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Sample records for pylori ja caga

  1. [The role of CagA in H. pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes human gastric epithelium and induces various diseases. But the mechanism of carcinogenesis in H. pylori infection remains to be assessed. We described that after attachment of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells, CagA is injected directly from the bacteria into the cells and undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated CagA can bind to SHP-2. Deregulation of SHP -2 by CagA may induce abnormal proliferation and movement of gastric epithelial cells. There are two patterns of CagA motifs between East Asian strains and Western strains. East Asian-type CagA confers stronger SHP-2 binding and transforming activities than Western-type CagA. We assessed the association between CagA diversity and clinical outcome in Asian countries, where mortalities from gastric cancer is different. As results, H. pylori infection with East Asian-type CagA was associated with gastric atrophy and cancer. Therefore, persistent active inflammation induced by the East Asian CagA-positive strain may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:19999107

  2. Gastrokine 1 inhibits the carcinogenic potentials of Helicobacter pylori CagA

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung Hwan; Seo, Ho Suk; Choi, Sung Sook; Chae, Hyun Suk; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Olga; Ashktorab, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T.; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Park, Won Sang

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori CagA directly injected by the bacterium into epithelial cells via a type IV secretion system, leads to cellular changes such as morphology, apoptosis, proliferation and cell motility, and stimulates gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) and gastrokine 1 (GKN1) on cell proliferation, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration in CagA- or GKN1-transfected gastric epithelial cells and mucosal tissues from humans and mice infected with H.pylori. On the molecular level, H.pylori CagA induced increased cell proliferation, ROS production, antiapoptotic activity, cell migration and invasion. Moreover, CagA induced activation of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and EMT-related proteins. In addition, H.pylori CagA reduced GKN1 gene copy number and expression in gastric cells and mucosal tissues of humans and mice. However, GKN1 overexpression successfully suppressed the carcinogenic effects of CagA through binding to CagA. These results suggest that GKN1 might be a target to inhibit the effects from H.pylori CagA. PMID:25239641

  3. Fragmentation of CagA Reduces Hummingbird Phenotype Induction by Helicobactor pylori

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Perng, Chin-Lin; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been linked to various gastro-intestinal diseases; nevertheless it remains to be clarified why only a minority of infected individuals develop illness. Studies from the West have indicated that the cagA gene and the associated EPIYA genotype of H. pylori is closely linked to the development of severe gastritis and gastric carcinoma; however, as yet no consistent correlation has been found among the bacteria from East Asia. In addition to genotype variation, the CagA protein undergoes fragmentation; however, the functional significance of fragmentation with respect to H. pylori infection remains unknown. In this study, we isolated 594 H. pylori colonies from 99 patients and examined the fragmentation patterns of CagA protein using immunoblotting. By analyzing the ability of the isolates to induce the host cell morphological transition to the highly invasive hummingbird phenotype, we demonstrated that H. pylori colonies with substantial CagA fragmentation are less potent in terms of causing this morphological transition. Our results uncovered a functional role for CagA fragmentation with respect to H. pylori-induced hummingbird phenotype formation and these findings suggest the possibility that the post-translational processing of CagA may be involved in H. pylori infection pathogenesis. PMID:26934189

  4. Fragmentation of CagA Reduces Hummingbird Phenotype Induction by Helicobactor pylori.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chi; Kuo, Wein-Shung; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Perng, Chin-Lin; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been linked to various gastro-intestinal diseases; nevertheless it remains to be clarified why only a minority of infected individuals develop illness. Studies from the West have indicated that the cagA gene and the associated EPIYA genotype of H. pylori is closely linked to the development of severe gastritis and gastric carcinoma; however, as yet no consistent correlation has been found among the bacteria from East Asia. In addition to genotype variation, the CagA protein undergoes fragmentation; however, the functional significance of fragmentation with respect to H. pylori infection remains unknown. In this study, we isolated 594 H. pylori colonies from 99 patients and examined the fragmentation patterns of CagA protein using immunoblotting. By analyzing the ability of the isolates to induce the host cell morphological transition to the highly invasive hummingbird phenotype, we demonstrated that H. pylori colonies with substantial CagA fragmentation are less potent in terms of causing this morphological transition. Our results uncovered a functional role for CagA fragmentation with respect to H. pylori-induced hummingbird phenotype formation and these findings suggest the possibility that the post-translational processing of CagA may be involved in H. pylori infection pathogenesis. PMID:26934189

  5. Exosomes as nanocarriers for systemic delivery of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Asako; Ueda, Koji; Nishiumi, Shin; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Azuma, Takeshi; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    CagA, encoded by cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA), is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gastric pathogen involved in the development of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Infection with cagA-positive H. pylori may also be associated with diseases outside the stomach, although the mechanisms through which H. pylori infection promotes extragastric diseases remain unknown. Here, we report that CagA is present in serum-derived extracellular vesicles, known as exosomes, in patients infected with cagA-positive H. pylori (n = 4). We also found that gastric epithelial cells inducibly expressing CagA secrete exosomes containing CagA. Addition of purified CagA-containing exosomes to gastric epithelial cells induced an elongated cell shape, indicating that the exosomes deliver functional CagA into cells. These findings indicated that exosomes secreted from CagA-expressing gastric epithelial cells may enter into circulation, delivering CagA to distant organs and tissues. Thus, CagA-containing exosomes may be involved in the development of extragastric disorders associated with cagA-positive H. pylori infection. PMID:26739388

  6. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  7. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  8. Effect of growth phase and acid shock on Helicobacter pylori cagA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Karita, M; Tummuru, M K; Wirth, H P; Blaser, M J

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains possessing cagA are associated with peptic ulceration. To understand the regulation of expression of cagA, picB, associated with interleukin-8 induction, and ureA, encoding the small urease subunit, we created gene fusions of cagA, ureA, and picB of strain 3401, using a promoterless reporter (xylE). Expression of XylE after growth in broth culture revealed that basal levels of expression of cagA and urea in H. pylori were substantially greater than for picB. For cagA expression in stationary-phase cells, brief exposure to acid pH caused a significant increase in xylE expression compared with neutral pH. In contrast, expression of xylE in urea or picB decreased after parallel exposure to acid pH (pH 7 > 6 > 5 > 4), regardless of the growth phase. Expression of the CagA protein varied with growth phase and pH exposure in parallel with the observed transcriptional variation. The concentration of CagA in a cell membrane-enriched fraction after growth at pH 6 was significantly higher than after growth at pH 5 or 7. We conclude that the promoterless reporter xylE is useful for studying the regulation of gene expression in H. pylori and that regulation of CagA production occurs mainly at the transcriptional level. PMID:8890198

  9. Functional association between the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors VacA and CagA.

    PubMed

    Argent, Richard H; Thomas, Rachael J; Letley, Darren P; Rittig, Michael G; Hardie, Kim R; Atherton, John C

    2008-02-01

    The Helicobacter pylori virulence factors CagA and VacA are implicated in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. Most strains possessing CagA also possess the more virulent vacuolating form of VacA. This study assessed the significance of possession of both virulence factors in terms of their effect on gastric epithelial cells, using a set of minimally passaged, isogenic VacA, CagA and CagE mutants in H. pylori strains 60190 and 84-183. The cagA and cagE mutants were found to significantly increase VacA-induced vacuolation of epithelial cells, and the vacA mutants significantly increased CagA-induced cellular elongations, compared with wild-type strains, indicating that CagA reduces vacuolation and VacA reduces hummingbird formation. Although epithelial cells incubated with the wild-type H. pylori strains may display both vacuolation and hummingbird formation, it was found that (i) hummingbird length was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells compared with those without vacuolation; (ii) the number of vacuoles was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells with hummingbird formation compared with those without hummingbirds; and (iii) cells displaying extensive vacuolation did not subsequently form hummingbirds and vice versa. VacA did not affect the phosphorylation of CagA. These data show that VacA and CagA downregulate each other's effects on epithelial cells, potentially allowing H. pylori interaction with cells whilst avoiding excessive cellular damage. PMID:18201978

  10. [Production of a recombinant CagA protein for the detection of Helicobacter pylori CagA antibodies].

    PubMed

    Akgüç, Miray; Karatayli, Ersin; Çelik, Esra; Koyuncu, Duygu; Çelik, İnci; Karatayli, Senem Ceren; Özden, Ali; Bozdayi, A Mithat

    2014-07-01

    At present, Helicobacter pylori infections affect approximately 50% of the world population. It is known that H.pylori is related with several gastric diseases including chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic and gastric ulcers as well as gastric carcinomas. CagA (Cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein which is one of the most important virulence factors of H.pylori, is thought to be responsible for the development of gastric cancer. CagA is a 128 kDa hydrophilic protein which binds to the epitelial stomach cells and is known to be phosphorylated on its EPIYA regions. The EPIYA regions are highly variable and carry a higher risk of developing gastric cancer than CagA negative strains. The aim of this study was to construct a prokaryotic expression system expressing a recombinant CagA protein, which can be used for the detection of anti-CagA antibodies. For the isolation of H.pylori genomic DNA, a total of 112 gastric biopsy samples obtained from patients who were previously found positive for rapid urease (CLO) test, were used. H.pylori DNAs were amplified from 57 of those samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of them 35 were found positive in terms of cagA gene. Different EPIYA motifs were detected in 25 out of 35 cagA positive samples, and one of those samples that contained the highest number of EPIYA motif, was chosen for the cloning procedure. Molecular cloning and expression of the recombinant fragment were performed with Champion Pet151/D expression vector (Invitrogen, USA), the expression of which was induced by the addition of IPTG (Isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) into the E.coli culture medium. Expression was observed with anti-histidin HRP (Horse Radish Peroxidase) antibodies by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot (WB) analysis. In our study, two clones possessing different fragments from the same H.pylori strain with three different EPIYA motifs were succesfully expressed. Since CagA antigen plays a signicant role in the pathogenesis of H.pylori

  11. Prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs in Helicobacter pylori among dyspeptic patients in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chomvarin, Chariya; Phusri, Karnchanawadee; Sawadpanich, Kookwan; Mairiang, Pisaln; Namwat, Wises; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of cagA type in Helicobacter pylori isolated from dyspeptic patients in northeastern Thailand and to determine whether the pattern of cagA EPIYA motifs were associated with clinical outcomes. One hundred and forty-seven H. pylori-infected dyspeptic patients were enrolled, of whom 68 had non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), 57 peptic ulcer disease (PUD), 18 gastric cancer (GCA), and 4 other gastroduodenal diseases. PCR and DNA sequence analysis were used to determine the cagA genotype and the pattern of EPIYA motifs. cagA-positive H. pylori were identified in 138 (94%) of H. pylori-infected dyspeptic patients of whom 75 (54%) were of the Western-type, 44 (32%) the East Asian type and 19 (14%) of the other types. The Western type is significantly found in PUD patients (p = 0.0175). The majority of cagA EPIYA was EPIYA-ABC (43%) and EPIYA-ABD (28%). There is no significant correlation between the increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and clinical outcomes. Thus, the most frequent cagA type found among northeastern Thai dyspeptic patients was the Western cagA type, which is significantly associated with PUD indicating a possible predictive parameter for clinical outcome. PMID:23082560

  12. The CagA toxin of Helicobacter pylori: abundant production but relatively low amount translocated

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Soto, Luisa F.; Haas, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    CagA is one of the most studied pathogenicity factors of the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori. It is injected into host cells via the H. pylori cag-Type IV secretion system. Due to its association with gastric cancer, CagA is classified as oncogenic protein. At the same time CagA represents the 4th most abundant protein produced by H. pylori, suggesting that high amounts of toxin are required to cause the physiological changes or damage observed in cells. We were able to quantify the injection of CagA into gastric AGS epithelial cells in vitro by the adaptation of a novel protease-based approach to remove the tightly adherent extracellular bacteria. After one hour of infection only 1.5% of the total CagA available was injected by the adherent bacteria, whereas after 3 hours 7.5% was found within the host cell. Thus, our data show that only a surprisingly small amount of the CagA available in the infection is finally injected under in vitro infection conditions. PMID:26983895

  13. Natural variant of the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein that lost the ability to interact with PAR1.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kana; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains carrying the cagA gene are associated with severe disease outcomes, most notably gastric cancer. CagA protein is delivered into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system. The translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at the C-terminal EPIYA motifs by host cell kinases. Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA acquires the ability to interact with and activate SHP2, thereby activating mitogenic signaling and inducing cell morphological transformation (hummingbird phenotype). CagA also interacts with PAR1b via the CM sequence, resulting in induction of junctional and polarity defects. Furthermore, CagA-PAR1b interaction stabilizes the CagA-SHP2 complex. Because transgenic mice systemically expressing CagA develop gastrointestinal and hematological malignancies, CagA is recognized as a bacterium-derived oncoprotein. Interestingly, the C-terminal region of CagA displays a large diversity among H. pylori strains, which influences the ability of CagA to bind to SHP2 and PAR1b. In the present study, we investigated the biological activity of v225d CagA, an Amerindian CagA of H. pylori isolated from a Venezuelan Piaroa Amerindian subject, because the variant CagA does not possess a canonical CM sequence. We found that v225d CagA interacts with SHP2 but not PAR1b. Furthermore, SHP2-binding activity of v225d CagA was much lower than that of CagA of H. pylori isolated from Western countries (Western CagA). v225d CagA also displayed a reduced ability to induce the hummingbird phenotype than that of Western CagA. Given that perturbation of PAR1b and SHP2 by CagA underlies the oncogenic potential of CagA, the v225d strain is considered to be less oncogenic than other well-studied cagA-positive H. pylori strains. PMID:24354359

  14. A novel diagnostic monoclonal antibody specific for Helicobacter pylori CagA of East Asian type.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Aiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Nguyen, Lam Tung; Kawazato, Hiroaki; Tanigawa, Masato; Murakami, Kazunari; Kishida, Tetsuko; Fujioka, Toshio; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2009-12-01

    Molecular biological and epidemiological studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori producing East Asian CagA protein variant is more virulent than that producing Western CagA. In the present study, we developed and validated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing East Asian CagA-positive H. pylori. A total of 32 H. pylori strains were tested and the data were subjected to receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The accuracy of the test, determined by calculating the area under the curve, was 0.96, which indicated a high level of accuracy. At the ROC optimized cutoff, the sensitivity and specificity of our ELISA method were 88.0% and 100%, respectively. The validated ELISA showed good performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. These results suggest that this test is suitable for the diagnostic detection of East Asian CagA carrying strains. We also analyzed the localization of the CagA protein in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa with fluorescence immunohistochemistry, and found that CagA protein expression was up-regulated by adhesion to epithelial cells. PMID:20078554

  15. Attenuated CagA oncoprotein in Helicobacter pylori from Amerindians in Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masato; Kiga, Kotaro; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Cok, Jaime; Hooper, Catherine C; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sanada, Takahito; Suzuki, Shiho; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Kamiya, Shigeru; Zou, Quan-Ming; Gilman, Robert H; Berg, Douglas E; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2011-08-26

    Population genetic analyses of bacterial genes whose products interact with host tissues can give new understanding of infection and disease processes. Here we show that strains of the genetically diverse gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori from Amerindians from the remote Peruvian Amazon contain novel alleles of cagA, a major virulence gene, and reveal distinctive properties of their encoded CagA proteins. CagA is injected into the gastric epithelium where it hijacks pleiotropic signaling pathways, helps Hp exploit its special gastric mucosal niche, and affects the risk that infection will result in overt gastroduodenal diseases including gastric cancer. The Amerindian CagA proteins contain unusual but functional tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and attenuated CRPIA motifs, which affect gastric epithelial proliferation, inflammation, and bacterial pathogenesis. Amerindian CagA proteins induced less production of IL-8 and cancer-associated Mucin 2 than did those of prototype Western or East Asian strains and behaved as dominant negative inhibitors of action of prototype CagA during mixed infection of Mongolian gerbils. We suggest that Amerindian cagA is of relatively low virulence, that this may have been selected in ancestral strains during infection of the people who migrated from Asia into the Americas many thousands of years ago, and that such attenuated CagA proteins could be useful therapeutically. PMID:21757722

  16. Conformational Analysis of Isolated Domains of Helicobacter pylori CagA

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Hernan; Saijo-Hamano, Yumiko; Kwok, Terry; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori is associated with increased virulence and gastric cancer risk. CagA is translocated into the host cell by a H. pylori type IV secretion system via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Translocated CagA interacts with numerous host factors, altering a variety of host signalling pathways. The recently determined crystal structure of C-terminally-truncated CagA indicated the presence of two domains: the smaller, flexible N-terminal domain and the larger, middle domain. In this study, we have investigated the conformation, oligomeric state and stability of the N-terminal, middle and glutamate-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA)-repeats domains. All three domains are monomeric, suggesting that the multimerisation of CagA observed in infected cells is likely to be mediated not by CagA itself but by its interacting partners. The middle and the C-terminal domains, but not the N-terminal domain, are capable of refolding spontaneously upon heat denaturation, lending support to the hypothesis that unfolded CagA is threaded C-terminus first through the type IV secretion channel with its N-terminal domain, which likely requires interactions with other domains to refold, being threaded last. Our findings also revealed that the C-terminal EPIYA-repeats domain of CagA exists in an intrinsically disordered premolten globule state with regions in PPII conformation - a feature that is shared by many scaffold proteins that bind multiple protein components of signalling pathways. Taken together, these results provide a deeper understanding of the physicochemical properties of CagA that underpin its complex cellular and oncogenic functions. PMID:24223932

  17. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world’s population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature. PMID:26457016

  18. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of CagA from Chinese Helicobacter pylori Isolates in AGS Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youli; Argent, Richard H.; Letley, Darren P.; Thomas, Rachael J.; Atherton, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains possessing the cag pathogenicity island (PaI) are associated with the development of gastroduodenal diseases, including gastric cancer. cag PaI products induce the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from epithelial cells and facilitate the translocation of CagA into the cell cytosol. In East Asia, where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, most strains possess the cag PaI. To date, however, no cag PaI phenotypic data have been provided for strains isolated in mainland China. Here we used 31 Chinese strains to determine the genotypic and phenotypic status of the cag PaI. All strains possessed cagA and cagE, and we observed a variation in the length of cagA variable regions. Nucleotide sequencing of the cagA variable region revealed that CagA was of two types, a short “Western” form with two tyrosine phosphorylation sites and a longer “East Asian” form with three tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Coculture of strains with AGS epithelial cells showed that strains could induce IL-8 secretion from the cells and that CagA with three phosphorylation sites became more phosphorylated than that with two and could induce significantly (P < 0.001) more cells to elongate. We hypothesize that the preponderance of the more active East Asian form of cagA may underlie the high rate of gastric cancer in China. PMID:15695680

  19. Serum Helicobacter pylori CagA antibody titer was a useful marker for advanced inflammation in the stomach in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakami, Kazunari; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim Subjects infected with H. pylori containing cagA do not always induce serum CagA antibody. Our previous meta-analysis showed that serum CagA seropositivity was associated with gastric cancer even in East Asian countries. However, it remains unclear why serum CagA positive status is associated with gastric cancer. In this study, we aimed to examine the relationship between anti CagA antibody titer and the levels of pepsinogen, and histological score. Methods Eighty-eight H. pylori positive Japanese patients with gastritis were included. Serum CagA antibody titer, pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histological scores were evaluated according to Update Sydney System. CagA expression was examined by immunoblot. Results Seroprevalence of CagA antibody was found in 75.0%. Interestingly, serum CagA antibody titer was significantly correlated with PG I and PG II levels (P = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively). Serum CagA antibody titer was also significantly correlated with mucosal inflammation in the corpus (P = 0.04). On the other hand, bacterial density was not related with CagA antibody titer. CagA expression level of the strains was irrespective of the status of PG and serum CagA antibody. Conclusions Subjects with higher serum CagA antibody titer can be considered as high risk population for the development of gastric cancer from the point of strong gastric inflammatory response even in Japan. Host recognition rather than bacterial colonization might be associated with the difference of serum CagA antibody titer. PMID:24033876

  20. Geographic differences and the role of cagA gene in gastroduodenal diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Valmaseda Pérez, T; Gisbert, J P; Pajares García, J M

    2001-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major causal agent of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Several bacterium genes seem to be involved in the pathogenicity mechanism. One of them, the cagA gene, has been extensively studied and characterized. In this article we have carried out a study of characteristics and genetic variability of cagA gene in different geographic areas of the world. At the same time, we have summarized several studies that evaluate possible relation of cagA with gastroduodenal diseases associated by H. pylori infection. In our study we found that the presence of the cagA gene has been confirmed in more than 60% H. pylori strains distributed throughout the world. The prevalence of cagA genotype is of 65.4% in gastritis patients, 84.2% in patients with peptic ulcer and 86.5% in those with gastric cancer. It shows a high genetic variability of cagA associated with gastroduodenal diseases that could serve as a virulence marker in H. pylori infected subjects. However, the high prevalence of H. pylori cagA positive strains in some geographic areas does not confirm the strong association between cagA and virulence of strains as described in other countries. Nowadays, cagA gene is considered as a marker for the presence of cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) in H. pylori genoma. This region contains several genes that has been involved with the production of cytokines that results in an increased inflammation of host gastric mucosa, but its function is unknown. Probably, others bacterium factors, such as susceptibility host and environmental cofactors could influence in the risk of developing different gastroduodenal diseases associated with H. pylori infection. PMID:11685943

  1. Evolution of cagA Oncogene of Helicobacter pylori through Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yoshikazu; Yahara, Koji; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half the human population and causes gastritis, ulcers, and cancer. The cagA gene product is a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. It is injected into epithelial cells, undergoes phosphorylation by host cell kinases, and perturbs host signaling pathways. CagA is known for its geographical, structural, and functional diversity in the C-terminal half, where an EPIYA host-interacting motif is repeated. The Western version of CagA carries the EPIYA segment types A, B, and C, while the East Asian CagA carries types A, B, and D and shows higher virulence. Many structural variants such as duplications and deletions are reported. In this study, we gained insight into the relationships of CagA variants through various modes of recombination, by analyzing all known cagA variants at the DNA sequence level with the single nucleotide resolution. Processes that occurred were: (i) homologous recombination between DNA sequences for CagA multimerization (CM) sequence; (ii) recombination between DNA sequences for the EPIYA motif; and (iii) recombination between short similar DNA sequences. The left half of the EPIYA-D segment characteristic of East Asian CagA was derived from Western type EPIYA, with Amerind type EPIYA as the intermediate, through rearrangements of specific sequences within the gene. Adaptive amino acid changes were detected in the variable region as well as in the conserved region at sites to which no specific function has yet been assigned. Each showed a unique evolutionary distribution. These results clarify recombination-mediated routes of cagA evolution and provide a solid basis for a deeper understanding of its function in pathogenesis. PMID:21853141

  2. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotypes among Alaskans and Their Correlation with Clinical Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Miernyk, Karen; Morris, Julie; Bruden, Dana; McMahon, Brian; Hurlburt, Debby; Sacco, Frank; Parkinson, Alan; Hennessy, Thomas; Bruce, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is common in Alaska. The development of severe H. pylori disease is partially determined by the virulence of the infecting strain. Here we present vacA and cagA genotype data for H. pylori strains isolated from Alaskans and their correlation with clinical disease. We enrolled patients scheduled for esophagogastroduodenoscopy and positive for H. pylori infection. Gastric biopsy specimens from the stomach antrum and fundus were cultured. We performed PCR analysis of the H. pylori vacA gene and for the presence of the cagA gene and cagA empty site. We genotyped 515 H. pylori samples from 220 Native and 66 non-Native Alaskans. We detected the cagA gene in 242/286 (85%) persons; of 222 strains that could be subtyped, 95% (212) were non-Asian cagA and 3% (6) were East Asian cagA. After removing mixed infections (n = 17), 83% of H. pylori strains had either the vacA s1m1 (120/269) or s2m2 (103/269) genotype. Sixty-six percent (68/103) of H. pylori strains with the vacA s2m2 genotype also contained the cagA gene. Infection with an H. pylori strain having the cagA gene or vacA s1m1 genotype (compared with s1m2 and s2m2) was associated with a decreased risk of esophagitis (P = 0.003 and 0.0003, respectively). Infection with an H. pylori strain having the vacA s1m1 genotype (compared with s1m2 and s2m2) was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (P = 0.003). The majority of H. pylori strains in this study carried the non-Asian cagA gene and either the vacA s1m1 or s2m2 genotype. A majority of H. pylori strains with the vacA s2m2 genotype also contained the cagA gene. There was an association of H. pylori genotype with esophagitis and PUD. PMID:21752979

  3. Sequence analysis of East Asian cagA of Helicobacter pylori isolated from asymptomatic healthy Japanese and Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Yoshinaga, Aya; Kimoto, Ai; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2011-03-01

    CagA, especially East Asian type, is one of the most important virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori, which is believed to contribute to the gastric cancer development. There is extreme sequence heterogeneity on 3' region of cagA gene, demonstrated by the sequence analysis of cagA of H. pylori strains isolated from gastric disease patients. However, whether such heterogeneity of the cagA gene sequence is related to the pathogenicity of H. pylori in the gastric cancer development is not certain. Therefore, in this study, the 3' region of cagA sequences isolated from asymptomatic healthy individuals in Japan and Thailand, which show high and low gastric cancer prevalence, respectively, were analyzed and compared with those from patients with gastric cancer. The CagA sequences analysis in 21 and 12 H. pylori DNA samples obtained from Japanese and Thai individuals, respectively, by the molecular phylogenetic method showed that the sequences were more conserved in the Thai individuals (concordance rates among Thai sequences, 93.9-100%) than in the Japanese individuals (concordance rates among Japanese sequences, 82.8-100%) as shown by unrooted neighbor-joining (N-J) consensus trees constructed with the sequence between Asn869 and Ala967 in CagA. CagA sequences in gastric cancer patients were obtained from published data; analysis of these sequences revealed that CagA sequences from almost all Thai individuals were concentrated in one branch. In contrast, CagA sequences from Japanese individuals were uniformly distributed throughout the N-J consensus tree. These results suggest that the difference in the CagA sequences between asymptomatic healthy Japanese and Thai individuals may be linked to the incidence of gastric cancer in Japan and Thailand. PMID:21046394

  4. Helicobacter pylori CagA protein polymorphisms and their lack of association with pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Nicole; Quiroga, Andrés; Delgado, Pilar; Bravo, María Mercedes; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA diversity and to evaluate the association between protein polymorphisms and the occurrence of gastric pathologies. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-two clinical isolates of H. pylori cultured from gastric biopsies obtained from Colombian patients with dyspepsia were included as study material. DNA extracted from isolates was used to determine cagA status, amplifying the C-terminal cagA gene region by polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and six strains with a single amplicon were sequenced and results were used to characterize the 3’ variable region of the cagA gene. To establish the number and type of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs Glutamine acid-Proline-Isoleucine-Tyrosine-Alanine (EPIYA) bioinformatic analysis using Amino Acid Sequence Analyzer-Amino Acid Sequence Analyzer software was conducted. Analysis of the association between the number of EPIYA motifs and the gastric pathology was performed using χ2 test and analysis of the presence of EPIYA-C motifs in relation to the pathology was made by logistic regression odds ratios. Comparisons among EPIYA types found and those reported in GenBank were performed using a proportion test in Statistix Analytical Software version 8.0. RESULTS: After amplification of the 3’ of the cagA gene, 106 from 122 isolates presented a single amplicon and 16 showed multiple amplicons. As expected, diversity in the size of the cagA unique fragments among isolates was observed. The 106 strains that presented a single amplicon after 3’ cagA amplification came from patients with gastritis (19 patients), atrophic gastritis (21), intestinal metaplasia (26), duodenal ulcer (22) and gastric cancer. DNA sequence analysis showed that the differences in size of 3’ cagA unique fragments was attributable to the number of EPIYA motifs: 1.9% had two EPIYA motifs, 62.3% had three, 33.0% had four and 2.8% had five motifs. The majority of tested clinical strains (62.3%) were found

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Thailand: A Nationwide Study of the CagA Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Tomohisa; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Pittayanon, Rapat; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Kishida, Tetsuko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mahachai, Varocha

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk to develop gastric cancer in Thailand is relatively low among Asian countries. In addition, the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of gastric cancer in Thailand varies with geographical distribution; the ASR in the North region is 3.5 times higher than that in the South region. We hypothesized that the prevalence of H. pylori infection and diversity of CagA phenotype contributes to the variety of gastric cancer risk in various regions of Thailand. Methods We conducted a nationwide survey within Thailand. We determined H. pylori infection prevalence by detecting H. pylori, using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The anti-CagA antibody and anti-East-Asian type CagA antibody (α-EAS Ab), which showed high accuracy in several East Asian countries, were used to determine CagA phenotype. Results Among 1,546 patients from four regions, including 17 provinces, the overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 45.9% (710/1,546). Mirroring the prevalence of H. pylori infection, histological scores were the lowest in the South region. Of the 710 H. pylori-positive patients, 93.2% (662) were immunoreactive with the anti-CagA antibody. CagA-negative strain prevalence in the South region was significantly higher than that in other regions (17.9%; 5/28; p < 0.05). Overall, only 77 patients (11.6%) were immunoreactive with the α-EAS Ab. There were no differences in the α-EAS Ab immunoreactive rate across geographical regions. Conclusions This is the first study using immunohistochemistry to confirm H. pylori infections across different regions in Thailand. The prevalence of East-Asian type CagA H. pylori in Thailand was low. The low incidence of gastric cancer in Thailand may be attributed to the low prevalence of precancerous lesions. The low incidence of gastric cancer in the South region might be associated with the lower prevalence of H. pylori infection, precancerous lesions, and CagA-positive H. pylori strains, compared with that in the

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 inhibits phosphorylation of the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA in gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; de Sablet, Thibaut; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) plays a pivotal role in the etiology of Helicobacter (H.) pylori-associated gastric diseases. CagA is injected into the cytoplasm of host cells by a type IV secretion system, and is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the host enzyme c-Src. We previously reported that the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits IL-8 secretion by H. pylori-infected cells. However, the cellular mechanism by which HO-1 regulates the innate immune function of infected cells remains unknown. We now show that nitric oxide and hemin, two inducers of HO-1, decrease the level of phosphorylated CagA (p-CagA) in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells and this is blocked by either pharmacologic inhibition of HO-1 or siRNA knockdown of hmox-1. Moreover, forced expression of HO-1 by transfection of a plasmid expressing hmox-1 also results in a strong attenuation of CagA phosphorylation. This occurs through the inhibition of H. pylori-induced c-Src phosphorylation/activation by HO-1. Consequently, H. pylori-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and activation of the pro-inflammatory response mediated by p-CagA are inhibited in HO-1-expressing cells. These data highlight a mechanism by which the innate immune response of the host can restrict the pathogenicity of H. pylori by attenuating CagA phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:23051580

  7. Analysis of the 3' variable region of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori isolated in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kee Don; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong Ho; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2007-04-01

    CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori is injected into epithelial cells, and it undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting in inducing cytoskeletal rearrangements. A few studies have suggested that the number of CagA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (EPIYA) and subtypes of CagA were associated with gastric cancer. This study was performed to characterize the 3' variable regions of the cagA gene of H. pylori and to investigate whether or not there is any relationship between the diversities of cagA and the disease outcome in Korea. Seventy-nine patients (chronic gastritis, 15; duodenal ulcer, 27; benign gastric ulcer, 18; gastric cancer, 19) were enrolled. Biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum for H. pylori culture, and genomic DNA was extracted. PCR and DNA sequence analysis was carried out for the 3' variable region of the cagA gene. Seventy-eight strains (98.8%) contained three EPIYA motifs and one strain (1.2%) isolated from a patient with duodenal ulcer contained four EPIYA motifs. Seventy-six strains (96.2%) were the East Asian type. In conclusion, there was no significant difference between the number of EPIYA motifs or CagA subtypes and various gastroduodenal diseases in Korea. PMID:17342405

  8. Variant of Helicobacter pylori CagA proteins induce different magnitude of morphological changes in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alfizah, Hanafiah; Ramelah, Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strains is associated with gastroduodenal diseases. The CagA protein is injected into gastric epithelial cells and supposedly induces morphological changes termed the 'hummingbird phenotype', which is associated with scattering and increased cell motility. The molecular mechanisms leading to the CagA-dependent morphological changes are only partially known. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of CagA variants on the magnitude of gastric epithelial cell morphological changes. Recombinant 3' terminal domains of cagA were cloned and expressed in a gastric epithelial cell line and the hummingbird phenotype was quantified by microscopy. The 3' region of the cagA gene of Malaysian H. pylori isolates showed six sub-genotypes that differed in the structural organization of the EPIYA repeat sequences. The percentage of hummingbird cells induced by CagA increased with duration of transfection. The hummingbird phenotype was observed to be more pronounced when CagA with 4 EPIYA motifs rather than 3 or 2 EPIYA motifs was produced. The activity of different CagA variants in the induction of the hummingbird phenotype in gastric epithelial cells depends at least in part on EPIYA motif variability. The difference in CagA genotypes might influence the potential of individual CagAs to cause morphological changes in host cells. Depending on the relative exposure of cells to CagA genotypes, this may contribute to the various disease outcomes caused by H. pylori infection in different individuals. PMID:22870595

  9. Influence of H. pylori CagA Coupled with Alcohol Consumption on Cytokine Profiles in Men

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Baoge; Han, Xinghai; Ren, Guangying; Jia, Yiguo; Liu, Yuanxun; Su, Jiliang; Wang, Zhongdong; Wang, Yafei; Wang, Hui; Pan, Jindun; Liu, Li-li; Hu, Wen-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) coupled with chronic alcohol ingestion on cytokine profiles. A total of 215 male subjects were divided into the following 4 groups: 130 alcohol H pylori CagA-negative consumers (CagA−) (group A), 50 alcohol H pylori CagA-positive consumers (CagA+) (group B), 24 nonalcohol H pylori CagA-negative consumers (group C), and 11 nonalcohol H pylori CagA-positive consumers (group D). The serum CagA, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, E-selectin, adiponectin (ADP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). After adjusting for age and mean alcohol drinking history, a multivariable linear regression analysis revealed that the mean daily alcohol consumption, IL-6, TNF-α, and ADP levels were significantly increased with increases in the serum CagA concentrations (P = 0.008, P = 0.000, P = 0.000, and P = 0.006, respectively). The serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels of group A were significantly lower than those of group B (all P = 0.000). Furthermore, the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels of groups A and C were significantly lower than those of group D (all P = 0.000), and the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels of group C were significantly lower than those of group B (all P = 0.000). The serum ADP and E-selectin levels of groups B and D were significantly higher than those of group A (P = 0.000). The serum ADP levels of group B were significantly higher than those of group C (P = 0.000), and the serum ADP and E-selectin levels of group C were significantly lower than those of group D (P = 0.000 and P = 0.005, respectively). Finally, the serum TNF-α levels of groups B, C, and D were significantly higher than those of group A (all P = 0.000), and the serum TNF-α levels of group C were significantly higher than those of group D (P = 0

  10. Helicobacter pylori induced interleukin-8 expression in gastric epithelial cells is associated with CagA positive phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, J E; Covacci, A; Farmery, S M; Xiang, Z; Tompkins, D S; Perry, S; Lindley, I J; Rappuoli, R

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To use a range of natural phenotypically variant strains of Helicobacter pylori with disparate CagA and VacA (vacuolating cytotoxin) expression to determine which bacterial factors are more closely associated with epithelial interleukin-8 (IL-8) induction. METHODS--Gastric epithelial cells (AGS and KATO-3) were co-cultured with five H pylori strains which were variously shown to express the cagA gene/CagA protein, VacA and/or to exhibit biological cytotoxicity. Secreted IL-8 was assayed by enzyme leaked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IL-8 messenger RNA (mRNA) was assayed using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction based technique (RT-PCR). RESULTS--Strains expressing CagA, including a variant strain (D931) which is non-cytotoxic and does not express the VacA protein, were found to upregulate epithelial IL-8 secretion and gene expression. In contrast, strains with no CagA expression, even in the presence of VacA and/or biological cytotoxicity, (G104, BA142), failed to induce IL-8 protein or mRNA above control values. CONCLUSIONS--These results strongly support a role for H pylori CagA or coexpressed factors other than the cytotoxin in upregulation of gastric epithelial IL-8. Increased epithelial IL-8 secretion and concomitant neutrophil chemotaxis and activation in addition to direct cytotoxicity may be an important factor in tissue damage and ulceration. Images PMID:7706517

  11. H. pylori virulence factor CagA increases intestinal cell proliferation by Wnt pathway activation in a transgenic zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Neal, James T.; Peterson, Tracy S.; Kent, Michael L.; Guillemin, Karen

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, and infection with strains carrying the virulence factor CagA significantly increases this risk. To investigate the mechanisms by which CagA promotes carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing CagA ubiquitously or in the anterior intestine. Transgenic zebrafish expressing either the wild-type or a phosphorylation-resistant form of CagA exhibited significantly increased rates of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and showed significant upregulation of the Wnt target genes cyclinD1, axin2 and the zebrafish c-myc ortholog myca. Coexpression of CagA with a loss-of-function allele encoding the β-catenin destruction complex protein Axin1 resulted in a further increase in intestinal proliferation. Coexpression of CagA with a null allele of the key β-catenin transcriptional cofactor Tcf4 restored intestinal proliferation to wild-type levels. These results provide in vivo evidence of Wnt pathway activation by CagA downstream of or in parallel to the β-catenin destruction complex and upstream of Tcf4. Long-term transgenic expression of wild-type CagA, but not the phosphorylation-resistant form, resulted in significant hyperplasia of the adult intestinal epithelium. We further utilized this model to demonstrate that oncogenic cooperation between CagA and a loss-of-function allele of p53 is sufficient to induce high rates of intestinal small cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, establishing the utility of our transgenic zebrafish model in the study of CagA-associated gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:23471915

  12. Five-year monitoring of considerable changes in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs of the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Mohammad; Ghorbani-Dalini, Sadegh; Doosti, Abbas; Najafi, Akram

    2014-08-01

    CagA is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori involved in host cell modulation. The C-terminal part of CagA containing the EPIYA motifs is highly variable and is important for the biological activity of the protein. The aim of this study was consideration of the changes in cagA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) of H. pylori. A set of 302 H. pylori DNA samples from the Iranian population from 2006 to 2011 was selected for the proposed study. The cagA gene and its TPMs were assessed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and specific primers. The prevalence of the cagA gene in our study ranged from 91.43% to 97.06% (with an average of 95.03%). Out of the cagA-positive samples, the prevalence of TPMs A and B increased from 12.5% and 23.44% to 71.2% and 63.63%, respectively. Also, the prevalence of samples infected with Western and East Asian types of H. pylori ranged from 64.06% to 5.73% for the Western type and 17.19% to 51.59% for the East Asian type. Overall, our results showed a high prevalence of the cagA gene. Also, it seems that cagA TPMs of H. pylori is undergoing a change from the Western type to the East Asian type in Iran. PMID:24771298

  13. J-Western Forms of Helicobacter pylori cagA Constitute a Distinct Phylogenetic Group with a Widespread Geographic Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Stacy S.; Valk, Pieter L.; Shaffer, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori strains expressing the bacterial oncoprotein CagA confers an increased risk of gastric cancer. While much is known about the ancestry and molecular evolution of Western, East Asian, and Amerindian cagA sequences, relatively little is understood about a fourth group, known as “J-Western,” which has been detected mainly in strains from Okinawa, Japan. We show here that J-Western cagA sequences have a more widespread global distribution than previously recognized, occur in strains with multiple different ancestral origins (based on multilocus sequence typing [MLST] analysis), and did not arise recently. As shown by comparisons of Western and J-Western forms of CagA, there are 45 fixed or nearly fixed amino acid differences, and J-Western forms contain a unique 4-amino-acid insertion. The mean nucleotide diversity of synonymous sites (πs) is slightly lower in the J-Western group than in the Western and East Asian groups (0.066, 0.086, and 0.083, respectively), which suggests that the three groups have comparable, but not equivalent, effective population sizes. The reduced πs of the J-Western group is attributable to ancestral recombination events within the 5′ region of cagA. Population genetic analyses suggest that within the cagA region encoding EPIYA motifs, the East Asian group underwent a marked reduction in effective population size compared to the Western and J-Western groups, in association with positive selection. Finally, we show that J-Western cagA sequences are found mainly in strains producing m2 forms of the secreted VacA toxin and propose that these functionally interacting proteins coevolved to optimize the gastric colonization capacity of H. pylori. PMID:22247512

  14. CagA C-terminal variations in Helicobacter pylori strains from Colombian patients with gastric precancerous lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sicinschi, L. A.; Correa, P.; Peek, R. M.; Camargo, M. C.; Piazuelo, M. B.; Romero-Gallo, J.; Hobbs, S. S.; Krishna, U.; Delgado, A.; Mera, R.; Bravo, L. E.; Schneider, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminus of the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein is polymorphic, bearing different EPIYA sequences (EPIYA-A, B, C or D), and one or more CagA multimerization (CM) motifs. The number of EPIYA-C motifs is associated with precancerous lesions and gastric cancer (GC). The relationship between EPIYA, CM motifs and gastric lesions was examined in H. pylori-infected Colombian patients from areas of high and low risk for GC. Genomic DNA was extracted from H. pylori strains cultured from gastric biopsies from 80 adults with dyspeptic symptoms. Sixty-seven (83.8%) of 80 strains were cagA positive. The 3′ region of cagA was sequenced, and EPIYA and CM motifs were identified. CagA proteins contained one (64.2%), two (34.3%) or three EPIYA-C motifs (1.5%), all with Western type CagA-specific sequences. Strains with one EPIYA-C motif were associated with less severe gastric lesions (non-atrophic and multifocal atrophic gastritis), whereas strains with multiple EPIYA-C motifs were associated with more severe lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) (p <0.001). In 54 strains, the CM motifs were identical to those common in Western strains. Thirteen strains from the low-risk area contained two different CM motifs: one of Western type located within the EPIYA-C segment and another following the EPIYA-C segment and resembling the CM motif found in East Asian strains. These strains induced significantly shorter projections in AGS cells and an attenuated reduction in levels of CagA upon immunodepletion of SHP-2 than strains possessing Western/Western motifs. This novel finding may partially explain the difference in GC incidence in these populations. PMID:19456839

  15. Helicobacter pylori cagA 12-bp insertion can be a marker for duodenal ulcer in Okinawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuichi; Shiota, Seiji; Matsunari, Osamu; Suzuki, Rumiko; Watada, Masahide; Binh, Tran Thanh; Kinjo, Nagisa; Kinjo, Fukunori; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds Helicobacter pylori cagA can be classified into mainly two types (East-Asian-type and Western-type cagA) according to the repeat regions located in the 3′ region. Recent studies showed that the Western-type cagA in strains from Okinawa, Japan formed a different cluster (J-Western-type cagA subtype). We also reported that J-Western-type cagA possess a 12-bp insertion located in the 5′ region of cagA sequence. Methods The prevalence of 12-bp insertion in cagA in Okinawa and the United States (U.S.) was examined by DNA sequencing. We then designed the primer pair which can detect the 12-bp insertion only by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The prevalence of strains with 12-bp insertion was examined in 336 strains isolated from Okinawa by PCR. Results In case of Western-type cagA/vacA s1m2 strains, the prevalence of 12-bp insertion was significantly higher in strains isolated from Okinawa than that from the U.S. (P = 0.002). Phylogenetic tree showed that strains with 12-bp insertion formed two individual clusters within J-Western-type cagA subtype; one is from Okinawa and another is from the U.S. Our designed primer set showed high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (90.8%) in Okinawa. The 12-bp insertion was found in 23.7%, 14.3%, 4.2%, and 4.0% of strains with duodenal ulcer (DU), gastritis, gastric cancer (GC), and gastric ulcer (GU), respectively (P < 0.001 for DU vs. GU) in Okinawa. Conclusions Although the mechanisms are unknown, the presence of 12-bp insertion was associated with the presence of DU and might have a suppressive action on GU and GC. PMID:23190390

  16. Identification of Helicobacter pylori and the cagA genotype in gastric biopsies using highly sensitive real-time PCR as a new diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shiho; Kato, Shunji; Matsukura, Norio; Ohtani, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Tokudome, Shinkan; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-06-01

    The CagA protein is one of the virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori, and two major subtypes of CagA have been observed, the Western and East Asian type. CagA is injected from the bacteria into gastric epithelial cells, undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, and binds to Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. The East Asian type CagA binds to SHP-2 more strongly than the Western type CagA. Here, we tried to distinguish the CagA type by highly sensitive real-time PCR with the objective of establishing a system to detect H. pylori and CagA subtypes from gastric biopsies. We designed primers and probe sets for Western or East Asian-cagA at Western-specific or East Asian-specific sequence regions, respectively, and H. pylori 16S rRNA. We could detect the H. pylori 16S rRNA gene, Western and East Asian-cagA gene from DNA of gastric biopsies. The sensitivity and specificity for H. pylori infection was 100% in this system. In Thai patients, 87.8% (36/41) were cagA-positive; 26.8% (11/41) were Western-cagA positive and 53.7% (22/41) were East Asian-cagA positive, while 7.3% (3/41) reacted with both types of cagA. These results suggest that this real-time PCR system provides a highly sensitive assessment of CagA type as a new diagnostic tool for the pathogenicity of H. pylori infection. PMID:15907447

  17. Association between cagA and vacA genotypes and pathogenesis in a Helicobacter pylori infected population from South-eastern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer have been shown to be related to infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Two major virulence factors of H. pylori, CagA and VacA, have been associated with these sequelae of the infection. In this study, total DNA was isolated from gastric biopsy specimens to assess the cagA and vacA genotypes. Results Variations in H. pylori cagA EPIYA motifs and the mosaic structure of vacA s/m/i/d regions were analysed in 155 H. pylori-positive gastric biopsies from 71 individuals using PCR and sequencing. Analysis of a possible association between cagA and vacA genotypes and gastroduodenal pathogenesis was made by logistic regression analysis. We found that H. pylori strains with variation in the number of cagA EPIYA motif variants present in the same biopsy correlated with peptic ulcer, while occurrence of two or more EPIYA-C motifs was associated with atrophy in the gastric mucosa. No statistically significant relation between vacA genotypes and gastroduodenal pathogenesis was observed. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that cagA genotypes may be important determinants in the development of gastroduodenal sequelae of H. pylori infection. In contrast to other studies, vacA genotypes were not related to disease progression or outcome. In order to fully understand the relations between cagA, vacA and gastroduodenal pathogenesis, the mechanisms by which CagA and VacA act and interact need to be further investigated. PMID:22747681

  18. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Man; Li, Fu-gang; Xie, Xi-sheng; Wang, Shao-qing; Fan, Jun-ming

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  19. Genotyping of the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene Isolated From Gastric Biopsies in Shiraz, Southern Iran: A PCR-RFLP and Sequence Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Moaddeb, Afsaneh; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Firouzi, Roya; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Farshad, Shohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. Objectives The aim of this study was to genotype the H. pylori cagA gene isolated from antral biopsies of patients with stomach symptoms, using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Patients and Methods A total of 161 gastric biopsies were collected from patients with stomach symptoms. After isolation of H. pylori from the biopsy culture, the cagA gene was assessed using PCR. The PCR products were then digested by the HinfI restriction endonuclease enzyme. A sample of each genotype was also subjected to direct sequencing for further analysis. Results From 161 antral biopsies, 61 (37.9%) were positive for H. pylori in culture. Overall, 24 cagA-positives were detected in the isolates. RFLP indicated three different genotypes (I, II, and III) of cagA with a frequency of 62.5%, 25%, and 12.5% among the isolates, respectively. Genotypes I and II of cagA were predominant in patients who had gastritis. However, genotype III was found in three patients with duodenitis and duodenal ulcers. Alignment of the nucleotide sequences of the three isolated genotypes, with H. pylori 26695 as a reference strain, revealed 12 inserted nucleotides in genotype III. When the sequence of genotype III was aligned with 15 additional H. pylori strains available in GenBank, the same inserted nucleotides were detected in six of them. Conclusions Using the PCR-RFLP method, three distinctive H. pylori cagA genotypes were detected in antral biopsies. Genotype I, which was predominant among the isolates, was significantly associated with gastritis. However, the data showed that cagA genotype III may play a role in duodenitis and duodenal ulcers in patients infected with H. pylori. PMID:27335631

  20. Role of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors vacuolating cytotoxin, CagA, and urease in a mouse model of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiara, P; Marchetti, M; Blaser, M J; Tummuru, M K; Cover, T L; Segal, E D; Tompkins, L S; Rappuoli, R

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic role of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors has been studied with a mouse model of gastric disease. BALB/c mice were treated orally with different amounts of sonic extracts of cytotoxic H. pylori strains (NCTC 11637, 60190, 84-183, and 87A300 [CagA+/Tox+]). The pathological effects on histological sections of gastric mucosae were assessed and were compared with the effects of treatments with extracts from noncytotoxic strains (G21 and G50 [CagA-/Tox-]) and from strains that express either CagA alone (D931 [CagA+/Tox-]) or the cytotoxin alone (G104 [CagA-/Tox+]). The treatment with extracts from cytotoxic strains induced various epithelial lesions (vacuolation, erosions, and ulcerations), recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lamina propria, and a marked reduction of the mucin layer. Extracts of noncytotoxic strains induced mucin depletion but no other significant pathology. Crude extracts of strain D931, expressing CagA alone, caused only mild infiltration of inflammatory cells, whereas extracts of strain G104, expressing cytotoxin alone, induced extensive epithelial damage but little inflammatory reaction. Loss of the mucin layer was not associated with a cytotoxic phenotype, since this loss was observed in mice treated with crude extracts of all strains. The pathogenic roles of CagA, cytotoxin, and urease were further assessed by using extracts of mutant strains of H. pylori defective in the expression of each of these virulence factors. The results obtained suggest that (i) urease activity does not play a significant role in inducing the observed gastric damage, (ii) cytotoxin has an important role in the induction of gastric epithelial cell lesions but not in eliciting inflammation, and (iii) other components present in strains which carry the cagA gene, but distinct from CagA itself, are involved in eliciting the inflammatory response. PMID:7558333

  1. Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27531909

  2. Non-invasive Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori cagA, vacA, and hopQ from Asymptomatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Sicinschi, Liviu A.; Correa, Pelayo; Bravo, Luis E.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.; Loh, John T.; Yepez, Maria C.; Gold, Benjamin D.; Thompson, Dexter T.; Cover, Timothy L.; Schneider, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    Background H. pylori infection is usually acquired in childhood, but little is known about its natural history in asymptomatic children, primarily due to the paucity of non-invasive diagnostic methods. H. pylori strains harboring cagA and specific alleles of hopQ and vacA are associated with increased risk for gastric cancer. Many studies of H. pylori virulence markers in children have the bias that symptomatic subjects are selected for endoscopy, and these children may harbor the most virulent strains. Our aim: to genotype cagA, hopQ and vacA alleles in stool DNA samples of healthy Colombian children residing in an area with high incidence of gastric cancer, in order to avoid selection bias resulting from endoscopy. Methods H. pylori status of 86 asymptomatic children was assessed by 13C-Urea Breath Test (UBT) and PCR. H. pylori 16S rRNA, cagA, hopQ and vacA genes were amplified from stool DNA samples and sequenced. Results UBT was positive in 69 (80.2%) of 86 children; in stool DNA analysis, 78.3% were positive by 16S rRNA PCR. cagA, vacA and hopQ were detected in 66.1%, 84.6%, and 72.3% of stool DNA samples from 16S rRNA positive children. Of the children's DNA samples which revealed vacA and hopQ alleles, 91.7% showed vacA s1 and 73.7% showed type I hopQ. Type I hopQ alleles were associated with cagA-positivity and vacA s1 genotypes (P<0.0001). Conclusions Using stool DNA samples, virulence markers of H. pylori were successfully genotyped in a high percentage of the asymptomatic infected children, revealing a high prevalence of genotypes associated with virulence. Type I hopQ alleles were associated with the presence of cagA and the vacA s1 genotype. PMID:22404439

  3. Helicobacter pylori CagA and IL-1β Promote the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered the most important risk factor, mainly by the activity of its virulence factor CagA. H. pylori/CagA-induced chronic inflammation triggers a series of gastric lesions of increased severity, starting with gastritis and ending with cancer. IL-1β has been associated with tumor development and invasiveness in different types of cancer, including gastric cancer. Currently, it is not clear if there is an association between CagA and IL-1β at a cellular level. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IL-1β and CagA on MCF-10A nontransformed cells. We found evidence that both CagA and IL-1β trigger the initiation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition characterized by β-catenin nuclear translocation, increased expression of Snail1 and ZEB1, downregulation of CDH1, and morphological changes during MCF-10A acini formation. However, only CagA induced MMP9 activity and cell invasion. Our data support that IL-1β and CagA target the β-catenin pathway, with CagA leading to acquisition of a stage related to aggressive tumors. PMID:27525003

  4. Helicobacter pylori CagA and IL-1β Promote the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered the most important risk factor, mainly by the activity of its virulence factor CagA. H. pylori/CagA-induced chronic inflammation triggers a series of gastric lesions of increased severity, starting with gastritis and ending with cancer. IL-1β has been associated with tumor development and invasiveness in different types of cancer, including gastric cancer. Currently, it is not clear if there is an association between CagA and IL-1β at a cellular level. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IL-1β and CagA on MCF-10A nontransformed cells. We found evidence that both CagA and IL-1β trigger the initiation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition characterized by β-catenin nuclear translocation, increased expression of Snail1 and ZEB1, downregulation of CDH1, and morphological changes during MCF-10A acini formation. However, only CagA induced MMP9 activity and cell invasion. Our data support that IL-1β and CagA target the β-catenin pathway, with CagA leading to acquisition of a stage related to aggressive tumors. PMID:27525003

  5. Application of PCR amplicon sequencing using a single primer pair in PCR amplification to assess variations in Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of various EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this study, a unique PCR assay and sequencing strategy was developed to establish the number and variation of cagA EPIYA motifs. Findings MDA-DNA derived from gastric biopsy specimens from eleven subjects with gastritis was used with M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primers for amplification of the cagA EPIYA motif region. Automated capillary electrophoresis using a high resolution kit and amplicon sequencing confirmed variations in the cagA EPIYA motif region. In nine cases, sequencing revealed the presence of AB, ABC, or ABCC (Western type) cagA EPIYA motif, respectively. In two cases, double cagA EPIYA motifs were detected (ABC/ABCC or ABC/AB), indicating the presence of two H. pylori strains in the same biopsy. Conclusion Automated capillary electrophoresis and Amplicon sequencing using a single, M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primer pair in PCR amplification enabled a rapid molecular typing of cagA EPIYA motifs. Moreover, the techniques described allowed for a rapid detection of mixed H. pylori strains present in the same biopsy specimen. PMID:20181142

  6. CagA Phosphorylation in Helicobacter pylori-Infected B Cells Is Mediated by the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinases of the Src and Abl Families.

    PubMed

    Krisch, Linda M; Posselt, Gernot; Hammerl, Peter; Wessler, Silja

    2016-09-01

    CagA is one of the most important virulence factors of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori CagA expression can be associated with the induction of severe gastric disorders such as gastritis, ulceration, gastric cancer, or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. After translocation through a type IV secretion system into epithelial cells, CagA is tyrosine phosphorylated by kinases of the Src and Abl families, leading to drastic cell elongation and motility. While the functional role of CagA in epithelial cells is well investigated, knowledge about CagA phosphorylation and its associated signal transduction pathways in B cells is only marginal. Here, we established the B cell line MEC1 derived from a B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patient as a new infection model to study the signal transduction in B cells controlled by H. pylori We observed that CagA was rapidly injected, strongly tyrosine phosphorylated, and cleaved into a 100-kDa N-terminal and a 40-kDa C-terminal fragment. To identify upstream signal transduction pathways of CagA phosphorylation in MEC1 cells, pharmacological inhibitors were employed to specifically target Src and Abl kinases. We observed that CagA phosphorylation was strongly inhibited upon treatment with an Src inhibitor and slightly diminished when the Abl kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was applied. The addition of dasatinib to block c-Abl and Src kinases led to a complete loss of CagA phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role for Src and Abl tyrosine kinases in CagA phosphorylation in B cells, which represent druggable targets in H. pylori-mediated gastric MALT lymphoma. PMID:27382024

  7. CagA Phosphorylation in Helicobacter pylori-Infected B Cells Is Mediated by the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinases of the Src and Abl Families

    PubMed Central

    Krisch, Linda M.; Posselt, Gernot; Hammerl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CagA is one of the most important virulence factors of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori. CagA expression can be associated with the induction of severe gastric disorders such as gastritis, ulceration, gastric cancer, or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. After translocation through a type IV secretion system into epithelial cells, CagA is tyrosine phosphorylated by kinases of the Src and Abl families, leading to drastic cell elongation and motility. While the functional role of CagA in epithelial cells is well investigated, knowledge about CagA phosphorylation and its associated signal transduction pathways in B cells is only marginal. Here, we established the B cell line MEC1 derived from a B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patient as a new infection model to study the signal transduction in B cells controlled by H. pylori. We observed that CagA was rapidly injected, strongly tyrosine phosphorylated, and cleaved into a 100-kDa N-terminal and a 40-kDa C-terminal fragment. To identify upstream signal transduction pathways of CagA phosphorylation in MEC1 cells, pharmacological inhibitors were employed to specifically target Src and Abl kinases. We observed that CagA phosphorylation was strongly inhibited upon treatment with an Src inhibitor and slightly diminished when the Abl kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was applied. The addition of dasatinib to block c-Abl and Src kinases led to a complete loss of CagA phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role for Src and Abl tyrosine kinases in CagA phosphorylation in B cells, which represent druggable targets in H. pylori-mediated gastric MALT lymphoma. PMID:27382024

  8. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  9. Proteomic Characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA Antigen Recognized by Child Serum Antibodies and Its Epitope Mapping by Peptide Array

    PubMed Central

    Akada, Junko; Okuda, Masumi; Hiramoto, Narumi; Kitagawa, Takao; Zhang, Xiulian; Kamei, Shuichi; Ito, Akane; Nakamura, Mikiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiwatani, Tomoko; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Teruko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp)-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s) unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. PMID:25141238

  10. Diverse characteristics of the CagA gene of Helicobacter pylori strains collected from patients from southern vietnam with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Truong, Bui Xuan; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ly, Le Thanh; Thong, Tran Minh; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Van Long, Dao; Furumatsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    The pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases is related to the diversity of Helicobacter pylori strains. CagA-positive strains are more likely to cause gastric cancer than CagA-negative strains. Based on EPIYA (Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala) motifs at the carboxyl terminus corresponding to phosphorylation sites, H. pylori CagA is divided into East Asian CagA and Western CagA. The former type prevails in East Asia and is more closely associated with gastric cancer. The present study used full sequences of the cagA gene and CagA protein of 22 H. pylori strains in gastric cancer and peptic ulcer patients from Southern Vietnam to make a comparison of genetic homology among Vietnamese strains and between them and other strains in East Asia. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on full amino acid sequences of 22 Vietnamese strains in accordance with 54 references from around the world. The cagA gene was found in all Vietnamese H. pylori strains. Twenty-one of 22 (95.5%) strains belonged to the East Asian type and had similar characteristics of amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminus to other strains from the East Asian region. From evidence of East Asian CagA and epidemiologic cancerous lesions in Vietnam, H. pylori-infected Vietnamese can be classified into a high-risk group for gastric cancer, but further studies on the interaction among environmental and virulence factors should be done. Finally, phylogenetic data support that there is a Japanese subtype in the Western CagA type. PMID:19846630

  11. Diverse Characteristics of the cagA Gene of Helicobacter pylori Strains Collected from Patients from Southern Vietnam with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer▿

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Bui Xuan; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ly, Le Thanh; Thong, Tran Minh; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Van Long, Dao; Furumatsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases is related to the diversity of Helicobacter pylori strains. CagA-positive strains are more likely to cause gastric cancer than CagA-negative strains. Based on EPIYA (Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala) motifs at the carboxyl terminus corresponding to phosphorylation sites, H. pylori CagA is divided into East Asian CagA and Western CagA. The former type prevails in East Asia and is more closely associated with gastric cancer. The present study used full sequences of the cagA gene and CagA protein of 22 H. pylori strains in gastric cancer and peptic ulcer patients from Southern Vietnam to make a comparison of genetic homology among Vietnamese strains and between them and other strains in East Asia. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on full amino acid sequences of 22 Vietnamese strains in accordance with 54 references from around the world. The cagA gene was found in all Vietnamese H. pylori strains. Twenty-one of 22 (95.5%) strains belonged to the East Asian type and had similar characteristics of amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminus to other strains from the East Asian region. From evidence of East Asian CagA and epidemiologic cancerous lesions in Vietnam, H. pylori-infected Vietnamese can be classified into a high-risk group for gastric cancer, but further studies on the interaction among environmental and virulence factors should be done. Finally, phylogenetic data support that there is a Japanese subtype in the Western CagA type. PMID:19846630

  12. A Tale of Two Toxins: Helicobacter Pylori CagA and VacA Modulate Host Pathways that Impact Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathleen R.; Whitmire, Jeannette M.; Merrell, D. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacterium that colonizes more than 50% of the world's population, which leads to a tremendous medical burden. H. pylori infection is associated with such varied diseases as gastritis, peptic ulcers, and two forms of gastric cancer: gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This association represents a novel paradigm for cancer development; H. pylori is currently the only bacterium to be recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, a significant amount of research has been conducted to identify the bacterial factors and the deregulated host cell pathways that are responsible for the progression to more severe disease states. Two of the virulence factors that have been implicated in this process are cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) and vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), which are cytotoxins that are injected and secreted by H. pylori, respectively. Both of these virulence factors are polymorphic and affect a multitude of host cellular pathways. These combined facts could easily contribute to differences in disease severity across the population as various CagA and VacA alleles differentially target some pathways. Herein we highlight the diverse types of cellular pathways and processes targeted by these important toxins. PMID:21687723

  13. Strategy To Characterize the Number and Type of Repeating EPIYA Phosphorylation Motifs in the Carboxyl Terminus of CagA Protein in Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Panayotopoulou, Effrosini G.; Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Papadakos, Konstantinos; Kalliaropoulos, Antonios; Papatheodoridis, George; Mentis, Andreas F.; Archimandritis, Athanasios J.

    2007-01-01

    Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) diversity with regard to EPIYA-A, -B, -C, or -D phosphorylation motifs may play an important role in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis, and therefore determination of these motifs in H. pylori clinical isolates can become a useful prognostic tool. We propose a strategy for the accurate determination of CagA EPIYA motifs in clinical strains, based upon one-step PCR amplification using primers that flank the EPIYA coding region. We thus analyzed 135 H. pylori isolates derived from 75 adults and 60 children Greek patients. A total of 34 cases were found to be EPIYA PCR negative and were consequently verified as cagA negative by cagA-specific PCR, empty-site cagA PCR, and Western blotting. Sequencing of the remaining 101 PCR-positive amplicons confirmed that an accurate prediction of the number of EPIYA motifs on the basis of size distribution of the PCR products was feasible in all cases. Furthermore, our assay could identify closely related H. pylori subclones within the same patient, harboring different numbers of EPIYA repeats. The prevalence of CagA proteins with three EPIYA motifs (ABC) or four EPIYA motifs (ABCC) was the same within the adult and children groups. However, CagA species with more than four EPIYA motifs were observed exclusively within adults (8.6%), suggesting that CagA-positive strains may acquire additional EPIYA-C motifs throughout adulthood. Our strategy requires no initial cagA screening of the clinical isolates and can accurately predict the number of EPIYA repeats in single or multiple closely related subclones bearing different numbers of EPIYA motifs in their CagA, which may coexist within the same patient. PMID:17151214

  14. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Traube, Leah; Jindal, Shawn; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Sticht, Heinrich; Backert, Steffen; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT) in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk. PMID:25646814

  15. Impact of structural polymorphism for the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein on binding to polarity-regulating kinase PAR1b.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroko; Hayashi, Takeru; Arisaka, Fumio; Senda, Toshiya; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. CagA, the product of the cagA gene, is a bacterial oncoprotein, which, upon delivery into gastric epithelial cells, binds to and inhibits the polarity-regulating kinase, partitioning-defective 1b (PAR1b) [also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (MARK2)], via its CagA multimerization (CM) motif. The inhibition of PAR1b elicits junctional and polarity defects, rendering cells susceptible to oncogenesis. Notably, the polymorphism in the CM motif has been identified among geographic variants of CagA, differing in either the copy number or the sequence composition. In this study, through quantitative analysis of the complex formation between CagA and PAR1b, we found that several CagA species have acquired elevated PAR1b-binding activity via duplication of the CM motifs, while others have lost their PAR1b-binding activity. We also found that strength of CagA-PAR1b interaction was proportional to the degrees of stress fiber formation and tight junctional disruption by CagA in gastric epithelial cells. These results indicate that the CM polymorphism is a determinant for the magnitude of CagA-mediated deregulation of the cytoskeletal system and thereby possibly affects disease outcome of cagA-positive H. pylori infection, including gastric cancer. PMID:27445265

  16. Impact of structural polymorphism for the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein on binding to polarity-regulating kinase PAR1b

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroko; Hayashi, Takeru; Arisaka, Fumio; Senda, Toshiya; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. CagA, the product of the cagA gene, is a bacterial oncoprotein, which, upon delivery into gastric epithelial cells, binds to and inhibits the polarity-regulating kinase, partitioning-defective 1b (PAR1b) [also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (MARK2)], via its CagA multimerization (CM) motif. The inhibition of PAR1b elicits junctional and polarity defects, rendering cells susceptible to oncogenesis. Notably, the polymorphism in the CM motif has been identified among geographic variants of CagA, differing in either the copy number or the sequence composition. In this study, through quantitative analysis of the complex formation between CagA and PAR1b, we found that several CagA species have acquired elevated PAR1b-binding activity via duplication of the CM motifs, while others have lost their PAR1b-binding activity. We also found that strength of CagA-PAR1b interaction was proportional to the degrees of stress fiber formation and tight junctional disruption by CagA in gastric epithelial cells. These results indicate that the CM polymorphism is a determinant for the magnitude of CagA-mediated deregulation of the cytoskeletal system and thereby possibly affects disease outcome of cagA-positive H. pylori infection, including gastric cancer. PMID:27445265

  17. Prevalence and correlation with clinical diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genotype among gastric patients from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Chen, Xin; Yang, Xuesong; Yan, Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n = 169), chronic gastritis (GIs), gastric ulcer (GU), and gastric cancer (GC) were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A total of 141 (84%) cases were found positive for H. pylori by 16S rRNA and ureA. GC showed high H. pylori infection (93%) compared with GIs (72%) and GU (84%). The vacAs1am1 was highly found in GC (40%) and GU (36%), vacAs1am2 in GIs (33%), vacAs1bm1 (14%) and vacAs1bm2 (8%) in GU cases, and s2m1 in normal cases (33%), while vacAs1cm1 showed low frequency in GIs (2%) and GU (3%) and GC showed negative result. The East-Asian cagA strain was highly observed in GC (43%), as compared to GIs (41%) and GU (20%). The East-Asian cagA/vacAs1am1 was significantly higher in GC (23%) than in GU (22%) and GIs (145) patients. The East-Asian type cagA with vacAs1a and vacAm1 is the most predominant genotype in H. pylori strains of Northeast China. PMID:24949419

  18. Evaluation of Clarithromycin Resistance and cagA and vacA Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori Strains from the West of Ireland Using Line Probe Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kieran A.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Moran, Anthony P.; Glennon, Maura; Smith, Terry; Maher, Majella

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of clarithromycin resistance-associated mutations, the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA), and the various vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) genotypes was determined in 50 gastric biopsy specimens from Helicobacter pylori-infected patients, using line probe assays. The clarithromycin resistance-associated mutation A2143G was detected in H. pylori strains from 26% of the specimens, which suggested that the high rate of H. pylori treatment failure in Ireland may be partly attributable to the presence of these mutations. All strains examined carried the vacA s1 genotype, and 76% were cagA positive. Of these 50 specimens, 13 (26%) carried H. pylori strains with vacA midregion genotype m1, 29 (58%) carried strains that were m2, 1 (2%) was infected by a strain that was positive for both m1 and m2, and 7 (14%) carried strains that could not be typed. PMID:11326028

  19. Transgenic expression of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA promotes apoptosis or tumorigenesis through JNK activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wandler, Anica M; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer development is strongly correlated with infection by Helicobacter pylori possessing the effector protein CagA. Using a transgenic Drosophila melanogaster model, we show that CagA expression in the simple model epithelium of the larval wing imaginal disc causes dramatic tissue perturbations and apoptosis when CagA-expressing and non-expressing cells are juxtaposed. This cell death phenotype occurs through activation of JNK signaling and is enhanced by loss of the neoplastic tumor suppressors in CagA-expressing cells or loss of the TNF homolog Eiger in wild type neighboring cells. We further explored the effects of CagA-mediated JNK pathway activation on an epithelium in the context of oncogenic Ras activation, using a Drosophila model of metastasis. In this model, CagA expression in epithelial cells enhances the growth and invasion of tumors in a JNK-dependent manner. These data suggest a potential role for CagA-mediated JNK pathway activation in promoting gastric cancer progression. PMID:23093933

  20. Serum Helicobacter pylori CagA antibody as a biomarker for gastric cancer in east-Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Matsunari, Osamu; Watada, Masahide; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Aims In east-Asian countries, while almost all Helicobacter pylori strains possess the cytotokine-associated gene A (CagA) gene, serum CagA antibody is not detected in some infected subjects. We aimed to clarify the association between anti-CagA antibody and gastric cancer in east-Asian countries. Materials & methods We performed a meta-analysis of case–control studies with age- and sex-matched controls, which provided raw data in east-Asian countries. Results Ten studies with a total of 4325 patients were identified in the search. Some reports from Japan, Korea and China showed a positive association between the presence of anti-CagA antibody and gastric cancer; however, the results differed in their various backgrounds. The disparate findings appeared to result from the use of different methods or from variations in the antigens used to detect the anti-CagA antibody. CagA seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. Conclusion Anti-CagA antibody can be used as a biomarker for gastric cancer even in east-Asian countries. PMID:21155667

  1. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Gui; Hu, Lei; Zang, Ming De; Wang, He-Xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-Fang; Su, Li-Ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-03-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  2. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He-xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-fang; Su, Li-ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  3. Prevalence of cagA and vacA among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Soroush, Setareh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Delpisheh, Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Bogdanović, Lidija; Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-07-01

    The varieties of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori may be due to differences in bacterial genotypes and virulence factors as well as environmental and host-related factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients in Iran and analyze their relevance to the disease status between two clinical groups via a meta-analysis method. Different databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, SID, Magiran, Science Direct, and Medlib were investigated, and 23 relevant articles from the period between 2001 and 2012 were finally analyzed. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random-effects model. Data were analyzed using R software and STATA. The prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients was 70% (95% CI, 64-75) and 41% (95% CI, 24.3-57.7), respectively. The prevalence of duodenal ulcers, peptic ulcers, and gastritis among cagA+ individuals was 53% (95% CI, 20-86), 65% (95% CI, 34-97), and 71% (95% CI, 59-84), respectively. Odds ratio (OR) between cagA-positive compared with cagA-negative patients showed a 1.89 (95% CI, 1.38-2.57) risk of ulcers. In conclusion, the frequency of cagA gene among H. pylori strains is elevated in Iran and it seems to be more frequently associated with gastritis. Therefore, any information about cagA and vacA prevalence among different H. pylori-infected clinical groups in the country can help public health authorities to plan preventive policies to reduce the prevalence of diseases associated with H. pylori infection. PMID:26230117

  4. Relationship between Tobacco, cagA and vacA i1 Virulence Factors and Bacterial Load in Patients Infected by Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Estefanía; Aragones, Nuria; Saez, Jesús; Galiana, Antonio; Sola-Vera, Javier; Ruiz-García, Montserrat; Paz-Zulueta, María; Sarabia-Lavín, Raquel; Brotons, Alicia; López-Girona, Elena; Pérez, Estefanía; Sillero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Several biological and epidemiological studies support a relationship between smoking and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to increase the risk of pathology. However, there have been few studies on the potential synergistic association between specific cagA and vacA virulence factors and smoking in patients infected by Helicobacter pylori. We studied the relationship between smoking and cagA, vacA i1 virulence factors and bacterial load in H. pylori infected patients. Methods Biopsies of the gastric corpus and antrum from 155 consecutive patients in whom there was clinical suspicion of infection by H. pylori were processed. In 106 patients H. pylori infection was detected. Molecular methods were used to quantify the number of microorganisms and presence of cagA and vacA i1 genes. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain patients’ clinical data and lifestyle variables, including tobacco and alcohol consumption. Adjusted Odds Ratios (ORadjusted) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. Results cagA was significantly associated with active-smoking at endoscope: ORadjusted 4.52. Evidence of association was found for vacA i1 (ORadjusted 3.15). Bacterial load was higher in active-smokers, although these differences did not yield statistical significance (median of 262.2 versus 79.4 copies of H. pylori per cell). Conclusions The association between smoking and a higher risk of being infected by a virulent bacterial population and with higher bacterial load, support a complex interaction between H. pylori infection and environmental factors. PMID:25794002

  5. Expression of cagA, virB/D Complex and/or vacA Genes in Helicobacter pylori Strains Originating from Patients with Gastric Diseases.

    PubMed

    Szkaradkiewicz, Andrzej; Karpiński, Tomasz M; Linke, Krzysztof; Majewski, Przemysław; Rożkiewicz, Dorota; Goślińska-Kuźniarek, Olga

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori, particularly in the context of its carcinogenic activity, we analysed expression of virulence genes: cagA, virB/D complex (virB4, virB7, virB8, virB9, virB10, virB11, virD4) and vacA in strains of the pathogen originating from persons with gastric diseases. The studies were conducted on 42 strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with histological diagnosis of non-atrophic gastritis-NAG (group 1, including subgroup 1 containing cagA+ isolates and subgroup 2 containing cagA- strains), multifocal atrophic gastritis-MAG (group 2) and gastric adenocarcinoma-GC (group 3). Expression of H. pylori genes was studied using microarray technology. In group 1, in all strains of H. pylori cagA+ (subgroup 1) high expression of the gene as well as of virB/D was disclosed, accompanied by moderate expression of vacA. In strains of subgroup 2 a moderate expression of vacA was detected. All strains in groups 2 and 3 carried cagA gene but they differed in its expression: a high expression was detected in isolates of group 2 and its hyperexpression in strains of group 3 (hypervirulent strains). In both groups high expression of virB/D and vacA was disclosed. Our results indicate that chronic active gastritis may be induced by both cagA+ strains of H. pylori, manifesting high expression of virB/D complex but moderate activity of vacA, and cagA- strains with moderate expression of vacA gene. On the other hand, in progression of gastric pathology and carcinogenesis linked to H. pylori a significant role was played by hypervirulent strains, manifesting a very high expression of cagA and high activity of virB/D and vacA genes. PMID:26866365

  6. Detection of serum antibodies to CagA and VacA and of serum neutralizing activity for vacuolating cytotoxin in patients with Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Donati, M; Moreno, S; Storni, E; Tucci, A; Poli, L; Mazzoni, C; Varoli, O; Sambri, V; Farencena, A; Cevenini, R

    1997-01-01

    Thirty patients with dyspepsia, with histological diagnosis of gastritis, and with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (n = 13) or nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (n = 17) were admitted to the study. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin-producing strains (Tox+) were isolated from 14 (46.7%) patients, whereas non-cytotoxin-producing (Tox-) H. pylori strains were isolated from the remaining patients. Of 30 patients studied, 20 (66.7%) had serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity in vitro. Fourteen patients with Tox+ H. pylori strains showed serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity and serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies reactive with both 87-kDa H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and 128-kDa cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA) by immunoblotting using native enriched preparations of VacA and CagA proteins from H. pylori culture supernatants as the antigens. A 94-kDa antigen cross-reacting with the 87-kDa VacA protein could be demonstrated in culture supernatant with immune sera from humans and animals. All patients (n = 10) lacking serum neutralizing activity were also negative for IgG or IgA against VacA antigen, whereas 6 of the 10 patients showed IgG serum antibody responses against CagA antigen. The prevalence of antibodies to VacA and CagA antigens was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in patients with gastritis (20 and 26 patients for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 30 patients) than in H. pylori culture-negative controls (0 of 27 for both VacA and CagA) and in randomly selected blood donors (17 and 21 for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 120 subjects). All patients with PUD had antibodies to CagA, whereas 13 of 17 (76.5%) patients with NUD had anti-CagA antibodies. Serum IgG antibodies to VacA were present in 9 (69.2%) patients with PUD of 13 patients and in 11 (64.7%) patients with NUD of 17 patients. Anti-CagA antibodies seemed to correlate better with PUD than anti-VacA antibodies. PMID:9220168

  7. Heterogeneity in the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes: association with gastroduodenal disease in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, M; Lastovica, A; Atherton, J; Louw, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Helicobacter pylori infection is universally associated with gastritis, but only sometimes with clinically significant disease. Candidate virulence markers seem to be useful in identifying the pathogenic infections in some populations.
AIMS—To investigate the association between putative virulence markers and disease in an African population.
METHODS—Fifty nine H pylori strains isolated from dyspeptic patients (11 with peptic ulceration, eight with gastric adenocarcinoma, and 28 with no pathology other than gastritis) were studied for differences in the genes vacA and cagA.
RESULTS—Forty seven (80%) of 59 strains had the vacA signal sequence genotype s1 (one s1a, 46 s1b) and 12 (20%) had subtype s2. vacA mid-region analysis revealed that 40 (68%) strains were vacA m1 and 19 (32%) were m2. All 14 strains from patients with peptic ulceration were vacA s1, in contrast to 23 (66%) of 35 strains from patients with gastritis alone (p<0.01). vacA s2 was found exclusively in patients with gastritis alone (p<0.01). All strains isolated from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma were s1b/m1 (p<0.005 versus gastritis alone). cagA was detectable in 56 (95%) of 59 isolates. Strains from patients with peptic ulceration (12/13 versus 19/30 with gastritis alone, p=0.05) had the shortest fragment length in the 3' region of cagA, while 4/10 strains from patients with gastric cancer had the longest fragment length in this region (p<0.02 versus gastritis alone).
CONCLUSION—In this study, the vacA s1 genotype, and fragment length of the 3' region of cagA identified isolates associated with significant clinical disease. The vacA s1bm1 genotype seems to be strongly associated with gastric cancer.


Keywords: adenocarcinoma; cagA; Helicobacter pylori; peptic ulceration; South Africa; vacuolating cytotoxin PMID:10486355

  8. Role of vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin-associated antigen CagA of Helicobacter pylori in the progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ki, Mi-Ran; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Joo; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Sung, Soo-Eun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Lee, Hye Seung; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-11-01

    Helicobacter (H.) pylori strains that express the cagA and s1a vacA genes are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. Here, we examined the association between the products of these virulence genes with the development of gastric cancer by immunohistochemical staining of gastric biopsy specimens taken from 208 routine gastroscopies and 43 gastric cancer patients. The correlation was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. CagA and VacA expressions in gastric mucosa were significantly associated with chronic gastritis (CG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM), respectively, accompanying CG independent of age. The association of CagA expression with IM accompanying CG was increased in patients over 50-year old (p < 0.01) and that of VacA with CG was significant in patients younger than 50 year (p < 0.05). VacA and CagA were associated with mild IM incidence (p = 0.025 and p = 0.076, respectively) but not advanced IM. In the 43 gastric cancer patients, positivity for VacA was significantly higher in cases of CG and IM than carcinoma (p = 0.042), while that for CagA was slightly higher for individuals with carcinoma than those with CG and IM. These results indicate that CagA and VacA are critical factors for inducing CG and the subsequent progression of IM from CG with an increasing age. PMID:25038872

  9. CagA status & genetic characterization of metronidazole resistant strains of H. pylori from: A region at high risk of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jin-Yong; Yue, Jing; Wang, Ming-Yi; Song, Wen-chong; Gao, Xiao-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of study was to determine relationship between cagA and genetic characterization of metronidazole (MTZ) resistant H. pylori strains from a region at high risk of gastric cancer. Methods: 172 H. pylori strains were isolated from the patients with dyspeptic symptoms, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for MTZ was assessed by E-test. rdxA and frxA genes were amplified using PCR among the MTZ resistant isolates. The status of the plasmid and classes 1~3 integrons were investigated in all isolates. Results: MTZ was detected in 88 isolates (51.16%). Variations in the rdxA gene leading to alterations of amino acids in RdxA proteins were identified in all MTZ resistant strains. FrxA contained missense alterations in 55 MTZ resistant isolates, while the premature truncation of FrxA was caused by frameshift mutations in 9 MTZ resistant strains. Plasmid was found in one MTZ sensitive strain (0.58%), and none of Class 1~3 integrases gene was detected in the studied isolates. The conservative cagA fragment was obtained from all clinical isolates of H. pylori. The sequence of cagA 3' variable region in 164 strains were obtained, including East Asian-type (122, 74.39%) and Western-type (42, 25.61%). Prevalence of Western-type cagA 3' variable region was significantly higher in MTZ resistant (33.73%, 28/83) than those of MTZ-sensitive strains (17.28%, 14/81) (p=0.02). Conclusion: A high prevalence of MTZ resistance was found in the region, and bacterial chromosome mutations in the rdxA and frxA gene still contribute to the high-level MTZ resistance. H. pylori strains characterized with West-type cagA 3’ variable region tend to acquire MTZ resistance in the region. PMID:25097521

  10. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133), 98% (1,010/1,033), 58% (581/1,009), and 96% (248/259), respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p < 0.001). Infection with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively) in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness. PMID

  11. A Comprehensive Sequence and Disease Correlation Analyses for the C-Terminal Region of CagA Protein of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Youlin; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Zhu, Qi; Matha, Ivan; Gao, Xiaolian

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is known to be associated with the development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma. Currently, the bacterial factors of H. pylori are reported to be important in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. CagA protein, encoded by the cagA, is the best studied virulence factor of H. pylori. The pathogenic CagA protein contains a highly polymorphic Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) repeat region in the C-terminal. This repeat region is reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases. The segments containing EPIYA motifs have been designated as segments A, B, C, and D; however the classification and disease relation are still unclear. This study used 560 unique CagA sequences containing 1,796 EPIYA motifs collected from public resources, including 274 Western and 286 East Asian strains with clinical data obtained from 433 entries. Fifteen types of EPIYA or EPIYA-like sequences are defined. In addition to four previously reported major segment types, several minor segment types (e.g., segment B′, B′′) and more than 30 sequence types (e.g., ABC, ABD) were defined using our classification method. We confirm that the sequences from Western and East Asian strains contain segment C and D, respectively. We also confirm that strains with two EPIYA segment C have a greater chance of developing gastric cancer than those with one segment C. Our results shed light on the relationships between the types of CagAs, the country of origin of each sequence type, and the frequency of gastric disease. PMID:19893742

  12. Simple Method for Determination of the Number of Helicobacter pylori CagA Variable-Region EPIYA Tyrosine Phosphorylation Motifs by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Argent, Richard H.; Zhang, Youli; Atherton, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains possessing the cag pathogenicity island are associated with the development of gastric cancer. The CagA protein is translocated into epithelial cells and becomes phosphorylated on tyrosine residues within EPIYA motifs, which may be repeated within the variable region of the protein. Strains possessing CagA with greater numbers of these repeats have been more closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis. Phosphorylated CagA leads to epithelial cell elongation, which is dependent on the number of variable-region EPIYA motifs. Thus, determination of the degree of CagA phosphorylation and the number of EPIYA motifs appears to be more important than detection of cagA alone. Determination of the number of EPIYA motifs by nucleotide sequencing, however, is a laborious and expensive process. We describe here a novel and rapid PCR method for determination of the pattern of repeats containing the EPIYA motif. This will aid in the identification of those strains that may be more likely to cause disease. PMID:15695681

  13. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori cagA, cagE, oipA and vacA in different major ethnic groups in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Hossein; Maleknejad, Parviz; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Feizabadi, Mohammad M; Jafari, Fereshteh; Rezadehbashi, Maryam; Nakhjavani, Farrokh A; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Zali, Mohammad R

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim There are geographical variations in Helicobacter pylori virulence genes; cagA, cagE, vacA and oipA. The present study compared the distribution of these genotypes in major ethnic groups residing in Tehran, Iran and their association with clinical outcomes. Methods A total of 124 H. pylori-positive patients living in Tehran were enrolled in this study. The ethnic distribution was 74 Persians, 33 Turks and 17 other ethnics including Kurds, Lurs, Afghanis and Arabs. The presence of the cagA, cagE and oipA genes and vacA alleles (signal [s] and middle [m] region) were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from H. pylori DNA. Results The cagA-positive status was predominant in all three ethnic groups (e.g. 65% in Persians and 73% in Turks). In contrast, the cagE-positive status was less than half in Persians (47%) and Turks (30%), whereas it was 77% in other ethnicities (P = 0.008). The predominant vacA genotypes were s1 and m1 in all three ethnic groups (e.g. 68% in Persians and 70% in Turks were s1). There was no significant association between cagA and cagE status or vacA genotypes and clinical outcomes. The oipA-positive strains were more common in non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (63%) than in peptic ulcer patients (15%) (P = 0.001) in Persians, but the association was not observed in other ethnic groups. Conclusion There are some differences in the H. pylori genotypes among the ethnic groups in Iran. However, none of these markers seemed to be clinically helpful in predicting the clinical presentation of a H. pylori infection in Iran. PMID:19702906

  14. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status

    PubMed Central

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; van Doorn, Leen Jan; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-01-01

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For this study we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared with subjects carrying cagA− strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95%CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (P=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status. PMID:23319424

  15. Distinct Diversity of vacA, cagA, and cagE Genes of Helicobacter pylori Associated with Peptic Ulcer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Shiho; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Colonization of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute and chronic gastric pathologies in humans. Several H. pylori virulence genes that may play a role in its pathogenicity have been identified. The most important determinants are vacA and cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes. In the present study, to consider the association of molecular genetics between vacA and the cagPAI regarding clinical outcome, we selected H. pylori strains with various genotypes of vacA in Japan and sequenced full-length vacA, cagA, and cagE genes. Sequencing of vacA and cagA genes revealed variable size, whereas the cagE gene was well conserved among strains. Each of the phylogenetic trees based on the deduced amino acid sequences of VacA, CagA, and CagE indicated that all three proteins were divided into two major groups, a Western group and an East Asian group, and the distributions of isolates exhibited similar patterns among the three proteins. The strains with s2 and s1a/m1a vacA genotypes and the Western-type 3′ region cagA genotype were classified into the Western group, and the strains with the s1c/m1b vacA genotype and the East Asian-type 3′ cagA genotype were included in the East Asian group. In addition, the prevalence of infection with the Western group strain was significantly higher in patients with peptic ulcer (90.0%, 9/10) than in patients with chronic gastritis (22.7%, 5/22) (χ2 = 12.64, P = 0.00057). These data suggest that the molecular genetics of vacA and cagPAI are associated and that the Western group with vacA and cagPAI genes is associated with peptic ulcer disease. PMID:16081930

  16. Distinct diversity of vacA, cagA, and cagE genes of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shiho; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-08-01

    Colonization of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute and chronic gastric pathologies in humans. Several H. pylori virulence genes that may play a role in its pathogenicity have been identified. The most important determinants are vacA and cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes. In the present study, to consider the association of molecular genetics between vacA and the cagPAI regarding clinical outcome, we selected H. pylori strains with various genotypes of vacA in Japan and sequenced full-length vacA, cagA, and cagE genes. Sequencing of vacA and cagA genes revealed variable size, whereas the cagE gene was well conserved among strains. Each of the phylogenetic trees based on the deduced amino acid sequences of VacA, CagA, and CagE indicated that all three proteins were divided into two major groups, a Western group and an East Asian group, and the distributions of isolates exhibited similar patterns among the three proteins. The strains with s2 and s1a/m1a vacA genotypes and the Western-type 3' region cagA genotype were classified into the Western group, and the strains with the s1c/m1b vacA genotype and the East Asian-type 3' cagA genotype were included in the East Asian group. In addition, the prevalence of infection with the Western group strain was significantly higher in patients with peptic ulcer (90.0%, 9/10) than in patients with chronic gastritis (22.7%, 5/22) (chi2 = 12.64, P = 0.00057). These data suggest that the molecular genetics of vacA and cagPAI are associated and that the Western group with vacA and cagPAI genes is associated with peptic ulcer disease. PMID:16081930

  17. Study of the Cytoxin-Associated Gene A (CagA Gene) in Helicobacter pylori Using Gastric Biopsies of Iraqi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalaf, Elham A.; Al-Khafaji, Zahra M.; Yassen, Nahi Y.; AL-Abbudi, Fadel A.; Sadwen, Saad N.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: The Helicobacter pylori CagA gene is a major virulence factor that plays an important role in gastric pathologies. The size variation of CagA gene, which is dependent on the 3’ repeat region, contains one or more Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs and CagA multimerization (CM) motifs. Four segments flanking the EPIYA motifs, EPIYA −A, −B, −C, or −D, were reported to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. The aim was to determine the roles of EPIYA segments and CM motifs in gastroduodenal pathogenesis in an Iraqi population. Patients and Methods: Gastric biopsies were collected from 210 patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU), gastric ulcer (GU), and gastric cancer (GC). The EPIYA motif genotyping was determined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The differences in age, gender, and CagA EPIYA motifs of H. pylori between GC, DU, GU and gastritis patients were analyzed using a χ2 -test. Results A total of 22 (45.8%) strains had three copies of EPIYA (ABC type), 2 (4.16%) had four copies (ABCC type), 6 (12.7%) had five copies (ABCCC type), 13 (27.08%) had two copies (AB type), 3 (6.25%) had the BC, and 2 (4.17%) had AC motif. The alignment of the deduced protein sequences confirmed that there were no East Asian type EPIYA-D sequences in Iraqi strains. A significant association was found between increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and GU (P ≤ 0.01) compared with gastritis. Conclusions: The structure of the 3’ region of the CagA gene in Iraqi strains was Western type with a variable number of EPIYA-C and CM motifs. A significant association was found between increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and GU compared with gastritis indicating predictive association with the severity of the disease. The GenBank accession numbers for the partial CagA nucleotide sequences determined in this study are JX164093-JX164112. PMID:23481132

  18. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C > T genotypes: A host and environment interaction in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M. Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G.; Sicinschi, Liviu A.; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U.; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene–environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals. PMID:22414649

  19. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals. PMID:22414649

  20. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  1. Helicobacter pylori CagA Induces AGS Cell Elongation through a Cell Retraction Defect That Is Independent of Cdc42, Rac1, and Arp2/3▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bourzac, Kevin M.; Botham, Crystal M.; Guillemin, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, which infects over one-half the world's population, is a significant risk factor in a spectrum of gastric diseases, including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Strains of H. pylori that deliver the effector molecule CagA into host cells via a type IV secretion system are associated with more severe disease outcomes. In a tissue culture model of infection, CagA delivery results in a dramatic cellular elongation referred to as the “hummingbird” phenotype, which is characterized by long, thin cellular extensions. These actin-based cytoskeletal rearrangements are reminiscent of structures that are regulated by Rho GTPases and the Arp2/3 complex. We tested whether these signaling pathways were important in the H. pylori-induced cell elongation phenotype. Contrary to our expectations, we found that these molecules are dispensable for cell elongation. Instead, time-lapse video microscopy revealed that cells infected by cagA+ H. pylori become elongated because they fail to release their back ends during cell locomotion. Consistent with a model in which CagA causes cell elongation by inhibiting the disassembly of adhesive cell contacts at migrating cells' lagging ends, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that focal adhesion complexes persist at the distal tips of elongated cell projections. Thus, our data implicate a set of signaling molecules in the hummingbird phenotype that are different than the molecules previously suspected. PMID:17194805

  2. In vitro effect of amoxicillin and clarithromycin on the 3’ region of cagA gene in Helicobacter pylori isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andrés; Matta, Andrés Januer; Pazos, Alvaro; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the in vitro effect of amoxicillin and clarithromycin on the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI). METHODS: One hundred and forty-nine clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cultured from gastric biopsies from 206 Colombian patients with dyspeptic symptoms from a high-risk area for gastric cancer were included as study material. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the agar dilution method. Resistant isolates at baseline and in amoxicillin and clarithromycin serial dilutions were subjected to genotyping (cagA, vacA alleles s and m), Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) polymerase chain reaction and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Images of the RAPD amplicons were analyzed by Gel-Pro Analyzer 4.5 program. Cluster analyses was done using SPSS 15.0 statistical package, where each of the fingerprint bands were denoted as variables. Dendrograms were designed by following Ward’s clustering method and the estimation of distances between each pair of H. pylori isolates was calculated with the squared Euclidean distance. RESULTS: Resistance rates were 4% for amoxicillin and 2.7% for clarithromycin with 2% double resistances. Genotyping evidenced a high prevalence of the genotype cagA-positive/vacA s1m1. The 3’ region of cagA gene was successfully amplified in 92.3% (12/13) of the baseline resistant isolates and in 60% (36/60) of the resistant isolates growing in antibiotic dilutions. Upon observing the distribution of the number of EPIYA repetitions in each dilution with respect to baseline isolates, it was found that in 61.5% (8/13) of the baseline isolates, a change in the number of EPIYA repetitions lowered antibiotic pressure. The gain and loss of EPIYA motifs resulted in a diversity of H. pylori subclones after bacterial adjustment to changing conditions product of antibiotic pressure. RAPD PCR evidenced the close clonal relationship between baseline isolates and isolates growing in antibiotic dilutions. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic

  3. Statins Attenuate Helicobacter pylori CagA Translocation and Reduce Incidence of Gastric Cancer: In Vitro and Population-Based Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Yu-An; Feng, Chun-Lung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lai, Chih-Ho; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The correlation of Helicobacter pylori and the etiology of gastric cancer was substantially certain. Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts), which provide platforms for signaling, are associated with H. pylori-induced pathogenesis leading to gastric cancer. Patients who have been prescribed statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have exhibited a reduced risk of several types of cancer. However, no studies have addressed the effect of statins on H. pylori-associated gastric cancer from the antineoplastic perspective. In this study, we showed that treatment of gastric epithelial cells with simvastatin reduced the level of cellular cholesterol and led to attenuation of translocation and phosphorylation of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is recognized as a major determinant of gastric cancer development. Additionally, a nationwide case-control study based on data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was conducted. A population-based case-control study revealed that patients who used simvastatin exhibited a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.70–0.83). In patients exhibiting H. pylori infection who were prescribed simvastatin, the adjusted OR for gastric cancer was 0.25 (95% CI = 0.12–0.50). Our results combined an in vitro study with a nationwide population analysis reveal that statin use might be a feasible approach to prevent H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. PMID:26730715

  4. Analysis of 3′-end variable region of the cagA gene in Helicobacter pylori isolated from Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Shokrzadeh, Leila; Baghaei, Kaveh; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Dabiri, Hossein; Jafari, Fereshteh; Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Tahami, Ali; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Zojaji, Homayon; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The 3′ region of the cagA gene, the most well-known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, contains Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs. Four segments flanking the EPIYA motifs, EPIYA-A, -B, -C, or -D, were reported to play important roles in H. pylori-related gastroduodenal pathogenesis. The aim was to determine the roles of EPIYA segments in gastroduodenal pathogenesis in an Iranian population. Methods A total of 92 cagA-positive Iranian strains isolated from dyspepsia patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (n = 77), peptic ulcer (n = 11) and gastric cancer (n = 4) were studied. The EPIYA motif genotyping was determined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Results A total of 86 (93.5%) strains had three copies of EPIYA (ABC type), three (3.3%) had four copies (ABCC type) and three (3.3%) had two copies (AB type). The alignment of the deduced protein sequences confirmed that there were no East Asian type EPIYA-D sequences (EPIYATIDFDEANQAG) in Iranian strains. When the prevalence of strains with multiple EPIYA-C segments in Iran was compared with previously published data, it was much lower than that in Colombia and Italy, but was higher than that of Iraq, and the patterns were parallel to the incidence of gastric cancer in these countries. Conclusion The structure of the 3′ region of the cagA gene in Iranian strains was Western type. Although we could not find differences between EPIYA types and clinical outcomes, low prevalence of strains with multiple EPIYA-C segments might be reasons for low incidence of gastric cancer in Iran. PMID:19793167

  5. Helicobacter pylori isolated from Iranian drinking water: vacA, cagA, iceA, oipA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Khamesipour, Faham; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    Despite the clinical importance of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric disorders, its exact route of transmission is still uncertain. Based on the contentious hypothesis and findings of previous investigations, water may play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. This study was carried out to investigate the vacA, cagA, oipA, iceA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties of H. pylori strains isolated from the drinking water samples of four major provinces in Iran. A total of 400 drinking water samples were cultured and tested. H. pylori-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes and antimicrobial resistance. Twelve of 400 (3%) water samples were positive for H. pylori. Samples from Isfahan province had the highest, while those from Shiraz had the lowest prevalence of H. pylori. The seasonal distribution was also determined, with the highest prevalence of bacteria in the summer season (7.36%). H. pylori strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (100%), erythromycin (75%), clarithromycin (75%), and trimethoprim (58.3%). The most commonly detected genotypes were vacAs1a (83.3%), vacAm1a (66.6%), vacAs2 (50%) and cagA (50%). The presence of similar genotypes in the H. pylori strains of drinking water and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated water maybe the sources of bacteria. Spiramycin and furazolidone are suggested for the treatment of cases of H. pylori infection. PMID:27419049

  6. No Association between CagA- and VacA-Positive Strains of Helicobacter pylori and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Noche, C. Domngang; Njajou, O.; Etoa, F. X.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Glaucoma is a public health issue worldwide, particularly in Africa. In Cameroon, the prevalence rate of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) ranges between 4.5% and 8.2%. Helicobacter pylori (HP) has been implicated in digestive and extra-digestive diseases, including glaucoma. The objective of this work was to evaluate the implication of CagA- and VacA-positive strains of HP in POAG using a case–control design. METHODS An analytical study was conducted from October 2013 to December 2013. Participants were recruited in eye care centers in Yaoundé. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were carried out in the La Grace Laboratory in Yaoundé. RESULTS The total sample consisted of 50 POAG patients and 31 controls with a mean age of 58.5 ± 12.2 years and 45.5 ± 14.6 years, respectively. The prevalence rates of HP in the POAG and control groups were 74% (37/50) and 87% (27/31), respectively (P = 0.125). The prevalence rates of CagA-positive HP seropositivity in the POAG and control groups were 26% and 22.58%, respectively (P = 0.47), and the prevalence rates of VacA-positive HP participants were 6% and 0%, respectively (P = 0.22). CONCLUSION The HP prevalence rates among POAG patients and controls were 74% and 87%, respectively. There was no significant difference between prevalence rates of HP in the POAG and control groups. There was no association between POAG and CagA- or VacA-positive HP infection. PMID:26917977

  7. Helicobacter pylori CagA: From Pathogenic Mechanisms to Its Use as an Anti-Cancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Markus; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rappuoli, Rino; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing chronic inflammation, which however is largely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, H. pylori-infected subjects can develop chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Chronic exposure to the pathogen and its ability to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the injection of cytotoxin-associated gene A into gastric epithelial cells may be key triggers of carcinogenesis. By deregulating cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions as well as DNA methylation, histone modifications, expression of micro RNAs, and resistance to apoptosis, EMT can actively contribute to early stages of the cancer formation. Host response to the infection significantly contributes to disease development and the concomitance of particular genotypes of both pathogen and host may turn into the most severe outcomes. T regulatory cells (Treg) have been recently demonstrated to play an important role in H. pylori-related disease development and at the same time the Treg-induced tolerance has been proposed as a possible mechanism that leads to less severe disease. Efficacy of antibiotic therapies of H. pylori infection has significantly dropped. Unfortunately, no vaccine against H. pylori is currently licensed, and protective immunity mechanisms against H. pylori are only partially understood. In spite of promising results obtained in animal models of infection with a number of vaccine candidates, few clinical trials have been conducted so far and with no satisfactory outcomes. However, prophylactic vaccination may be the only means to efficiently prevent H. pylori-associated cancers. PMID:24133496

  8. Effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori infection on anti-platelet glycoprotein antibody producing B cells in patients with primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Shan; Kuang, Li-Ping; Zhuang, Chun-Lan; Jiang, Jia-Dian; Shi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori or HP) infection on circulating B cells producing specific platelet glycoprotein antibodies and the association between therapeutic outcomes in primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients. Methods: A total of 76 newly diagnosed primary ITP patients were included in the study which was conducted at the first affiliated hospital of Shantou University Medical college, in Shantou city China, between January 2013 and January 2014. These patients were tested for H. pylori infection by 13C urea breath test and for anti-CagA antibody in H. pylori positive cases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Anti-GPIb and anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells were measured using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay in all ITP patients and 30 controls. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was also detected in ITP patients. Results: The numbers of anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells in HP+CagA+ patients were higher than in HP+CagA- or HP- patients. However, anti-GPIb antibody-producing B cells were found higher in HP- patients. Analysis of treatment outcomes showed that a therapeutic response was more likely in patients presenting anti-GPIIb/IIIa B cells, but the poor response was found to be associated with anti-GPIb B cells and ANA presences. Conclusion: CagA antigen of H. pylori may induce anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibodies production by a molecular mimicry mechanism. Anti-GPIIb/IIIa and anti-GPIb antibody producing B Cells detection is useful for predicting treatment effects of primary ITP. PMID:25878627

  9. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A 10-DAY DRUG THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC GASTRODUODENAL PATHOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH CAGA-POSITIVE STRAINS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI].

    PubMed

    Dudnyk, V M; Rudenko, G M

    2015-01-01

    The results of triple Helicobacter-therapy (omeprazole, amoxicillin, nifuratel) in the treatment of chronic gastroduodenal pathology in children depending on the duration of it's use. The effectiveness of drug therapy was evaluated in terms of eradication of Helicobacter pylori and dynamics of pain, dyspeptic syndrome and astenovegetative syndrome. PMID:26118054

  10. Evaluation of the Anti-East Asian CagA-Specific Antibody for CagA Phenotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lam Tung; Uchida, Tomohisa; Kuroda, Akiko; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Trinh, Tuan Dung; Ta, Long; Mai, Hong Bang; Ho, Dang Quy Dung; Hoang, Hoa Hai; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Kudo, Yoko; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2009-01-01

    The determination of the cagA genotype is generally based on sequencing the variable 3′ region of the cagA gene. In a previous study, we successfully generated an anti-East Asian CagA-specific antibody (anti-EAS Ab) immunoreactive only with the East Asian CagA and not with the Western CagA. In a small number of Japanese patients, anti-EAS Ab appeared to be a useful tool for phenotyping CagA immunohistochemically. The present study was conducted to validate the anti-EAS Ab immunohistochemistry method in a larger number of patients from Vietnam and Thailand. A total of 385 Vietnamese and Thais were recruited. Helicobacter pylori status was determined by a combination of three methods, including culture, histology, and immunohistochemistry with anti-H. pylori antibody. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the anti-EAS Ab immunohistochemistry method for the diagnosis of CagA phenotype were calculated based on the results of the cagA sequencing as the gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of our immunohistochemistry method were 96.7%, 97.9%, and 97.1%, respectively. Moreover, anti-EAS Ab was not cross-reactive with noninfected gastric mucosa. In conclusion, immunohistochemistry with anti-EAS Ab appears to be a good method for determination of CagA phenotype. PMID:19776193

  11. In Silico Profiling of the Potentiality of Curcumin and Conventional Drugs for CagA Oncoprotein Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Akhileshwar K; Tewari, Mallika; Shukla, Hari S; Roy, Bijoy K

    2015-08-01

    The oncoprotein cytotoxic associated gene A (CagA) of Helicobacter pylori plays a pivotal role in the development of gastric cancer, so it has been an important target for anti-H. pylori drugs. Conventional drugs are currently being implemented against H. pylori. The inhibitory role of plant metabolites like curcumin against H. pylori is still a major scientific challenge. Curcumin may represent a novel promising drug against H. pylori infection without producing side effects. In the present study, a comparative analysis between curcumin and conventional drugs (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, pantoprazole, and metronidazole) was carried out using databases to investigate the potential of curcumin against H. pylori targeting the CagA oncoprotein. Curcumin was filtered using Lipinski's rule of five and the druglikeness property for evaluation of pharmacological properties. Subsequently, molecular docking was employed to determine the binding affinities of curcumin and conventional drugs to the CagA oncoprotein. According to the results obtained from FireDock, the binding energy of curcumin was higher than those of amoxicillin, pantoprazole, and metronidazole, except for clarithromycin, which had the highest binding energy. Accordingly, curcumin may become a promising lead compound against CagA+ H. pylori infection. PMID:25996140

  12. Echoes of a distant past: The cag pathogenicity island of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pacchiani, Nicola; Censini, Stefano; Buti, Ludovico; Covacci, Antonello

    2013-11-01

    This review discusses the multiple roles of the CagA protein encoded by the cag pathogenicity island of Helicobacter pylori and highlights the CagA degradation activities on p53. By subverting the p53 tumor suppressor pathway CagA induces a strong antiapoptotic effect. Helicobacter pylori infection has been always associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The pro-oncogenic functions of CagA also target the tumor suppressor ASPP2. In the absence of tumor suppressor genes, cells survive and proliferate at times and in places where their survival and proliferation are inappropriate. PMID:24097901

  13. Repressed TGF-β signaling through CagA-Smad3 interaction as pathogenic mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Kim, Seong-Jin; Park, Jong Min; Hahm, Ki Baik; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes chronic gastric inflammation, peptic ulceration, and gastric carcinogenesis, in which H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) plays major pathogenic action. Since transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and its signaling also are principally implicated in either modulating gastric mucosal inflammatory responses or causing carcinogenesis and are attenuated after H. pylori infection, we hypothesized that dysregulated Smad signaling and repressed TGF-β might be core pathogenic mechanism for H. pylori-associated gastritis or carcinogenesis. Until now, no precise underlying mechanism how deranged TGF-β signaling developed after H. pylori infection relevant to various clinical manifestations remains unclear. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism about the inhibition of TGF-β signaling by H. pylori CagA protein. H. pylori CagA significantly suppressed TGF-β/Smad transcriptional responses through critical inhibition of Smad3, though CagA interacted constitutively with Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4. CagA inhibited TGF-β-induced suppression of proinflammatory chemokines, such as IL-8, CXCL1 and CXCL3, as well as TGF-β-induced transcription of target genes. In conclusion, repressed TGF-β signaling associated with CagA-positive H. pylori infection could be an important determinant for the outcome of H. pylori infection. Therefore, TGF-β signaling is one of the important determinants to avoid from H. pylori CagA pathogenicity. PMID:26388668

  14. Immune Responses to "Helicobacter pylori" Infection in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Rostami, Mahmoud Nateghi; Nikmanesh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Infection with "Helicobacter pylori" was assessed through serum "H. pylori" IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The sero-status of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) was determined as a risk determinant for severe "H. pylori"-associated diseases. In total, 210 children with ID were included who were permanent resident of…

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  16. The significance of cagA+Helicobacter pylori in reflux oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Warburton-Timms, V; Charlett, A; Valori, R; Uff, J; Shepherd, N; Barr, H; McNulty, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Helicobacter pylori is a gastroduodenal pathogen associated with ulceration, dyspepsia, and adenocarcinoma. Recent preliminary studies have suggested that H pylori may be protective for oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition, strains of H pylori identified by the presence of the cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) are shown to have a significant inverse association with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Given that cagA+ H pylori may protect against oesophageal carcinoma, these strains may be protective for oesophagitis, a precursor of oesophageal carcinoma.
AIMS—The aim of this study was to investigate the association between cagA+ H pylori and endoscopically proved oesophagitis.
PATIENTS—The study group included 1486 patients attending for routine upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy.
METHODS—At endoscopy the oesophagus was assessed for evidence of reflux disease and graded according to standard protocols. Culture and histology of gastric biopsy specimens determined H pylori status. The prevalence of cagA was identified by an antibody specific ELISA (Viva Diagnostika, Germany).
RESULTS—H pylori was present in 663/1485 (45%) patients and in 120/312 (38%) patients with oesophagitis. Anti-CagA antibody was found in 499/640 (78%) H pylori positive patients. Similarly, anti-CagA antibody was found in 422/521 (81%) patients with a normal oesophagus and in 42/60 (70%) with mild, 24/35 (69%) with moderate, and 11/24 (46%) with severe oesophagitis. The risk of severe oesophagitis was significantly decreased for patients infected with cagA+ H pylori after correction for confounding variables (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.41-0.80; p=0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that infection by cagA+ H pylori may be protective for oesophageal disease.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; cagA+; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; oesophagitis; oesophageal adenocarcinoma; hiatus hernia PMID:11511554

  17. CagA-mediated pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tohidpour, Abolghasem

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been described as the main etiologic agent of gastric cancer, causing a considerable rate of mortality and morbidity in human population across the world. Although the infection mainly begins asymptomatically, but simply develops to peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, lymphoma of the gastric mucosa and eventually adenocarcinoma. The major pathological feature of H. pylori infection is due to the activity of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), a 125-140 kDa protein encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). CagA is also known as the first bacterial onco-protein, ranking the H. pylori-mediated adenocarcinoma as the second most deadly cancer type worldwide. Upon cytoplasmic translocation CagA undergoes interacting with numerous proteins in phosphorylation dependent and independent manners within the gastric epithelial cells. The profound effect of CagA on multiple intracellular pathways causes major consequences such as perturbation of intracellular actin trafficking, stimulation of inflammatory responses and disruption of cellular tight junctions. Such activities of CagA further participate in development of the hummingbird phenotype and gastric cancer. This review is sought to provide a structural and functional analysis of the CagA protein with focus on demonstrating the molecular basis of the mechanism of CagA intracellular translocation and its interaction with intracellular targets. PMID:26796299

  18. Intracellular and Interstitial Expression of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes in Gastric Precancerous Intestinal Metaplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Semino-Mora, Cristina; Doi, Sonia Q.; Marty, Aileen; Simko, Vlado; Carlstedt, Ingemar; Dubois, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer are associated with Helicobacter pylori, but the bacterium often is undetectable in these lesions. To unravel this apparent paradox, IM, H. pylori presence, and the expression of H. pylori virulence genes were quantified concurrently using histologic testing, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. H. pylori was detected inside metaplastic, dysplastic, and neoplastic epithelial cells, and cagA and babA2 expression was colocalized. Importantly, expression of cagA was significantly higher in patients with IM and adenocarcinoma than in control subjects. The preneoplastic “acidic” MUC2 mucin was detected only in the presence of H. pylori, and MUC2 expression was higher in patients with IM, dysplasia, and cancer. These novel findings are compatible with the hypothesis that all stages of gastric carcinogenesis are fostered by persistent intracellular expression of H. pylori virulence genes, especially cagA inside MUC2-producing precancerous gastric cells and pleomorphic cancer cells. PMID:12695995

  19. Relation between periodontitis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Pei; Zhou, Weiying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The correlation between periodontitis and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the mouth was analyzed. Method: 70 elderly patients with periodontitis treated at our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were recruited. Dental plaques and gargle were collected for H. pylori detection using PCR technique. Periodontal health status of the patients was recorded. 70 control cases with healthy periodontium were also included. The symptoms of H. pylori infection in the mouth were compared between the two groups, and the results were analyzed statistically. Results: The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the periodontitis group was 71.4%; the positive rate of cagA gene was 35.7%. The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the control group was 34.3% and that of cagA gene was 12.9%. The two groups did not show significant differences in these two indicators (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in subgingival plaques was higher than that in supragingival plaques, and the difference was of statistical significance (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of H. pylori in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was obviously higher than that of patients with mild periodontitis (P<0.05). Conclusion: Periodontal health status of elderly people with periodontitis correlated with H. pylori infection in the stomach. PMID:26629215

  20. Helicobacter pylori typing as a tool for tracking human migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from different geographic areas exhibit clear phylogeographical differentiation; therefore, the genotypes of H. pylori strains can serve as markers for the migration of human populations. Currently, the genotypes of two virulence factors of H. pylori, cagA and vacA, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are widely used markers for genomic diversity within H. pylori populations. There are two types of cagA: the East Asian type and the Western type. In addition, the right end of the cag pathogenicity island is divided into five subtypes and there are distinct mosaic structures at the signal region and the middle region of vacA. Using combinations of the cagA, cag right end junction, and vacA genotypes, five major groups (East Asia type, South/Central Asia type, Iberian/Africa type and Europe type) have been defined according to geographical associations. MLST has revealed seven modern population types and six ancestral population types of H. pylori, and is a useful tool for mapping human migration patterns. Serial studies of large numbers of H. pylori strains, including strains isolated from aboriginal populations, show that MLST analysis provides more detailed information on human migration than does the analysis of human genetics. H. pylori infection is rapidly declining as a result of improvements in personal hygiene and quality of life. The molecular epidemiology of H. pylori infection has much to tell us and should be studied before it disappears entirely. PMID:19702588

  1. Helicobacter pylori typing as a tool for tracking human migration.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Y

    2009-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from different geographic areas exhibit clear phylogeographical differentiation; therefore, the genotypes of H. pylori strains can serve as markers for the migration of human populations. Currently, the genotypes of two virulence factors of H. pylori, cagA and vacA, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are widely used markers for genomic diversity within H. pylori populations. There are two types of cagA: the East Asian type and the Western type. In addition, the right end of the cag pathogenicity island is divided into five subtypes and there are distinct mosaic structures at the signal region and the middle region of vacA. Using combinations of the cagA, cag right end junction, and vacA genotypes, five major groups (East Asia type, South/Central Asia type, Iberian/Africa type and Europe type) have been defined according to geographical associations. MLST has revealed seven modern population types and six ancestral population types of H. pylori, and is a useful tool for mapping human migration patterns. Serial studies of large numbers of H. pylori strains, including strains isolated from aboriginal populations, show that MLST analysis provides more detailed information on human migration than does the analysis of human genetics. H. pylori infection is rapidly declining as a result of improvements in personal hygiene and quality of life. The molecular epidemiology of H. pylori infection has much to tell us and should be studied before it disappears entirely. PMID:19702588

  2. Association between Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and gastroduodenal diseases in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsunari, Osamu; Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Watada, Masahide; Kinjo, Nagisa; Murakami, Kazunari; Fujioka, Toshio; Kinjo, Fukunori; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer in Okinawa is lowest in Japan. Some previous reports using small number of strains suggested that the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori with Western-type cagA in Okinawa compared to other areas in Japan might contribute to the low incidence of gastric cancer. It has still not been confirmed why the prevalence of Western-type cagA strains is high in Okinawa. We examined the association between the virulence factors of H. pylori and gastroduodenal diseases in Okinawa. The genotypes of cagA and vacA of 337 H. pylori strains were determined by PCR and gene sequencing. The genealogy of these Western-type cagA strains in Okinawa was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Overall, 86.4% of the strains possessed cagA: 70.3% were East-Asian type and 16.0% were Western type. After adjustment by age and sex, the presence of East-Asian-type cagA/vacA s1m1 genotypes was significantly associated with gastric cancer compared to gastritis (odds ratio = 6.68, 95% confidence interval = 1.73 to 25.8). The structure of Western-type CagA in Okinawa was different from that of typical Western-type CagA found in Western countries. Intriguingly, MLST analysis revealed that the majority of Western-type cagA strains formed individual clusters but not hpEurope. Overall, low prevalence of gastric cancer in Okinawa may result from the high prevalence of non-East-Asian-type cagA strains. The origin of Western-type cagA strains in Okinawa may be different from those of Western countries. PMID:22189111

  3. Cag Type IV Secretion System: CagI Independent Bacterial Surface Localization of CagA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Navin; Shariq, Mohd; Kumari, Rajesh; Tyagi, Rakesh K.; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori Cag type IV secretion system (Cag-T4SS) is a multi-component transporter of oncoprotein CagA across the bacterial membranes into the host epithelial cells. To understand the role of unique Cag-T4SS component CagI in CagA translocation, we have characterized it by biochemical and microscopic approaches. We observed that CagI is a predominantly membrane attached periplasmic protein partially exposed to the bacterial surface especially on the pili. The association of the protein with membrane appeared to be loose as it could be easily recovered in soluble fraction. We documented that the stability of the protein is dependent on several key components of the secretion system and it has multiple interacting partners including a non-cag-PAI protein HP1489. Translocation of CagA across the bacterial membranes to cell surface is CagI-independent process. The observations made herein are expected to assist in providing an insight into the substrate translocation by the Cag-T4SS system and Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis. PMID:24040297

  4. Helicobacter pylori in North and South America before Columbus.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Orito, Etsuro; Mizokami, Masashi; Gutierrez, Oscar; Saitou, Naruya; Kodama, Tadashi; Osato, Michael S; Kim, Jong G; Ramirez, Francisco C; Mahachai, Varocha; Graham, David Y

    2002-04-24

    We present a molecular epidemiologic study, based on an analysis of vacA, cagA and cag right end junction genotypes from 1042 Helicobacter pylori isolates, suggesting that H. pylori was present in the New World before Columbus. Eight Native Colombian and Alaskan strains possessed novel vacA and/or cagA gene structures and were more closely related to East Asian than to non-Asian H. pylori. Some Native Alaskan strains appear to have originated in Central Asia and to have arrived after strains found in South America suggesting that H. pylori crossed the Bering Strait from Asia to the New World at different times. PMID:12062433

  5. Conservation of Helicobacter pylori genotypes in different ethnic groups in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Y; Malaty, H M; Osato, M S; Graham, D Y

    2000-06-01

    This study was concerned with whether the Helicobacter pylori strains circulating among ethnic groups living in the same region differ. The polymerase chain reactions to genotype (cagA, vacA, and iceA) H. pylori isolates from healthy volunteers from 4 ethnic groups (black, n=35; white Hispanic, n=31; whites, n=30; Vietnamese, n=29) residing in Houston were examined. The Vietnamese volunteers had the "East Asian"-type cagA 3' repeat region structure, and the others had the "non-Asian" type. The most common genotypes were delineated as follows: blacks and Hispanics, cagA+, vacA s1b-m1, and iceA2; whites, cagA+, vacA s1a-m2, and iceA2; and Vietnamese, cagA+, vacA s1c-m2, and iceA2. Two Hispanic families were also examined. H. pylori isolates from the children and their mothers had the same genotype and were different from those associated with the children's fathers or brothers-in-law. Conservation of an H. pylori genotype within ethnic groups over the course of generations will prove useful for epidemiological study of the coevolution of humans and H. pylori. PMID:10837199

  6. CagA promotes proliferation and secretion of extracellular matrix by inhibiting signaling pathway of apoptosis in rat glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Tan, Rui-Zhi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Hong-Lian; Liu, Yu-Hang; Wen, Dan; Fan, Jun-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Cytotoxin-associated antigen A (CagA), a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (Hp), is associated with the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Recent researches demonstrated that Hp exists in palatine tonsil in all studied IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients, most of which were CagA-positive, suggesting that CagA may be a causative pathogenic factor of IgAN. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathway are still largely unclear. In the present study, CCK8 assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry were performed to investigate the effect of CagA on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix secretion in rat glomerular mesangial cells. RT-PCR and western blotting were used to reveal the potential signaling pathway. Rat glomerular mesangial cells were treated with recombinant CagA protein for 72 h, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We found that CagA promoted cell proliferation and extracellular matrix secretion by inhibiting signaling pathway of apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggested that CagA induced cellular injury in glomerular mesangium by proliferation and secretion of extracellular matrix, and may play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:26837331

  7. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  8. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  9. Analysis of T4SS-induced signaling by H. pylori using quantitative phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Glowinski, Frithjof; Holland, Carsten; Thiede, Bernd; Jungblut, Peter R.; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen colonizing the human stomach. Infection with H. pylori causes chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and may lead to peptic ulceration and/or gastric cancer. A major virulence determinant of H. pylori is the type IV secretion system (T4SS), which is used to inject the virulence factor CagA into the host cell, triggering a wide range of cellular signaling events. Here, we used a phosphoproteomic approach to investigate tyrosine signaling in response to host-pathogen interaction, using stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC) of AGS cells to obtain a differential picture between multiple infection conditions. Cells were infected with wild type H. pylori P12, a P12Δ CagA deletion mutant, and a P12Δ PAI deletion mutant to compare signaling changes over time and in the absence of CagA or the T4SS. Tryptic peptides were enriched for tyrosine (Tyr) phosphopeptides and analyzed by nano-LC-Orbitrap MS. In total, 85 different phosphosites were found to be regulated following infection. The majority of phosphosites identified were kinases of the MAPK family. CagA and the T4SS were found to be key regulators of Tyr phosphosites. Our findings indicate that CagA primarily induces activation of ERK1 and integrin-linked factors, whereas the T4SS primarily modulates JNK and p38 activation. PMID:25101063

  10. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction. PMID:24914316

  11. Rare Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genotypes in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Matsunari, Osamu; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Both the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer are high in Bhutan. The high incidence of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer suggest the phylogeographic origin of an infection with a more virulent strain of H. pylori. More than 90% of Bhutanese strains possessed the highly virulent East Asian-type CagA and all strains had the most virulent type of vacA (s1 type). More than half also had multiple repeats in East Asian-type CagA, which are rare in other countries and are reported characteristictly found in assciation with atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer consistent with Bhutanese strains having multiple H. pylori virulence factors associated with an increase in gastric cancer risk. Phylogeographic analyses showed that most Bhutanese strains belonged to the East Asian population type with some strains (17.5%) sharing East Asian and Amerindian components. Only 9.5% belonged to the European type consistant with H. pylori in Bhutan representing an intermediate evolutionary stage between H. pylori from European and East Asian countries. PMID:26931643

  12. Rare Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genotypes in Bhutan

    PubMed Central

    Matsunari, Osamu; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Both the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer are high in Bhutan. The high incidence of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer suggest the phylogeographic origin of an infection with a more virulent strain of H. pylori. More than 90% of Bhutanese strains possessed the highly virulent East Asian-type CagA and all strains had the most virulent type of vacA (s1 type). More than half also had multiple repeats in East Asian-type CagA, which are rare in other countries and are reported characteristictly found in assciation with atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer consistent with Bhutanese strains having multiple H. pylori virulence factors associated with an increase in gastric cancer risk. Phylogeographic analyses showed that most Bhutanese strains belonged to the East Asian population type with some strains (17.5%) sharing East Asian and Amerindian components. Only 9.5% belonged to the European type consistant with H. pylori in Bhutan representing an intermediate evolutionary stage between H. pylori from European and East Asian countries. PMID:26931643

  13. Assessment of East Asian-type cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori using stool specimens from asymptomatic healthy Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kimoto, Ai; Fujimoto, Saori; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2009-09-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that CagA, a virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori and known to have multiple genotypes, plays a critical role in the development of stomach cancer. However, the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori strains and the cagA genotypes have not been well studied in healthy individuals because of the difficulty in collecting gastric specimens. In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of infection with H. pylori, particularly the strains with the East Asian cagA genotype (which is more potent in causing gastric diseases), among healthy asymptomatic Japanese individuals by a noninvasive method using stool specimens. The H. pylori antigen was detected in 40.3 % of healthy asymptomatic adult individuals (n=186) enrolled in the study. For the detection and genotyping of the cagA gene, DNA was extracted from the stool specimens of these individuals and analysed by PCR. We detected the East Asian cagA genotype in the DNA samples of a significantly high number (63.1 %) of healthy asymptomatic Japanese individuals. These results indicate that a significant number of asymptomatic healthy Japanese individuals were infected with highly virulent H. pylori. PMID:19528144

  14. Interleukin-8 response of gastric epithelial cell lines to Helicobacter pylori stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S A; Tummuru, M K; Miller, G G; Blaser, M J

    1995-01-01

    Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori activates a mucosal inflammatory response by mononuclear cells and neutrophils that includes expression of cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-8. In this study, we analyzed the IL-8 response of human gastric cancer cell lines (Kato III, AGS, and MKN28) to H. pylori infection in vitro. IL-8 mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription-PCR amplification of RNA extracted from epithelial cells after incubation with different H. pylori wild-type and mutant strains, and IL-8 secretion was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Exposure to viable H. pylori induced IL-8 mRNA and protein synthesis in all three gastric cell lines but not in nongastric epithelial cell lines. Heat-killed H. pylori and a crude cytotoxin preparation did not induce significant IL-8 secretion. IL-8 mRNA peaked between 2 and 4 h postinfection, and IL-8 protein production was maximal 24 h postinfection. Exposure of gastric carcinoma cells to other gastrointestinal bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Campylobacter jejuni, and Escherichia coli, but not Campylobacter fetus, induced IL-8 synthesis. Wild-type strains that expressed the vacuolating cytotoxin (Tox+) and a cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA) product (CagA+) induced significantly more IL-8 than did CagA- Tox- strains. However, there was no decrease in IL-8 induction by isogenic mutants of CagA-, Tox-, or Cag- Tox- strains or by a mutant lacking the urease subunits. These results indicate that exposure to H. pylori and other gram-negative organisms that do not colonize the gastric mucosa induces IL-8 production by gastric carcinoma cells in vitro. Although the CagA+ Tox+ phenotype of H. pylori is associated with enhanced IL-8 production by gastric cell lines, other bacterial constituents are clearly essential. PMID:7729872

  15. Molecular analysis of Helicobacter pylori virulent-associated genes in hepatobiliary patients

    PubMed Central

    Boonyanugomol, Wongwarut; Chomvarin, Chariya; Sripa, Banchob; Chau-in, Siri; Pugkhem, Ake; Namwat, Wises; Wongboot, Warawan; Khampoosa, Bandit

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Helicobacter pylori virulence-associated genes in hepatobiliary patients, including vacA, iceA, babA2, cagA and cagE, have not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate these genes and the association of those and the clinical outcomes in hepatobiliary diseases. Methods Eighty H. pylori-PCR-positive cases were obtained from hepatobiliary patients, representing both cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) (n = 58) and cholelithiasis (n = 22). The diversity of virulence genes was examined by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of cagA was determined using the maximum parsimony method. Results The vacAs1a + c/m1, iceA1 and babA2 genes were the most predominant genotypes in both CCA and cholelithiasis patients. The cagA and cagE genes were found significantly more frequently in patients with CCA than those with cholelithiasis (P < 0.05). The cagA positive samples were the Western-type cagA and showed that almost all of the detected sequences in Thai hepatobiliary and Thai gastric cancer patients were classified in the same cluster but separated from the cluster of Japan and other countries. Conclusions The cagA and cagE genes may be associated in the pathogenesis of hepatobiliary diseases, especially of CCA. Besides the bacterial variation, other host factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of hepatobiliary cancer. PMID:23043664

  16. Helicobacter pylori generates cells with cancer stem cell properties via epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like changes.

    PubMed

    Bessède, E; Staedel, C; Acuña Amador, L A; Nguyen, P H; Chambonnier, L; Hatakeyama, M; Belleannée, G; Mégraud, F; Varon, C

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. The link with gastric adenocarcinoma is partly due to the H. pylori CagA oncoprotein. CagA is responsible for a particular cell phenotype in vitro, the 'hummingbird' phenotype, that corresponds to an elongation of the cells, mimicking an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT participates in the carcinogenesis process, and is involved in the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, its involvement in gastric carcinogenesis has yet not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of H. pylori in EMT and in the emergence of gastric CSCs. For this purpose, gastric epithelial cells were cocultured with a cagA-positive H. pylori strain or its isogenic-deleted mutants or were transfected with CagA expression vectors. Study of the expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers showed that H. pylori, via CagA, is responsible for an EMT phenotype associated with an increase in mesenchymal markers as well as CD44 expression, a known gastric CSC marker. Moreover, infection led to an increased ability to migrate, to invade and to form tumorspheres. Cell sorting experiments showed that only the CD44(high) cells induced by H. pylori infection displayed the mesenchymal phenotype and CSC properties in vitro, and had higher tumorigenic properties than CD44(low) cells in xenografted mice. Immunohistochemistry analyses on human and mouse gastric mucosa tissue samples confirmed a high expression of CD44 and mesenchymal markers in H. pylori-infected cases, and in gastric dysplasia and carcinoma. All of these data suggest that H. pylori, via CagA, unveils CSC-like properties by induction of EMT-like changes in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:24096479

  17. Disruption of Nitric Oxide Signaling by Helicobacter pylori Results in Enhanced Inflammation by Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Verriere, Thomas; Scull, Brooks P.; de Sablet, Thibaut; Glumac, Ashley; Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    A strong cellular crosstalk exists between the pathogen Helicobacter pylori and high-output NO production. However, how NO and H. pylori interact to signal in gastric epithelial cells and modulate the innate immune response is unknown. We show that chemical or cellular sources of NO induce the anti-inflammatory effector heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in gastric epithelial cells through a pathway that requires NF-κB. However, H. pylori decreases NO-induced NF-κB activation, thereby inhibiting HO-1 expression. This inhibitory effect of H. pylori results from activation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 by the H. pylori virulence factor CagA and by the host signaling molecules ERK1/2 and JNK. Consistent with these findings, HO-1 is downregulated in gastric epithelial cells of patients infected with cagA+, but not cagA− H. pylori. Enhancement of HO-1 activity in infected cells or in H. pylori-infected mice inhibits chemokine generation and reduces inflammation. These data define a mechanism by which H. pylori favors its own pathogenesis by inhibiting HO-1 induction through the action of CagA. PMID:21987660

  18. Helicobacter pylori Activates Matrix Metalloproteinase 10 in Gastric Epithelial Cells via EGFR and ERK-mediated Pathways.

    PubMed

    Costa, Angela M; Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Sougleri, Ioanna S; Oliveira, Maria J; Carreto, Laura; Santos, Manuel A; Sgouras, Dionyssios N; Carneiro, Fatima; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and increases the risk for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. H. pylori upregulates the expression and activity of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in cell lines and in the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms leading to upregulation of MMP10 in gastric epithelial cells induced by H. pylori Infection of gastric cells with H. pylori led to an increase in levels of MMP-10 messenger RNA, protein secretion, and activity. cagA knockout mutants or CagA phosphorylation-defective mutants failed to increase MMP10 expression. These results were confirmed in infection experiments with clinical isolates with known cagA status and in human gastric biopsy specimens. Treatment of cells with chemical inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR and the kinase Src abrogated H. pylori-induced MMP10 expression. Inhibitors of ERK1/2 and JNK kinases abolished and significantly decreased H. pylori-induced MMP10 expression, respectively, whereas inhibition of the kinase p38 had no effect. Finally, inhibition of MMP10 expression by small interfering RNA led to a decrease in the gastric cell-invasive phenotype mediated by the infection. In conclusion, CagA-positive H. pylori strains stimulate MMP10 expression. MMP-10 modulation occurs via EGFR activation in a process that involves Src, ERK, and JNK pathways. MMP-10 may be implicated in H. pylori-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:26802142

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has an association with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in the stomach. Gastric cancer occurs in only a minority of infected individuals, however. Such clinical diversities are caused by variations of H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, environmental factors, and interactions of these factors. By three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori had a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. In addition, the Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens demonstrated that H. pylori infection could develop into gastric cancer. The experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori have an interaction with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster and codes the type IV secretion machinery system, forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird morphology, growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are probably translocated into target cells and accelerate cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism of the interaction between H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells will provide us with a new strategy for effective prevention of the development of gastric cancer induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:15449106

  20. Geographic differences in gastric cancer incidence can be explained by differences between Helicobacter pylori strains.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Kato, Mototsugu; Asaka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Certain populations with high incidences of Helicobacter pylori infection, such as those in East Asian countries, have high incidences of gastric cancer, while other highly infected populations, such as those in Africa and South Asia, do not. The various rates of gastric cancer associated with different geographic areas can be explained, at least in part, by the differences in the genotypes of H. pylori cagA and vacA. Populations expressing a high incidence of gastric cancer are mostly identical with regions where East Asian type CagA is predominant. In contrast, incidence of gastric cancer is low in Africa, South Asia, and Europe, where strains typically possess Western type CagA. Within East Asia, strains from northern parts, where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, predominantly possess the vacA m1 genotype, whereas the m2 genotype is predominant in southern parts where the gastric cancer incidence is low. PMID:18552463

  1. Geographic Differences in Gastric Cancer Incidence Can be Explained by Differences between Helicobacter pylori Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Kato, Mototsugu; Asaka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Certain populations with high incidences of Helicobacter pylori infection, such as those in East Asian countries, have high incidences of gastric cancer, while other highly infected populations, such as those in Africa and South Asia, do not. The various rates of gastric cancer associated with different geographic areas can be explained, at least in part, by the differences in the genotypes of H. pylori cagA and vacA. Populations expressing a high incidence of gastric cancer are mostly identical with regions where East Asian type CagA is predominant. In contrast, incidence of gastric cancer is low in Africa, South Asia, and Europe, where strains typically possess Western type CagA. Within East Asia, strains from northern parts, where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, predominantly possess the vacA m1 genotype, whereas the m2 genotype is predominant in southern parts where the gastric cancer incidence is low. PMID:18552463

  2. Extracellular galectin-3 counteracts adhesion and exhibits chemoattraction in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Ling, Samantha Shi Min; Ho, Bow

    2016-08-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside lectin that is upregulated and rapidly secreted by gastric epithelial cells in response to Helicobacter pylori infection. An earlier study reported the involvement of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) in the expression of intracellular Gal-3. However, the role of extracellular Gal-3 and its functional significance in H. pylori-infected cells remains uncharacterized. Data presented here demonstrate secretion of Gal-3 is an initial host response event in gastric epithelial cells during H. pylori infection and is independent of CagA. Previously, Gal-3 was shown to bind to H. pylori LPS. The present study elaborates the significance of this binding, as extracellular recombinant Gal-3 (rGal-3) was shown to inhibit the adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric epithelial cells. Interestingly, a decrease in H. pylori adhesion to host cells also resulted in a decrease in apoptosis. Furthermore, the study also demonstrated a chemoattractant role of extracellular rGal-3 in the recruitment of THP-1 monocytes. This study outlines the previously unidentified roles of extracellular Gal-3 where it acts as a negative regulator of H. pylori adhesion and apoptosis in gastric epithelial cells, and as a chemoattractant to THP-1 monocytes. Our findings could contribute to the better understanding of how Gal-3 acts as a modulator under H. pylori-induced pathological conditions. PMID:27283429

  3. Assessment of Risk and Sero-Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization among Remote Orang Asli Tribes in Peninsula Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thevakumar, Kavitha; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Chua, Eng Guan; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Goh, Khean Lee; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Marshall, Barry J; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Li Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is related to human poverty with marked differences between developing and developed countries. Socioeconomic factors and living standards are the main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the risk and sero-prevalence of H. pylori colonization among Orang Asli in Peninsula Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Orang Asli subjects in seven isolated settlements spanning across all three major tribes (Negrito, Proto Malay and Senoi) in Malaysia. Socio-demographic characteristics of the subjects were obtained through interview. Subjects were tested for H. pylori colonization based on CagA and whole cell (WC) antigen serological assays. A total of 275 subjects participated in this study. Among these subjects, 115 (44.7%) were H. pylori sero-positive with highest sero-prevalence among Negrito (65.7%). Among subjects who were H. pylori sero-positive, CagA sero positivity was also significantly higher among Negrito. The highest proportion of respondents reported to be H. pylori sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (57.9%), males (56.2%), Negrito (48.6%) and live in bamboo house (92.3%). The highest proportion of respondents reported to be CagA sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (41.4%), males (35.6%) and Negrito (48.6%). The results of this study demonstrate that H. pylori colonization can be related to age, gender, tribes and house materials and CagA sero-positive stain closely associated with age, gender and tribes. PMID:27441568

  4. Assessment of Risk and Sero-Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization among Remote Orang Asli Tribes in Peninsula Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Thevakumar, Kavitha; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Chua, Eng Guan; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Goh, Khean Lee; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Marshall, Barry J.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Li Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is related to human poverty with marked differences between developing and developed countries. Socioeconomic factors and living standards are the main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the risk and sero-prevalence of H. pylori colonization among Orang Asli in Peninsula Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Orang Asli subjects in seven isolated settlements spanning across all three major tribes (Negrito, Proto Malay and Senoi) in Malaysia. Socio-demographic characteristics of the subjects were obtained through interview. Subjects were tested for H. pylori colonization based on CagA and whole cell (WC) antigen serological assays. A total of 275 subjects participated in this study. Among these subjects, 115 (44.7%) were H. pylori sero-positive with highest sero-prevalence among Negrito (65.7%). Among subjects who were H. pylori sero-positive, CagA sero positivity was also significantly higher among Negrito. The highest proportion of respondents reported to be H. pylori sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (57.9%), males (56.2%), Negrito (48.6%) and live in bamboo house (92.3%). The highest proportion of respondents reported to be CagA sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (41.4%), males (35.6%) and Negrito (48.6%). The results of this study demonstrate that H. pylori colonization can be related to age, gender, tribes and house materials and CagA sero-positive stain closely associated with age, gender and tribes. PMID:27441568

  5. A method for assessment of Helicobacter pylori genotype using stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Fujimoto, Saori; Moriyama, Toshiki; Azuma, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2009-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been regarded as a major factor associated with the development of gastric diseases. The characterization of infected H. pylori in asymptomatic individuals is important for the prediction of the onset of such diseases. However, because of the difficulty in obtaining gastric biopsy samples, H. pylori in healthy subjects have not been studied sufficiently. Therefore, we tested a noninvasive method for the characterization of H. pylori using stool specimens. This method involved H. pylori antigen detection in stool specimens by immunochromatography; confirmation of H. pylori DNA by real-time PCR that involved the detection of its 16S rRNA gene in the DNA extracted from stool specimens; and nested PCR with genotype-specific primer pairs. A total of 80 samples obtained from asymptomatic subjects were assessed using this method. The results showed that the prevalence of H. pylori in asymptomatic Japanese individuals was 37.5%. The detection rate of the virulence factor gene cagA was 18.8%. Furthermore, all the detected cagA belonged to the highly virulent East-Asian type. These data suggest that the method used in this study is valuable for studying the molecular epidemiology of H. pylori infection in asymptomatic people. PMID:19484810

  6. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  8. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 Influences Bacterial Virulence and Is Essential for Gastric Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Anderl, Florian; Kruse, Tobias; Schindele, Franziska; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta Katarzyna; Fischer, Wolfgang; Gerhard, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The Dsb protein family is responsible for introducing disulfide bonds into nascent proteins in prokaryotes, stabilizing the structure of many proteins. Helicobacter pylori HP0231 is a Dsb-like protein, shown to catalyze disulfide bond formation and to participate in redox homeostasis. Notably, many H. pylori virulence factors are stabilized by the formation of disulfide bonds. By employing H. pylori HP0231 deficient strains we analyzed the effect of lack of this bacterial protein on the functionality of virulence factors containing putative disulfide bonds. The lack of H. pylori HP0231 impaired CagA translocation into gastric epithelial cells and reduced VacA-induced cellular vacuolation. Moreover, H. pylori HP0231 deficient bacteria were not able to colonize the gastric mucosa of mice, probably due to compromised motility. Together, our data demonstrate an essential function for H. pylori HP0231 in gastric colonization and proper function of bacterial virulence factors related to gastric pathology. PMID:27138472

  9. [Mucosal immune response to Helicobacter pylori in children with gastroduodenal diseases and allergy].

    PubMed

    Mazurina, S A; Ilintseva, N V; Gervazieva, V B

    2014-01-01

    In children with chronic gastritis/gastroduodenitis, erosions and ulcer of stomach and duodenum and associated allergic diseases (asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis) CagA, sIgA and IgE antibodies to the H. pylori were determined by ELISA in the supernatants of feces. H. pylori infection was determined according to "Maastricht IV". The frequency and contents of CagA did not differ among the groups we studied. However, in children with positive urease test the contents of CagA was significantly higher (p = 0.03) compared with other children. The highest levels of sIgA were found in the feces supernatants from non-allergic children with CG/CGD and were associated with H. pylori infection. The immune response in children with erosions and ulcer of stomach and duodenum and in children with allergy was presented the sIgE to H. pylori. Also, the negative correlation between the level sIgE to H. pylori and content sIgA was found in children with allergy. Thus, increased IgE indicates not only allergy, but also acts as a protective role in the development of anti-infective immunity. PMID:25916130

  10. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Rural and Urban Dyspeptic Patients from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Monica; Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Reyes, Nelson; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Rojas, Héctor; Michelangeli, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this work was to assess the Helicobacter pylori prevalence in a rural mestizo population and compare it to an urban population from Venezuela. The study was performed in gastric juice samples of 71 dyspeptic patients from Caracas (urban) and 39 from Tucupita (rural), in the Orinoco Delta region. Helicobacter pylori was detected by amplification of 16S rRNA, glmM, and ureA genes in 55.0% patients from urban and 87.2% from rural populations. cagA was found positive in 51% and 62% urban and rural patients, respectively. Non-H. pylori Helicobacter species were not detected in the urban population, but was found in 7.7% of patients in the rural study site. Frequency values of the 16S rRNA, glmM, and ureA genes were higher in the rural population. The odds ratio for each gene was 15.18 for 16S rRNA, 2.34 for glmM, 2.89 for ureA, and 1.53 cagA, showing significant differences except for cagA when gene frequency was compared in both populations. These results demonstrate a higher frequency of H. pylori and gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter infection in a rural mestizo population with low hygienic standards as compared with city dwellers, representing a potential risk for the development of gastroduodenal diseases. PMID:26195456

  11. Virulence genotypes and drug resistance of Helicobacter pylori from Vladivostok, Russia: another feature in the Far East.

    PubMed

    Reva, Ivan; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Taneike, Ikue; Nakagawa, Saori; Ike, Masami; Pererva, Oleg; Tarankov, Alexey; Agapov, Mikhail; Rizhkov, Evgeniy; Singur, Olga; Reva, Galina; Potapov, Vladimir; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori in Vladivostok, Far Eastern Russia, was investigated during 2004 to 2009. The genotype cagA(+) vacA(+) (s1/m1 or m2) accounted for 74.7%, with cagA(-) vacA(+) (s2/m2) at 11.2%. The CagA EPIYA type was mainly Western ABC, with minor types (ABCCC and novel AAABC) or non-Western/non-East Asia type (AB). Regarding drug resistance, metronidazole resistance was the highest, with a marked decrease in 6 years (from 71.4% to 30.8%); in contrast, levofloxacin and clarithromycin resistance increased. The data indicate that in Vladivostok, H. pylori was mainly the Western (not East Asian) type and dynamic changes in drug resistance occurred during 6 years. PMID:22211953

  12. Antiadhesion and anti-inflammation effects of noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit extracts on AGS cells during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Ko, Chien-Hui; Yan, Yeong-Yu; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2014-03-19

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen that adheres to host cells and injects cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8), inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Noni (Morinda citrifolia) is found to possess antibacteria, anti-inflammation, and antioxidation activities, but its effect on H. pylori infection is still unknown. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of noni fruit were used in this study. The inhibitory effect on CagA and H. pylori-induced IL-8, iNOS, and COX-2 were determined. The coculture medium was collected for measuring neutrophil chemotaxis. Both extracts of noni fruit showed weak inhibition on H. pylori. Both ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts provided antiadhesion of H. pylori to AGS cells and down-regulation on the CagA, IL-8, COX-2, and iNOS expressions. Results also indicated both extracts relieved neutrophil chemotaxis. Noni fruit extracts down-regulated inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, and the phenolic compounds play key role in antiadhesion. PMID:24528133

  13. Antimicrobial activity against Helicobacter pylori strains and antioxidant properties of blackberry leaves (Rubus ulmifolius) and isolated compounds.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; D'Addario, Claudia; Colacevich, Andrea; Focardi, Silvia; Borghini, Francesca; Santucci, Annalisa; Figura, Natale; Rossi, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    Rubus spp. (Rosaceae) provide extracts used in traditional medicine as antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant and radical scavenging agents. Resistance to antibiotics used to treat Helicobacter pylori infection as well as their poor availability in developing countries prompted us to test the antimicrobial activity of Rubus ulmifolius leaves and isolated polyphenols against two H. pylori strains with different virulence (CagA+ strain 10K and CagA(-) strain G21). The antioxidant activity (TEAC values) of the tested compounds ranged from 4.88 (gallic acid) to 1.60 (kaempferol), whilst the leaf extract gave a value of 0.12. All the isolated polyphenols as well as the leaf extract showed antibacterial activity against both of the H. pylori strains. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the extract for H. pylori strains G21 and 10K, respectively, were 1200 microg/mL and 1500 microg/mL after 24h of exposure and 134 microg/mL and 270 microg/mL after 48 h exposure. Ellagic acid showed very low MBC values towards both of the H. pylori strains after 48 h (2 microg/mL and 10 microg/mL for strains G21 and 10K, respectively) and kaempferol toward G21 strain (MBC=6 microg/mL). A relationship between antimicrobial activity and antioxidant capacity was found only for H. pylori strain G21 CagA(-) strain. PMID:19386474

  14. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Neddermann, Matthias; Maubach, Gunter; Naumann, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is estimated to infect more than half of the worlds human population and represents a major risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection and clinical consequences are controlled by highly complex interactions between the host, colonizing bacteria, and environmental parameters. Important bacterial determinants linked with gastric disease development include the cag pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS), the translocated effector protein CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, adhesin BabA, urease, serine protease HtrA, secreted outer membrane vesicles, and many others. The high quantity of these factors and allelic changes in the corresponding genes reveals a sophisticated picture and problems in evaluating the impact of each distinct component. Extensive work has been performed to pinpoint molecular processes related to H. pylori-triggered pathogenesis using Mongolian gerbils, mice, primary tissues, as well as novel in vitro model systems such as gastroids. The manipulation of host signaling cascades by the bacterium appears to be crucial for inducing pathogenic downstream activities and gastric disease progression. Here, we review the most recent advances in this important research area. PMID:27531534

  15. Validation of Urine Test for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Indonesian Population

    PubMed Central

    Syam, Ari Fahrial; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Uwan, Willy Brodus; Simanjuntak, David; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We measured the accuracy of the urine test (RAPIRUN) for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia (Jakarta, Pontianak, and Jayapura) using histology confirmed by immunohistochemistry and/or culture as gold standards. We also used immunohistochemistry to identify CagA phenotype and analyzed H. pylori CagA diversity in Indonesia. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection in 88 consecutive dyspeptic patients based on the urine test was 15.9% (14/88), 38.1% for patients in Jayapura that had higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that in Jakarta (9.7%, P = 0.02) and Pontianak (8.3%, P = 0.006). Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of RAPIRUN were 83.3%, 94.7%, 71.4%, 97.3%, and 93.2%, respectively. All of the H. pylori-positive patients were immunoreactive for anti-CagA antibody but not immunoreactive for East Asian specific anti-CagA antibody in all H. pylori-positive subjects. We confirmed the high accuracy of RAPIRUN in Indonesian population. In general, we found less virulent type of H. pylori in Indonesia, which partly explained the low incidence gastric cancer in Indonesia. PMID:26824034

  16. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastroduodenal Diseases from Molecular Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen that infects the stomach and produces inflammation that is responsible for various gastroduodenal diseases. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infections in Africa and South Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer in these areas is much lower than in other countries. The incidence of gastric cancer also tends to decrease from north to south in East Asia. Data from molecular epidemiological studies show that this variation in different geographic areas could be explained in part by different types of H. pylori virulence factors, especially CagA, VacA, and OipA. H. pylori infection is thought to be involved in both gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer, which are at opposite ends of the disease spectrum. This discrepancy can also be explained in part by another H. pylori factor, DupA, as well as by CagA typing (East Asian type versus Western type). H. pylori has a genome of approximately 1,600 genes; therefore, there might be other novel virulence factors. Because genome wide analyses using whole-genome sequencing technology give a broad view of the genome of H. pylori, we hope that next-generation sequencers will enable us to efficiently investigate novel virulence factors. PMID:22829807

  17. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastroduodenal Diseases from Molecular Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen that infects the stomach and produces inflammation that is responsible for various gastroduodenal diseases. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infections in Africa and South Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer in these areas is much lower than in other countries. The incidence of gastric cancer also tends to decrease from north to south in East Asia. Data from molecular epidemiological studies show that this variation in different geographic areas could be explained in part by different types of H. pylori virulence factors, especially CagA, VacA, and OipA. H. pylori infection is thought to be involved in both gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer, which are at opposite ends of the disease spectrum. This discrepancy can also be explained in part by another H. pylori factor, DupA, as well as by CagA typing (East Asian type versus Western type). H. pylori has a genome of approximately 1,600 genes; therefore, there might be other novel virulence factors. Because genome wide analyses using whole-genome sequencing technology give a broad view of the genome of H. pylori, we hope that next-generation sequencers will enable us to efficiently investigate novel virulence factors. PMID:22829807

  18. CD44 Plays a Functional Role in Helicobacter pylori-induced Epithelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Feng, Rui; Schumacher, Michael A.; Li, Jing; Mahe, Maxime M.; Engevik, Amy C.; Javier, Jose E.; Peek Jr, Richard M.; Ottemann, Karen; Orian-Rousseau, Veronique; Boivin, Gregory P.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Zavros, Yana

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxin-associated gene (Cag) pathogenicity island is a strain-specific constituent of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) that augments cancer risk. CagA translocates into the cytoplasm where it stimulates cell signaling through the interaction with tyrosine kinase c-Met receptor, leading cellular proliferation. Identified as a potential gastric stem cell marker, cluster-of-differentiation (CD) CD44 also acts as a co-receptor for c-Met, but whether it plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial proliferation is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CD44 plays a functional role in H. pylori-induced epithelial cell proliferation. To assay changes in gastric epithelial cell proliferation in relation to the direct interaction with H. pylori, human- and mouse-derived gastric organoids were infected with the G27 H. pylori strain or a mutant G27 strain bearing cagA deletion (∆CagA::cat). Epithelial proliferation was quantified by EdU immunostaining. Phosphorylation of c-Met was analyzed by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis for expression of CD44 and CagA. H. pylori infection of both mouse- and human-derived gastric organoids induced epithelial proliferation that correlated with c-Met phosphorylation. CagA and CD44 co-immunoprecipitated with phosphorylated c-Met. The formation of this complex did not occur in organoids infected with ∆CagA::cat. Epithelial proliferation in response to H. pylori infection was lost in infected organoids derived from CD44-deficient mouse stomachs. Human-derived fundic gastric organoids exhibited an induction in proliferation when infected with H. pylorithat was not seen in organoids pre-treated with a peptide inhibitor specific to CD44. In the well-established Mongolian gerbil model of gastric cancer, animals treated with CD44 peptide inhibitor Pep1, resulted in the inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation and associated atrophic gastritis. The current study reports a unique approach to study H

  19. Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island's role in B7-H1 induction and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Alzahrani, Shatha; House, Jennifer; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Sharpe, Arlene H; Rampy, Bill A; Pinchuk, Irina V; Reyes, Victor E

    2015-01-01

    During Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection CD4+ T cells in the gastric lamina propria are hyporesponsive and polarized by Th1/Th17 cell responses controlled by Treg cells. We have previously shown that H. pylori upregulates B7-H1 expression on GEC, which, in turn, suppress T cell proliferation, effector function, and induce Treg cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms and the functional relevance of B7-H1 induction by H. pylori infection to chronic infection. Using H. pylori wild type (WT), cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI-) and cagA- isogenic mutant strains we demonstrated that H. pylori requires its type 4 secretion system (T4SS) as well as its effector protein CagA and peptidoglycan (PG) fragments for B7-H1 upregulation on GEC. Our study also showed that H. pylori uses the p38 MAPK pathway to upregulate B7-H1 expression in GEC. In vivo confirmation was obtained when infection of C57BL/6 mice with H. pylori PMSS1 strain, which has a functional T4SS delivery system, but not with H. pylori SS1 strain lacking a functional T4SS, led to a strong upregulation of B7-H1 expression in the gastric mucosa, increased bacterial load, induction of Treg cells in the stomach, increased IL-10 in the serum. Interestingly, B7-H1-/- mice showed less Treg cells and reduced bacterial loads after infection. These studies demonstrate how H. pylori T4SS components activate the p38 MAPK pathway, upregulate B7-H1 expression by GEC, and cause Treg cell induction; thus, contribute to establishing a persistent infection characteristic of H. pylori. PMID:25807464

  20. Infection of less virulent Helicobacter pylori strains in asymptomatic healthy individuals in Thailand as a potential contributing factor to the Asian enigma.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kimoto, Ai; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Azuma, Takeshi; Mahachai, Varocha; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Lertkupinit, Comsun; Luangjaru, Somchai; Noophan, Phadet; Chanatrirattanapan, Rattikorn; Piyanirandr, Vanich; Sappajit, Theeranan; Suthivarakom, Karun; Sangsuk, Leelaowadee; Wangroongsarb, Piyada

    2010-03-01

    In Thailand, gastric cancer incidence is considerably low despite the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the genotypes of cagA by using 179 stool specimens obtained from asymptomatic Thai individuals. In this study, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 43.6%, and the detection rate of cagA-positive strains was 43.5%. In addition, the proportion of the highly virulent East-Asian type of cagA was 7.2%. These results indicate that the low prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori strain as well as the low prevalence of East-Asian genotype cagA-positive strains may contribute to the low gastric cancer incidence. PMID:20036753

  1. High Frequency of vacA s1m2 Genotypes Among Helicobacter pylori Isolates From Patients With Gastroduodenal Disorders in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pajavand, Hamid; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Mohajeri, Parviz; Bakhtyari, Somaye; Bashiri, Homayoon; Kalali, Behnam; Gerhard, Markus; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection and related diseases outcome are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial, host and environmental factors. Several distinct virulence factors of H. pylori have been shown to be associated with different clinical outcomes. Here we focused on vacA and cagA genotypes of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric disorder. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of two toxins and genotypes of VacA toxin in patients referred to a central hospital in the west of Iran (Imam Reza hospital, Kermanshah) during 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: Samples were collected from patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric biopsy specimens from the stomach antrum and corpus were cultured. PCR analysis was performed for genotyping H. pylori vacA and cagA genes. Results: Helicobacter pylori was isolated from 48% (96/200) of patients with gastroduodenal disorders. In 81/96 (84%) cases, the cagA gene was present. Among different genotypes of vacA, two s1m2 and s2m2 genotypes were dominant with frequency of 39.5% and 50%, respectively. The frequency of the s1m1 genotype was 7.2% (7/96), which is much lower than elsewhere. H. pylori isolates with positive results for cagA gene and vacA s1m2 genotypes showed statistically significant correlation with peptic ulcer (s1m2 13/34 [38.2%] P = 0.003). However, isolates of H. pylori infection with cagA gene and vacA s2m2 genotypes were significantly associated with development of gastritis (s2m2 41/42 [97.6%] P = 0.000). Conclusions: About 90% of H. pylori strains potentially contained vacA s2m2 and s1m2 genotypes. Infection with H. pylori strain containing the cagA gene or the vacA s1m1 and s1m2 genotypes was associated with increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). PMID:26862378

  2. Antibacterial activity of grape extracts on cagA-positive and -negative Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Martini, S; D'Addario, C; Braconi, D; Bernardini, G; Salvini, L; Bonechi, C; Figura, N; Santucci, A; Rossi, C

    2009-11-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative/adjuvant approaches for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori using biologically active compounds, especially antioxidants from plants. In the present work, we tested the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of hydro-alcoholic extracts from Colorino, Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon grape cultivars against H. pylori G21 (cagA-negative, cagA-) and 10K, (cagApositive, cagA+) clinical isolates. We determined the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) by incubating strain suspensions in Brucella broth with fetal bovine serum and samples at different concentrations in a final volume of 100 microl in a microaerobic atmosphere. After incubation, subcultures were carried out on Brucella agar plates which were incubated for 3-5 days in a microaerobic environment. The lowest concentration in broth, where the subculture on agar showed complete absence of growth, was considered the MBC.The Colorino extract showed the highest antibacterial activity against G21 strain (MBC=1.35 mg/ml), while Sangiovese and Carbernet MBCs were 4.0 mg/ml ca. H. pylori 10K was only susceptible to Colorino after 48 hours (MBC = 3.57 mg/ml). Resveratrol exhibited the highest antibacterial activity. interestingly, the most pathogenic strain (10K) was less susceptible to both the grape extracts and the isolated compounds. These results suggest that the administration of grape extracts and wine constituents, in addition to antibiotics, might be useful in the treatment of H. pylori infection. Should the reduced susceptibility of 10K strain be extended to all the cagA+ H. pylori isolates, which are endowed with cancer promoter activity, this observation may help explain why the organisms expressing CagA are more closely associated with atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinoma development. PMID:19933041

  3. Food Allergy and Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zheng Fei; Majid, Noorizan A.; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Based on the hygiene hypothesis, a low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection may explain the recent high prevalence of allergic diseases including food allergy. However, there are very few studies that investigate the relationship between H. pylori and food allergy. Summary: We searched for PubMed, Ovid Medline and the Cochrane library for relevant articles published in English from inception to November 2015. The inverse relationship between H. pylori and food allergy remains unproven because of contradictory and limited evidence at the moment. Likewise, only limited studies have examined the relationship between CagA; one of H. pylori virulence factor and food allergy. On the other hand, in vitro evidence seems to point out a role of H. pylori in the causation of food allergy. The inconsistent results from epidemiological data may be due to small sample size, heterogeneous populations and unstandardised methods or food allergens. Conclusion: Available studies do not support the role of H. pylori in food allergy. PMID:27047479

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection in children: should it be carefully assessed?

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Princz, D; Daoud, G; Salgado-Sabel, A; Cavazza, M E

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of H. pylori infection, mainly acquired during childhood and may be persisting throughout life, has been found high in developing countries; this high prevalence is related to low socioeconomic status. The persistence of bacterium exposure is related to gastritis and other severe complications including peptic ulcer, lymphoma MALT and gastric cancer, which are rarely present in the pediatric age due to a lower inflammatory and immunological response. Virulence factors, host gastric mucosal factors, and the natural environment of patients are associated with the clinical outcome of H. pylori infection. The main bacterial virulence factors include adhesins (BabA, SabA), vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, and the products of the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI). There are geographic differences between cagA, vacA status and H. pylori related diseases. The main criteria to evaluate H. pylori infection in children are gastrointestinal and extra gastrointestinal manifestations related to H. pylori infection, familial history of gastric cancer, peptic ulcer, lymphoma MALT, symptomatic children living in high prevalence regions, and immigrant or adopted children in developed countries. Early detection of H. pylori and its virulence factors, in addition to effective methods of eradication associated with prevention programs, may lead to the decrease of H. pylori incidence and gastritis, especially in endemic high-risk regions. The early assessment in children may prevent further severe complications in adulthood. PMID:27212173

  5. Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B E; Cohen, H; Blaser, M J

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium which causes chronic gastritis and plays important roles in peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. H. pylori has been found in the stomachs of humans in all parts of the world. In developing countries, 70 to 90% of the population carries H. pylori. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is lower. There appears to be no substantial reservoir of H. pylori aside from the human stomach. Transmission can occur by iatrogenic, fecal-oral, and oral-oral routes. H. pylori is able to colonize and persist in a unique biological niche within the gastric lumen. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which appears essential to the survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A variety of tests to diagnose H. pylori infection are now available. Histological examination of gastric tissue, culture, rapid urease testing, DNA probes, and PCR analysis, when used to test gastric tissue, all require endoscopy. In contrast, breath tests, serology, gastric juice PCR, and urinary excretion of [15N]ammonia are noninvasive tests that do not require endoscopy. In this review, we highlight advances in the detection of the presence of the organism and methods of differentiating among types of H. pylori, and we provide a background for appropriate chemotherapy of the infection. PMID:9336670

  6. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    PubMed

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  7. [H. pylori infections in children: clinical, diagnostic and treatment implications].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Franciszek; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most widespread infection all over the Word. The rate of this infection varies, depending on age, geographic region, socioeconomic and hygienic conditions. Most infected children live in the poor, developing countries without adequate living and hygienic conditions. Prevalence of H. pylori infections in children in Poland was 32.01%. The course of infection in children depends on individual predisposition, environmental factors and virulence of H. pylori. In children in Poland infection with cagA+s1m1 genotype occurs most frequently. In children, a connection of H. pylori infection to ulcer disease of the duodenum was demonstrated. Additionally, the diagnostic tests of infection and diagnostic assessing eradication were discussed in the work. Recommendations on the treatment of H. pylori taking into account the necessity of the assessment of bacteria sensitivity to antibiotics were outlined. It is particularly important in the regions with high resistance of H. pylori to clarythromycin, which in children can exceed 20%. PMID:24340886

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinoma: Not all the strains and patients are alike

    PubMed Central

    Figura, Natale; Marano, Luigi; Moretti, Elena; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) develops in only 1%-3% of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected people. The role in GC formation of the bacterial genotypes, gene polymorphisms and host’s factors may therefore be important. The risk of GC is enhanced when individuals are infected by strains expressing the oncoprotein CagA, in particular if CagA has a high number of repeats containing the EPIYA sequence in its C’-terminal variable region or particular amino acid sequences flank the EPIYA motifs. H. pylori infection triggers an inflammatory response characterised by an increased secretion of some chemokines by immunocytes and colonised gastric epithelial cells; these molecules are especially constituted by proteins composing the interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) group and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Polymorphisms in the promoter regions of genes encoding these molecules, could account for high concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the gastric mucosa, which may cause hypochlorhydria and eventually GC. Inconsistent results have been attained with other haplotypes of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Genomic mechanisms of GC development are mainly based on chromosomal or microsatellite instability (MSI) and deregulation of signalling transduction pathways. H. pylori infection may induce DNA instability and breaks of double-strand DNA in gastric mucocytes. Different H. pylori strains seem to differently increase the risk of cancer development run by the host. Certain H. pylori genotypes (such as the cagA positive) induce high degrees of chronic inflammation and determine an increase of mutagenesis rate, oxidative-stress, mismatch repair mechanisms, down-regulation of base excision and genetic instability, as well as generation of reactive oxygen species that modulate apoptosis; these phenomena may end to trigger or concur to GC development. PMID:26798436

  9. H. pylori-Induced Higher C-Reactive Protein in Obese African Americans.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nuzhat R; Garvey, W Timothy; Khaled, Mohammad A

    2009-02-01

    African Americans are more susceptible to develop insulin resistance, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and coronary heart disease (CHD), and systemic inflammation is central to the pathophysiology of these chronic diseases. African Americans are also more likely to contract H. pylori (cagA) infections during their childhood. However, the contribution of H. pylori infection to the degree of overall systemic inflammation in these chronic diseases is not known. Therefore, we studied 46 apparently healthy African Americans, over 40 years of age who were, infected with H. pylori (cagA). These volunteers were assessed at baseline and after treatment with triple regimen drug therapy to eradicate H. pylori. All but 3 subjects were found to be free of this infection by urea breath test (UBT) after the treatment period. No hyperhomocysteinemia was found in these subjects and there were no significant changes in the level of homocysteine (tHcy), folate and B(12); however, CRP levels measured by high sensitivity assay showed a significant (p=0.02) decrease 2 months after the eradication. We further stratified CRP values according to the BMI < 27 and > 27. There was more profound reduction in CRP in the more obese group (i.e., BMI>27) from 54.26 ± 23.67 to 18.73 ± 17.39 mg/l (p=0.01), compared with the leaner subjects in whom CRP decreases from 8.88 ± 6.23 to 4.94 ± 6.21 mg/L (p=0.04), after eradication of the H. pylori (cagA) infection. The level of CRP, however, remained significantly higher in the obese subjects even after the eradication of this infection, indicative of a smaller residual influence of adiposity on CRP. Thus, a major component of systemic inflammation in African Americans may be attributable to chronic H. pylori infection. PMID:22102851

  10. Prevalence of the Helicobacter pylori babA2 gene and correlation with the degree of gastritis in infected Slovenian children.

    PubMed

    Homan, Matjaž; Šterbenc, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Luzar, Boštjan; Zidar, Nina; Orel, Rok; Poljak, Mario

    2014-10-01

    The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of the babA2 gene within Helicobacter pylori strains circulating in the Slovenian pediatric population, to further clarify its significance in causing inflammation of gastric mucosa in children and to verify whether cagA, vacA, iceA and babA genes work independently or synergistically in causing gastritis. A total of 163 H. pylori isolates obtained from the same number of children were tested for the presence of cagA, vacA and iceA genes using previously established methods, while the babA2 gene was determined using novel polymerase chain reaction assay targeting a 139-bp fragment of the central region of babA2. The babA2 gene was detected in 47.9% of H. pylori samples. The presence of the babA2 gene was strongly associated with cagA, vacA s1 and vacA m1 genotype. The babA2 status correlated positively with bacterial density score, activity of inflammation and chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa. No significant correlation was found between the babA2 status and the presence of atrophy or intestinal metaplasia. In addition, the activity of gastric inflammation and density score were significantly associated with the coexpression of the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1 and babA2 genes. The study, which included the largest number of pediatric H. pylori samples to date, confirmed that babA2 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis in children. Furthermore, our results suggest that babA2, cagA and vacA s1 and m1 gene products may work synergistically in worsening the inflammation of gastric mucosa. PMID:25055876

  11. Analysis of virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori isolated from a Vietnamese population

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of gastric cancer differs among countries in Asia, and it has been suggested that virulence factors associated with Helicobacter pylori are partly responsible. The aim of this study was to investigate several genetic factors regarded as virulence or molecular epidemiologic markers in H. pylori isolates from Vietnamese subjects. Results The cagA, vacA and cag right-end junction genotypes of 103 H. pylori strains from Vietnam (54 from Hanoi and 49 from Ho Chi Minh) were determined by PCR and sequencing. Three types of deletion in the region located upstream of the cagA Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) repeat region were identified: the 39-bp deletion type, the 18-bp deletion type, and the no-deletion type. The majority of strains studied (77%; 80/103) had the 18-bp deletion irrespective of geographical location in the country or clinical outcome. All of the 39-bp and 18-bp deletion-type strains possessed the East Asian type cagA repeat region. The type II cag right-end junction genotype was predominant (84%). The vacA m1 genotype was significantly more common in strains isolated in Hanoi, where the incidence of gastric cancer is higher, than in strains from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusion Pre-EPIYA-region typing of the cagA gene could provide a new genetic marker of H. pylori genomic diversity. Our data support the hypothesis that vacA m1 is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:19698173

  12. Molecular epidemiology, population genetics, and pathogenic role of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rumiko; Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is linked to various gastroduodenal diseases; however, only approximately 20% of infected individuals develop severe diseases. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection in Africa and South Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer in these areas is much lower than in other countries. Furthermore, the incidence of gastric cancer tends to decrease from north to south in East Asia. Such geographic differences in the pathology can be explained, at least in part, by the presence of different types of H. pylori virulence factors, especially cagA, vacA, and the right end of the cag pathogenicity island. The genotype of the virulence genes is also useful as a tool to track human migration utilizing the high genetic diversity and frequent recombination between different H. pylori strains. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using 7 housekeeping genes can also help predict the history of human migrations. Population structure analysis based on MLST has revealed 7 modern population types of H. pylori, which derived from 6 ancestral populations. Interestingly, the incidence of gastric cancer is closely related to the distribution of H. pylori populations. The different incidence of gastric cancer can be partly attributed to the different genotypes of H. pylori circulating in different geographic areas. Although approaches by MLST and virulence factors are effective, these methods focus on a small number of genes and may miss information conveyed by the rest of the genome. Genome-wide analyses using DNA microarray or whole-genome sequencing technology give a broad view on the genome of H. pylori. In particular, next-generation sequencers, which can read DNA sequences in less time and at lower costs than Sanger sequencing, enabled us to efficiently investigate not only the evolution of H. pylori, but also novel virulence factors and genomic changes related to drug resistance. PMID:22197766

  13. ABO Blood Group, Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Herbert; Lu, Lingeng; Kidd, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Carriage of a non–O ABO blood group and colonization by Helicobacter pylori are thought to be risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We examined these associations in a population-based case–control study of 373 case patients and 690 control subjects frequency matched on sex and age. Control subjects were selected by random-digit dialing. Seropositivity for H pylori and its virulence protein CagA was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was associated with non–O blood group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.83, P = .034) and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.66, P = .025), but no association was observed for CagA seropositivity (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.52 to 1.16). An association between pancreatic cancer risk and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity was found among individuals with non–O blood type but not among those with O blood type (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.49 to 5.20, P = .0014; OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.62 to 2.64, P = .51, respectively). This study demonstrates an association between pancreatic cancer and H pylori colonization, particularly for individuals with non–O blood types. PMID:20181960

  14. Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori antigens and gastric noncardia cancer risk in the nutrition intervention trial cohort.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gwen; Freedman, Neal D; Michel, Angelika; Fan, Jin-Hu; Taylor, Philip R; Pawlita, Michael; Qiao, You-Lin; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2015-10-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the strongest known risk factor for gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). We used multiplex serology to determine whether seropositivity to 15 H. pylori proteins is associated with the subsequent development of noncardia gastric cancer in Linxian, China. We included 448 GNCA cases and 1242 controls from two time points within the Linxian General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial, Linxian. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was defined as positivity to ≥4 of the 15 included antigens. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were adjusted for major GNCA risk factors. In addition, we undertook a meta-analysis combining H. pylori multiplex serology data from both time points. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with a significant increase in risk of GNCA at one time point (1985; OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 1.91, 6.19) and this association remained significant following adjustment for H. pylori or CagA ELISA seropositivity (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.56, 5.47). Combining data from both time points in a meta-analysis H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of GNCA, as were six individual antigens: GroEL, HP0305, CagA, VacA, HcpC and Omp. CagM was inversely associated with risk of GNCA. We identified six individual antigens that confer an increase in risk of GNCA within this population of high H. pylori seroprevalence, as well as a single antigen that may be inversely associated with GNCA risk. We further determined that the H. pylori multiplex assay provides additional information to the conventional ELISA methods on risk of GNCA. PMID:25845708

  15. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  16. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  17. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, Galit H.; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L.; Fox, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  18. Virulence Genes and Neutral DNA Markers of Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Different Ethnic Communities of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Simanti; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Balakrish Nair, G.; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Hembram, Jabaranjan; Berg, Douglas E.; Rani Saha, Dhira; Khan, Asis; Santra, Amal; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Chowdhury, Abhijit

    2003-01-01

    Virulence-associated genes and neutral DNA markers of Helicobacter pylori strains from the Santhal and Oroan ethnic minorities of West Bengal, India, were studied. These people have traditionally been quite separate from other Indians and differ culturally, genetically, and linguistically from mainstream Bengalis, whose H. pylori strains have been characterized previously. H. pylori was found in each of 49 study participants, although none had peptic ulcer disease, and was cultured from 31 of them. All strains carried the cag pathogenicity island and potentially toxigenic s1 alleles of vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) and were resistant to at least 8 μg of metronidazole per ml. DNA sequence motifs in vacA mid-region m1 alleles, cagA, and an informative insertion or deletion motif next to cagA from these strains were similar to those of strains from ethnic Bengalis. Three mobile elements, IS605, IS607, and ISHp608, were present in 29, 19, and 10%, respectively, of Santhal and Oroan strains, which is similar to their prevalence in Bengali H. pylori. Thus, there is no evidence that the gene pools of H. pylori of these ethnic minorities differ from those of Bengalis from the same region. This relatedness of strains from persons of different ethnicities bears on our understanding of H. pylori transmission between communities and genome evolution. PMID:12904384

  19. Virulence genes and neutral DNA markers of Helicobacter pylori isolates from different ethnic communities of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Datta, Simanti; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Balakrish Nair, G; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Hembram, Jabaranjan; Berg, Douglas E; Rani Saha, Dhira; Khan, Asis; Santra, Amal; Bhattacharya, S K; Chowdhury, Abhijit

    2003-08-01

    Virulence-associated genes and neutral DNA markers of Helicobacter pylori strains from the Santhal and Oroan ethnic minorities of West Bengal, India, were studied. These people have traditionally been quite separate from other Indians and differ culturally, genetically, and linguistically from mainstream Bengalis, whose H. pylori strains have been characterized previously. H. pylori was found in each of 49 study participants, although none had peptic ulcer disease, and was cultured from 31 of them. All strains carried the cag pathogenicity island and potentially toxigenic s1 alleles of vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) and were resistant to at least 8 micro g of metronidazole per ml. DNA sequence motifs in vacA mid-region m1 alleles, cagA, and an informative insertion or deletion motif next to cagA from these strains were similar to those of strains from ethnic Bengalis. Three mobile elements, IS605, IS607, and ISHp608, were present in 29, 19, and 10%, respectively, of Santhal and Oroan strains, which is similar to their prevalence in Bengali H. pylori. Thus, there is no evidence that the gene pools of H. pylori of these ethnic minorities differ from those of Bengalis from the same region. This relatedness of strains from persons of different ethnicities bears on our understanding of H. pylori transmission between communities and genome evolution. PMID:12904384

  20. Screening Helicobacter pylori genes induced during infection of mouse stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aparna; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Yan, Ming; Joo, Jungsoo; Gu, Lei; Sang, Hong; Gregory-Bryson, Emmalena; Wood, William G; Ni, Yisheng; Smith, Kimberly; Jackson, Sharon H; Coleman, William G

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of in vivo environment on gene expression in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) as it relates to its survival in the host. METHODS: In vivo expression technology (IVET) systems are used to identify microbial virulence genes. We modified the IVET-transcriptional fusion vector, pIVET8, which uses antibiotic resistance as the basis for selection of candidate genes in host tissues to develop two unique IVET-promoter-screening vectors, pIVET11 and pIVET12. Our novel IVET systems were developed by the fusion of random Sau3A DNA fragments of H. pylori and a tandem-reporter system of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and beta-galactosidase. Additionally, each vector contains a kanamycin resistance gene. We used a mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 and mice, as selective media to identify specific genes that H. pylori expresses in vivo. Gene expression studies were conducted by infecting RAW 264.7 cells with H. pylori. This was followed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to determine the relative expression levels of in vivo induced genes. RESULTS: In this study, we have identified 31 in vivo induced (ivi) genes in the initial screens. These 31 genes belong to several functional gene families, including several well-known virulence factors that are expressed by the bacterium in infected mouse stomachs. Virulence factors, vacA and cagA, were found in this screen and are known to play important roles in H. pylori infection, colonization and pathogenesis. Their detection validates the efficacy of these screening systems. Some of the identified ivi genes have already been implicated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori and other bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae. Transcription profiles of all ivi genes were confirmed by real time PCR analysis of H. pylori RNA isolated from H. pylori infected RAW 264.7 macrophages. We compared the expression profile of H. pylori and RAW 264

  1. H pylori iceA alleles are disease-specific virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Caner, Vildan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yonetci, Nadir; Zencir, Sevil; Karagenc, Nedim; Kaleli, Ilknur; Bagci, Huseyin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize and compare genotype profiles of H pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis and duodenal ulcer in western part of Turkey. METHODS: A total of 46 patients [30 chronic gastritis (CG) and 16 duodenal ulcer (DU)] who had undergone endoscopy because of dyspeptic complaints were studied. The antral biopsy specimens were evaluated for the presence of H pylori by rapid urease test and culture, and the genotype profiles were determined by real-time PCR. RESULTS: The cagA gene was observed in 43 (93.5%) isolates. The vacA s1m2 genotype was the predominant subtype, found in 63.3% and 68.7% of isolates in patients with CG and DU, respectively. Twenty (66.6%) isolates from patients with CG were iceA2 positive while the iceA1 was predominant in those with DU (68.8%). In terms of the association of the iceA alleles to other genes, both alleles were significantly associated with the cagA vacA s1m2 genotype. CONCLUSION: The prevalent circulating genotypes in CG and DU were cagA vacA s1m2 iceA2 and cagA vacA s1m2 iceA1 genotype, respectively. It was found that cagA vacA s1m2 genotype seems to be common virulence factors in both CG and DU while iceA alleles show specificity for gastroduodenal pathologies in this study. PMID:17552005

  2. Serum Helicobacter pylori FliD antibody and the risk of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hailin; Zhang, Bing; Hu, Xiaomeng; Dong, Yingzi; Fan, Qing; Guo, Fang; Ren, Xiyun; Zhou, Haibo; Tian, Wenjing; Zhao, Yashuang

    2016-01-01

    FliD and CagA are important virulence factors of H. pylori. We aimed to evaluate the screening values of FliD and CagA for gastric cancer (GC). Serum samples were obtained from 232 cases and 266 controls in a case-control study. Unconditional multivariate logistic regression with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used to analyze the relationships between FliD, CagA and GC. The sensitivities, specificities and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated. Finally, the combined screening values of FliD, FlaA, NapA and CagA were assessed based on discriminant analysis. In all subjects, the associations of FliD and CagA with GC were evident with ORs (95% CIs) of 7.6 (4.7-12.3) and 2.5 (1.6-3.8), respectively (*p<0.001). The areas under ROC curves (AUCs) for FliD and CagA were 0.800 and 0.653, respectively. The AUC for the combination of FliD, FlaA and NapA was 0.915, which represented an increase of 0.115 over that of FliD alone (*p<0.001). These findings indicate that the FliD antibody is associated with GC and could exhibit high validity as a biomarker in screening for GC patients. The combination of FliD, FlaA and NapA improved the screening validity. PMID:26968951

  3. Association of helicobacter pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis with risk of colonic, pancreatic and gastric cancer: A ten-year follow-up of the ESTHER cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe Andres; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Yan; Holleczek, Bernd; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association of H. pylori and chronic atrophic gastritis (AG) with colonic, pancreatic and gastric cancer in a population-based prospective cohort. Methods Serum antibodies against H. pylori in general and specific to cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), as well as serum pepsinogen I and II were analyzed in 9,506 men and women, aged 50–75 years in a cohort study from Saarland, Germany. Incident cases of colonic, pancreatic and gastric cancer were ascertained by record linkage with data from the Saarland Cancer Registry. Results During an average follow-up of 10.6 years, 108 colonic, 46 pancreatic and 27 gastric incident cancers were recorded. There was no association between H. pylori infection and colonic cancer (HR = 1.07; 95% CI 0.73–1.56) or pancreatic cancer (HR = 1.32; 0.73–2.39), regardless of either CagA seropositivity or AG status. In contrast, CagA+ infection was associated with a strongly increased risk of gastric cancer, especially non-cardia gastric cancer, and this association was particularly pronounced in the presence of AG. Compared to people without AG and without CagA+ infection, people with both risk factors had a significantly increased risk of non-cardia gastric cancer (HR = 32.4; 7.6–137.6). Conclusions This large cohort study did not observe an association of H. pylori infection or AG with colonic or pancreatic cancer, but underlines that the vast majority of non-cardia gastric cancers arise from AG and infection with CagA+ H. pylori strains. PMID:26958813

  4. Serological response to Helicobacter pylori infection among Latin American populations with contrasting risks of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Camargo, M Constanza; Beltran, Mauricio; Conde-Glez, Carlos J; Harris, Paul R; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Carolina Flórez, Astrid; Torres, Javier; Ferreccio, Catterina; Sampson, Joshua N; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer is a rare outcome of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Serologic profiles may reveal bacterial, environmental and/or host factors associated with cancer risk. We therefore compared specific anti-H. pylori antibodies among populations with at least twofold differences in gastric cancer mortality from Mexico, Colombia and Chile. Our study included 1,776 adults (mean age 42 years) from three nationally representative surveys, equally divided between residents of high- and low-risk areas. Antibodies to 15 immunogenic H. pylori antigens were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex assays; results were summarized to identify overall H. pylori seropositivity. We used logistic regression to model associations between antibody seroreactivity and regional cancer risk (high vs. low), adjusting for country, age and sex. Both risk areas had similar H. pylori seroprevalence. Residents in high- and low-risk areas were seroreactive to a similar number of antigens (means 8.2 vs. 7.9, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, OR: 1.02, p = 0.05). Seroreactivities to Catalase and the known virulence proteins CagA and VacA were each significantly (p < 0.05) associated with residence in high-risk areas, but ORs were moderate (1.26, 1.42 and 1.41, respectively) and their discriminatory power was low (area under the curve < 0.6). The association of Catalase was independent from effects of either CagA or VacA. Sensitivity analyses for antibody associations restricted to H. pylori-seropositive individuals generally replicated significant associations. Our findings suggest that humoral responses to H. pylori are insufficient to distinguish high and low gastric cancer risk in Latin America. Factors determining population variation of gastric cancer burden remain to be identified. PMID:26178251

  5. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two- ... breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of ...

  6. Tests for H. pylori

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcer disease - H. pylori ; PUD - H. pylori ... There are several methods to test for H. pylori infection. Breath Test (Carbon Isotope-urea Breath Test, or UBT) Up to 2 weeks before the test, you need to stop taking ...

  7. Helicobacter pylori Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... pylori stool antigen test; H. pylori breath test; Urea breath test; CLO test; Rapid urease test (RUT) ... of H. pylori antigen in a stool sample Urea breath test A person drinks a liquid containing ...

  8. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Shiota, Seiji; Matsuda, Miyuki; Binh, Tran Thanh; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Tshering, Lotay; Dung, Ho D. Q.; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsunari, Osamu; Myint, Thein; Khien, Vu Van; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3)galT(jhp0563) was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer. PMID:26090448

  9. Ancestral European roots of Helicobacter pylori in India

    PubMed Central

    Devi, S Manjulata; Ahmed, Irshad; Francalacci, Paolo; Hussain, M Abid; Akhter, Yusuf; Alvi, Ayesha; Sechi, Leonardo A; Mégraud, Francis; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2007-01-01

    Background The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is co-evolved with its host and therefore, origins and expansion of multiple populations and sub populations of H. pylori mirror ancient human migrations. Ancestral origins of H. pylori in the vast Indian subcontinent are debatable. It is not clear how different waves of human migrations in South Asia shaped the population structure of H. pylori. We tried to address these issues through mapping genetic origins of present day H. pylori in India and their genomic comparison with hundreds of isolates from different geographic regions. Results We attempted to dissect genetic identity of strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the 7 housekeeping genes (atpA, efp, ureI, ppa, mutY, trpC, yphC) and phylogeographic analysis of haplotypes using MEGA and NETWORK software while incorporating DNA sequences and genotyping data of whole cag pathogenicity-islands (cagPAI). The distribution of cagPAI genes within these strains was analyzed by using PCR and the geographic type of cagA phosphorylation motif EPIYA was determined by gene sequencing. All the isolates analyzed revealed European ancestry and belonged to H. pylori sub-population, hpEurope. The cagPAI harbored by Indian strains revealed European features upon PCR based analysis and whole PAI sequencing. Conclusion These observations suggest that H. pylori strains in India share ancestral origins with their European counterparts. Further, non-existence of other sub-populations such as hpAfrica and hpEastAsia, at least in our collection of isolates, suggest that the hpEurope strains enjoyed a special fitness advantage in Indian stomachs to out-compete any endogenous strains. These results also might support hypotheses related to gene flow in India through Indo-Aryans and arrival of Neolithic practices and languages from the Fertile Crescent. PMID:17584914

  10. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in Helicobacter pylori-induced migration and invasive growth of gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton is a significant hallmark of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected gastric epithelial cells leading to cell migration and invasive growth. Considering the cellular mechanisms, the type IV secretion system (T4SS) and the effector protein cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) of H. pylori are well-studied initiators of distinct signal transduction pathways in host cells targeting kinases, adaptor proteins, GTPases, actin binding and other proteins involved in the regulation of the actin lattice. In this review, we summarize recent findings of how H. pylori functionally interacts with the complex signaling network that controls the actin cytoskeleton of motile and invasive gastric epithelial cells. PMID:22044652

  11. Determination of Helicobacter pylori virulence by analysis of the cag pathogenicity island isolated from Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Kaveh; Shokrzadeh, Leila; Jafari, Fereshteh; Dabiri, Hossein; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Bolfion, Mehdi; Zojaji, Homayon; Aslani, Mehdi; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    Background The cag pathogenicity island (PAI), which can divide into two parts: cagI and cagII, is the most well-known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori. Aims We investigated the association between genetic variations within the cag PAI (cagA and cagE in the cagI and cagT in the cagII) and clinical outcomes in Iranian population. Subjects A total of 231 patients including 182 patients with gastritis, 41 with peptic ulcer and 8 with gastric cancer. Methods The presences of the cagA, cagE and cagT genes were measured by polymerase chain reaction and the results were compared with clinical outcomes and gastric histology. Results The cagA, cagE and cagT genes were found in 154 (66.7%), 90 (39.0%) and 70 (30.3%) of clinical isolates. At least 144 (62.3%) strains possessed partially deleted cag PAI (e.g., 69 [29.9%] strains were cagA-positive, but cagE and cagT-negative). Conclusion The simple gene as well as the combination of the genes in the cag PAI appeared not to be useful markers to predict H. pylori-related diseases in Iranian population. The genomic sequences of the cag PAI in Iranian strains might be considerably different from those in other geographic locations. PMID:19261552

  12. Differences in Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori from Different Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Velapatiño, Billie; Su, WanWen; Pan, ZhiJun; Garcia, Claudia; Hernandez, Virginia; Valdez, Yanet; Mistry, Rajesh S.; Gilman, Robert H.; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Hua; Alarcón, Teresa; López-Brea, Manuel; Balakrish Nair, G.; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Datta, Simanti; Shirai, Mutsunori; Nakazawa, Teruko; Ally, Reidwaan; Segal, Isidore; Wong, Benjamin C. Y.; Lam, S. K.; Olfat, Farzad O.; Borén, Thomas; Engstrand, Lars; Torres, Olga; Schneider, Roberto; Thomas, Julian E.; Czinn, Steven; Berg, Douglas E.

    2000-01-01

    DNA motifs at several informative loci in more than 500 strains of Helicobacter pylori from five continents were studied by PCR and sequencing to gain insights into the evolution of this gastric pathogen. Five types of deletion, insertion, and substitution motifs were found at the right end of the H. pylori cag pathogenicity island. Of the three most common motifs, type I predominated in Spaniards, native Peruvians, and Guatemalan Ladinos (mixed Amerindian-European ancestry) and also in native Africans and U.S. residents; type II predominated among Japanese and Chinese; and type III predominated in Indians from Calcutta. Sequences in the cagA gene and in vacAm1 type alleles of the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) of strains from native Peruvians were also more like those from Spaniards than those from Asians. These indications of relatedness of Latin American and Spanish strains, despite the closer genetic relatedness of Amerindian and Asian people themselves, lead us to suggest that H. pylori may have been brought to the New World by European conquerors and colonists about 500 years ago. This thinking, in turn, suggests that H. pylori infection might have become widespread in people quite recently in human evolution. PMID:10809702

  13. Reciprocal impact of host factors and Helicobacter pylori genotypes on gastric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand-Jahromy, Sahar; Siavoshi, Farideh; Malekzadeh, Reza; Nejad Sattari, Taher; Latifi-Navid, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) genotypes and patient age and sex on the development of gastric diseases. METHODS: H. pylori-infected patients (n = 233) referred to the endoscopy unit at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) were diagnosed with chronic gastritis (CG), gastric ulcer (GU), or duodenal ulcer (DU). Brucella blood agar was used for biopsy cultures and H. pylori isolation under microaerobic conditions. H. pylori isolates were confirmed with biochemical tests and through amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. DNA was extracted from fresh cultures of the H. pylori isolates and used for amplification of vacA alleles and the cagA gene. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the association between H. pylori genotypes, age (< 40 years vs > 40 years) and sex of the patient, and gastric diseases. RESULTS: CG was the most prevalent gastric disease (113/233; 48.5%), compared to GU (64/233; 27.5%) and DU (56/233; 24%). More patients were male, and gastric diseases were more frequent in patients > 40 years (P < 0.05). The percentage of CG and GU patients that were male and female did not show a significant difference; however DU was more common in males (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a diagnosis of CG in patients > 40 years was more common in females (18.5%) than males (11.6%) (P = 0.05), whereas a diagnosis of GU or DU in patients > 40 years was more frequent in males (14.6% vs 10.7% and 12.4% vs 4.3%, respectively). Overall, genotyping of the H. pylori isolates revealed that the vacA s1 (82%), vacA m2 (70%), and cagA+ (72.5%) alleles were more frequent than vacA s2 (18%), vacA m1 (29.2%), and cagA- (all P < 0.05). The vacA s1m2cagA+ genotype was the most prevalent within the three disease groups. vacA s1m2 frequency was 56.2% with a similar occurrence in all diagnoses, while vacA s1m1 appeared more often in DU patients (33.9%). A genotype of vacA s2m2 occurred in 15% of isolates and was more common in CG patients (21

  14. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro–in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:25052757

  15. Differences in Virulence Markers between Helicobacter pylori Strains from Iraq and Those from Iran: Potential Importance of Regional Differences in H. pylori-Associated Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Nawfal R.; Mohammadi, Marjan; Talebkhan, Yeganeh; Doraghi, Masoumeh; Letley, Darren P.; Muhammad, Merdan K.; Argent, Richard H.; Atherton, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma; the latter is common in Iran but not in Iraq. We hypothesized that more virulent H. pylori strains may be found in Iran than in Iraq and so compared established and newly described virulence factors in strains from these countries. We studied 59 unselected dyspeptic patients from Iran and 49 from Iraq. cagA was found in similar proportions of strains from both countries (76% in Iran versus 71% in Iraq) and was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease in Iraq (P ≤ 0.01) but not in Iran. cagA alleles encoding four or more tyrosine phosphorylation motifs were found in 12% of the Iranian strains but none of the Iraqi strains (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in the vacA signal-, middle-, or intermediate-region types between Iranian and Iraqi strains. Among the strains from Iran, vacA genotypes showed no specific peptic ulcer associations, but among the strains from Iraq, vacA i1 strains were associated with gastric ulcer (P ≤ 0.02), mimicking their previously demonstrated association with gastric cancer in Iran. dupA was found in similar proportions of Iranian and Iraqi strains (38% and 32%, respectively) and was associated with peptic ulceration in Iraqi patients (P ≤ 0.01) but not Iranian patients. H. pylori strains from Iraq and Iran possess virulence factors similar to those in Western countries. The presence of cagA with more phosphorylation motifs in Iranian strains may contribute to the higher incidence of gastric cancer. However, the association between strain virulence markers and disease in Iraq but not Iran suggests that other host and environmental factors may be more important in the disease-prone Iranian population. PMID:18353934

  16. Lactic acid bacteria strains exert immunostimulatory effect on H. pylori-induced dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Małgorzata; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Helmin-Basa, Anna; Andryszczyk, Marek; Motyl, Ilona; Wieczyńska, Jolanta; Gackowska, Lidia; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Januszewska, Milena; Michałkiewicz, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (antagonistic or nonantagonistic against H. pylori in vitro) would differ in their abilities to modulate the DCs maturation profiles reflected by their phenotype and cytokine expression patterns. Methods. Monocyte-derived DCs maturation was elicited by their direct exposure to the LAB strains of L. rhamnosus 900 or L. paracasei 915 (antagonistic and nonantagonistic to H. pylori, resp.), in the presence or absence of H. pylori strain cagA+. The DCs maturation profile was assessed on the basis of surface markers expression and cytokines production. Results. We observed that the LAB strains and the mixtures of LAB with H. pylori are able to induce mature DCs. At the same time, the L. paracasei 915 leads to high IL-10/IL-12p70 cytokine ratio, in contrast to L. rhamnosus 900. Conclusions. This study showed that the analyzed lactobacilli strains are more potent stimulators of DC maturation than H. pylori. Interestingly from the two chosen LAB strains the antagonistic to H. pylori-L. rhamnosus strain 900 has more proinflammatory and probably antibactericidal properties. PMID:25759836

  17. Helicobacter pylori in water systems for human use in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Mazari-Hiriart, M; López-Vidal, Y; Calva, J J

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer in humans. Transmission of H. pylori is still not certain with some epidemiological data suggesting water as a possible transmission route. The objective of this study was to detect H. pylori 16S rRNA gene in five water systems in the Mexico City area. Samples were taken between 1997 and 2000 from extraction wells (system 1), from dams used as water sources, both pre- and post-treatment (systems 2 and 3), treated wastewater (system 4) and non-treated wastewater (system 5). Detection of the H. pylori 16S rRNA gene in water samples was carried out using nested PCR in 139 water samples and confirmed by using cagA gene detection by PCR-hybridisation. The results showed the presence of H. pylori in 58 (42%) of the water samples in total with a prevalence of 68% in system 1, 100% in system 2, 0% in system 3, 17% in system 4 and 20% in system 5. This first stage showed the presence of H. pylori in the tested water systems; nevertheless, viability of the microorganism in water and vegetables needs to be confirmed as well as demonstration of a relationship between human and environmental strains. PMID:11464777

  18. Evolutionary History of the Helicobacter pylori Genome: Implications for Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Piazuelo, M. Blanca

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori has evolved over the millennia since its migration out of Africa along with its human host approximately 60,000 years ago. Human migrations, after thousands of years of permanent settlement in those lands, resulted in seven prototypes of genetic populations of H. pylori with distinct geographical distributions. In all continents, present day isolates of H. pylori have molecular markers that reflect population migrations. The colonization of the Americas as well as the slave trade introduced European and African strains to the New World. The relationship between H. pylori genome and gastric cancer rates is linked to the presence of the cagA gene, but the knowledge on this subject is incomplete because other genes may be involved in certain populations. A new situation for Homo sapiens is the absence of H. pylori colonization in certain, mostly affluent, populations, apparently brought about by improved home sanitation and widespread use of antibiotics during the last decades. The disappearance of H. pylori from the human microbiota may be linked to emerging epidemics of esophageal adenocarcinoma, some allergic diseases such as asthma and some autoimmune disorders. PMID:22375167

  19. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric mucosal atrophy in Bhutan, a country with a high prevalence of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsunari, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Recently, serum Helicobacter pylori antibodies and pepsinogen (PG) have been used for gastric cancer screening. The incidence of gastric cancer in Bhutan is reported to be quite high compared with that in neighbouring countries. In this study, 381 subjects from three areas of Bhutan were assessed for gastric mucosal atrophy and serological parameters. Anti-H. pylori IgG, PG I, PG II and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) antibodies were measured using ELISA. Subjects were classified into four groups according to H. pylori and PG seropositivity: Group A (H. pylori-negative/PG-negative), Group B (H. pylori-positive/PG-negative), Group C (H. pylori-positive/PG-positive) and Group D (H. pylori-negative/PG-positive). The prevalence of H. pylori in the 381 subjects was 71.1 % (271/381), with high infection rates found in rural areas. The PG I/II ratio was significantly inversely correlated with the atrophy score in the antrum and the corpus (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the PG status was significantly associated with the presence of atrophy in the corpus. The prevalence of the PG-positive status was significantly higher among H. pylori-positive subjects than among H. pylori-negative subjects (P<0.001). Based on the ABC method, Group B was the most dominant, followed by Group A, Group C and Group D. The high incidence of gastric cancer in Bhutan can be attributed to the high prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric mucosal atrophy. PMID:23831768

  20. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro. PMID:27158376

  1. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro. PMID:27158376

  2. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  3. Helicobacter pylori alters the distribution of ZO-1 and p120ctn in primary human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Sabine; Hundertmark, Tanja; Kuester, Doerthe; Kalinski, Thomas; Peitz, Ulrich; Roessner, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is related to the development of diverse gastric pathologies, possibly by affecting epithelial junctional complexes that define cell polarity and play an essential role in transepithelial transport and cell-cell adhesion. Using primary gastric epithelial cell cultures, effects of H. pylori on the expression and localization of tight/adherence junction proteins and the resulting morphological changes and migratory capabilities were studied under in vivo-like conditions. Gastric epithelial cells were isolated from biopsies or gastrectomies and maintained in Quantum286 on collagen I-coated culture dishes or cover-slips. Cell cultures were characterized and further analyzed by western blot and immunofluorescent staining for ZO-1, p120ctn, and H. pylori CagA. Morphological changes and migratory response were monitored by time-lapse digital image microscopy. ZO-1 and p120ctn protein expression levels remain unaffected by H. pylori infection. Immunocytochemistry on H. pylori-infected primary cell monolayers focally showed disruption of intercellular ZO-1 staining and accumulation of ZO-1 in small vesicles. H. pylori infection recruited non-phosphorylated p120ctn to perinuclear vesicles. The fraction of phosphorylated p120ctn increased and could be detected in the nucleus, at the cell membrane, and at the leading edge of migrating cells. These alterations, triggered by H. pylori infection, are associated with an elongation phenotype and increased migration. PMID:17509776

  4. Analysis of Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori in Pakistan Reveals High Degrees of Pathogenicity and High Frequencies of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Faisal; Campbell, Barry James; Alfizah, Hanafiah; Varro, Andrea; Zahra, Rabaab; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pritchard, David Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori contributes to failure in eradicating the infection and is most often due to point and missense mutations in a few key genes. Methods The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of H. pylori isolates from 46 Pakistani patients were determined by Etest. Resistance and pathogenicity genes were amplified, and sequences were analyzed to determine the presence of mutations. Results A high percentage of isolates (73.9%) were resistant to metronidazole (MTZ), with considerable resistance to clarithromycin (CLR; 47.8%) and amoxicillin (AML; 54.3%) also observed. Relatively few isolates were resistant to tetracycline (TET; 4.3%) or to ciprofloxacin (CIP; 13%). However, most isolates (n = 43) exhibited resistance to one or more antibiotics. MTZ-resistant isolates contained missense mutations in oxygen-independent NADPH nitroreductase (RdxA; 8 mutations found) and NADH flavin oxidoreductase (FrxA; 4 mutations found). In the 23S rRNA gene, responsible for CLR resistance, a new point mutation (A2181G) and 4 previously reported mutations were identified. Pathogenicity genes cagA, dupA, and vacA s1a/m1 were detected frequently in isolates which were also found to be resistant to MTZ, CLR, and AML. A high percentage of CagA and VacA seropositivity was also observed in these patients. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences showed uniform distribution of the 3′ region of cagA throughout the tree. Conclusions We have identified H. pylori isolates in Pakistan which harbor pathogenicity genes and worrying antibiotic resistance profiles as a result of having acquired multiple point and missense mutations. H. pylori eradication regimens should therefore be reevaluated in this setting. PMID:24827414

  5. A Conserved Helicobacter pylori Gene, HP0102, Is Induced Upon Contact With Gastric Cells and Has Multiple Roles in Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2016-07-15

    Contact with host cells is recognized as a signal capable of triggering expression of bacterial genes important for host pathogen interaction. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelial cell line AGS strongly upregulated expression of a gene, HP0102, in the adhered bacteria in all strains examined, including several Indian clinical isolates. The gene is highly conserved and ubiquitously present in all 69 sequenced H. pylori genomes at the same genomic locus, as well as in 15 Indian clinical isolates. The gene is associated with 2 distinct phenotypes related to pathogenicity. In AGS cell-adhered H. pylori, it has a role in upregulation of cagA expression from a specific σ(28)-RNAP promoter and consequent induction of the hummingbird phenotype in the infected AGS cells. Furthermore, HP0102 has a role in chemotaxis and a ΔHP0102 mutant exhibited low acid-escape response that might account for the poor colonization efficiency of the mutant. PMID:27056952

  6. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection. PMID:26733497

  7. Evaluation of the effect of cagPAI genes of Helicobacter pylori on AGS epithelial cell morphology and IL-8 secretion.

    PubMed

    Salih, Barik A; Guner, Ahmet; Karademir, Ahu; Uslu, Merve; Ovali, Mehmet Akif; Yazici, Duygu; Bolek, Bora Kazim; Arikan, Soykan

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori cagPAI genes play an important role in pathogenesis, however little is known about their functions in isolates from Turkish patients. We aimed to evaluate the intactness and the effect of the cagPAI genes (cagT, cagM, cagE, cagA) and cagA EPIYA motifs on the AGS morphological changes and IL-8 induction. Of 53 patients 38 were found infected with H. pylori. PCR amplification of the cagPAI genes showed 42.1 % intact, 39.5 % partially deleted and 18.4 % with complete deletions. Isolates from gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer patients with intact and partially deleted cagPAI genes induced higher IL-8 secretion than those with complete deletions. Isolates from gastritis patients had higher deletion frequencies of the cagT and cagM genes than the other two genes. Infection of AGS cells with isolates that possess intact cagPAI and EPIYA-ABC resulted in the formation of the hummingbird phenotype. The cagA positive isolates induced higher IL-8 secretion than cagA negative isolates. Isolates from DU patients with more than one EPIYA-C motif induced higher concentrations of IL-8 than those with EPIYA-ABC. In conclusion, the intactness of the cagPAI in our isolates from different patients was not conserved. An intact cagPAI was found to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DU but not GU or gastritis. The cagA gene, but not other cagPAI genes, was associated with the induction of IL-8 and the morphological changes of the AGS cells. An increase in the number of EPIYA-C motifs had noticeable effect on the formation of the hummingbird phenotype. PMID:24170115

  8. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer in the Middle East: a new enigma?

    PubMed

    Hussein, Nawfal R

    2010-07-14

    The Middle East is the home of ethnic groups from three main backgrounds: Semitic (Arabs and Jews), Indo-European (Persians and Kurdish) and Turkic (Turkish and Turkmens). Its geographic location, which has been under continuous influences from Asia, Europe and Africa, has made it an ideal site for epidemiological studies on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and genotyping. The gastric cancer rate differs in this region from very high in Iran (26.1/10(5)) to low in Israel (12.5/10(5)) and very low in Egypt (3.4/10(5)). Epidemiological studies showed that the prevalence of H. pylori is almost similar in those countries with a high level of infection in childhood. Importantly, the frequency of vacA s1 and m1 regions and cagA+ genotypes were higher in non Semitic populations who inhabit the North than Semitic populations, the inhabitants of Southern parts of the Middle East. H. pylori infection prevalence, distribution pattern of virulence factors, diet and smoking could not have explained the difference in cancer rate. This reflects the multifactorial aetiology of gastric cancer and suggests that H. pylori infection does not always directly correlate with the risk for gastrointestinal disease, such as gastric cancer. Further detailed investigations and international comparative studies of each risk factor need to be performed to investigate whether this represents a true enigma. PMID:20614477

  9. Helicobacter pylori vacA Genotypes in Chronic Gastritis and Gastric Carcinoma Patients from Macau, China

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Ferreira, Rui M.; Batalha, Sellma; Hlaing, Thazin; Wong, Sio In; Carneiro, Fatima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major triggering factor for gastric carcinoma, but only a small proportion of infected patients develop this disease. Differences in virulence observed among H. pylori strains, namely in the vacuolating cytotoxin vacA gene, may contribute to this discrepancy. Infection with vacA s1, i1 and m1 strains increases the risk for progression of gastric premalignant lesions and for gastric carcinoma. However, in East Asian countries most of the H. pylori strains are vacA s1, regardless of the patients’ clinical status, and the significance of the vacA i1 and m1 genotypes for gastric carcinoma in this geographic area remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relationship in 290 patients from Macau, China. Using very sensitive and accurate genotyping methods, we detected infection with vacA i1 and with vacA m1 strains in, respectively, 85.2% and 52.6% of the patients that were infected with single genotypes. The prevalence of cagA-positive strains was 87.5%. No significant associations were observed between vacA genotypes or cagA and gastric carcinoma. It is worth noting that 37.5% of the infected patients had coexistence of H. pylori strains with different vacA genotypes. Additional studies directed to other H. pylori virulence factors should be performed to identify high risk patients in East Asia. PMID:27164143

  10. Effects of combining extracts (from propolis or Zingiber officinale) with clarithromycin on Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nostro, A; Cellini, L; Di Bartolomeo, S; Cannatelli, M A; Di Campli, E; Procopio, F; Grande, R; Marzio, L; Alonzo, V

    2006-03-01

    Propolis and Zingiber officinale have been shown to be specifically targeted against Helicobacter pylori strains, to possess antiinflammatory, antioxidant and antitumoral activity and to be used in traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments. Considering that these natural products could potentially serve as novel therapeutic tools also in combination with an antibiotic, the aim of this work was to evaluate their effect when combined with clarithromycin on clinical H. pylori isolates (n = 25), characterized in respect to both clarithromycin susceptibility and the presence of the cagA gene. The results showed that the combinations of propolis extract + clarithromycin and Z. officinale extract + clarithromycin exhibited improved inhibition of H. pylori with synergistic or additive activity. Interestingly, the susceptibility to combinations was significantly independent of the microbial clarithromycin susceptibility status. Only one H. pylori strain showed antagonism towards the Z. officinale extract + clarithromycin combination. The data demonstrate that combinations of propolis extract + clarithromycin and Z. officinale extract + clarithromycin have the potential to help control H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:16521108

  11. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer in the Middle East: A new enigma?

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Nawfal R

    2010-01-01

    The Middle East is the home of ethnic groups from three main backgrounds: Semitic (Arabs and Jews), Indo-European (Persians and Kurdish) and Turkic (Turkish and Turkmens). Its geographic location, which has been under continuous influences from Asia, Europe and Africa, has made it an ideal site for epidemiological studies on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and genotyping. The gastric cancer rate differs in this region from very high in Iran (26.1/105) to low in Israel (12.5/105) and very low in Egypt (3.4/105). Epidemiological studies showed that the prevalence of H. pylori is almost similar in those countries with a high level of infection in childhood. Importantly, the frequency of vacA s1 and m1 regions and cagA+ genotypes were higher in non Semitic populations who inhabit the North than Semitic populations, the inhabitants of Southern parts of the Middle East. H. pylori infection prevalence, distribution pattern of virulence factors, diet and smoking could not have explained the difference in cancer rate. This reflects the multifactorial aetiology of gastric cancer and suggests that H. pylori infection does not always directly correlate with the risk for gastrointestinal disease, such as gastric cancer. Further detailed investigations and international comparative studies of each risk factor need to be performed to investigate whether this represents a true enigma. PMID:20614477

  12. Therapeutic Vaccination against Helicobacter pylori in the Beagle Dog Experimental Model: Safety, Immunogenicity, and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giacomo; Ruggiero, Paolo; Peppoloni, Samuele; Pancotto, Laura; Fortuna, Damiano; Lauretti, Laura; Volpini, Gianfranco; Mancianti, Silvia; Corazza, Michele; Taccini, Ennio; Di Pisa, Francesco; Rappuoli, Rino; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa causing gastritis and peptic ulcer and increasing the risk of gastric cancer. The efficacy of current antibiotic-based therapies can be limited by problems of patient compliance and increasing antibiotic resistance; the vaccine approach can overcome these limits. The present study describes the therapeutic vaccination of experimentally H. pylori-infected beagle dogs, an animal model that reproduces several aspects of the human infection with H. pylori. The vaccine consisted of three recombinant H. pylori antigens, CagA, VacA, and NAP, formulated at different doses (10, 25, or 50 μg each) with alum and administered intramuscularly either weekly or monthly. No adverse effects were observed after vaccination and a good immunoglobulin G response was generated against each of the three antigens. Bacterial colonization and gastritis were decreased after the completion of the vaccination cycle, especially in the case of the monthly immunization schedule. In conclusion, therapeutic vaccination in the beagle dog model was safe and immunogenic and was able to limit H. pylori colonization and the related gastric pathology. PMID:15155627

  13. Helicobacter pylori vacA Genotypes in Chronic Gastritis and Gastric Carcinoma Patients from Macau, China.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Ferreira, Rui M; Batalha, Sellma; Hlaing, Thazin; Wong, Sio In; Carneiro, Fatima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major triggering factor for gastric carcinoma, but only a small proportion of infected patients develop this disease. Differences in virulence observed among H. pylori strains, namely in the vacuolating cytotoxin vacA gene, may contribute to this discrepancy. Infection with vacA s1, i1 and m1 strains increases the risk for progression of gastric premalignant lesions and for gastric carcinoma. However, in East Asian countries most of the H. pylori strains are vacA s1, regardless of the patients' clinical status, and the significance of the vacA i1 and m1 genotypes for gastric carcinoma in this geographic area remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relationship in 290 patients from Macau, China. Using very sensitive and accurate genotyping methods, we detected infection with vacA i1 and with vacA m1 strains in, respectively, 85.2% and 52.6% of the patients that were infected with single genotypes. The prevalence of cagA-positive strains was 87.5%. No significant associations were observed between vacA genotypes or cagA and gastric carcinoma. It is worth noting that 37.5% of the infected patients had coexistence of H. pylori strains with different vacA genotypes. Additional studies directed to other H. pylori virulence factors should be performed to identify high risk patients in East Asia. PMID:27164143

  14. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  15. Protection against Helicobacter pylori infection in mice by intragastric vaccination with H. pylori antigens is achieved using a non-toxic mutant of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) as adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, M; Rossi, M; Giannelli, V; Giuliani, M M; Pizza, M; Censini, S; Covacci, A; Massari, P; Pagliaccia, C; Manetti, R; Telford, J L; Douce, G; Dougan, G; Rappuoli, R; Ghiara, P

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that infection of mice with H. pylori can be prevented by oral immunization with H. pylori antigens given together with E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) as adjuvant. Since LT cannot be used in humans because of its unacceptable toxicity, we investigated whether protection of mice could be achieved by co-administration of antigens with non-toxic LT mutants. Here we show that CD1/SPF mice are protected against infection after oral vaccination with either purified H. pylori antigens (native and recombinant VacA, urease and CagA), or whole-cell vaccine formulations, given together with the non-toxic mutant LTK63 as a mucosal adjuvant. Furthermore we show that such protection is antigen-specific since immunization with recombinant or native VacA plus LTK63 conferred protection against infection by an H. pylori Type I strain, which expresses VacA, but not against challenge with a Type II strain which is not able to express this antigen. These results show that: (1) protection against H. pylori can be achieved in the mouse model of infection using subunit recombinant constructs plus non-toxic mucosal adjuvants; and (2) this mouse model is an useful tool in testing H. pylori vaccine formulations for eventual use in humans. PMID:9607006

  16. Differences in interleukin 8 expression in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa tissues from patients in Bhutan and the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Iwatani, Shun; Cruz, Modesto; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Disla, Mildre; Terao, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Tshering, Lotay; Mitsui, Takahiro; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection vary geographically. H pylori strains, disease presentation, and environments differ markedly in Bhutan and Dominican Republic. The aims were to compare the strains, histology, and expression of interleukin (IL) 8 and IL-10 from gastric mucosa from the 2 countries. H pylori status was assessed by the combination of rapid urease test, culture, and histology. Histology was evaluated using the updated Sydney System, and cytokines in gastric biopsies were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were 138 subjects from Bhutan and 155 from Dominican Republic. The prevalence of H pylori infection was 65% and 59%, respectively. The genotype of cagA was predominantly East Asian type in Bhutan versus Western type in Dominican Republic. Gastritis severity was significantly higher in H pylori-infected subjects from Bhutan than those from Dominican Republic. IL-8 expression by H pylori infection was 5.5-fold increased in Bhutan versus 3-fold in Dominican Republic (P < .001); IL-10 expression was similar. IL-8 expression levels among H pylori-infected cases tended to be positively correlated with polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration scores in both countries. IL-8 expression among those with grade 2 and 3 polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Dominican Republic. The difference in IL-8 expression in the 2 countries is reflected in the different disease pattern between them. Whether the dominant factor is differences in H pylori virulence, in host-H pylori-environmental interactions, genetic factors or all remains unclear. However, severity of inflammation appears to be a critical factor in disease pathogenesis. We compared IL-8 messenger RNA levels between the high gastric cancer risk country, Bhutan (mainly East Asian-type H pylori), and the lower gastric cancer risk country, Dominican Republic (mainly Western-type H pylori). PMID

  17. Differences in interleukin-8 expression in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa tissues from patients in Bhutan and the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Iwatani, Shun; Cruz, Modesto; Jiménez Abreu, José A.; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Disla, Mildre; Terao, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Machachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Tshering, Lotay; Mitsui, Takahiro; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection vary geographically. H. pylori strains, disease presentation, and environments differ markedly in Bhutan and Dominican Republic. The aims were to compare the strains, histology and expression of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 from gastric mucosa from the two countries. H. pylori status was assessed by the combination of rapid urease test, culture and histology. Histology was evaluated using the updated Sydney System and cytokines in gastric biopsies were measured using real-time PCR. There were 138 subjects from Bhutan and 155 from Dominican Republic. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 65% and 59%, respectively. The genotype of cagA was predominantly East-Asian type in Bhutan vs. Western type in Dominican Republic. Gastritis severity was significantly higher in H. pylori-infected subjects from Bhutan than those from Dominican Republic. IL-8 expression by H. pylori-infection was 5.5-fold increase in Bhutan vs. 3-fold in Dominican Republic (p <0.001); IL-10 expression was similar. IL-8 expression levels among H. pylori-infected cases tended to be positively correlated with polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) and monocyte infiltration (MNC) scores in both countries. IL-8 expression among those with grade 2 and 3 PMN and MNC was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Dominican Republic. The difference in IL-8 expression in two countries is reflected in the different disease pattern between them. Whether the dominant factor is differences in H. pylori virulence, in host-H. pylori-environmental interactions, genetic factors or all remains unclear. However, severity of inflammation appears to be a critical factor in disease pathogenesis. We compared IL-8 mRNA levels between high gastric cancer risk country; Bhutan (mainly East Asian type H. pylori) and lower gastric cancer risk country; Dominican Republic (mainly Western type H. pylori). PMID:25454482

  18. Microbiota studies in the bile duct strongly suggest a role for Helicobacter pylori in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Jiménez, F; Guitron, A; Segura-López, F; Méndez-Tenorio, A; Iwai, S; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Torres, J

    2016-02-01

    Biliary tract cancer or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECCA) represents the sixth commonest cause of cancer in the gastrointestinal tract in western countries. We aimed to characterize the microbiota and its predicted associated functions in the biliary tract of ECCA and benign biliary pathology (BBP). Samples were taken from 100 patients with ECCA and 100 patients with BBP by endoscopic cholangio-pancreatography for DNA extraction. Ten patients with ECCA and ten with BBP were selected for microbiota studies using the V4-16S rRNA gene and sequenced in Illumina platform. Microbiota analyses included sample-to-sample distance metrics, ordination/clustering and prediction of functions. Presence of Nesterenkonia sp. and Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genes were tested in the 100 ECCA and 100 BBP samples. Phylum Proteobacteria dominated all samples (60.4% average). Ordination multicomponent analyses showed significant microbiota separation between ECCA and BBP (p 0.010). Analyses of 4002 operational taxonomic units with presence variation in at least one category probed a separation of ECCA from BBP. Among these, Nesterenkonia decreased, whereas Methylophilaceae, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Novosphingobium and H. pylori increased in ECCA. Predicted associated functions showed increased abundance of H. pylori virulence genes in ECCA. cagA and vacA genes were confirmed by PCR in ECCA and BBP samples. This is the first microbiota report in ECCA and BBP to show significant changes in microbial composition. Bacterial species unusual for human flora were found: Methylophilaceae and Nesterenkonia are reported in hypersaline soils, and Mesorhizobium is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium. Enrichment of virulence genes confirms previous studies suggesting that H. pylori might be associated with ECCA. PMID:26493848

  19. Antigenic characterization of Helicobacter pylori strains from different parts of the world.

    PubMed Central

    Höök-Nikanne, J; Perez-Perez, G I; Blaser, M J

    1997-01-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori is considered to be relatively homogeneous at the phenotypic level, our aim was to describe its antigenic heterogeneity and to examine differences in host response. Whole-cell lysates of H. pylori strains originally isolated from persons from Africa, the People's Republic of China, Japan, Peru, Thailand, or the United States or from monkeys were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblots were performed by using sera from H. pylori-infected persons from different areas of the world and rabbit immune sera against H. pylori antigens. Specific H. pylori antibody responses in persons from the United States and the People's Republic of China were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with antigens prepared from U.S. or Chinese strains. Despite diverse origins, the strains showed conserved major bands of 84, 60, 56, 31, and 25 kDa. Although there were clear differences in minor bands, there was no obvious geographic pattern. The anti-CagA serum recognized 120- to 140-kDa bands in cagA+ strains from around the world. Although antigenic preparations from individual U.S. or Chinese strains were not optimally sensitive for serologic detection of infection in the heterologous country, use of pools of strains largely overcame this phenomenon. We conclude that conserved H. pylori antigens exist and are recognized by sera from persons from many parts of the world. The heterogeneity of H. pylori antigens and the serological responses of infected hosts is not fully explained by geographic differences. Use of pools may allow development of antigens for serologic testing in any country. PMID:9302211

  20. Molecular epidemiology and outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection in Thailand: a cultural cross roads.

    PubMed

    Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Mahachai, Varocha; Tumwasorn, Somying; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2004-10-01

    ABSTRACT Background. Thailand is at the cultural cross roads between East and South Asia. It has been suggested that this is also the region where the predominant Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) genotype changes from East Asian to South Asian. Methods. We compared the molecular epidemiology and outcome of H. pylori infections among different ethnic groups in Thailand (Thai, Thai-Chinese and Chinese). H. pylori isolates were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction based on cagA, cag right end junction and vacA genotypes. Results. Ninety-eight isolates from 38 ethnic Thai, 20 ethnic Chinese and 40 Thai-Chinese were categorized into East Asian (45%), South/Central Asian (26%), Western (1%) or mixed type (29%). The East Asian genotype was the most common among Chinese (85%) and Thai-Chinese (55%) (p <.01 compared to ethnic Thai). The ethnicity of the mother among mixed Thai-Chinese marriages predicted the genotype of the child's H. pylori (e.g. when the mother was Chinese, 84% had East Asian type vs. 29% when the mother was Thai) (p <.001). Gastric cancer was common among ethnic Chinese with East Asian genotype (e.g. all Chinese with gastric cancer or peptic ulcer disease had East Asian genotype, whereas only 40% of Chinese with gastritis had this genotype). Conclusions. Immigration, intermarriage and the variety of H. pylori genotypes in Thailand suggest that Thailand is an ideal site for epidemiological studies attempting to relate H. pylori genotypes and host factors to outcome. Our data also support the hypothesis that the primary caretaker of the children is most likely the source of the infection. PMID:15361085

  1. Distinct diversity of the cag pathogenicity island among Helicobacter pylori strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Yamazaki, Shiho; Ohtani, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2004-06-01

    The severity of Helicobacter pylori-related disease is correlated with the presence of a cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Genetic diversity within the cag PAI may have a modifying effect on the pathogenic potential of the infecting strain. We analyzed the complete cag PAI sequences of 11 representative Japanese strains according to their vacA genotypes and clinical effects and examined the relationship between the diversity of the cag PAI and clinical features. The cag PAI genes were divided into two major groups, a Western and a Japanese group, by phylogenetic analysis based on the entire cag PAI sequences. The predominant Japanese strains formed a Japanese cluster which was different from the cluster formed by Western strains. The diversity of the cag PAI was associated with the vacA and cagA genotypes. All strains with the s1c vacA genotype were in the Japanese cluster. In addition, all strains with the East Asian-type cagA genotype were also in the Japanese cluster. Patients infected with the Japanese-cluster strain had high-grade gastric mucosal atrophy. These results suggest that a distinct diversity of the cag PAI of H. pylori is present among Japanese strains and that this diversity may be involved in the development of atrophic gastritis and may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:15184428

  2. Distinct Diversity of the cag Pathogenicity Island among Helicobacter pylori Strains in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Yamazaki, Shiho; Ohtani, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    The severity of Helicobacter pylori-related disease is correlated with the presence of a cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Genetic diversity within the cag PAI may have a modifying effect on the pathogenic potential of the infecting strain. We analyzed the complete cag PAI sequences of 11 representative Japanese strains according to their vacA genotypes and clinical effects and examined the relationship between the diversity of the cag PAI and clinical features. The cag PAI genes were divided into two major groups, a Western and a Japanese group, by phylogenetic analysis based on the entire cag PAI sequences. The predominant Japanese strains formed a Japanese cluster which was different from the cluster formed by Western strains. The diversity of the cag PAI was associated with the vacA and cagA genotypes. All strains with the s1c vacA genotype were in the Japanese cluster. In addition, all strains with the East Asian-type cagA genotype were also in the Japanese cluster. Patients infected with the Japanese-cluster strain had high-grade gastric mucosal atrophy. These results suggest that a distinct diversity of the cag PAI of H. pylori is present among Japanese strains and that this diversity may be involved in the development of atrophic gastritis and may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:15184428

  3. H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 Prime Higher Integrin α5β1 in Adverse pH Condition to Enhance Hypochlorhydria Vicious Cycle for Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Chang, Wei-Lun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims H. pylori CagL amino acid polymorphisms such as Y58/E59 can increase integrin α5β1 expression and gastric cancer risk. Hypochlorhydria during chronic H. pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis. The study test whether CagL-Y58/E59 isolates may regulate integrin α5β1 to translocate CagA via the type IV secretory system even under adverse pH conditions, and whether the integrin α5β1 expression primed by H. pylori is a pH-dependent process involving hypochlorhydria in a vicious cycle to promote gastric carcinogenesis. Methods The expressions of integrin α5 and β1, CagA phosphorylation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation of AGS cells exposed to CagL-Y58/E59 H. pylori, isogenic mutants, and different H. pylori CagL amino acid replacement mutants under different pH values were determined. Differences in the pepsinogen I/II ratio (indirectly indicating gastric acidity) and gastric integrin α5β1 expression were compared among the 172 H. pylori-infected patients with different cancer risks. Results Even under adversely low pH condition, H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 still keep active integrin β1 with stronger binding affinity, CagA translocation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation than the other mutants (p<0.05). The in vitro assay revealed higher priming of integrin α5β1 by H. pylori under elevated pH as hypochlorhydria (p<0.05). In the H. pylori-infected patients, the gastric integrin α5β1 expressions were higher in those with pepsinogen I/II ratio <6 than in those without (p<0.05). Conclusions H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 prime higher integrin under adverse pH and may involve to enhance hypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis, and thus require an early eradication. PMID:24009701

  4. Efficacy of the antimicrobial peptide TP4 against Helicobacter pylori infection: in vitro membrane perturbation via micellization and in vivo suppression of host immune responses in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Jayaram Lakshmaiah; Huang, Han-Ning; Wu, Chang-Jer; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is marked by a strong association with various gastric diseases, including gastritis, ulcers, and gastric cancer. Antibiotic treatment regimens have low success rates due to the rapid occurrence of resistant H. pylori strains, necessitating the development of novel anti-H. pylori strategies. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of a novel peptide, Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4), against multidrug resistant gastric pathogen H. pylori, based on its in vitro and in vivo efficacy. TP4 inhibited the growth of both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori (CagA+, VacA+) via membrane micelle formation, which led to membrane depolarization and extravasation of cellular constituents. During colonization of gastric tissue, H. pylori infection maintains high T regulatorysubsets and a low Th17/Treg ratio, and results in expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Treatment with TP4 suppressed Treg subset populations and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. TP4 restored the Th17/Treg balance, which resulted in early clearance of H. pylori density and recovery of gastric morphology. Toxicity studies demonstrated that TP4 treatment has no adverse effects in mice or rabbits. The results of this study indicate that TP4 may be an effective and safe monotherapeutic agent for the treatment of multidrug resistant H. pylori infections. PMID:26002554

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of Helicobacter pylori from Malaysia identifies three distinct lineages suggestive of differential evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narender; Mariappan, Vanitha; Baddam, Ramani; Lankapalli, Aditya K.; Shaik, Sabiha; Goh, Khean-Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Perkins, Tim; Benghezal, Mohammed; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Marshall, Barry J.; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2015-01-01

    The discordant prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its related diseases, for a long time, fostered certain enigmatic situations observed in the countries of the southern world. Variation in H. pylori infection rates and disease outcomes among different populations in multi-ethnic Malaysia provides a unique opportunity to understand dynamics of host–pathogen interaction and genome evolution. In this study, we extensively analyzed and compared genomes of 27 Malaysian H. pylori isolates and identified three major phylogeographic lineages: hspEastAsia, hpEurope and hpSouthIndia. The analysis of the virulence genes within the core genome, however, revealed a comparable pathogenic potential of the strains. In addition, we identified four genes limited to strains of East-Asian lineage. Our analyses identified a few strain-specific genes encoding restriction modification systems and outlined 311 core genes possibly under differential evolutionary constraints, among the strains representing different ethnic groups. The cagA and vacA genes also showed variations in accordance with the host genetic background of the strains. Moreover, restriction modification genes were found to be significantly enriched in East-Asian strains. An understanding of these variations in the genome content would provide significant insights into various adaptive and host modulation strategies harnessed by H. pylori to effectively persist in a host-specific manner. PMID:25452339

  6. Coiled coil rich proteins (Ccrp) influence molecular pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Schätzle, Sarah; Specht, Mara; Waidner, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori relies on its capacity to adapt to a hostile environment and to escape the host response. Although there have been great advances in our understanding of the bacterial cytoskeleton, major gaps remain in our knowledge of its contribution to virulence. In this study we have explored the influence of coiled coil rich proteins (Ccrp) cytoskeletal elements on pathogenicity factors of H. pylori. Deletion of any of the ccrp resulted in a strongly decreased activity of the main pathogenicity factor urease. We further investigated their role using in vitro co-culture experiments with the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS modeling H. pylori - host cell interactions. Intriguingly, host cell showed only a weak "scattering/hummingbird" phenotype, in which host cells are transformed from a uniform polygonal shape into a severely elongated state characterized by the formation of needle-like projections, after co-incubation with any ccrp deletion mutant. Furthermore, co-incubation with the ccrp59 mutant resulted in reduced type IV secretion system associated activities, e.g. IL-8 production and CagA translocation/phosphorylation. Thus, in addition to their role in maintaining the helical cell shape of H. pylori Ccrp proteins influence many cellular processes and are thereby crucial for the virulence of this human pathogen. PMID:25822999

  7. Phylogeographic origin of Helicobacter pylori determines host-adaptive responses upon coculture with gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheh, Alexander; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Merrell, D Scott; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T; Fox, James G

    2013-07-01

    While Helicobacter pylori infects over 50% of the world's population, the mechanisms involved in the development of gastric disease are not fully understood. Bacterial, host, and environmental factors play a role in disease outcome. To investigate the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori pathogenesis, global gene expression of six H. pylori isolates was analyzed during coculture with gastric epithelial cells. Clustering analysis of six Colombian clinical isolates from a region with low gastric cancer risk and a region with high gastric cancer risk segregated strains based on their phylogeographic origin. One hundred forty-six genes had increased expression in European strains, while 350 genes had increased expression in African strains. Differential expression was observed in genes associated with motility, pathogenicity, and other adaptations to the host environment. European strains had greater expression of the virulence factors cagA, vacA, and babB and were associated with increased gastric histologic lesions in patients. In AGS cells, European strains promoted significantly higher interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression than did African strains. African strains significantly induced apoptosis, whereas only one European strain significantly induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that gene expression profiles of clinical isolates can discriminate strains by phylogeographic origin and that these profiles are associated with changes in expression of the proinflammatory and protumorigenic cytokine IL-8 and levels of apoptosis in host epithelial cells. These findings support the hypothesis that bacterial factors determined by the phylogeographic origin of H. pylori strains may promote increased gastric disease. PMID:23630959

  8. Down-regulated Th17 Responses Are Associated with Reduced Gastritis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Cover, Timothy L.; Venegas, Alejandro; Salazar, Maria G.; Smythies, Lesley E.; Harris, Paul R.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces less gastric inflammation in children than adults. Here we investigated whether this reduced inflammation involves dysregulated Th17 responses. H. pylori-infected children and adults in Santiago, Chile had similar levels of H. pylori colonization, proportions of bacteria containing cagA and s1/s2 vacA markers of virulence and strain genotypes (predominantly hpEurope), but the children had significantly reduced levels of gastric inflammation and neutrophil infiltration. The reduced neutrophil accumulation in infected children was accompanied by significantly fewer gastric Th17 cells and significantly lower levels of IL-17-specific mRNA and protein compared to infected adults. The gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected children also contained higher numbers of IL-10+ cells and increased levels of both IL-10 and Foxp3 mRNA compared to that of infected adults. Thus, reduced gastric inflammation, including diminished neutrophil accumulation, in H. pylori-infected children compared with infected adults is likely due to down-regulated gastric Th17/IL-17 responses as a consequence of enhanced mucosal regulatory T cell activity in the children. PMID:23299619

  9. Therapeutic intragastric vaccination against Helicobacter pylori in mice eradicates an otherwise chronic infection and confers protection against reinfection.

    PubMed

    Ghiara, P; Rossi, M; Marchetti, M; Di Tommaso, A; Vindigni, C; Ciampolini, F; Covacci, A; Telford, J L; De Magistris, M T; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Del Giudice, G

    1997-12-01

    Chronic infection of the gastroduodenal mucosae by the gram-negative spiral bacterium Helicobacter pylori is responsible for chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers such as adenocarcinoma and low-grade gastric B-cell lymphoma. The success of eradication by antibiotic therapy is being rapidly hampered by the increasing occurrence of antibiotic-resistant strains. An attractive alternative approach to combat this infection is represented by the therapeutic use of vaccines. In the present work, we have exploited the mouse model of persistent infection by mouse-adapted H. pylori strains that we have developed to assess the feasibility of the therapeutic use of vaccines against infection. We report that an otherwise chronic H. pylori infection in mice can be successfully eradicated by intragastric vaccination with H. pylori antigens such as recombinant VacA and CagA, which were administered together with a genetically detoxified mutant of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (referred to as LTK63), in which the serine in position 63 was replaced by a lysine. Moreover, we show that therapeutic vaccination confers efficacious protection against reinfection. These results represent strong evidence of the feasibility of therapeutic use of VacA- or CagA-based vaccine formulations against H. pylori infection in an animal model and give substantial preclinical support to the application of this kind of approach in human clinical trials. PMID:9393788

  10. Helicobacter pylori cagL amino acid polymorphisms and its association with gastroduodenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sanket Kumar; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Tripathi, Aparna; Jaiswal, Virendra; Khatoon, Jahanarah; Ghsohal, Uday Chand; Krishnani, Narendra; Husain, Nuzhat

    2013-07-01

    CagL is a pilus protein of Helicobacter pylori that interacts with host cellular α5β1 integrins through its arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif, guiding proper positioning of the T4SS and translocation of CagA. Deletion or sequence variations of cagL significantly diminished the ability of H. pylori to induce secretion of IL-8 by the host cell. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the association of cagL and its amino acid sequence polymorphisms with gastric cancer (GC), peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) as there are no such studies from India. In total, 200 adult patients (NUD 120, PUD 30, GC 50) who underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by rapid urease test, culture, histopathology, and PCR. The collected isolates were screened for cagL genotype by PCR and assessed for amino acid sequence polymorphisms using sequence translation. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in study population was 52.5%. Most of the isolates were cagL genopositive (86.6%), and all had RGD motif in their amino acid sequences. D58 and K59 polymorphisms in cagL-genopositive strains were significantly higher in GC patients (P < 0.05). Combined D58K59 polymorphism was associated with higher risk of GC (3.8-fold) when compared to NUD. In conclusion, H. pylori cagL amino acid polymorphisms such as D58K59 are correlated with a higher risk of GC in the Indian population. Further studies are required to know the exact role of particular cagL amino acid polymorphisms in the pathogenicity of H. pylori infection. PMID:22941498

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shmuely, Haim; Shimon, Ilan; Gitter, Limor Azulay

    2016-07-01

    An association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection as environmental risk factors for Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has been reported. We investigated this hypothesis in women in which HT is more common. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies against H pylori (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), CagA protein (Western blot assay), circulating antibodies to thyroid antigens, mainly thyroperoxidase (TPOAbs) and thyroglobulin (TgAbs), were tested in 101 females with HT and 111 non-HT control women without a history of autoimmune disease. Thyroid function, socioeconomic status at childhood, and family history of thyroid malfunction were also studied. Forty-seven HT women (46.5%) tested seropositive for H pylori versus 48 controls (43.2%; P = 0.63). The prevalence of anti-CagA antibodies was 21.3% in HT-infected patients and 31.2% in infected controls (P = 0.352). Women with HT were older than the controls at a significance level of 0.03, and higher prevalence of hypothyroidism (69% vs 13.5%, respectively) and family history of thyroid malfunction (59% vs 34%, respectively) (P < 0.001 in both). Body mass index, diaphragmatic hernia, peptic ulcer, heartburn, use of proton pump inhibitors, childhood socioeconomic background, and crowding index showed no significant difference between HT-positive or negative individuals. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that H pylori seropositivity was not associated with HT (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 0.57-1.83, P = 0.95) and that family thyroid malfunction was independently associated with an increased risk of HT (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 1.86-6.18, P < 0.001). No association was found between H pylori infection and HT in women. Family history of thyroid malfunction is a risk factor for HT. PMID:27442635

  12. Helicobacter pylori inhibits dendritic cell maturation via interleukin-10-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Rizzuti, David; Ang, Michelle; Sokollik, Christiane; Wu, Ted; Abdullah, Majd; Greenfield, Laura; Fattouh, Ramzi; Reardon, Colin; Tang, Michael; Diao, Jun; Schindler, Christian; Cattral, Mark; Jones, Nicola L

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human gastric mucosa causing a chronic infection that is the primary risk factor for gastric cancer development. Recent studies demonstrate that H. pylori promotes tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) development indicating that this bacterium evades the host immune response. However, the signaling pathways involved in modulating DC activation during infection remain unclear. Here, we report that H. pylori infection activated the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway in murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) and splenic DCs isolated ex vivo. Isogenic cagA-, cagE-, vacA- and urease-mutants exhibited levels of phosphoSTAT3 that were comparable to in the wild-type (WT) parent strain. H. pylori-infected BMDCs produced increased immunosuppressive IL-10, which activated STAT3 in an autocrine/paracrine fashion. Neutralization of IL-10 prevented H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation in both BMDCs and splenic DCs. In addition, anti-IL-10 treatment of infected H. pylori-BMDCs was associated with increased CD86 and MHC II expression and enhanced proinflammatory IL-1β cytokine secretion. Finally, increased CD86 and MHC II expression was detected in H. pylori-infected STAT3 knockout DCs when compared to WT controls. Together, these results demonstrate that H. pylori infection induces IL-10 secretion in DCs, which activates STAT3, thereby modulating DC maturation and reducing IL-1β secretion. These findings identify a host molecular mechanism by which H. pylori can manipulate the innate immune response to potentially favor chronic infection and promote carcinogenesis. PMID:25412627

  13. Analysis of Genomic Diversity among Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Iranian Children by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Falsafi, Tahereh; Sotoudeh, Nazli; Feizabadi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Mahjoub, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Presence of genomic diversity among Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains have been suggested by numerous investigators. Little is known about diversity of H. pylori strains isolated from Iranian children and their association with virulence of the strains. Our purpose was to assess the degree of genomic diversity among H. pylori strains isolated from Iranian-children, on the basis of vacA genotype, cagA status of the strains, sex, age as well as the pathological status of the patients. Methods: Genomic DNA from 44 unrelated H. pylori strains isolated during 1997–2009, was examined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Pathological status of the patients was performed according to the modified Sydney-system and genotype/status of vacA/cagA genes was determined by PCR. PFGE was performed using XbaI restriction-endonuclease and the field inversion-gel electrophoresis system. Findings: No significant relationship was observed between the patterns of PFGE and the cagA/vacA status/genotype. Also no relationship was observed between age, sex, and pathological status of the children and the PFGE patterns of their isolates. Similar conclusion was obtained by Total Lab software. However, more relationship was observed between the strains isolated in the close period (1997–2009, 2001–2003, 2005–2007, and 2007–2009) and more difference was observed among those obtained in the distant periods (1997 and 2009). Conclusion: H. pylori strains isolated from children in Iran are extremely diverse and this diversity is not related to their virulence characteristics. Occurrence of this extreme diversity may be related to adaptation of H. pylori strains to variable living conditions during transmission between various host individuals. PMID:26019775

  14. Tests for H. pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... special substance that has urea. Urea is a waste product the body produces as it breaks down protein. The urea used in the test has been made harmlessly radioactive. If H. pylori are present, the bacteria convert ...

  15. Prevalence and Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Biopsy Specimens from Patients with Gastroduodenal Pathologies in the Cukurova Region of Turkey▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagiyev, Togrul; Yula, Erkan; Abayli, Bahri; Koksal, Fatih

    2009-01-01

    The effects of Helicobacter pylori genotypes on clinical prognosis in the Cukurova region of Turkey were investigated by PCR. The prevalence of type I strains carrying the s1c allele, unlike in neighboring regions and countries, was found to be significantly higher in patients with gastritis and/or gastric ulcers (P = 0.001), and that of type I strains carrying the s1a allele was found to be significantly higher in patients with duodenal ulcers (P < 0.001). The cagA gene was strongly associated with the more virulent vacA genotypes (P < 0.001). PMID:19846654

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root

    PubMed Central

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Suzuki, Rumiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146), and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%), cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%), vacA s1a (74.5%), and m1c (54.9%) were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03). Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05). These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone. PMID:26226153

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Suzuki, Rumiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146), and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%), cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%), vacA s1a (74.5%), and m1c (54.9%) were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03). Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05). These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone. PMID:26226153

  18. Resistance to clarithromycin and genotypes in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Fasciana, Teresa; Calà, Cinzia; Bonura, Celestino; Di Carlo, Enza; Matranga, Domenica; Scarpulla, Giuseppe; Manganaro, Michele; Camilleri, Salvatore; Giammanco, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains to clarithromycin is increasing in several developed countries and their association with a genetic pattern circulation has been variously explained as related to different geographical areas. In this study we have reported: the prevalence of the resistance of H. pylori, isolated in Sicily, to clarithromycin; the principal point of mutation associated with this resistance; and the more frequent association between resistance to clarithromycin and cagA, the EPIYA motif, and the vacA and oipA genes. Resistance to clarithromycin was detected in 25% of cases, the main genetic mutation involved being A2143G. The cagA gene was present in 48% of cases and the distribution of the EPIYA motif was: ABC in 35 cases; ABCC in 8 cases; ABCCC in 2 cases; ABC-ABCC in 2 cases; and ABC-ABCC-ABCCC in 1 case. Regarding the vacA allele, an s1i1m1 combination was detected in 35% of cases, s1i1m2 in 12 %, s1i2m2 in 12%, s2i2m2 in 40%, and a double s1m1-m2 mosaic in 1% of cases. The status of the oipA gene was 'off' in 45% of cases and 'on' in 55%. Resistance to clarithromycin was found to be high in Sicily, but no correlation was found among resistance to clarithromycin, the vacA gene and oipA status; a higher correlation was observed between resistant strains and cagA-negative strains. PMID:26338221

  19. High resolution electron microscopy of the Helicobacter pylori Cag type IV secretion system pili produced in varying conditions of iron availability.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kathryn Patricia; Blanz, Eric Joshua; Gaddy, Jennifer Angeline

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a helical-shaped, gram negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric niche of half of the human population. H. pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. One virulence factor that has been associated with increased risk of gastric disease is the Cag-pathogenicity island, a 40-kb region within the chromosome of H. pylori that encodes a type IV secretion system and the cognate effector molecule, CagA. The Cag-T4SS is responsible for translocating CagA and peptidoglycan into host epithelial cells. The activity of the Cag-T4SS results in numerous changes in host cell biology including upregulation of cytokine expression, activation of proinflammatory pathways, cytoskeletal remodeling, and induction of oncogenic cell-signaling networks. The Cag-T4SS is a macromolecular machine comprised of sub-assembly components spanning the inner and outer membrane and extending outward from the cell into the extracellular space. The extracellular portion of the Cag-T4SS is referred to as the "pilus". Numerous studies have demonstrated that the Cag-T4SS pili are formed at the host-pathogen interface(. However, the environmental features that regulate the biogenesis of this important organelle remain largely obscure. Recently, we reported that conditions of low iron availability increased the Cag-T4SS activity and pilus biogenesis. Here we present an optimized protocol to grow H. pylori in varying conditions of iron availability prior to co-culture with human gastric epithelial cells. Further, we present the comprehensive protocol for visualization of the hyper-piliated phenotype exhibited in iron restricted conditions by high resolution scanning electron microscopy analyses. PMID:25489938

  20. Prevalence of two homologous genes encoding glycosyltransferases of Helicobacter pylori in the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Miyuki; Shiota, Seiji; Matsunari, Osamu; Watada, Masahide; Murakami, Kazunari; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims jhp0562 and β-(1,3)galT (jhp0563) of Helicobacter pylori have been suggested as novel virulent factors; however the clinical associations and functions of these genes remain unclear. We examined the prevalence of jhp0562, β-(1,3)galT, and cagA in the United States (U.S.) and Japanese populations. Methods A total of 308 strains (171 from the U.S. and 137 from Japan) were examined for the status of jhp0562, β-(1,3)galT, and cagA by polymerase chain reaction. Results There were significant differences in the status of jhp0562, β-(1,3)galT and cagA between the U.S. and Japanese populations (P < 0.001). In the U.S., the prevalence of β-(1,3)galT was significantly lower in strains isolated from patients with duodenal ulcer (DU) or gastric ulcer (GU) than those with gastritis (47.8% and 32.1% vs. 72.0%, P < 0.01), and the absence of β-(1,3)galT was an independent factor discriminating DU and GU from gastritis (adjusted odds ratios, 4.21 and 8.52; 95% confidence intervals, 1.75 to 10.12 and 2.76 to 26.33, respectively). In the U.S., the prevalence of the jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3)galT-negative genotype was significantly higher in strains from DU and GU patients than in those from gastritis patients (50.0%, 67.9%, and 24.4%, P < 0.01) and the cagA status was significantly correlated with that of jhp0562 and inversely correlated with that of β-(1,3)galT. In contrast, the prevalence of these three genes was not significantly different in Japan. Conclusions jhp0562 or β-(1,3)galT can be used to discriminate peptic ulcers from gastritis in the U.S., but not in Japan. PMID:21592227

  1. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26372825

  2. Potential effect of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection on glucose metabolism of Mongolian gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Li, Wei; He, Cong; Xie, Chuan; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection on metabolic parameters in Mongolian gerbils. METHODS: A total of 40 male, 5- to 8-wk-old, specific-pathogen-free Mongolian gerbils (30-50 g) were randomly allocated into two groups: a control group (n = 20) and an H. pylori group (n = 20). After a two-week acclimation period, the control group was administered Brucella broth and the H. pylori group was challenged intra-gastrically five times every other day with approximately 109/CFU H. pylori ATCC43504 (CagA+, VacA+). Each group was then divided into two subgroups, which were sacrificed at either 6 or 12 mo. The control and H. pylori subgroups each contained 10 Mongolian gerbils. Body weight, abdominal circumference, and body length were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and Lee’s index were calculated. Biochemical assays were used to detect serum indexes, including glucose, glycated hemoglobin (GHb), glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol, using an automatic biochemistry analyzer. Inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon (IFN)-γ, were assayed using ELISA. The expression of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was detected by immunohistochemistry, and islet apoptosis was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. RESULTS: At each time point, body weight, abdominal circumference, BMI, and Lee’s index were increased after H. pylori infection. However, these differences were not significant. H. pylori infection significantly increased the GHb (5.45 ± 0.53 vs 4.98 ± 0.22, P < 0.05) and HbA1c (4.91 ± 0.61 vs 4.61 ± 0.15, P < 0.05) levels at 12 mo. We observed no significant differences in serum biochemical indexes, including fasting blood glucose, triacylglycerol and total cholesterol, at 6 or 12 mo after infection. H. pylori infection

  3. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer. PMID:26645900

  4. Helicobacter pylori in vegetables and salads: genotyping and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Yahaghi, Emad; Khamesipour, Faham; Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad; Sakhaei, Mohammad Hossein; Masoudimanesh, Mojtaba; Khameneie, Maryam Khayyat

    2014-01-01

    From a clinical and epidemiological perspective, it is important to know which genotypes and antibiotic resistance patterns are present in H. pylori strains isolated from salads and vegetables. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to find this purpose. Three hundred eighty washed and unwashed vegetable samples and fifty commercial and traditional salad samples were collected from Isfahan, Iran. Samples were cultured and those found positive for H. pylori were analyzed using PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion method. Seven out of 50 (14%) salad and 52 out of 380 (13.68%) vegetable samples harbored H. pylori. In addition, leek, lettuce, and cabbage were the most commonly contaminated samples (30%). The most prevalent virulence genes were oipA (86.44%) and cagA (57.625). VacA s1a (37.28%) and iceA1 (47.45%) were the most prevalent genotypes. Forty different genotypic combinations were recognized. S1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (33.89%), s1a/cagA+/iceA2/oipA (30.50%), and m1a/cagA+/iceA1/oipA+ (28.81%) were the most prevalent combined genotypes. Bacterial strains had the highest levels of resistance against metronidazole (77.96%), amoxicillin (67.79%), and ampicillin (61.01%). High similarity in the genotyping pattern of H. pylori among vegetable and salad samples and human specimens suggests that vegetable and salads may be the sources of the bacteria. PMID:25184146

  5. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  6. Helicobacter pylori: Helicobacter pylori gastritis--a novel distinct disease entity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Mori, Hideki

    2015-10-01

    A global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been developed. Topics discussed include whether dyspepsia caused by H. pylori infection is separate from functional dyspepsia or not, the evaluation method for H. pylori-induced gastritis, eradication therapy for H. pylori gastritis to prevent gastric carcinogenesis and management after H. pylori eradication. PMID:26369312

  7. [Transmission route of H. pylori].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Masumi; Tachikawa, Tomohiro; Maekawa, Kohei; Fukuda, Yoshihiro

    2013-08-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is rapidly decreased in Japan. H. pylori infection is mainly acquired in the first 2 years life and the risk of infection declines rapidly after 5 years of age. Person-to-person transmission in the family appears to be the predominant and in the population with low prevalence, several studies showed the infected mother is likely to be the main source of the infection. H. pylori can be detected from vomitus, saliva and cathartic stools and the possibility of source of infection. Waterborne infection is unlikely in the developed countries. PMID:23967662

  8. A Novel Line Immunoassay Based on Recombinant Virulence Factors Enables Highly Specific and Sensitive Serologic Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Formichella, Luca; Romberg, Laura; Bolz, Christian; Vieth, Michael; Geppert, Michael; Göttner, Gereon; Nölting, Christina; Walter, Dirk; Schepp, Wolfgang; Schneider, Arne; Ulm, Kurt; Wolf, Petra; Busch, Dirk H.; Soutschek, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world's population, and infection can lead to ulcers, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Serology is the only test applicable for large-scale, population-based screening, but current tests are hampered by a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity. Also, no serologic test allows the differentiation of type I and type II strains, which is important for predicting the clinical outcome. H. pylori virulence factors have been associated with disease, but direct assessment of virulence factors requires invasive methods to obtain gastric biopsy specimens. Our work aimed at the development of a highly sensitive and specific, noninvasive serologic test to detect immune responses to important H. pylori virulence factors. This line immunoassay system (recomLine) is based on recombinant proteins. For this assay, six highly immunogenic virulence factors (CagA, VacA, GroEL, gGT, HcpC, and UreA) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and immobilized to nitrocellulose membranes to detect serological immune responses in patient's sera. For the validation of the line assay, a cohort of 500 patients was screened, of which 290 (58.0%) were H. pylori negative and 210 (42.0%) were positive by histology. The assay showed sensitivity and specificity of 97.6% and 96.2%, respectively, compared to histology. In direct comparison to lysate blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the recomLine assay had increased discriminatory power. For the assessment of individual risk for gastrointestinal disease, the test must be validated in a larger and defined patient cohort. Taking the data together, the recomLine assay provides a valuable tool for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. PMID:24006137

  9. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Children: A Contribution to Get Insight into the Virulence of the Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vitoriano, Inês; Saraiva-Pava, Kathy D.; Rocha-Gonçalves, Alexandra; Santos, Andrea; Lopes, Ana I.; Oleastro, Mónica; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA “on” status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence factors. PMID

  10. Soluble extracts from Helicobacter pylori induce dome formation in polarized intestinal epithelial monolayers in a laminin-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Terrés, A M; Windle, H J; Ardini, E; Kelleher, D P

    2003-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach at the interface between the mucus layer and the apical pole of gastric epithelial cells. A number of secreted and shed products from the bacteria, such as proteins and lipopolysaccharide, are likely to have a role in the pathogenesis at the epithelial level. To determine the physiological response of transporting polarized epithelia to released soluble factors from the bacterium, we used the T84 cell line. Monolayers of T84 cells were exposed to soluble extracts from H. pylori. The extracts induced rapid "dome" formation as well as an immediate decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance. Domes are fluid-filled blister-like structures unique to polarized epithelia. Their formation has been linked to sodium-transporting events as well as to diminished adherence of the cells to the substrate. H. pylori-induced dome formation in T84 monolayers was exacerbated by amiloride and inhibited by ouabain. Furthermore, it was associated with changes in the expression of the laminin binding alpha 6 beta 4 integrin and the 67-kDa laminin receptor. Domes formed primarily on laminin-coated filters, rather than on fibronectin or collagen matrices, and their formation was inhibited by preincubating the bacterial extract with soluble laminin. This effect was specific to H. pylori and independent of the urease, vacA, cagA, and Lewis phenotype of the strains. These data indicate that released elements from H. pylori can alter the physiological balance and integrity of the epithelium in the absence of an underlying immune response. PMID:12819097

  11. The Human Antimicrobial Protein Calgranulin C Participates in Control of Helicobacter pylori Growth and Regulation of Virulence.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kathryn P; Delgado, Alberto G; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Mortensen, Brittany L; Correa, Pelayo; Damo, Steven M; Chazin, Walter J; Skaar, Eric P; Gaddy, Jennifer A

    2015-07-01

    During infectious processes, antimicrobial proteins are produced by both epithelial cells and innate immune cells. Some of these antimicrobial molecules function by targeting transition metals and sequestering these metals in a process referred to as "nutritional immunity." This chelation strategy ultimately starves invading pathogens, limiting their growth within the vertebrate host. Recent evidence suggests that these metal-binding antimicrobial molecules have the capacity to affect bacterial virulence, including toxin secretion systems. Our previous work showed that the S100A8/S100A9 heterodimer (calprotectin, or calgranulin A/B) binds zinc and represses the elaboration of the H. pylori cag type IV secretion system (T4SS). However, there are several other S100 proteins that are produced in response to infection. We hypothesized that the zinc-binding protein S100A12 (calgranulin C) is induced in response to H. pylori infection and also plays a role in controlling H. pylori growth and virulence. To test this, we analyzed gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive and -negative patients for S100A12 expression. These assays showed that S100A12 is induced in response to H. pylori infection and inhibits bacterial growth and viability in vitro by binding nutrient zinc. Furthermore, the data establish that the zinc-binding activity of the S100A12 protein represses the activity of the cag T4SS, as evidenced by the gastric cell "hummingbird" phenotype, interleukin 8 (IL-8) secretion, and CagA translocation assays. In addition, high-resolution field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) was used to demonstrate that S100A12 represses biogenesis of the cag T4SS. Together with our previous work, these data reveal that multiple S100 proteins can repress the elaboration of an oncogenic bacterial surface organelle. PMID:25964473

  12. The Human Antimicrobial Protein Calgranulin C Participates in Control of Helicobacter pylori Growth and Regulation of Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Kathryn P.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Mortensen, Brittany L.; Correa, Pelayo; Damo, Steven M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    During infectious processes, antimicrobial proteins are produced by both epithelial cells and innate immune cells. Some of these antimicrobial molecules function by targeting transition metals and sequestering these metals in a process referred to as “nutritional immunity.” This chelation strategy ultimately starves invading pathogens, limiting their growth within the vertebrate host. Recent evidence suggests that these metal-binding antimicrobial molecules have the capacity to affect bacterial virulence, including toxin secretion systems. Our previous work showed that the S100A8/S100A9 heterodimer (calprotectin, or calgranulin A/B) binds zinc and represses the elaboration of the H. pylori cag type IV secretion system (T4SS). However, there are several other S100 proteins that are produced in response to infection. We hypothesized that the zinc-binding protein S100A12 (calgranulin C) is induced in response to H. pylori infection and also plays a role in controlling H. pylori growth and virulence. To test this, we analyzed gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive and -negative patients for S100A12 expression. These assays showed that S100A12 is induced in response to H. pylori infection and inhibits bacterial growth and viability in vitro by binding nutrient zinc. Furthermore, the data establish that the zinc-binding activity of the S100A12 protein represses the activity of the cag T4SS, as evidenced by the gastric cell “hummingbird” phenotype, interleukin 8 (IL-8) secretion, and CagA translocation assays. In addition, high-resolution field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) was used to demonstrate that S100A12 represses biogenesis of the cag T4SS. Together with our previous work, these data reveal that multiple S100 proteins can repress the elaboration of an oncogenic bacterial surface organelle. PMID:25964473

  13. Detailed analysis of Helicobacter pylori Fur-regulated promoters reveals a Fur box core sequence and novel Fur-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-06-01

    In Helicobacter pylori, iron balance is controlled by the Ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an iron-sensing repressor protein that typically regulates expression of genes implicated in iron transport and storage. Herein, we carried out extensive analysis of Fur-regulated promoters and identified a 7-1-7 motif with dyad symmetry (5'-TAATAATnATTATTA-3'), which functions as the Fur box core sequence of H. pylori. Addition of this sequence to the promoter region of a typically non-Fur regulated gene was sufficient to impose Fur-dependent regulation in vivo. Moreover, mutation of this sequence within Fur-controlled promoters negated regulation. Analysis of the H. pylori chromosome for the occurrence of the Fur box established the existence of well-conserved Fur boxes in the promoters of numerous known Fur-regulated genes, and revealed novel putative Fur targets. Transcriptional analysis of the new candidate genes demonstrated Fur-dependent repression of HPG27_51, HPG27_52, HPG27_199, HPG27_445, HPG27_825 and HPG27_1063, as well as Fur-mediated activation of the cytotoxin associated gene A, cagA (HPG27_507). Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed specific binding of Fur to the promoters of each of these genes. Future experiments will determine whether loss of Fur regulation of any of these particular genes contributes to the defects in colonization exhibited by the H. pylori fur mutant. PMID:22507395

  14. Variations in Helicobacter pylori Cytotoxin-Associated Genes and Their Influence in Progression to Gastric Cancer: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Torres, Javier; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Franceschi, Silvia; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Canzian, Federico; Kato, Ikuko

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and can establish a long-term infection of the gastric mucosa. Persistent Hp infection often induces gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma. Virulent HP isolates harbor the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island (cagPAI), a 40 kb stretch of DNA that encodes components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS). This T4SS forms a pilus for the injection of virulence factors into host target cells, such as the CagA oncoprotein. We analyzed the genetic variability in cagA and other selected genes of the HP cagPAI (cagC, cagE, cagL, cagT, cagV and cag Gamma) using DNA extracted from frozen gastric biopsies or from clinical isolates. Study subjects were 95 cagA+ patients that were histologically diagnosed with chronic gastritis or gastric cancer in Venezuela and Mexico, areas with high prevalence of Hp infection. Sequencing reactions were carried out by both Sanger and next-generation pyrosequencing (454 Roche) methods. We found a total of 381 variants with unambiguous calls observed in at least 10% of the originally tested samples and reference strains. We compared the frequencies of these genetic variants between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis cases. Twenty-six SNPs (11 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous) showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05), and two SNPs, in position 1039 and 1041 of cagE, showed a highly significant association with cancer (p-value = 2.07×10−6), and the variant codon was located in the VirB3 homology domain of Agrobacterium. The results of this study may provide preliminary information to target antibiotic treatment to high-risk individuals, if effects of these variants are confirmed in further investigations. PMID:22235308

  15. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  16. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach. PMID:22368251

  17. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and poor growth. There is evidence of the role of H. pylori in childhood iron deficiency anemia, but the results are not conclusive. The possibility of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, as well as childhood asthma, remains a controversial question. A better understanding of the H. pylori disease spectrum in childhood should lead to clearer recommendations about testing for and treating H. pylori infection in children who are more likely to develop clinical sequelae. PMID:21049552

  18. Helicobacter pylori in children.

    PubMed

    Sustmann, Andrea; Okuda, Masumi; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in early childhood may differ in many aspects compared to infection in adulthood: the immune response in the gut, the type and prevalence of complications within and outside the stomach, and the impact on long-term health. In high prevalence countries, transient infections seem to be common in infants and toddlers, and the consequences of this phenomenon on the short- and long-term immune response are still unclear. Other controversial issues are related to the question of which H. pylori-infected children benefit from treatment and which is the best regimen to eradicate the infection in the presence of a worldwide increasing antibiotic resistance. The first large-scale randomized placebo-controlled vaccination trial in schoolchildren indicates that prevention of the infection may be possible. PMID:27531540

  19. Three unsuccessful treatments of Helicobacter pylori infection by a highly virulent strain with quadruple antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Yordanov, Daniel; Markovska, Rumyana; Mitov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of an adult patient undergoing three unsuccessful Helicobacter pylori treatments, including proton pump inhibitor (PPI), bismuth subcitrate, metronidazole and tetracycline in 2012, PPI, amoxicillin and clarithromycin in 2013, and PPI, amoxicillin and rifampin in 2014. Following the first treatment, the isolate was metronidazole and ciprofloxacin/levofloxacin resistant. After the second treatment, the isolate was resistant to metronidazole, ciprofloxacin/levofloxacin and rifampin, developing secondary clarithromycin resistance by A2143G mutation and was susceptible only to tetracycline. After the third treatment, the patient still remained H. pylori positive. Patient's strain was highly virulent (cagA (+) , cagE (+) and vacA s1a/m1/i1). The evolution of the patient's disease was from gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2012 to two duodenal ulcers in 2015. Briefly, the infecting strain showed quadruple antibiotic resistance and a transient amoxicillin resistance. Triple clarithromycin-based treatment induced secondary clarithromycin resistance by A2143G mutation, while rifampin resistance caused the third treatment failure. Several options for the next treatment regimens are discussed. PMID:26634607

  20. Growth Phase-Dependent Response of Helicobacter pylori to Iron Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, D. Scott; Thompson, Lucinda J.; Kim, Charles C.; Mitchell, Hazel; Tompkins, Lucy S.; Lee, Adrian; Falkow, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that is often found in extremely limited available quantities within eukaryotic hosts. Because of this, many pathogenic bacteria have developed regulated networks of genes important for iron uptake and storage. In addition, it has been shown that many bacteria use available iron concentrations as a signal to regulate virulence gene expression. We have utilized DNA microarray technology to identify genes of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori that are differentially regulated on a growth-inhibiting shift to iron starvation conditions. In addition, the growth phase-dependent expression of these genes was investigated by examining both exponential and stationary growth phase cultures. We identified known iron-regulated genes, as well as a number of genes whose regulation by iron concentration was not previously appreciated. Included in the list of regulated factors were the known virulence genes cagA, vacA, and napA. We examined the effect of iron starvation on the motility of H. pylori and found that exponential- and stationary-phase cultures responded differently to the stress. We further found that while growing cells are rapidly killed by iron starvation, stationary-phase cells show a remarkable ability to survive iron depletion. Finally, bioinformatic analysis of the predicted promoter regions of the differentially regulated genes led to identification of several putative Fur boxes, suggesting a direct role for Fur in iron-dependent regulation of these genes. PMID:14573673

  1. The Helicobacter pylori Cag Pathogenicity Island Protein Cag1 is Associated with the Function of T4SS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochun; Ling, Feng; Wang, Hua; Yu, Min; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Cheng; Qian, Jingyi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Shao, Shihe

    2016-07-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is involved in gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric cancer. Virulent strains harboring the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) which encode a Type IV Secretion System (T4SS) can induce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-8 and deliver their major effector proteins CagA into the gastric cells. While a subset of cag PAI genes have been identified to be the homologues of T4SS genes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a majority have unknown functions. We have identified one of such proteins, Cag1, which was predicted to be a non-classically secreted and virulent protein. Our results showed that Cag1 is a membrane-associated protein essential for the induction of multiple cytokine secretions, and cag1-deficient mutant has partial influence on CagA translocation; while the protein itself was not injected into host cells. Our data indicated that Cag1 is located in the bacterial membrane and is associated with the function of T4SS. PMID:26971262

  2. Helicobacter pylori in oral ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, T; Horie, N; Kato, T; Kaneko, T; Komiyama, K

    2000-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen involved in the development of gastrointestinal ulcers, but its involvement in oral ulcerous lesions is unclear. As culture is generally recognized as the gold standard for diagnosis of H. pylori infection, we employed this approach to assess the association of H. pylori with oral mucosal ulcerations. Samples were collected from patients with oral mucosal ulcerative disorders: 12 cases of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), 7 cases of herpes simplex virus (HSV) stomatitis, and 3 cases of erosive lichen planus (LP). Serum IgG antibodies against H. pylori were examined in all cases. All of the RAS and erosive LP cases were culture-negative for H. pylori, while two cases of HSV stomatitis were positive. The two culture-positive cases were also seropositve for the H. pylori antigen. It is suggested that H. pylori might not have a direct association with oral ulcerations. However, H. pylori in the oral cavity might exist in a non-culturable coccoid state without productive infection, and might form colonies only under special conditions such as HSV infection. PMID:11269381

  3. Vaccinating against Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Czinn, Steven J; Blanchard, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa remains a cause of significant morbidity and mortality almost 30 years after its discovery. H. pylori infection can lead to several gastric maladies, including gastric cancer, and although antimicrobial therapies for the infection exist, the cost of treatment for gastric cancer and the prognosis of individuals who present with this disease make vaccine development a cost effective alternative to bacterial eradication. Experimental mucosal and systemic H. pylori vaccines in mice significantly reduce bacterial load and sometimes provide sterilizing immunity. Clinical trials of oral vaccines consisting of H. pylori proteins with bacterial exotoxin adjuvants or live attenuated bacterial vectors expressing H. pylori proteins induce adaptive immune mechanisms but fail to consistently reduce bacterial load. Clinical trials and murine studies demonstrate that where H. pylori is killed, either spontaneously or following vaccination, the host demonstrated cellular immunity. Improved efficacy of vaccines may be achieved in new trials of vaccine formulations that include multiple antigens and use methods to optimize cellular immunity. Unfortunately, the industrial sponsors that served as the primary engine for much of the previous animal and human research have withdrawn their support. A renewed or expanded commitment from the biotechnology or pharmaceutical industry that could exploit recent advances in our understanding of the host immune response to H. pylori is necessary for the advancement of an H. pylori vaccine. PMID:21304478

  4. Helicobacter pylori interferes with an embryonic stem cell micro RNA cluster to block cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs, post-transcriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression, are implicated in host defense against pathogens. Viruses and bacteria have evolved strategies that suppress microRNA functions, resulting in a sustainable infection. In this work we report that Helicobacter pylori, a human stomach-colonizing bacterium responsible for severe gastric inflammatory diseases and gastric cancers, downregulates an embryonic stem cell microRNA cluster in proliferating gastric epithelial cells to achieve cell cycle arrest. Results Using a deep sequencing approach in the AGS cell line, a widely used cell culture model to recapitulate early events of H. pylori infection of gastric mucosa, we reveal that hsa-miR-372 is the most abundant microRNA expressed in this cell line, where, together with hsa-miR-373, it promotes cell proliferation by silencing large tumor suppressor homolog 2 (LATS2) gene expression. Shortly after H. pylori infection, miR-372 and miR-373 synthesis is highly inhibited, leading to the post-transcriptional release of LATS2 expression and thus, to a cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. This downregulation of a specific cell-cycle-regulating microRNA is dependent on the translocation of the bacterial effector CagA into the host cells, a mechanism highly associated with the development of severe atrophic gastritis and intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Conclusions These data constitute a novel example of host-pathogen interplay involving microRNAs, and unveil the couple LATS2/miR-372 and miR-373 as an unexpected mechanism in infection-induced cell cycle arrest in proliferating gastric cells, which may be relevant in inhibition of gastric epithelium renewal, a major host defense mechanism against bacterial infections. PMID:22027184

  5. Correlation between cag Pathogenicity Island Composition and Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastroduodenal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christina; Sillén, Anna; Eriksson, Lena; Strand, Mona-Lisa; Enroth, Helena; Normark, Staffan; Falk, Per; Engstrand, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with a variety of outcomes ranging from seemingly asymptomatic coexistence to peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (PAI) contains genes associated with a more aggressive phenotype and has been suggested to be a determinant of severe disease outcome. The cagA gene has served as a marker for the cag PAI. However, the presence of this single gene does not necessarily indicate the presence of a complete set of cag PAI genes. We have analyzed the composition of the cag PAI in 66 clinical isolates obtained from patients with duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, and nonulcer dyspepsia. Hybridization of DNA to microarrays containing all the genes of the cag PAI showed that 76 and 9% of the strains contained all or none of the cag PAI genes, respectively. Partial deletions of the cag PAI were found in 10 isolates (15%), of which 3 were cagA negative. The ability to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in AGS cells was correlated to the presence of a complete cag PAI. Strains carrying only parts of the island induced IL-8 at levels significantly lower than those induced by cag PAI-positive isolates. The presence of an intact cag PAI correlates with development of more severe pathology, and such strains were found more frequently in patients with severe gastroduodenal disease (odds ratio, 5.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 17.4). Partial deletions of the cag PAI appear to be sufficient to render the organism less pathogenic. PMID:14573679

  6. [Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Masumi; Fukuda, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is mainly acquired in the first 2 or 3 years and the risk of infection declines rapidly after 5 years of age. In developing countries, acquisition age of the infection is probably lower than in developed countries. In Japan, main transmission route is intrafamilial and mother to children infection is most important. But in developing countries, some reports suggest that extrafamilial infection is more important. The famous paper revealed that H. pylori can be cultivated from vomitus, saliva and cathartic stools and the possibility of source of H. pylori infection. Bed sharing, large number of family members, delayed weaning from a feeding bottle, regurgitated gastric juice in the mother's mouth are reported as risk factors of the infection. PMID:19999106

  7. Comparative Genomics of a Helicobacter pylori Isolate from a Chinese Yunnan Naxi Ethnic Aborigine Suggests High Genetic Divergence and Phage Insertion

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuanhai; He, Lihua; Zhang, Maojun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common pathogen correlated with several severe digestive diseases. It has been reported that isolates associated with different geographic areas, different diseases and different individuals might have variable genomic features. Here, we describe draft genomic sequences of H. pylori strains YN4-84 and YN1-91 isolated from patients with gastritis from the Naxi and Han populations of Yunnan, China, respectively. The draft sequences were compared to 45 other publically available genomes, and a total of 1059 core genes were identified. Genes involved in restriction modification systems, type four secretion system three (TFS3) and type four secretion system four (TFS4), were identified as highly divergent. Both YN4-84 and YN1-91 harbor intact cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) and have EPIYA-A/B/D type at the carboxyl terminal of cagA. The vacA gene type is s1m2i1. Another major finding was a 32.5-kb prophage integrated in the YN4-84 genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (30/33) with Helicobacter pylori prophage KHP30. Moreover, a 1,886 bp transposable sequence (IS605) was found in the prophage. Our results imply that the Naxi ethnic minority isolate YN4-84 and Han isolate YN1-91 belong to the hspEAsia subgroup and have diverse genome structure. The genome has been extensively modified in several regions involved in horizontal DNA transfer. The important roles played by phages in the ecology and microevolution of H. pylori were further emphasized. The current data will provide valuable information regarding the H. pylori genome based on historic human migrations and population structure. PMID:25799515

  8. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  9. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  10. [Helicobacter pylori - 2012].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2012-09-01

    The author overviews some aspects of literature data of the past 2 years. Genetic research has identified polymorphisms of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and the host which could play a role in the clinical outcome of the infection (peptic ulcer or gastric cancer). So far they have been performed in research centers but with a decrease of costs, they will take their place in diagnosing the diseases and tailoring the treatment. Antibiotic resistance is still growing in Southern European countries and is decreasing in Belgium and Scandinavia. Currently, the clarithromycin resistance rate is of 17-33% in Budapest and levofloxacin resistance achieved 27%. With careful assessment of former antibiotic use the resistance to certain antibiotics can be avoided and the rates of eradication improved. Immigration is a growing problem worldwide: according to Australian, Canadian and Texan studies, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori is much higher in the immigrant groups than in the local population. An Italian study showed that the eradication rate of triple therapy is significantly lower in the Eastern European immigrants than in the Italians. A recent research has suggested a link between female/male infertility, habitual abortion and Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are no published data or personal experience to show whether successful eradication of the virus in these cases is followed by successful pregnancies or not. The author overviews the Maastricht process and analyzes the provisions of the Maastricht IV/Florence consensus, in which the new diagnostic algorithms and indications of eradication therapy are reformulated according to the latest levels of evidence and recommendation grading. According to the "test and treat" strategy, either the urea breath test or the stool monoclonal antigen test are recommended as a non-invasive diagnostic method in primary care. Endoscopy is still recommended in case of alarm symptoms, complicated ulcer, or if