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Sample records for pyogenic liver abscesses

  1. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many potential causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  2. Pyogenic liver abscess: uncommon presentation.

    PubMed

    Sotto Mayor, Joana; Robalo, Maria Margarida; Pacheco, Ana Paula; Esperança, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a rare entity, but it is fatal when untreated. With a peak incidence in the fifth decade of life, its early recognition and intervention are key to successful treatment and better prognosis of patients. In recent years, its approach has been enhanced by the use of percutaneous drainage, improved imaging techniques and a better microbiological characterisation, allowing for a more appropriate use of antibiotics. Clinical manifestations are variable and depend on the size of the abscess, the condition of the patient, associated diseases and possible complications. Among the most common symptoms that stand out are the pain in the upper quadrants of the abdomen, high fever, nausea and vomiting. The authors present the case of a patient who developed an atrial flutter as the initial presentation of a hepatic abscess that imagiologically mimicked a hepatic tumour. PMID:27170608

  3. Pyogenic liver abscess: Changing patterns in approach

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz A; Bari, Shams UL; Rouf, Khawaja Abdul; Wani, Khurshid Alam

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To define optimum management of the pyogenic liver abscess and assess new trends in treatment. METHODS: One hundred and sixty nine patients with pyogenic liver abscess managed at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Kashmir (India) from July 2001 to August 2006 were studied to evaluate and define the optimum treatment. RESULTS: Mortality in the surgically treated group of patients was 9.4% (12/119), while those treated non-surgically had a fatality rate of 16.66% (7/42). Multiple liver abscesses treated surgically had a surprisingly low mortality of 30%. The biliary tract (64.97%) was the most common cause of liver abscess. Multiple abscesses, mixed organisms and abscess complications are all associated with a significantly increased mortality. However, the lethality of the primary disease process was the most important factor in determining survival. CONCLUSION: Transperitoneal surgical drainage and antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment. Percutaneous drainage is recommended for high risk patients only. PMID:21206721

  4. Appendectomy correlates with increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chien, Sou-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known on the association between appendectomy and pyogenic liver abscess. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between appendectomy and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 212,530 subjects age 20 to 84 years with newly diagnosed appendectomy as the appendectomy group since 1998 to 2010, and 850,099 randomly selected subjects without appendectomy as the nonappendectomy group. Both appendectomy and nonappendectomy groups were matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing appendectomy. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess at the end of 2011 was estimated in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to investigate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of pyogenic liver abscess associated with appendectomy and other comorbidities including alcoholism, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver diseases, and diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.73-fold greater in the appendectomy group than that in the nonappendectomy group (3.85 vs 2.22 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 1.71, 1.76). The multivariable regression analysis disclosed that the adjusted HR of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.77 for the appendectomy group (95% CI 1.59, 1.97), when compared with the nonappendectomy group. Appendectomy is associated with increased hazard of pyogenic liver abscess. Further studies remain necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:27368018

  5. Citrobacter koseri: an unusual cause of pyogenic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Monica; Sharma, Alka; Singh, Ram; Lehl, S S

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscess is a common pathology in the Indian subcontinent and usually results from amoebic or bacterial infection. Pyogenic abscesses usually occur in those with underlying predisposing factors like intra-abdominal infections, biliary infections or comorbidities like malignancy, immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus and previous biliary surgery or interventional endoscopy. Citrobacter is an unusual cause of pyogenic liver abscess and may occur in the setting of underlying comorbidities. We report a 56-year-old man with diabetes (operated for periampullary carcinoma 20 years ago), who presented with a history of fever for 1 week and on evaluation was found to have Citrobacter koseri-related hepatic abscess. The patient was managed with parenteral antibiotics, repeated aspiration of liver abscess and pigtail drainage. PMID:23505286

  6. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Gemella morbillorum

    PubMed Central

    Sumberaz, Alessandro; Testino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Even though Gemella morbillorum infection (GMI) is rare in humans, it may nevertheless, cause endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, pleural empyema, nephritis, mediastinitis, and occasionally, liver abscess. We are describing the case of a 64-years-old Caucasian male admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory parameters revealed inflammation signs, and instrumental examinations showed the presence of diverticula in the ascending colon. Abdominal ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) showed two focal lesions in the right liver lobe. One had the characteristics of a simple cyst; the second was hypoechoic with a low density area, possibly containing necrotic material. US-guided needle biopsy was found negative for neoplastic cells, showing purulent infiltrate. Pus culture was found positive for GMI. Systemic antibiotic therapy coupled with repeated US-guided needle aspiration, induced the resolution of the hepatic abscess. Few cases have been reported of hepatic abscess caused by GMI in immunocompetent non-cirrhotic subjects. PMID:25100894

  7. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Singh, N Pal; Sagar, Tanu; Nirmal, Kirti; Kaur, I Rajender

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a gram negative aerobic non-fermenter bacilli. It is considered as an important emerging pathogen after Acinetobacter baumannii in patients with impaired immune system and in nosocomial infections. Here, we present a case of community acquired pyogenic liver Abscess caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii in a diabetic patient. PMID:27504286

  8. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N. Pal; Nirmal, Kirti; Kaur, I. Rajender

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a gram negative aerobic non-fermenter bacilli. It is considered as an important emerging pathogen after Acinetobacter baumannii in patients with impaired immune system and in nosocomial infections. Here, we present a case of community acquired pyogenic liver Abscess caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii in a diabetic patient. PMID:27504286

  9. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  10. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  11. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  12. Gas-Forming Pyogenic Liver Abscess with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Muhammad K.; Jones, Kellie R.

    2015-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare but rapidly fatal infection. The main virulence factor of this pathogen is its α-toxin (lecithinase), which decomposes the phospholipid in cell membranes leading to cell lysis. Once the bacteria are in blood stream, massive intravascular hemolysis occurs. This can present as anemia on admission with evidence of hemolysis as indicated by low serum haptoglobin, high serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elevated indirect bilirubin, and spherocytosis. The clinical course of C. perfringens septicemia is marked by rapidly deteriorating course with a mortality rate ranging from 70 to 100%. The very rapid clinical course makes it difficult to diagnose on time, and most cases are diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore it is important to consider C. perfringens infection in any severely ill patient with fever and evidence of hemolysis. We present a case of seventy-seven-year-old male with septic shock secondary to pyogenic liver abscess with a brief review of existing literature on C. perfringens. PMID:26090240

  13. Analysis of the Bacterial Diversity in Liver Abscess: Differences Between Pyogenic and Amebic Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Reyna-Fabián, Miriam E; Zermeño, Valeria; Ximénez, Cecilia; Flores, Janin; Romero, Miguel F; Diaz, Daniel; Argueta, Jesús; Moran, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Cerritos, René

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that virulence in Entamoeba histolytica is triggered in the presence of both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria species using in vitro and in vivo experimental animal models. In this study, we examined samples aspirated from abscess material obtained from patients who were clinically diagnosed with amebic liver abscess (ALA) or pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). To determine the diversity of bacterial species in the abscesses, we performed partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, the E. histolytica and Entamoeba dispar species were genotyped using tRNA-linked short tandem repeats as specific molecular markers. The association between clinical data and bacterial and parasite genotypes were examined through a correspondence analysis. The results showed the presence of numerous bacterial groups. These taxonomic groups constitute common members of the gut microbiota, although all of the detected bacterial species have a close phylogenetic relationship with bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, some patients clinically diagnosed with PLA and ALA were coinfected with E. dispar or E. histolytica, which suggests that the virulence of these parasites increased in the presence of bacteria. However, no specific bacterial groups were associated with this effect. Together, our results suggest a nonspecific mechanism of virulence modulation by bacteria in Entamoeba. PMID:26572872

  14. Zolpidem Use Associated With Increased Risk of Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association between zolpidem use and pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan.This was a population-based case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program since 2000 to 2011. We identified 1325 patients aged 20 to 84 years with the first-attack of pyogenic liver abscess as the cases, and 5082 patients without pyogenic liver abscess matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of hospitalization for pyogenic liver abscess as the controls. Patients whose last remaining 1 tablet for zolpidem was noted ≤7 days before the date of admission for pyogenic liver abscess were defined as current use of zolpidem. Patients whose last remaining 1 tablet for zolpidem was noted >7 days before the date of admission for pyogenic liver abscess were defined as late use of zolpidem. Patients who never received 1 prescription for zolpidem were defined as never use of zolpidem. A multivariable unconditional logistic regression model was used to measure the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) to explore the association between zolpidem use and pyogenic liver abscess.After adjustment for possible confounding variables, the adjusted OR of pyogenic liver abscess was 3.89 for patients with current use of zolpidem (95% CI 2.89, 5.23), when compared with those with never use of zolpidem. The adjusted OR decreased to 0.85 for those with late use of zolpidem (95% CI 0.70, 1.03), but without statistical significance.Current use of zolpidem is associated with the increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess. Physicians should take the risk of pyogenic liver abscess into account when prescribing zolpidem. PMID:26266369

  15. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Due to Rhodococcus equi in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Napoleão, Fátima; Vieira Damasco, Paulo; Ferreira Camello, Thereza Cristina; Damasceno do Vale, Márcio; Braga de Andrade, Arnaldo Feitosa; Hirata, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2005-01-01

    A case of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent individual was successfully treated by combining surgery and antibiotics. The R. equi-targeted antimicrobial agents erythromycin and rifampin were used only after surgical resection of the lesion and identification of the infective organism. PMID:15695730

  16. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  17. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  18. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  19. A middle-aged lady with a pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Law, Siu-Tong; Lee, Ming Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare, but rapidly fatal infection. It is usually associated with malignancy and immunosuppression. We report the case of 50-year-old lady with the secondary liver metastases from rectal cancer presented with fever and epigastric pain. The identification of Gram-positive bacilli septicaemia, the presence of gas-forming liver abscess and massive intravascular hemolysis should lead to the suspicion of C. perfringens infection. Here we review twenty cases published since 1990 and their clinical features are discussed. The importance of ”an aggressive treatment policy” with multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:22993668

  20. Appendectomy correlates with increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chien, Sou-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Little is known on the association between appendectomy and pyogenic liver abscess. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between appendectomy and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan.This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 212,530 subjects age 20 to 84 years with newly diagnosed appendectomy as the appendectomy group since 1998 to 2010, and 850,099 randomly selected subjects without appendectomy as the nonappendectomy group. Both appendectomy and nonappendectomy groups were matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing appendectomy. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess at the end of 2011 was estimated in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to investigate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of pyogenic liver abscess associated with appendectomy and other comorbidities including alcoholism, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver diseases, and diabetes mellitus.The overall incidence of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.73-fold greater in the appendectomy group than that in the nonappendectomy group (3.85 vs 2.22 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 1.71, 1.76). The multivariable regression analysis disclosed that the adjusted HR of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.77 for the appendectomy group (95% CI 1.59, 1.97), when compared with the nonappendectomy group.Appendectomy is associated with increased hazard of pyogenic liver abscess. Further studies remain necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:27368018

  1. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the management of pyogenic liver abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, J H; Madayag, M A; Localio, S A; Spencer, F C

    1975-01-01

    An unexplained increase in the frequency of pyogenic liver abscesses of unknown etiology has, fourtunately, been paralleled by significant advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. This report reviews experience with 14 patients operated upon at NYU Medical Center since 1971. Eight cases (57%) were cryptogenic. Other abscesses were associated with biliary disease (3); abdominal sepsis (2); and trauma (1). Abscesses were present on hospitalization in 12 patients. Clinical findings included fever (101-108 F); 100%; leucocytosis, 71%; anorexia and vomiting, 50%; localized tenderness and hepatomegaly, 50%; hypoalbuminemia, 86%; hypocholesterolemia, 78%; elevated SGOT, 71%; and elevated aikaline phosphatase, 43%. Technetium hepatic scintiscans showed focal defects in 10 of 12 patients (83%), but did not detect multiple abscesses in 2 of these. Hepatic arteriography performed in 10 patients was highly accurate, outlining single abscesses in 6 and multiple abscesses in 4. Furthermore, in one patient a false positive scintiscan was demonstrated by negative arteriography, confirmed by autopsy. In 4 patients, arteriography indicated an abscess in the posterior-superior area of the right hepatic lobe. With precise anatomical localization, a trans-thoracic approach permitted uncomplicated drainage in each case. This approach provides excellent exposure and direct drainage for abscesses in this area. An additional therapeutic adjunct in two patients, with 4 and 11 abscesses each, was postoperative intraportal infusion of antibiotics through the umbilical vein. Thirteen patients (83%) recovered, one dying from pulmonary embolism. Primary hepatic abscesses occur with increasing frequency. Primary hepatic abscesses occur with increasing frequency. Primary hepatic abscesses occur with increasing frequency. The methods described allow more precise preoperative diagnosis and direct surgical drainage. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1130869

  2. Prevalence of and risk factors for endogenous endophthalmitis in patients with pyogenic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Hyung; Jun, Chung Hwan; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Wan Sik; Jung, Sook In; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) can be successfully treated, the visual prognosis of patients with endogenous endophthalmitis (EE) associated with a PLA is poor. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention may salvage useful vision. Therefore, we investigated risk factors for EE in patients with PLA, to facilitate early diagnosis. Methods Data from 626 patients diagnosed with PLA between January 2004 and July 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: those with liver abscess-associated endogenous endophthalmitis (LAEE) and non-LAEE. Results The prevalence of EE in PLA patients was 1.92%. The mean age for all patients (373 males, 59.6%) was 62.8 years. Upon multivariate logistic regression, a liver abscess or another systemic infection (odds ratio [OR], 5.52; p = 0.005), an abscess in the right superior segment (OR, 5.26; p = 0.035), and Klebsiella pneumoniae infection (OR, 3.68; p = 0.039), were risk factors for LAEE. The final visual outcomes of patients with LAEE included no light perception in seven, hand motion only in three, and decreased visual acuity in two. Vitrectomy and early intravitreal injections of antibiotics improved visual acuity and preserved useful vision. Conclusions PLA patients with other systemic infections, abscesses in the right superior segment, and K. pneumoniae infection require close monitoring and early intervention to treat LAEE. Intravitreal antibiotic injections or early vitrectomy may salvage useful vision. PMID:26161011

  3. Fusobacterium Nucleatum: Atypical Organism of Pyogenic Liver Abscess Might be Related to Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Yuklyaeva, Nataliya; Sornprom, Suthanya; Hyman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) are the most common form of liver abscesses in the United States. Most cases are caused by enteric bacteria and anaerobes. We report a case of PLA caused by a rare pathogen, Fusobacterium nucleatum, from an unusual primary site of infection. Case Report: A 60-year-old male presented with subacute fever. Initial work-up revealed leukocytosis and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Dental examination and Panorex x-ray were normal. Imaging of the liver with abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 5.5 cm abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Culture of the aspirate grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. He improved with abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy with moxifloxacin and metronidazole. Colonoscopy performed a few weeks later, demonstrated sigmoid ulceration most likely from the previous diverticulitis. Conclusion: PLAs can be a complication of sigmoid diverticulitis and as a result of occult dental disease as well. The clinical presentation of Fusobacterium infection is diverse and can be fatal if diagnosis is delayed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to preventing serious complications. PMID:27213146

  4. A liver abscess deprived a healthy adult of eyesight: endogenous endophthalmitis associated with a pyogenic liver abscess caused by serotype K1 Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Maruno, Takahisa; Ooiwa, Yoko; Takahashi, Ken; Kodama, Yuzo; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia usually causes urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and other infectious diseases in hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Among the types of Klebsiella pneumonia, serotype K1 is known to be a highly virulent pathogen. We herein report the case of a healthy 63-year-old man with a pyogenic liver abscess and bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by serotype K1 Klebsiella pneumonia. Although the patient received percutaneous abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy, he lost his eyesight. To improve the poor prognoses of ocular complications, providing both an earlier diagnosis and treatment is critical. PMID:23583997

  5. Tropical liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, K. G.; Yap, I.; Wong, S. T.; Wee, A.; Guan, R.; Kang, J. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Forty-one consecutive cases of liver abscesses seen at the National University Hospital, Singapore from 1988 to 1994 were reviewed. Twenty-seven cases (65%) were pyogenic, six (15%) amoebic, two (5%) tuberculous and six (15%) indeterminate. The predominance of pyogenic abscesses is in marked contrast to previous studies from the region a decade ago in which amoebic abscesses were the commonest type. The commonest pathogen causing pyogenic abscess was Klebsiella pneumoniae. Two cases were due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this organism needs to be actively looked for in smears and cultures of aspirated material. As the majority of organisms isolated were resistant to ampicillin, empirical antibiotic treatment for suspected pyogenic abscess should include gentamicin or a cephalosporin. Percutaneous needle aspiration of the abscess was performed for 85% of pyogenic abscesses and surgery was necessary in only two cases because of complications. We found that percutaneous aspiration of liver abscess is helpful to confirm the diagnosis, provides a better bacteriological culture yield, gives a good outcome, and may uncover clinically unsuspected conditions like malignancy and tuberculoma which may mimic the presentation of liver abscesses. We recommend routine cytological examination of aspirated abscess material as well as stains and cultures for acid-fast bacilli. PMID:9122104

  6. Pyogenic liver abscess presenting as a ''warm'' lesion in Ga-67 scintigram. A potential pitfall in interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Domstad, P.A.; Purcell, M.; DeLand, F.H.

    1984-03-01

    In the Ga-67 scintigram, most pyogenic liver abscesses appear to be areas of high radiotracer concentration; rarely photon-deficient lesions may also occur. We present a 58-year-old man with sepsis and hepatic abscess, demonstrated by a Tc-99m BIDA study and a computerized tomogram of the body, showing homogenous radiogallium uptake throughout the liver in the Ga-67 images. To avoid missing such a ''warm'' lesion, it is emphasized that abdominal Ga-67 scintigrams for localization of a focal inflammatory lesion should be done along with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m BIDA scintigraphy.

  7. Pyogenic liver abscess: a retrospective analysis of 107 patients during a 3-year period.

    PubMed

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Chen, Chin-Ming; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Hou, Ching-Cheng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2005-12-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a potentially life-threatening disease, and early diagnosis may be difficult. In order to provide diagnostic clues and to enhance the prompt management of such cases, we retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics of PLA during a 3-year period in a tertiary-care hospital. The crude incidence rate of PLA in our study was 446.1 per 100,000 hospital admissions. Male predominance and a mean age of 57.6 +/- 14.4 years were observed. Diabetes mellitus was the most common concomitant disease, and biliary pathologies were the most common predisposing cause of this type of abscess. The most common clinical features were fever, chills, and abdominal pain. Leukocytosis was found in 67.3% of the patients, and the observed C-reactive protein (CRP) values were high. The most common pathogen was Klebsiella pneumoniae. The mortality rate was 6.5%. A complete history, physical examination, evaluation of the white blood cell count and CRP, and the prompt arrangement of imaging studies may lead to an earlier diagnosis. The aggressive performance of image-guided catheter drainage and the appropriate administration of antibiotics may reduce the mortality rate of PLA. PMID:16377869

  8. Pyogenic liver abscess: Differences in etiology and treatment in Southeast Asia and Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cerwenka, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of etiology and timely treatment of underlying causes, when possible, play an important role in the successful therapy of patients with pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Recent publications from Central Europe and Southeast Asia hint at considerable differences in etiology. In this article, we aim to elaborate these differences and their therapeutic implications. Apart from some special types of PLA that are comparable in Southeast Asia and Central Europe (such as posttraumatic or postprocedural PLA), there are clear differences in the microbiological spectrum, which implies different risk factors and disease courses. Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) PLA is predominantly seen in Southeast Asia, whereas, in Central Europe, PLA is typically caused by Escherichia coli, Streptococcus or Staphylococcus, and these patients are more likely to be older and to have a biliary abnormality or malignancy. K. pneumoniae patients are more likely to have diabetes mellitus. Control of septic spread is crucial in K. pneumoniae patients, whereas treatment of the underlying diseases is decisive in many Central European PLA patients. PMID:20503444

  9. A case of pyogenic liver abscesses in a previously healthy adolescent man

    PubMed Central

    Mentel, Dena A.; Cameron, Danielle B.; Gregg, Shea C.; Cholewczynski, Walter; Savetamal, Alisa; Crombie, Roselle E.; Possenti, Paul P.; Atweh, Nabil A.

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old, previously healthy man admitted with abdominal pain, high-grade fevers, nausea and emesis was found to have multiple hepatic abscesses. Aspiration cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum, a rare bacterium causing potentially fatal liver abscesses in humans. Following sequential percutaneous drainages and narrowing of antibiotics, the patient was discharged on a 6-week antibiotic course and showed no signs of infection. A week after presentation it was discovered that he had experienced upper respiratory symptoms and sore throat prior to presentation. Because oropharyngeal infections are a potential source of bacteremia, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with hepatic abscesses and no evidence of immunocompromise. PMID:25389131

  10. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic amebiasis; Extraintestinal amebiasis; Abscess - amebic liver ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis , an intestinal infection that is also called ...

  11. Primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Wu, T L; Huang, C H; Hwang, D Y; Lai, J H; Su, R Y

    1998-01-01

    During a six-year period, eleven persons with primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas muscle were treated at the Mackay Memorial Hospital. Five were males and six were females and their average age was 47.2 years (range 6-83 years). The abscess was identified by CT in 7 patients, MRI in 2 and ultrasonography in 1. One abscess was found during laparotomy. Treatment included extraperitoneal drainage of the abscess in 7 patients and CT guided aspiration in 3. One patient improved after antibiotic therapy and they all recovered after treatment. The diagnosis of primary pyogenic abscess requires a high index of suspicion and the best treatment is early operative drainage and administration of systemic antibiotics. PMID:9549580

  12. Pyogenic psoas abscess: analysis of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, M F; Lau, Y J; Hu, B S; Shi, Z Y; Lin, Y H

    1999-12-01

    From 1993 to 1998, 29 pyogenic psoas abscesses occurring in 27 patients were seen in Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Their age range was 25 to 85 years. Diabetes mellitus was the leading underlying disease. Fever and pain in the flank area, back and hip were the usual manifestations. The duration of symptoms prior to the diagnosis ranged from 3 days to 6 months. Most abscesses were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) images and proven by abscess cultures, which were divided into primary and secondary types. Eighteen of 29 abscesses were regarded as primary. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen in the primary abscesses, followed by Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, viridans streptococci, S. epidermidis, and Salmonella spp.. In the secondary abscess category, E. coli was the leading organism in this series, followed by S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, viridans streptococci and Candida albicans. The associated conditions included epidural abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, perirenal abscess, pulmonary tuberculosis, empyema, hydronephrosis and trauma history. The initial empiric therapy comprised mostly of cefazolin or oxacillin with or without an aminoglycoside. Thirteen patients underwent percutaneous drainage, while six received surgical debridement, including two with a recurrent abscess. One patient had both drainage and debridement. Others received medical treatment only. Two of the patients with primary abscess died in spite of percutaneous drainage. Therefore, open drainage, besides appropriate antibiotic treatment, is still required to control complex abscesses with sepsis. PMID:10650491

  13. Therapy of Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, Christoph; Wiegand, Johannes; Karlas, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Liver abscess (LA) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Methods This review comprehensively describes epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of LA, with a strong focus on antimicrobial treatment choices and the impact of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Results In industrialized areas, pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) accounts for over 80% of the cases, whereas Entamoeba histolyticais responsible for up to 10% of the cases, with a higher incidence in tropical areas. Highly virulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniaehave emerged as a predominant cause of PLA in Asian countries and tend to spread to the USA, Australia, and European countries, therefore requiring special alertness. Most common symptoms of LA are fever, chills, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain, although a broad spectrum of non-specific symptoms may also occur. Conclusion Imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography scan) and microbiological findings play a crucial role in the diagnosis of LA. The treatment of choice for PLA is a multimodal approach combining broad-spectrum antibiotics and aspiration or drainage of larger abscess cavities. Amebic LA can be cured by metronidazole therapy without drainage. PMID:26287275

  14. The conservative management of acute pyogenic iliopsoas abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Tong, C W; Griffith, J F; Lam, T P; Cheng, J C

    1998-01-01

    We describe three cases of acute pyogenic abscess of the iliopsoas in children treated conservatively. Two patients had image-guided aspiration and one was managed with antibiotics alone. All made a complete recovery. Acute pyogenic abscess of the iliopsoas in children can be treated effectively and safely with intravenous antibiotics and image-guided aspiration of the abscess. PMID:9460958

  15. Primary pyogenic psoas abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Kadambari, D; Jagdish, S

    2000-01-01

    Primary pyogenic psoas abscess, although quite a common condition, particularly in the tropics, is often overlooked as a clinical entity, probably because a psoas abscess has been traditionally associated with tuberculous spondylitis. The abscess is easily diagnosed by ultrasonography (US). Treatment by open drainage and antibiotics effective against Staphylococcus aureus results in complete reversal of symptoms and signs. In our series of 55 cases in the pediatric age group (0-12 years), pain and flexion at the hip were the most frequent clinical features at presentation. US was diagnostic in all cases in which it was performed. All except 1 patient showed complete resolution with extraperitoneal drainage, antibiotics, and skin traction. Although 4% of the cases were associated with suppurative external-iliac lymphadenitis, the remaining ones arose de novo in the psoas sheath, suggesting a primary pyomyositis of the psoas muscle. PMID:10955575

  16. Fusobacterium Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Buelow, Ben D.; Lambert, Joelle M.; Gill, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome); its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation. PMID:24348321

  17. Fusobacterium liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Ben D; Lambert, Joelle M; Gill, Ryan M

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome); its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation. PMID:24348321

  18. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... sanitation exist. Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and India have significant health problems from this disease. Risk ... are the usual treatment for liver abscess. A drug such as paromomycin or diloxanide must also be ...

  19. Pasteurella multocida liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Cortez, J C; Shapiro, M; Awe, R J

    1986-08-01

    A previously healthy 61-year-old woman was seen with an abnormal chest roentgenogram and a 3-week history of fever, chills, malaise, and right upper quadrant pain. Blood cultures revealed Pasteurella multocida sensitive to penicillin. Liver spleen radioisotope scan and CT scan revealed space occupying lesions in the right lobe of the liver. The patient was a gardener with no pets or animal exposure. This case illustrates P. multocida septicemia and a liver abscess in a patient without animal exposure. In addition, the possibility of soil as another reservoir of infection is raised. PMID:3487981

  20. Acute pyogenic iliopsoas abscess in children in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shah, R K; Singh, R P; Shah, N P

    2004-10-01

    We describe a prospective study of twenty-four cases of acute pyogenic abscess of the iliopsoas in children treated conservatively and operatively. Eight patients were managed conservatively with antibiotics alone while sixteen others were managed operatively by open drainage. All made a complete recovery. PMID:15510959

  1. Prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín; Morán-Mendoza, Onofre; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Mandeville, Peter B; Tapia-Pérez, J Humberto; Sánchez-Reyna, Martín; Sánchez-Rodríguez, José Juan; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify the variables that predict the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses. Methods We prospectively carried out a case–control study on a cohort of patients who had been diagnosed with amoebic liver abscesses using clinical, ultrasonic, and serologic methods. Patients with pyogenic abscesses, negative ELISA tests for amoebiasis, immunosuppression status, or previous abdominal surgery were excluded. All patients received metronidazole, and those who demonstrated 4 days of unfavorable clinical responses received percutaneous or surgical draining of the abscess. Demographic, laboratory, and ultrasonographic characteristics were assessed as prognostic indications of failure. Results Of 40 patients with amoebic liver abscess, 24 (mean age: 36.7±11.2 years) responded to medical treatment and 16 (41.8±11.6 years) required drainage, including 14 patients who underwent percutaneous drainage and two patients who required surgery. The albumin level, abscess volume, abscess diameter, and alkaline phosphatase level were all statistically significant (P<0.05) on the bivariate analysis. The highest (>99%) sensitivity and negative predictive value were observed for an abscess volume >500 ml and diameter >10 cm, while the best specificity and positive predictive value were achieved with the combination of low serum albumin level, high alkaline phosphatase level, and large abscess volume or diameter. Conclusions The prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses include low albumin, high alkaline phosphatase, and large abscess volume or diameter. The combination of these variables is a useful and easy tool for determining appropriate therapy. PMID:23265424

  2. An uncommon cause of recurrent pyogenic meningitis: pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Rama; Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Shanmugasundar, G; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Upreti, Vimal; Das, Ashim

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a 36-year-old male who presented with headache and hypopituitarism, and MRI revealed a ring enhancing lesion with pituitary stalk thickening. During follow-up, he presented with recurrent pyogenic meningitis with persistence of the lesion, therefore a diagnosis of pituitary abscess was considered. He underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) with evacuation of pus and received antibiotic treatment for the same. After this he remarkably improved and had no recurrence of symptoms. He is on levothyroxine, glucocorticoids and testosterone replacement therapy for his respective hormone deficits. PMID:22767626

  3. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated. PMID:23608848

  4. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Masquerading as Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vinit; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Singla, Vikas; Bansal, Rinkesh K.; Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Malignancy masquerading as liver abscess, and presenting with fever, is mainly described in patients with colorectal cancers with liver metastasis. Primary liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as non-resolving liver abscess is extremely uncommon and carries a dismal prognosis. We present a rare case of non-resolving liver abscess as a presenting manifestation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25941437

  5. Bacterial flora of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T G; Beharka, A B; Chengappa, M M; Carroll, L H; Raun, A P; Laudert, S B; Parrott, J C

    1999-04-01

    Bacterial flora of liver abscesses from cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin and susceptibilities of the predominant bacterial isolates to tylosin and other antimicrobial compounds were determined. Abscessed livers were collected at slaughter from cattle originating from feedlots that had fed tylosin (n = 36) or no tylosin (n = 41) for at least 2 yr, and segments of livers with one or two intact abscesses were transported to the laboratory. Abscesses were cultured for anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Fusobacterium necrophorum, either as single culture or mixed with other bacteria, was isolated from all abscesses. The incidence of subsp. necrophorum, as part of the mixed infection, was lower (P < .05) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (33 vs 61%). However, the incidence of Actinomyces pyogenes was higher (P < .01) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (53 vs 10%). Totals of 119 F. necrophorum and 21 A. pyogenes isolates were used for determinations of susceptibilities to bacitracin, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, lasalocid, monensin, tylosin, tilmicosin, and virginiamycin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antibiotics were determined with a broth microdilution method. The mean MIC of tylosin for F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes were not different between isolates from tylosin and no-tylosin groups. We concluded that continuous feeding of tylosin did not induce resistance in F. necrophorum or A. pyogenes. Also, the higher incidence of mixed infection of F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes in liver abscesses of tylosin-fed cattle suggests a potential synergistic interaction between the two organisms in causing liver abscesses. PMID:10328365

  6. Liver Abscess Caused by Infection with Community-Acquired Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Breurec, Sebastien; Melot, Benedicte; Hoen, Bruno; Passet, Virginie; Schepers, Kinda; Bastian, Sylvaine

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of pyogenic liver abscess caused by community-acquired Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae. The infecting isolate had 2 prominent features of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains: the capsular polysaccharide synthesis region for K1 serotype and the integrative and conjugative element ICEKp1, which encodes the virulence factors yersiniabactin, salmochelin, and RmpA. PMID:26890371

  7. Occult liver abscess following clinically unsuspected ingestion of foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B C; Mossey, J

    1997-01-01

    Two uncommon cases of foreign body (a wooden clothespin and a toothpick) perforation of the gur with associated pyogenic liver abscesses are presented. These cases illustrate the difficulties of preoperative diagnosis. The lack of history of ingestion of foreign bodies, variable clinical presentation of the conditions and radiolucent natures of the foreign bodies all play a role in impeding the diagnosis preoperatively. This report emphasizes the role of ultrasound and computed tomographic scan in evaluating similar cases. Any patient with known risk factors for ingestion of foreign body should arouse suspicion and be investigated further. PMID:9286481

  8. Liver abscess caused by Salmonella choleraesuis

    PubMed Central

    Kamatani, Takashi; Okada, Takemichi; Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshihito; Yokomori, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with long-term alcohol abuse presented with intermittent fever. Abdominal computed tomography revealed multiple masses. Abscess blood and pus cultures conducted after percutaneous catheter drainage with pigtail catheters yielded Salmonella choleraesuis. Antibiotic treatment with meropenem was started using multiple catheters in the liver. Drainage catheters in different locations were exchanged several times with larger-bored catheters. After septicemia was detected, abscesses spread to the peritoneal cavity. Pleural complications developed. Antibiotic treatment, with careful drainage guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, controlled the abscesses and complications. This report describes the difficult clinical course and treatment of a liver abscess from S. choleraesuis. PMID:25945064

  9. Left lobe amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Rasaretnam, Rudra; Wijetilaka, Shelton E.

    1976-01-01

    For reasons which are not quite clear amoebic liver abscesses in the left lobe are relatively uncommon. On account of the lesser bulk of the left lobe, and the potentially greater space under the left hemidiaphragm, expansive lesions within it remain less obtrusive than corresponding lesions in the right. Sixteen such cases are analysed and five distinct modes of clinical presentation have been found. Eight of the patients presented late with perforation into either the peritoneal or pleural cavities. In seven of eight remaining cases, an abdominal mass suggestive of a left lobe lesion was present. Anaemia, leucocytosis and a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate were usually present, and in the five cases seen in the last year a positive reaction was obtained to the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Confirmatory radiological features were present only in advanced cases. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:959101

  10. Liver Abscess Formation Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Lu, Dong; He, Yu-Sheng; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Cheng, De-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and evaluate the therapeutic effect of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) on the abscesses. A retrospective review of patient charts was performed in 3613 patients who suffered from liver malignancies (2832 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 781 with metastatic hepatic tumor) and had undergone 11,054 TACE procedures from January 2005 to October 2013. Liver abscesses were found in 21 patients. PCD was performed in all abscess patients. The clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following TACE were investigated and the therapeutic effect of PCD was evaluated. The incidence of liver abscess was 0.58% per patient and 0.19% per procedure. Approximately 57.1% of the patients had a medical history of bilioenteric anastomosis or biliary stent implantation. On computed tomography scans, the abscesses appeared as low-attenuation lesions and high-density iodinate oil scattered in the abscesses. The ultrasound showed the well defined, heterogeneously hypoechoic lesions. Positive microbiological isolates were obtained in all pus cultures and in 47.6% of blood cultures. The most common bacterium was Escherichia coli (52.4%). Twenty patients (95.2%) were cured from abscesses by using PCD, and 1 died of sepsis. Patients with predisposing factors are prone to an increased risk of liver abscess following TACE. Bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests on pus and blood help on the antibiotics selection. PCD combined with aggressive antibiotics can be recommended as the first-line therapeutic regimen. PMID:27124055

  11. Klebsiella pneumoniae Liver Abscess and Metastatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jason T.; Lewis, Catherine R.; Danner, Omar K.; Wilson, Kenneth L.; Matthews, L. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well-known cause of liver abscess. Higher rates of liver abscess associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae are seen in Taiwan. Metastatic endophthalmitis is a common complication associated with a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Case Report. We report a case of a 67-year-old Korean female with Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess. The patient developed metastatic endophthalmitis and ultimately succumbed to her disease despite aggressive medical and surgical treatment. Conclusion. Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Liver abscesses preferably should be treated with percutaneous drainage, but surgical treatment is needed in some cases. Metastatic spread to the eye is a common complication that must be treated aggressively with intravenous antibiotics and surgical intervention if necessary. PMID:26788530

  12. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  13. Challenging pyogenic cerebral abscess complicated by subdural empyema. A case report.

    PubMed

    Valencia, M P; Moon, A

    2012-12-20

    Brain abscesses develop in response to a parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria, beginning as a localized area of cerebritis and evolving into a suppurative lesion surrounded by a well-vascularized fibrotic capsule. The leading etiologic agents of brain abscess are the streptococcal strains and S. aureus. Abscesses may also be secondary to fungal or parasitic organisms. Brain abscess represents a significant medical problem, accounting for one in every 10,000 hospital admissions in the United States, and remains a serious situation despite recent advances made in detection and therapy. These lesions often produce complex clinical and radiologic findings and require prompt recognition and treatment to avoid a fatal neurologic outcome. Subdural empyema represents an important type of intracranial suppurative infectious-inflammatory disorder. Clinically, these patients initially have signs and symptoms of meningitis, but this course might be complicated later by the development of seizures and focal neurologic signs. PMID:24029180

  14. Medical treatment of multiple streptococcal liver abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlow, A.; Vellend, H.

    1983-04-01

    We describe four cases of multiple, cryptogenic, and streptococcal liver abscesses which were cured with antibiotic therapy. Two of the patients were referred for medical management as a last resort after open surgical drainage failed to eradicate the suppurative process. The other two patients were treated from the time of diagnosis with antimicrobial agents alone. Blood cultures or needle aspirates of the abscesses yielded a pure growth of streptococci in all instances. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G. Cryptogenic streptococcal abscesses may represent a subset of multiple hepatic abscesses particularly amenable to successful medical therapy consisting of a minimum of 6 weeks parenteral antibiotic therapy followed by a period of oral antibiotics until clinical, biochemical, and radiological resolution of the abscesses has occurred.

  15. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  16. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  17. Ruptured Liver Abscess in Neonates: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Choudhury, SR; Jhanwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hepatic abscess is a rare disease seen mainly in preterm following umbilical catheterisation. Liver abscess in term neonates without any predisposing factor is still rarer and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of liver abscess in term neonates presenting with abdominal mass due to rupture. PMID:27433449

  18. Percutaneous Drainage Combined with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Pyogenic Spondylitis with Iliopsoas Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroaki; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes in patients with pyogenic spondylitis accompanied by iliopsoas abscess who were treated by percutaneous drainage combined with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Overview of Literature To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of the use of percutaneous drainage combined with HBO therapy for the treatment of this condition. Methods Twenty-three patients (13 men, 10 women; mean age, 69.0 years; range, 45-85 years) were treated with percutaneous drainage combined with HBO therapy in addition to commonly used conservative therapy. Mean follow-up duration was 27.7 months (range, 12-48 months). Clinical outcomes and imaging examinations were retrospectively investigated. Results Symptoms such as low back pain, radicular pain, and hip pain resolved in all patients immediately after treatment. Mean time from the start of treatment to the return of C-reactive protein levels to normal or baseline values recorded before the onset of spondylitis was 28.3 days (range, 8-56 days). In the final set of follow-up radiographic studies, all patients were free from progressive destructive changes. Follow-up magnetic resonance images or computed tomography with contrast enhancement confirmed the disappearance or near-total resolution of the iliopsoas abscess cavity with healing of the pyogenic spondylitis in all 23 patients. No recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusions The present study suggests that patients with pyogenic spondylitis accompanied by iliopsoas abscess can be cured without a prolonged period of therapy or recurrence using this treatment. PMID:24967038

  19. Incidence and severity of Arcanobacterium pyogenes injection site abscesses with needle or needle-free injection.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Bryce M; Houser, Terry A; Hollis, Larry C; Tokach, Michael D; Nietfeld, Jerome C; Higgins, James J; Anderson, Gary A; Goehring, Brandon L

    2012-12-01

    Nursery-age pigs (n=198) were used to evaluate the difference in abscess formation at needle-free jet and conventional needle-and-syringe injection sites. Needle-free jet injection was used to administer injections in the neck and ham on one side of the animal whereas needle-and-syringe was used for neck and ham injections on the opposite side. Immediately prior to injection, the injection site surfaces were contaminated with an inoculum of Arcanobacterium pyogenes. Each pig was humanely euthanized 27 or 28 days after injections. Histopathological results showed that needle-free jet injection was associated with more abscesses than needle-and-syringe injection at both neck (P=0.0625) and ham (P=0.0313) injection sites. Out of 792 injection sites, only 13 abscesses were observed, with 12 of those present at needle-free jet injection sites. Needle-free jet injection may increase the occurrence of injection site abscesses that necessitate carcass trimming at pork processing plants. PMID:22854129

  20. Melioidosis: A Rare Cause of Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Catherine S. C.; Casupang, Ma. Amornetta J.

    2016-01-01

    Case Presentation. This is a case of a 44-year-old male, farmer, known to be diabetic, presenting with two-week history of vague abdominal pain associated with high grade fever. Abdominal CT scan showed localized liver abscess at segment 8 measuring 7.5 × 6.8 × 6.1 cm. Patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic ultrasound guided pigtail insertion for drainage of abscess. Culture studies showed moderate growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in which the patient completed seven days of IV Meropenem. On follow-up after 12 weeks of oral Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, taken twice a day, the patient remained asymptomatic with no residual findings based on the abdominal ultrasound. Discussion. Diagnosis of melioidosis, a known “great masquerader,” relies heavily on culture studies. Consensus with regard to the management of liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei has not yet been established due to the rarity of cases. Surgical intervention through either a percutaneous or open drainage has shown good outcomes compared to IV antibiotics alone. In Philippines, the possibility of underreporting is highly plausible. This write-up serves not only to report a rare presentation of melioidosis but also to add to the number of cases reported in the country, possibly indicative of disease emergence. PMID:27529039

  1. Melioidosis: A Rare Cause of Liver Abscess.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter Franz M San; Teh, Catherine S C; Casupang, Ma Amornetta J

    2016-01-01

    Case Presentation. This is a case of a 44-year-old male, farmer, known to be diabetic, presenting with two-week history of vague abdominal pain associated with high grade fever. Abdominal CT scan showed localized liver abscess at segment 8 measuring 7.5 × 6.8 × 6.1 cm. Patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic ultrasound guided pigtail insertion for drainage of abscess. Culture studies showed moderate growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in which the patient completed seven days of IV Meropenem. On follow-up after 12 weeks of oral Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, taken twice a day, the patient remained asymptomatic with no residual findings based on the abdominal ultrasound. Discussion. Diagnosis of melioidosis, a known "great masquerader," relies heavily on culture studies. Consensus with regard to the management of liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei has not yet been established due to the rarity of cases. Surgical intervention through either a percutaneous or open drainage has shown good outcomes compared to IV antibiotics alone. In Philippines, the possibility of underreporting is highly plausible. This write-up serves not only to report a rare presentation of melioidosis but also to add to the number of cases reported in the country, possibly indicative of disease emergence. PMID:27529039

  2. [Amoebic liver abscess--case report].

    PubMed

    Marsík, L; Ferko, A; Vacek, Z

    2005-07-01

    The authors present a case of a young male, who suffered with extraintestinal form of amoebiasis-amoebic liver abscesses. The patient traveled to India two month before symptoms onset. The diagnosis based on ultrasonography and computed tomography was definetely confirmed by serological examination. Metronidazol treatment was given initially, followed by percutaneous drainage. Open surgical tretment was indicated due to failure of percutaneous treatment. Patient was discharged home in a good condition one month after surgery. At this time patient is doing well eight months after surgery. PMID:16164088

  3. Liver abscess caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seu Hee; Kim, Min Ja; Roh, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Yoon, Young Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Invasive infections caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis are very rare in humans. We experienced an unusual case of liver abscess due to B. vesicularis in an immunocompetent young male. The patient was successfully treated by liver abscess drainage and with antimicrobial therapy of ceftriaxone followed by ampicillin/sulbactam. The organism found in the aspiration culture of the abscess material was initially reported, by using a VITEK 2 system, as Sphingomonas paucimobilis. However, later, B. vesicularis was confirmed as the true pathogen through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first case of liver abscess caused by B. vesicularis. PMID:22767540

  4. Pyogenic granuloma associated with periodontal abscess and bone loss - A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Panseriya, Bhrugesh J; Hungund, Shital

    2011-07-01

    A diverse group of the pathologic process can produce the enlargement of soft tissues in the oral cavity and often present a diagnostic challenge. This soft tissue enlargement may represent a variation of the normal anatomic structure, inflammatory reaction, cyst, neoplasm, and developmental anomalies. A group of reactive hyperplasias, which develop in response to chronic recurring tissue injury that stimulates an excessive tissue repair response. The pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a reactive enlargement that is an inflammatory response to local irritation such as calculus, a fractured tooth, rough dental restoration, and foreign materials or hormonal (pregnancy tumor) and rarely associated with bone loss. This paper presents a rare case of PG associated with periodontal abscess and bone loss in a 30-year-old male. PMID:22090773

  5. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jaideep; Gautam, Hitender; Venugopal, Shwetha; Porwal, Chhavi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Urvashi B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  6. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jaideep; Venugopal, Shwetha; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  7. [Liver abscess formation after treatment of liver cancer by arterial injection using adriamycin/mitomycin C oil suspension (ADMOS)].

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Hori, A; Satake, M; Kanetsuki, I; Ueno, K; Nishida, H; Ikeda, K; Kobayashi, H; Nakajo, M

    1992-02-25

    Of 210 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 135), metastatic liver cancer (n = 71) and cholangiocarcinoma (n = 4) who underwent intra-arterial infusion of adriamycin and/or mitomycin C oil suspension (ADMOS) and cisplatin, and both regimens, pyogenic liver abscess occurred in seven (3.3%). The percentages of abscess formation in the respective types of liver cancer were 0.8, 7.0 and 25%. These differences among the three types of liver cancer were attributed to the volume of the tumor vascular beds to be embolized, which might determine the relative amount or regional Lipiodol retention in the tumor and normal liver tissue. Four of seven patients with hepatic abscess had received the intra-arterial infusion of ADMOS, and their angiographic findings showed sequential decreases in the vascular beds of the tumor in comparison with those of previous infusion procedures; all had hypovascular liver tumors angiographically. We have never experienced this complication in other treatments such as embolization of the hepatic arteries and intra-arterial infusion of water-soluble anticancer drugs alone. These results suggest that the most important factor leading to abscess formation is the ischemic destruction of the intrahepatic ducts secondary to occlusion of the peribiliary arterial plexus by Lipiodol and/or the direct effects of anticancer drugs on these vessels. To avoid this complication, the volume of Lipiodol used for intraarterial infusion therapy should be carefully determined, especially when the patient has hypovascular tumors of the liver and a history of multiple previous intraarterial infusion procedures of anticancer drug. The use of ADMOS should be avoided in patients with hypovascular tumors of the liver such as secondary deposits and cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:1313961

  8. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band. PMID:23680184

  9. [Acute cholangitis secondary to ascariasis and complicated by liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Rakotonaivo, A; Ranoharison, H D; Razarimahefa, S H; Rakotozafindrabe, R; Rabenjanahary, T H; Ramanampamonjy, R M

    2015-01-01

    Acute cholangitis secondary to ascariasis is rare and occurs mainly in areas of high endemicity. The clinical presentation is non-specific, sometimes complicated by liver abscess. Abdominal ultrasound plays an important role in diagnosis and therapeutic surveillance. We report the case of a 35-year-old Malagasy woman with an acute cholangitis secondary to ascariasis and complicated by liver abscesses and its course to full recovery under medical treatment. PMID:26742557

  10. [Iliopsoas abscess: a rare complication of pyogenic sacroiliitis in a child].

    PubMed

    Zrig, M; Mnif, H; Zrig, A; Koubaa, M; Jawahdou, R; Mnari, W; Golli, W; Abid, A

    2010-02-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare entity in children. Diagnosis is often delayed because of its variable clinical presentation, low suspicion by the examining physician, and rare findings on radiographs. Delayed diagnosis, however, results in complications such as iliopsoas abscess. We report the case of a 12-year-old girl hospitalized with a 21-day history of fever, pain in the left iliac fossa, and flexion contracture of the hip. On examination, she had fever (38.9 degrees C), psoitis, localized tenderness at the left sacroiliac joint, and pain elicited by lateral compression of the pelvis. The abdominal examination was normal. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 130 mm in the first hour, C-reactive protein was 186 mg/l, and the white blood cell count was 18,400/mm(3), with 79% neutrophils. Urinalysis was normal. Blood cultures were negative. Radiographs of the pelvis showed irregular left sacroiliac borders. The CT scan provided the diagnosis of sacroiliitis complicated by an ilioapsoas abcsess. Treatment was based on antibiotic therapy associated with surgical drainage. Bacteriologic investigation revealed Staphylococcus aureus. The patient's temperature returned to normal on the second day. Antibiotics were continued for 3 months, leading to full recovery. PMID:19962864

  11. Streptococcus pyogenes Associated Post-traumatic Brodie’s Abscess of Cuboid: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Priyadarshi; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Varma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Brodie’s abscess of cuboid bone is one of the rarest diagnosis in children which most often is hematogenous in origin. Although Streptococcus pyogenes has been uncommonly implicated as causative organism in other bones, it is not yet reported in the cuboid. Case Report: We report the case of 14-year-old boy who presented with a lytic lesion in the cuboid bone. It was preceded by a penetrating injury with a small iron nail. He was treated with simple curettage without the addition of bone graft. Frank pus present in the cavity in the cuboid bone grew S. pyogenes on bacterial culture. Symptoms resolved after 6 weeks of antibiotics, however, complete radiological healing was obtained after 9 months. Conclusion: Although very rare, S. pyogenes associated Brodie’s abscess should strongly be suspected in a posttraumatic lytic lesion in the cuboid bone and bone grafting is not always required for bone healing even in presence of large pus-filled cavity. PMID:27299080

  12. Balantidium Coli liver abscess: first case report from India.

    PubMed

    Kapur, P; Das, A K; Kapur, P R; Dudeja, M

    2016-03-01

    Protozoal infections are common in the tropics. Amoebic colitis is the commonest of these infections and can lead to liver abscess as a complication. Balantidium coli is a rare free moving protozoal parasite which is known to infest human large intestine causing a type of colitis very similar to that caused by Entamoeba histolytica. However this pathogen is not known to cause liver invasion in humans. We report here a case of liver abscess caused by B. coli, which is probably the first such case reported in Indian literature. PMID:27065613

  13. Amebic pericardial effusion: a rare complication of amebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, B V; Somani, P N; Khanna, M N; Srivastava, P K; Jha, B N; Verma, S P

    1975-06-01

    Two rare cases of amebic pericardial effusion as a complication of amoebic liver abscess in the left lobe are described. The pericardial amebiasis should be suspected in a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of pericardial effusion with an evidence of hepatic abscess (in the left lobe) or in a patient with pericardial effusion of uncertain etiology. Aspiration of "anchovy sauce" pus from both the pericardial cavity and the liver should be regarded as confirming the diagnosis of amebic pericarditis secondary to amebic liver abcess because demonstration of Entamoeba hystolytica is seldom possible. Removal of pericardial pus and metronidazole intake were markedly effective in treating our patients. PMID:123716

  14. Clinical characteristics and progression of liver abscess caused by toxocara

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kyung Ho; Song, Jung Eun; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and progression of liver abscess caused by toxocara. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with serum IgG antibody to Toxocara canis and liver abscess diagnosed using abdominal computed tomography between February 2010 and February 2015. Among 84 patients exhibiting serum IgG antibody to Toxocara canis, 34 patients were diagnosed with liver asbscess and treated with albendazole. A follow-up period of 1 year was conducted. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 53 (34-79) years, with 26 (76.5%) patients being male. Twenty-one (61.7%) patients were moderate or heavy drinkers, 23 (67.6%) patients had a history of eating raw meat or liver and 6 (17.6%) patients owned pet dogs or cats. Main patient symptoms consisted of right upper quadrant pain, fever, and fatigue; 18 (52.9%) patients, however, presented with no symptoms. Lung involvement was detected in 444 (11.7%) patients. The eosinophil count increased in 29 (85.3%) patients at initial diagnosis, and decreased in most patients after albendazole treatment. The initial serum IgE level increased in 25 (73.5%) patients, but exhibited various response levels after albendazole treatment. Liver abscess formation improved in all patients. CONCLUSION: The liver abscess was improved with albendazole treatment. PMID:27366302

  15. Differential host susceptibility and bacterial virulence factors driving Klebsiella liver abscess in an ethnically diverse population.

    PubMed

    Lee, I Russel; Molton, James S; Wyres, Kelly L; Gorrie, Claire; Wong, Jocelyn; Hoh, Chu Han; Teo, Jeanette; Kalimuddin, Shirin; Lye, David C; Archuleta, Sophia; Holt, Kathryn E; Gan, Yunn-Hwen

    2016-01-01

    Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae is an emerging cause of community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess. First described in Asia, it is now increasingly recognized in Western countries, commonly afflicting those with Asian descent. This raises the question of genetic predisposition versus geospecific strain acquisition. We leveraged on the Antibiotics for Klebsiella Liver Abscess Syndrome Study (A-KLASS) clinical trial ongoing in ethnically diverse Singapore, to prospectively examine the profiles of 70 patients together with their isolates' genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. The majority of isolates belonged to capsule type K1, a genetically homogenous group corresponding to sequence-type 23. The remaining K2, K5, K16, K28, K57 and K63 isolates as well as two novel cps isolates were genetically heterogeneous. K1 isolates carried higher frequencies of virulence-associated genes including rmpA (regulator of mucoid phenotype A), kfu (Klebsiella ferric uptake transporter), iuc (aerobactin), iro (salmochelin) and irp (yersiniabactin) than non-K1 isolates. The Chinese in our patient cohort, mostly non-diabetic, had higher prevalence of K1 infection than the predominantly diabetic non-Chinese (Malays, Indian and Caucasian). This differential susceptibility to different capsule types among the various ethnic groups suggests patterns of transmission (e.g. environmental source, familial transmission) and/or genetic predisposition unique to each race despite being in the same geographical location. PMID:27406977

  16. Differential host susceptibility and bacterial virulence factors driving Klebsiella liver abscess in an ethnically diverse population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I. Russel; Molton, James S.; Wyres, Kelly L.; Gorrie, Claire; Wong, Jocelyn; Hoh, Chu Han; Teo, Jeanette; Kalimuddin, Shirin; Lye, David C.; Archuleta, Sophia; Holt, Kathryn E.; Gan, Yunn-Hwen

    2016-01-01

    Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae is an emerging cause of community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess. First described in Asia, it is now increasingly recognized in Western countries, commonly afflicting those with Asian descent. This raises the question of genetic predisposition versus geospecific strain acquisition. We leveraged on the Antibiotics for Klebsiella Liver Abscess Syndrome Study (A-KLASS) clinical trial ongoing in ethnically diverse Singapore, to prospectively examine the profiles of 70 patients together with their isolates’ genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. The majority of isolates belonged to capsule type K1, a genetically homogenous group corresponding to sequence-type 23. The remaining K2, K5, K16, K28, K57 and K63 isolates as well as two novel cps isolates were genetically heterogeneous. K1 isolates carried higher frequencies of virulence-associated genes including rmpA (regulator of mucoid phenotype A), kfu (Klebsiella ferric uptake transporter), iuc (aerobactin), iro (salmochelin) and irp (yersiniabactin) than non-K1 isolates. The Chinese in our patient cohort, mostly non-diabetic, had higher prevalence of K1 infection than the predominantly diabetic non-Chinese (Malays, Indian and Caucasian). This differential susceptibility to different capsule types among the various ethnic groups suggests patterns of transmission (e.g. environmental source, familial transmission) and/or genetic predisposition unique to each race despite being in the same geographical location. PMID:27406977

  17. Unusual Presentation of Recurrent Pyogenic Bilateral Psoas Abscess Causing Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism by Iliac Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Sakam, Sailaja; Ashraf, Umair; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Bilateral psoas abscess • acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis • bilateral pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Progressive left leg swelling • productive cough with whitish sputum • right flank pain Medication: Antibiotics and anticoagulation Clinical Procedure: CT-guided percutaneous drain placement Specialty: Internal Medicine/Critical Care Objective: Unusual presentation Background: Psoas abscesses are a known cause of back pain, but they have not been reported as a cause of acute lower extremity thromboses and bilateral pulmonary emboli. We report a patient with bilateral psoas abscesses causing extensive pulmonary emboli through compression of the iliac vein. Case Report: A 47-year-old man presented with bilateral leg swelling over 4 weeks. Physical examination revealed a thin male with bilateral leg swelling, extending to the thigh on his left side. He had hemoglobin of 10.5 g/dl, leukocytosis of 16 000/ml, and an elevated D-dimer. A computed tomography (CT) angiogram of his chest showed extensive bilateral pulmonary emboli and infarcts. He remained febrile with vague flank pain, prompting a CT of his abdomen and pelvis that showed large, multiloculated, septated, bilateral psoas abscesses with compression of the left femoral vein by the left psoas abscess and a thrombus distal to the occlusion. Two liters of pus was drained from the left psoas abscess by CT-guidance, and although the Gram staining showed Gram-positive cocci in clusters, cultures from the abscess and blood were negative. A repeat CT showed resolution of the abscesses, and the drain was removed. He was discharged to a nursing home to complete a course of intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusions: Although the infectious complications of psoas abscesses have been described in the literature, the mechanical complications of bilateral psoas abscesses are lacking. It is important to assess for complete resolution of psoas abscesses through

  18. Detection of excretory Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the urine, and detection of E. histolytica DNA and lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus for the diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Parija, Subhash C; Khairnar, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    Background Amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and pyogenic liver abscesses (PLA) appear identical by ultrasound and other imaging techniques. Collection of blood or liver abscess pus for diagnosis of liver abscesses is an invasive procedure, and the procedure requires technical expertise and disposable syringes. Collection of urine is a noninvasive procedure. Therefore, there has been much interest shown towards the use of urine as an alternative clinical specimen for the diagnosis of some parasitic infections. Here, we report for the first time the detection of E. histolytica DNA excreted in the urine for diagnosis of the cases of ALA. Results E. histolytica DNA was detected in liver abscess pus specimen of 80.4% of ALA patients by a nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S-like r RNA gene. The nested PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in all 37 (100%) liver abscess pus specimens collected prior to metronidazole treatment, but were detected in only 53 of 75 (70.6%) pus specimens collected after therapy with metronidazole. Similarly, the PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in 21 of 53 (39.6%) urine specimens of ALA patients. The test detected E. histolytica DNA in only 4 of 23 (17.4%) urine specimens collected prior to metronidazole treatment, but were detected in 17 of 30 (56.7%) urine specimens collected after treatment with metronidazole. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of lectin E. histolytica antigen in the liver abscess pus showed a sensitivity of 50% and the indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test for detection of amoebic antibodies in the serum showed a sensitivity of 76.8% for the diagnosis of the ALA. Conclusion The present study for the first time shows that the kidney barrier in ALA patients is permeable to E. histolytica DNA molecule resulting in excretion of E. histolytica DNA in urine which can be detected by PCR. The study also shows that the PCR for detection of E. histolytica DNA in urine of patients with ALA

  19. The role of cross sectional imaging in the management of acute pyogenic inguinal abscess - extrapelvic versus intrapelvic origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Abscesses involving the inguinal region as manifestations of complex soft-tissue infections are rare, and the infectious route is usually unclear. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the importance of imaging study and whether the clinical presentations differ between the extrapelvic and intrapelvic origin. Methods Patients who presented with inguinal abscess between January 2003 and December 2010 were evaluated retrospectively. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and debridement. Imaging studies, including computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, were performed in all patients to elucidate the origin and extent of infectious disease, and the results were reviewed. Clinical data, laboratory examination findings, and culture results were analyzed. Results Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the study: 13 patients whose infections were of extrapelvic origin (Group 1) and 15 patients of intrapelvic origin (Group 2). Imaging studies yielded information that helped guiding the treatment. Gram-positive coccus infection was more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.001), while mixed pathogen and anaerobic bacterial infection were more frequent in Group 2 (p = 0.002 and p = 0.006, respectively). Group 2 had a higher incidence of history of malignancy and chronic renal failure (p = 0.044 and p = 0.038, respectively). Conclusions Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful in diagnosing cases of inguinal abscess and determining the extent of infection. In patients presenting with acute pyogenic inguinal abscess, a higher prevalence of chronic renal failure and history of malignancy were found in those with an intrapelvic, as compared with an extrapelvic, origin of infection. PMID:23537455

  20. The first case report of Raoultella planticola liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Sujata; Shahrrava, Anahita; Al Zoubi, Moamen; Malow, James

    2016-01-01

    Raoultella species are a group of gram-negative, non-motile bacilli commonly isolated from the environment. The group was considered a member of the genus Klebsiella until the late 1990s. Raoultella planticola is a rare cause of human infections. We report the first case of liver abscess caused by this organism. The patient was successfully treated with appropriate antimicrobials combined with operative drainage. PMID:27516968

  1. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masakazu; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Uemura, Hisashi; Okada, Kaoru; Nakane, Shigeru; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hirohito; Oka, Yoshio; Nezu, Riichiro

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses. The 59-year-old female patient presented with a fever at a body temperature of 39.0°C. On abdominal computed tomography (CT), multiple liver abscesses were detected, and percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) was performed. The day after the PTAD, the patient's fever subsided and her inflammatory response abated. A lower gastrointestinal examination, performed to identify the origin of her symptoms, revealed a type 1 tumor in the sigmoid colon. A biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Prior to surgery, a second abdominal CT scan was performed, and a single liver metastasis was detected. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and partial liver resection were simultaneously performed. The histopathological diagnosis of the colon cancer was tub2, pN1, pH1, P0, ly1, v1, stage IV. To date, the patient remains free from hepatic abscess and colon cancer recurrence. Gastrointestinal examinations should be performed as early as possible to identify the cause of hepatic abscesses. Moreover, therapeutic decisions should only be made after imaging and examinations have been performed, which will be sufficient to identify the presence of liver metastases. PMID:25731285

  2. Cellular bases of experimental amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, V.; Mena-Lopez, R.; Anaya-Velazquez, F.; Martinez-Palomo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The complete sequence of morphologic events during amebic liver abscess formation in the hamster has been studied, from the lodgement of amebas in the hepatic sinusoids to the development of extensive liver necrosis. Following intraportal inoculation of live amebas, the early stages of the lesion (from 1 to 12 hours) were characterized by acute cellular infiltration composed of an increasingly large number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which surrounded centrally located trophozoites. Histiocytes and lysed leukocytes were situated on the periphery of the lesions. Hepatocytes close to the early lesions showed degenerative changes which led to necrosis; however, direct contact of liver cells with amebas was very rarely observed. At later stages, the extent of necrosis increased, macrophages and epithelioid cells replaced most leukocytes, and well-organized granulomas developed. Extensive necrosis associated with fused granulomas was present by Day 7. The results suggest that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites do not produce amebic liver abscesses in hamsters through direct lysis of hepatocytes. Rather, tissue destruction is the result of the accumulation and subsequent lysis of leukocytes and macrophages surrounding the amebas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6385728

  3. Multiple Medium Amoebic Liver Abscesses Successfully Treated with Medication and Comprehensive Percutaneous Catheter Drainage.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Yu; Shirano, Michinori; Iida, Ko; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Goto, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Solitary small (<5 cm) amoebic liver abscesses in the right lobe are generally treated using medication alone, while large abscesses are typically treated via a combination of medication and drainage. However, the therapeutic indications for multiple medium (5-10 cm) amoebic liver abscesses remain unclear. We herein report the findings of a 53-year-old woman who was receiving lenalidomide for multiple myeloma and subsequently developed multiple amoebic abscesses. Metronidazole alone was unsuccessful, although metronidazole and repeated percutaneous catheter drainage of the right lobe, left lobe, and thorax proved to ultimately be successful. Therefore, the successful use of medication alone may be associated with the total combined abscess volume. PMID:27523014

  4. [A case of multiple liver abscesses associated with Streptococcus salivarius in a patient with chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Saori; Otsuka, Taiga; Tsuji, Chika; Nakashita, Shunya; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an oral commensal bacterium that rarely causes disease in humans. Here, we report a case of liver abscess associated with S. salivarius in a 41-year-old woman who presented with continuous abdominal discomfort, fatigue, and fever. She was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses; she underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage. Thereafter, S. salivarius was isolated in all bacterial cultures of the drained abscesses, and it was sensitive to penicillins. She made a good recovery after treatment. In the absence of an infective source other than chronic periodontitis, the cause of liver abscesses was attributed to oral S. salivarius. S. salivarius is a normal oral commensal, and oral commensals must be considered if the infective origin of liver abscess cannot be determined. PMID:25100350

  5. A Case of Liver Abscess with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Koyano, Saho; Tatsuno, Keita; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are gram-negative, sulfate-reducing, and anaerobic bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Because Desulfovibrio spp. are infrequent causative agents of infectious diseases and are difficult to isolate and to identify from clinical specimens, the appropriate antibiotic therapy to infection with Desulfovibrio spp. has not been determined. We report the first case of liver abscess with bacteremia due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to show the clinical presentation and treatment. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam and oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. PMID:25632357

  6. First report of liver abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fen; Fan, Zhenping; Cui, Enbo; Zhang, Wenjin; Bao, Chunmei; Chen, Suming; Mao, Yuanli; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    This is the first reported case of liver abscess attributable to Salmonella serovar Dublin infection and also the fourth case of Salmonella liver abscess complicated with hepatocellular carcinoma reported since 1990. Drainage combined with intravenous antibiotics resulted in improvement, but recovery regressed again. Subsequent hepatic left lobectomy led to full recovery. PMID:23784127

  7. [Liver abscess and infective endocarditis cases caused by Ruminococcus productus].

    PubMed

    Sucu, Nurgün; Köksal, Iftihar; Yilmaz, Gürdal; Aydin, Kemalettin; Caylan, Rahmet; Aktoz Boz, Gönülden

    2006-10-01

    The genus Ruminococcus which are anaerobe Gram positive cocci, previously classified as Peptostreptococcus, may colonize the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, vagina and skin of humans and animals. In this report a case of liver abscess and a case of infective endocarditis caused by Ruminoccocus productus, which is very rarely encountered in the clinical practice were presented. The first case was a 32 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2002, with the complaints of fever lasting for 20 days and pain while breathing. The abdominal ultrasonography revealed the presence of a liver abscess, and the drainage material from the abscess yielded Ruminococcus productus, identified in BACTEC 9200 (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md) anaerobe system. As the isolate was found to be sensitive to penicilin, the empirical gentamicin and ampicillin/sulbactam therapy was continued. The second case was a 25 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2005, with the signs of fever lasting for 3-4 months, chills, bone and joint pains. As multiple vegetations were detected in echocardiography, blood cultures were collected and empirical therapy with ceftriaxone and gentamicin was initiated with the preliminary diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Bacteria which were isolated from blood cultures by BACTEC 9200 system have been identified as R. productus. As this strain was also sensitive to penicillin, the empirical therapy was changed to penicilin and gentamicin. These two cases indicated that R. productus should be considered in complicated infections even if it is a rarely isolated species from the clinical samples. PMID:17205698

  8. Pyogenic hepatic abscess presenting years after a choledochojejunostomy: a rare clinical occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Megan; Mangaonkar, Abhishek; Lovelace, Candace; Ibe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented with fever, chills/rigors and night sweats since 6 days. Blood cultures (4/4) initially reported Gram negative lactose-fermenting rods. Physical examination was fairly benign which included a normal abdominal examination. Laboratory tests were significant for an elevated white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein . Empirically, he was treated with piperacillin tazobactam. A chart review showed that he had undergone a choledochojejunostomy for a pancreatic head tumour 7 years before. We found a few reported cases of hepatic abscesses after choledochojejunostomy presenting years after the procedure. An abdominal CT scan confirmed our suspicion. Percutaneous drainage was performed and his antibiotics were switched to ciprofloxacin and metronidazole, based on the sensitivity report. The patient's clinical condition steadily improved. PMID:24913077

  9. [Treatment of primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas: retrospective study of 18 cases].

    PubMed

    Dahami, Z; Sarf, I; Dakir, M; Aboutaieb, R; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-11-01

    The primitive abcess of psoas muscle is a rare affection which involves mainly the young. The authors report 18 cases of primitive pyogenic abcess of psoas collected during a period of six years in the urology service of UHC Ibn Rochd Casablanca. The purpose of this review is to discuss the different therapeutic attitudes. The study concerned 11 men and seven women, their mean age was 35 years. The mean delay of evolution was 45 days. The physical exam found a psoitisis (five cases) and a flunk swelling (14 cases). The ultrasound exam showed the collection which was hypoechogenic in seven cases and heterogenous in 11 cases. The CT scan showed an heterogenouse hypodense collection without enhansment in seven cases. The use of antibiotherapy alone (four cases) and percutaneous drainage (four cases) permitted the recovery just respectively in one and two cases. Fifteen patients (83%) were operated through a postero-lateral lumbotomy route without costal resection. The bacteriological exam of the pus found a Staphylococcis aureus (ten cases) and Escherichia coli (two cases). The evolution was favorable in 14 cases; one patient was dead at fifth day post operatively by heart infarction. For the authors, the surgical drainage remains the treatment of choice. PMID:11774765

  10. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses resolve quickly once appropriately treated. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a strain of "staph" bacteria resistant to antibiotics in the penicillin family, which have been the ...

  11. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... compress by wetting a washcloth with warm — not hot — water and placing it over the abscess for ...

  12. [A case of liver abscess due to Streptococcus anginosus infection secondary to a dental extraction].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Hideyuki; Matsui, Noriaki; Tsukamoto, Shinji; Funakoshi, Sadahiro; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kabemura, Teppei; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro

    2015-08-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a high fever. He had undergone a dental extraction about 1 month prior to admission because of apical periodontitis. Imaging study revealed liver abscess lesions. Infection with Streptococcus anginosus was confirmed using both stab and blood culture. An adequate selection of antibiotics was administered, and a good outcome was obtained. There have been no case reports of liver abscess caused by intraoral commensal flora related to dental extraction in healthy adults. This case shows that liver abscesses can occur secondary to dental extractions, even in healthy adults. PMID:26250133

  13. A Rare Case of Toxic Myocarditis Caused by Bacterial Liver Abscess Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhai; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Hua; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Toxic myocarditis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Emergency Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chills, high fever, right upper abdomen pain, and increased white blood cell count are the main and common clinical features of bacterial liver abscess. It is rare to see bacterial liver abscess present symptoms of myocardial injury first, and this can lead to misdiagnosis. Case Report: We report a case of toxic myocarditis caused by bacterial liver abscess. The patient first presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation, and elevated TNI, which misled us to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the coronary artery had no stenosis or obstructive lesions after emergency coronary angiography. Then we modified the diagnosis to toxic myocarditis. Bacterial liver abscess was the proposed etiology after a series of auxiliary examinations. Finally, antibiotics and percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage were used to improve the clinical outcome. Conclusions: It is rare that patients with bacterial liver abscess first present symptoms of myocardial injury. Differential diagnosis between myocarditis and myocardial infarction should be careful, as myocarditis is a diagnosis of exclusion, and coronary angiography is necessary to confirm coronary disease. Percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage can effectively cure bacterial liver abscess. PMID:26726772

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Foecking, Mark F.; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation. PMID:24786958

  15. Risk factors, management, and prognosis for liver abscess after radical resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changxi; Li, Tao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Qiangpu; Zhi, Xuting

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare but potentially lethal infectious complication after radical surgical resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC), this study is aimed to identify the risk factors, management and prognosis of PLA after curative surgical resection of HC. Methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 95 patients who underwent surgical resection of HC at a tertiary center were included in this study. The risk factors pertaining to PLA formation were identified by exact logistic regression. Results: PLA developed in 8 of 95 patients. The median duration of PLA formation following surgical procedure was 145 days (range, 16-295 days) and the most commonly isolated microorganism was Escherichia coli (4/8). Though most patients who developed PLA after surgery were successfully managed with antibiotics and invasive therapy, the overall survival was statistically poorer than those without PLA formation (median, 16.9 vs. 34.2 months, P=0.048). Univariate analysis revealed that coexisting biliary disorders (37.5% vs. 8.0%, P=0.036), vascular reconstruction (37.5% vs. 9.2%, P=0.041) and margin status (62.5% vs. 21.8%, P=0.023) were associated with PLA formation, whereas only vascular reconstruction (odds ratio (OR), 10.31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-142.73; P=0.047) and margin status (OR, 8.45; 95% CI, 1.13-109.38; P=0.035) were identified as independent risk factors by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Intraoperative vascular reconstruction and positive margin status pose greater risks for PLA formation after radical resection of HC. For patients with high risk factors, careful follow-up is needed for early detection and management of this infrequent complication. PMID:26885067

  16. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  17. Actinomyces naeslundii and Eikenella corrodens as rare causes of liver abscesses.

    PubMed

    Jaqua, Nathan Thomas; Smith, Adam J; Shin, Terry T; Jahanmir, Jay

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with an unremarkable medical history was admitted with vague conditions of fever, chills, myalgias and malaise. Physical examination was remarkable for only scleral icterus. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin. Imaging demonstrated two masses in the right lobe of his liver, which were ultimately drained and cultures demonstrated Actinomyces and Eikenella. He continued to have fever on broad-spectrum antibiotics until catheter drainage of the abscesses was performed. He was eventually discharged in improved condition on amoxicillin-clavulanate. His aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin continued to improve and he remained afebrile and asymptomatic. A repeat CT 2 months after discharge demonstrated resolution of the abscesses. Actinomyces and Eikenella are rare causes of liver abscesses and treatment requires drainage and an extended course of antibiotics. The polymicrobial character typical of liver abscesses makes antibiotic therapy challenging when cultures reveal rare organisms such as Actinomyces and Eikenella. PMID:23867879

  18. [Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis associated with liver abscess: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, T; Nakamura, H; Takei, I; Maruyama, H; Kataoka, K; Saruta, T; Kobayashi, Y

    1989-10-01

    We report a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis associated with liver abscess, which was successfully treated with cefotaxime (CTX), one of the third-generation cephalosporins. A 53-year-old man was admitted to Keio University Hospital on June 13, 1988, because of a fever and a headache. On June 3, he suddenly started shivering and his temperature rose to 39 degrees C. He then began to complain of polydipsia, polyuria, and a weight loss of 4 kg a week. On June 11, he developed a severe headache. Four years prior to this incident, he had been diagnosed as having diabetes after a routine medical examination, but had neglected to undergo medical treatment. On admission, laboratory data showed leukocytosis, hyperglycemia (394 mg/dl) and ketonuria (4+). A lumbar puncture yielded cloudy cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing 500/3 cells/mm8, of which about 70% were neutrophils. A diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and purulent meningitis was made. A treatment with ampicillin (ABPC) and CTX, (12 g/day, each) was begun. On the third day, cultures of a blood specimen and CSF yielded both K. pneumoniae. The MICs of CTX to K. pneumoniae isolated from blood and CSF were both 0.05 microgram/ml. ABPC was discontinued, gentamicin was administered for 2 days, CTX was continued at the same dosage level and an administration of prednisolone 40 mg daily was begun.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2691713

  19. Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Lachish, Tamar; Wieder-Finesod, Anat; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-05-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is endemic in developing countries. The epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the disease in developing countries are well described. Travelers from nonendemic countries can serve as a model for the natural history of ALA. Currently, the available literature on travelers is limited. This is a retrospective observational study on Israeli travelers diagnosed with ALA. Data regarding travel history, clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment were collected and analyzed. Among 6,867 ill returning Israeli travelers, amebiasis was diagnosed in 53 travelers (0.77%), of whom 14 were with ALA (0.2%). Twelve ALA cases (86%) had an exposure in the Indian subcontinent. The male to female ratio was 1:1, with no significant clinical differences between the sexes. The average lag period between exposure and onset of symptoms was 17.1 months. The lack of male predominance and the prolonged lag period may imply that behavioral factors are pivotal in the development of ALA. Larger case series of travelers are required. PMID:26928829

  20. Amebic liver abscess: epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Seeto, R K; Rockey, D C

    1999-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is a serious, but readily treatable form of hepatic infection. In order to understand the clinical features of this condition in the United States, we reviewed the medical histories of 56 patients with ALA at two large San Francisco Hospitals from 1979 to 1994. Patients were divided into the following groups based on the presumed manner in which they had acquired ALA: those born or raised in the United States, with a history of travel to an endemic area (Tr-ALA); those from an endemic area, but living in the United States for less than one year (En-ALA); and those neither from nor having traveled to an endemic area (N-ALA). We found distinct clinical patterns in patients from different epidemiological groups. Patients with Tr-ALA were a decade older than those from endemic regions, were more likely to be male, and tended to have an insidious onset. Furthermore, compared to patients with En-ALA, those with Tr-ALA were more likely to have hepatomegaly (P < 0.0001) and large abscesses (ALA > 10 cm; P < 0.01). One third of the patients studied had no associated travel history or endemic origin as risk factors. Of these, 63% had a condition consistent with severe immunosuppression, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnourishment with severe hypoalbuminemia, or chronic infection. In patients with N-ALA, the presence of a presumed immunosuppressed state increased significantly, as compared to patients with endemic or travel risk factors for ALA. During the last five years of the study, one third of all patients diagnosed with ALA were HIV positive (including 2 with a new diagnosis of AIDS), many of whom were discovered to be HIV-infected only after presentation with ALA. We conclude that travel to and origin in an endemic area are important risk factors for the development of ALA, and patients in these different epidemiological groups appear to have distinct clinical features. Further, in the absence of recognized

  1. Multiple liver abscesses in a dog secondary to the liver fluke Metorchis conjunctus treated by percutaneous transhepatic drainage and alcoholization.

    PubMed

    Lemetayer, Julie D; Snead, Elizabeth C; Starrak, Greg S; Wagner, Brent A

    2016-06-01

    A 1-year-old German shepherd × husky cross dog was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses and severe cholangitis secondary to the liver fluke Metorchis conjunctus. The dog was successfully treated with 2 percutaneous transhepatic drainage and alcoholization procedures, and a prolonged course of antibiotics and praziquantel. PMID:27247459

  2. Concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials for liver abscesses in patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu Suk

    2016-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disorder caused by defective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase enzyme and characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Although liver abscess is a common manifestation of CGD, its management in CGD patients is not well-defined. In addition, the generalized guidelines for treating liver abscesses do not necessarily apply to CGD patients. Corticosteroids are commonly used to control granulomatous complications, such as inflammatory gastrointestinal and genitourinary lesions, in patients with CGD, Corticosteroids have also been used in combination with antimicrobials to treat refractory infections in patients with CGD. Because corticosteroids are capable of suppressing symptomatic inflammation, all potential infections must be adequately controlled prior to corticosteroid initiation. We report 3 typical CGD cases with liver abscesses refractory to conventional treatments that were successfully treated with the concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials. It remains unclear whether corticosteroid therapy is required for liver abscesses in CGD refractory to conventional treatments. However, based on our observations, use of corticosteroids in combination with optimal antimicrobials should be considered for refractory liver abscesses in CGD. PMID:27186231

  3. Concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials for liver abscesses in patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung-Sue; Lee, Mu Suk

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disorder caused by defective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase enzyme and characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Although liver abscess is a common manifestation of CGD, its management in CGD patients is not well-defined. In addition, the generalized guidelines for treating liver abscesses do not necessarily apply to CGD patients. Corticosteroids are commonly used to control granulomatous complications, such as inflammatory gastrointestinal and genitourinary lesions, in patients with CGD, Corticosteroids have also been used in combination with antimicrobials to treat refractory infections in patients with CGD. Because corticosteroids are capable of suppressing symptomatic inflammation, all potential infections must be adequately controlled prior to corticosteroid initiation. We report 3 typical CGD cases with liver abscesses refractory to conventional treatments that were successfully treated with the concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials. It remains unclear whether corticosteroid therapy is required for liver abscesses in CGD refractory to conventional treatments. However, based on our observations, use of corticosteroids in combination with optimal antimicrobials should be considered for refractory liver abscesses in CGD. PMID:27186231

  4. First case of amebic liver abscess 22 years after the first occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Nespola, Benoît; Betz, Valérie; Brunet, Julie; Gagnard, Jean-Charles; Krummel, Yves; Hansmann, Yves; Hannedouche, Thierry; Christmann, Daniel; Pfaff, Alexander W.; Filisetti, Denis; Pesson, Bernard; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man consulted in November 2012 for abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. The patient had a history of suspected hepatic amebiasis treated in Senegal in 1985 and has not traveled to endemic areas since 1990. Abdominal CT scan revealed a liver abscess. At first, no parasitological tests were performed and the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Only after failure of this therapy, serology and PCR performed after liver abscess puncture established the diagnosis of hepatic amebiasis. The patient was treated with metronidazole and tiliquinol-tilbroquinol. Amebic liver abscess is the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation. Hepatic amebiasis 22 years after the last visit to an endemic area is exceptional and raises questions on the mechanisms of latency and recurrence of these intestinal protozoan parasites. PMID:26088504

  5. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Lubbock Strains Isolated from Liver Abscesses of Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Thomas, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequencing of 13 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock strains isolated from liver abscesses of feedlot cattle is reported here. The availability of these genomes will help to further understand the etiologic role of Salmonella strains in liver abscesses of cattle and will serve as references in microbial trace-back studies to improve food safety. PMID:27151794

  6. Pyogenic sacroiliitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Kabins, S.A.

    1980-07-01

    Seven definite and three probable cases of pyogenic sacroiliitis are presented and compared to 72 cases found in the English literature. Patients may present with a subacute localized or an acute systemic illness. Six of our patients were parenteral drug abusers. Sacroiliac uptake of gallium 67 citrate and/or technetium 99m pyrophosphate suggested the diagnosis which was confirmed by fluoroscopically controlled joint aspiration when blood cultures were sterile. Gram-negative organisms, group B streptococci and a Staphylococcus were isolated. Antibiotic treatment for four to six weeks was uniformly successful. Surgery should be reserved for abscess or sequestrum formation, neither of which were encountered in this series.

  7. [Secondary amyloidosis in amebiasis with intrathoracic complications of amebic liver abscess combined with helminthiases and maduromycosis].

    PubMed

    Ermilov, V V

    1991-01-01

    One case of a secondary amyloidosis in amebiasis with intrathoracic complications of amebic liver abscesses in association with strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, bancroftian filariasis and maduromycosis is described. It's suggested that the progression of secondary amyloidosis was due to the prolonged process of amebiasis in association with helminthiasis and mycosis. PMID:1953364

  8. A case of liver abscess with systemic infection caused by Fusobacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Naoki; Okai, Ken; Takahashi, Atsushi; Abe, Kazumichi; Kanno, Yukiko; Hayashi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Blood testing showed elevated levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cells. Computed tomography revealed multilocular masses of the right hepatic lobe, reticulonodular shadowing on both lungs, left kidney masses, and aortic arch aneurysm. Fusobacterium nucleatum was isolated from the hepatic abscess after percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Because of severe dental caries, he was diagnosed with liver abscess caused by dental infection with F. nucleatum. Administration of cefmetazole and meropenem was not effective; however, he showed remarkable improvement after treatment with metronidazole and continuous drainage. PMID:27151479

  9. Review: amebic liver abscess in children - the role of diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Merten, D.F.; Kirks, D.R.

    1984-12-01

    Amebiasis, infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, affects at least 10% of the world's population, with an incidence exceeding 30% in tropical and subtropical regions. Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal form of invasive amebiasis and is a serious life-threatening disease in children. Recent experience indicates the prognosis of ALA in childhood to be improved with early identification of abscesses and prompt institution of treatment. The authors incorporate experience with a case of ALA in infancy with a review of current literature (1974-1983) to delineate clinical and radiologic features of ALA in childhood and further define the role of hepatic imaging in the diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Risk of Liver Abscess Formation in Patients with Prior Biliary Intervention Following Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Cholapranee, Aurada; Houten, Diana van; Deitrick, Ginna; Dagli, Mandeep; Sudheendra, Deepak; Mondschein, Jeffrey I.; Soulen, Michael C.

    2015-04-15

    PurposePatients without a competent sphincter of Oddi due to prior surgical or endoscopic therapy are at high risk for liver abscess following chemoembolization despite aggressive antimicrobial prophylaxis. We examined a cohort of such patients undergoing Y-90 resin radioembolization and compared them to a cohort of chemoembolized patients.MethodsReview of our quality-assurance database identified 24 radioembolizations performed in 16 patients with prior biliary intervention. An aggressive prophylactic regimen of oral levofloxacin and metronidazole 2 days pre-procedure continuing for 14 days after, oral neomycin/erythromycin bowel prep the day before, and IV levofloxacin/metronidazole the day of treatment was prescribed. Patients underwent resin microsphere radioembolization dosed according to the BSA method. Patients had clinical, imaging, and laboratory assessment 1 month after each treatment, and then every 3 months. The chemoembolization cohort consisted of 13 patients with prior biliary intervention who had undergone 24 chemoembolization procedures.ResultsNo radioembolization patient developed an abscess. In the cohort of chemoembolized patients who received the same prophylaxis, liver abscess occurred following 3 of 24 (12.5 %) procedures in 3 of 13 (23 %) patients, one fatal.ConclusionsThis preliminary experience suggests that the risk of liver abscess among patients with prior biliary intervention may be lower following radioembolization than chemoembolization, which could potentially expand treatment options in this high-risk population.

  11. Amoebic liver abscess – a cause of acute respiratory distress in an infant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The usual presentation of amebic liver abscess in children is extremely variable and unpredictable. It presents with a picture of common pediatric illness that is fever, lethargy, and abdominal pain, and can go on to develop into a rare complication of rupture into the pleura to cause acute respiratory distress, which is another common pediatric illness. In our patient, diagnosis was not made or suspected in these two stages. Case presentation This is the report of a 2-year-old male infant who presented with a 2-week history of anorexia, fever, and abdominal pain. A few hours after admission, he suddenly developed acute respiratory distress; chest X-ray demonstrated massive right pleural effusion that failed to response to tube thoracostomy. Limited thoracotomy revealed a ruptured amebic liver abscess through the right cupola of the diaphragm. The content of the abscess was evacuated from the pleural cavity, which was drained with two large chest tubes. Serological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ruptured amebic liver abscess. Postoperative treatment with antibiotics including metronidazole continued until full recovery. Conclusion Diagnosis of such a rare disease requires a high degree of suspicion. In this patient, the diagnosis was only made postoperatively. The delay in presentation and the sudden onset of respiratory distress must be emphasized for all those physicians who care for children. PMID:19192277

  12. A case of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess syndrome in an Iraqi male.

    PubMed

    Kazanji, Noora; Klein, Rachel E; Lohani, Sadichhya; Mertens, Amy N; Le, Julie

    2016-07-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with fevers, productive cough and decreased appetite. He emigrated from Iraq 4 years ago. Chest x-ray revealed a left lung consolidation. Respiratory cultures and two sets of blood cultures grew out pan-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae Liver ultrasound revealed a 6.4-cm complex lesion in the left hepatic lobe. A biopsy of the liver lesion produced bloody purulent aspirate; abscess cultures yielded a highly viscous pan-susceptible K. pneumoniae Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess syndrome is a newly described invasive syndrome due to a hypermucoviscous phenotype associated with serotypes K1 and K2 of Klebsiella. Although it is more commonly endemic to the Asian-Pacific region, it has been increasingly reported as an emerging global disease. We present the first case of this syndrome in a patient of middle-eastern descent. We also present pictorial evidence of the microbe's unique viscous, muculent texture grown on agar. PMID:27016535

  13. Refractory ulcerative colitis accompanied with cytomegalovirus colitis and multiple liver abscesses: a case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Hirata, Ichiro; Egashira, Yutaro; Ishida, Kumi; Kawakami, Ken; Morita, Eijiro; Murano, Naoko; Yasumoto, Shingo; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Toshina, Ken; Nishikawa, Takashi; Hamamoto, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Ken; Katsu, Ken-Ichi

    2005-09-01

    Various hepato-biliary complications are an increased incidence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and portal bacteremia is well documented in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). However, few reports mention UC in association with liver abscesses. Recently, there are several reports describing cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in association with disease exacerbation and steroid refractoriness in patients with UC. Here we present a case of refractory UC accompanied with multiple liver abscesses and CMV colitis. The patient, a 72-year-old male, with a five-year history of repeated admissions to our hospital for UC, presented with an exacerbation of his UC. Sigmoidoscopy performed on admission suggested that his UC was exacerbated, then he was given prednisolone and mesalazine orally, and betamethasone enemas. However, he had exacerbated symptoms. Repeat sigmoidoscopy revealed multiple longitudinal ulcers and pseudopolyps in the rectosigmoid colon. Although immunohistochemical staining of biopsy specimens and the serum testing for antigenemia were negative on admission and after the repeat sigmoidoscopy, they became histologically positive for CMV. Nonetheless, the patient developed spiking fevers, soon after ganciclovir was administered. Laboratory studies revealed an increased white cell count with left shift, and Enterococcus fecalis grew in blood cultures. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained and the diagnosis of liver abscesses associated with UC was made, based on CT results. The hepatic abscesses were successfully treated with intravenous meropenem for 6 wk, without further percutaneous drainage. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple liver abscesses that develop during UC exacerbation complicated by CMV colitis. PMID:16127763

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-03-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient's condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  16. Psoas muscle pyogenic abscess in association with infected hip arthroplasty: a rare case of simultaneous bilateral presentation.

    PubMed

    Volpin, Andrea; Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Berizzi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral presentation of psoas abscess with prosthetic joint involvement is extremely rare. A 68-year-old woman presented to us with bilateral dull aching groin pain of 6 months' duration, which flared up in the past month, associated with pyrexial symptoms. She had undergone bilateral hip replacements in the past with uneventful recovery. MRI showed bilateral psoas muscle collection in communication with the hip joints. Preoperative hip aspirate demonstrated frank pus with positivity on Gram stain and radiographs confirmed prosthetic loosening of bilateral hips. The patient subsequently underwent two-stage revision arthroplasty of both infected hip implants. At 5-year follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic with good functional outcome and no recurrence on serial MRI. PMID:25994433

  17. Finding of Biliary Fascioliasis by Endoscopic Ultrasonography in a Patient with Eosinophilic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Catherine; Lahmi, Farhad; Iranshahi, Majid; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Iran. It occurs mainly in sheep-rearing areas of temperate climates, but sporadic cases have been reported from many other parts of the world. The usual definitive host is the sheep. Humans are accidental hosts in the life cycle of Fasciola. Typical symptoms may be associated with fascioliasis, but in some cases diagnosis and treatment may be preceded by a long period of abdominal pain and vague gastrointestinal symptoms. We report a case with epigastric and upper quadrant abdominal pain for the last 6 months, with imaging suggesting liver abscess and normal biliary ducts. The patient had no eosinophilia with negative stool examinations, so she was initially treated with antibiotics for liver abscess. Her clinical condition as well as follow-up imagings showed appropriate response after antibiotic therapy. Finally, endoscopic ultrasonography revealed Fasciola hepatica, which was then extracted with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:25473389

  18. Sexual Dimorphism in the Control of Amebic Liver Abscess in a Mouse Model of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lotter, Hannelore; Jacobs, Thomas; Gaworski, Iris; Tannich, Egbert

    2006-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of human infection by the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In contrast to intestinal infection, ALA greatly predominates in males but is rare in females. Since humans are the only relevant host for E. histolytica, experimental studies concerning this sexual dimorphism have been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model. By serial liver passage of cultured E. histolytica trophozoites in gerbils and mice, we generated amebae which reproducibly induce ALA in C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, all animals developed ALA, but the time courses of abscess formation differed significantly between the genders. Female mice were able to clear the infection within 3 days, whereas in male mice the parasite could be recovered for at least 14 days. Accordingly, male mice showed a prolonged time of recovery from ALA. Immunohistology of abscesses revealed that polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages were the dominant infiltrates, but in addition, γ,δ-T cells, NK cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells were also present at early times during abscess development, whereas conventional α,β-T cells appeared later, when female mice had already cleared the parasite. Interestingly, male and female mice differed in early cytokine production in response to ameba infection. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays performed with spleen cells of infected animals revealed significantly higher numbers of interleukin-4-producing cells in male mice but significantly higher numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells in female mice. Early IFN-γ production and the presence of functional NKT cells were found to be important for the control of hepatic amebiasis as application of an IFN-γ-neutralizing monoclonal antibody or the use of NKT knockout mice (Vα14iNKT, Jα 18−/−) dramatically increased the size of ALA in female mice. In addition, E. histolytica trophozoites could be reisolated from

  19. Sexual dimorphism in the control of amebic liver abscess in a mouse model of disease.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; Jacobs, Thomas; Gaworski, Iris; Tannich, Egbert

    2006-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of human infection by the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In contrast to intestinal infection, ALA greatly predominates in males but is rare in females. Since humans are the only relevant host for E. histolytica, experimental studies concerning this sexual dimorphism have been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model. By serial liver passage of cultured E. histolytica trophozoites in gerbils and mice, we generated amebae which reproducibly induce ALA in C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, all animals developed ALA, but the time courses of abscess formation differed significantly between the genders. Female mice were able to clear the infection within 3 days, whereas in male mice the parasite could be recovered for at least 14 days. Accordingly, male mice showed a prolonged time of recovery from ALA. Immunohistology of abscesses revealed that polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages were the dominant infiltrates, but in addition, gamma,delta-T cells, NK cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells were also present at early times during abscess development, whereas conventional alpha,beta-T cells appeared later, when female mice had already cleared the parasite. Interestingly, male and female mice differed in early cytokine production in response to ameba infection. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays performed with spleen cells of infected animals revealed significantly higher numbers of interleukin-4-producing cells in male mice but significantly higher numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing cells in female mice. Early IFN-gamma production and the presence of functional NKT cells were found to be important for the control of hepatic amebiasis as application of an IFN-gamma-neutralizing monoclonal antibody or the use of NKT knockout mice (Valpha14iNKT, Jalpha 18(-/-)) dramatically increased the size of ALA in female mice. In addition, E. histolytica trophozoites

  20. Transfer of CMY-2 Cephalosporinase from Escherichia coli to Virulent Klebsiella pneumoniae Causing a Recurrent Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-01-01

    A CMY-2-producing capsular type K2 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain (TVGHKP93) with multidrug resistance was isolated from a recurrent liver abscess in a patient who also carried a CMY-2-producing Escherichia coli strain (TVGHEC01) in the stool. TVGHKP93 retained its high virulence compared with that of the isogenic strain (TVGHKP60) with wild-type resistance from the first liver abscess. Our conjugation experiment showed the successful transfer of the blaCMY-2-carrying plasmid from TVGHEC01 into TVGHKP60. The transconjugant showed both high virulence and the multidrug-resistant phenotype, as did TVGHKP93. PMID:25987637

  1. Brocho-biliary fistula: A rare complication after ruptured liver abscess in a 3½ year old child.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prawin; Mehta, Poonam; Ismail, Javed; Agarwala, Sandeep; Jana, Manisha; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil K

    2015-01-01

    Bronchobiliary fistula (BBF) is a rare condition, defined by the presence of abnormal communication between biliary tract and bronchial tree. We describe a 3½-year-old child who developed BBF after rupture of liver abscess. She underwent exploratory laparotomy and peritoneal wash for ruptured liver abscess. Seven months later she presented with fever and cough with yellow-colored expectoration (bilioptysis). An abnormal communication between right branch of the hepatic duct and a branch of right main bronchus was identified. Child underwent right lateral thoracotomy and right lower lobectomy with surgical excision of sinus tract. On follow-up child was asymptomatic and doing well. PMID:26628766

  2. Protection of gerbils from amebic liver abscess by immunization with a recombinant Entamoeba histolytica antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T; Cieslak, P R; Stanley, S L

    1994-01-01

    Amebiasis, infection by the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, is a leading parasitic cause of death. As a step in the development of a recombinant antigen vaccine to prevent E. histolytica infection, we looked at the ability of a recombinant version of the serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) to elicit a protective immune response against invasive amebic disease. Gerbils, a standard model for amebic liver abscess, were immunized with either a recombinant SREHP/maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion, recombinant MBP alone, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), all combined with complete Freund's adjuvant. In the first trial (group 1), gerbils received a primary and two booster immunizations intraperitoneally; in the second trial (group 2), gerbils were immunized by a single intradermal injection. SREHP/MBP-immunized gerbils in both groups produced antibody to native SHEHP and developed delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to recombinant SREHP. All gerbils were challenged by an intrahepatic injection with 5 x 10(4) virulent E. histolytica HM1-IMSS trophozoites. Complete protection from amebic liver abscess was seen in 64% of the SHEHP/MBP-immunized gerbils in group 1 and in 100% of the SREHP/MBP-immunized gerbils in group 2. There was no protection observed in MBP- or PBS-immunized gerbils in either group. Our results indicate that the SREHP molecule has potential as a vaccine to prevent amebic infection and demonstrate that successful vaccination of animals with recombinant E. histolytica antigen vaccines is possible. Images PMID:8132322

  3. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient. A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization. Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array. PMID:26945363

  4. Tumor-Like Liver Abscess Mimicking Malignancy With Lung Metastases in a Patient With Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih Hsin; Sun, Cheuk-Kay; Jiang, Jiunn-Song; Tsai, Ming Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The worldwide incidence of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KLA) is increasing. It is important to accurately diagnose this life-threatening disease to provide timely and appropriate treatment. Here we report the case of a 38-year-old man with acute renal failure and a tumor-like liver abscess and septic pulmonary embolism. Initially, his clinical symptoms, laboratory tests, and radiological findings presented equivocal results of malignancy with metastases. Fine needle aspiration of liver tumor was performed, which showed purulent material with a culture positive for K pneumoniae. KLA symptoms are atypical, and radiological findings may mimic a malignancy with tumor necrosis. In some circumstances, liver aspiration biopsy may be necessary to confirm the real etiology, leading to prompt and timely treatment. Moreover, we should be alert for the impression of KLA when facing a diabetic patient with liver mass lesion and acute renal failure. PMID:26986170

  5. Successful treatment of liver abscess secondary to foreign body penetration of the alimentary tract: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Lee-Won; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Wu, Chin-Chu; Sun, Cheuk-Kay

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic abscess caused by foreign body penetration of the alimentary tract is rare. We report a case of gastric antrum penetration due to a toothpick complicated by liver abscess formation. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of upper abdominal pain for 2 mo. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed at a local clinic revealed a toothpick penetrating the gastric antrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen at our hospital revealed a gastric foreign body embedded in the posterior wall of gastric antrum with regional phlegmon over the lesser sac and adhesion to the pancreatic body without notable vascular injury, and a hepatic abscess seven cm in diameter over the left liver lobe. Endoscopic removal of the foreign body was successfully performed without complication. The liver abscess was treated with parenteral antibiotics without drainage. The patient’s recovery was uneventful. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated complete resolution of the hepatic abscess six months after discharge. Relevant literature from the PubMed database was reviewed and the clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, treatment strategies and outcomes of 88 reported cases were analyzed. The results showed that only 6 patients received conservative treatment with parenteral antibiotics, while the majority underwent either image-guided abscess drainage or laparotomy. Patients receiving abscess drainage via laparotomy had a significantly shorter length of hospitalization compared with those undergoing image-guided drainage. There was no significant difference in age between those who survived and those who died, however, the latter presented to hospitals in a more critical condition than the former. The overall mortality rate was 7.95%. PMID:24707157

  6. Liver abscesses in cattle: A review of incidence in Holsteins and of bacteriology and vaccine approaches to control in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Amachawadi, R G; Nagaraja, T G

    2016-04-01

    Liver abscesses are the primary liver abnormality of feedlot cattle at slaughter. The incidence of liver abscesses is highly variable, but generally ranges from 10% to 20%. The incidence of total and the proportion of severely abscessed livers (A+) are greater in Holsteins fed for beef production and culled dairy cows than in beef breeds. The reason for the greater incidence of liver abscesses in Holstein steers is not known, but one of the reasons is likely because of increased days on feed. The high prevalence in cull cows is likely because no specific intervention, such as use of tylosin in the feed, is approved for use in dairy cows. Liver abscesses are generally a sequela to ruminal acidosis and rumenitis in cattle fed diets high in readily-fermentable carbohydrates and low in roughages; thus, the term "acidosis-rumenitis-liver abscess complex." Liver abscesses are almost always polymicrobial infections with Gram negative anaerobes constituting the predominant flora. Almost all studies have concluded that , a ruminal bacterium, is the primary causative agent and (formerly ) is the secondary pathogen. A limited number of studies have been done on the bacterial flora of liver abscesses of culled dairy cows and Holstein feedlot steers. A recent study has reported on isolation of from liver abscesses of Holstein cattle. The control of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle has depended on the use of antibiotics, particularly tylosin, in the feed combined with sound nutritional management to minimize occurrence of acidosis and subsequent rumenitis. Although there is no evidence of resistance development in , the future of tylosin use as a feed additive in feedlot cattle is uncertain. Regardless, beginning January 2017, the use of tylosin in feedlot cattle for the prevention of liver abscesses will be under veterinary oversight. Although tylosin is widely used in the feedlot industry, there is considerable interest in evaluating antibiotic alternatives, such as essential

  7. Discordant Tc-99m sulfur colloid and In-113m chloride blood pool images in patients with acute amebic liver abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Reba, R.C.; Tu, Y.C.; Yeh, S.H.

    1983-07-01

    Using combined Tc-99m sulfur colloid and In-113m chloride eluate imaging, studies from 32 patients with proven amebic liver abscess were analyzed. The results revealed good perfusion of the amebic lesion in three, poor perfusion in 11, and absent perfusion in 18. These results appear to depend on abscess size and age. Images with In-113m seem to be better than those with Tc-99m sulfur colloid in depicting amebic liver abscess during antiamebic therapy. Overall, the In-113m images provide more precise information concerning abscess size and shape.

  8. [Puncture aspiration using ultrasound guidance in the treatment of abscesses and other purulent foci in the liver, pancreas and kidneys].

    PubMed

    Martínek, A; Hrabovský, V; Klvana, P

    2003-08-01

    The authors deal with the problem of application of a therapeutic fine needle aspiration puncture in abscesses and other purulent foci in organs of abdominal cavity and retroperitoneum. The treatment using this method under continuing antibiotic therapy has been used in 60 patients (40 men, 20 women), 25 of them suffering from liver abscesses, 28 other from purulent foci of pancreas and seven patients from purulent foci of the kidney. In most patients there were solitary foci (43 persons). The total volume of the evacuated pus was higher than 20 ml in most patients (52), being even more than 100 ml in 2 patients. No relation ship was found among the number of foci, their volume and efficiency of the treatment. The average number of punctures until the abscesses and other purulent foci were healed up was 2.76 in the liver, 2.5 in pancreas and 1.1 in the kidney. The efficiency of therapy was higher in liver abscesses (96%), in purulent foci of pancreas (82%) and lower in the kidney abscesses (57%). The higher efficiency in the purulent foci of pancreas was probably influenced by predominant representation by infected pseudocysts in this group. The lower average number of punctures until the abscesses were healed up and the lower success in the kidney were influenced by a more radical approach of urologists who, having made the first evacuation puncture, performed a radical operation intervention. The complications were encountered in 9.5% of all punctures, being always insignificant. The results obtained demonstrated the contribution of aimed therapeutic aspiration puncture in the therapy of purulent foci of parenchymal organs of abdominal cavity and retroperitoneum as compared with surgical treatment. The advantage of the applied method in the therapy of purulent foci of the liver and pancreas may be seen in the higher success rate, low invasiveness and a low risk of complications together with a low financial cost and wide availability. PMID:14518087

  9. Rapid Resolution of Cholangitic Abscess and Biliary Sepsis in a Liver Transplant Recipient after Hepatic Artery Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Trakroo, Sushrut

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic arterial flow is paramount in preserving biliary integrity. We present an interesting clinical scenario of a liver transplant recipient with biliary anastomotic stricture who developed biliary abscess and sepsis after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography. The abscess did not respond to maximal medical management, percutaneous drainage, and adequate endoscopic biliary drainage. Clinically, patient continued to deteriorate and imaging identified hepatic artery stenosis which was treated with percutaneous intra-arterial stenting. Revascularization and perfusion of infected area led to rapid resolution of abscess and sepsis. This case emphasizes the anatomic basis of biliary ductal pathology. An important educational point is to understand that interrupted hepatic arterial supply can lead to biliary complications in liver transplant recipients and early correction of perfusion deficit should be pursued in such cases. In nonresolving hepatobiliary infections after liver transplantation, hepatic arterial compromise should be looked for and if present promptly treated. Reperfusion of biliary system in our patient led to improved antibiotics penetration, resolution of abscess and sepsis, and healing of biliary stricture. PMID:27340588

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes Infection in a Free-Living European Hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Franklinos, Lydia H V; Efstratiou, Androulla; Macgregor, Shaheed K; John, Shinto K; Hopkins, Timothy; Cunningham, Andrew A; Lawson, Becki

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a common pathogen of humans, was isolated from the carcass of a free-living European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) found in northern England in June 2014. The animal had abscessation of the deep right cervical lymph node, mesenteric lymph nodes and liver. The S. pyogenes strain isolated from the lesions, peritoneal and pleural cavities was characterised as emm 28, which can be associated with invasive disease in humans. This is the first known report of S. pyogenes in a hedgehog and in any free-living wild animal that has been confirmed by gene sequencing. As close associations between wild hedgehogs and people in England are common, we hypothesise that this case might have resulted from anthroponotic infection. PMID:26242215

  11. Tylosin resistance in Arcanobacterium pyogenes is encoded by an erm X determinant.

    PubMed

    Jost, B Helen; Field, Adam C; Trinh, Hien T; Songer, J Glenn; Billington, Stephen J

    2003-11-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a commensal on the mucous membranes of many economically important animal species, is also a pathogen, causing abscesses of the skin, joints, and visceral organs as well as mastitis and abortion. In food animals, A. pyogenes is exposed to antimicrobial agents used for growth promotion, prophylaxis, and therapy, notably tylosin, a macrolide antibiotic used extensively for the prevention of liver abscessation in feedlot cattle in the United States. Of 48 A. pyogenes isolates, 11 (22.9%) exhibited inducible or constitutive resistance to tylosin (MIC of > or = 128 microg/ml). These isolates also exhibited resistance to other macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics, suggesting a macrolide-lincosamide resistance phenotype. Of the 11 resistant isolates, genomic DNA from nine hybridized to an erm(X)-specific probe. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the A. pyogenes erm(X) gene indicated that it was >95% similar to erm(X) genes from Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium spp. Eight of the erm(X)-containing A. pyogenes isolates exhibited inducible tylosin resistance, which was consistent with the presence of a putative leader peptide upstream of the erm(X) open reading frame. For at least one A. pyogenes isolate, 98-4277-2, erm(X) was present on a plasmid, pAP2, and was associated with the insertion sequence IS6100. pAP2 also carried genes encoding the repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system determinant Tet 33. The repA gene from pAP2 was nonfunctional in Escherichia coli and at least one A. pyogenes isolate, suggesting that there may be host-encoded factors required for replication of this plasmid. PMID:14576111

  12. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the Saliva of Amoebic Liver Abscess Patients Who Received Prior Treatment with Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2008-01-01

    Saliva is an easily-accessible and a non-invasive clinical specimen alternate to blood and liver pus. An attempt was made to detect Entamoeba histolytica DNA released in the saliva of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) patients by applying 16S-like rRNA gene-based nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NM-PCR). The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of eight (28.6%) of 28 ALA patients. The NM-PCR result was negative for E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of all the eight ALA patients who were tested prior to treatment with metronidazole but was positive in the saliva of eight (40%) of 20 ALA patient who were tested after therapy with metronidazole. The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in liver abscess pus of all 28 (100%) patients with ALA. The TechLab E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive for E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus of 13 (46.4%) of the 28 ALA patients. The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test was positive for anti-amoebic antibodies in the serum of 22 (78.6%) of the 28 ALA patients and 2 (5.7%) of 35 healthy controls. The present study, for the first time, demonstrates the release of E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of ALA patients by applying NM-PCR. PMID:19069620

  13. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the saliva of amoebic liver abscess patients who received prior treatment with metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2008-12-01

    Saliva is an easily-accessible and a non-invasive clinical specimen alternate to blood and liver pus. An attempt was made to detect Entamoeba histolytica DNA released in the saliva of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) patients by applying 16S-like rRNA gene-based nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NM-PCR). The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of eight (28.6%) of 28 ALA patients. The NM-PCR result was negative for E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of all the eight ALA patients who were tested prior to treatment with metronidazole but was positive in the saliva of eight (40%) of 20 ALA patient who were tested after therapy with metronidazole. The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in liver abscess pus of all 28 (100%) patients with ALA. The TechLab E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive for E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus of 13 (46.4%) of the 28 ALA patients. The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test was positive for anti-amoebic antibodies in the serum of 22 (78.6%) of the 28 ALA patients and 2 (5.7%) of 35 healthy controls. The present study, for the first time, demonstrates the release of E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of ALA patients by applying NM-PCR. PMID:19069620

  14. Primary Neonatal Diaphragmatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zouari, Mohamed; Jallouli, Mohamed; Ben Thabet, Afef; Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diaphragmatic abscesses are extremely rare and they usually develop by direct extension from a liver abscess. The first case of primary diaphragmatic abscess in a neonate is reported and the difficulties of diagnosing this rare entity are discussed. PMID:26023529

  15. First report of Entamoeba histolytica infection from Timor-Leste--acute amoebic colitis and concurrent late development of amoebic liver abscess in returned travellers to Australia.

    PubMed

    Nourse, Clare B; Robson, Jennifer M; Whitby, Michael R; Francis, Josh R

    2016-02-01

    This communication reports invasive amoebic colitis and late onset amoebic liver abscess in three members of a group of 12 Australian travellers to Timor-Leste (TL). This is the first report of Entamoeba histolytica infection from TL. Clinicians in Australia need to consider amoebiasis in the differential diagnosis in travellers returning with colitis, abdominal pain and fever. Presentation with amoebic liver abscess months after exposure is rare but should be suspected in symptomatic individuals with a relevant history of travel. PMID:26858275

  16. Protection of gerbils from amebic liver abscess by immunization with a recombinant protein derived from the 170-kilodalton surface adhesin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T; Stanley, S L

    1994-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide through intestinal infection and amebic liver abscess. Here we show that vaccination of gerbils, a standard model for amebic liver abscess, with recombinant proteins derived from the 170-kDa galactose-binding adhesin of E. histolytica and the serine-rich E. histolytica protein or a combination of the two recombinant antigens provides excellent protection against subsequent hepatic challenge with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. PMID:8188384

  17. NOCARDIOSIS REVEALED BY THYROID ABSCESS AND PNEUMONIA IN A LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Reechaipichitkul, Wipa; Thanasatirakul, Pachara

    2015-11-01

    Nocardia thyroid abscess with pneumonia is a rare clinical presentation. We reported a liver transplant recipient with Nocardia thyroiditis and pneumonia after receiving high dose immunosuppressants to preserve his graft. The patient is a 50-year-old male who developed hepatitis C virus-related liver cirrhosis and received a liver transplant. Seven months post-transplantation the patient developed graft rejection, which was treated with 3 days pulse dose methyl-prednisolone followed by an increased dose of his tracolimus, mycophenolate and prednisolone. He presented to the hospital with a 2 week history of fever, tenderness in his anterior neck and dry cough. On admission his temperature was 39.5°C. The right wing of his thyroid gland was swollen to 3 cm in size, fluctuant and tender. On auscultation of his lungs there were fine crepitations and increased vocal resonance in the right middle lung field. On laboratory testing, a complete blood count (CBC) revealed leukocytosis (19,900/mm3) with neutrophils (97%). A chest X-ray showed an patchy infiltrates and round circumscribed densities in the superior segment of the right lower lobe of his lung. A CT scan of his neck revealed a diffusely enlarged right wing of the thyroid gland, 3.8 cm in diameter that had an abnormal hyposignal area. A CT of his chest revealed consolidation of the superior segment of the right lower lobe and necrotic right paratracheal lymph nodes with inflamed strap muscles. Fine needle aspiration of the right lobe of thyroid gland was performed. Modified acid-fast bacilli (MAFB) staining showed partially acid-fast beaded branching filamentous organisms and a culture grew out Nocardia asteroides. He was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for 6 months. He improved clinically and his chest X-ray also cleared. PMID:26867364

  18. Reversal of tetraplegia in a patient with haematogenous cervical epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Katonis, Pavlos; Souvatzis, Xenia; Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic haematogenous cervical epidural abscess complicated by tetraplegia is an uncommon entity, but its clinical importance overshadows its rarity. Predisposing risk factors for spinal epidural abscess include diabetes, intravenous drug abuse, liver disease, renal failure, malignancy, HIV, infection elsewhere, rheumatoid conditions, trauma and a number of spinal interventions. Lack of recovery and death are much more frequent when complete paralysis exists since more than 24 to 48 hours. Most authors combine decompressive laminectomy and antibiotics. Anterior decompression and needle aspiration are rarely used, the former more specifically in case of anterior abscess formation. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on gadolinium-enhanced MRI is essential to diagnose the pathology and institute appropriate treatment on an individual basis. The authors report on a diabetic male patient who developed a cervical epidural abscess with tetraplegia after dental extraction. He was treated within six hours by one stage anterior/posterior decompression and fusion, with complete recovery. PMID:21954768

  19. Liver scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperplasia or adenoma of the liver Abscess Budd-Chiari syndrome Infection Liver disease (such as cirrhosis or ... Amebic liver abscess Cirrhosis Hepatic vein obstruction (Budd-Chiari) Hepatitis Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Liver disease Splenic ...

  20. A review of the proposed role of neutrophils in rodent amebic liver abscess models.

    PubMed

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Meza, Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Drago-Serrano, María Elisa; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Ventura-Juárez, Javier; Cárdenas-Jaramillo, Luz María; Pacheco-Yepez, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Host invasion by Entamoeba histolytica, the pathogenic agent of amebiasis, can lead to the development of amebic liver abscess (ALA). Due to the difficulty of exploring host and amebic factors involved in the pathogenesis of ALA in humans, most studies have been conducted with animal models (e.g., mice, gerbils, and hamsters). Histopathological findings reveal that the chronic phase of ALA in humans corresponds to lytic or liquefactive necrosis, whereas in rodent models there is granulomatous inflammation. However, the use of animal models has provided important information on molecules and mechanisms of the host/parasite interaction. Hence, the present review discusses the possible role of neutrophils in the effector immune response in ALA in rodents. Properly activated neutrophils are probably successful in eliminating amebas through oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms, including neutrophil degranulation, the generation of free radicals (O2(-), H2O2, HOCl) and peroxynitrite, the activation of NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzymes, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). On the other hand, if amebas are not eliminated in the early stages of infection, they trigger a prolonged and exaggerated inflammatory response that apparently causes ALAs. Genetic differences in animals and humans are likely to be key to a successful host immune response. PMID:26880421

  1. A review of the proposed role of neutrophils in rodent amebic liver abscess models

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Meza, Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Drago-Serrano, María Elisa; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Ventura-Juárez, Javier; Cárdenas-Jaramillo, Luz María; Pacheco-Yepez, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Host invasion by Entamoeba histolytica, the pathogenic agent of amebiasis, can lead to the development of amebic liver abscess (ALA). Due to the difficulty of exploring host and amebic factors involved in the pathogenesis of ALA in humans, most studies have been conducted with animal models (e.g., mice, gerbils, and hamsters). Histopathological findings reveal that the chronic phase of ALA in humans corresponds to lytic or liquefactive necrosis, whereas in rodent models there is granulomatous inflammation. However, the use of animal models has provided important information on molecules and mechanisms of the host/parasite interaction. Hence, the present review discusses the possible role of neutrophils in the effector immune response in ALA in rodents. Properly activated neutrophils are probably successful in eliminating amebas through oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms, including neutrophil degranulation, the generation of free radicals (O2−, H2O2, HOCl) and peroxynitrite, the activation of NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzymes, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). On the other hand, if amebas are not eliminated in the early stages of infection, they trigger a prolonged and exaggerated inflammatory response that apparently causes ALAs. Genetic differences in animals and humans are likely to be key to a successful host immune response. PMID:26880421

  2. Imaging of cerebritis, encephalitis, and brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Rath, Tanya J; Hughes, Marion; Arabi, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain abscess, pyogenic infection, and encephalitis. The role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and management of pyogenic brain abscess and its complications is reviewed. The imaging appearances of several common and select uncommon infectious encephalitides are reviewed. Common causes of encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, and their imaging appearances, are also discussed. When combined with CSF, serologic studies and patient history, imaging findings can suggest the cause of encephalitis. PMID:23122258

  3. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  4. Pulmonary Thromboembolism Complicating Amebic Liver Abscess: First Reported Case in the United States—Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Devon; Gale, Michael; Patel, Sunny; Kaluta, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Even in the absence of Amebic colitis, Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal complication of Entamoeba histolytica infection. In the USA, it is most prevalent in middle aged immigrant males from endemic countries such as Africa, Mexico, and India. One of the complications of ALA is inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis, which is believed to result from the mechanical compression of the IVC and the consequent thrombogenic nidus elicited from the resultant inflammatory response. There are very few reported cases and even fewer in which the thrombus became a harbinger to pulmonary thromboembolism. We present the case of a 43-year-old male from West Africa who presented with the chief complaint of right upper quadrant abdominal pain for one week associated with persistent nonproductive cough. He had a positive serum Entamoeba histolytica antibody with CT scan findings of a hepatic abscess with thrombosis of the hepatic vein and inferior vena cava and numerous bilateral pulmonary emboli. This amebic liver abscess was successfully treated with metronidazole and paromomycin, whereas the pulmonary thromboembolism was managed with medical anticoagulation. Based on current knowledge, this is the first reported case in the USA. PMID:26294987

  5. Natural Killer T Cells Activated by a Lipopeptidophosphoglycan from Entamoeba histolytica Are Critically Important To Control Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Buko; Winau, Florian; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Ulmer, Artur J.; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert; Jacobs, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune response is supposed to play an essential role in the control of amebic liver abscess (ALA), a severe form of invasive amoebiasis due to infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In a mouse model for the disease, we previously demonstrated that Jα18-/- mice, lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, suffer from more severe abscess development. Here we show that the specific activation of iNKT cells using α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) induces a significant reduction in the sizes of ALA lesions, whereas CD1d−/− mice develop more severe abscesses. We identified a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from E. histolytica membranes (EhLPPG) as a possible natural NKT cell ligand and show that the purified phosphoinositol (PI) moiety of this molecule induces protective IFN-γ but not IL-4 production in NKT cells. The main component of EhLPPG responsible for NKT cell activation is a diacylated PI, (1-O-[(28∶0)-lyso-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-]2-O-(C16:0)-Ins). IFN-γ production by NKT cells requires the presence of CD1d and simultaneously TLR receptor signalling through MyD88 and secretion of IL-12. Similar to α-GalCer application, EhLPPG treatment significantly reduces the severity of ALA in ameba-infected mice. Our results suggest that EhLPPG is an amebic molecule that is important for the limitation of ALA development and may explain why the majority of E. histolytica-infected individuals do not develop amebic liver abscess. PMID:19436711

  6. Natural killer T cells activated by a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from Entamoeba histolytica are critically important to control amebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; González-Roldán, Nestor; Lindner, Buko; Winau, Florian; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Ulmer, Artur J; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert; Jacobs, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The innate immune response is supposed to play an essential role in the control of amebic liver abscess (ALA), a severe form of invasive amoebiasis due to infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In a mouse model for the disease, we previously demonstrated that Jalpha18(-/-) mice, lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, suffer from more severe abscess development. Here we show that the specific activation of iNKT cells using alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) induces a significant reduction in the sizes of ALA lesions, whereas CD1d(-/-) mice develop more severe abscesses. We identified a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from E. histolytica membranes (EhLPPG) as a possible natural NKT cell ligand and show that the purified phosphoinositol (PI) moiety of this molecule induces protective IFN-gamma but not IL-4 production in NKT cells. The main component of EhLPPG responsible for NKT cell activation is a diacylated PI, (1-O-[(28:0)-lyso-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-]2-O-(C16:0)-Ins). IFN-gamma production by NKT cells requires the presence of CD1d and simultaneously TLR receptor signalling through MyD88 and secretion of IL-12. Similar to alpha-GalCer application, EhLPPG treatment significantly reduces the severity of ALA in ameba-infected mice. Our results suggest that EhLPPG is an amebic molecule that is important for the limitation of ALA development and may explain why the majority of E. histolytica-infected individuals do not develop amebic liver abscess. PMID:19436711

  7. A Case Report of Metronidazole Induced Neurotoxicity in Liver Abscess Patient and the Usefulness of MRI for its Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Arjit; Shukla, Arvind; Joon, Pawan

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very widely used drug for the treatment of multiple ailments caused by anaerobic bacteria as well as some protozoan parasites. Though its usual side effects are not very serious, yet sometimes it may cause profound adverse effects like neurotoxicity. We present here a case of liver abscess. The patient was treated for a long time with metronidazole and developed sudden onset neurotoxicity which was diagnosed by MRI. The present case also highlights the need of vigilant monitoring of patients on metronidazole for symptoms of neurotoxicity and the usefulness of MRI for diagnosis of the same. PMID:26894145

  8. The Trend in Distribution of Q223R Mutation of Leptin Receptor Gene in Amoebic Liver Abscess Patients from North India: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2014-01-01

    Host genetic susceptibility is an important risk factor in infectious diseases. We explored the distribution of Q223R mutation in leptin receptor gene of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) patients of North India. A total of 55 ALA samples along with 102 controls were subjected to PCR-RFLP analysis. The frequency of allele “G” (coding for arginine) was in general high in Indian population irrespective of the disease. Our results of Fisher exact test shows that heterozygous mutant (QQ versus QR, P = 0.049) and homozygous mutant (QQ versus RR, P = 0.004) were significantly associated with amoebic liver abscess when compared with homozygous wild (QQ). PMID:25114924

  9. Counter immunoelectrophoresis as a rapid screening test for amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Tosswill, J H; Ridley, D S; Warhurst, D C

    1980-01-01

    Counter immunoelectrophoresis using cellulose acetate as the supporting medium was used as a rapid screening test for amoebic abscess. All the sera from 40 cases gave positive results. No false positives were obtained, but the results in intestinal amoebiasis were less reliable. An attempt was made to account for discrepancies in previous reports. PMID:6987273

  10. Testosterone Increases Susceptibility to Amebic Liver Abscess in Mice and Mediates Inhibition of IFNγ Secretion in Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lotter, Hannelore; Helk, Elena; Bernin, Hannah; Jacobs, Thomas; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; González-Roldán, Nestor; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA), a parasitic disease due to infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, occurs age and gender dependent with strong preferences for adult males. Using a mouse model for ALA with a similar male bias for the disease, we have investigated the role of female and male sexual hormones and provide evidence for a strong contribution of testosterone. Removal of testosterone by orchiectomy significantly reduced sizes of abscesses in male mice, while substitution of testosterone increased development of ALA in female mice. Activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are known to be important for the control of ALA, is influenced by testosterone. Specifically activated NKT cells isolated from female mice produce more IFNγ compared to NKT cells derived from male mice. This high level production of IFNγ in female derived NKT cells was inhibited by testosterone substitution, while the IFNγ production in male derived NKT cells was increased by orchiectomy. Gender dependent differences were not a result of differences in the total number of NKT cells, but a result of a higher activation potential for the CD4− NKT cell subpopulation in female mice. Taken together, we conclude that the hormone status of the host, in particular the testosterone level, determines susceptibility to ALA at least in a mouse model of the disease. PMID:23424637

  11. Testosterone increases susceptibility to amebic liver abscess in mice and mediates inhibition of IFNγ secretion in natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; Helk, Elena; Bernin, Hannah; Jacobs, Thomas; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; González-Roldán, Nestor; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA), a parasitic disease due to infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, occurs age and gender dependent with strong preferences for adult males. Using a mouse model for ALA with a similar male bias for the disease, we have investigated the role of female and male sexual hormones and provide evidence for a strong contribution of testosterone. Removal of testosterone by orchiectomy significantly reduced sizes of abscesses in male mice, while substitution of testosterone increased development of ALA in female mice. Activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are known to be important for the control of ALA, is influenced by testosterone. Specifically activated NKT cells isolated from female mice produce more IFNγ compared to NKT cells derived from male mice. This high level production of IFNγ in female derived NKT cells was inhibited by testosterone substitution, while the IFNγ production in male derived NKT cells was increased by orchiectomy. Gender dependent differences were not a result of differences in the total number of NKT cells, but a result of a higher activation potential for the CD4(-) NKT cell subpopulation in female mice. Taken together, we conclude that the hormone status of the host, in particular the testosterone level, determines susceptibility to ALA at least in a mouse model of the disease. PMID:23424637

  12. Intra-Abdominal Abscess and Primary Peritonitis Caused by Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Huseyin Agah; Demiray, Tayfur; Koroglu, Mehmet; Cakmak, Guner; Hakki Ciftci, Ihsan; Ozbek, Ahmet; Altindis, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria are low-virulence bacteria existing as commensals in the oral flora and gastrointestinal tracts of humans. S. anginosus may spread to the blood in individuals with poor oral hygiene in cases of oral infections, such as gingivitis and tooth abscesses, that develop following the loss of mucosal unity. This may lead to infections in the whole body, primarily as brain and liver abscesses. Case Presentation A 32-year-old male patient presented with complaints of nausea, vomiting, and diffuse abdominal pain. Diffuse abdominal tenderness and rebound tenderness were detected particularly in the epigastrium and right upper quadrant. Laboratory assessment revealed a leukocyte count of 20,500/mm3. Free fluid around the liver and heterogeneous areas of abscess formation in the right lateral gallbladder were revealed on abdominal computed tomography. Diffuse adhesions between the bowel and seropurulent free liquid in the abdomen were detected on surgical exploration, and a sample was taken for cultures. The patient was discharged without complications on the sixth postoperative day and his antibiotic course was completed with 4 weeks of oral treatment. We reviewed the literature for similar cases of disseminated pyogenic infections caused by the S. anginosus group. Conclusions It should be kept in mind that the oral flora bacterium S. anginosus may cause transient bacteremia and deep-seated organ abscesses in immunodeficient patients with poor oral hygiene. Such patients with intra-abdominal abscesses should be treated with antibiotics and surgery.

  13. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Images Amebic brain ...

  14. Evaluation of the C-Terminal Fragment of Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNAc Lectin Intermediate Subunit as a Vaccine Candidate against Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue; Man, Suqin; Fu, Yongfeng; Cheng, Xunjia; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal protozoan parasite that causes amoebiasis, including amebic dysentery and liver abscesses. E. histolytica invades host tissues by adhering onto cells and phagocytosing them depending on the adaptation and expression of pathogenic factors, including Gal/GalNAc lectin. We have previously reported that E. histolytica possesses multiple CXXC sequence motifs, with the intermediate subunit of Gal/GalNAc lectin (i.e., Igl) as a key factor affecting the amoeba's pathogenicity. The present work showed the effect of immunization with recombinant Igl on amebic liver abscess formation and the corresponding immunological properties. Methodology/Principal Findings A prokaryotic expression system was used to prepare the full-length Igl and the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal fragments (C-Igl) of Igl. Vaccine efficacy was assessed by challenging hamsters with an intrahepatic injection of E. histolytica trophozoites. Hamsters intramuscularly immunized with full-length Igl and C-Igl were found to be 92% and 96% immune to liver abscess formation, respectively. Immune-response evaluation revealed that C-Igl can generate significant humoral immune responses, with high levels of antibodies in sera from immunized hamsters inhibiting 80% of trophozoites adherence to mammalian cells and inducing 80% more complement-mediated lysis of trophozoites compared with the control. C-Igl was further assessed for its cellular response by cytokine-gene qPCR analysis. The productions of IL-4 (8.4-fold) and IL-10 (2-fold) in the spleen cells of immunized hamsters were enhanced after in vitro stimulation. IL-4 expression was also supported by increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 gene. Conclusions/Significance Immunobiochemical characterization strongly suggests the potential of recombinant Igl, especially the C-terminal fragment, as a vaccine candidate against amoebiasis. Moreover, protection through Th2-cell participation enabled effective

  15. The EhADH112 recombinant polypeptide inhibits cell destruction and liver abscess formation by Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Carolina; Orozco, Esther; Sánchez, Tomás; García-Pérez, Rosa María; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2004-04-01

    The Entamoeba histolytica EhCPADH complex, formed by a cysteine proteinase (EhCP112) and an adhesin (EhADH112), is involved in adherence, phagocytosis and cytolysis. This makes this complex an attractive candidate as a vaccine against amoebiasis. Here, we produced the recombinant polypeptide EhADH243, which includes the adherence epitope detected by a monoclonal antibody against the EhCPADH complex. EhADH243 was purified, and the effect of the polypeptide on in vitro and in vivo virulence was studied. Antibodies against EhADH243 reacted with the EhCPADH complex and with the recombinant polypeptide. EhADH243 and antibodies against this polypeptide inhibited adherence, phagocytosis and destruction of cell monolayers by live trophozoites, but had little effect on cell monolayer destruction by trophozoite extracts. EhADH243 recognized a 97 kDa protein in the MDCK membrane fraction that could be a putative receptor for E. histolytica trophozoites. Hamsters immunized with EhADH243 developed humoral response against EhCPADH, and animals were partially protected from amoebic liver abscess. PMID:15009028

  16. Intermedilysin, a novel cytotoxin specific for human cells secreted by Streptococcus intermedius UNS46 isolated from a human liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamune, H; Ohnishi, C; Katsuura, A; Fushitani, K; Whiley, R A; Tsuji, A; Matsuda, Y

    1996-01-01

    A novel cytotoxin (intermedilysin) specific for human cells was identified as a cytolytic factor of Streptococcus intermedius UNS46 isolated from a human liver abscess. Intermedilysin caused human cell death with membrane blebs. Intermedilysin was purified from UNS46 culture medium by means of gel filtration and hydrophobic chromatography. The purified toxin was resolved into major and minor bands of 54 and 53 kDa, respectively, by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These proteins reacted with an antibody against intermedilysin. Five internal peptide fragments of intermedilysin were sequenced and found to have 42 to 71% homology with the thiol-activated cytotoxin pneumolysin. However, the action of intermedilysin differed from that of thiol-activated cytotoxins, especially in terms of a lack of activation by dithiothreitol and resistance to treatments with N-ethylmaleimide and 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid), although cholesterol inhibited the toxin activity. Intermedilysin was potently hemolytic on human erythrocytes but was 100-fold less effective on chimpanzee and cynomolgus monkey erythrocytes. Intermedilysin was not hemolytic in nine other animal species tested. Since human erythrocytes treated with trypsin were far less sensitive to intermedilysin than were the intact cells, a cell membrane protein(s) may participate in the intermedilysin action. These data demonstrated that intermedilysin is distinguishable from all known bacterial cytolysins. PMID:8757839

  17. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Pancreatic abscess Symptoms: Jaundice • fatigue • anorexia • subjective weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration • biliary stenting • endoscopic cholangiopancreatography Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare coexistance of disease or pathology Background: Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. Case Report: A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient’s symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. Conclusions: EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this

  18. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. Videolaparoscopic treatment for isolated necrosis and abscess of the round ligament of the liver.

    PubMed

    Martin, T G

    2004-09-01

    A case involving abcess and necrosis of the round ligament of the liver is described. This type of case is seldom reported in medical literature. Laparaoscopy is a very useful and feasible tool for the diagnosis and treatment of such cases. The video shows an oversized round ligament with necrotic appearance partially blocked by the epiplon, gallbladder, and stomach. (This online case report contains a video.). PMID:15803243

  20. DNA vaccination based on pyolysin co-immunized with IL-1β enhances host antibacterial immunity against Trueperella pyogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Zhao, Kelei; Zhang, Ziqi; Tang, Ce; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-06-24

    Trueperella pyogenes is a commensal and opportunistic pathogen normally causes mastitis, liver abscesses and pneumonia of economically important livestock. To date, no specific control measure was reported to prevent T. pyogenes infections. In this study, we first constructed a recombinant plasmid pVAX1-PLO based on the main virulent factor pyolysin gene as DNA vaccine against T. pyogenes infection. Subsequently, transient expression of pVAX1-PLO and pcDNA3.1/V5-fIL-1β were identified in Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T) by immunofluorescence assay. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity between different immunized groups. The results showed that the successful expression of PLO or fIL-1β protein was detected by confocal microscopy for cells transfected with plasmid pVAX1-PLO and/or pcDNA3.1/V5-fIL-1β. The mice immunized with pVAX1-PLO elicited a higher titer of PLO-specific antibody than the control group. The levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 were significantly increased in the pVAX1-PLO immunized mice, while the expression level of IL-4 was slightly increased but not significant. These findings suggested that the DNA vaccine pVAX1-PLO can primarily induce Th1 immune response. The residual Colony-Forming Units (CFUs) from the liver and peritoneal fluid were decreased obviously in the pVAX1-PLO treated mice compared with the control. Importantly, co-immunization with pcDNA3.1/V5-fIL-1β and pVAX1-PLO could enhance host humoral and cellular immune responses and significantly protect mouse from T. pyogenes infection. In conclusion, our study provides a promising strategy against T. pyogenes infections and implies the potential clinical application of combined DNA vaccines in diseases control. PMID:27091688

  1. Ilio-psoas abscesses: percutaneous drainage under image guidance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Suri, S; Gulati, M; Singh, P

    1997-09-01

    Over a 5-year period, 56 psoas abscesses occurring in 51 patients were managed by image-guided percutaneous drainage, either by needle aspiration (n = 10) or by catheter drainage (n = 46) in conjunction with medical therapy. Twenty-seven patients had tuberculous abscesses (bilateral in five) while 24 patients had pyogenic abscesses. Percutaneous treatment was successful in 16 of the 24 patients (66.7%) with pyogenic abscesses. The reasons for failure were co-existent bowel lesions, phlegmonous involvement of muscle without liquefaction, multiloculated abscess cavity and thick tenacious pus not amenable to percutaneous drainage. Surgery was required in seven patients, either for failed percutaneous drainage or for the management of co-existent disease. Percutaneous drainage was initially successful in all 27 patients of tuberculous psoas abscesses. However, eight patients presented with recurrence requiring repeat intervention. The average duration of catheter drainage was longer in patients with tuberculous abscess (11 days) than in patients with pyogenic abscess (6 days). Percutaneous drainage under image guidance provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses. PMID:9313737

  2. Perirenal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... The biggest risk factor for perirenal abscess is kidney stones , by blockage of urine flow. This provides a ... perirenal abscess should lead to a good outcome. Kidney stones must be treated to avoid further infections. In ...

  3. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  4. Comparison of nested-multiplex, Taqman & SYBR Green real-time PCR in diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess in a tertiary health care institute in India

    PubMed Central

    Dinoop, K.P.; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Mandal, Jharna; Swaminathan, R.P.; Narayanan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Amoebiasis is a common parasitic infection caused by Entamoeba histolytica and amoebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of amoebiasis. The aim of this study was to standardise real-time PCR assays (Taqman and SYBR Green) to detect E. histolytica from liver abscess pus and stool samples and compare its results with nested-multiplex PCR. Methods: Liver abscess pus specimens were subjected to DNA extraction. The extracted DNA samples were subjected to amplification by nested-multiplex PCR, Taqman (18S rRNA) and SYBR Green real-time PCR (16S-like rRNA assays to detect E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii). The amplification products were further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was done for nested-multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR and the area under the curve was calculated for evaluating the accuracy of the tests to dignose ALA. Results: In all, 17, 19 and 25 liver abscess samples were positive for E. histolytica by nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green and Taqman real-time PCR assays, respectively. Significant differences in detection of E. histolytica were noted in the real-time PCR assays evaluated (P<0.0001). The nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green real-time PCR and Taqman real-time PCR evaluated showed a positivity rate of 34, 38 and 50 per cent, respectively. Based on ROC curve analysis (considering Taqman real-time PCR as the gold standard), it was observed that SYBR Green real-time PCR was better than conventional nested-multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of ALA. Interpretation & conclusions: Taqman real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA had the highest positivity rate evaluated in this study. Both nested multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR assays utilized were evaluated to give accurate results. Real-time PCR assays can be used as the gold standard in rapid and reliable diagnosis, and appropriate management of amoebiasis, replacing the

  5. Prevalent HLA Class II Alleles in Mexico City Appear to Confer Resistance to the Development of Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Eric G.; Granados, Julio; Partida-Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Valenzuela, Olivia; Rascón, Edgar; Magaña, Ulises; Escamilla-Tilch, Mónica; López-Reyes, Alberto; Nieves-Ramírez, Miriam; González, Enrique; Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Valadez, Alicia; Luna, Alexandra; Estrada, Francisco J.; Maldonado, Carmen; Ximénez, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is an endemic disease and a public health problem throughout Mexico, although the incidence rates of amebic liver abscess (ALA) vary among the geographic regions of the country. Notably, incidence rates are high in the northwestern states (especially Sonora with a rate of 12.57/100,000 inhabitants) compared with the central region (Mexico City with a rate of 0.69/100,000 inhabitants). These data may be related to host genetic factors that are partially responsible for resistance or susceptibility. Therefore, we studied the association of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles with resistance or susceptibility to ALA in two Mexican populations, one each from Mexico City and Sonora. Ninety ALA patients were clinically diagnosed by serology and sonography. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To establish the genetic identity of both populations, 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) were analyzed with multiplexed PCR, and the allelic frequencies of HLA were studied by PCR-SSO using LUMINEX technology. The allele frequencies obtained were compared to an ethnically matched healthy control group (146 individuals). We observed that both affected populations differed genetically from the control group. We also found interesting trends in the population from Mexico City. HLA-DQB1*02 allele frequencies were higher in ALA patients compared to the control group (0.127 vs 0.047; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 2.9, 95% CI= 1.09-8.3). The less frequent alleles in ALA patients were HLA-DRB1*08 (0.118 vs 0.238 in controls; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 0.42, 95% CI= 0.19-0.87) and HLA-DQB1*04 (0.109 vs 0.214; p= 0.02; pc= NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.20-0.94). The haplotype HLA-DRB1*08/-DQB1*04 also demonstrated a protective trend against the development of this disease (0.081 vs. 0.178; p=0.02; pc=NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.16-0.93). These trends suggest that the prevalent alleles in the population of Mexico City may be associated with protection against the development of ALA

  6. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. CASE REPORT A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. CONCLUSIONS EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this practice may be associated with an inherently significant risk of misdiagnosis and subsequent unnecessary surgery, as illustrated by this case. Malignancy was initially suspected in our patient and surgical resection was recommended. Endoscopic measures were only pursued to complete staging. We propose that EUS-guided biopsy may be a crucial diagnostic step in the management algorithm

  7. Retroperitoneoscopic drainage of a psoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Katara, Avinash N; Shah, Rasik S; Bhandarkar, Deepraj S; Unadkat, Rajan J

    2004-09-01

    Pyogenic psoas abscess in the pediatric age group is a primary condition caused mostly by Staphylococcus aureus. The preferred treatment is percutaneous or surgical drainage under a cover of systemic antibiotics. Laparoscopic drainage scores over open surgery in terms of minimal invasion, shorter hospital stay, better patient comfort, and more complete drainage compared with the percutaneous approach. The authors report a case of a 4-year-old boy with a psoas abscess that was effectively drained laparoscopically through an extraperitoneal approach. PMID:15359416

  8. Peritonsillar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of bacteria called group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus . Peritonsillar abscess most often occurs in older children, adolescents, and young adults. The condition is rare now that antibiotics are used to treat tonsillitis.

  9. Peritonsillar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstruction Cellulitis of the jaw, neck, or chest Endocarditis (rare) Fluid around the lungs ( pleural effusion ) Inflammation ... chap 196. Read More Abscess Breathing difficulty Cellulitis Endocarditis Pericarditis Pleural effusion Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Retropharyngeal ...

  10. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the rectum Fatigue, fever , night sweats, and chills Redness, painful and hardened tissue in the area ... other symptoms of anorectal abscess You have fever, chills, or other new symptoms after being treated for ...

  11. Perirenal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. Causes Most perirenal abscesses are caused by urinary tract infections that start in the bladder. They then spread ... develop: Abdominal pain Burning with urination Chills Fever Urinary tract infection Prevention If you have kidney stones, ask your ...

  12. Peritonsillar Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... person's tonsil toward the uvula (the dangling fleshy object at the back of the mouth). If this happens, it can become hard to swallow, speak, and maybe even breathe. If you think you have an abscess in the back of ...

  13. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Brain abscesses commonly occur when bacteria or fungi infect part of the brain. As a result, swelling and irritation (inflammation) develop. Infected brain cells, white blood cells, live and dead bacteria, ...

  14. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses may occur after: A bacterial infection (often staphylococcus) A minor wound or injury Boils Folliculitis (infection ... Daum RS. Staphylococcus aureus . In: Long SS, ed. Principles and Practice ... Diseases. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012: ...

  15. Genome Sequence of the Uncommon Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm66 Strain STAB13021, Isolated from Clonal Clustered Cases in French Brittany

    PubMed Central

    Meygret, Alexandra; Vincent, Pascal; Moullec, Séverine; Nacazume, Jessica; Adnani, Yahia; Lavenier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the complete annotated genome sequence of the invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strain M/emm66, isolated in 2013 from a subcutaneous abscess in new clustered cases in French Brittany. PMID:27445380

  16. Genome Sequence of the Uncommon Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm66 Strain STAB13021, Isolated from Clonal Clustered Cases in French Brittany.

    PubMed

    Meygret, Alexandra; Vincent, Pascal; Moullec, Séverine; Nacazume, Jessica; Adnani, Yahia; Lavenier, Dominique; Kayal, Samer; Faili, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the complete annotated genome sequence of the invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strain M/emm66, isolated in 2013 from a subcutaneous abscess in new clustered cases in French Brittany. PMID:27445380

  17. Cell Based Drug Delivery: Micrococcus luteus Loaded Neutrophils as Chlorhexidine Delivery Vehicles in a Mouse Model of Liver Abscesses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, Sebastian O.; Menon, Sailesh; Alshetaiwi, Hamad; Shrestha, Tej B.; Chlebanowski, Lauren; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Troyer, Deryl L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent WHO report on antibiotic resistances shows a dramatic increase of microbial resistance against antibiotics. With only a few new antibiotics in the pipeline, a different drug delivery approach is urgently needed. We have obtained evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of a cell based drug delivery system that utilizes the innate immune system as targeting carrier for antibacterial drugs. In this study we show the efficient loading of neutrophil granulocytes with chlorhexidine and the complete killing of E. coli as well as Fusobacterium necrophorum in in-vitro studies. Fusobacterium necrophorum causes hepatic abscesses in cattle fed high grain diets. We also show in a mouse model that this delivery system targets infections of F. necrophorum in the liver and reduces the bacterial burden by an order of magnitude from approximately 2•106 to 1•105. PMID:26011247

  18. Ascariasis as a cause of hepatic abscess: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, V; Thakur, S; Rana, B

    2015-01-01

    We receive around 60 cases of hepatic abscess in a year. The commonest diagnosis reached at the time of discharge is amoebic liver abscess. The diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess is mostly presumptive and thus the patients are usually given a mixed treatment with injection ceftriaxone and tablet metronidazole. Here we report three cases of hepatic abscess diagnosed recently, where ascariasis was the probable etiology. Ascariasis may be a much commoner cause of hepatic abscesses in this region than we think. PMID:26068350

  19. Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster by Intramuscular Immunization with an Autographa californica Baculovirus Driving the Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Ruiz, Dulce María; Aguilar-Diaz, Hugo; Bobes, Raúl José; Sampieri, Alicia; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Carrero, Julio César

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that oral immunization using Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment (AcNPV-LC3) of Entamoeba histolytica conferred protection against ALA development in hamsters. In this study, we determined the ability of AcNPV-LC3 to protect against ALA by the intramuscular route as well as the liver immune response associated with protection. Results showed that 55% of hamsters IM immunized with AcNPV-LC3 showed sterile protection against ALA, whereas other 20% showed reduction in the size and extent of abscesses, resulting in some protection in 75% of animals compared to the sham control group. Levels of protection showed a linear correlation with the development and intensity of specific antiamoeba cellular and humoral responses, evaluated in serum and spleen of hamsters, respectively. Evaluation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns expressed in the liver of hamsters showed that sterile protection was associated with the production of high levels of IFNγ and IL-4. These results suggest that the baculovirus system is equally efficient by the intramuscular as well as the oral routes for ALA protection and that the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment is a highly protective antigen against hepatic amoebiasis through the local induction of IFNγ and IL-4. PMID:26090442

  20. Pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Rudwan, M A

    1977-05-28

    Three cases of pituitary abscess are presented. The history of recurrent attacks of aseptic meningitis, together with radiological and clinical features suggestive of pituitary tumor, appear to form a fairly typical picture of the condition. Long follow-up was possible in two of the cases. There are no radiological features which distinguish the lesion from pituitary tumor, hence the importance of recognizing the significance of such a clinical presentation with radiological evidence of sellar enlargement. Pituitary abscesses seem to occur in preexisting pituitary tumors. The possible relationship with pituitary infarction is discussed. PMID:865667

  1. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-01-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1–A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1–B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. “Non-pathogenicity” included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while “pathogenicity” comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  2. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Fehling, Helena; Matthiesen, Jenny; Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-08-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  3. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Boils especially on the back or scalp Bone infections of the spine (vertebral osteomyelitis) People who inject drugs are also at increased ... Complications Complications may include: Brain abscess Brain damage Bone infection (osteomyelitis) Chronic back pain Meningitis Nerve damage Return ...

  4. Subareolar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland. The areolar gland is located in the breast under or below the areola (colored area around the nipple). ... an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

  5. Effects of dietary sunflower seeds and tylosin phosphate on production variables, carcass characteristics, fatty acid composition, and liver abscess incidence in crossbred steers.

    PubMed

    Mir, P S; Dugan, M E R; He, M L; Entz, T; Yip, B

    2008-11-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial experiment with 48 crossbred steers (with Hereford, Angus, and Charolais genetics, and an initial BW of 373 +/- 8.4 kg) was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary sunflower seeds (SS) and tylosin phosphate (TP) on production factors, carcass characteristics, liver abscess incidence, and fatty acid composition of the muscle (pars costalis diaphragmatis; PCD) and subcutaneous fat. Individually penned steers were fed either a control diet of 84.5% rolled barley, 14% barley silage, and 1.5% mineral and vitamin mix on a DM basis, or an SS diet, in which SS replaced 15% of the diet. Half the animals fed each diet received TP at 11 mg/kg of DM as a top dressing. Interactions were significant for all production factors. A reduction (P = 0.008) in DMI was observed from 10.1 +/- 0.4 kg/d, in steers fed the control diet, to 8.9 +/- 0.3 and 8.6 +/- 0.3 kg/d, in steers fed the SS and SS + TP diets, respectively. Greater (P = 0.014) ADG was observed for steers fed the control diet than for those fed the SS or SS + TP diet (1.4 vs. 1.1 and 1.2, SE = 0.1 kg/d, respectively); however, G:F ratios were greater (P = 0.011) in steers fed the control diets than in those fed the SS diets. Steers fed the control and SS diets had the heaviest and lightest HCW (347 +/- 6.9 vs. 325 +/- 8.4 kg; P = 0.025), respectively. Lean meat yield (%) of steers fed SS was greater (P = 0.117) than in steers fed the control diets, whereas total lean yield [(HCW x lean meat yield)/100] was similar (P = 0.755). Provision of the SS or SS + TP diet eliminated (P = 0.08 for interaction) liver abscesses compared with the 36 and 9% incidence in steers fed the control or control + TP diet, respectively. Fatty acid weight percentages (wt%) followed similar patterns in PCD and subcutaneous fat. Feeding the SS diets led to greater (P = 0.001) wt% of 18:0 and 18:2n-6, but reduced the wt% of 16:0, 9-cis (c)-18:1, and 18:3n-3 in PCD compared with that in steers fed the control diets, but the wt

  6. Two cases of monomicrobial intraabdominal abscesses due to KPC - 3 Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 clone

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the etiology of pyogenic liver and pancreatic abscesses is an important factor in determining the success of combined surgical and antibiotic treatment. Literature shows geographical variations in the prevalence and distribution of causative organisms, and the spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing bacteria is an emerging cause of abdominal infections. Case presentation We herein describe two cases of intra-abdominal abscesses due to monomicrobial infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 258 producing K. pneumoniae carbapenemase 3 (KPC-Kp). In case 1, a 50-year-old HIV-negative Italian woman with chronic pancreatitis showed infection of a pancreatic pseudocystic lesion caused by KPC-Kp. In case 2, a 64-year-old HIV- negative Italian woman with pancreatic neoplasm and liver metastases developed a liver abscess due to KPC after surgery. Both women were admitted to our hospital but to different surgical units. The clonal relationship between the two isolates was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In case 2, the patient was already colonized at admission and inter-hospital transmission of the pathogen was presumed. A long-term combination regimen of colistin with tigecycline and percutaneous drainage resulted in full recovery and clearance of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. Conclusions Timely microbiological diagnosis, the combined use of new and old antibiotics and radiological intervention appeared to be valuable in managing these serious conditions. The emergence and dissemination of MDR organisms is posing an increasing challenge for physicians to develop new therapeutic strategies and control and prevention frameworks. PMID:21961811

  7. Antisense Inhibition of Expression of Cysteine Proteinases Affects Entamoeba histolytica-Induced Formation of Liver Abscess in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Serge; Stolarsky, Tamara; Bracha, Rivka; Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Mirelman, David

    1999-01-01

    Trophozoites of virulent Entamoeba histolytica transfected with the antisense gene encoding cysteine proteinase 5 (CP5) have only 10% of the CP activity but retain their cytopathic activity on mammalian monolayers. In the present study we found that the transfected trophozoites with low levels of CP activity were incapable of inducing the formation of liver lesions in hamsters. PMID:9864246

  8. Mucosal delivery of ACNPV baculovirus driving expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment confers protection against amoebic liver abscess in hamster.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Laclette, J P; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, J C

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine. PMID:22110386

  9. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar Calreticulin: Inhibition of Classical Complement Pathway and Differences in the Level of Expression in Amoebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ximénez, Cecilia; González, Enrique; Nieves, Miriam E.; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; García de León, Ma del Carmen; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G.; Partida, Oswaldo; Cerritos, René

    2014-01-01

    The role of calreticulin (CRT) in host-parasite interactions has recently become an important area of research. Information about the functions of calreticulin and its relevance to the physiology of Entamoeba parasites is limited. The present work demonstrates that CRT of both pathogenic E. histolytica and nonpathogenic E. dispar species specifically interacted with human C1q inhibiting the activation of the classical complement pathway. Using recombinant EhCRT protein, we demonstrate that CRT interaction site and human C1q is located at the N-terminal region of EhCRT. The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experiments show that CRT and human C1q colocalize in the cytoplasmic vesicles and near to the surface membrane of previously permeabilized trophozoites or are incubated with normal human serum which is known to destroy trophozoites. In the presence of peripheral mononuclear blood cells, the distribution of EhCRT and C1q is clearly over the surface membrane of trophozoites. Nevertheless, the level of expression of CRT in situ in lesions of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in the hamster model is different in both Entamoeba species; this molecule is expressed in higher levels in E. histolytica than in E. dispar. This result suggests that EhCRT may modulate some functions during the early moments of the host-parasite relationship. PMID:24860808

  10. Use of micro samples of finger prick blood dried on filter paper for a quick and simple dipstick dot-EIA for diagnosis of amebic liver abscess (ALA).

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Ghosh, S; Singal, A K; Anand, B S; Talwar, G P

    1994-01-01

    Filter paper was used as a support to absorb micro samples of finger prick blood for detection of antibodies to Entamoeba histolytica (causative organism of amebiasis) by a rapid dipstick dot-EIA technique; 8 microliters of blood was sufficient to saturate discs (diameter 6 mm) of Whatman paper No. 3. Conditions of elution of blood from the discs were optimized and the best results were obtained when 0.4 ml of buffer was used for elution for 30 minutes at room temperature. The filter paper technique is extremely useful for field use and for diagnosis of amebic liver abscess on a large scale since it does not involve centrifugation of blood and use of sterile vials because blood dried on paper can be stored in polythene bags at room temperature for up to 3 months and for a week at 42 degrees C without significant loss of antibody activity, thereby eliminating the need of refrigeration of samples for storage or transportation to a reference laboratory. Elution of blood from different discs of the same patient was found to be highly reproducible without appreciable loss of sensitivity or specificity. Twenty-four confirmed ALA, 29 non-ALA, and 25 apparently normal healthy controls, with no previous history of amebiasis, were tested. Sensitivity and specificity of the test was found to be 96% and 92%, respectively. PMID:8189328

  11. Mucosal Delivery of ACNPV Baculovirus Driving Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment Confers Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Ruiz, DM; Laclette, JP; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, JC

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine. PMID:22110386

  12. Tuberculous liver abscess in an immunocompetent child with pulmonary tuberculosis as a cause of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Bahar; Somer, Ayper; Hatipoğlu, Nevin; Keser, Melike; Yekeler, Ensar; Gün, Feryal; Güllüoğlu, Mine; Salman, Tansu; Salman, Nuran

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of FUO. A case of prolonged fever with hepatic and pulmonary tuberculosis as a final diagnosis is herein presented. A 4-year-old, otherwise healthy boy presented with an axillary temperature of up to 39.5ºC for the previous 3 weeks. His medical history revealed an occasional increase in body temperature up to 38.5ºC for the last 6 months. Physical examination revealed coarse breath sounds on the basal lung area. Chest X-ray showed mediastinal lymphadenomegaly and computed tomography revealed paratracheal conglomerated lymph nodes and a groundglass appearance on the right lung. There were multiple contrast-enhanced, hypoechoic nodules with central necrosis in the liver parenchyma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Open liver biopsy yielded chronic granulomatous inflammation compatible with pathological findings of tuberculosis infection. The culture specimen was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The patient improved rapidly after antituberculous therapy was initiated. Tuberculosis, especially in its disseminated form, poses a distinct diagnostic challenge in cases of prolonged fever with unproven etiology, and thus persistence should be exercised in disclosing the cause of such fevers. PMID:26613227

  13. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor an anti-inflammatory peptide; therapeutics originating from amebic abscess of the liver.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan R

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica in culture produces a pentapeptide (MQCNS). This oligopeptide inhibits the in vitro and in vivo locomotion of human monocytes, hence its denomination Monocyte Locomotion Inhibitory Factor (MLIF). The original isolated peptide and its synthetic construct display similar effects, among others, being inhibition of the respiratory burst in monocytes and neutrophils, decrease of Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) skin hypersensitivity in guinea pigs and gerbils, and delay of mononuclear leukocytes in human Rebuck skin windows with inhibition of vascular cell Very late antigen (VLA)-4 and Vascular adhesion molecules (VCAM) in endothelia and monocytes. The MLIF molecular mechanism of action is unknown, but data reveal its implication in Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. This could explain MLIF multiplicity of biological effects. On the other hand, the amebic peptide has been useful in treating experimental amebiasis of the liver. The amebic peptide is effective in reducing inflammation induced by carragenin and arthritis in a Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Microarray data from experimental arthritis revealed an MLIF gene expression profile that includes genes that are involved in apoptosis, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, and inflammation / chemotaxis. MLIF could be involved in unsuspected biological factions because there is increasing data on the peptide effect on several cell activities. This review also presents uses of MLIF as described in patents. PMID:22074573

  14. [Primary psoas abscess in a child. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gilio, A E; Pahl, M M; Barbosa, R B; Henriques, C L; Ejzenberg, B; Okay, Y

    1997-01-01

    Primary psoas abscess is an uncommon disease. In children, clinical manifestations is often inspecific leading to diagnostic delay. The authors relate a primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas muscle in a 7-year-old girl with secondary septic arthritis of the hip. Confirmation of diagnosis was established by computerized tomography (CT) of the abdominal and pelvic areas. A review of the literature is presented about clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, etiology, diagnostic and therapeutic management of this infrequent entity. PMID:9595782

  15. Propionibacterium Acnes Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Man in the Absence of Prior Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Odunukan, Olufunso W; Masannat, Fares; Baka, J Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a rare, but established, cause of intracranial abscesses. We describe a case of P. acnes brain abscess in an immunocompetent man without prior neurosurgery. A 49-year old man with mild psoriasis presented with a two-week history of gait changes, generalized weakness and a two-day history of headaches, aphasia and confusion. Imaging revealed a left thalamic mass and surgical biopsy suggested a pyogenic abscess. Cultures of biopsy samples of the abscess grew P. acnes alone. MRI and serial neurological exam showed marked clinical improvement with intravenous antibiotics. The significant reduction in the abscess was sustained on MRI obtained at six weeks after completion of antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, P. acnes must be considered as a differential diagnosis in individuals presenting with features suggestive of a brain abscess even in the absence of immunosuppression or previous neurosurgery. PMID:26999913

  16. Obturator internus muscle abscess in children: report of seven cases and review.

    PubMed

    Viani, R M; Bromberg, K; Bradley, J S

    1999-01-01

    Obturator internus muscle (OIM) abscess is an uncommon entity often mistaken for septic arthritis of the hip. We describe seven children with OIM abscess and review seven previously reported cases. The most common presenting symptoms were hip or thigh pain (14 patients), fever (13), and limp (13). The hip was flexed, abducted, and externally rotated in 11 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (CT) were diagnostic for OIM abscess in the 14 patients. Associated abscesses were located in the obturator externus muscle (5 patients), psoas muscle (2), and iliac muscle (1). The etiologic agents were Staphylococcus aureus (8 patients), Streptococcus pyogenes (2), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (2), and Enterococcus faecalis (1). Three patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous drainage, and three had surgical drainage. Three patients had ischial osteomyelitis in addition to OIM abscess. The 11 children with uncomplicated OIM abscess were treated for a median of 28 days. All patients had an uneventful recovery. PMID:10028081

  17. Hepatolithiasis and the syndrome of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis: clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Wilson Man-shan; Chan, Yiu-kay; Wong, Chi-tat; Lo, Yan-fai; Yeung, Yat-wah; Lee, Yat-wing

    2011-02-01

    Primary hepatothiasis (HL) and recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) are two terms describing the different aspects of the same disease, with HL emphasizing the pathologic changes and RPC emphasizing the clinical presentation and suppurative inflammation. It is predominantly a disease of the Far East. In the 1960s, it was the third most common cause of emergency abdominal surgery at a university hospital in Hong Kong. Thereafter, its incidence has decreased considerably, possibly due to improved standards of living and Westernized diet. Clinically, patients may present acutely with recurrent bacterial cholangitis and its possible complications, such as liver abscess and septicemic shock, or with chronic complications, such as cholangiocarcinoma. Pathologically, it is characterized by pigmented calcium bilirubinate stones within dilated intrahepatic bile ducts featuring chronic inflammation, mural fibrosis, and proliferation of peribiliary glands, without extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Episodes of suppurative inflammation cumulate in sclerosing cholangitis of peripheral ducts and parenchymal fibrosis resulting from collapse and scarring. Mass-forming inflammatory pseudotumor and neoplasms like intraductal papillary neoplasms and cholangiocarcinoma are increasingly recognized complications. Modern imaging techniques allow definitive diagnosis, accurate assessment for treatment planning, and detection of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach (interventional endoscopist, interventional radiologist, hepatobiliary surgeon, and intensivists) is important for optimal patient outcome. PMID:21344349

  18. Streptococcus milleri and Recurrent Intra-Abdominal Abscesses: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gana, Tabitha M.; Awolaran, Olugbenga; Akhtar, Sobia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent intra-abdominal abscesses as a postoperative complication following diverticular perforation in which Streptococcus milleri (SM) was isolated. SM is evaluated here as a potent pyogenic organism commonly associated with intra-abdominal abscess especially in the postoperative setting. With the commonly adopted conservative management, the challenges of recurrence and prolonged hospital stay experienced in the indexed case as well as many other previous reports are highlighted. We also present a recommendation of the need for a more intensive approach of SM-related abscess drainage along with areas that would benefit further research. PMID:27313942

  19. Clinical and echocardiographic findings in an 8 year old Brown Swiss cow with myocardial abscess.

    PubMed

    Gerspach, C; Schwarzwald, C C; Hilbe, M; Buczinski, S

    2016-06-01

    Intramyocardial abscesses are rare in cattle and may lead to unspecific clinical signs. This case report describes the clinical and echocardiographic findings in an 8 year old Brown Swiss cow presented with an intramural myocardial abscess. The main clinical findings were anorexia, drop in milk yield, fever, tachycardia, and hyperfibrinogenemia. Neither heart murmurs nor cardiac arrhythmias were present on auscultation. Transthoracic echocardiographic examination revealed a prominent intramural mass embedded in the left ventricular free wall and bulging into the lumen of the left ventricle. Diagnosis was confirmed at necropsy. A culture of the abscess grew Trueperella pyogenes. PMID:26900053

  20. [Pyogenic sacroiliitis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Chimura, T; Banzai, M; Yamakawa, M; Sato, S; Satou, S

    2001-09-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is an extremely rare disease in the field of obstetrics and gynecology, and especially for the cases discovered and treated during pregnancy, only five cases can be found in literature. We experienced one case of the disease in which the patient needed urgent hospitalization due to dysbasia caused by fever and pain at the left hip at the 27th week of her pregnancy. The patient was a 31-year-old primipara presenting typical clinical symptoms of pyogenic sacroiliitis along with evidence of severe infection as represented by fever of 39.7 degrees C and CRP of 12.6 mg/dl. She showed a good response to meropenem (MEPM) at 1 g twice a day for 8 days and then at 0.5 g twice a day for 2 days, followed by faropenem (FRPM) at 200 mg three times a day for 12 days, which successfully improved her subjective and objective findings as well as her laboratory test values, resulting in a complete cure. The definitive diagnosis of the disease in the patient was made on the basis of MRI findings, but no pathogen was identified. The patient was found to have marginal placenta previa as a complication, but she had an uneventful trans-vaginal delivery at the 37th week of her pregnancy and left hospital after both she and her baby showed favorable post-delivery progress. The case reported here is the first case of pyogenic sacroiliitis that has ever been discovered and treated during pregnancy in Japan. PMID:11729713

  1. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected fluid and pus located inside the belly (abdominal cavity). This type of abscess can be located near ... abdominal abscesses: Abdominal x-ray Ultrasound of the abdomen and pelvis CT scan of the abdomen and ...

  2. Abscess in the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses are streptococci and staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is a serious infection. Obstruction ... night sweats. In contrast, lung abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA can be fatal within days, ...

  3. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  4. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess is caused by an infection inside the spine. An abscess of the spinal cord itself is ... by a staphylococcus infection that spreads through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some ...

  5. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your abscess will be treated with antibiotics and drainage of the pus. At first, you will likely ... of your antibiotics, even if you feel better. DRAINAGE Your abscess needs to be drained of pus. ...

  6. Multiple brain abscesses.

    PubMed

    Burke, L P; Ho, S U; Cerullo, L J; Kim, K S; Harter, D H

    1981-12-01

    A young woman with 12 separate brain abscesses was treated medically after aspiration of one abscess for diagnostic bacteriological examination. She made an excellent recovery with only minimal residual neurological dysfunction. Surgical aspiration for detailed bacteriological studies followed by appropriate antimicrobial therapy is an effective way of treating multiple brain abscesses in the neurologically stable patient. PMID:7330768

  7. Delayed Infrarenal Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Treated by Endovascular Stent Graft in Pyogenic Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Hyuk; Hwang, Dae-Hyun; Pang, Chae-Hyun; Wang, Shaobai; Kim, In-Sung; Ahn, Jung-Tae; Kim, Young-Woo

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old male patient with pyogenic spondylodiscitis and epidural and psoas abscesses underwent posterior decompression, debridement, and instrumented fusion, followed by anterior debridement and reconstruction. Sudden onset flank pain was diagnosed 7 weeks postoperatively and was determined to be a pseudoaneurysm located at the aorta inferior to the renal artery and superior to the aortic bifurcation area. An endovascular stent graft was applied to successfully treat the pseudoaneurysm. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and infection status was stabilized. PMID:24353853

  8. Atlantoaxial Subluxation after Pyogenic Spondylitis around the Odontoid Process.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Atsushi; Yagi, Mitsuru; Takemitsu, Masakazu; Machida, Masafumi; Asazuma, Takashi; Ichimura, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. A case report and review of the literature. Objective. The aim of this study was to describe the conservative management of pyogenic spondylitis around the odontoid process. Summary of Background Data. Atlantoaxial subluxation after pyogenic spondylitis is rare. The therapeutic approach to infection of the upper cervical spine is controversial. Methods. Medical chart and radiological images of a 76-year-old male patient were retrospectively reviewed. Radiography revealed atlantoaxial subluxation, and an abscess was seen around the odontoid process on magnetic resonance images. Intravenous antibiotics and a halo vest were used to treat the patient. We then observed the patient's conservative treatment course. Results. C-reactive protein levels returned to normal 4 weeks after administration of the intravenous antibiotics. The patient's muscle weakness also completely recovered 8 weeks after administration of the intravenous antibiotics. Because the patient was able to walk without any support, surgical treatment was not necessary. Conclusions. Pyogenic spondylitis of the upper cervical spine is a rare manifestation. Surgical or conservative treatment must be selected carefully based on the patient's symptoms. If early diagnosis and treatment can be provided to the patients, conservative treatment can be achieved. PMID:26090255

  9. Pyogenic cervical spondylitis with quadriplegia as a complication of severe burns: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Asakage, Naoki; Katami, Atsuo; Takekawa, Satoru; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Goto, Michitoshi; Fukai, Ryuta

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of cervical pyogenic spondylitis complicated by epidural abscess with quadriplegia during treatment of severe burns. The patient was a 49-year-old man with 3rd-degree burns to 20% of his body, involving the lower extremities. We performed escharectomy of the 3rd-degree necrosis on days 7 and 16, followed by the first skin graft on day 23. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in the postoperative graft wound culture. On day 23 after the skin graft, he became febrile and began to experience cervical pain and muscle weakness of the extremities. By day 24, quadriplegia had developed. A cervical vertebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed pyogenic spondylitis with an epidural abscess, which was causing the quadriplegia. We treated the patient by performing curettage of the pyogenic lesion and anterior fixation of the cervical vertebral bodies. The fact that P. aeruginosa was detected in the pyogenic focus culture indicated that burn wound sepsis was responsible for the infection. This case reinforces that acting on a strong suspicion helps to establish a diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment early. PMID:17072727

  10. Palatal pyogenic granulomaa.

    PubMed

    Mahabob, Nazargi; Kumar, Senthil; Raja, Subramani

    2013-07-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a kind of inflammatory hyperplasia seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection. In reality it arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. It is also called as pregnancy tumor because of its high frequency of occurrence during the early part of pregnancy. Even though, this lesion is non-neoplastic and treatment procedure is simple, it should be diagnosed correctly before proceeding with the treatment. The most common site for PGs is gingiva (75%) and rarely in the palate. In this case report, we are going to present very rare occurrence of pregnancy tumor in the hard palate. PMID:23956603

  11. Interactions of Lactobacilli with Pathogenic Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Westbroek, Mark L.; Davis, Crystal L.; Fawson, Lena S.; Price, Travis M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether (1) a decreased concentration of Lactobacilli allows S. pyogenes to grow; (2) S. pyogenes is able to grow in the presence of healthy Lactobacillus concentrations; (3) S. pyogenes is capable of inhibiting Lactobacilli. Methods. One hundred fifty patient samples of S. pyogenes were mixed with four different concentrations of L. crispatus and L. jensenii. Colony counts and pH measurements were taken from these concentrations and compared using t-tests and ANOVA statistical analyses. Results. Statistical tests showed no significant difference between the colony counts of S. pyogenes by itself and growth when mixed with Lactobacilli, and no significant difference between the colony counts of S. pyogenes in the four different concentrations of Lactobacilli. Conclusion. The statistical data representing the growth of these two organisms suggests that Lactobacilli did not inhibit the growth of S. pyogenes. Also, S. pyogenes did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacilli. PMID:20508738

  12. Pattern of Retropharyngeal Abscess in Nigerian Children

    PubMed Central

    Ijaduola, Taiwo G.A.

    1986-01-01

    A study of cases of retropharyngeal abscess in Nigerian children was carried out. It occurred most commonly in children under the age of 6 months and in more male children than female in a ratio of 5:3. Most children seen at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital were brought in late with the upper airway already obstructed. A diagnostic tool of soft-tissue x-ray examination of the neck is not foolproof. In fact, 22.58 percent of soft-tissue x-ray examinations of the neck in this study produced false-positive results. Factors contributing to these results are discussed. Bacteriology showed the main organisms to be Hemophilus influenzae (45.84 percent) and Streptococcus pyogenes (33.33 percent). All cases were found to be secondary to upper respiratory tract infection. PMID:3950981

  13. Hepatic abscess induced by foreign body: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sofia A; Alberto, Sara CF; Cruz, Elsa; Pires, Eduardo; Figueira, Tomás; Coimbra, Élia; Estevez, José; Oliveira, Mário; Novais, Luís; Deus, João R

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic abscess due to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract caused by ingested foreign bodies is uncommon. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult as patients are often unaware of the foreign body ingestion and symptoms and imagiology are usually non-specific. The authors report a case of 62-year-old woman who was admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Further investigation revealed hepatic abscess, without resolution despite antibiotic therapy. A liver abscess resulting from perforation and intra-hepatic migration of a bone coming from the pilorum was diagnosed by surgery. The literature concerning foreign body-induced perforation of the gastrointestinal tract complicated by liver abscess is reviewed. PMID:17457985

  14. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  15. A Case of Acute Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Bacteremia Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Baek, Hae Lim; Jang, Seung Jun; Moon, Song Mi

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare osteoarticular infection, occurring most frequently in children and young adults. Diagnosis of the disease is challenging because of a general lack of awareness of the disease and its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative bacteria in pyogenic sacroiliitis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has typically been considered a hospital-associated pathogen; however, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infections are becoming increasingly common in Korea. We report the first domestic case of acute pyogenic sacroiliitis with abscess and bacteremia caused by CA-MRSA. The pathogen carried the type IV-A staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) without the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, and was identified as sequence type (ST) 72 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:24475359

  16. Parapharyngeal abscess is frequently associated with concomitant peritonsillar abscess.

    PubMed

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Fischer, Anne Sophie Lind; Antonsen, Christine; Rusan, Maria; Eskildsen, Helle; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-06-01

    To characterize patients with parapharyngeal abscess admitted to a Danish tertiary care centre and evaluate our management. This is a retrospective chart review. All records of patients with parapharyngeal abscess admitted to the Ear-Nose-Throat Department at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2001 through December 2011 were reviewed. In total, 63 patients (41 males), aged 4-89 years (median, 45 years) were included in the study. The mean annual incidence of parapharyngeal abscess was 0.9 cases/100,000 population. Thirty-three (52%) patients had concomitant peritonsillar abscess. In two patients the parapharyngeal abscess was accompanied by necrotizing fasciitis. The most frequent surgical approach used was intrapharyngeal incision in combination with tonsillectomy. The most commonly used antibiotic regimen was benzylpenicillin plus metronidazole. Seven (13%) patients returned to the operating theatre due to post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage or insufficient abscess drainage. Tonsillectomy and internal incision of the abscess in combination with a narrow-spectrum intravenous penicillin and metronidazole is a safe and efficient approach for managing parapharyngeal abscesses. This approach, however, carries a relatively high complication rate, requiring close surveillance in the early post-operative period. This is especially true for parapharyngeal abscess patients without peritonsillar abscess. In our series, these patients were more ill, more likely to experience complications, require intensive care, intubation, and tracheotomy, than parapharyngeal abscess patients with concurrent peritonsillar abscess. The frequent co-existence of parapharyngeal abscess and peritonsillar abscess favours careful consideration of addition of tonsillectomy to intrapharyngeal incision. PMID:23982668

  17. [Brain abscess - overview].

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur Arni; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Olafsson, Ingvar H

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess is a life threatening illness, demanding rapid diagnosis and treatment. Its development requires seeding of an organism into the brain parenchyma, often in an area of damaged brain tissue or in a region with poor microcirculation. The lesion evolves from a cerebritis stage to capsule formation. Brain abscesses can be caused by contiguous or haematogenous spread of an infection, or by head trauma/ neurosurgical procedure. The most common presentation is that of headache and vomiting due to raised intracranial pressure. Seizures have been reported in up to 50% of cases. Focal neurological deficits may be present, depending on the location of the lesion. Treatment of a brain abscess involves aspiration or excision, along with parenteral antibiotic therapy. The outcome has improved dramatically in the last decades due to improvement in diagnostic techniques, neurosurgery, and broad-spectrum antibiotics. The authors provide an overview of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of brain abscesses. PMID:23341403

  18. Neonatal iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kameoka, Kazuhiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawakami, Sanae; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children, particularly in neonates. A male neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with a weight of 2915 g. On day 22 after birth, his family noticed that his right thigh was swollen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass extending to the right iliopsoas from the right thigh with thick septa. Puncture to the right groin yielded purulent fluid, and so a diagnosis of abscess was made. The puncture was followed by surgical drainage through a small inguinal incision, and the abscess cavity was irrigated thoroughly using normal saline. Culture of abscess fluid was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, so intravenous ABPC infusion was continued. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicate that the IPA was derived from arthritis of the hip, and the patients received Riemenbügel for the incomplete hip dislocation. He is doing well at 2 years of age. PMID:23005905

  19. Idiopathic thyroid abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Hassranah, Dale; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Thyroid abscesses are uncommon because the gland is relatively resistant to developing infection due to its rich blood supply, well-developed capsule and high iodine content. However, clinicians must be aware of this differential to make an early diagnosis. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient who required urgent operative resection as definitive treatment for a thyroid abscess secondary to infection with Staphylococcus aureus. DISCUSSION Although this is rare, a thyroid abscess left untreated can lead to serious morbidity. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the presenting features and therapeutic options. CONCLUSION Thyroid abscess is an uncommon diagnosis but can lead to significant morbidity. Therefore clinicians must be aware of the diagnosis in order to institute early aggressive management. PMID:24981167

  20. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  1. Splenic abscess: clinical features, microbiologic finding, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Sangchan, Apichat; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Mairiang, Pisaln

    2003-05-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity but may be underreported. A retrospective study at Srinagarind Hospital revealed 60 cases of splenic abscess between 1992 and 2001. The causative organisms were identified in 41 cases (68.3%). Gram negative bacilli were commonly isolated and Burkholderia pseudomallei was the most predominant. Diabetes mellitus and leukemia were common underlying diseases found in 46.3 per cent and 9.7 per cent of culture confirmed cases, respectively. The patients usually presented with fever, left upper quadrant pain, tenderness and splenomegaly. Multiple abscesses were more commonly found in the melioidosis than in the non-melioidosis group (p = 0.032), but a single abscess was more commonly found in the non-melioidosis than in the melioidosis group (p = 0.032). Concurrent liver abscesses, often multiple, were not different in both groups. Antimicrobials alone were given in 66.7 per cent of cases with melioidosis and 64.7 per cent of non-melioidosis group. Splenectomy and percutaneous aspiration were performed only in 29.3 per cent and 4.9 per cent of cases with splenic abscess. The overall mortality rate of splenic abscess was only 4.9 per cent in the present series. In conclusion, splenic abscess is not uncommon. Burkholderia pseudomalleli is the most common causative agent found in the present series. Therefore, it should be targeted in the initial empirical antibiotic therapy before the culture results are available especially when multiple lesions in the spleen and concurrent multiple liver abscesses are seen. Prolonged treatment with appropriate antimicrobials alone is usually effective. Splenectomy and/or aspiration may be useful in selected patients. PMID:12859100

  2. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of tubercular and pyogenic spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Galhotra, Ritu Dhawan; Jain, Tanica; Sandhu, Parambir; Galhotra, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of spinal infections and specifically its accuracy in differentiating tubercular and pyogenic spondylodiscitis. Materials and Methods: Totally, 50 patients referred for MRI scans with the clinical diagnosis of spinal infections were included in our study. The patients were classified as tubercular (TS), pyogenic (PS), and indeterminate spondylodiscitis on the basis of imaging findings and were correlated with the final diagnosis made by histopathology/cytology/culture/biochemistry or with successful therapeutic outcome. Imaging findings were subsequently analyzed for differentiating tubercular and pyogenic spondylodiscitis using the Chi-square test. Results: The most common pattern of spinal infection was spondylodiscitis (78% incidence rate) with epidural extension (86%) and cord compression (64%) being most common complications observed. Imaging (postcontrast study) and final diagnosis correlated in 93.7% tubercular (sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 90%) and 75% pyogenic (sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 83.3%) spondylodiscitis. The patients with tubercular spondylitis had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher incidence of following MRI findings: A well-defined paraspinal abnormal signal (80% in TS vs. 40% in PS), a thin and smooth abscess wall (84.2% in TS vs. 10% in PS), presence of intraosseous abscess (35% in TS vs. 0% in PS), focal and heterogenous enhancement of the vertebral body (75% in TS vs. 20% in PS), vertebral destruction more than or equal to grade 3 (71.8% in TS vs. 0% in PS), loss of cortical definition (75% in TS vs. 20% in PS), and spinal deformity (50% in TS vs. 5% in PS). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced images improve the sensitivity and specificity of detection and differentiation of tubercular and PS. PMID:26283836

  3. Extragingival Pyogenic Granuloma: an Unusual Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is thought to represent an exuberant tissue reaction to local irritation. It occurs in second decade of life in young females. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic growth, pedunculated or sessile, which usually bleeds on provocation. Oral pyogenic granuloma preferentially affects the gingiva. On rare occasion, it can be found extragingivally on lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, and palate which may mimic more serious pathological conditions such as malignancies. This article reports an unusual case of extra gingival pyogenic granuloma occurring on the right buccal mucosa in a female patient and discusses the features that distinguish this lesion from other similar oral mucosal lesions. PMID:26535410

  4. BRAIN ABSCESS PRESENTING WITH CATATONIA

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth J.B.; Borde, Milind; Davis, Rachel

    1995-01-01

    A fifty year old man presented to a psychiatric unit with catatonia. He was later found to have a brain abscess in the left frontal region. Brain abscess has not been previously reported to be associated with catatonia. PMID:21743747

  5. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  6. Habitat, wildlife, and one health: Arcanobacterium pyogenes in Maryland and Upper Eastern Shore white-tailed deer populations

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Melissa M.; DePerno, Christopher S.; Conner, Mark C.; Eyler, T. Brian; Lancia, Richard A.; Klaver, Robert W.; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the distribution of disease in wildlife is key to predicting the impact of emerging zoonotic one health concerns, especially for wildlife species with extensive human and livestock interfaces. The widespread distribution and complex interactions of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with humans suggest deer population health and management may have implications beyond stewardship of the animals. The intracranial abscessation suppurative meningitis (IASM) disease complex in deer has been linked to Arcanobacterium pyogenes, an under-diagnosed and often misdiagnosed organism considered commensal in domestic livestock but associated with serious disease in numerous species, including humans. Methods Our study used standard bacterial culture techniques to assess A. pyogenes prevalence among male deer sampled across six physiogeographic regions in Maryland and male and female deer in the Upper Eastern Shore under Traditional Deer Management (TDM) and Quality Deer Management (QDM), a management protocol that alters population demographics in favor of older male deer. Samples were collected from antler pedicles for males, the top of the head where pedicles would be if present for females, or the whole dorsal frontal area of the head for neonates. We collected nasal samples from all animals by swabbing the nasopharyngeal membranes. A gram stain and catalase test were conducted, and aerobic bacteria were identified to genus and species when possible. We evaluated the effect of region on whether deer carried A. pyogenes using Pearson's chi-square test with Yates’ continuity correction. For the white-tailed deer management study, we tested whether site, age class and sex predisposed animals to carrying A. pyogenes using binary logistic regression. Results A. pyogenes was detected on deer in three of the six regions studied, and was common in only one region, the Upper Eastern Shore. In the Upper Eastern Shore, 45% and 66% of antler and nasal

  7. Huge Pyogenic Granuloma of the Penis

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Fatih; Akbulut, Tugba; Kucukdurmaz, Faruk; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granulomas are benign vascular disorders of the skin and mucose membranes, generally developed by trauma and irritation. The lesions are generally small. They are most commonly seen in the skin and oral mucosa and rarely seen on penis. We present the case of a huge pyogenic granuloma on the penis. PMID:26229706

  8. Huge Pyogenic Granuloma of the Penis.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Akbulut, Tugba; Kucukdurmaz, Faruk; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granulomas are benign vascular disorders of the skin and mucose membranes, generally developed by trauma and irritation. The lesions are generally small. They are most commonly seen in the skin and oral mucosa and rarely seen on penis. We present the case of a huge pyogenic granuloma on the penis. PMID:26229706

  9. Epizootiology of cranial abscess disease in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) of Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Bradley S.; Belser, Emily H.; Killmaster, Charlie H.; Bowers, John W.; Irwin, Brian J.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Miller, Karl V.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial abscess disease is a cause of natural mortality for mature male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Most cases of abscesses are associated with bacterial infection byTrueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes, but a complete understanding of the epidemiology of this disease is lacking. We quantified the effects of individual characteristics, site-specific herd demographics, land cover, and soil variables in estimating the probability of this disease. We examined 7,545 white-tailed deer from 60 sites throughout Georgia US for signs of cranial abscesses, the predecessor of intracranial abscesses, and recorded the presence or absence of cranial abscesses for each individual examined. We detected no cranial abscesses in 2,562 female deer but 91 abscesses in 4,983 male deer examined (1.8%). A generalized linear mixed model, treating site as a random effect, was used to examine several potential explanatory risk factors including site-level landscape and soil characteristics (soil and forest type), demographic factors (deer density and male to female ratio), and individual host factors (deer sex and age). Model results indicated that the probability of a male having a cranial abscess increased with age and that adult sex ratio (male:female) was positively associated with this disease. Site-specific variables for land cover and soil types were not strongly associated with observations of the disease at the scale measured and a large amount of among-site variability remained. Given the demonstrated effect of age, gender, and local sex ratios but the remaining unexplained spatial variability, additional investigation into spatiotemporal variation of the presumed bacterial causative agent of cranial abscesses appears warranted.

  10. Urolithiasis and psoas abscess in a 2-year-old boy with type 1 glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Zafar; Qazi, Saqib Hamid

    2006-11-01

    We report on a pyogenic psoas abscess secondary to an impacted calcium oxalate ureteric stone in a 2-year-old boy with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1). The patient had a drainage of the abscess through a flank incision followed by percutaneous nephrostomy and open ureterolithotomy. Metabolic acidosis, hyperuricemia, hypocitraturia, and hypercalciuria appear to be significant in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis in patients with GSD-1. Regular ultrasonography of the abdomen along with optimal metabolic control may delay or prevent urolithiasis and its complications in GSD-1 patients. PMID:16932895

  11. Radiological management of multiple hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms associated with cholangitic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ankur; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Baruah, Bhaskar; Shalimar; Sharma, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP) are uncommon, occurring mostly as a complication of trauma (accidental or iatrogenic). Liver abscess rarely causes HAP and multiple HAP associated with cholangitic abscesses have not been reported in the literature. We present a patient of acute necrotizing pancreatitis with stent block cholangitis and multiple cholangitic abscesses who developed hemorrhagic output through drainage catheter in the liver abscess. A multiphasic CT angiography demonstrated three HAP, which were treated with a combination of endovascular coil embolization and percutaneous thrombin injection. The fact that cholangitic abscesses may be associated with pseudoaneurysms should not be neglected, considering the potentially catastrophic complication and relatively easy radiological management. CT angiography permits accurate diagnosis and lays down the roadmap for endovascular procedures. PMID:27081232

  12. Hepatic abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum after a trip to the dentist.

    PubMed

    Bytyci, Faton; Khromenko, Elena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with no significant medical history was admitted to the hospital, with high-grade fever and right upper quadrant pain. He was found, on abdominal ultrasound, to have a right lobe hepatic cystic lesion. MRI of the abdomen confirmed a hepatic abscess. Cultures obtained under CT guidance showed the abscess to be caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is a rare bacterium that can cause potentially fatal liver abscesses. Following drainage and intravenous antibiotic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged on a 4-week antibiotic course. An abdominal CT, performed 6 weeks after discharge, showed total resolution of the abscess. The patient had, 2 weeks prior to the development of the liver abscess, undergone routine dental cleaning. Neither upper respiratory symptoms nor sore throat had been identified prior to the presentation. PMID:26933183

  13. Brain abscess: Current management.

    PubMed

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  14. Brain abscess: Current management

    PubMed Central

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  15. Tubercular thyroid abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awanish; Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Srivastava, Rohit; Khan, Khursheed Alam

    2013-01-01

    We encountered a patient who presented with neck swelling, difficulty in swallowing, voice change along with systemic features such as evening rise of temperature, chronic cough and weight loss. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed two cystic swellings. An ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of tubercular abscess. The patient responded well to antigravity aspiration of the swellings and antitubercular treatment. PMID:23814203

  16. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  17. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: Computed tomography features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Xi-Zhen; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess (IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). All IPTAs (11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis. PMID:26435779

  18. Pediatric pyogenic granuloma of the glans penis.

    PubMed

    Eickhorst, Kimberly M; Nurzia, Michael J; Barone, Joseph G

    2003-03-01

    Pyogenic granulomas are benign vascular proliferations of the skin and mucous membranes. We present a case report of a 13-year-old uncircumcised boy with phimosis and a pyogenic granuloma of the glans penis. The relationship between these lesions, phimosis, smegma, and circumcision is discussed. When the lesion is found in conjunction with phimosis, consideration should be given for circumcision. Close follow-up to rule out recurrence is necessary. PMID:12639669

  19. Recurrent Soft Tissue Abscesses Caused by Legionella cincinnatiensis

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Jacques G. H.; Schorr, Mirjam; Gaia, V.; Zbinden, R.; Altwegg, M.

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent soft tissue abscesses of the jaw, wrist, and arm developed in a 73-year-old housewife with nephrotic syndrome and immunoglobulin A(κ) gammopathy of unknown etiology. Conventional cultures remained negative, despite visible gram-negative rods on microscopy. Broad-spectrum PCR revealed Legionella cincinnatiensis, which was confirmed by isolation of the organism on special Legionella medium. Infections due to Legionella species outside the lungs are rare. L. cincinnatiensis has been implicated in only four cases of clinical infection; these involved the lungs in three patients and the central nervous system in one patient. We conclude that broad-spectrum PCR can be a valuable tool for the evaluation of culture-negative infections with a high probability of bacterial origin and that Legionella might be an underdiagnosed cause of pyogenic soft tissue infection. PMID:11724886

  20. Liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, W R; Lake, J R; Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Schladt, D P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Wainright, J L; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    The median waiting time for patients with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 18 days in 2012 to 9 days in 2014, after implementation of the Share 35 policy in June 2013. Similarly, mortality among candidates listed with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 366 per 100 waitlist years in 2012 to 315 in 2014. The number of new active candidates added to the pediatric liver transplant waiting list in 2014 was 655, down from a peak of 826 in 2005. The number of prevalent candidates (on the list on December 31 of the given year) continued to decline, 401 active and 173 inactive. The number of deceased donor pediatric liver transplants peaked at 542 in 2008 and was 478 in 2014. The number of living donor liver pediatric transplants was 52 in 2014; most were from donors closely related to the recipients. Graft survival continued to improve among pediatric recipients of deceased donor and living donor livers. PMID:26755264

  1. Pituitary abscess: an unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Anatoly; Gunnarsson, Thorsteinn; Sommer, Doron; Miller, Elka

    2010-02-01

    The pituitary gland can demonstrate a variety of pathologies with different clinical presentations. Amongst them, pituitary abscess is a rare infectious disease for which contrast-enhanced MRI aids the diagnostic pathway. We present a 16-year-old girl with imaging and surgical findings consistent with primary pituitary abscess. PMID:19937240

  2. Chemical epidural abscess: case report.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Dreyfus, P M

    1971-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. PMID:5571318

  3. Chemical epidural abscess: case report

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, N.; Dreyfus, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. Images PMID:5571318

  4. Perinephric abscess caused by ruptured retrocecal appendix: MDCT demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar Ahmad; Farooq, Mir; Gojwari, Tariq; Kosar, Tasleem

    2010-01-01

    Acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening yet difficult to diagnose. One such presentation is described in a 60-year-old man who was brought to the hospital due to right lumbar pain and fever for the last 15 days. Ultrasonography showed a right perinephric gas and fluid collection. Abdominal computed tomography with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) revealed gas-containing abscess in the right retroperitoneal region involving the perinephric space, extending from the lower pole of the right kidney up to the bare area of the liver. Inflamed retrocecal appendix was seen on thick multiplanar reformat images with its tip at the lower extent of the abscess. Laparotomy and retroperitoneal exploration were performed immediately and a large volume of foul smelling pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was confirmed as the cause of the abscess. PMID:20842255

  5. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed. PMID:24348613

  6. Management of a transcranial abscess secondary to interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Thomas Edward; Ahmad, Fateh; Hackett, Scott; Rodrigues, Desiderio; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency that predisposes to opportunistic pyogenic infections in affected patients. The presentation can be variable, and the microbiological and immunologic management of this condition has been documented; however, the atypical nature of its presentation calls for a different approach in its surgical management. This is the first reported case of transcranial progression of a soft tissue abscess in a patient with IRAK-4 deficiency, with an emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to treat infection at an extremely vulnerable anatomic site. PMID:25569407

  7. Candida tropicalis brain abscess in a neonate: An emerging nosocomial menace

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Gulati, Sheffali; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Atin; Singh, Manmohan; Xess, Immaculata

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are a relatively uncommon cause of brain abscess in neonates and early infancy. They are usually associated with predisposing factors like prematurity, low birth weight, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Candida tropicalis (C. tropicalis) is rapidly emerging as a nosocomial threat in the neonatal intensive care settings. This case report describes a neonate with C. tropicalis brain abscess who was diagnosed early and managed aggressively with a favorable outcome. Inadvertent use of intravenous antibiotics can have serious complications such as invasive fungal infection. Correct microbiological diagnosis is the key to successful treatment of deep-seated pyogenic infection. Fungal etiology should always be studied in relevant clinical settings. PMID:25506171

  8. Percutaneous Transhepatic Drainage of Inaccessible Abdominal Abscesses Following Abdominal Surgery Under Real-Time CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 {+-} 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 {+-} 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  9. Experimental Staphylococcus aureus brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, D R; Britt, R R; Obana, W G; Stuart, J; Murphy-Irwin, K

    1986-01-01

    The virulent organism Staphylococcus aureus produced brain abscesses that were quantitatively and qualitatively different from those caused by less virulent organisms. S. aureus abscesses created larger lesions, as earlier ependymitis, delayed progress toward healing, and caused areas of inflammatory escape outside the collagen capsule. Imaging tests revealed similar findings: the abscesses were larger, had more extensive central necrosis, and showed earlier evidence of ependymitis. This virulent organism also demonstrated that white matter is more susceptible than overlying gray matter to destruction by infection. The pattern of spread and other histologic findings suggest that collagen capsule formation has less of an infection "containment" function than was previously thought. PMID:3085444

  10. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in tubo-ovarian abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tohru; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Doh, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    In this report, we describe the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) in a patient who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the pelvis and subsequent histologic analysis. The content of the TOA was markedly high signal intensity relative to the surrounding tissue on DWI, and it showed low signal intensity on the apparent diffusion coefficient map; these findings were consistent with those of published reports on brain and liver abscesses. PMID:20088410