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Sample records for pyramidal neuron number

  1. Pyramidal Neuron Number in Layer 3 of Primary Auditory Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Delevich, Kristen M.; Marcsisin, Michael J.; Zhang, Wei; Sampson, Allan R.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G.; Lewis, David A.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrate impairments of sensory processing within primary auditory cortex. We have previously identified lower densities of dendritic spines and axon boutons, and smaller mean pyramidal neuron somal volume, in layer 3 of the primary auditory cortex in subjects with schizophrenia, all of which might reflect fewer layer 3 pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia. To examine this hypothesis, we developed a robust stereological method based upon unbiased principles for estimation of total volume and pyramidal neuron numbers for each layer of a cortical area. Our method generates both a systematic, uniformly random set of mapping sections as well as a set of randomly rotated sections cut orthogonal to the pial surface, within the region of interest. We applied our approach in twelve subjects with schizophrenia, each matched to a normal comparison subject. Primary auditory cortex volume was assessed using Cavalieri’s method. The relative and absolute volume of each cortical layer and, within layer 3, the number and density of pyramidal neurons was estimated using our novel approach. Subject groups did not differ in regional volume, layer volumes, or pyramidal neuron number, although pyramidal neuron density was significantly greater in subjects with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that previously observed lower densities of dendritic spines and axon boutons reflect fewer numbers per neuron, and contribute to greater neuronal density via a reduced neuropil. Our approach represents a powerful new method for stereologic estimation of features of interest within individual layers of cerebral cortex, with applications beyond the current study. PMID:19524554

  2. Preliminary findings suggest the number and volume of supragranular and infragranular pyramidal neurons are similar in the anterior superior temporal area of control subjects and subjects with autism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Esther; Camacho, Jasmin; Combs, Zachary; Ariza, Jeanelle; Lechpammer, Mirna; Noctor, Stephen; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the cytoarchitecture of the anterior superior temporal area (TA2) of the postmortem cerebral cortex in 9 subjects with autism and 9 age-matched typically developing subjects between the ages of 13 and 56 years. The superior temporal gyrus is involved in auditory processing and social cognition and its pathology has been correlated with autism. We quantified the number and soma volume of pyramidal neurons in the supragranular layers and pyramidal neurons in the infragranular layers in each subject. We did not find significant differences in the number or volume of supragranular or infragranular neurons in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism compared to typically developing subjects. This report does not support an alteration of supragranular to infragranular neurons in autism. However, further stereological analysis of the number of cells and cell volumes in specific cortical areas is needed to better establish the cellular phenotype of the autistic cerebral cortex and to understand its clinical relevance in autism. PMID:25582788

  3. Cholinergic inhibition of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Allan T; Stuart, Greg J

    2005-11-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a central neurotransmitter critical for normal cognitive function. Here we show that transient muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation directly inhibits neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Using whole-cell and cell-attached recordings from neurons in slices of rat somatosensory cortex, we demonstrate that transient activation of M1-type muscarinic receptors induces calcium release from IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores and subsequent activation of an apamin-sensitive, SK-type calcium-activated potassium conductance. ACh-induced hyperpolarizing responses were blocked by atropine and pirenzepine but not by methoctramine or GABA receptor antagonists (picrotoxin, SR 95531 [2-(3-carboxypropyl)-3-amino-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyridazinium bromide], and CGP 55845 [(2S)-3-[[(15)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid]). Responses were associated with a 31 +/- 5% increase in membrane conductance, had a reversal potential of -93 +/- 1 mV, and were eliminated after internal calcium chelation with BAPTA, blockade of IP3 receptors, or extracellular application of cadmium but not by sodium channel blockade with tetrodotoxin. Calcium-imaging experiments demonstrated that ACh-induced hyperpolarizing, but not depolarizing, responses were correlated with large increases in intracellular calcium. Surprisingly, transient increases in muscarinic receptor activation were capable of generating hyperpolarizing responses even during periods of tonic muscarinic activation sufficient to depolarize neurons to action potential threshold. Furthermore, eserine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor similar to those used therapeutically in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, disproportionately enhanced the excitatory actions of acetylcholine while reducing the ability of acetylcholine to generate inhibitory responses during repeated applications of ACh. These data demonstrate that acetylcholine can directly inhibit the

  4. The mammalian neocortex new pyramidal neuron: a new conception

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The new cerebral cortex (neocortex) and the new type of pyramidal neuron are mammalian innovations that have evolved for operating their increasing motor capabilities while essentially using analogous anatomical and neural makeups. The human neocortex starts to develop in 6-week-old embryos with the establishment of a primordial cortical organization, which resembles the primitive cortices of amphibian and reptiles. From the 8th to the 15th week of age, new pyramidal neurons, of ependymal origin, are progressively incorporated within this primordial cortex forming a cellular plate that divides its components into those above it (neocortex first layer) and those below it (neocortex subplate zone). From the 16th week of age to birth and postnatally, the new pyramidal neurons continue to elongate functionally their apical dendrite by adding synaptic membrane to incorporate the needed sensory information for operating its developing motor activities. The new pyramidal neuron’ distinguishing feature is the capacity of elongating anatomically and functionally its apical dendrite (its main receptive surface) without losing its original attachment to first layer or the location of its soma and, hence, retaining its essential nature. The number of pyramidal cell functional strata established in the motor cortex increases and reflects each mammalian species motor capabilities: the hedgehog needs two pyramidal cell functional strata to carry out all its motor activities, the mouse 3, cat 4, primates 5 and humans 6. The presence of six pyramidal cell functional strata distinguish the human motor cortex from that of others primates. Homo sapiens represent a new evolutionary stage that have transformed his primate brain for operating his unique motor capabilities, such as speaking, writing, painting, sculpturing and thinking as a premotor activity. Words used in language are the motor expression of thoughts and represent sounds produced by maneuvering the column of expiratory

  5. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment decreases spine density in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Curto, Yasmina; Garcia-Mompo, Clara; Bueno-Fernandez, Clara; Nacher, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The adult brain retains a substantial capacity for synaptic reorganization, which includes a wide range of modifications from molecular to structural plasticity. Previous reports have demonstrated that the structural remodeling of excitatory neurons seems to occur in parallel to changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. The function of neuronal inhibitory networks can be modified through GABAA receptors, which have a binding site for benzodiazepines (BZ). Although BZs are among the most prescribed drugs, is not known whether they modify the structure and connectivity of pyramidal neurons. In the present study we wish to elucidate the impact of a chronic treatment of 21 days with diazepam (2mg/kg, ip), a BZ that acts as an agonist of GABAA receptors, on the structural plasticity of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex of adult mice. We have examined the density of dendritic spines and the density of axonal en passant boutons in the cingulate cortex. Although no significant changes were observed in their anxiety levels, animals treated with diazepam showed a decrease in the density of spines in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Most GFP-expressing en passant boutons in the upper layers of the cingulate cortex had an extracortical origin and no changes in their density were detected after diazepam treatment. These results indicate that the chronic potentiation of GABAergic synapses can induce the structural remodeling of postsynaptic elements in pyramidal neurons. PMID:26733301

  6. In vivo dendritic calcium dynamics in neocortical pyramidal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Karel; Denk, Winfried; Kleinfeld, David; Tank, David W.

    1997-01-01

    THE dendrites of mammalian pyramidal neurons contain a rich collection of active conductances that can support Na+ and Ca2+ action potentials (for a review see ref. 1). The presence, site of initiation, and direction of propagation of Na+ and Ca2+ action potentials are, however, controversial2, and seem to be sensitive to resting membrane potential, ionic composition, and degree of channel inactivation, and depend on the intensity and pattern of synaptic stimulation. This makes it difficult to extrapolate from in vitro experiments to the situation in the intact brain. Here we show that two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy3 can penetrate the highly scattering tissue of the intact brain. We used this property to measure sensory stimulus-induced dendritic [Ca2+] dynamics of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of the rat primary vibrissa (Sm1) cortex in vivo. Simultaneous recordings of intracellular voltage and dendritic [Ca2+] dynamics during whisker stimulation or current injection showed increases in [Ca2+] only in coincidence with Na+ action potentials. The amplitude of these [Ca2+] transients at a given location was approximately proportional to the number of Na+ action potentials in a short burst. The amplitude for a given number of action potentials was greatest in the proximal apical dendrite and declined steeply with increasing distance from the soma, with little Ca2+ accumulation in the most distal branches, in layer 1. This suggests that widespread Ca2+ action potentials were not generated, and any significant [Ca2+] increase depends on somatically triggered Na+ action potentials.

  7. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  8. Neural Precursor Lineages Specify Distinct Neocortical Pyramidal Neuron Types

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William A.; Medalla, Maria; Guillamon-Vivancos, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Several neural precursor populations contemporaneously generate neurons in the developing neocortex. Specifically, radial glial stem cells of the dorsal telencephalon divide asymmetrically to produce excitatory neurons, but also indirectly to produce neurons via three types of intermediate progenitor cells. Why so many precursor types are needed to produce neurons has not been established; whether different intermediate progenitor cells merely expand the output of radial glia or instead generate distinct types of neurons is unknown. Here we use a novel genetic fate mapping technique to simultaneously track multiple precursor streams in the developing mouse brain and show that layer 2 and 3 pyramidal neurons exhibit distinctive electrophysiological and structural properties depending upon their precursor cell type of origin. These data indicate that individual precursor subclasses synchronously produce functionally different neurons, even within the same lamina, and identify a primary mechanism leading to cortical neuronal diversity. PMID:25878286

  9. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron. PMID:26778972

  10. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D.; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E.; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron. PMID:26778972

  11. Physiological evidence that pyramidal neurons lack functional water channels.

    PubMed

    Andrew, R David; Labron, Mark W; Boehnke, Susan E; Carnduff, Lisa; Kirov, Sergei A

    2007-04-01

    The physiological conditions that swell mammalian neurons are clinically important but contentious. Distinguishing the neuronal component of brain swelling requires viewing intact neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, and axons and measuring their changing volume in real time. Cultured or dissociated neuronal somata swell within minutes under acutely overhydrated conditions and shrink when strongly dehydrated. But paradoxically, most central nervous system (CNS) neurons do not express aquaporins, the membrane channels that conduct osmotically driven water. Using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM), we monitored neuronal volume under osmotic stress in real time. Specifically, the volume of pyramidal neurons in cerebral cortex and axon terminals comprising cerebellar mossy fibers was measured deep within live brain slices. The expected swelling or shrinking of the gray matter was confirmed by recording altered light transmittance and by indirectly measuring extracellular resistance over a wide osmotic range of -80 to +80 milliOsmoles (mOsm). Neurons expressing green fluorescent protein were then imaged with 2PLSM between -40 and +80 mOsm over 20 min. Surprisingly, pyramidal somata, dendrites, and spines steadfastly maintained their volume, as did the cerebellar axon terminals. This precluded a need for the neurons to acutely regulate volume, preserved their intrinsic electrophysiological stability, and confirmed that these CNS nerve cells lack functional aquaporins. Thus, whereas water easily permeates the aquaporin-rich endothelia and glia driving osmotic brain swelling, neurons tenatiously maintain their volume. However, these same neurons then swell dramatically upon oxygen/glucose deprivation or [K+]0 elevation, so prolonged depolarization (as during stroke or seizure) apparently swells neurons by opening nonaquaporin channels to water. PMID:16723408

  12. Proton radiation alters intrinsic and synaptic properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Irina V; Schneider, Calvin J; Bezaire, Marianne; Soltesz, Ivan; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Nelson, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    High-energy protons constitute at least 85% of the fluence of energetic ions in interplanetary space. Although protons are only sparsely ionizing compared to higher atomic mass ions, they nevertheless significantly contribute to the delivered dose received by astronauts that can potentially affect central nervous system function at high fluence, especially during prolonged deep space missions such as to Mars. Here we report on the long-term effects of 1 Gy proton irradiation on electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mouse hippocampus. The hippocampus is a key structure for the formation of long-term episodic memory, for spatial orientation and for information processing in a number of other cognitive tasks. CA1 pyramidal neurons form the last and critical relay point in the trisynaptic circuit of the hippocampal principal neurons through which information is processed before being transferred to other brain areas. Proper functioning of CA1 pyramidal neurons is crucial for hippocampus-dependent tasks. Using the patch-clamp technique to evaluate chronic effects of 1 Gy proton irradiation on CA1 pyramidal neurons, we found that the intrinsic membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons were chronically altered at 3 months postirradiation, resulting in a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (VRMP) and a decrease in input resistance (Rin). These small but significant alterations in intrinsic properties decreased the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and had a dramatic impact on network function in a computational model of the CA1 microcircuit. We also found that proton-radiation exposure upregulated the persistent Na(+) current (INaP) and increased the rate of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Both the INaP and the heightened rate of mEPSCs contribute to neuronal depolarization and excitation, and at least in part, could compensate for the reduced excitability resulting from the radiation effects on the

  13. Redistribution of synaptic efficacy between neocortical pyramidal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markram, Henry; Tsodyks, Misha

    1996-08-01

    EXPERiENCE-dependent potentiation and depression of synaptic strength has been proposed to subserve learning and memory by changing the gain of signals conveyed between neurons1,2. Here we examine synaptic plasticity between individual neocortical layer-5 pyramidal neurons. We show that an increase in the synaptic response, induced by pairing action-potential activity in pre- and postsynaptic neurons, was only observed when synaptic input occurred at low frequencies. This frequency-dependent increase in synaptic responses arises because of a redistribution of the available synaptic efficacy and not because of an increase in the efficacy. Redistribution of synaptic efficacy could represent a mechanism to change the content, rather than the gain, of signals conveyed between neurons.

  14. A sodium-pump-mediated afterhyperpolarization in pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Allan T; Dasari, Sameera; Onoue, Keita; Stephens, Emily K; Hasse, J Michael; Avesar, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    The sodium-potassium ATPase (i.e., the "sodium pump") plays a central role in maintaining ionic homeostasis in all cells. Although the sodium pump is intrinsically electrogenic and responsive to dynamic changes in intracellular sodium concentration, its role in regulating neuronal excitability remains unclear. Here we describe a physiological role for the sodium pump in regulating the excitability of mouse neocortical layer 5 and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Trains of action potentials produced long-lasting (∼20 s) afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) that were insensitive to blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels or chelation of intracellular calcium, but were blocked by tetrodotoxin, ouabain, or the removal of extracellular potassium. Correspondingly, the AHP time course was similar to the decay of activity-induced increases in intracellular sodium, whereas intracellular calcium decayed at much faster rates. To determine whether physiological patterns of activity engage the sodium pump, we replayed in vitro a place-specific burst of 15 action potentials recorded originally in vivo in a CA1 "place cell" as the animal traversed the associated place field. In both layer 5 and CA1 pyramidal neurons, this "place cell train" generated small, long-lasting AHPs capable of reducing neuronal excitability for many seconds. Place-cell-train-induced AHPs were blocked by ouabain or removal of extracellular potassium, but not by intracellular calcium chelation. Finally, we found calcium contributions to the AHP to be temperature dependent: prominent at room temperature, but largely absent at 35°C. Our results demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for the sodium-potassium ATPase in regulating the excitability of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:23926257

  15. Electrotonic Coupling between Pyramidal Neurons in the Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Barakat, Amey; Zhou, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    Electrotonic couplings (i.e., electrical synapses or gap junctions) are fundamental to neuronal synchronization, and thus essential for many physiological functions and pathological disorders. Interneuron electrical synapses have been studied intensively. Although studies on electrotonic couplings between pyramidal cells (PCs) are emerging, particularly in the hippocampus, evidence is still rare in the neocortex. The electrotonic coupling of PCs in the neocortex is therefore largely unknown in terms of electrophysiological, anatomical and synaptological properties. Using multiple patch-clamp recording with differential interference contrast infrared videomicroscopy (IR-DIC) visualization, histochemical staining, and 3D-computer reconstruction, electrotonic coupling was recorded between close PCs, mainly in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the visual cortical regions of ferrets and rats. Compared with interneuron gap junctions, these electrotonic couplings were characterized by several special features. The recording probability of an electrotonic coupling between PCs is extremely low; but the junctional conductance is notably high, permitting the direct transmission of action potentials (APs) and even tonic firing between coupled neurons. AP firing is therefore perfectly synchronized between coupled PCs; Postjunctional APs and spikelets alternate following slight changes of membrane potentials; Postjunctional spikelets, especially at high frequencies, are summated and ultimately reach AP-threshold to fire. These properties of pyramidal electrotonic couplings largely fill the needs, as predicted by simulation studies, for the synchronization of a neuronal assembly. It is therefore suggested that the electrotonic coupling of PCs plays a unique role in the generation of neuronal synchronization in the neocortex. PMID:20436674

  16. Stereological study of pyramidal neurons in the human superior temporal gyrus from childhood to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Nicole; Sheley, Matthew F.; Schumann, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    The association cortex of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) is implicated in complex social and linguistic functions. As such, reliable methods for quantifying cellular variation in this region could greatly benefit researchers interested in addressing the cellular correlates of typical and atypical function associated with these critical cognitive abilities. To facilitate this task, we first present a general set of cytoarchitectonic criteria targeted specifically toward stereological analyses of thick, Nissl stained sections for the homotypical cortex of the STG, referred to, here, as BA22/TA. Secondly, we use the optical fractionator to estimate pyramidal neuron number and the nucleator for pyramidal somal and nuclear volume to investigate the influence of age and sex on these parameters and to set a typically developing baseline for future comparisons. In 11 typically developing cases aged 4-48 years, the most distinguishing features of BA22/TA were the presence of distinct granular layers, a prominent, jagged layer IIIc, and a distinctly staining VIa. The average number of neurons was 91 ± 15 million, volume of pyramidal soma, 1,512 μm3, and nuclear volume, 348 μm3. We found no correlation with age and neuron number. In contrast, pyramidal somal and nuclear volume were both negatively correlated and linearly associated with age in regression analyses. We found no significant sex differences. Overall, the data support the idea that postnatal neuron numbers are relatively stable through development but also suggest that neuronal volume may be subject to important developmental variation. Both measures are critical variables in the study of developmental neuropathology. PMID:25556320

  17. Comparative morphology of three types of projection-identified pyramidal neurons in the superficial layers of cat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, J A; Chase, R; Thejomayen, M

    1996-02-26

    The morphology and dendritic organization of corticocortical neurons in the superficial layers of area 18 that project to area 17 were studied by intracellular injection of lucifer yellow in the fixed-slice preparation. This corticocortical population contains primarily standard pyramidal cells, but occasional nonpyramidal, modified, fusiform, star, and inverted pyramidal cells were also seen. All cell types were present throughout layer 2 and in the upper and middle parts of layer 3. Standard pyramidal cells were found exclusively in lower layer 3. The mean somatic area of the area 17 projecting neurons was 251 microns 2. The width of basal dendritic fields was correlated to cell size for standard pyramidal cells but not for the other cell types. Next, the morphology and dendritic organization of the area 17 projecting neurons were compared to the pyramidal cells of the local horizontal patch networks and of the callosal system. The depth profile of the area 17 projecting and callosal pyramidal groups was virtually identical, peaking at 400 microns from the pial surface, whereas the local patch pyramidal group peaked at 281 microns. The local patch, area 17 projecting, and callosal pyramidal cells displayed increasingly larger mean somatic areas and basilar dendritic field width measurements. The number of basal dendritic branch points was greatest for callosal cells, and it was indistinguishable between local patch and area 17 projecting neurons. In the tangential plane, circular dendritic fields were observed on all callosal cells, but they were found on only approximately half of the local patch and area 17 projecting neurons. The remaining local patch and area 17 projecting neurons displayed mediolaterally and anteroposteriorly elongated basal dendritic fields, respectively. PMID:8866848

  18. Changes in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cat.

    PubMed

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Engelhardt, J K; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether age-dependent changes in axonal conduction velocity occur in pyramidal tract neurons. A total of 260 and 254 pyramidal tract neurons were recorded extracellularly in the motor cortex of adult control and aged cats, respectively. These cells were activated antidromically by electrical stimulation of the medullary pyramidal tract. Fast- and slow-conducting neurons were identified according to their axonal conduction velocity in both control and aged cats. While 51% of pyramidal tract neurons recorded in the control cats were fast conducting (conduction velocity greater than 20 m/s), only 26% of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cats were fast conducting. There was a 43% decrease in the median conduction velocity for the entire population of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats when compared with that of pyramidal tract neurons in the control cats (P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test). A linear relationship between the spike duration of pyramidal tract neurons and their antidromic latency was present in both control and aged cats. However, the regression slope was significantly reduced in aged cats. This reduction was due to the appearance of a group of pyramidal tract neurons with relatively shorter spike durations but slower axonal conduction velocities in the aged cat. Sample intracellular data confirmed the above results. These observations form the basis for the following conclusions: (i) there is a decrease in median conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats; (ii) the reduction in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats is due, in part, to fibers that previously belonged to the fast-conducting group and now conduct at slower velocity. PMID:10392844

  19. Mechanisms underlying subunit independence in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Behabadi, Bardia F; Mel, Bartlett W

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neuron (PN) dendrites compartmentalize voltage signals and can generate local spikes, which has led to the proposal that their dendrites act as independent computational subunits within a multilayered processing scheme. However, when a PN is strongly activated, back-propagating action potentials (bAPs) sweeping outward from the soma synchronize dendritic membrane potentials many times per second. How PN dendrites maintain the independence of their voltage-dependent computations, despite these repeated voltage resets, remains unknown. Using a detailed compartmental model of a layer 5 PN, and an improved method for quantifying subunit independence that incorporates a more accurate model of dendritic integration, we first established that the output of each dendrite can be almost perfectly predicted by the intensity and spatial configuration of its own synaptic inputs, and is nearly invariant to the rate of bAP-mediated "cross-talk" from other dendrites over a 100-fold range. Then, through an analysis of conductance, voltage, and current waveforms within the model cell, we identify three biophysical mechanisms that together help make independent dendritic computation possible in a firing neuron, suggesting that a major subtype of neocortical neuron has been optimized for layered, compartmentalized processing under in-vivo-like spiking conditions. PMID:24357611

  20. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity. PMID:26151674

  1. Pyramidal neurons in the septal and temporal CA1 field of the human and hedgehog tenrec hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liagkouras, Ioannis; Michaloudi, Helen; Batzios, Christos; Psaroulis, Dimitrios; Georgiadis, Marios; Künzle, Heinz; Papadopoulos, Georgios C

    2008-07-01

    The present study examines comparatively the cellular density of disector-counted/Nissl-stained CA1 pyramidal neurons and the morphometric characteristics (dendritic number/length, spine number/density and Sholl-counted dendritic branch points/20 microm) of the basal and apical dendritic systems of Golgi-impregnated CA1 neurons, in the septal and temporal hippocampus of the human and hedgehog tenrec brain. The obtained results indicate that in both hippocampal parts the cellular density of the CA1 pyramidal neurons is lower in human than in tenrec. However, while the human pyramidal cell density is higher in the septal hippocampal part than in the temporal one, in the tenrec the density of these cells is higher in the temporal part. The dendritic tree of the CA1 pyramidal cells, more developed in the septal than in temporal hippocampus in both species studied, is in general more complex in the human hippocampus. The basal and the apical dendritic systems exhibit species related morphometric differences, while dendrites of different orders exhibit differences in their number and length, and in their spine density. Finally, in both species, as well as hippocampal parts and dendritic systems, changes of dendritic morphometric features along ascending dendritic orders fluctuate in a similar way, as do the number of dendritic branch points in relation to the distance from the neuron soma. PMID:18511020

  2. EPSPs Measured in Proximal Dendritic Spines of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Acker, Corey D; Hoyos, Erika; Loew, Leslie M

    2016-01-01

    EPSPs occur when the neurotransmitter glutamate binds to postsynaptic receptors located on small pleomorphic membrane protrusions called dendritic spines. To transmit the synaptic signal, these potentials must travel through the spine neck and the dendritic tree to reach the soma. Due to their small size, the electrical behavior of spines and their ability to compartmentalize electrical signals has been very difficult to assess experimentally. In this study, we developed a method to perform simultaneous two-photon voltage-sensitive dye recording with two-photon glutamate uncaging in order to measure the characteristics (amplitude and duration) of uncaging-evoked EPSPs in single spines on the basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons in acute brain slices from CD1 control mice. We were able to record uncaging-evoked spine potentials that resembled miniature EPSPs at the soma from a wide range of spine morphologies. In proximal spines, these potentials averaged 13.0 mV (range, 6.5-30.8 mV; N = 20) for an average somatic EPSP of 0.59 mV, whereas the mean attenuation ratio (spine/soma) was found to be 25.3. Durations of spine EPSP waveforms were found to be 11.7 ms on average. Modeling studies demonstrate the important role that spine neck resistance (R neck) plays in spine EPSP amplitudes. Simulations used to estimate R neck by fits to voltage-sensitive dye measurements produced a mean of 179 MΩ (range, 23-420 MΩ; N = 19). Independent measurements based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of a cytosolic dye from spines of the same population of neurons produced a mean R neck estimate of 204 MΩ (range, 52-521 MΩ; N = 34). PMID:27257618

  3. Location-Dependent Excitatory Synaptic Interactions in Pyramidal Neuron Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Behabadi, Bardia F.; Polsky, Alon; Jadi, Monika; Schiller, Jackie; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical pyramidal neurons (PNs) receive thousands of excitatory synaptic contacts on their basal dendrites. Some act as classical driver inputs while others are thought to modulate PN responses based on sensory or behavioral context, but the biophysical mechanisms that mediate classical-contextual interactions in these dendrites remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. Distal excitation lowers the local spike threshold for more proximal inputs, while having little effect on peak responses at the soma. In contrast, proximal excitation lowers the threshold, but also substantially increases the gain of distally-driven responses. Our findings support the view that PN basal dendrites possess significant analog computing capabilities, and suggest that the diverse forms of nonlinear response modulation seen in the neocortex, including uni-modal, cross-modal, and attentional effects, could depend in part on pathway-specific biases in the spatial distribution of excitatory synaptic contacts onto PN basal dendritic arbors. PMID:22829759

  4. Altered intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in aged PDAPP mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Novelia, Janet; Kerrigan, Talitha L.; Brown, Jon T.; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Randall, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidopathy involves the accumulation of insoluble amyloid β (Aβ) species in the brain’s parenchyma and is a key histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Work on transgenic mice that overexpress Aβ suggests that elevated Aβ levels in the brain are associated with aberrant epileptiform activity and increased intrinsic excitability (IE) of CA1 hippocampal neurons. In this study we examined if similar changes could be observed in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from aged PDAPP mice (20–23 month old, Indiana mutation: V717F on APP gene) compared to their age-matched wild-type littermate controls. Whole-cell current clamp recordings revealed that sub-threshold intrinsic properties, such as input resistance, resting membrane potential and hyperpolarization activated “sag” were unaffected, but capacitance was significantly decreased in the transgenic animals. No differences between genotypes were observed in the overall number of action potentials (AP) elicited by 500 ms supra-threshold current stimuli. PDAPP neurons, however, exhibited higher instantaneous firing frequencies after accommodation in response to high intensity current injections. The AP waveform was narrower and shorter in amplitude in PDAPP mice: these changes, according to our in silico model of a CA1/3 pyramidal neuron, depended on the respective increase and reduction of K+ and Na+ voltage-gated channels maximal conductances. Finally, the after-hyperpolarization, seen after the first AP evoked by a +300 pA current injection and after 50 Hz AP bursts, was more pronounced in PDAPP mice. These data show that Aβ-overexpression in aged mice altered the capacitance, the neuronal firing and the AP waveform of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Some of these findings are consistent with previous work on younger PDAPP; they also show important differences that can be potentially ascribed to the interaction between amyloidopathy and ageing. Such a change of IE properties over time underlies

  5. Human cerebrospinal fluid increases the excitability of pyramidal neurons in the in vitro brain slice

    PubMed Central

    Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Andreasson, Ulf; Daborg, Jonny; Riebe, Ilse; Wasling, Pontus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hanse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The composition of brain extracellular fluid is shaped by a continuous exchange of substances between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid. The CSF is known to contain a wide range of endogenous neuromodulatory substances, but their collective influence on neuronal activity has been poorly investigated. We show here that replacing artificial CSF (aCSF), routinely used for perfusion of brain slices in vitro, with human CSF (hCSF) powerfully boosts spontaneous firing of CA1, CA3 and layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the rat brain slice. CA1 pyramidal neurons in hCSF display lowered firing thresholds, more depolarized resting membrane potentials and reduced input resistance, mimicking properties of pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo. The increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons was completely occluded by intracellular application of GTPγS, suggesting that endogenous neuromodulators in hCSF act on G-protein coupled receptors to enhance excitability. We found no increase in spontaneous inhibitory synaptic transmission by hCSF, indicating a differential effect on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Our findings highlight a previously unknown function of the CSF in promoting spontaneous excitatory activity, and may help to explain differences observed in the activity of pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25556798

  6. Cortical integration in the visual system of the macaque monkey: large-scale morphological differences in the pyramidal neurons in the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, G N; Tweedale, R; Rosa, M G

    1999-01-01

    Layer III pyramidal neurons were injected with Lucifer yellow in tangential cortical slices taken from the inferior temporal cortex (area TE) and the superior temporal polysensory (STP) area of the macaque monkey. Basal dendritic field areas of layer III pyramidal neurons in area STP are significantly larger, and their dendritic arborizations more complex, than those of cells in area TE. Moreover, the dendritic fields of layer III pyramidal neurons in both STP and TE are many times larger and more complex than those in areas forming 'lower' stages in cortical visual processing, such as the first (V1), second (V2), fourth (V4) and middle temporal (MT) visual areas. By combining data on spine density with those of Sholl analyses, we were able to estimate the average number of spines in the basal dendritic field of layer III pyramidal neurons in each area. These calculations revealed a 13-fold difference in the number of spines in the basal dendritic field between areas STP and V1 in animals of similar age. The large differences in complexity of the same kind of neuron in different visual areas go against arguments for isopotentiality of different cortical regions and provide a basis that allows pyramidal neurons in temporal areas TE and STP to integrate more inputs than neurons in more caudal visual areas. PMID:10445291

  7. The neuronal code for number.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Humans and non-human primates share an elemental quantification system that resides in a dedicated neural network in the parietal and frontal lobes. In this cortical network, 'number neurons' encode the number of elements in a set, its cardinality or numerosity, irrespective of stimulus appearance across sensory motor systems, and from both spatial and temporal presentation arrays. After numbers have been extracted from sensory input, they need to be processed to support goal-directed behaviour. Studying number neurons provides insights into how information is maintained in working memory and transformed in tasks that require rule-based decisions. Beyond an understanding of how cardinal numbers are encoded, number processing provides a window into the neuronal mechanisms of high-level brain functions. PMID:27150407

  8. Stimulation of α1-adrenoceptors facilitates GABAergic transmission onto pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Tang, H; Cheng, Z-Y

    2015-08-01

    Whereas activation of α1-adrenoceptors (α1-ARs) modulates glutamatergic transmission, the roles of α1-ARs in GABAergic transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are elusive. Here, we examined the effects of the α1-AR agonist phenylephrine (Phe) on GABAergic transmission onto pyramidal neurons in the deep layers of the mPFC. We found that bath application of Phe dose-dependently increased the amplitude of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs). Phe increased the frequency but not the amplitude of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). Ca(2+) influx through T-type voltage-gated calcium channels is required for Phe-induced increases in GABA release. Phe increases GABA release probability and the number of releasable vesicles. Phe depolarizes the fast-spiking (FS) interneurons without effects on the firing rate of action potentials (APs) of interneurons. Phe-induced depolarization is independent of extracellular Na(+), Ca(2+) and T-type calcium channels, but requires inward rectifier K(+) channels (Kirs). The present study demonstrates that Phe enhances GABAergic transmission onto mPFC pyramidal neurons through inhibiting interneurons Kirs, which further depolarizes interneurons leading to increase in Ca(2+) influx via T-type calcium channels. Our results may provide a cellular and molecular mechanism that helps explain α1-AR-induced PFC dysfunction. PMID:25943480

  9. IK1 channels do not contribute to the slow afterhyperpolarization in pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Mateos-Aparicio, Pedro; Hönigsperger, Christoph; Raghuram, Vijeta; Wu, Wendy W; Ridder, Margreet C; Sah, Pankaj; Maylie, Jim; Storm, Johan F; Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    In pyramidal neurons such as hippocampal area CA1 and basolateral amygdala, a slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) follows a burst of action potentials, which is a powerful regulator of neuronal excitability. The sAHP amplitude increases with aging and may underlie age related memory decline. The sAHP is due to a Ca2+-dependent, voltage-independent K+ conductance, the molecular identity of which has remained elusive until a recent report suggested the Ca2+-activated K+ channel, IK1 (KCNN4) as the sAHP channel in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The signature pharmacology of IK1, blockade by TRAM-34, was reported for the sAHP and underlying current. We have examined the sAHP and find no evidence that TRAM-34 affects either the current underling the sAHP or excitability of CA1 or basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. In addition, CA1 pyramidal neurons from IK1 null mice exhibit a characteristic sAHP current. Our results indicate that IK1 channels do not mediate the sAHP in pyramidal neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11206.001 PMID:26765773

  10. Temporal synchrony and gamma to theta power conversion in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Sachin P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Timing is a crucial aspect of synaptic integration. For pyramidal neurons that integrate thousands of synaptic inputs spread across hundreds of microns, it is thus a challenge to maintain the timing of incoming inputs at the axo-somatic integration site. Here we show that pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus use a gradient of inductance in the form of HCN channels as an active mechanism to counteract location-dependent temporal differences of dendritic inputs at the soma. Using simultaneous multi-site whole cell recordings complemented by computational modeling, we find that this intrinsic biophysical mechanism produces temporal synchrony of rhythmic inputs in the theta and gamma frequency ranges across wide regions of the dendritic tree. While gamma and theta oscillations are known to synchronize activity across space in neuronal networks, our results identify a novel mechanism by which this synchrony extends to activity within single pyramidal neurons with complex dendritic arbors. PMID:24185428

  11. Corticocortical synaptic influences on morphologically identified pyramidal neurones in the motor cortex of the monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Porter, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Corticocortical synaptic influences on pyramidal neurones in the precentral motor cortex of monkeys were examined using intracellular recordings. Corticocortical afferents from the postarcuate premotor area and the somatic sensory cortical areas were activated by bifocal stimulation of the cortical surface. Neurones that were found to respond orthodromically to such stimuli were labelled by intracellular ionophoresis of horseradish peroxidase. 2. Almost all neurones that were penetrated satisfactorily and labelled successfully were found to be pyramidal neurones located in lamina III or lamina V. Some labelled neurones in lamina V were also characterized as pyramidal tract neurones (PTNs) by antidromic activation from the cerebral peduncles or medullary pyramids. 3. Pyramidal neurones located in lamina III and lamina V (including PTNs) were excited at short latency by stimulation of the premotor cortex (1.1-4.0 ms) and somatosensory cortex (1.1-6.5 ms). There were no statistical differences in the distributions of latencies of corticocortical EPSPs between those evoked in lamina III neurones and those recorded in lamina V neurones, or between corticocortical EPSPs evoked from the premotor cortex in comparison with those from the somatosensory cortex. Excitatory responses to stimulation of the premotor area were usually more difficult to evoke and smaller in amplitude than those produced by stimulation of the somatosensory areas. 4. Corticocortical EPSPs were often followed by IPSPs. The amplitudes of the EPSPs and IPSPs could be increased by increasing the stimulus intensity. In a few neurones IPSPs that were not preceded by EPSPs were recorded. Images Plate 1 PMID:3418539

  12. Branch specific and spike-order specific action potential invasion in basal, oblique, and apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Singh, Mandakini B.; Sterjanaj, Enas V.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In neocortical pyramidal neurons, action potentials (APs) propagate from the axon into the dendritic tree to influence distal synapses. Traditionally, AP backpropagation was studied in the thick apical trunk. Here, we used the principles of optical imaging developed by Cohen to investigate AP invasion into thin dendritic branches (basal, oblique, and tuft) of prefrontal cortical L5 pyramidal neurons. Multisite optical recordings from neighboring dendrites revealed a clear dichotomy between two seemingly equal dendritic branches belonging to the same cell (“sister branches”). We documented the variable efficacy of AP invasion in basal and oblique branches by revealing their AP voltage waveforms. Using fast multisite calcium imaging, we found that trains of APs are filtered differently between two apical tuft branches. Although one dendritic branch passes all spikes in an AP train, another branch belonging to the same neuron, same cortical layer, and same path distance from the cell body, experiences only one spike. Our data indicate that the vast differences in dendritic voltage and calcium transients, detected in dendrites of pyramidal neurons, arise from a nonuniform distribution of A-type K+ conductance, an aggregate number of branch points in the path of the AP propagation and minute differences in dendritic diameter. PMID:26157997

  13. Structural reorganization of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of alcohol dependent rats is associated with altered glial plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airee; Zamora-Martinez, Eva R.; Edwards, Scott; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of glial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to CIE and were injected with mitotic markers to label and phenotype proliferating cells to test the hypothesis that CIE produces concurrent alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons and the cell cycle kinetics and developmental stages of glial progenitors in the mPFC. Medial prefrontal cortical tissue was processed for Golgi-Cox staining, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis. CIE increased dendritic arborization and spine densities within basal and apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons via aberrant reorganization of actin cytoskeleton-associated molecules. CIE concomitantly increased expression of total NR2B subunits without affecting phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr-1472 or levels of PSD-95. CIE reduced the length of S phase of the cell cycle of glial progenitors and reduced proliferation and differentiation of progenitors into bHLH transcription factor Olig2-expressing premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). CIE also produced a corresponding hyperphosphorylation of Olig2, and reduced expression of myelin basic protein. Our findings demonstrate that CIE-induced alterations in OPCs and myelin-related proteins are associated with profound alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons. In sum, our results not only provide evidence that alcohol dependence leads to pathological changes in the mPFC, which may in part define a cellular basis for cognitive impairments associated with alcoholism, but also show dependence-associated morphological changes in the PFC at the single neuron level. PMID:24667898

  14. Structural reorganization of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of alcohol dependent rats is associated with altered glial plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Airee; Zamora-Martinez, Eva R; Edwards, Scott; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of glial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to CIE and were injected with mitotic markers to label and phenotype proliferating cells to test the hypothesis that CIE produces concurrent alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons and the cell cycle kinetics and developmental stages of glial progenitors in the mPFC. Medial prefrontal cortical tissue was processed for Golgi-Cox staining, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis. CIE increased dendritic arborization and spine densities within basal and apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons via aberrant reorganization of actin cytoskeleton-associated molecules. CIE concomitantly increased the expression of total NR2B subunits without affecting phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr-1472 or levels of PSD-95. CIE reduced the length of S-phase of the cell cycle of glial progenitors and reduced proliferation and differentiation of progenitors into bHLH transcription factor Olig2-expressing premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). CIE also produced a corresponding hyperphosphorylation of Olig2, and reduced expression of myelin basic protein. Our findings demonstrate that CIE-induced alterations in OPCs and myelin-related proteins are associated with profound alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons. In sum, our results not only provide evidence that alcohol dependence leads to pathological changes in the mPFC, which may in part define a cellular basis for cognitive impairments associated with alcoholism, but also show dependence-associated morphological changes in the PFC at the single neuron level. PMID:24667898

  15. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  16. Chemical interactions with pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the cerebral cortex: control of pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Adams, J D

    2009-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the cerebral cortex are involved in learning and memory and have complex connections with other neurons through a very large array of dendrites. These dendrites can switch between long term depression and long term potentiation depending on global summation of various inputs. The plasticity of the input into pyramidal neurons makes the neuronal output variable. Many interneurons in the cerebral cortex and distant neurons in other brain regions are involved in providing input to pyramidal neurons. All of these neurons and interneurons have neurotransmitters that act through receptors to provide input to pyramidal neurons. Serotonin is one of the important neurotransmitters involved with pyramidal neurons and has been implicated in psychosis, psychedelic states and what are called sacred dreams. This review will discuss the various chemicals and receptors that are important with pyramidal neurons including opioids, nicotine, scopolamine, psilocybin, LSD, mescaline, ergot alkaloids, salvinorin A, ergine and other compounds that interact with opioid, nicotinic, muscarinic and serotonergic receptors. The natural compounds provide clues to structure activity relationships with the receptors. It has been postulated that each receptor in the body has a natural agonist and antagonist, in addition to the normal neurotransmitters. It is common for natural antagonists and agonists to be peptides. Various possible peptide structures will be proposed for natural antagonists and agonists at each receptor. Natural antagonists and agonists may provide new ways to explore the functions of pyramidal neurons in normal health and pain management. PMID:19799545

  17. Experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Qiao, Qian; Tsai, Jin-Wu; Yang, Guang; Li, Wei; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that sensory and motor experiences play an important role in the remodeling of dendritic spines of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in the cortex. In this study, we examined the effects of sensory deprivation and motor learning on dendritic spine remodeling of layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in the barrel and motor cortices. Similar to L5 pyramidal neurons, spines on apical dendrites of L2/3 pyramidal neurons are plastic during development and largely stable in adulthood. Sensory deprivation via whisker trimming reduces the elimination rate of existing spines without significant effect on the rate of spine formation in the developing barrel cortex. Furthermore, we show that motor training increases the formation and elimination of dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex. Unlike L5 pyramidal neurons, however, there is no significant difference in the rate of spine formation between sibling dendritic branches of L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Our studies indicate that sensory and motor learning experiences have important impact on dendritic spine remodeling in L2/3 pyramidal neurons. They also suggest that the rules governing experience-dependent spine remodeling are largely similar, but not identical, between L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 277-286, 2016. PMID:26033635

  18. Turtle Dorsal Cortex Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types with Indistinguishable Visual Responses

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Thomas; Wright, Nathaniel; Thornquist, Stephen; Ariel, Michael; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed inventory of the constituent pieces in cerebral cortex is considered essential to understand the principles underlying cortical signal processing. Specifically, the search for pyramidal neuron subtypes is partly motivated by the hypothesis that a subtype-specific division of labor could create a rich substrate for computation. On the other hand, the extreme integration of individual neurons into the collective cortical circuit promotes the hypothesis that cellular individuality represents a smaller computational role within the context of the larger network. These competing hypotheses raise the important question to what extent the computational function of a neuron is determined by its individual type or by its circuit connections. We created electrophysiological profiles from pyramidal neurons within the sole cellular layer of turtle visual cortex by measuring responses to current injection using whole-cell recordings. A blind clustering algorithm applied to these data revealed the presence of two principle types of pyramidal neurons. Brief diffuse light flashes triggered membrane potential fluctuations in those same cortical neurons. The apparently network driven variability of the visual responses concealed the existence of subtypes. In conclusion, our results support the notion that the importance of diverse intrinsic physiological properties is minimized when neurons are embedded in a synaptic recurrent network. PMID:26633877

  19. MACF1 regulates the migration of pyramidal neurons via microtubule dynamics and GSK-3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Mueller, Ulrich; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2014-11-01

    Neuronal migration and subsequent differentiation play critical roles for establishing functional neural circuitry in the developing brain. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these processes are poorly understood. Here, we show that microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (MACF1) determines neuronal positioning by regulating microtubule dynamics and mediating GSK-3 signaling during brain development. First, using MACF1 floxed allele mice and in utero gene manipulation, we find that MACF1 deletion suppresses migration of cortical pyramidal neurons and results in aberrant neuronal positioning in the developing brain. The cell autonomous deficit in migration is associated with abnormal dynamics of leading processes and centrosomes. Furthermore, microtubule stability is severely damaged in neurons lacking MACF1, resulting in abnormal microtubule dynamics. Finally, MACF1 interacts with and mediates GSK-3 signaling in developing neurons. Our findings establish a cellular mechanism underlying neuronal migration and provide insights into the regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics in developing neurons. PMID:25224226

  20. Anatomy and physiology of the thick-tufted layer 5 pyramidal neuron

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Srikanth; Markram, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The thick-tufted layer 5 (TTL5) pyramidal neuron is one of the most extensively studied neuron types in the mammalian neocortex and has become a benchmark for understanding information processing in excitatory neurons. By virtue of having the widest local axonal and dendritic arborization, the TTL5 neuron encompasses various local neocortical neurons and thereby defines the dimensions of neocortical microcircuitry. The TTL5 neuron integrates input across all neocortical layers and is the principal output pathway funneling information flow to subcortical structures. Several studies over the past decades have investigated the anatomy, physiology, synaptology, and pathophysiology of the TTL5 neuron. This review summarizes key discoveries and identifies potential avenues of research to facilitate an integrated and unifying understanding on the role of a central neuron in the neocortex. PMID:26167146

  1. Suppressive Effects of Resveratrol Treatment on The Intrinsic Evoked Excitability of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Meftahi, Gholamhossein; Ghotbedin, Zohreh; Eslamizade, Mohammad Javad; Hosseinmardi, Narges; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has a wide range of desirable biological actions. Despite a growing body of evidence indicating that resveratrol induces changes in neu- ronal function, little effort, if any, has been made to investigate the cellular effect of res- veratrol treatment on intrinsic neuronal properties. Materials and Methods This experimental study was performed to examine the acute effects of resveratrol (100 µM) on the intrinsic evoked responses of rat Cornu Ammonis (CA1) pyramidal neurons in brain slices, using whole cell patch clamp re- cording under current clamp conditions. Results Findings showed that resveratrol treatment caused dramatic changes in evoked responses of pyramidal neurons. Its treatment induced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the after hyperpolarization amplitude of the first evoked action potential. Resveratrol-treated cells displayed a significantly broader action potential (AP) when compared with either control or vehicle-treated groups. In addition, the mean instantaneous firing frequency between the first two action potentials was significantly lower in resveratrol-treated neurons. It also caused a significant reduction in the time to maximum decay of AP. The rheobase current and the utilization time were both significantly greater following resveratrol treatment. Neurons exhibited a significantly depolarized voltage threshold when exposed to resveratrol. Conclusion Results provide direct electrophysiological evidence for the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on pyramidal neurons, at least in part, by reducing the evoked neural activity. PMID:26464825

  2. Aberrant excitatory rewiring of layer V pyramidal neurons early after neocortical trauma.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, D Koji; Gu, Feng; Parada, Isabel; Vyas, Shri; Prince, David A

    2016-07-01

    Lesioned neuronal circuits form new functional connections after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In humans and animal models, aberrant excitatory connections that form after TBI may contribute to the pathogenesis of post-traumatic epilepsy. Partial neocortical isolation ("undercut" or "UC") leads to altered neuronal circuitry and network hyperexcitability recorded in vivo and in brain slices from chronically lesioned neocortex. Recent data suggest a critical period for maladaptive excitatory circuit formation within the first 3days post UC injury (Graber and Prince 1999, 2004; Li et al. 2011, 2012b). The present study focuses on alterations in excitatory connectivity within this critical period. Immunoreactivity (IR) for growth-associated protein (GAP)-43 was increased in the UC cortex 3days after injury. Some GAP-43-expressing excitatory terminals targeted the somata of layer V pyramidal (Pyr) neurons, a domain usually innervated predominantly by inhibitory terminals. Immunocytochemical analysis of pre- and postsynaptic markers showed that putative excitatory synapses were present on somata of these neurons in UC neocortex. Excitatory postsynaptic currents from UC layer V Pyr cells displayed properties consistent with perisomatic inputs and also reflected an increase in the number of synaptic contacts. Laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) experiments demonstrated reorganized excitatory connectivity after injury within the UC. Concurrent with these changes, spontaneous epileptiform bursts developed in UC slices. Results suggest that aberrant reorganization of excitatory connectivity contributes to early neocortical hyperexcitability in this model. The findings are relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of neocortical post-traumatic epileptogenesis and are important in terms of the timing of potential prophylactic treatments. PMID:26956396

  3. ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal rat neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, J. T.; Nie, H.-Y.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the power of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) cluster ion imaging to characterize biological structures, such as that of the rat central nervous system. A large number of the studies to date have been carried out on the "structural scale" imaging several mm 2 using mounted thin sections. In this work, we present our ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging results on hippocampal rat brain neurons, at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. As a part of an ongoing investigation to examine gut linked metabolic factors in autism spectrum disorders using a novel rat model, we have observed a possible variation in hippocampal Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neuron geometry in thin, paraformaldehyde fixed brain sections. However, the fixation process alters the tissue matrix such that much biochemical information appears to be lost. In an effort to preserve as much as possible this original information, we have established a protocol using unfixed thin brain sections, along with low dose, 500 eV Cs + pre-sputtering that allows imaging down to the sub-cellular scale with minimal sample preparation.

  4. Maternal mobile phone exposure alters intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat; Moazzami, Kasra; Shabani, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Some studies have shown that exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF) may result in structural damage to neurons. In this study, we have elucidated the alteration in the hippocampal function of offspring Wistar rats (n = 8 rats in each group) that were chronically exposed to mobile phones during their gestational period by applying behavioral, histological, and electrophysiological tests. Rats in the EMF group were exposed to 900 MHz pulsed-EMF irradiation for 6 h/day. Whole cell recordings in hippocampal pyramidal cells in the mobile phone groups did show a decrease in neuronal excitability. Mobile phone exposure was mostly associated with a decrease in the number of action potentials fired in spontaneous activity and in response to current injection in both male and female groups. There was an increase in the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in mobile phone rats compared with the control. The results of the passive avoidance and Morris water maze assessment of learning and memory performance showed that phone exposure significantly altered learning acquisition and memory retention in male and female rats compared with the control rats. Light microscopy study of brain sections of the control and mobile phone-exposed rats showed normal morphology.Our results suggest that exposure to mobile phones adversely affects the cognitive performance of both female and male offspring rats using behavioral and electrophysiological techniques. PMID:24604340

  5. Layer 4 Pyramidal Neurons Exhibit Robust Dendritic Spine Plasticity In Vivo after Input Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kribakaran, Sahana; Mostany, Ricardo; Badaloni, Aurora; Consalez, G. Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) exhibit somewhat modest synaptic plasticity after whisker input deprivation. Whether neurons involved at earlier steps of sensory processing show more or less plasticity has not yet been examined. Here, we used longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy to investigate dendritic spine dynamics in apical tufts of GFP-expressing layer 4 (L4) pyramidal neurons of the vibrissal (barrel) S1 after unilateral whisker trimming. First, we characterize the molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological properties of identified L4 neurons in Ebf2-Cre transgenic mice. Next, we show that input deprivation results in a substantial (∼50%) increase in the rate of dendritic spine loss, acutely (4–8 d) after whisker trimming. This robust synaptic plasticity in L4 suggests that primary thalamic recipient pyramidal neurons in S1 may be particularly sensitive to changes in sensory experience. Ebf2-Cre mice thus provide a useful tool for future assessment of initial steps of sensory processing in S1. PMID:25948276

  6. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  7. The mode of synaptic activation of pyramidal neurons in the cat primary somatosensory cortex: an intracellular HRP study.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Samejima, A; Oka, H

    1990-01-01

    A total of 141 pyramidal neurons in the cat primary somatosensory cortex (SI) were recorded intracellularly under Nembutal anesthesia (7 in layer II, 43 in layer III, 8 in layer IV, 58 in layer V and 25 in layer VI). Most neurons were identified by intracellular staining with HRP, though some layer V pyramidal neurons were identified only electrophysiologically with antidromic activation of medullary pyramid (PT) or pontine nuclear (PN) stimulation. Excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs) were analyzed with stimulation of the superficial radial nerve (SR), the ventral posterolateral nucleus (VPL) in the thalamus and the thalamic radiation (WM). The pyramidal neurons in layers III and IV received EPSPs at the shortest latency: 9.1 +/- 2.1 ms (Mean +/- S.D.) for SR and 1.6 +/- 0.7 ms for VPL stimulation. Layer II pyramidal neurons also responded at a short latency to VPL stimulation (1.7 +/- 0.5 ms), though their mean latencies for SR-induced EPSPs were relatively longer (10.6 +/- 1.9 ms). The mean latencies were much longer in layers V and VI pyramidal neurons (10.2 +/- 2.4 ms and 2.9 +/- 1.5 ms in layer V pyramidal neurons and 9.9 +/- 2.5 ms and 2.8 +/- 1.6 ms in layer VI pyramidal ones, respectively for SR and VPL stimulation). The comparison of the latencies between VPL and WM stimulation indicates that most layer III-IV pyramidal neurons and some pyramidal cells in layers II, V and VI received monosynaptic inputs from VPL. These findings are consistent with morphological data on the laminar distribution of thalamocortical fibers, i.e., thalamocortical fibers terminate mainly in the deeper part of layers III and IV with some collaterals in layers V, VI and II-I. The time-sequences of the latencies of VPL-EPSPs indicate that corticocortical and/or transcallosal neurons (pyramidal neurons in layers II and III) fire first and are followed by firing of the output neurons projecting to the subcortical structures (pyramidal neurons in layers V and VI). PMID:2358022

  8. Thalamocortical input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons measured using quantitative large-scale array tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rah, Jong-Cheol; Bas, Erhan; Colonell, Jennifer; Mishchenko, Yuriy; Karsh, Bill; Fetter, Richard D.; Myers, Eugene W.; Chklovskii, Dmitri B.; Svoboda, Karel; Harris, Timothy D.; Isaac, John T. R.

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular locations of synapses on pyramidal neurons strongly influences dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity. Despite this, there is little quantitative data on spatial distributions of specific types of synaptic input. Here we use array tomography (AT), a high-resolution optical microscopy method, to examine thalamocortical (TC) input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We first verified the ability of AT to identify synapses using parallel electron microscopic analysis of TC synapses in layer 4. We then use large-scale array tomography (LSAT) to measure TC synapse distribution on L5 pyramidal neurons in a 1.00 × 0.83 × 0.21 mm3 volume of mouse somatosensory cortex. We found that TC synapses primarily target basal dendrites in layer 5, but also make a considerable input to proximal apical dendrites in L4, consistent with previous work. Our analysis further suggests that TC inputs are biased toward certain branches and, within branches, synapses show significant clustering with an excess of TC synapse nearest neighbors within 5–15 μm compared to a random distribution. Thus, we show that AT is a sensitive and quantitative method to map specific types of synaptic input on the dendrites of entire neurons. We anticipate that this technique will be of wide utility for mapping functionally-relevant anatomical connectivity in neural circuits. PMID:24273494

  9. Thalamocortical input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons measured using quantitative large-scale array tomography.

    PubMed

    Rah, Jong-Cheol; Bas, Erhan; Colonell, Jennifer; Mishchenko, Yuriy; Karsh, Bill; Fetter, Richard D; Myers, Eugene W; Chklovskii, Dmitri B; Svoboda, Karel; Harris, Timothy D; Isaac, John T R

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular locations of synapses on pyramidal neurons strongly influences dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity. Despite this, there is little quantitative data on spatial distributions of specific types of synaptic input. Here we use array tomography (AT), a high-resolution optical microscopy method, to examine thalamocortical (TC) input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We first verified the ability of AT to identify synapses using parallel electron microscopic analysis of TC synapses in layer 4. We then use large-scale array tomography (LSAT) to measure TC synapse distribution on L5 pyramidal neurons in a 1.00 × 0.83 × 0.21 mm(3) volume of mouse somatosensory cortex. We found that TC synapses primarily target basal dendrites in layer 5, but also make a considerable input to proximal apical dendrites in L4, consistent with previous work. Our analysis further suggests that TC inputs are biased toward certain branches and, within branches, synapses show significant clustering with an excess of TC synapse nearest neighbors within 5-15 μm compared to a random distribution. Thus, we show that AT is a sensitive and quantitative method to map specific types of synaptic input on the dendrites of entire neurons. We anticipate that this technique will be of wide utility for mapping functionally-relevant anatomical connectivity in neural circuits. PMID:24273494

  10. Dendritic and Axonal Architecture of Individual Pyramidal Neurons across Layers of Adult Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Hemanth; Verhoog, Matthijs B.; Doreswamy, Keerthi K.; Eyal, Guy; Aardse, Romy; Lodder, Brendan N.; Goriounova, Natalia A.; Asamoah, Boateng; B. Brakspear, A.B. Clementine; Groot, Colin; van der Sluis, Sophie; Testa-Silva, Guilherme; Obermayer, Joshua; Boudewijns, Zimbo S.R.M.; Narayanan, Rajeevan T.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Segev, Idan; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; de Kock, Christiaan P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The size and shape of dendrites and axons are strong determinants of neuronal information processing. Our knowledge on neuronal structure and function is primarily based on brains of laboratory animals. Whether it translates to human is not known since quantitative data on “full” human neuronal morphologies are lacking. Here, we obtained human brain tissue during resection surgery and reconstructed basal and apical dendrites and axons of individual neurons across all cortical layers in temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21). Importantly, morphologies did not correlate to etiology, disease severity, or disease duration. Next, we show that human L(ayer) 2 and L3 pyramidal neurons have 3-fold larger dendritic length and increased branch complexity with longer segments compared with temporal cortex neurons from macaque and mouse. Unsupervised cluster analysis classified 88% of human L2 and L3 neurons into human-specific clusters distinct from mouse and macaque neurons. Computational modeling of passive electrical properties to assess the functional impact of large dendrites indicates stronger signal attenuation of electrical inputs compared with mouse. We thus provide a quantitative analysis of “full” human neuron morphologies and present direct evidence that human neurons are not “scaled-up” versions of rodent or macaque neurons, but have unique structural and functional properties. PMID:26318661

  11. Distinctive transcriptome alterations of prefrontal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arion, Dominique; Corradi, John P.; Tang, Shaowu; Datta, Dibyadeep; Boothe, Franklyn; He, Aiqing; Cacace, Angela M.; Zaczek, Robert; Albright, Charles F.; Tseng, George; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with alterations in working memory that reflect dysfunction of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) circuitry. Working memory depends on the activity of excitatory pyramidal cells in DLPFC layer 3, and to a lesser extent in layer 5. Although many studies have profiled gene expression in DLPFC gray matter in schizophrenia, little is known about cell type-specific transcript expression in these two populations of pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that interrogating gene expression specifically in DLPFC layer 3 or 5 pyramidal cells would reveal new and/or more robust schizophrenia-associated differences that would provide new insights into the nature of pyramidal cell dysfunction in the illness. We also sought to determine the impact of other variables, such as a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder or medication use at time of death, on the patterns of gene expression in pyramidal neurons. Individual pyramidal cells in DLPFC layers 3 or 5 were captured by laser microdissection from 36 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and matched normal comparison subjects. The mRNA from cell collections was subjected to transcriptome profiling by microarray followed by qPCR validation. Expression of genes involved in mitochondrial (MT) or ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) functions were markedly down-regulated in the patient group (p values for MT-related and UPS-related pathways were <10−7 and <10−5 respectively). MT-related gene alterations were more prominent in layer 3 pyramidal cells, whereas UPS-related gene alterations were more prominent in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Many of these alterations were not present, or found to a lesser degree, in samples of DLPFC gray matter from the same subjects, suggesting that they are pyramidal cell-specific. Furthermore, these findings principally reflected alterations in the schizophrenia subjects, were not present or present to a lesser degree in the schizoaffective disorder subjects

  12. Laminar Differences in Dendritic Structure of Pyramidal Neurons in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Concepción; Leguey, Ignacio; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    Pyramidal cell structure varies between different cortical areas and species, indicating that the cortical circuits that these cells participate in are likely to be characterized by different functional capabilities. Structural differences between cortical layers have been traditionally reported using either the Golgi method or intracellular labeling, but the structure of pyramidal cells has not previously been systematically analyzed across all cortical layers at a particular age. In the present study, we investigated the dendritic architecture of complete basal arbors of pyramidal neurons in layers II, III, IV, Va, Vb, and VI of the hindlimb somatosensory cortical region of postnatal day 14 rats. We found that the characteristics of basal dendritic morphologies are statistically different in each cortical layer. The variations in size and branching pattern that exist between pyramidal cells of different cortical layers probably reflect the particular functional properties that are characteristic of the cortical circuit in which they participate. This new set of complete basal dendritic arbors of 3D-reconstructed pyramidal cell morphologies across each cortical layer will provide new insights into interlaminar information processing in the cerebral cortex. PMID:26762857

  13. Laminar Differences in Dendritic Structure of Pyramidal Neurons in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Concepción; Leguey, Ignacio; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Pyramidal cell structure varies between different cortical areas and species, indicating that the cortical circuits that these cells participate in are likely to be characterized by different functional capabilities. Structural differences between cortical layers have been traditionally reported using either the Golgi method or intracellular labeling, but the structure of pyramidal cells has not previously been systematically analyzed across all cortical layers at a particular age. In the present study, we investigated the dendritic architecture of complete basal arbors of pyramidal neurons in layers II, III, IV, Va, Vb, and VI of the hindlimb somatosensory cortical region of postnatal day 14 rats. We found that the characteristics of basal dendritic morphologies are statistically different in each cortical layer. The variations in size and branching pattern that exist between pyramidal cells of different cortical layers probably reflect the particular functional properties that are characteristic of the cortical circuit in which they participate. This new set of complete basal dendritic arbors of 3D-reconstructed pyramidal cell morphologies across each cortical layer will provide new insights into interlaminar information processing in the cerebral cortex. PMID:26762857

  14. The pyramidal neuron in cerebral cortex following prenatal X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, J.A.; Norton, S.

    1982-07-01

    Pregnant rats were subjected to whole body X-irradiation amounting to 125 R, on gestational day 15. Cortical pyramidal neurons were examined in irradiated and control offspring at 4 weeks and 4 to 6 months postnatally. All gestationally irradiated rats developed ectopic cortex located below the corpus callosum adjacent to the caudate nucleus in the forebrain. With the rapid Golgi stain, counts were made of dendritic spines on the apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells in the normally-located cortex and compared with similar neurons in the ectopias. Dendritic spines were present on all pyramidal cells but spines were more sparse on ectopic pyramidal cells. Electron microscopic examination of ectopic and layered cortex in irradiated rats showed axodendritic synapses on the spines and shafts of the dendrites and axosomatic synapses, all of which were indistinguishable morphologically from synapses in control cortex. As a result of the observations made with the light and electron microscopes, it is concluded that the ectopic cortex may contain functional cells in spite of the abnormal location of the tissue.

  15. Distinct profiles of myelin distribution along single axons of pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Berger, Daniel R; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Vercelli, Alessandro; Seung, H Sebastian; Lichtman, Jeff W; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-04-18

    Myelin is a defining feature of the vertebrate nervous system. Variability in the thickness of the myelin envelope is a structural feature affecting the conduction of neuronal signals. Conversely, the distribution of myelinated tracts along the length of axons has been assumed to be uniform. Here, we traced high-throughput electron microscopy reconstructions of single axons of pyramidal neurons in the mouse neocortex and built high-resolution maps of myelination. We find that individual neurons have distinct longitudinal distribution of myelin. Neurons in the superficial layers displayed the most diversified profiles, including a new pattern where myelinated segments are interspersed with long, unmyelinated tracts. Our data indicate that the profile of longitudinal distribution of myelin is an integral feature of neuronal identity and may have evolved as a strategy to modulate long-distance communication in the neocortex. PMID:24744380

  16. NAAG reduces NMDA receptor current in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons of acute slices and dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Richard; Coyle, Joseph T; Tsai, Guochan; Greene, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is an abundant neuropeptide in the nervous system, yet its functions are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons of the CA1 sector of acutely prepared hippocampal slices were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. At low concentrations (20 microM), NAAG reduced isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic currents or NMDA-induced currents. The NAAG-induced change in the NMDA concentration/response curve suggested that the antagonism was not competitive. However, the NAAG-induced change in the concentration/response curve for the NMDAR co-agonist, glycine, indicated that glycine can overcome the NAAG antagonism. The antagonism of the NMDAR induced by NAAG was still observed in the presence of LY-341495, a potent and selective mGluR3 antagonist. Moreover, in dissociated pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region, NAAG also reduced the NMDA current and this effect was reversed by glycine. These results suggest that NAAG reduces the NMDA currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:15354184

  17. Encoding of Spatio-Temporal Input Characteristics by a CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Pissadaki, Eleftheria Kyriaki; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Reczko, Martin; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2010-01-01

    The in vivo activity of CA1 pyramidal neurons alternates between regular spiking and bursting, but how these changes affect information processing remains unclear. Using a detailed CA1 pyramidal neuron model, we investigate how timing and spatial arrangement variations in synaptic inputs to the distal and proximal dendritic layers influence the information content of model responses. We find that the temporal delay between activation of the two layers acts as a switch between excitability modes: short delays induce bursting while long delays decrease firing. For long delays, the average firing frequency of the model response discriminates spatially clustered from diffused inputs to the distal dendritic tree. For short delays, the onset latency and inter-spike-interval succession of model responses can accurately classify input signals as temporally close or distant and spatially clustered or diffused across different stimulation protocols. These findings suggest that a CA1 pyramidal neuron may be capable of encoding and transmitting presynaptic spatiotemporal information about the activity of the entorhinal cortex-hippocampal network to higher brain regions via the selective use of either a temporal or a rate code. PMID:21187899

  18. Stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of steroid hormone receptors in brain regions that mediate virtually every aspect of brain function has broadened the definition of 'neuroendocrinology' to include the reciprocal communication between the brain and the body via hormonal and neural pathways. The brain is the central organ of stress and adaptation to stress because it perceives and determines what is threatening, as well as determining the behavioral and physiological responses to the stressor. The adult and developing brain possess remarkable structural and functional plasticity in response to stress, including neurogenesis leading to neuronal replacement, dendritic remodeling, and synapse turnover. Stress causes an imbalance of neural circuitry subserving cognition, decision-making, anxiety and mood that can alter expression of those behaviors and behavioral states. The two Brain Research papers noted in this review played an important role in triggering these advances. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26740399

  19. Physiological synaptic signals initiate sequential spikes at soma of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rongjing; Qian, Hao; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2011-01-01

    The neurons in the brain produce sequential spikes as the digital codes whose various patterns manage well-organized cognitions and behaviors. A source for the physiologically integrated synaptic signals to initiate digital spikes remains unknown, which we studied at pyramidal neurons of cortical slices. In dual recordings from the soma vs. axon, the signals recorded in vivo induce somatic spikes with higher capacity, which is associated with lower somatic thresholds and shorter refractory periods mediated by voltage-gated sodium channels. The introduction of these parameters from the soma and axon into NEURON model simulates sequential spikes being somatic in origin. Physiological signals integrated from synaptic inputs primarily trigger the soma to encode neuronal digital spikes. PMID:21549002

  20. Alterations in dendrite and spine morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons in DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Nishida, Tomoki; Hori, Osamu; Tohyama, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite and dendritic spine formation are crucial for proper brain function. DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) was first identified as a Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia1 (DISC1) binding partner. DBZ is highly expressed in the cerebral cortex of developing and adult rodents and is involved in neurite formation, cell positioning, and the development of interneurons and oligodendrocytes. The functional roles of DBZ in postnatal brain remain unknown; thus we investigated cortical pyramidal neuron morphology in DBZ knockout (KO) mice. Morphological analyses by Golgi staining alone in DBZ KO mice revealed decreased dendritic arborization, increased spine density. A morphological analysis of the spines revealed markedly increased numbers of thin spines. To investigate whole spine structure in detail, electron tomographic analysis using ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) combined with Golgi staining was performed. Tomograms and three-dimensional models of spines revealed that the spines of DBZ KO mice exhibited two types of characteristic morphology, filopodia-like spines and abnormal thin-necked spines having an extremely thin spine neck. Moreover, conventional electron microscopy revealed significantly decreased number of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) in spines of DBZ KO mice. In conclusion, DBZ deficiency impairs the morphogenesis of dendrites and spines in cortical pyramidal neurons. PMID:25983680

  1. Spatial Gene-Expression Gradients Underlie Prominent Heterogeneity of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cembrowski, Mark S; Bachman, Julia L; Wang, Lihua; Sugino, Ken; Shields, Brenda C; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-01-20

    Tissue and organ function has been conventionally understood in terms of the interactions among discrete and homogeneous cell types. This approach has proven difficult in neuroscience due to the marked diversity across different neuron classes, but it may be further hampered by prominent within-class variability. Here, we considered a well-defined canonical neuronal population—hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs)—and systematically examined the extent and spatial rules of transcriptional heterogeneity. Using next-generation RNA sequencing, we identified striking variability in CA1 PCs, such that the differences within CA1 along the dorsal-ventral axis rivaled differences across distinct pyramidal neuron classes. This variability emerged from a spectrum of continuous gene-expression gradients, producing a transcriptional profile consistent with a multifarious continuum of cells. This work reveals an unexpected amount of variability within a canonical and narrowly defined neuronal population and suggests that continuous, within-class heterogeneity may be an important feature of neural circuits. PMID:26777276

  2. Neurofilament-labeled pyramidal neurons and astrocytes are deficient in DNA methylation marks in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Andrew J; Vickers, James C; Taberlay, Phillippa C; Woodhouse, Adele

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that epigenetic alterations may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD); yet, there is little information regarding epigenetic modifications in specific cell types. We assessed DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine [5mC]) and hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine [5hmC]) marks specifically in neuronal and glial cell types in the inferior temporal gyrus of human AD cases and age-matched controls. Interestingly, neurofilament (NF)-labeled pyramidal neurons that are vulnerable to AD pathology are deficient in extranuclear 5mC in AD cases compared with controls. We also found that fewer astrocytes exhibited nuclear 5mC and 5hmC marks in AD cases compared with controls. However, there were no alterations in 5mC and 5hmC in disease-resistant calretinin interneurons or microglia in AD, and there was no alteration in the density of 5mC- or 5hmC-labeled nuclei in near-plaque versus plaque-free regions in late-AD cases. 5mC and 5hmC were present in a high proportion of neurofibrillary tangles, suggesting no loss of DNA methylation marks in tangle bearing neurons. We provide evidence that epigenetic dysregulation may be occurring in astrocytes and NF-positive pyramidal neurons in AD. PMID:27459923

  3. Dopaminergic modulation of axonal potassium channels and action potential waveform in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Mingyu; Tian, Cuiping; Yang, Mingpo; Wang, Yonghong; Shu, Yousheng

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels play critical roles in shaping neuronal signals. KV channels distributed in the perisomatic regions and thick dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons have been extensively studied. However, the properties and regulation of KV channels distributed in the thin axons remain unknown. In this study, by performing somatic and axonal patch-clamp recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortical slices, we showed that the rapidly inactivating A-currents mediated the transient K(+) currents evoked by action potential (AP) waveform command (KAP) at the soma, whereas the rapidly activating but slowly inactivating KV1-mediated D-currents dominated the KAP at the axon. In addition, activation of D1-like receptors for dopamine decreased the axonal K(+) currents, as a result of an increase in the activity of cAMP-PKA pathway. In contrast, activation of D2-like receptors showed an opposite effect on the axonal K(+) currents. Further experiments demonstrated that functional D1-like receptors were expressed at the main axon trunk and their activation could broaden the waveforms of axonal APs. Together, these results show that axonal KV channels were subjected to dopamine modulation, and this modulation could regulate the waveforms of propagating APs at the axon, suggesting an important role of dopaminergic modulation of axonal KV channels in regulating neuronal signalling. PMID:23568892

  4. Enhancement of an outwardly rectifying chloride channel in hippocampal pyramidal neurons after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Chang, Quanzhong; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Xiawen; Qiao, Jiantian; Gao, Tianming

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear, but it is known that apoptosis is involved in this process. Chloride efflux has been implicated in the progression of apoptosis in various cell types. Using both the inside-out and whole-cell configurations of the patch-clamp technique, the present study characterized an outwardly rectifying chloride channel (ORCC) in acutely dissociated pyramid neurons in the hippocampus of adult rats. The channel had a nonlinear current-voltage relationship with a conductance of 42.26±1.2pS in the positive voltage range and 18.23±0.96pS in the negative voltage range, indicating an outward rectification pattern. The channel is Cl(-) selective, and the open probability is voltage-dependent. It can be blocked by the classical Cl(-) channel blockers DIDS, SITS, NPPB and glibenclamide. We examined the different changes in ORCC activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons at 6, 24 and 48h after transient forebrain ischemia. In the vulnerable CA1 neurons, ORCC activity was persistently enhanced after ischemic insult, whereas in the invulnerable CA3 neurons, no significant changes occurred. Further analysis of channel kinetics suggested that multiple openings are a major contributor to the increase in channel activity after ischemia. Pharmacological blockade of the ORCC partly attenuated cell death in the hippocampal neurons. We propose that the enhanced activity of ORCC might contribute to selective neuronal damage in the CA1 region after cerebral ischemia, and that ORCC may be a therapeutic target against ischemia-induced cell death. PMID:27181516

  5. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression Is Restricted to Subsets of Excitatory Pyramidal Glutamatergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Louessard, Morgane; Lacroix, Alexandre; Martineau, Magalie; Mondielli, Gregoire; Montagne, Axel; Lesept, Flavie; Lambolez, Bertrand; Cauli, Bruno; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Although the extracellular serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in pathophysiological processes such as learning and memory, anxiety, epilepsy, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease, information about its regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution in vivo is lacking. In the present study, we observed, in healthy mice and rats, the presence of tPA in endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, mastocytes, and ependymocytes, but not in pericytes, microglial cells, and astrocytes. Moreover, blockage of the axo-dendritic transport unmasked tPA expression in neurons of cortical and hippocampal areas. Interestingly, combined electrophysiological recordings, single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistological analyses revealed that the presence of tPA is restricted to subsets of excitatory pyramidal glutamatergic neurons. We further evidenced that tPA is stored in synaptobrevin-2-positive glutamatergic synaptic vesicles. Based on all these data, we propose the existence of tPA-ergic neurons in the mature brain. PMID:26377106

  6. Effects of Maternal Marginal Iodine Deficiency on Dendritic Morphology in the Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons in Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Min, Hui; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Ye; Shan, Zhongyan; Xi, Qi; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Although the salt iodization programmes are taken to control iodine deficiency (ID), some regions are still suffering from marginal ID. During pregnancy, marginal ID frequently leads to subtle insufficiency of thyroid hormones, characterized as low serum T4 levels. Therefore, the present research was to explore the effects of maternal marginal ID exposure on dendritic arbor growth in the hippocampal CA1 region and the underlying mechanisms. We established Wistar rat models with ID diet during pregnancy and lactation. The overall daily iodine intakes of the rats were estimated as 7.0, 5.0 and 1.5 μg/day in the control, marginal ID and severe ID groups, respectively. To study the morphological alterations of pyramidal neurons, Golgi-Cox procedure was conducted in the hippocampus. Sholl analyses demonstrated a slight decrease in the total length and branching numbers of basal dendrites on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14 and PN21 in marginal ID group relative to the controls. However, there was no overt morphological change observed in apical dendrites. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of MAP2, stathmin and JNK1 was down-regulated in marginal ID group. We speculate that the pups treated with maternal marginal ID subjected to subtle changes in dendritic growth of CA1 pyramidal neurons, which may be associated with the dysregulation of MAP2 and stathmin in a JNK1-dependent manner. PMID:27017219

  7. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J

    2016-03-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  8. In Vivo Monosynaptic Excitatory Transmission between Layer 2 Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jouhanneau, Jean-Sébastien; Kremkow, Jens; Dorrn, Anja L.; Poulet, James F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the properties of monosynaptic connections between identified neurons in vivo. We made multiple (two to four) two-photon targeted whole-cell recordings from neighboring layer 2 mouse somatosensory barrel cortex pyramidal neurons in vivo to investigate excitatory monosynaptic transmission in the hyperpolarized downstate. We report that pyramidal neurons form a sparsely connected (6.7% connectivity) network with an overrepresentation of bidirectional connections. The majority of unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials were small in amplitude (<0.5 mV), with a small minority >1 mV. The coefficient of variation (CV = 0.74) could largely be explained by the presence of synaptic failures (22%). Both the CV and failure rates were reduced with increasing amplitude. The mean paired-pulse ratio was 1.15 and positively correlated with the CV. Our approach will help bridge the gap between connectivity and function and allow investigations into the impact of brain state on monosynaptic transmission and integration. PMID:26670044

  9. A Method for High Fidelity Optogenetic Control of Individual Pyramidal Neurons In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Donald C.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic methods have emerged as a powerful tool for elucidating neural circuit activity underlying a diverse set of behaviors across a broad range of species. Optogenetic tools of microbial origin consist of light-sensitive membrane proteins that are able to activate (e.g., channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2) or silence (e.g., halorhodopsin, NpHR) neural activity ingenetically-defined cell types over behaviorally-relevant timescales. We first demonstrate a simple approach for adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of ChR2 and NpHR transgenes to the dorsal subiculum and prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex in rat. Because ChR2 and NpHR are genetically targetable, we describe the use of this technology to control the electrical activity of specific populations of neurons (i.e., pyramidal neurons) embedded in heterogeneous tissue with high temporal precision. We describe herein the hardware, custom software user interface, and procedures that allow for simultaneous light delivery and electrical recording from transduced pyramidal neurons in an anesthetized in vivo preparation. These light-responsive tools provide the opportunity for identifying the causal contributions of different cell types to information processing and behavior. PMID:24022017

  10. The effects of prolonged intracortical microstimulation on the excitability of pyramidal tract neurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Douglas B; Agnew, William F; Bullara, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the excitability changes induced in cerebral cortical neurons during prolonged microstimulation with a spatially dense microelectrodes array. The arrays of 16 iridium microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the postcruciate gyrus of cats. Neuronal responses characteristic of single pyramidal tract axons (ULRs) were recorded in the medullary pyramid. 7 h of pulsing of individual electrodes at 50 Hz and at 4 nC/ph induced little or no change in the ULRs' electrical thresholds. The thresholds also were quite stable when 4 of the 16 microelectrodes were pulsed on each of 14 consecutive days. However, when all 16 microelectrodes were pulsed for 7 h at 4 nC/ph, the threshold of approximately half of the ULRs became elevated. Recovery of excitability required 2-18 days. Prolonged sequential (interleaved) pulsing of the 16 microelectrodes induced less depression of excitability than did simultaneous pulsing, but only when the stimulus amplitude was low (12 A, 1.8 nC/ph). Stimulation at a higher amplitude (15 nC/ph) induced much more depression of excitability. These findings imply that multiple processes mediate the stimulation-induced depression of neuronal excitability. The data also demonstrate that the depression can be reduced by employing a stimulus regimen in which the inherent spatial resolution of the array is maximized (sequential pulsing at an amplitude in which there is minimal overlap of the effective current fields). PMID:11874134

  11. NADPH oxidase elevations in pyramidal neurons drive psychosocial stress-induced neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, S; Jaquet, V; Sorce, S; Dubois-Dauphin, M; Hultqvist, M; Bäckdahl, L; Holmdahl, R; Colaianna, M; Cuomo, V; Trabace, L; Krause, K-H

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the development of behavioral and histopathological alterations in animal models of psychosis. Here we investigate the causal contribution of reactive oxygen species generation by the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 to neuropathological alterations in a rat model of chronic psychosocial stress. In rats exposed to social isolation, the earliest neuropathological alterations were signs of oxidative stress and appearance of NOX2. Alterations in behavior, increase in glutamate levels and loss of parvalbumin were detectable after 4 weeks of social isolation. The expression of the NOX2 subunit p47phox was markedly increased in pyramidal neurons of isolated rats, but below detection threshold in GABAergic neurons, astrocytes and microglia. Rats with a loss of function mutation in the NOX2 subunit p47phox were protected from behavioral and neuropathological alterations induced by social isolation. To test reversibility, we applied the antioxidant/NOX inhibitor apocynin after initiation of social isolation for a time period of 3 weeks. Apocynin reversed behavioral alterations fully when applied after 4 weeks of social isolation, but only partially after 7 weeks. Our results demonstrate that social isolation induces rapid elevations of the NOX2 complex in the brain. Expression of the enzyme complex was strongest in pyramidal neurons and a loss of function mutation prevented neuropathology induced by social isolation. Finally, at least at early stages, pharmacological targeting of NOX2 activity might reverse behavioral alterations. PMID:22832955

  12. In Vivo Monosynaptic Excitatory Transmission between Layer 2 Cortical Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jouhanneau, Jean-Sébastien; Kremkow, Jens; Dorrn, Anja L; Poulet, James F A

    2015-12-15

    Little is known about the properties of monosynaptic connections between identified neurons in vivo. We made multiple (two to four) two-photon targeted whole-cell recordings from neighboring layer 2 mouse somatosensory barrel cortex pyramidal neurons in vivo to investigate excitatory monosynaptic transmission in the hyperpolarized downstate. We report that pyramidal neurons form a sparsely connected (6.7% connectivity) network with an overrepresentation of bidirectional connections. The majority of unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials were small in amplitude (<0.5 mV), with a small minority >1 mV. The coefficient of variation (CV = 0.74) could largely be explained by the presence of synaptic failures (22%). Both the CV and failure rates were reduced with increasing amplitude. The mean paired-pulse ratio was 1.15 and positively correlated with the CV. Our approach will help bridge the gap between connectivity and function and allow investigations into the impact of brain state on monosynaptic transmission and integration. PMID:26670044

  13. Enhanced Sensitivity to Rapid Input Fluctuations by Nonlinear Threshold Dynamics in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mensi, Skander; Hagens, Olivier; Gerstner, Wulfram; Pozzorini, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The way in which single neurons transform input into output spike trains has fundamental consequences for network coding. Theories and modeling studies based on standard Integrate-and-Fire models implicitly assume that, in response to increasingly strong inputs, neurons modify their coding strategy by progressively reducing their selective sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. Combining mathematical modeling with in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that, in L5 pyramidal neurons, the firing threshold dynamics adaptively adjust the effective timescale of somatic integration in order to preserve sensitivity to rapid signals over a broad range of input statistics. For that, a new Generalized Integrate-and-Fire model featuring nonlinear firing threshold dynamics and conductance-based adaptation is introduced that outperforms state-of-the-art neuron models in predicting the spiking activity of neurons responding to a variety of in vivo-like fluctuating currents. Our model allows for efficient parameter extraction and can be analytically mapped to a Generalized Linear Model in which both the input filter--describing somatic integration--and the spike-history filter--accounting for spike-frequency adaptation--dynamically adapt to the input statistics, as experimentally observed. Overall, our results provide new insights on the computational role of different biophysical processes known to underlie adaptive coding in single neurons and support previous theoretical findings indicating that the nonlinear dynamics of the firing threshold due to Na+-channel inactivation regulate the sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. PMID:26907675

  14. Enhanced Sensitivity to Rapid Input Fluctuations by Nonlinear Threshold Dynamics in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mensi, Skander; Hagens, Olivier; Gerstner, Wulfram; Pozzorini, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The way in which single neurons transform input into output spike trains has fundamental consequences for network coding. Theories and modeling studies based on standard Integrate-and-Fire models implicitly assume that, in response to increasingly strong inputs, neurons modify their coding strategy by progressively reducing their selective sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. Combining mathematical modeling with in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that, in L5 pyramidal neurons, the firing threshold dynamics adaptively adjust the effective timescale of somatic integration in order to preserve sensitivity to rapid signals over a broad range of input statistics. For that, a new Generalized Integrate-and-Fire model featuring nonlinear firing threshold dynamics and conductance-based adaptation is introduced that outperforms state-of-the-art neuron models in predicting the spiking activity of neurons responding to a variety of in vivo-like fluctuating currents. Our model allows for efficient parameter extraction and can be analytically mapped to a Generalized Linear Model in which both the input filter—describing somatic integration—and the spike-history filter—accounting for spike-frequency adaptation—dynamically adapt to the input statistics, as experimentally observed. Overall, our results provide new insights on the computational role of different biophysical processes known to underlie adaptive coding in single neurons and support previous theoretical findings indicating that the nonlinear dynamics of the firing threshold due to Na+-channel inactivation regulate the sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. PMID:26907675

  15. Synaptogenesis and development of pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology in the chimpanzee neocortex resembles humans

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Serena; Duka, Tetyana; Larsen, Michael D.; Janssen, William G. M.; Collins, Zachary; Bauernfeind, Amy L.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Baze, Wallace B.; McArthur, Mark J.; Hopkins, William D.; Wildman, Derek E.; Lipovich, Leonard; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Jacobs, Bob; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2013-01-01

    Neocortical development in humans is characterized by an extended period of synaptic proliferation that peaks in mid-childhood, with subsequent pruning through early adulthood, as well as relatively delayed maturation of neuronal arborization in the prefrontal cortex compared with sensorimotor areas. In macaque monkeys, cortical synaptogenesis peaks during early infancy and developmental changes in synapse density and dendritic spines occur synchronously across cortical regions. Thus, relatively prolonged synapse and neuronal maturation in humans might contribute to enhancement of social learning during development and transmission of cultural practices, including language. However, because macaques, which share a last common ancestor with humans ∼25 million years ago, have served as the predominant comparative primate model in neurodevelopmental research, the paucity of data from more closely related great apes leaves unresolved when these evolutionary changes in the timing of cortical development became established in the human lineage. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and Golgi staining to characterize synaptic density and dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons in primary somatosensory (area 3b), primary motor (area 4), prestriate visual (area 18), and prefrontal (area 10) cortices of developing chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We found that synaptogenesis occurs synchronously across cortical areas, with a peak of synapse density during the juvenile period (3–5 y). Moreover, similar to findings in humans, dendrites of prefrontal pyramidal neurons developed later than sensorimotor areas. These results suggest that evolutionary changes to neocortical development promoting greater neuronal plasticity early in postnatal life preceded the divergence of the human and chimpanzee lineages. PMID:23754422

  16. Unexpected survival of neurons of origin of the pyramidal tract after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Jessica L.; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Strong, Melissa K.; Wong, Jamie K.; Willenberg, Rafer; Steward, Oswald

    2010-01-01

    There is continuing controversy about whether the cells of origin of the corticospinal tract (CST) undergo retrograde cell death following spinal cord injury (SCI). All previous attempts to assess this have utilized imaging and/or histological techniques to assess upper motoneurons in the cerebral cortex. Here we address the question in a novel way by assessing Wallerian degeneration and axon numbers in the medullary pyramid of Sprague-Dawley rats following both acute SCI, either at cervical level 5 (C5) or thoracic level 9 (T9), and chronic SCI at T9. Our findings demonstrate that only a fraction of a percent of the total axons in the medullary pyramid exhibit any sign of degeneration at any time post-SCI—no more so than in uninjured control rats. Moreover, design-based counts of myelinated axons revealed no decrease in axon number in the medullary pyramid after SCI, regardless of injury level, severity, or time post injury. Spinal cord injured rats had fewer myelinated axons in the medullary pyramid at 1-year post injury than aged matched controls suggesting that injury may affect ongoing myelination of axons during aging. We conclude that SCI does not cause death of the CST cell bodies in the cortex; therefore therapeutic strategies aimed at promoting axon regeneration of the CST in the spinal cord do not require a separate intervention to prevent retrograde degeneration of upper motoneurons in the cortex. PMID:20739574

  17. SCYL2 Protects CA3 Pyramidal Neurons from Excitotoxicity during Functional Maturation of the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Sebastien; Earls, Laurie R.; Howell, Sherie; Smeyne, Richard J.; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal death caused by excessive excitatory signaling, excitotoxicity, plays a central role in neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanisms regulating this process, however, are still incompletely understood. Here we show that the coated vesicle-associated kinase SCYL2/CVAK104 plays a critical role for the normal functioning of the nervous system and for suppressing excitotoxicity in the developing hippocampus. Targeted disruption of Scyl2 in mice caused perinatal lethality in the vast majority of newborn mice and severe sensory-motor deficits in mice that survived to adulthood. Consistent with a neurogenic origin of these phenotypes, neuron-specific deletion of Scyl2 also caused perinatal lethality in the majority of newborn mice and severe neurological defects in adult mice. The neurological deficits in these mice were associated with the degeneration of several neuronal populations, most notably CA3 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, which we analyzed in more detail. The loss of CA3 neurons occurred during the functional maturation of the hippocampus and was the result of a BAX-dependent apoptotic process. Excessive excitatory signaling was present at the onset of degeneration, and inhibition of excitatory signaling prevented the degeneration of CA3 neurons. Biochemical fractionation reveals that Scyl2-deficient mice have an altered composition of excitatory receptors at synapses. Our findings demonstrate an essential role for SCYL2 in regulating neuronal function and survival and suggest a role for SCYL2 in regulating excitatory signaling in the developing brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here we examine the in vivo function of SCYL2, an evolutionarily conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein pseudokinase thought to regulate protein trafficking along the secretory pathway, and demonstrate its importance for the normal functioning of the nervous system and for suppressing excitatory signaling in the developing brain. Together with recent studies

  18. Active dendrites regulate the impact of gliotransmission on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-06-01

    An important consequence of gliotransmission, a signaling mechanism that involves glial release of active transmitter molecules, is its manifestation as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent slow inward currents in neurons. However, the intraneuronal spatial dynamics of these events or the role of active dendrites in regulating their amplitude and spatial spread have remained unexplored. Here, we used somatic and/or dendritic recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and demonstrate that a majority of NMDAR-dependent spontaneous slow excitatory potentials (SEP) originate at dendritic locations and are significantly attenuated through their propagation across the neuronal arbor. We substantiated the astrocytic origin of SEPs through paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, where we found that specific infusion of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) into either distal or proximal astrocytes enhanced the amplitude and frequency of neuronal SEPs. Importantly, SEPs recorded after InsP3 infusion into distal astrocytes exhibited significantly slower kinetics compared with those recorded after proximal infusion. Furthermore, using neuron-specific infusion of pharmacological agents and morphologically realistic conductance-based computational models, we demonstrate that dendritically expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) and transient potassium channels play critical roles in regulating the strength, kinetics, and compartmentalization of neuronal SEPs. Finally, through the application of subtype-specific receptor blockers during paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, we provide evidence that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDARs predominantly mediate perisomatic and dendritic SEPs, respectively. Our results unveil an important role for active dendrites in regulating the impact of gliotransmission on neurons and suggest astrocytes as a source of dendritic plateau potentials that have been implicated in localized plasticity and place cell

  19. Alterations of Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons: Turning Points in the Genesis of Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Alberto; De Giorgio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons (PNs) represent the majority of neocortical cells and their involvement in cognitive functions is decisive. Therefore, they are the most obvious target of developmental disorders characterized by mental retardation. Genetic and non-genetic forms of intellectual disability share a few basic pathogenetic signatures that result in the anomalous function of PNs. Here, we review the key mechanisms impairing these neurons and their participation in the cortical network, with special focus on experimental models of fetal exposure to alcohol. Due to the heterogeneity of PNs, some alterations affect selectively a given cell population, which may also differ depending on the considered pathology. These specific features open new possibilities for the interpretation of cognitive defects observed in mental retardation syndromes, as well as for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:25157343

  20. Protein Kinase C Regulates Ionic Conductance in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons: Electrophysiological Effects of Phorbol Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Alger, Bradley E.

    1985-04-01

    The vertebrate central nervous system contains very high concentrations of protein kinase C, a calcium-and phospholipid-stimulated phosphorylating enzyme. Phorbol esters, compounds with inflammatory and tumor-promoting properties, bind to and activate this enzyme. To clarify the role of protein kinase C in neuronal function, we have localized phorbol ester receptors in the rat hippocampus by autoradiography and examined the electrophysiological effects of phorbol esters on hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vitro. Phorbol esters blocked a calcium-dependent potassium conductance. In addition, phorbol esters blocked the late hyperpolarization elicited by synaptic stimulation even though other synaptic potentials were not affected. The potencies of several phorbol esters in exerting these actions paralleled their affinities for protein kinase C, suggesting that protein kinase C regulates membrane ionic conductance.

  1. Potential Synaptic Connectivity of Different Neurons onto Pyramidal Cells in a 3D Reconstruction of the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ropireddy, Deepak; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing connectomic data and ongoing efforts focus either on individual synapses (e.g., with electron microscopy) or on regional connectivity (tract tracing). An individual pyramidal cell (PC) extends thousands of synapses over macroscopic distances (∼cm). The contrasting requirements of high-resolution and large field of view make it too challenging to acquire the entire synaptic connectivity for even a single typical cortical neuron. Light microscopy can image whole neuronal arbors and resolve dendritic branches. Analyzing connectivity in terms of close spatial appositions between axons and dendrites could thus bridge the opposite scales, from synaptic level to whole systems. In the mammalian cortex, structural plasticity of spines and boutons makes these “potential synapses” functionally relevant to learning capability and memory capacity. To date, however, potential synapses have only been mapped in the surrounding of a neuron and relative to its local orientation rather than in a system-level anatomical reference. Here we overcome this limitation by estimating the potential connectivity of different neurons embedded into a detailed 3D reconstruction of the rat hippocampus. Axonal and dendritic trees were oriented with respect to hippocampal cytoarchitecture according to longitudinal and transversal curvatures. We report the potential connectivity onto PC dendrites from the axons of a dentate granule cell, three CA3 PCs, one CA2 PC, and 13 CA3b interneurons. The numbers, densities, and distributions of potential synapses were analyzed in each sub-region (e.g., CA3 vs. CA1), layer (e.g., oriens vs. radiatum), and septo-temporal location (e.g., dorsal vs. ventral). The overall ratio between the numbers of actual and potential synapses was ∼0.20 for the granule and CA3 PCs. All potential connectivity patterns are strikingly dependent on the anatomical location of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic neurons. PMID:21779242

  2. An Augmented Two-Layer Model Captures Nonlinear Analog Spatial Integration Effects in Pyramidal Neuron Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    JADI, MONIKA P.; BEHABADI, BARDIA F.; POLEG-POLSKY, ALON; SCHILLER, JACKIE; MEL, BARTLETT W.

    2014-01-01

    In pursuit of the goal to understand and eventually reproduce the diverse functions of the brain, a key challenge lies in reverse engineering the peculiar biology-based “technology” that underlies the brain’s remarkable ability to process and store information. The basic building block of the nervous system is the nerve cell, or “neuron,” yet after more than 100 years of neurophysiological study and 60 years of modeling, the information processing functions of individual neurons, and the parameters that allow them to engage in so many different types of computation (sensory, motor, mnemonic, executive, etc.) remain poorly understood. In this paper, we review both historical and recent findings that have led to our current understanding of the analog spatial processing capabilities of dendrites, the major input structures of neurons, with a focus on the principal cell type of the neocortex and hippocampus, the pyramidal neuron (PN). We encapsulate our current understanding of PN dendritic integration in an abstract layered model whose spatially sensitive branch-subunits compute multidimensional sigmoidal functions. Unlike the 1-D sigmoids found in conventional neural network models, multidimensional sigmoids allow the cell to implement a rich spectrum of nonlinear modulation effects directly within their dendritic trees. PMID:25554708

  3. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  4. Simple Method for Evaluation of Planum Temporale Pyramidal Neurons Shrinkage in Postmortem Tissue of Alzheimer Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kutová, Martina; Mrzílková, Jana; Kirdajová, Denisa; Řípová, Daniela; Zach, Petr

    2014-01-01

    We measured the length of the pyramidal neurons in the cortical layer III in four subregions of the planum temporale (transitions into superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, insular cortex, and Sylvian fissure) in control group and Alzheimer disease patients. Our hypothesis was that overall length of the pyramidal neurons would be smaller in the Alzheimer disease group compared to controls and also there would be right-left asymmetry in both the control and Alzheimer disease groups. We found pyramidal neuron length asymmetry only in controls—in the transition into the Sylvian fissure—and the rest of the subregions in the control group and Alzheimer disease patients did not show size difference. However, control-Alzheimer disease group pyramidal neuron length comparison revealed (a) no length difference in superior temporal gyrus transition area, (b) reversal of asymmetry in the insular transition area with left insular transition significantly shorter in the Alzheimer disease group compared to the control group, (c) both right and left Heschl's gyrus transitions significantly shorter in the Alzheimer disease group compared to the control group, and (d) right Sylvian fissure transition significantly shorter in the Alzheimer disease group compared to the control group. This neuronal length measurement method could supplement already existing neuropathological criteria for postmortem Alzheimer disease diagnostics. PMID:24719875

  5. Heterogeneity of spine density in pyramidal neurons of isocortex of mongoose, Herpestes edwardsii (É. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire 1818).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, U C; Singh, Sippy; Chauhan, Prashant

    2013-08-01

    The characteristics of pyramidal neurons within six layers of Indian gray mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii) isocortex have been investigated using Golgi and Cresyl-Violet methods. Pyramidal neurons and the cytoarchitecture of isocortex of mongoose were photographed with the help of computer aided Nikon eclipse 80i microscope whereas the lucida drawings were made by simple light microscope equipped with camera lucida. The cortical neurons exhibit marked regional differences in phenotype. The differences occur in morphology and distribution of spines within the cortical neurons not only among different species but also within an animal's brain. The present investigation aims at studying the features of pyramidal neurons and to find out the differences if any in distribution of spines in different layers (II-VI) as well as regions (Frontal, Temporal, Parietal, and Occipital) of isocortex of mongoose, which will provide information regarding importance of different layer and region. This piece of work embarks the findings that spine density shows inter-regional as well as interlaminar variations within isocortex of mongoose indicating that pyramidal cells present in varied layer and region are not equally functional and there do exists differences in activity among layers and regions. Among regions, the Temporal region possessing highest spine density contributes more toward functioning of mongoose isocortex and might play significant role in predatory nature of mongoose because this region in mammals is associated with auditory, visual perception, and object recognition. PMID:23733533

  6. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. PMID:25515596

  7. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulation of beta‐amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ‐overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2–5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1–42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ‐(500 nM) and vehicle‐(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub‐threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated “sag”. Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra‐threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after‐hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25515596

  8. Discharges of pyramidal tract and other motor cortical neurones during locomotion in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, D M; Drew, T

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for chronically implanting fine flexible microwires into cat motor cortex, which permitted extracellular recordings to be made from 165 single neurones. Most units were recordable for 12 h and some for up to 2 days. Of the neurones tested, 57% were shown to project to the medullary pyramid (pyramidal tract neurones, p.t.n.s). Antidromic latencies corresponded to a range of conduction velocities from 63 to 9 m/s. In the animal at rest neurones discharged at rates from 0.5 to 44 impulses/s. During locomotion at 0.5 m/s (a slow walk) 56% of cells discharged faster than at rest and 80% showed frequency modulations time-locked to the step cycle. Most fired one discrete burst of impulses per step or one peak period superimposed on a maintained discharge. In different cells peak activity occurred at widely different times during the step cycle. A few cells peaked twice per step. Peak rates (averaged over twenty steps) ranged from 10 to over 120 impulses/s, the values for most slow-axon p.t.n.s (conduction velocity less than 21 m/s) being lower than for any of the fast-axon p.t.n.s. For locomotion at speeds between 0.37 and 1.43 m/s a roughly linear relationship existed between discharge rate and speed in 14% of cells. However, the changes were modest and in most cells both mean rate and peak rate were unrelated to speed. In some cells discharge phasing was fixed (relative to the step cycle in the contralateral forelimb); in others there were progressive phase shifts (or more complex changes) as speed increased. During locomotion up a 10 degrees incline discharge phasings were the same as on the flat in all of the twenty-seven neurones studied and most showed no substantial change in mean rate or peak rate (although there were substantial increases in limb muscle electromyogram amplitudes). Images Plate 1 PMID:6699782

  9. Deleterious impacts of a 900-MHz electromagnetic field on hippocampal pyramidal neurons of 8-week-old Sprague Dawley male rats.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Arzu; Aslan, Ali; Baş, Orhan; İkinci, Ayşe; Özyılmaz, Cansu; Sönmez, Osman Fikret; Çolakoğlu, Serdar; Odacı, Ersan

    2015-10-22

    Children are at potential risk due to their intense use of mobile phones. We examined 8-week-old rats because this age of the rats is comparable with the preadolescent period in humans. The number of pyramidal neurons in the cornu ammonis of the Sprague Dawley male rat (8-weeks old, weighing 180-250 g) hippocampus following exposure to a 900 MHz (MHz) electromagnetic field (EMF) were examined. The study consisted of control (CN-G), sham exposed (SHM-EG) and EMF exposed (EMF-EG) groups with 6 rats in each. The EMF-EG rats were exposed to 900 MHz EMF (1h/day for 30 days) in an EMF jar. The SHM-EG rats were placed in the EMF jar but not exposed to the EMF (1h/day for 30 days). The CN-G rats were not placed into the exposure jar and were not exposed to the EMF during the study period. All animals were sacrificed at the end of the experiment, and their brains were removed for histopathological and stereological analysis. The number of pyramidal neurons in the cornu ammonis of the hippocampus was estimated on Cresyl violet stained sections of the brain using the optical dissector counting technique. Histopathological evaluations were also performed on these sections. Histopathological observation showed abundant cells with abnormal, black or dark blue cytoplasm and shrunken morphology among the normal pyramidal neurons. The largest lateral ventricles were observed in the EMF-EG sections compared to those from the other groups. Stereological analyses showed that the total number of pyramidal neurons in the cornu ammonis of the EMF-EG rats was significantly lower than those in the CN-G (p<0.05) and the SHM-EG (p<0.05). In conclusion, our results suggest that pyramidal neuron loss and histopathological changes in the cornu ammonis of 8-week-old male rats may be due to the 900-MHz EMF exposure. PMID:26239913

  10. DeCoN: genome-wide analysis of in vivo transcriptional dynamics during pyramidal neuron fate selection in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Brettler, Andrea C.; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Hrvatin, Siniša; Rinn, John L.; Arlotta, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal development requires a complex choreography of transcriptional decisions to obtain specific cellular identities. Realizing the ultimate goal of identifying genome-wide signatures that define and drive specific neuronal fates has been hampered by enormous complexity in both time and space during development. Here, we have paired high-throughput purification of pyramidal neuron subclasses with deep profiling of spatiotemporal transcriptional dynamics during corticogenesis to resolve lineage choice decisions. We identified numerous features ranging from spatial and temporal usage of alternative mRNA isoforms and promoters to a host of mRNA genes modulated during fate specification. Notably, we uncovered numerous long non-coding RNAs with restricted temporal and cell type specific expression. To facilitate future exploration, we provide an interactive online database to enable multidimensional data mining and dissemination. This multi-faceted study generates a powerful resource and informs understanding of the transcriptional regulation underlying pyramidal neuron diversity in the neocortex. PMID:25556833

  11. Dgcr8 is required in pyramidal neurons for normal inhibitory synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ruby; Schofield, Claude M; Cruz, Cassandra G Dela; Jones-Davis, Dorothy M; Blelloch, Robert; Ullian, Erik M

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of nervous system function, and in vivo knockout studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are necessary for multiple aspects of neuronal development and survival. However, the requirements of miRNA biogenesis in the formation and function of synapses in the cerebral cortex are only minimally understood. Here, we have generated and characterized a mouse line with a conditional neuronal deletion of Dgcr8, a miRNA biogenesis protein predicted to process miRNAs exclusively. Loss of Dgcr8 in pyramidal neurons of the cortex results in a non-cell-autonomous reduction in parvalbumin interneurons in the prefrontal cortex, accompanied by a severe deficit in inhibitory synaptic transmission and a corresponding reduction of inhibitory synapses. Together, these results suggest a vital role for miRNAs in governing essential aspects of inhibitory transmission and interneuron development in the mammalian nervous system. These results may be relevant to human diseases such as schizophrenia, where both altered Dgcr8 levels as well as aberrant inhibitory transmission in the prefrontal cortex have been postulated to contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:22728723

  12. Evidence for Alzheimer's disease-linked synapse loss and compensation in mouse and human hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Krystina M; Molina-Campos, Elizabeth; Musial, Timothy F; Price, Andrea L; Oh, Kwang-Jin; Wolke, Malerie L; Buss, Eric W; Scheff, Stephen W; Mufson, Elliott J; Nicholson, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with alterations in the distribution, number, and size of inputs to hippocampal neurons. Some of these changes are thought to be neurodegenerative, whereas others are conceptualized as compensatory, plasticity-like responses, wherein the remaining inputs reactively innervate vulnerable dendritic regions. Here, we provide evidence that the axospinous synapses of human AD cases and mice harboring AD-linked genetic mutations (the 5XFAD line) exhibit both, in the form of synapse loss and compensatory changes in the synapses that remain. Using array tomography, quantitative conventional electron microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy for AMPARs, and whole-cell patch-clamp physiology, we find that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in transgenic mice are host to an age-related synapse loss in their distal dendrites, and that the remaining synapses express more AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Moreover, the number of axonal boutons that synapse with multiple spines is significantly reduced in the transgenic mice. Through serial section electron microscopic analyses of human hippocampal tissue, we further show that putative compensatory changes in synapse strength are also detectable in axospinous synapses of proximal and distal dendrites in human AD cases, and that their multiple synapse boutons may be more powerful than those in non-cognitively impaired human cases. Such findings are consistent with the notion that the pathophysiology of AD is a multivariate product of both neurodegenerative and neuroplastic processes, which may produce adaptive and/or maladaptive responses in hippocampal synaptic strength and plasticity. PMID:25031178

  13. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  14. Cortical and striatal neurone number in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Heinsen, H; Strik, M; Bauer, M; Luther, K; Ulmar, G; Gangnus, D; Jungkunz, G; Eisenmenger, W; Götz, M

    1994-01-01

    The total cortical and striatal neurone and glial numbers were estimated in five cases of Huntington's disease (three males, two females) and five age- and sex-matched control cases. Serial 500-microns-thick gallocyanin-stained frontal sections through the left hemisphere were analysed using Cavalieri's principle for volume and the optical disector for cell density estimations. The average cortical neurone number of five controls (mean age 53 +/- 13 years, range 36-72 years) was 5.97 x 10(9) +/- 320 x 10(6), the average number of small striatal neurones was 82 x 10(6) +/- 15.8 x 10(6). The left striatum (caudatum, putamen, and accumbens) contained a mean of 273 x 10(6) +/- 53 x 10(6) glial cells (oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and unclassifiable glial profiles). The mean cortical neurone number in Huntington's disease patients (mean age 49 +/- 14 years, range 36-75 years) was diminished by about 33% to 3.99 x 10(9) +/- 218 x 10(6) nerve cells (P < or = 0.012, Mann-Whitney U-test). The mean number of small striatal neurones decreased tremendously to 9.72 x 10(6) +/- 3.64 x 10(6) (-88%). The decrease in total glial cells was less pronounced (193 x 10(6) +/- 26 x 10(6)) but the mean glial index, the numerical ratio of glial cells per neurone, increased from 3.35 to 22.59 in Huntington's disease. Qualitatively, neuronal loss was most pronounced in supragranular layers of primary sensory areas (Brodmann's areae 3,1,2; area 17, area 41). Layer IIIc pyramidal cells were preferentially lost in association areas of the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, whereas spared layer IV granule cells formed a conspicuous band between layer III and V in these fields. Methodological issues are discussed in context with previous investigations and similarities and differences of laminar and lobar nerve cell loss in Huntington's disease are compared with nerve cell degeneration in other neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:7839825

  15. Acute Seizures in Old Age Leads to a Greater Loss of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons, an Increased Propensity for Developing Chronic TLE and a Severe Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kuruba, Ramkumar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-02-01

    The aged population displays an enhanced risk for developing acute seizure (AS) activity. However, it is unclear whether AS activity in old age would result in a greater magnitude of hippocampal neurodegeneration and inflammation, and an increased predilection for developing chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we addressed these issues in young-adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats after three-hours of AS activity, induced through graded intraperitoneal injections of kainic acid (KA), and terminated through a diazepam injection. During the three-hours of AS activity, both young adult and aged groups exhibited similar numbers of stage-V motor seizures but the numbers of stage-IV motor seizures were greater in the aged group. In both age groups, three-hour AS activity induced degeneration of 50-55% of neurons in the dentate hilus, 22-32% of neurons in the granule cell layer and 49-52% neurons in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer without showing any interaction between the age and AS activity. However, degeneration of neurons in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer showed a clear interaction between the age and AS activity (12% in the young adult group and 56% in the aged group), suggesting that an advanced age makes the CA1 pyramidal neurons more susceptible to die with AS activity. The extent of inflammation measured through the numbers of activated microglial cells was similar between the two age groups. Interestingly, the predisposition for developing chronic TLE at 2-3 months after AS activity was 60% for young adult rats but 100% for aged rats. Moreover, both frequency & intensity of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronic phase after AS activity were 6-12 folds greater in aged rats than in young adult rats. Furthermore, aged rats lost their ability for spatial learning even in a scrupulous eleven-session water maze learning paradigm after AS activity, in divergence from young adult rats which retained the

  16. Synaptic gene dysregulation within hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Counts, Scott E.; Alldred, Melissa J.; Che, Shaoli; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Mufson, Elliott J.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical neuropathologic studies suggest that the selective vulnerability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal projection neurons plays a key role in the onset of cognitive impairment during the early phases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Disruption of this neuronal population likely affects hippocampal pre- and postsynaptic efficacy underlying episodic memory circuits. Therefore, identifying perturbations in the expression of synaptic gene products within CA1 neurons prior to frank AD is crucial for the development of disease modifying therapies. Here we used custom-designed microarrays to examine progressive alterations in synaptic gene expression within CA1 neurons in cases harvested from the Rush Religious Orders Study who died with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (NCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, a putative prodromal AD stage), or mild/moderate AD. Quantitative analysis revealed that 21 out of 28 different transcripts encoding regulators of synaptic function were significantly downregulated (1.4 to 1.8 fold) in CA1 neurons in MCI and AD compared to NCI, whereas synaptic transcript levels were not significantly different between MCI and AD. The downregulated transcripts encoded regulators of presynaptic vesicle trafficking, including synaptophysin and synaptogyrin, regulators of vesicle docking and fusion/release, such as synaptotagmin and syntaxin 1, and regulators of glutamatergic postsynaptic function, including PSD-95 and synaptopodin. Clinical pathologic correlation analysis revealed that downregulation of these synaptic markers was strongly associated with poorer antemortem cognitive status and postmortem AD pathological criteria such as Braak stage, NIA-Reagan, and CERAD diagnosis. In contrast to the widespread loss of synaptic gene expression observed in CA1 neurons in MCI, transcripts encoding β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), APP family members, and regulators of APP metabolism were not differentially regulated in CA1 neurons across the

  17. Density of voltage-gated potassium channels is a bifurcation parameter in pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Hugh P. C.; Århem, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Several types of intrinsic dynamics have been identified in brain neurons. Type 1 excitability is characterized by a continuous frequency-stimulus relationship and, thus, an arbitrarily low frequency at threshold current. Conversely, Type 2 excitability is characterized by a discontinuous frequency-stimulus relationship and a nonzero threshold frequency. In previous theoretical work we showed that the density of Kv channels is a bifurcation parameter, such that increasing the Kv channel density in a neuron model transforms Type 1 excitability into Type 2 excitability. Here we test this finding experimentally, using the dynamic clamp technique on Type 1 pyramidal cells in rat cortex. We found that increasing the density of slow Kv channels leads to a shift from Type 1 to Type 2 threshold dynamics, i.e., a distinct onset frequency, subthreshold oscillations, and reduced latency to first spike. In addition, the action potential was resculptured, with a narrower spike width and more pronounced afterhyperpolarization. All changes could be captured with a two-dimensional model. It may seem paradoxical that an increase in slow K channel density can lead to a higher threshold firing frequency; however, this can be explained in terms of bifurcation theory. In contrast to previous work, we argue that an increased outward current leads to a change in dynamics in these neurons without a rectification of the current-voltage curve. These results demonstrate that the behavior of neurons is determined by the global interactions of their dynamical elements and not necessarily simply by individual types of ion channels. PMID:25339708

  18. Subcolumnar dendritic and axonal organization of spiny stellate and star pyramid neurons within a barrel in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Egger, Veronica; Nevian, Thomas; Bruno, Randy M

    2008-04-01

    Excitatory neurons at the level of cortical layer 4 in the rodent somatosensory barrel field often display a strong eccentricity in comparison with layer 4 neurons in other cortical regions. In rat, dendritic symmetry of the 2 main excitatory neuronal classes, spiny stellate and star pyramid neurons (SSNs and SPNs), was quantified by an asymmetry index, the dendrite-free angle. We carefully measured shrinkage and analyzed its influence on morphological parameters. SSNs had mostly eccentric morphology, whereas SPNs were nearly radially symmetric. Most asymmetric neurons were located near the barrel border. The axonal projections, analyzed at the level of layer 4, were mostly restricted to a single barrel except for those of 3 interbarrel projection neurons. Comparing voxel representations of dendrites and axon collaterals of the same neuron revealed a close overlap of dendritic and axonal fields, more pronounced in SSNs versus SPNs and considerably stronger in spiny L4 neurons versus extragranular pyramidal cells. These observations suggest that within a barrel dendrites and axons of individual excitatory cells are organized in subcolumns that may confer receptive field properties such as directional selectivity to higher layers, whereas the interbarrel projections challenge our view of barrels as completely independent processors of thalamic input. PMID:17656622

  19. Dendritic Target Region-Specific Formation of Synapses Between Excitatory Layer 4 Neurons and Layer 6 Pyramidal Cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guanxiao; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Excitatory connections between neocortical layer 4 (L4) and L6 are part of the corticothalamic feedback microcircuitry. Here we studied the intracortical element of this feedback loop, the L4 spiny neuron-to-L6 pyramidal cell connection. We found that the distribution of synapses onto both putative corticothalamic (CT) and corticocortical (CC) L6 pyramidal cells (PCs) depends on the presynaptic L4 neuron type but is independent of the postsynaptic L6 PC type. L4 spiny stellate cells establish synapses on distal apical tuft dendrites of L6 PCs and elicit slow unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (uEPSPs) in L6 somata. In contrast, the majority of L4 star pyramidal neurons target basal and proximal apical oblique dendrites of L6 PCs and show fast uEPSPs. Compartmental modeling suggests that the slow uEPSP time course is primarily the result of dendritic filtering. This suggests that the dendritic target specificity of the 2 L4 spiny neuron types is due to their different axonal projection patterns across cortical layers. The preferential dendritic targeting by different L4 neuron types may facilitate the generation of dendritic Ca(2+) or Na(+) action potentials in L6 PCs; this could play a role in synaptic gain modulation in the corticothalamic pathway. PMID:25595180

  20. Theoretical principles underlying optical stimulation of a channelrhodopsin-2 positive pyramidal neuron

    PubMed Central

    Foutz, Thomas J.; Arlow, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging field of neuromodulation that permits scaled, millisecond temporal control of the membrane dynamics of genetically targeted cells using light. Optogenetic technology has revolutionized neuroscience research; however, numerous biophysical questions remain on the optical and neuronal factors impacting the modulation of neural activity with photon-sensitive ion channels. To begin to address such questions, we developed a computational tool to explore the underlying principles of optogenetic neural stimulation. This “light-neuron” model consists of theoretical representations of the light dynamics generated by a fiber optic in brain tissue, coupled to a multicompartment cable model of a cortical pyramidal neuron embedded with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) membrane dynamics. Simulations revealed that the large energies required to generate an action potential are primarily due to the limited conductivity of ChR2, and that the major determinants of stimulation threshold are the surface area of illuminated cell membrane and proximity to the light source. Our results predict that the activation threshold is sensitive to many of the properties of ChR2 (density, conductivity, and kinetics), tissue medium (scattering and absorbance), and the fiber-optic light source (diameter and numerical aperture). We also illustrate the impact of redistributing the ChR2 expression density (uniform vs. nonuniform) on the activation threshold. The model system developed in this study represents a scientific instrument to characterize the effects of optogenetic neuromodulation, as well as an engineering design tool to help guide future development of optogenetic technology. PMID:22442566

  1. Sevoflurane improves electrophysiological recovery of rat hippocampal slice CA1 pyramidal neurons after hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Matei, Gina; Pavlik, Rostislav; McCadden, Tai; Cottrell, James E; Kass, Ira S

    2002-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic agent that reduces cerebral metabolism and thereby may reduce neuronal damage during energy deprivation. We have examined the effect of sevoflurane on hypoxic neuronal damage in rat hippocampal slices. Slices were subjected to 0%, 2%, or 4% sevoflurane 10 minutes before, during, and 10 minutes after hypoxia. The Schaffer collateral pathway was stimulated every 10 seconds and the evoked population spike recorded in the CA1 pyramidal cell region throughout the experiment. During hypoxia, the postsynaptic evoked response was blocked. The time until the blockade of this response in the 0% sevoflurane group was 158 seconds. Sevoflurane (4%) significantly delayed the loss of the evoked response during hypoxia (242 seconds). The percent recovery of the postsynaptic population spike was calculated by dividing the size of the response 120 minutes after hypoxia by its prehypoxic, presevoflurane amplitude. There was no recovery of the population spike in the 0% sevoflurane group 120 minutes after the end of 5 minutes of hypoxia (6 +/- 6%); there was significantly better recovery after 5 minutes of hypoxia in the sevoflurane (4%) treated group (40 +/- 9%). A lower concentration of sevoflurane (2%) delayed the loss of evoked response during hypoxia (191 seconds), but it did not significantly affect recovery of the population spike after hypoxia (7 +/- 7%). Hypoxia irreversibly damages electrophysiologic activity. A high, but clinically usable, concentration of sevoflurane increases the time during hypoxia until the postsynaptic evoked response is blocked and improves recovery of this response after 5 minutes of hypoxia. PMID:12357086

  2. Regulation of Action Potential Waveforms by Axonal GABAA Receptors in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Mingpo; Zeng, Shaoqun; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb) of the main axon trunk of layer –5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs) and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors. PMID:24971996

  3. Total number and volume of Von Economo neurons in the cerebral cortex of cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Butti, Camilla; Sherwood, Chet C; Hakeem, Atiya Y; Allman, John M; Hof, Patrick R

    2009-07-10

    Von Economo neurons (VENs) are a type of large, layer V spindle-shaped neurons that were previously described in humans, great apes, elephants, and some large-brained cetaceans. Here we report the presence of Von Economo neurons in the anterior cingulate (ACC), anterior insular (AI), and frontopolar (FP) cortices of small odontocetes, including the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), and the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The total number and volume of VENs and the volume of neighboring layer V pyramidal neurons and layer VI fusiform neurons were obtained by using a design-based stereologic approach. Two humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) brains were investigated for comparative purposes as representatives of the suborder Mysticeti. Our results show that the distribution of VENs in these cetacean species is comparable to that reported in humans, great apes, and elephants. The number of VENs in these cetaceans is also comparable to data available from great apes, and stereologic estimates indicate that VEN volume follows in these cetacean species a pattern similar to that in hominids, the VENs being larger than neighboring layer V pyramidal cells and conspicuously larger than fusiform neurons of layer VI. The fact that VENs are found in species representative of both cetacean suborders in addition to hominids and elephants suggests that these particular neurons have appeared convergently in phylogenetically unrelated groups of mammals possibly under the influence of comparable selective pressures that influenced specifically the evolution of cortical domains involved in complex cognitive and social/emotional processes. PMID:19412956

  4. Apoptosis of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is virus independent in a mouse model of acute neurovirulent picornavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Buenz, Eric J; Sauer, Brian M; Lafrance-Corey, Reghann G; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L; Howe, Charles L

    2009-08-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  5. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  6. Repeated cocaine weakens GABAB-Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons in the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, Matthew; Kotecki, Lydia; de Velasco, Ezequiel Marron Fernandez; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Repeated cocaine exposure triggers adaptations in Layer 5/6 glutamatergic neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that promote behavioral sensitization and drug-seeking behavior. While suppression of metabotropic inhibitory signaling has been implicated in these behaviors, underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Girk/KIR3 channels mediate most of the GABAB receptor (GABABR)-dependent inhibition of Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and that repeated cocaine suppresses this pathway. This adaptation was selective for GABABR-dependent Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrLC) and involved a D1/5 dopamine receptor- and phosphorylation-dependent internalization of GABABR and Girk channels. Persistent suppression of Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 of the dorsal mPFC enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity and occluded behavioral sensitization. Thus, the cocaine-induced suppression of GABABR-Girk signaling in Layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prelimbic cortex appears to represent an early adaptation critical for promoting addiction-related behavior. PMID:24094109

  7. Synaptic Conductance Estimates of the Connection Between Local Inhibitor Interneurons and Pyramidal Neurons in Layer 2/3 of a Cortical Column.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jochen H O; Meyer, H S; Schmitt, Arno C; Straehle, Jakob; Weitbrecht, Trinh; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of a principal whisker yields sparse action potential (AP) spiking in layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in a cortical column of rat barrel cortex. The low AP rates in pyramidal neurons could be explained by activation of interneurons in L2/3 providing inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. L2/3 interneurons classified as local inhibitors based on their axonal projection in the same column were reported to receive strong excitatory input from spiny neurons in L4, which are also the main source of the excitatory input to L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Here, we investigated the remaining synaptic connection in this intracolumnar microcircuit. We found strong and reliable inhibitory synaptic transmission between intracolumnar L2/3 local-inhibitor-to-L2/3 pyramidal neuron pairs [inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) amplitude -0.88 ± 0.67 mV]. On average, 6.2 ± 2 synaptic contacts were made by L2/3 local inhibitors onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons at 107 ± 64 µm path distance from the pyramidal neuron soma, thus overlapping with the distribution of synaptic contacts from L4 spiny neurons onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons (67 ± 34 µm). Finally, using compartmental simulations, we determined the synaptic conductance per synaptic contact to be 0.77 ± 0.4 nS. We conclude that the synaptic circuit from L4 to L2/3 can provide efficient shunting inhibition that is temporally and spatially aligned with the excitatory input from L4 to L2/3. PMID:25761638

  8. Chandelier cells control excessive cortical excitation: characteristics of whisker-evoked synaptic responses of layer 2/3 nonpyramidal and pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinghua; Stornetta, Ruth L; Zhu, J Julius

    2004-06-01

    Chandelier cells form inhibitory axo-axonic synapses on pyramidal neurons with their characteristic candlestick-like axonal terminals. The functional role of chandelier cells is still unclear, although the preferential loss of this cell type at epileptic loci suggests a role in epilepsy. Here we report an examination of whisker- and spontaneous activity-evoked responses in chandelier cells and other fast-spiking nonpyramidal neurons and regular-spiking pyramidal neurons in layer 2/3 of the barrel cortex. Fast-spiking nonpyramidal neurons, including chandelier cells, basket cells, neurogliaform cells, double bouquet cells, net basket cells, bitufted cells, and regular-spiking pyramidal neurons all respond to stimulation of multiple whiskers on the contralateral face. Whisker stimulation, however, evokes small, delayed EPSPs preceded by an earlier IPSP and no action potentials in chandelier cells, different from other nonpyramidal and pyramidal neurons. In addition, chandelier cells display a larger receptive field with lower acuity than other fast-spiking nonpyramidal neurons and pyramidal neurons. Notably, simultaneous dual whole-cell in vivo recordings show that chandelier cells, which rarely fire action potentials spontaneously, fire more robustly than other types of cortical neurons when the overall cortical excitation increases. Thus, chandelier cells may not process fast ascending sensory information but instead may be reserved to prevent excessive excitatory activity in neuronal networks. PMID:15175379

  9. The response of L5 pyramidal neurons of the PFC to magnetic stimulation from a micro-coil

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fried, Shelley I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation of the nervous system, e.g. transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), has been used both to unravel basic structure and function of the nervous system as well as to treat neurological diseases, i.e. clinical depression. Despite progress in both areas, ongoing advancements have been limited by a lack of understanding of the mechanism by which magnetic stimulation alters neural activity. Here, we report responses of cortical neurons to magnetic stimulation arising from a sub-millimeter coil. Cell attached patch clamp was used to record neural activity of layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the in vitro mouse brain slice preparation. The fields arising from the small coil were quite different from those arising during clinical TMS but nevertheless allowed the responses of cortical neurons to magnetic stimulation to be probed. For example, the focal nature of induced fields allowed the sensitivity of different regions within targeted pyramidal neurons, e.g. apical dendrite, soma and axon hillock, to be compared. We found that PFC pyramidal neurons were not sensitive to single pulses of stimulation regardless of coil location. However, regions of the apical dendrite and proximal axon were both sensitive to repetitive stimulation as long as the orientation of the induced electric field was aligned with the long axis of the neuron. These results suggest that neurons of the PFC are sensitive to weak magnetic fields and further, that this type of approach may be useful for unraveling some of the mechanisms underlying TMS. PMID:25571395

  10. RNA interference of Marlin-1/Jakmip1 results in abnormal morphogenesis and migration of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Vidal, René L; Fuentes, Patricio; Valenzuela, José Ignacio; Alvarado-Diaz, Carlos P; Ramírez, Omar A; Kukuljan, Manuel; Couve, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The formation of the nervous systems requires processes that coordinate proliferation, differentiation and migration of neuronal cells, which extend axons, generate dendritic branching and establish synaptic connections during development. The structural organization and dynamic remodeling of the cytoskeleton and its association to the secretory pathway are critical determinants of cell morphogenesis and migration. Marlin-1 (Jakmip1) is a microtubule-associated protein predominantly expressed in neurons and lymphoid cells. Marlin-1 participates in polarized secretion in lymphocytes, but its functional association with the neuronal cytoskeleton and its contribution to brain development have not been explored. Combining in vitro and in vivo approaches we show that Marlin-1 contributes to the establishment of neuronal morphology. Marlin-1 associates to the cytoskeleton in neurites, is required for the maintenance of an intact Golgi apparatus and its depletion produces the down-regulation of kinesin-1, a plus-end directed molecular motor with a central function in morphogenesis and migration. RNA interference of Marlin-1 in vivo results in abnormal migration of newborn pyramidal neurons during the formation of the cortex. Our results support the involvement of Marlin-1 in the acquisition of the complex architecture and migration of pyramidal neurons, two fundamental processes for the laminar layering of the cortex. PMID:22828129

  11. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC. PMID:27326669

  12. EPSPs Measured in Proximal Dendritic Spines of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract EPSPs occur when the neurotransmitter glutamate binds to postsynaptic receptors located on small pleomorphic membrane protrusions called dendritic spines. To transmit the synaptic signal, these potentials must travel through the spine neck and the dendritic tree to reach the soma. Due to their small size, the electrical behavior of spines and their ability to compartmentalize electrical signals has been very difficult to assess experimentally. In this study, we developed a method to perform simultaneous two-photon voltage-sensitive dye recording with two-photon glutamate uncaging in order to measure the characteristics (amplitude and duration) of uncaging-evoked EPSPs in single spines on the basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons in acute brain slices from CD1 control mice. We were able to record uncaging-evoked spine potentials that resembled miniature EPSPs at the soma from a wide range of spine morphologies. In proximal spines, these potentials averaged 13.0 mV (range, 6.5–30.8 mV; N = 20) for an average somatic EPSP of 0.59 mV, whereas the mean attenuation ratio (spine/soma) was found to be 25.3. Durations of spine EPSP waveforms were found to be 11.7 ms on average. Modeling studies demonstrate the important role that spine neck resistance (Rneck) plays in spine EPSP amplitudes. Simulations used to estimate Rneck by fits to voltage-sensitive dye measurements produced a mean of 179 MΩ (range, 23–420 MΩ; N = 19). Independent measurements based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of a cytosolic dye from spines of the same population of neurons produced a mean Rneck estimate of 204 MΩ (range, 52–521 MΩ; N = 34). PMID:27257618

  13. Ethanol enhances neurosteroidogenesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by paradoxical NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2011-07-01

    Using an antibody against 5α-reduced neurosteroids, predominantly allopregnanolone, we found that immunostaining in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices was confined to pyramidal neurons. This neurosteroid staining was increased following 15 min administration of 60 mm but not 20 mm ethanol, and the enhancement was blocked by finasteride and dutasteride, selective inhibitors of 5α-reductase, a key enzyme required for allopregnanolone synthesis. Consistent with a prior report indicating that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) activation can promote steroid production, we observed that D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), a competitive NMDAR antagonist, blocked the effects of 60 mm ethanol on staining. We previously reported that 60 mm ethanol inhibits the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular model for memory formation, in the CA1 region. In the present study, LTP inhibition by 60 mm ethanol was also overcome by both the 5α-reductase inhibitors and by APV. Furthermore, the effects of ethanol on neurosteroid production and LTP were mimicked by a low concentration of NMDA (1 μm), and the ability of NMDA to inhibit LTP and to enhance neurosteroid staining was reversed by finasteride and dutasteride, as well as by APV. These results indicate that ethanol paradoxically enhances GABAergic neurosteroid production by activation of unblocked NMDARs and that acute LTP inhibition by ethanol represents a form of NMDAR-mediated metaplasticity. PMID:21734282

  14. A Novel Form of Local Plasticity in Tuft Dendrites of Neocortical Somatosensory Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Maya; Shulman, Yoav; Schiller, Jackie

    2016-06-01

    Tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons form a separate biophysical and processing compartment. Presently, little is known about plasticity mechanisms in this isolated compartment. Here, we describe a novel form of plasticity in which unpaired low-frequency (0.1 Hz) stimulation of tuft inputs resulted in prolonged transient (86.3 ± 7.3 min) potentiation of EPSPs (286.1% ± 30.5%) and enhanced local excitability that enabled more-efficient back-propagation of axo-somatic action potentials and dendritic calcium spikes selectively into the activated dendritic segments. This plasticity was exclusive to tuft dendrites and did not occur in basal dendrites. Induction of this plasticity depended on activation of Kv4.2 potassium and NMDAR channels, internalization of membrane proteins, and insertion of AMPAR. This unique form of tuft plasticity increases proximal-distal electrical coupling of activated tuft dendrites and opens a prolonged time window for binding and storing feedforward and feedback information in a branch-specific manner. PMID:27210551

  15. Reduced dendritic arborization and hyperexcitability of pyramidal neurons in a Scn1b-based model of Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reid, Christopher A; Leaw, Bryan; Richards, Kay L; Richardson, Robert; Wimmer, Verena; Yu, Christiaan; Hill-Yardin, Elisa L; Lerche, Holger; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies, including Dravet syndrome, are severe treatment-resistant epilepsies with developmental regression. We examined a mouse model based on a human β1 sodium channel subunit (Scn1b) mutation. Homozygous mutant mice shared phenotypic features and pharmaco-sensitivity with Dravet syndrome. Patch-clamp analysis showed that mutant subicular and layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons had increased action potential firing rates, presumably as a consequence of their increased input resistance. These changes were not seen in L5 or CA1 pyramidal neurons. This raised the concept of a regional seizure mechanism that was supported by data showing increased spontaneous synaptic activity in the subiculum but not CA1. Importantly, no changes in firing or synaptic properties of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic interneurons from mutant mice were observed, which is in contrast with Scn1a-based models of Dravet syndrome. Morphological analysis of subicular pyramidal neurons revealed reduced dendritic arborization. The antiepileptic drug retigabine, a K+ channel opener that reduces input resistance, dampened action potential firing and protected mutant mice from thermal seizures. These results suggest a novel mechanism of disease genesis in genetic epilepsy and demonstrate an effective mechanism-based treatment of the disease. PMID:24747835

  16. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons switch from a multipolar migration mode to a novel "climbing" migration mode during development.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Ayako; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Matsunaga, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2014-01-22

    The hippocampus plays important roles in brain functions. Despite the importance of hippocampal functions, recent analyses of neuronal migration have mainly been performed on the cerebral neocortex, and the cellular mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hippocampus are not yet completely understood. Moreover, why a prolonged time is required for hippocampal neurons to complete their migration has been unexplainable for several decades. We analyzed the migratory profile of neurons in the developing mouse hippocampal CA1 region and found that the hippocampal pyramidal neurons generated near the ventricle became postmitotic multipolar cells and accumulated in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) in the late stage of development. The hippocampal neurons passed through the pyramidal layer by a unique mode of migration. Their leading processes were highly branched and made contact with many radial fibers. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the migrating cells changed their scaffolds from the original radial fibers to other radial fibers, and as a result they proceed in a zigzag manner, with long intervals. The migrating cells in the hippocampus reminded us of "rock climbers" that instead of using their hands to pull up their bodies were using their leading processes to pull up their cell bodies. Because this mode of migration had never been described, we called it the "climbing" mode. The change from the "climbing" mode in the hippocampus to the "locomotion" mode in the neocortex may have contributed to the brain expansion during evolution. PMID:24453304

  17. Alterations of the electrophysiological properties from cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons in temporary rapamycin-treated rodent brain slices.

    PubMed

    Ren, Keming; Chen, Lijuan; Sheng, Guoxia; Wang, Jiangping; Jin, Xiaoming; Jiang, Kewen

    2016-01-26

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is involved in neuro-developmental/degenerative and neuropsychiatric abnormalities. Rapamycin, a specific and potent inhibitor of mTOR signaling, could regulate synaptic plasticity and synaptic transmission of glutamatergic neurons following prolonged treatment. Its immediate effects on electrophysiological properties of cortical layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons where the information undergoes a sophisticated processing remain unknown. Here, we found that acute (within 2min) bath-application of rapamycin (0.5μgml(-1)) was able to depolarize the current-clamp baseline potentials significantly at postnatal day (P) 4, P10 in rats and P90 in mice (P<0.05), and altered the membrane current/voltage (I/V) curves in an age-dependent manner. Rapamycin not only increased the standard deviation or the peak amplitude of baseline membrane potential, but also increased the frequencies of spontaneous action potentials in more mature neurons (P10 and P90). In addition, rapamycin decreased the burst-firing frequencies of cortical L5 burst-spiking neurons from mature brains, and further switched their firing modes to regular-spiking ones. These findings suggest that acute inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin induces an immediate impact on L5 pyramidal neurons' electrophysiological properties, indicating that its effects might involve mechanisms of ion channel's regulation. PMID:26639426

  18. Depolarizing GABA acts on intrinsically bursting pyramidal neurons to drive giant depolarizing potentials in the immature hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Sampsa T; Huttu, Kristiina; Soltesz, Ivan; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2005-06-01

    Spontaneous periodic network events are a characteristic feature of developing neuronal networks, and they are thought to play a crucial role in the maturation of neuronal circuits. In the immature hippocampus, these types of events are seen in intracellular recordings as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) during the stage of neuronal development when GABA(A)-mediated transmission is depolarizing. However, the precise mechanism how GABAergic transmission promotes GDP occurrence is not known. Using whole-cell, cell-attached, perforated-patch, and field-potential recordings in hippocampal slices, we demonstrate here that CA3 pyramidal neurons in the newborn rat generate intrinsic bursts when depolarized. Furthermore, the characteristic rhythmicity of GDP generation is not based on a temporally patterned output of the GABAergic interneuronal network. However, GABAergic depolarization plays a key role in promoting voltage-dependent, intrinsic pyramidal bursting activity. The present data indicate that glutamatergic CA3 neurons have an instructive, pacemaker role in the generation of GDPs, whereas both synaptic and tonic depolarizing GABAergic mechanisms exert a temporally nonpatterned, facilitatory action in the generation of these network events. PMID:15930375

  19. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans. PMID:26064916

  20. Evidence for neuroprotective effect of sulbutiamine against oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Jeehyun; Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Kang, Kui Dong

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampus is one of the earliest brain regions that gets affected by ischemia, however, no pharmacological therapy exists yet that can fully counteract the ischemic damage. Here we study the effect of sulbutiamine, a synthetic thiamine analogue that can cross the blood-brain barrier easily, on hippocampal neurons under an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We find that exposure to OGD in the presence of sulbutiamine significantly increases neuronal viability and enhances electrophysiological properties such as excitatory synaptic transmissions and intrinsic neuronal membrane input resistance in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, here we report, for the first time, the neuroprotective evidence of sulbutiamine on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons under OGD, which may have beneficial implications as a possible therapeutic agent/substance against ischemic insult. PMID:22040892

  1. Dysplastic neocortex and subcortical heterotopias in methylazoxymethanol-treated rats: an intracellular study of identified pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed

    Sancini, G; Franceschetti, S; Battaglia, G; Colacitti, C; Di Luca, M; Spreafico, R; Avanzini, G

    1998-05-01

    Intracellular recordings were obtained using biocytin-filled electrodes from 78 neurones located in both dysplastic neocortex and subcortical heterotopic aggregates in a model of neuronal migration disorder induced in rats by means of a double methylazoxymethanol injection given on embryonic day 15. Both regular spiking and intrinsically bursting pyramidal neurones were found in all of the examined structures and were synaptically activated by subcortical stimulation. In a neuronal subpopulation (22%) located in the neocortex as well as in the subcortical heterotopic aggregates, the injection of depolarising current pulses elicited aberrant firing patterns, consisting of repetitive bursts of APs that gradually increased in duration and eventually merged in a long-lasting discharge. The gradual development of this 'excessive' bursting behaviour suggests a progressive run-down of the slow components of the hyperpolarising afterpotential. PMID:9792622

  2. Changes in Neuronal Excitability by Activated Microglia: Differential Na+ Current Upregulation in Pyramid-Shaped and Bipolar Neurons by TNF-α and IL-18

    PubMed Central

    Klapal, Lars; Igelhorst, Birte A.; Dietzel-Meyer, Irmgard D.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are activated during pathological events in the brain and are capable of releasing various types of inflammatory cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of 5% microglia activated by 1 μg/ml lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to hippocampal cultures upregulates Na+ current densities (INavD) of bipolar as well as pyramid-shaped neurons, thereby increasing their excitability. Deactivation of microglia by the addition of 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) decreases INavD below control levels suggesting that the residual activated microglial cells influence neuronal excitability in control cultures. Preincubation of hippocampal cultures with 10 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a major cytokine released by activated microglia, upregulated INavD significantly by ~30% in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells, the upregulation only reached an increase of ~14%. Incubation of the cultures with antibodies against either TNF-receptor 1 or 2 blocked the upregulation of INavD in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells, increases in INavD were exclusively blocked by antibodies against TNF-receptor 2, suggesting that both cell types respond differently to TNF-α exposure. Since additional cytokines, such as interleukin-18 (IL-18), are released from activated microglia, we tested potential effects of IL-18 on INavD in both cell types. Exposure to 5–10 ng/ml IL-18 for 4 days increased INavD in both pyramid-shaped as well as bipolar neurons, albeit the dose–response curves were shifted to lower concentrations in bipolar cells. Our results suggest that by secretion of cytokines, microglial cells upregulate Na+ current densities in bipolar and pyramid-shaped neurons to some extent differentially. Depending on the exact cytokine composition and concentration released, this could change the balance between the activity of inhibitory bipolar and excitatory pyramid-shaped cells. Since bipolar cells show a larger upregulation of

  3. Pyramidal tract neurons receptive to different forelimb joints act differently during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Erik E.

    2012-01-01

    During locomotion, motor cortical neurons projecting to the pyramidal tract (PTNs) discharge in close relation to strides. How their discharges vary based on the part of the body they influence is not well understood. We addressed this question with regard to joints of the forelimb in the cat. During simple and ladder locomotion, we compared the activity of four groups of PTNs with somatosensory receptive fields involving different forelimb joints: 1) 45 PTNs receptive to movements of shoulder, 2) 30 PTNs receptive to movements of elbow, 3) 40 PTNs receptive to movements of wrist, and 4) 30 nonresponsive PTNs. In the motor cortex, a relationship exists between the location of the source of afferent input and the target for motor output. On the basis of this relationship, we inferred the forelimb joint that a PTN influences from its somatosensory receptive field. We found that different PTNs tended to discharge differently during locomotion. During simple locomotion shoulder-related PTNs were most active during late stance/early swing, and upon transition from simple to ladder locomotion they often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically did not change activity, modulation, or discharge duration on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing and upon transition to the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. These data suggest that during locomotion the motor cortex uses distinct mechanisms to control the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. PMID:22236716

  4. Manipulating Kv4.2 identifies a specific component of hippocampal pyramidal neuron A-current that depends upon Kv4.2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lauver, Aaron; Yuan, Li-Lian; Jeromin, Andreas; Nadin, Brian M.; Rodríguez, José J.; Davies, Heather A.; Stewart, Michael G.; Wu, Gang-Yi; Pfaffinger, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The somatodendritic A-current, ISA, in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons regulates the processing of synaptic inputs and the amplitude of back propagating action potentials into the dendritic tree, as well as the action potential firing properties at the soma. In this study, we have used RNA interference and over-expression to show that expression of the Kv4.2 gene specifically regulates the ISA component of A-current in these neurons. In dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neuron cultures, or organotypic cultured CA1 pyramidal neurons, the expression level of Kv4.2 is such that the ISA channels are maintained in the population at a peak conductance of approximately 950 pS/pF. Suppression of Kv4.2 transcripts in hippocampal pyramidal neurons using an RNA interference vector suppresses ISA current by 60% in 2 days, similar to the effect of expressing dominant-negative Kv4 channel constructs. Increasing the expression of Kv4.2 in these neurons increases the level of ISA to 170% of the normal set point without altering the biophysical properties. Our results establish a specific role for native Kv4.2 transcripts in forming and maintaining ISA current at characteristic levels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:17026528

  5. The protective role of ascorbic acid on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in a rat model of maternal lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Hamid; Ganji, Farzaneh

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathogenic mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. The antioxidant ascorbic acid protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons against cell death during congenital lead exposure; however, critical functions like synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity depend on preservation of dendritic and somal morphology. This study was designed to examine if ascorbic acid also protects neuronal morphology during developmental lead exposure. Timed pregnant rats were divided into four treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 100mg/kg ascorbic acid once a day via gavage, (3) 0.05% lead acetate in drinking water, and (4) 0.05% lead+100mg/kg oral ascorbic acid. Brains of eight male pups (P25) per treatment group were processed for Golgi staining. Changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons' somal size were estimated by cross-sectional area and changes in dendritic arborization by Sholl's analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to compare results among treatment groups. Lead-exposed pups exhibited a significant decrease in somal size compared to controls (P<0.01) that was reversed by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. Sholl's analysis revealed a significant increase in apical dendritic branch points near cell body (P<0.05) and a decreased total dendritic length in both apical and basal dendritic trees of CA1 neurons (P<0.05). Ascorbic acid significantly but only partially reversed the somal and dendritic damage caused by developmental lead exposure. Oxidative stress thus contributes to lead neurotoxicity but other pathogenic mechanisms are also involved. PMID:26783884

  6. Aging-Related Hyperexcitability in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Is Mediated by Enhanced A-Type K+ Channel Function and Expression.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Dina; Hattori, Shoai; Ybarra, Natividad; Musial, Timothy F; Buss, Eric W; Richter, Hannah; Oh, M Matthew; Nicholson, Daniel A; Disterhoft, John F

    2015-09-23

    Aging-related impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition have been attributed to maladaptive changes in the functional properties of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal subregions. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 pyramidal neurons, with CA3 pyramidal neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing in the hippocampal circuit. Here, we use whole-cell current-clamp to demonstrate that aged rat (29-32 months) CA3 pyramidal neurons fire significantly more action potentials (APs) during theta-burst frequency stimulation and that this is associated with faster AP repolarization (i.e., narrower AP half-widths and enlarged fast afterhyperpolarization). Using a combination of patch-clamp physiology, pharmacology, Western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and array tomography, we demonstrate that these faster AP kinetics are mediated by enhanced function and expression of Kv4.2/Kv4.3 A-type K(+) channels, particularly within the perisomatic compartment, of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, our study indicates that inhibition of these A-type K(+) channels can restore the intrinsic excitability properties of aged CA3 pyramidal neurons to a young-like state. Significance statement: Age-related learning deficits have been attributed, in part, to altered hippocampal pyramidal neuronal function with normal aging. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 neurons, with CA3 neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing. Hence, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie the hyperexcitability reported in the CA3 region. Contrary to CA1 neurons, we demonstrate that postburst afterhyperpolarization is not altered with aging and that aged CA3 pyramidal neurons are able to fire significantly more action potentials and that this is associated with

  7. Aging-Related Hyperexcitability in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Is Mediated by Enhanced A-Type K+ Channel Function and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Dina; Hattori, Shoai; Ybarra, Natividad; Musial, Timothy F.; Buss, Eric W.; Richter, Hannah; Oh, M. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognition have been attributed to maladaptive changes in the functional properties of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal subregions. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 pyramidal neurons, with CA3 pyramidal neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing in the hippocampal circuit. Here, we use whole-cell current-clamp to demonstrate that aged rat (29–32 months) CA3 pyramidal neurons fire significantly more action potentials (APs) during theta-burst frequency stimulation and that this is associated with faster AP repolarization (i.e., narrower AP half-widths and enlarged fast afterhyperpolarization). Using a combination of patch-clamp physiology, pharmacology, Western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and array tomography, we demonstrate that these faster AP kinetics are mediated by enhanced function and expression of Kv4.2/Kv4.3 A-type K+ channels, particularly within the perisomatic compartment, of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, our study indicates that inhibition of these A-type K+ channels can restore the intrinsic excitability properties of aged CA3 pyramidal neurons to a young-like state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Age-related learning deficits have been attributed, in part, to altered hippocampal pyramidal neuronal function with normal aging. Much evidence has come from work on CA1 neurons, with CA3 neurons receiving comparatively less attention despite its age-related hyperactivation being postulated to interfere with spatial processing. Hence, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie the hyperexcitability reported in the CA3 region. Contrary to CA1 neurons, we demonstrate that postburst afterhyperpolarization is not altered with aging and that aged CA3 pyramidal neurons are able to fire significantly more action potentials and that this is associated with

  8. Functional consequences of age-related morphologic changes to pyramidal neurons of the rhesus monkey prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Coskren, Patrick J.; Luebke, Jennifer I.; Kabaso, Doron; Wearne, Susan L.; Yadav, Aniruddha; Rumbell, Timothy; Hof, Patrick R.; Weaver, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Layer 3 (L3) pyramidal neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) of rhesus monkeys exhibit dendritic regression, spine loss and increased action potential (AP) firing rates during normal aging. The relationship between these structural and functional alterations, if any, is unknown. To address this issue, morphological and electrophysiological properties of L3 LPFC pyramidal neurons from young and aged rhesus monkeys were characterized using in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and high-resolution digital reconstruction of neurons. Consistent with our previous studies, aged neurons exhibited significantly reduced dendritic arbor length and spine density, as well as increased input resistance and firing rates. Computational models using the digital reconstructions with Hodgkin-Huxley and AMPA channels allowed us to assess relationships between demonstrated age-related changes and to predict physiological changes that have not yet been tested empirically. For example, the models predict that in both backpropagating APs and excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), attenuation is lower in aged versus young neurons. Importantly, when identical densities of passive parameters and voltage- and calcium-gated conductances were used in young and aged model neurons, neither input resistance nor firing rates differed between the two age groups. Tuning passive parameters for each model predicted significantly higher membrane resistance (Rm) in aged versus young neurons. This Rm increase alone did not account for increased firing rates in aged models, but coupling these Rm values with subtle differences in morphology and membrane capacitance did. The predicted differences in passive parameters (or parameters with similar effects) are mathematically plausible, but must be tested empirically. PMID:25527184

  9. Calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizations regulate synchronization and timing of epileptiform bursts in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Sevilla, David; Garduño, Julieta; Galván, Emilio; Buño, Washington

    2006-12-01

    Calcium-activated potassium conductances regulate neuronal excitability, but their role in epileptogenesis remains elusive. We investigated in rat CA3 pyramidal neurons the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-mediated afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) in the genesis and regulation of epileptiform activity induced in vitro by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in Mg(2+)-free Ringer. Recurring spike bursts terminated by prolonged AHPs were generated. Burst synchronization between CA3 pyramidal neurons in paired recordings typified this interictal-like activity. A downregulation of the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) paralleled the emergence of the interictal-like activity. When the mAHP was reduced or enhanced by apamin and EBIO bursts induced by 4-AP were increased or blocked, respectively. Inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) with carbachol, t-ACPD, or isoproterenol increased bursting frequency and disrupted burst regularity and synchronization between pyramidal neuron pairs. In contrast, enhancing the sAHP by intracellular dialysis with KMeSO(4) reduced burst frequency. Block of GABA(A-B) inhibitions did not modify the abnormal activity. We describe novel cellular mechanisms where 1) the inhibition of the mAHP plays an essential role in the genesis and regulation of the bursting activity by reducing negative feedback, 2) the sAHP sets the interburst interval by decreasing excitability, and 3) bursting was synchronized by excitatory synaptic interactions that increased in advance and during bursts and decreased throughout the subsequent sAHP. These cellular mechanisms are active in the CA3 region, where epileptiform activity is initiated, and cooperatively regulate the timing of the synchronized rhythmic interictal-like network activity. PMID:16971683

  10. Pik3c3 deletion in pyramidal neurons results in loss of synapses, extensive gliosis and progressive neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liangli; Budolfson, Katie; Wang, Fan

    2010-01-01

    The lipid kinase PIK3C3 (also known as VPS34) regulates multiple aspects of endo-membrane trafficking processes. PIK3C3 is widely expressed by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), and its catalytic product PI3P is enriched in dendritic spines. Here we generated a line of conditional mutant mouse in which Pik3c3 is specifically deleted in hippocampal and in small subsets of cortical pyramidal neurons using the CaMKII-Cre transgene. We found that Pik3c3-deficiency initially causes loss of dendritic spines accompanied with reactive gliosis, which is followed by progressive neuronal degeneration over a period of several months. Layers III and IV cortical neurons are more susceptible to Pik3c3-deletion than hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, in aged conditional Pik3c3 mutant animals, there are extensive gliosis and severe secondary loss of wildtype neurons. Our analyses show that Pik3c3 is essential for CNS neuronal homeostasis and Pik3c3flox/flox;CaMKII-Cre mouse is a useful model for studying pathological changes in progressive forebrain neurodegeneration. PMID:20955765

  11. Cannabinoids attenuate hippocampal gamma oscillations by suppressing excitatory synaptic input onto CA3 pyramidal neurons and fast spiking basket cells

    PubMed Central

    Holderith, Noémi; Németh, Beáta; Papp, Orsolya I; Veres, Judit M; Nagy, Gergő A; Hájos, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) activation by exogenous ligands can impair memory processes, which critically depend on synchronous neuronal activities that are temporarily structured by oscillations. In this study, we aimed to reveal the mechanisms underlying the cannabinoid-induced decrease in gamma oscillations. We first verified that cannabinoids (CP55,940 and WIN55,212-2) readily suppressed carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in the CA3 region of hippocampal slices via activation of CB1Rs. The cannabinoid-induced decrease in the peak power of oscillations was accompanied by reduced and less precise firing activity in CA3 pyramidal cells and fast spiking basket cells. By examining the cannabinoid sensitivity of synaptic inputs we found that the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents was significantly suppressed upon CB1R activation in both CA3 pyramidal cells and fast spiking basket cells. In contrast, evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA3 pyramidal cells were unaltered. Furthermore, we observed that a CB1R agonist-induced decrease in the oscillation power at the beginning of the drug application was accompanied primarily by the reduced discharge of fast spiking basket cells, while pyramidal cell firing was unaltered. This result implies that the dampening of cholinergically induced gamma oscillations in the hippocampus by cannabinoids can be explained by a reduced excitatory input predominantly onto fast spiking basket cells, which leads to a reduction in neuronal firing frequency and precision, and thus to smaller field potentials. In addition, we uncovered that the spontaneously occurring sharp wave-ripple activities in hippocampal slices could also be suppressed by CB1R activation suggesting that cannabinoids profoundly reduce the intrinsically generated oscillatory activities at distinct frequencies in CA3 networks by reducing synaptic neurotransmission. PMID:21859823

  12. Pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex in post-stroke, vascular and other ageing-related dementias.

    PubMed

    Foster, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E; Slade, Janet Y; Hall, Roslyn; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Burke, Matthew; Thomas, Alan J; Khundakar, Ahmad; Allan, Louise M; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Dementia associated with cerebrovascular disease is common. It has been reported that ∼30% of elderly patients who survive stroke develop delayed dementia (post-stroke dementia), with most cases being diagnosed as vascular dementia. The pathological substrates associated with post-stroke or vascular dementia are poorly understood, particularly those associated with executive dysfunction. Three separate yet interconnecting circuits control executive function within the frontal lobe involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. We used stereological methods, along with immunohistological and related cell morphometric analysis, to examine densities and volumes of pyramidal neurons of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex in the frontal lobe from a total of 90 elderly subjects (age range 71-98 years). Post-mortem brain tissues from post-stroke dementia and post-stroke patients with no dementia were derived from our prospective Cognitive Function After Stroke study. We also examined, in parallel, samples from ageing controls and similar age subjects pathologically diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, mixed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, and vascular dementia. We found pyramidal cell volumes in layers III and V in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of post-stroke and vascular dementia and, of mixed and Alzheimer's disease subjects to be reduced by 30-40% compared to post-stroke patients with no dementia and controls. There were no significant changes in neuronal volumes in either the anterior cingulate or orbitofrontal cortices. Remarkably, pyramidal neurons within the orbitofrontal cortex were also found to be smaller in size when compared to those in the other two neocortical regions. To relate the cell changes to cognitive function, we noted significant correlations between neuronal volumes and total CAMCOG, orientation and memory scores and clinical

  13. [The dendritic spines of the pyramidal neurons in layer V of the rat sensorimotor cortex following a 14-day space flight].

    PubMed

    Belichenko, P V; Krasnov, I B

    1991-11-01

    There was made a quantitative study of the influence of 14 days space flight ("Kosmos-2044") on dendritic spine (DS) density of the layer V pyramidal neurons of rat sensomotor cortex. There was found an increase of the number of apical DS lying in the layers III-IV in the flight group only. Number of DS on oblique dendrites was increased in the III-IV cortical layers both in the flight and tail-suspended rats. There was also an increase in the number of DS on basal dendrites in all experimental groups. Obtained data are compared with similar 7 days flight results ("Kosmos-1667") and other data of nervous tissue plasticity in weightlessness. PMID:1810500

  14. Sulforhodamine 101 induces long-tem potentiation of intrinsic excitability and synaptic efficacy in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Kang, Ning; Yu, Yufei; Zhang, Jinsong; Petersen, Nicolas; Tian, Guo-Feng; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) has been extensively used for investigation as a specific marker for astroglia in vivo and activity-dependent dye for monitoring regulated exocytosis. Here, we report that SR101 has bioactive effects on neuronal activity. Perfusion of slices with SR101 (1 μM) for 10 min induced long-term potentiation of intrinsic neuronal excitability (LTP-IE) and a long-lasting increase in evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices. The increase in intrinsic neuronal excitability was a result of negative shifts in the action potential (AP) threshold. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, AP-5 (50 μM), blocked SR101-induced LTP-IE, but glutamate receptor blockers, AP-5 (50 μM), MCPG (200 μM), and MSOP (100 μM), only partially blocked SR101-induced potentiation of eEPSCs. SR101 induced an enhancement of evoked synaptic NMDAR currents, suggesting that SR101 enhances activation of synaptic NMDARs. SR101-induced LTP-IE and potentiation of synaptic transmission triggered spontaneous neuronal firing in slices and in vivo epileptic seizures. Our results suggest that SR101 is an epileptogenic agent that long-lastingly lowers the AP threshold to increase intrinsic neuronal excitability and enhances the synaptic efficacy to increase synaptic inputs. As such, SR101 can be used as an experimental tool to induce epileptic seizures. PMID:20600669

  15. [Do the island neurons of regio entorhinalis belong to the class of pyramid or star-shaped cells?].

    PubMed

    Braak, H; Braak, E; Strenge, H

    1976-01-01

    In the vicinity of the collateral sulcus the cellular islands of the entorhinal region (lamina alpha of the outer principal layer = Pre-alpha) fuse, forming a cellular plate which runs obliquely through the outer laminae. Finally, the cellular elements of Pre-alpha lie in between the third and the fourth layer of the isocortex. The islands are mainly composed of star-shaped nerve cells with thorny dendrites and an axon extending into the white matter. Within the reaches of the oblique plate the shape of these cellular elements underlies an alteration. Apical and basal dendrites become more and more recognizable, the cell body gains the shape of a pyramid. For this reason, we consider the star-shaped neurons of the islands to be modified pyramidal cells. They are compared with the genuine star cells (Golgi-II-cells) of the layer. Distinguishing characteristics not only of the Golgi- but also of the pigment-picture allow the unequivocal distinction between the modified pyramids and the Golgi-II-cells. PMID:801848

  16. Distinct Cell- and Layer-Specific Expression Patterns and Independent Regulation of Kv2 Channel Subtypes in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Hannah I.; Guan, Dongxu; Bocksteins, Elke; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Murray, Karl D.; Cobb, Melanie M.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Zito, Karen; Foehring, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The Kv2 family of voltage-gated potassium channel α subunits, comprising Kv2.1 and Kv2.2, mediate the bulk of the neuronal delayed rectifier K+ current in many mammalian central neurons. Kv2.1 exhibits robust expression across many neuron types and is unique in its conditional role in modulating intrinsic excitability through changes in its phosphorylation state, which affect Kv2.1 expression, localization, and function. Much less is known of the highly related Kv2.2 subunit, especially in forebrain neurons. Here, through combined use of cortical layer markers and transgenic mouse lines, we show that Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 are localized to functionally distinct cortical cell types. Kv2.1 expression is consistently high throughout all cortical layers, especially in layer (L) 5b pyramidal neurons, whereas Kv2.2 expression is primarily limited to neurons in L2 and L5a. In addition, L4 of primary somatosensory cortex is strikingly devoid of Kv2.2 immunolabeling. The restricted pattern of Kv2.2 expression persists in Kv2.1-KO mice, suggesting distinct cell- and layer-specific functions for these two highly related Kv2 subunits. Analyses of endogenous Kv2.2 in cortical neurons in situ and recombinant Kv2.2 expressed in heterologous cells reveal that Kv2.2 is largely refractory to stimuli that trigger robust, phosphorylation-dependent changes in Kv2.1 clustering and function. Immunocytochemistry and voltage-clamp recordings from outside-out macropatches reveal distinct cellular expression patterns for Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 in intratelencephalic and pyramidal tract neurons of L5, indicating circuit-specific requirements for these Kv2 paralogs. Together, these results support distinct roles for these two Kv2 channel family members in mammalian cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons within the neocortex are arranged in a laminar architecture and contribute to the input, processing, and/or output of sensory and motor signals in a cell- and layer-specific manner. Neurons of different

  17. Number and Laminar Distribution of Neurons in a Thalamocortical Projection Column of Rat Vibrissal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Verena C.; Oberlaender, M.; de Kock, Christiaan P.J.; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2010-01-01

    This is the second article in a series of three studies that investigate the anatomical determinants of thalamocortical (TC) input to excitatory neurons in a cortical column of rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Here, we report the number and distribution of NeuN-positive neurons within the C2, D2, and D3 TC projection columns in P27 rat somatosensory barrel cortex based on an exhaustive identification of 89 834 somata in a 1.15 mm3 volume of cortex. A single column contained 19 109 ± 444 neurons (17 560 ± 399 when normalized to a standard-size projection column). Neuron density differences along the vertical column axis delineated “cytoarchitectonic” layers. The resulting neuron numbers per layer in the average column were 63 ± 10 (L1), 2039 ± 524 (L2), 3735 ± 905 (L3), 4447 ± 439 (L4), 1737 ± 251 (L5A), 2235 ± 99 (L5B), 3786 ± 168 (L6A), and 1066 ± 170 (L6B). These data were then used to derive the layer-specific action potential (AP) output of a projection column. The estimates confirmed previous reports suggesting that the ensembles of spiny L4 and thick-tufted pyramidal neurons emit the major fraction of APs of a column. The number of APs evoked in a column by a sensory stimulus (principal whisker deflection) was estimated as 4441 within 100 ms post-stimulus. PMID:20534784

  18. Delayed Effects of Corticosterone on Slow After-Hyperpolarization Potentials in Mouse Hippocampal versus Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Anup G.; Henckens, Marloes J. A. G.; Fernández, Guillén; Joëls, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The rodent stress hormone corticosterone changes neuronal activity in a slow and persistent manner through transcriptional regulation. In the rat dorsal hippocampus, corticosterone enhances the amplitude of calcium-dependent potassium currents that cause a lingering slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP) at the end of depolarizing events. In this study we compared the putative region-dependency of the delayed effects of corticosterone (approximately 5 hrs after treatment) on sAHP as well as other active and passive properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from three prefrontal areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortex, with the hippocampus of adult mice. In agreement with previous studies, corticosterone increased sAHP amplitude in the dorsal hippocampus with depolarizing steps of increasing amplitude. However, in the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortices we did not observe any modifications of sAHP amplitude after corticosterone treatment. Properties of single action potentials or % ratio of the last spike interval with respect to the first spike interval, an indicator of accommodation in an action potential train, were not significantly affected by corticosterone in all brain regions examined. Lastly, corticosterone treatment did not induce any lasting changes in passive membrane properties of hippocampal or cortical neurons. Overall, the data indicate that corticosterone slowly and very persistently increases the sAHP amplitude in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, while this is not the case in the cortical regions examined. This implies that changes in excitability across brain regions reached by corticosterone may vary over a prolonged period of time after stress. PMID:24901987

  19. Little-known neurons of the medial wall: a literature review of pyramidal cells of the cingulate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Pauc, Robin; Young, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of poorly understood and underresearched neuroanatomy of selected pyramidal cells of the medial wall of the cingulate gyrus. Methods A literature review was performed; and separate computerized literature searches of PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and the World Wide Web were used for each cell type using individual set time scales for the discovery of each cell. A narrative overview of the literature was developed using information from searches of computerized databases and authoritative texts. Discussion The medial walls of the cerebral hemispheres, notably the cingulate gyri, contain species-specific neuron fields that to date are not well known within the scientific community and yet have been implicated as the underlying cause of such varying conditions as dysgraphia and autism in children and obsessive-compulsive disorder and Alzheimer disease in adults. As these neurons are late to develop both phylogenetically and ontogenetically, it has been suggested that they may be particularly vulnerable to stressors that potentially could be an underlying factor in a wide range of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Conclusion It is considered that knowledge of these little-known pyramidal fields of the medial wall of the human brain is essential to the understanding of how the brain functions both in sickness and in health. PMID:22027033

  20. Early postnatal migration and development of layer II pyramidal neurons in the rodent cingulate/retrosplenial cortex.

    PubMed

    Zgraggen, Eloisa; Boitard, Michael; Roman, Inge; Kanemitsu, Michiko; Potter, Gael; Salmon, Patrick; Vutskits, Laszlo; Dayer, Alexandre G; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2012-01-01

    The cingulate and retrosplenial regions are major components of the dorsomedial (dm) limbic cortex and have been implicated in a range of cognitive functions such as emotion, attention, and spatial memory. While the structure and connectivity of these cortices are well characterized, little is known about their development. Notably, the timing and mode of migration that govern the appropriate positioning of late-born neurons remain unknown. Here, we analyzed migratory events during the early postnatal period from ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) to the cerebral cortex by transducing neuronal precursors in the VZ/SVZ of newborn rats/mice with Tomato/green fluorescent protein-encoding lentivectors. We have identified a pool of postmitotic pyramidal precursors in the dm part of the neonatal VZ/SVZ that migrate into the medial limbic cortex during the first postnatal week. Time-lapse imaging demonstrates that these cells migrate on radial glial fibers by locomotion and display morphological and behavioral changes as they travel through the white matter and enter into the cortical gray matter. In the granular retrosplenial cortex, these cells give rise to a Satb2+ pyramidal subtype and develop dendritic bundles in layer I. Our observations provide the first insight into the patterns and dynamics of cell migration into the medial limbic cortex. PMID:21625013

  1. Properties of BK-type Ca++-dependent K+ channel currents in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons in rats of different ages

    PubMed Central

    Książek, Aneta; Ładno, Wioletta; Szulczyk, Bartłomiej; Grzelka, Katarzyna; Szulczyk, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in cognitive functions, which undergo profound changes during adolescence. This alteration of the PFC function derives from neuron activity, which, in turn, may depend on age-dependent properties and the expression of neuronal ion channels. BK-type channels are involved in controlling both the Ca++ ion concentration in the cell interior and cell excitability. The purpose of this study was to test the properties of BK currents in the medial PFC pyramidal neurons of young (18- to 22-day-old), adolescent (38- to 42-day-old), and adult (60- to 65-day-old) rats. Whole-cell currents evoked by depolarizing voltage steps were recorded from dispersed medial PFC pyramidal neurons. A selective BK channel blocker – paxilline (10 μM) – irreversibly decreased the non-inactivating K+ current in neurons that were isolated from the young and adult rats. This current was not significantly affected by paxilline in the neurons obtained from adolescent rats. The properties of single-channel K+ currents were recorded from the soma of dispersed medial PFC pyramidal neurons in the cell-attached configuration. Of the K+ channel currents that were recorded, ~90% were BK and leak channel currents. The BK-type channel currents were dependent on the Ca++ concentration and the voltage and were inhibited by paxilline. The biophysical properties of the BK channel currents did not differ among the pyramidal neurons isolated from young, adolescent, and adult rats. Among all of the recorded K+ channel currents, 38.9, 12.7, and 21.1% were BK-type channel currents in the neurons isolated from the young, adolescent, and adult rats, respectively. Furthermore, application of paxilline effectively prolonged the half-width of the action potential in pyramidal neurons in slices isolated from young and adult rats but not in neurons isolated from adolescent rats. We conclude that the availability of BK channel currents decreases in medial PFC pyramidal

  2. Muscarinic receptor control of pyramidal neuron membrane potential in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rats.

    PubMed

    Kurowski, P; Gawlak, M; Szulczyk, P

    2015-09-10

    Damage to the cholinergic input to the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Cholinergic endings release acetylcholine, which activates nicotinic and/or G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors activate transduction systems, which control cellular effectors that regulate the membrane potential in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. The mechanisms responsible for the cholinergic-dependent depolarization of mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons in slices obtained from young rats were elucidated in this study. Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission as well as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) and voltage-dependent Ca(++) currents were eliminated. Cholinergic receptor stimulation by carbamoylcholine chloride (CCh; 100 μM) evoked depolarization (10.0 ± 1.3 mV), which was blocked by M1/M4 (pirenzepine dihydrochloride, 2 μM) and M1 (VU 0255035, 5 μM) muscarinic receptor antagonists and was not affected by a nicotinic receptor antagonist (mecamylamine hydrochloride, 10 μM). CCh-dependent depolarization was attenuated by extra- (20 μM) or intracellular (50 μM) application of an inhibitor of the βγ-subunit-dependent transduction system (gallein). It was also inhibited by intracellular application of a βγ-subunit-binding peptide (GRK2i, 10μM). mPFC pyramidal neurons express Nav1.9 channels. CCh-dependent depolarization was abolished in the presence of antibodies against Nav1.9 channels in the intracellular solution and augmented by the presence of ProTx-I toxin (100 nM) in the extracellular solution. CCh-induced depolarization was not affected by the following reagents: intracellular transduction system blockers, including U-73122 (10 μM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), SQ 22536 (100 μM) and H-89 (2 μM); channel blockers, including Ba(++) ions (200 μM), apamin (100 nM), flufenamic acid (200 μM), 2-APB (200 μM), SKF 96365 (50 μM), and ZD 7288 (50 μM); and a Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger blocker, benzamil (20

  3. Effects of low frequency electric fields on synaptic integration in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: implications for power line emissions

    PubMed Central

    Cavarretta, Francesco; Carnevale, Nicholas T.; Tegolo, Domenico; Migliore, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The possible cognitive effects of low frequency external electric fields (EFs), such as those generated by power lines, are poorly understood. Their functional consequences for mechanisms at the single neuron level are very difficult to study and identify experimentally, especially in vivo. The major open problem is that experimental investigations on humans have given inconsistent or contradictory results, making it difficult to estimate the possible effects of external low frequency electric fields on cognitive functions. Here we investigate this issue with realistic models of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our findings suggest how and why EFs, with environmentally observed frequencies and intensities far lower than what is required for direct neural activation, can perturb dendritic signal processing and somatic firing of neurons that are crucially involved in cognitive tasks such as learning and memory. These results show that individual neuronal morphology, ion channel dendritic distribution, and alignment with the electric field are major determinants of overall effects, and provide a physiologically plausible explanation of why experimental findings can appear to be small and difficult to reproduce, yet deserve serious consideration. PMID:25346660

  4. Automated evolutionary optimization of ion channel conductances and kinetics in models of young and aged rhesus monkey pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rumbell, Timothy H; Draguljić, Danel; Yadav, Aniruddha; Hof, Patrick R; Luebke, Jennifer I; Weaver, Christina M

    2016-08-01

    Conductance-based compartment modeling requires tuning of many parameters to fit the neuron model to target electrophysiological data. Automated parameter optimization via evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is a common approach to accomplish this task, using error functions to quantify differences between model and target. We present a three-stage EA optimization protocol for tuning ion channel conductances and kinetics in a generic neuron model with minimal manual intervention. We use the technique of Latin hypercube sampling in a new way, to choose weights for error functions automatically so that each function influences the parameter search to a similar degree. This protocol requires no specialized physiological data collection and is applicable to commonly-collected current clamp data and either single- or multi-objective optimization. We applied the protocol to two representative pyramidal neurons from layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex of rhesus monkeys, in which action potential firing rates are significantly higher in aged compared to young animals. Using an idealized dendritic topology and models with either 4 or 8 ion channels (10 or 23 free parameters respectively), we produced populations of parameter combinations fitting the target datasets in less than 80 hours of optimization each. Passive parameter differences between young and aged models were consistent with our prior results using simpler models and hand tuning. We analyzed parameter values among fits to a single neuron to facilitate refinement of the underlying model, and across fits to multiple neurons to show how our protocol will lead to predictions of parameter differences with aging in these neurons. PMID:27106692

  5. Optogenetic drive of neocortical pyramidal neurons generates fMRI signals that are correlated with spiking activity

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, I.; Knoblich, U.; Desai, M.; Bernstein, J.; Graybiel, A.M.; Boyden, E.S.; Buckner, R.L.; Moore, C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Local fluctuations in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal serve as the basis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Understanding the correlation between distinct aspects of neural activity and the BOLD response is fundamental to the interpretation of this widely used mapping signal. Analysis of this question requires the ability to precisely manipulate the activity of defined neurons. To achieve such control, we combined optogenetic drive of neocortical neurons with high-resolution (9.4 T) rodent fMRI and detailed analysis of neurophysiological data. Light-driven activation of pyramidal neurons resulted in a positive BOLD response at the stimulated site. To help differentiate the neurophysiological correlate(s) of the BOLD response, we employed light trains of the same average frequency, but with periodic and Poisson distributed pulse times. These different types of pulse trains generated dissociable patterns of single-unit, multi-unit and local field potential (LFP) activity, and of BOLD signals. The BOLD activity exhibited the strongest correlation to spiking activity with increasing rates of stimulation, and, to a first approximation, was linear with pulse delivery rate, while LFP activity showed a weaker correlation. These data provide an example of a strong correlation between spike rate and the BOLD response. PMID:23523914

  6. Numbers, Neurons and Tides, Oh My!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Mary Theresa

    2006-01-01

    Mathematical applications to biology are presented in Anatomy & Physiology, General and Marine Biology. Body measurements and anatomical terminology are integrated, and problems involving neuron conduction speed, red blood cells, hemoglobin and glomerular filtration presented. General Biology applications include trans-membrane potential and…

  7. Axonal Morphometry of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons Semi-Automatically Reconstructed After In-Vivo Labeling in Different CA3 Locations

    PubMed Central

    Ropireddy, Deepak; Scorcioni, Ruggero; Lasher, Bonnie; Buzsáki, Gyorgy; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    Axonal arbors of principal neurons form the backbone of neuronal networks in the mammalian cortex. Three-dimensional reconstructions of complete axonal trees are invaluable for quantitative analysis and modeling. However, digital data are still sparse due to labor intensity of reconstructing these complex structures. We augmented conventional tracing techniques with computational approaches to reconstruct fully labeled axonal morphologies. We digitized the axons of three rat hippocampal pyramidal cells intracellularly filled in-vivo from different CA3 sub-regions: two from areas CA3b and CA3c, respectively, toward the septal pole, and one from the posterior/ventral area (CA3pv) near the temporal pole. The reconstruction system was validated by comparing the morphology of the CA3c neuron with that traced from the same cell by a different operator on a standard commercial setup. Morphometric analysis revealed substantial differences among neurons. Total length ranged from 200mm (CA3b) to 500mm (CA3c), and axonal branching complexity peaked between 1mm (CA3b and CA3pv) and 2mm (CA3c) of Euclidean distance from the soma. Length distribution was analyzed among sub-regions (CA3a,b,c and CA1a,b,c), cytoarchitectonic layers, and longitudinal extent within a three-dimensional template of the rat hippocampus. The CA3b axon extended thrice more collaterals within CA3 than into CA1. On the contrary, the CA3c projection was double into CA1 than within CA3. Moreover, the CA3b axon extension was equal between strata oriens and radiatum, while the CA3c axon displayed an oriens/radiatum ratio of 1:6. The axonal distribution of the CA3pv neuron was intermediate between those of the CA3b and CA3c neurons both relative to sub-regions and layers, with uniform collateral presence across CA3/CA1 and moderate preponderance of radiatum over oriens. In contrast with the dramatic sub-region and layer differences, the axon longitudinal spread around the soma was similar for the three neurons

  8. Sex differences in GABA(B)R-GIRK signaling in layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the mouse prelimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Marron Fernandez de Velasco, Ezequiel; Hearing, Matthew; Xia, Zhilian; Victoria, Nicole C; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in multiple disorders characterized by clear sex differences, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and drug addiction. These sex differences likely represent underlying differences in connectivity and/or the balance of neuronal excitability within the mPFC. Recently, we demonstrated that signaling via the metabotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABABR) and G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K(+) (GIRK/Kir3) channels modulates the excitability of the key output neurons of the mPFC, the layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons. Here, we report a sex difference in the GABABR-GIRK signaling pathway in these neurons. Specifically, GABABR-dependent GIRK currents recorded in the prelimbic region of the mPFC were larger in adolescent male mice than in female counterparts. Interestingly, this sex difference was not observed in layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the adjacent infralimbic cortex, nor was it seen in young adult mice. The sex difference in GABABR-GIRK signaling is not attributable to different expression levels of signaling pathway components, but rather to a phosphorylation-dependent trafficking mechanism. Thus, sex differences related to some diseases associated with altered mPFC function may be explained in part by sex differences in GIRK-dependent signaling in mPFC pyramidal neurons. PMID:25843643

  9. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate ameliorates aging effects in the dendritic tree of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of both male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Kougias, Daniel G; Nolan, Suzanne O; Koss, Wendy A; Kim, Taehyeon; Hankosky, Emily R; Gulley, Joshua M; Juraska, Janice M

    2016-04-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), a supplement commonly used to maintain muscle in elderly and clinical populations, has been unexplored in the aging brain. In both healthy aging humans and rat models, there are cognitive deficits associated with age-related dendritic shrinkage within the prefrontal cortex. The present study explores the effects of relatively short- and long-term (7 and 31 weeks) oral HMB supplementation starting at 12 months of age in male and female rats on the dendritic tree of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since female rats continue to secrete ovarian hormones after reaching reproductive senescence, middle-aged female rats were ovariectomized to model humans. As expected, there were fewer spines and a retraction of dendritic material in the apical and basilar trees in old age controls of both sexes compared with their middle-aged counterparts. However, these losses did not occur in the HMB-treated rats in either dendrites or the total number of dendritic spines. Thus, HMB forestalled the effects of aging on the dendritic tree of this population of neurons. PMID:26973106

  10. Loss of functional A-type potassium channels in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2013-12-11

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K(+) currents (I(KA)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of I(KA) using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less I(KA) in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K(+) channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K(+) current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by K(V)4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in I(KA) was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of I(KA) in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome. PMID:24336711

  11. Selective Pharmacological Modulation of Pyramidal Neurons and Interneurons in the CA1 Region of the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Marzia; Comas, Tanya; Mealing, Geoffrey A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is a complex network tightly regulated by interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In neurodegenerative disorders where cognitive functions such as learning and memory are impaired this excitation-inhibition balance may be altered. Interestingly, the uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist memantine, currently in clinical use for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, may alter the excitation-inhibition balance in the hippocampus. However, the specific mechanism by which memantine exerts this action is not clear. To better elucidate the effect of memantine on hippocampal circuitry, we studied its pharmacology on NMDAR currents in both pyramidal cells (PCs) and interneurons (Ints) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Applying whole-cell patch-clamp methodology to acute rat hippocampal slices, we report that memantine antagonism is more robust in PCs than in Ints. Using specific NMDAR subunit antagonists, we determined that this selective antagonism of memantine is attributable to specific differences in the molecular make-up of the NMDARs in excitatory and inhibitory neurons. These findings offer new insight into the mechanism of action and therapeutic potential of NMDA receptor pharmacology in modulating hippocampal excitability. PMID:23493925

  12. The spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation in layer 5 pyramidal neurons: a voltage imaging study.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Marko A; Foust, Amanda J; McCormick, David A; Zecevic, Dejan

    2011-09-01

    The spatial pattern of Na(+) channel clustering in the axon initial segment (AIS) plays a critical role in tuning neuronal computations, and changes in Na(+) channel distribution have been shown to mediate novel forms of neuronal plasticity in the axon. However, immunocytochemical data on channel distribution may not directly predict spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation, and prior electrophysiological measures are either indirect (extracellular) or lack sufficient spatial resolution (intracellular) to directly characterize the spike trigger zone (TZ). We took advantage of a critical methodological improvement in the high sensitivity membrane potential imaging (V(m) imaging) technique to directly determine the location and length of the spike TZ as defined in functional terms. The results show that in mature axons of mouse cortical layer 5 pyramidal cells, action potentials initiate in a region ∼20 μm in length centred between 20 and 40 μm from the soma. From this region, the AP depolarizing wave invades initial nodes of Ranvier within a fraction of a millisecond and propagates in a saltatory fashion into axonal collaterals without failure at all physiologically relevant frequencies. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to the saltatory conduction in mature axons, AP propagation is non-saltatory (monotonic) in immature axons prior to myelination. PMID:21669974

  13. Dietary cholesterol modulates the excitability of rabbit hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Desheng; Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has shown high dietary cholesterol can affect learning and memory including rabbit eyeblink conditioning and this effect may be due to increased membrane cholesterol and enhanced hippocampal amyloid beta production. This study investigated whether dietary cholesterol modulates rabbit hippocampal CA1 neuron membrane properties known to be involved in rabbit eyeblink conditioning. Whole-cell current clamp recordings in hippocampal neurons from rabbits fed 2% cholesterol or normal chow for 8 weeks revealed changes including decreased after-hyperpolarization amplitudes (AHPs) – an index of membrane excitability shown to be important for rabbit eyeblink conditioning. This index was reversed by adding copper to drinking water – a dietary manipulation that can retard rabbit eyeblink conditioning. Evidence of cholesterol effects on membrane excitability was provided by application of methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a compound that reduces membrane cholesterol, which increased the excitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons. PMID:20639007

  14. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  15. ACTIVITY-DEPENDENT STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY AFTER AVERSIVE EXPERIENCES IN AMYGDALA AND AUDITORY CORTEX PYRAMIDAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc− neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc− neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  16. Multi-photon Intracellular Sodium Imaging Combined with UV-mediated Focal Uncaging of Glutamate in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has enabled the analysis of morphological and physiological parameters of brain cells in the intact tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with electrophysiology, it is widely used to study activity-related calcium signals in small subcellular compartments such as dendrites and dendritic spines. In addition to calcium transients, synaptic activity also induces postsynaptic sodium signals, the properties of which are only marginally understood. Here, we describe a method for combined whole-cell patch-clamp and multi-photon sodium imaging in cellular micro domains of central neurons. Furthermore, we introduce a modified procedure for ultra-violet (UV)-light-induced uncaging of glutamate, which allows reliable and focal activation of glutamate receptors in the tissue. To this end, whole-cell recordings were performed on Cornu Ammonis subdivision 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons in acute tissue slices of the mouse hippocampus. Neurons were filled with the sodium-sensitive fluorescent dye SBFI through the patch-pipette, and multi-photon excitation of SBFI enabled the visualization of dendrites and adjacent spines. To establish UV-induced focal uncaging, several parameters including light intensity, volume affected by the UV uncaging beam, positioning of the beam as well as concentration of the caged compound were tested and optimized. Our results show that local perfusion with caged glutamate (MNI-Glutamate) and its focal UV-uncaging result in inward currents and sodium transients in dendrites and spines. Time course and amplitude of both inward currents and sodium signals correlate with the duration of the uncaging pulse. Furthermore, our results show that intracellular sodium signals are blocked in the presence of blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors, demonstrating that they are mediated by sodium influx though this pathway. In summary, our method provides a reliable tool for the investigation of intracellular

  17. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (I GABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited I GABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I GABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation.

  19. Impaired Memory and Evidence of Histopathology in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons through Injection of Aβ1-42 Peptides into the Frontal Cortices of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Eslamizade, Mohammad Javad; Madjd, Zahra; Rasoolijazi, Homa; Saffarzadeh, Fatemeh; Pirhajati, Vahid; Aligholi, Hadi; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which has much benefited from animal models to find the basics of its pathophysiology. In our previous work (Haghani, Shabani, Javan, Motamedi, & Janahmadi, 2012), a non-transgenic rat model of AD was used in electrophysiological studies. However, we did not investigate the histological aspects in the mentioned study. Methods: An AD model was developed through bilateral injection of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) into the frontal cortices. Behavioral and histological methods were used to assess alterations in the memory and (ultra)structures. Furthermore, melatonin has been administered to assess its efficacy on this AD model. Results: Passive avoidance showed a progressive decline in the memory following Aβ injection. Furthermore, Nissl staining showed that Aβ neurotoxicity caused shrinkage of the CA1 pyramidal neurons. Neurodegeneration was clearly evident from Fluoro-jade labeled neurons in Aβ treated rats. Moreover, higher NF-κB immunoreactive CA1 pyramidal neurons were remarkably observed in Aβ treated rats. Ultrastructural analysis using electron microscopy also showed the evidence of subcellular abnormalities. Melatonin treatment in this model of AD prevented Aβ-induced increased NF-κB from immunoreaction and neurodegeneration. Discussion: This study suggests that injection of Aβ into the frontal cortices results in the memory decline and histochemical disturbances in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, melatonin can prevent several histological changes induced by Aβ. PMID:27303597

  20. Roles of specific Kv channel types in repolarization of the action potential in genetically identified subclasses of pyramidal neurons in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Dhruba; Guan, Dongxu; Foehring, Robert C

    2016-05-01

    The action potential (AP) is a fundamental feature of excitable cells that serves as the basis for long-distance signaling in the nervous system. There is considerable diversity in the appearance of APs and the underlying repolarization mechanisms in different neuronal types (reviewed in Bean BP. Nat Rev Neurosci 8: 451-465, 2007), including among pyramidal cell subtypes. In the present work, we used specific pharmacological blockers to test for contributions of Kv1, Kv2, or Kv4 channels to repolarization of single APs in two genetically defined subpopulations of pyramidal cells in layer 5 of mouse somatosensory cortex (etv1 and glt) as well as pyramidal cells from layer 2/3. These three subtypes differ in AP properties (Groh A, Meyer HS, Schmidt EF, Heintz N, Sakmann B, Krieger P. Cereb Cortex 20: 826-836, 2010; Guan D, Armstrong WE, Foehring RC. J Neurophysiol 113: 2014-2032, 2015) as well as laminar position, morphology, and projection targets. We asked what the roles of Kv1, Kv2, and Kv4 channels are in AP repolarization and whether the underlying mechanisms are pyramidal cell subtype dependent. We found that Kv4 channels are critically involved in repolarizing neocortical pyramidal cells. There are also pyramidal cell subtype-specific differences in the role for Kv1 channels. Only Kv4 channels were involved in repolarizing the narrow APs of glt cells. In contrast, in etv1 cells and layer 2/3 cells, the broader APs are partially repolarized by Kv1 channels in addition to Kv4 channels. Consistent with their activation in the subthreshold range, Kv1 channels also regulate AP voltage threshold in all pyramidal cell subtypes. PMID:26864770

  1. Alterations in CA1 pyramidal neuronal intrinsic excitability mediated by Ih channel currents in a rat model of amyloid beta pathology.

    PubMed

    Eslamizade, M J; Saffarzadeh, F; Mousavi, S M M; Meftahi, G H; Hosseinmardi, N; Mehdizadeh, M; Janahmadi, M

    2015-10-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by changing the neuronal excitability. However, the cellular mechanisms by which accumulation of Aβ affects intrinsic neuronal properties are not well understood. The effect of bilateral intra-frontal cortex Aβ (1-42) peptide injection on the intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with particular focus on the contribution of hyperpolarization-activated (Ih) channel currents was examined using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Passive avoidance memory impairment and morphological changes in rats receiving intra-frontal Aβ treatment were observed, which was associated with significant changes both in passive and active intrinsic electrical membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Electrophysiological recording showed a significant decrease in neuronal excitability associated with an augmentation in the first spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude. In addition, the depolarizing sag voltage was altered in neurons recorded from Aβ-treated group. In voltage-clamp condition, a hyperpolarizing activated inward current sensitive to ZD7288 and capsaicin was significantly increased in neurons from Aβ-treated rats. The Ih current density was increased and the activation curve was shifted toward less negative potential in the Aβ-treated group as compared to control group. The enhancing effect of Aβ treatment on Ih current was confirmed by showing upregulation of the mRNA of HCN1 channel in the CA1 pyramidal layer of hippocampi. These findings suggest the contribution of Ih and possibly TRPV1 channel currents to the changes induced by Aβ treatment in the intrinsic membrane properties, which, in turn, may provide therapeutic targets for treatment of AD. PMID:26254243

  2. [The effect of enzymatic treatment using proteases on properties of persistent sodium current in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Lun'ko, O O; Isaiev, D S; Maxymiuk, O P; Kryshtal', O O; Isaieva, O V

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of proteases, widely used for neuron isolation in electrophysiological studies, on the amplitude and kinetic characteristics of persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Properties of I(NaP) were studied on neurons isolated by mechanical treatment (control group) and by mechanical and enzymatic treatment using pronase E (from Streptomyces griseus) or protease type XXIII (from Aspergillus oryzae). We show that in neurons isolated with pronase E kinetic of activation and density of I(NaP) was unaltered. Enzymatic treatment with protease type XXIII did not alter I(NaP) activation but result in significant decrease in I(NaP) density. Our data indicates that enzymatic treatment using pronase E for neuron isolation is preferable for investigation of I(NaP). PMID:25097934

  3. A Distinct Class of Slow (∼0.2–2 Hz) Intrinsically Bursting Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons Determines UP/DOWN State Dynamics in the Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, David; Bao, Ying; Connelly, William M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Hughes, Stuart W.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    During sleep and anesthesia, neocortical neurons exhibit rhythmic UP/DOWN membrane potential states. Although UP states are maintained by synaptic activity, the mechanisms that underlie the initiation and robust rhythmicity of UP states are unknown. Using a physiologically validated model of UP/DOWN state generation in mouse neocortical slices whereby the cholinergic tone present in vivo is reinstated, we show that the regular initiation of UP states is driven by an electrophysiologically distinct subset of morphologically identified layer 5 neurons, which exhibit intrinsic rhythmic low-frequency burst firing at ∼0.2–2 Hz. This low-frequency bursting is resistant to block of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission but is absent when slices are maintained in a low Ca2+ medium (an alternative, widely used model of cortical UP/DOWN states), thus explaining the lack of rhythmic UP states and abnormally prolonged DOWN states in this condition. We also characterized the activity of various other pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons during UP/DOWN states and found that an electrophysiologically distinct subset of layer 5 regular spiking pyramidal neurons fires earlier during the onset of network oscillations compared with all other types of neurons recorded. This study, therefore, identifies an important role for cell-type-specific neuronal activity in driving neocortical UP states. PMID:25855163

  4. Ventral tegmental area afferents to the prefrontal cortex maintain membrane potential 'up' states in pyramidal neurons via D(1) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B L; O'Donnell, P

    2000-12-01

    The electrophysiological nature of dopamine actions has been controversial for years, with data supporting both inhibitory and excitatory actions. In this study, we tested whether stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the source of the dopamine innervation of the prefrontal cortex, would exert different responses depending on the membrane potential states that pyramidal neurons exhibit when recorded in vivo, and whether VTA stimulation would have a role in controlling transitions between these states. Prefrontal cortical neurons have a very negative resting membrane potential (down state) interrupted by plateau depolarizations (up state). Although the up state had been shown to be dependent on hippocampal afferents in nucleus accumbens neurons, our results indicate that neither hippocampal nor thalamic inputs are sufficient to drive up events in prefrontal cortical neurons. Electrical VTA stimulation resulted in a variety of actions, in many cases depending on the neuron membrane potential state. Trains of stimuli resembling burst firing evoked a long-lasting transition to the up state, an effect blocked by a D(1) antagonist and mimicked by chemical VTA stimulation. These results indicate that projections from the VTA to the prefrontal cortex may be involved in controlling membrane potential states that define assemblies of activable pyramidal neurons in this region. PMID:11073866

  5. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in non-pyramidal neurons of the human isocortex.

    PubMed

    Braak, E; Braak, H; Weindl, A

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of somatostatin-immunoreactive cell bodies and axons throughout the human isocortex and subjacent white matter was examined. Vibratome sections of cortical tissue (30-40 micrometers thick) obtained at surgery were treated to reveal the antigen by the unlabelled antibody enzyme method. Two types of somatostatin-immunoreactive axons were present: short, coiled axons and extended ones that follow a straight course in various directions. Somatostatin immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were encountered in layers II-VI and in the subjacent white matter. The majority of labelled cells were found in the white matter and layer VI, and then in layers II and III. The immunoreactive perikarya were fusiform, triangular or multipolar in shape and did not show preferential orientation of their long axis. Frequently, the fusiform neurons in layer VI and in the white matter were aligned parallel to radiate bundles of myelinated fibres. The immunoreactive neurons gave rise to a few thick dendrites. Often thin axon-like processes could also be recognized, originating either from the cell body or from a thicker dendrite. After destaining of the chromogen and counterstaining with aldehydefuchsin and gallocyanin chromealum, the formerly immunoreactive neurons displayed a light and eccentrically located nucleus. The soma contained only a sparse amount of basophilic substance and was nearly devoid of lipofuscin granules. In electron micrographs, the cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were localized near the periphery of the soma. Immunoreactivity occurred along membranes of the RER cistern, outer mitochondrial membrane, and in particles 120-150 micrometers in diameter. Rounded areas (up to a diameter of 1 micrometer) lacked immunoreactivity. Furthermore, there were a few tiny lysosomes. PMID:2867717

  6. Memory-enhancing intra-basolateral amygdala clenbuterol infusion reduces post-burst afterhyperpolarizations in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons following inhibitory avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Lovitz, E S; Thompson, L T

    2015-03-01

    Activation of the basolateral amygdala can modulate the strength of fear memories, including those in single-trial inhibitory avoidance (IA) tasks. Memory retention, measured by the latency to re-enter a dark-compartment paired 24h earlier with a footshock, varies with intensity of this aversive stimulus. When higher intensity footshocks were used, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited reduced afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) 24h post-trial, an effect blocked by immediate post-trial inactivation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). Similar AHP reductions in CA1 have been observed in a number of learning tasks, with time courses appropriate to support memory consolidation. When less intense footshocks were used for IA training of Sprague-Dawley rats, immediate post-trial infusion of the β-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol into BLA was required to enhance hippocampal Arc protein expression 45 min later and to enhance memory retention tested 48 h later. Here, using Long-Evans rats and low-intensity footshocks, we confirmed that bilateral immediate post-trial infusion of 15 ng/0.5 μl of the β-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol into BLA significantly enhances memory for an IA task. Next, clenbuterol was infused into one BLA immediately post-training, with vehicle infused into the contralateral BLA, then hippocampal CA1 neuron AHPs were assessed 24 h later. Only CA1 neurons from hemispheres ipsilateral to post-trial clenbuterol infusion showed learning-dependent AHP reductions. Excitability of CA1 neurons from the same trained rats, but from the vehicle-infused hemispheres, was identical to that from untrained rats receiving unilateral clenbuterol or vehicle infusions. Peak AHPs, medium and slow AHPs, and accommodation were reduced only with the combination of IA training and unilateral BLA β-receptor activation. Similar to previous observations of BLA adrenergic memory-related enhancement of Arc protein expression in hippocampus, increased CA1 neuronal

  7. Dysregulated expression of neuregulin-1 by cortical pyramidal neurons disrupts synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Zhang, Mingyue; Trembak-Duff, Irina; Unterbarnscheidt, Tilmann; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Dibaj, Payam; Martins de Souza, Daniel; Boretius, Susann; Brzózka, Magdalena M; Steffens, Heinz; Berning, Sebastian; Teng, Zenghui; Gummert, Maike N; Tantra, Martesa; Guest, Peter C; Willig, Katrin I; Frahm, Jens; Hell, Stefan W; Bahn, Sabine; Rossner, Moritz J; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwab, Markus H

    2014-08-21

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) gene variants are associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia. It is unclear whether risk haplotypes cause elevated or decreased expression of NRG1 in the brains of schizophrenia patients, given that both findings have been reported from autopsy studies. To study NRG1 functions in vivo, we generated mouse mutants with reduced and elevated NRG1 levels and analyzed the impact on cortical functions. Loss of NRG1 from cortical projection neurons resulted in increased inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, and hypoactivity. Neuronal overexpression of cysteine-rich domain (CRD)-NRG1, the major brain isoform, caused unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, abnormal spine growth, altered steady-state levels of synaptic plasticity-related proteins, and impaired sensorimotor gating. We conclude that an "optimal" level of NRG1 signaling balances excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cortex. Our data provide a potential pathomechanism for impaired synaptic plasticity and suggest that human NRG1 risk haplotypes exert a gain-of-function effect. PMID:25131210

  8. Dendritic sodium spikes are required for long-term potentiation at distal synapses on hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yujin; Hsu, Ching-Lung; Cembrowski, Mark S; Mensh, Brett D; Spruston, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic integration of synaptic inputs mediates rapid neural computation as well as longer-lasting plasticity. Several channel types can mediate dendritically initiated spikes (dSpikes), which may impact information processing and storage across multiple timescales; however, the roles of different channels in the rapid vs long-term effects of dSpikes are unknown. We show here that dSpikes mediated by Nav channels (blocked by a low concentration of TTX) are required for long-term potentiation (LTP) in the distal apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, imaging, simulations, and buffering experiments all support a model whereby fast Nav channel-mediated dSpikes (Na-dSpikes) contribute to LTP induction by promoting large, transient, localized increases in intracellular calcium concentration near the calcium-conducting pores of NMDAR and L-type Cav channels. Thus, in addition to contributing to rapid neural processing, Na-dSpikes are likely to contribute to memory formation via their role in long-lasting synaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06414.001 PMID:26247712

  9. Developmental profile of localized spontaneous Ca(2+) release events in the dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kenichi; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N

    2012-12-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate that localized spontaneous Ca(2+) release events can be detected in the dendrites of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus and other neurons (J. Neurosci. 29 (2009) 7833-7845). These events have some properties that resemble ryanodine receptor mediated "sparks" in myocytes, and some that resemble IP(3) receptor mediated "puffs" in oocytes. They can be detected in the dendrites of rats of all tested ages between P3 and P80 (with sparser sampling in older rats), suggesting that they serve a general signaling function and are not just important in development. However, in younger rats the amplitudes of the events are larger than the amplitudes in older animals and almost as large as the amplitudes of Ca(2+) signals from backpropagating action potentials (bAPs). The rise time of the event signal is fast at all ages and is comparable to the rise time of the bAP fluorescence signal at the same dendritic location. The decay time is slower in younger animals, primarily because of weaker Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms at that age. Diffusion away from a brief localized source is the major determinant of decay at all ages. A simple computational model closely simulates these events with extrusion rate the only age dependent variable. PMID:22951184

  10. DENDRITIC SPINE PATHOLOGIES IN HIPPOCAMPAL PYRAMIDAL NEURONS FROM RETT SYNDROME BRAIN AND AFTER EXPRESSION OF RETT-ASSOCIATED MECP2 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Chapleau, Christopher A.; Calfa, Gaston D.; Lane, Meredith C.; Albertson, Asher J.; Larimore, Jennifer L.; Kudo, Shinichi; Armstrong, Dawna L.; Percy, Alan K.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X chromosome-linked neurodevelopmental disorder associated with the characteristic neuropathology of dendritic spines common in diseases presenting with mental retardation (MR). Here, we present the first quantitative analyses of dendritic spine density in postmortem brain tissue from female RTT individuals, which revealed that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons have lower spine density than age-matched non-MR female control individuals. The majority of RTT individuals carry mutations in MECP2, the gene coding for a methylated DNA-binding transcriptional regulator. While altered synaptic transmission and plasticity has been demonstrated in Mecp2-deficient mouse models of RTT, observations regarding dendritic spine density and morphology have produced varied results. We investigated the consequences of MeCP2 dysfunction on dendritic spine structure by overexpressing (∼twofold) MeCP2-GFP constructs encoding either the wildtype (WT) protein, or missense mutations commonly found in RTT individuals. Pyramidal neurons within hippocampal slice cultures transfected with either WT or mutant MECP2 (either R106W or T158M) showed a significant reduction in total spine density after 48hrs of expression. Interestingly, spine density in neurons expressing WT MECP2 for 96hrs was comparable to that in control neurons, while neurons expressing mutant MECP2 continued to have lower spines density than controls after 96hrs of expression. Knockdown of endogenous Mecp2 with a specific small hairpin interference RNA (shRNA) also reduced dendritic spine density, but only after 96hrs of expression. On the other hand, the consequences of manipulating MeCP2 levels for dendritic complexity in CA3 pyramidal neurons were only minor. Together, these results demonstrate reduced dendritic spine density in hippocampal pyramidal neurons from RTT patients, a distinct dendritic phenotype also found in neurons expressing RTT-associated MECP2 mutations or after sh

  11. Antagomirs targeting microRNA-134 increase hippocampal pyramidal neuron spine volume in vivo and protect against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Engel, Tobias; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Reynolds, James; Reschke, Cristina R; Conroy, Ronan M; McKiernan, Ross C; deFelipe, Javier; Henshall, David C

    2015-07-01

    Emerging data support roles for microRNA (miRNA) in the pathogenesis of various neurologic disorders including epilepsy. MicroRNA-134 (miR-134) is enriched in dendrites of hippocampal neurons, where it negatively regulates spine volume. Recent work identified upregulation of miR-134 in experimental and human epilepsy. Targeting miR-134 in vivo using antagomirs had potent anticonvulsant effects against kainic acid-induced seizures and was associated with a reduction in dendritic spine number. In the present study, we measured dendritic spine volume in mice injected with miR-134-targeting antagomirs and tested effects of the antagomirs on status epilepticus triggered by the cholinergic agonist pilocarpine. Morphometric analysis of over 6,400 dendritic spines in Lucifer yellow-injected CA3 pyramidal neurons revealed increased spine volume in mice given antagomirs compared to controls that received a scrambled sequence. Treatment of mice with miR-134 antagomirs did not alter performance in a behavioral test (novel object location). Status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine was associated with upregulation of miR-134 within the hippocampus of mice. Pretreatment of mice with miR-134 antagomirs reduced the proportion of animals that developed status epilepticus following pilocarpine and increased animal survival. In antagomir-treated mice that did develop status epilepticus, seizure onset was delayed and total seizure power was reduced. These studies provide in vivo evidence that miR-134 regulates spine volume in the hippocampus and validation of the seizure-suppressive effects of miR-134 antagomirs in a model with a different triggering mechanism, indicating broad conservation of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:24874920

  12. Inhibition as a Binary Switch for Excitatory Plasticity in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Katharina A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is thought to induce memory traces in the brain that are the foundation of learning. To ensure the stability of these traces in the presence of further learning, however, a regulation of plasticity appears beneficial. Here, we take up the recent suggestion that dendritic inhibition can switch plasticity of excitatory synapses on and off by gating backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) and calcium spikes, i.e., by gating the coincidence signals required for Hebbian forms of plasticity. We analyze temporal and spatial constraints of such a gating and investigate whether it is possible to suppress bAPs without a simultaneous annihilation of the forward-directed information flow via excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In a computational analysis of conductance-based multi-compartmental models, we demonstrate that a robust control of bAPs and calcium spikes is possible in an all-or-none manner, enabling a binary switch of coincidence signals and plasticity. The position of inhibitory synapses on the dendritic tree determines the spatial extent of the effect and allows a pathway-specific regulation of plasticity. With appropriate timing, EPSPs can still trigger somatic action potentials, although backpropagating signals are abolished. An annihilation of bAPs requires precisely timed inhibition, while the timing constraints are less stringent for distal calcium spikes. We further show that a wide-spread motif of local circuits—feedforward inhibition—is well suited to provide the temporal precision needed for the control of bAPs. Altogether, our model provides experimentally testable predictions and demonstrates that the inhibitory switch of plasticity can be a robust and attractive mechanism, hence assigning an additional function to the inhibitory elements of neuronal microcircuits beyond modulation of excitability. PMID:27003565

  13. The effects of black garlic ethanol extract on the spatial memory and estimated total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus of monosodium glutamate-exposed adolescent male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hermawati, Ery; Sari, Dwi Cahyani Ratna; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-09-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is believed to exert deleterious effects on various organs, including the hippocampus, likely via the oxidative stress pathway. Garlic (Alium sativum L.), which is considered to possess potent antioxidant activity, has been used as traditional remedy for various ailments since ancient times. We have investigated the effects of black garlic, a fermented form of garlic, on spatial memory and estimated the total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in adolescent male Wistar rats treated with MSG. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: C- group, which received normal saline; C+ group, which was exposed to 2 mg/g body weight (bw) of MSG; three treatment groups (T2.5, T5, T10), which were treated with black garlic extract (2.5, 5, 10 mg/200 g bw, respectively) and MSG. The spatial memory test was carried out using the Morris water maze (MWM) procedure, and the total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus was estimated using the physical disector design. The groups treated with black garlic extract were found to have a shorter path length than the C- and C+ groups in the escape acquisition phase of the MWM test. The estimated total number of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was higher in all treated groups than that of the C+ group. Based on these results, we conclude that combined administration of black garlic and MSG may alter the spatial memory functioning and total number of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus of rats. PMID:25422084

  14. TRPV1 receptors augment basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, F; Eslamizade, M J; Mousavi, S M M; Abraki, S B; Hadjighassem, M R; Gorji, A

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy in human and animals is attributed to alterations in brain function especially hippocampus formation. Changes in synaptic activity might be causally related to the alterations during epileptogenesis. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) as one of the non-selective ion channels has been shown to be involved in synaptic transmission. However, the potential role of TRPV1 receptors in synaptic function in the epileptic brain needs to be elucidated. In the present study, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry to assess hippocampal TRPV1 mRNA expression, protein content, and distribution. Moreover, the effects of pharmacologic activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors on the slope of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were analyzed in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons, after 3months of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). SE induced an upregulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein content in the whole hippocampal extract, as well as its distribution in both CA1 and CA3 regions. Activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors (via capsaicin 1μM and capsazepine 10μM, respectively) did not influence basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 regions of control slices, however, capsaicin increased and capsazepine decreased synaptic transmission in both regions in tissues from epileptic animals. Taken together, these findings suggest that a higher expression of TRPV1 in the epileptic condition is accompanied by alterations in basal synaptic transmission. PMID:26621124

  15. Repeated restraint stress-induced atrophy of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and decreases in glutamatergic efflux in the rat amygdala are prevented by the antidepressant agomelatine.

    PubMed

    Grillo, C A; Risher, M; Macht, V A; Bumgardner, A L; Hang, A; Gabriel, C; Mocaër, E; Piroli, G G; Fadel, J R; Reagan, L P

    2015-01-22

    Major depressive illness is among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders and is associated with neuroplasticity deficits in limbic structures such as the amygdala. Since exposure to stressful life events is proposed to contribute to depressive illness, our recent studies examined the effects of stress on amygdalar neuroplasticity. These studies determined that repeated stress elicits deficits in glutamatergic activity in the amygdala, neuroplasticity deficits that can be prevented by some but not all antidepressants. In view of these observations, the goal of the current study was to determine the effects of repeated restraint stress (RRS) on the dendritic architecture of pyramidal neurons in the rat basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (CBL), as well as glutamate efflux in the CBL and central nucleus of the amygdala (CMX) via in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the ability of the antidepressant agomelatine to prevent RRS-induced neuroplasticity deficits. Compared with control rats, rats subjected to RRS exhibited atrophy of CBL pyramidal neurons, including decreases in total dendritic length, branch points, and dendritic complexity index. In addition, glutamate efflux was significantly reduced in the CMX of rats subjected to RRS, thereby identifying a potential neurochemical consequence of stress-induced dendritic atrophy of CBL pyramidal neurons. Lastly, an acute stress challenge increased corticosterone (CORT) levels in the CBL, suggesting that stress-induced increases in CORT levels may contribute to the neuroanatomical and neurochemical effects of RRS in the CBL. Importantly, these RRS-induced changes were prevented by daily agomelatine administration. These results demonstrate that the neuroanatomical and neurochemical properties of glutamatergic neurons in the rat amygdala are adversely affected by repeated stress and suggest that the therapeutic effects of agomelatine may include protection of structural and neurochemical plasticity in limbic

  16. Marked changes in dendritic structure and spine density precede significant neuronal death in vulnerable cortical pyramidal neuron populations in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Matthew J; Mu, Erica W H; Noakes, Peter G; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Bellingham, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterised by the death of upper (corticospinal) and lower motor neurons (MNs) with progressive muscle weakness. This incurable disease is clinically heterogeneous and its aetiology remains unknown. Increased excitability of corticospinal MNs has been observed prior to symptoms in human and rodent studies. Increased excitability has been correlated with structural changes in neuronal dendritic arbors and spines for decades. Here, using a modified Golgi-Cox staining method, we have made the first longitudinal study examining the dendrites of pyramidal neurons from the motor cortex, medial pre-frontal cortex, somatosensory cortex and entorhinal cortex of hSOD1(G93A) (SOD1) mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls at postnatal (P) days 8-15, 28-35, 65-75 and 120. Progressive decreases in dendritic length and spine density commencing at pre-symptomatic ages (P8-15 or P28-35) were observed in layer V pyramidal neurons within the motor cortex and medial pre-frontal cortex of SOD1 mice compared to WT mice. Spine loss without concurrent dendritic pathology was present in the pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from disease-onset (P65-75). Our results from the SOD1 model suggest that dendritic and dendritic spine changes foreshadow and underpin the neuromotor phenotypes present in ALS and may contribute to the varied cognitive, executive function and extra-motor symptoms commonly seen in ALS patients. Determining if these phenomena are compensatory or maladaptive may help explain differential susceptibility of neurons to degeneration in ALS. PMID:27488828

  17. Learning pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischof, Horst

    1994-02-01

    Neural networks and image pyramids share many similarities, as we have shown in previous papers. In this paper we explore the usage of neural network learning algorithms for image pyramids. In particular, learning algorithms for principal component extraction have some interesting properties for pyramids. These algorithms are consistent with Linskers principle of maximum information preservation. We will review several algorithms for principal component extraction and show how they can be used in regular, gray-level pyramids. The usage of constraint autoassociative back-propagation networks yields a new type of pyramid, where not all cells perform the same reduction function. Several applications for this new type of pyramid are outlined.

  18. Pyramidal Neurons in Rat Prefrontal Cortex Projecting to Ventral Tegmental Area and Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Express 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Borsetti, Pablo; Cortés, Roser

    2009-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in higher brain functions altered in schizophrenia. Classical antipsychotics modulate cortico-limbic circuits mainly through subcortical D2 receptor blockade, whereas second generation (atypical) antipsychotics preferentially target cortical 5-HT receptors. Anatomical and functional evidence supports a PFC-based control of the brainstem monoaminergic nuclei. Using a combination of retrograde tracing experiments and in situ hybridization we report that a substantial proportion of PFC pyramidal neurons projecting to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or ventral tegmental area (VTA) express 5-HT2A receptors. Cholera-toxin B application into the DR and the VTA retrogradely labeled projection neurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) and in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In situ hybridization of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA in the same tissue sections labeled a large neuronal population in mPFC and OFC. The percentage of DR-projecting neurons expressing 5-HT2A receptor mRNA was ∼60% in mPFC and ∼75% in OFC (n = 3). Equivalent values for VTA-projecting neurons were ∼55% in both mPFC and ventral OFC. Thus, 5-HT2A receptor activation/blockade in PFC may have downstream effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic systems via direct descending pathways. Atypical antipsychotics may distally modulate monoaminergic cells through PFC 5-HT2A receptor blockade, presumably decreasing the activity of neurons receiving direct cortical inputs. PMID:19029064

  19. Synapsin III Acts Downstream of Semaphorin 3A/CDK5 Signaling to Regulate Radial Migration and Orientation of Pyramidal Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Perlini, Laura E.; Szczurkowska, Joanna; Ballif, Bryan A.; Piccini, Alessandra; Sacchetti, Silvio; Giovedì, Silvia; Benfenati, Fabio; Cancedda, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synapsin III (SynIII) is a phosphoprotein that is highly expressed at early stages of neuronal development. Whereas in vitro evidence suggests a role for SynIII in neuronal differentiation, in vivo evidence is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo downregulation of SynIII expression affects neuronal migration and orientation. By contrast, SynIII overexpression affects neuronal migration, but not orientation. We identify a cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) phosphorylation site on SynIII and use phosphomutant rescue experiments to demonstrate its role in SynIII function. Finally, we show that SynIII phosphorylation at the CDK5 site is induced by activation of the semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) pathway, which is implicated in migration and orientation of cortical pyramidal neurons (PNs) and is known to activate CDK5. Thus, fine-tuning of SynIII expression and phosphorylation by CDK5 activation through Sema3A activity is essential for proper neuronal migration and orientation. PMID:25843720

  20. Postsynaptic mGluR5 promotes evoked AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission onto neocortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons during development

    PubMed Central

    Loerwald, Kristofer W.; Patel, Ankur B.; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2014-01-01

    Both short- and long-term roles for the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor number 5 (mGluR5) have been examined for the regulation of cortical glutamatergic synapses. However, how mGluR5 sculpts neocortical networks during development still remains unclear. Using a single cell deletion strategy, we examined how mGluR5 regulates glutamatergic synaptic pathways in neocortical layer 2/3 (L2/3) during development. Electrophysiological measurements were made in acutely prepared slices to obtain a functional understanding of the effects stemming from loss of mGluR5 in vivo. Loss of postsynaptic mGluR5 results in an increase in the frequency of action potential-independent synaptic events but, paradoxically, results in a decrease in evoked transmission in two separate synaptic pathways providing input to the same pyramidal neurons. Synaptic transmission through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, but not N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, is specifically decreased. In the local L2/3 pathway, the decrease in evoked transmission appears to be largely due to a decrease in cell-to-cell connectivity and not in the strength of individual cell-to-cell connections. This decrease in evoked transmission correlates with a decrease in the total dendritic length in a region of the dendritic arbor that likely receives substantial input from these two pathways, thereby suggesting a morphological correlate to functional alterations. These changes are accompanied by an increase in intrinsic membrane excitability. Our data indicate that total mGluR5 function, incorporating both short- and long-term processes, promotes the strengthening of AMPA receptor-mediated transmission in multiple neocortical pathways. PMID:25392167

  1. Validation of optical voltage reporting by the genetically encoded voltage indicator VSFP-Butterfly from cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in mouse brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Empson, Ruth M; Goulton, Chelsea; Scholtz, David; Gallero-Salas, Yasir; Zeng, Hongkui; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how behavior emerges from brain electrical activity is one of the ultimate goals of neuroscience. To achieve this goal we require methods for large-scale recording of the electrical activity of specific neuronal circuits. A very promising approach is to use optical reporting of membrane voltage transients, particularly if the voltage reporter is genetically targeted to specific neuronal populations. Targeting in this way allows population signals to be recorded and interpreted without blindness to neuronal diversity. Here, we evaluated the voltage-sensitive fluorescent protein, VSFP Butterfly 2.1, a genetically encoded voltage indicator (GEVI), for monitoring electrical activity of layer 2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons in mouse brain slices. Standard widefield fluorescence and two-photon imaging revealed robust, high signal-to-noise ratio read-outs of membrane voltage transients that are predominantly synaptic in nature and can be resolved as discrete areas of synaptically connected layer 2/3 neurons. We find that targeted expression of this GEVI in the cortex provides a flexible and promising tool for the analysis of L2/3 cortical network function. PMID:26229003

  2. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ruth DT; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP, resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons. © 2013 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23996525

  3. Altered Intrinsic Pyramidal Neuron Properties and Pathway-Specific Synaptic Dysfunction Underlie Aberrant Hippocampal Network Function in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Clair A.; Witton, Jonathan; Nowacki, Jakub; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Jones, Matthew W.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and deposition of tau protein aggregates is proposed to contribute to cognitive impairments in dementia by disrupting neuronal function in brain regions, including the hippocampus. We used a battery of in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological recordings in the rTg4510 transgenic mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau protein, to investigate the effects of tau pathology on hippocampal neuronal function in area CA1 of 7- to 8-month-old mice, an age point at which rTg4510 animals exhibit advanced tau pathology and progressive neurodegeneration. In vitro recordings revealed shifted theta-frequency resonance properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons, deficits in synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral synapses, and blunted plasticity and imbalanced inhibition at temporoammonic synapses. These changes were associated with aberrant CA1 network oscillations, pyramidal neuron bursting, and spatial information coding in vivo. Our findings relate tauopathy-associated changes in cellular neurophysiology to altered behavior-dependent network function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dementia is characterized by the loss of learning and memory ability. The deposition of tau protein aggregates in the brain is a pathological hallmark of dementia; and the hippocampus, a brain structure known to be critical in processing learning and memory, is one of the first and most heavily affected regions. Our results show that, in area CA1 of hippocampus, a region involved in spatial learning and memory, tau pathology is associated with specific disturbances in synaptic, cellular, and network-level function, culminating in the aberrant encoding of spatial information and spatial memory impairment. These studies identify several novel ways in which hippocampal information processing may be disrupted in dementia, which may provide targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26758828

  4. Genotype-specific effects of Mecp2 loss-of-function on morphology of Layer V pyramidal neurons in heterozygous female Rett syndrome model mice

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Leslie; Stuss, David P.; McPhee, David; Delaney, Kerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurological disorder primarily caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The heterozygous female brain consists of mosaic of neurons containing both wild-type MeCP2 (MeCP2+) and mutant MeCP2 (MeCP2-). Three-dimensional morphological analysis was performed on individually genotyped layer V pyramidal neurons in the primary motor cortex of heterozygous (Mecp2+/-) and wild-type (Mecp2+/+) female mice ( > 6 mo.) from the Mecp2tm1.1Jae line. Comparing basal dendrite morphology, soma and nuclear size of MeCP2+ to MeCP2- neurons reveals a significant cell autonomous, genotype specific effect of Mecp2. MeCP2- neurons have 15% less total basal dendritic length, predominantly in the region 70–130 μm from the cell body and on average three fewer branch points, specifically loss in the second and third branch orders. Soma and nuclear areas of neurons of mice were analyzed across a range of ages (5–21 mo.) and X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) ratios (12–56%). On average, MeCP2- somata and nuclei were 15 and 13% smaller than MeCP2+ neurons respectively. In most respects branching morphology of neurons in wild-type brains (MeCP2 WT) was not distinguishable from MeCP2+ but somata and nuclei of MeCP2 WT neurons were larger than those of MeCP2+ neurons. These data reveal cell autonomous effects of Mecp2 mutation on dendritic morphology, but also suggest non-cell autonomous effects with respect to cell size. MeCP2+ and MeCP2- neuron sizes were not correlated with age, but were correlated with XCI ratio. Unexpectedly the MeCP2- neurons were smallest in brains where the XCI ratio was highly skewed toward MeCP2+, i.e., wild-type. This raises the possibility of cell non-autonomous effects that act through mechanisms other than globally secreted factors; perhaps competition for synaptic connections influences cell size and morphology in the genotypically mosaic brain of RTT model mice. PMID:25941473

  5. Highly differentiated cellular and circuit properties of infralimbic pyramidal neurons projecting to the periaqueductal gray and amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ashley N.; Yousuf, Hanna; Dalton, Sarah; Sheets, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    The infralimbic (IL) cortex is a key node in an inter-connected network involved in fear and emotion processing. The cellular and circuit-level mechanisms whereby IL neurons receive, filter, and modulate incoming signals they project onward to diverse downstream nodes in this complex network remain poorly understood. Using the mouse as our model, we applied anatomical labeling strategies, brain slice electrophysiology, and focal activation of caged glutamate via laser scanning photostimulation (glu-LSPS) for quantitative neurophysiological analysis of projectionally defined neurons in IL. Injection of retrograde tracers into the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) was used to identify cortico-PAG (CP) and cortico-BLA (CA) neurons in IL. CP neurons were found exclusively in layer 5 (L5) of IL whereas CA neurons were detected throughout layer 2, 3, and 5 of IL. We also identified a small percentage of IL neurons that project to both the PAG and the BLA. We found that L5 CP neurons have a more extensive dendritic structure compared to L5 CA neurons. Neurophysiological recordings performed on retrogradely labeled neurons in acute brain slice showed that CP and CA neurons in IL could be broadly classified in two groups: neuronal resonators and non-resonators. Layer 2 CA neurons were the only class that was exclusively non-resonating. CP, CA, and CP/CA neurons in layers 3 and 5 of IL consisted of heterogeneous populations of resonators and non-resonators showing that projection target is not an exclusive predictor of intrinsic physiology. Circuit mapping using glu-LSPS revealed that the strength and organization of local excitatory and inhibitory inputs were stronger to CP compared to CA neurons in IL. Together, our results establish an organizational scheme linking cellular neurophysiology with microcircuit parameters of defined neuronal subclasses in IL that send descending commands to subcortical structures involved in fear behavior. PMID:25972785

  6. Resolution of Nested Neuronal Representations Can Be Exponential in the Number of Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Stemmler, Martin B.

    2012-07-01

    Collective computation is typically polynomial in the number of computational elements, such as transistors or neurons, whether one considers the storage capacity of a memory device or the number of floating-point operations per second of a CPU. However, we show here that the capacity of a computational network to resolve real-valued signals of arbitrary dimensions can be exponential in N, even if the individual elements are noisy and unreliable. Nested, modular codes that achieve such high resolutions mirror the properties of grid cells in vertebrates, which underlie spatial navigation.

  7. Epileptiform activity induces distance-dependent alterations of the Ca2+ extrusion mechanism in the apical dendrites of subicular pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Kalyan V; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2008-12-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie acquired changes in Ca(2+) dynamics of different neuronal compartments are important in the induction and maintenance of epileptiform activity. Simultaneous electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging techniques were used to understand the basic properties of dendritic Ca(2+) signaling in rat subicular pyramidal neurons during epileptiform activity. Distance-dependent changes in the Ca(2+) decay kinetics locked to spontaneous epileptiform discharges and back-propagating action potentials were observed in the apical dendrites. A decrement in the mean tau value of Ca(2+) decay was observed in distal parts (95-110 mum) of the apical dendrites compared with proximal segments (30-45 mum) in in-vitro epileptic conditions but not in control. Pharmacological agents that block Ca(2+) transporters, i.e. Na(+)/ Ca(2+) exchangers (Benzamil), plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps (Calmidazolium) and smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps (Thapsigargin), were applied locally to the proximal and distal part of the apical dendrites in both experimental conditions to understand the molecular aspects of the Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms. The relative contribution of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers in Ca(2+) extrusion was higher in the distal apical dendrites in the in-vitro epileptic condition and this property modulated the excitability of the neuron in simulation. The Ca(2+) homeostatic mechanisms that restore normal Ca(2+) levels could play a major neuroprotective role in the distal dendrites that receive synaptic inputs. PMID:19046366

  8. Activation of Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Medial Prefrontal Cortex Enhances Food-Seeking Behavior While Reducing Impulsivity in the Absence of an Effect on Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Warthen, Daniel M.; Lambeth, Philip S.; Ottolini, Matteo; Shi, Yingtang; Barker, Bryan Scot; Gaykema, Ronald P.; Newmyer, Brandon A.; Joy-Gaba, Jonathan; Ohmura, Yu; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Güler, Ali D.; Patel, Manoj K.; Scott, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in a wide range of executive cognitive functions, including reward evaluation, decision-making, memory extinction, mood, and task switching. Manipulation of the mPFC has been shown to alter food intake and food reward valuation, but whether exclusive stimulation of mPFC pyramidal neurons (PN), which form the principle output of the mPFC, is sufficient to mediate food rewarded instrumental behavior is unknown. We sought to determine the behavioral consequences of manipulating mPFC output by exciting PN in mouse mPFC during performance of a panel of behavioral assays, focusing on food reward. We found that increasing mPFC pyramidal cell output using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) enhanced performance in instrumental food reward assays that assess food seeking behavior, while sparing effects on affect and food intake. Specifically, activation of mPFC PN enhanced operant responding for food reward, reinstatement of palatable food seeking, and suppression of impulsive responding for food reward. Conversely, activation of mPFC PN had no effect on unconditioned food intake, social interaction, or behavior in an open field. Furthermore, we found that behavioral outcome is influenced by the degree of mPFC activation, with a low drive sufficient to enhance operant responding and a higher drive required to alter impulsivity. Additionally, we provide data demonstrating that DREADD stimulation involves a nitric oxide (NO) synthase dependent pathway, similar to endogenous muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation, a finding that provides novel mechanistic insight into an increasingly widespread method of remote neuronal control. PMID:27065827

  9. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  10. Specific Targeting of the Basolateral Amygdala to Projectionally Defined Pyramidal Neurons in Prelimbic and Infralimbic Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ashley N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adjacent prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) regions in the medial prefrontal cortex have distinct roles in emotional learning. A complete mechanistic understanding underlying this dichotomy remains unclear. Here we explored targeting of specific PL and IL neurons by the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a limbic structure pivotal in pain and fear processing. In mice, we used retrograde labeling, brain-slice recordings, and adenoviral optogenetics to dissect connectivity of ascending BLA input onto PL and IL neurons projecting to the periaqueductal gray (PAG) or the amygdala. We found differential targeting of BLA projections to PL and IL cortex. Activating BLA projections evoked excitatory and inhibitory responses in cortico-PAG (CP) neurons in layer 5 (L5) of both PL and IL cortex. However, all inhibitory responses were polysynaptic and monosynaptic BLA input was stronger to CP neurons in IL cortex. Conversely, the BLA preferentially targeted corticoamygdalar (CA) neurons in layer 2 (L2) of PL over IL cortex. We also reveal that BLA input is projection specific by showing preferential targeting of L5 CP neurons over neighboring L3/5 CA neurons in IL cortex. We conclude by showing that BLA input is laminar-specific by producing stronger excitatory responses CA neurons in L3/5 compared with L2 in IL cortex. Collectively, this study reveals differential targeting of the BLA to PL and IL cortex, which depends both on laminar location and projection target of cortical neurons. Overall, our findings should have important implications for understanding the processing of pain and fear input by the PL and IL cortex. PMID:27022632

  11. Axon diameters and conduction velocities in the macaque pyramidal tract

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, L.; Field, P.; Maier, M. A.; Kraskov, A.; Kirkwood, P. A.; Nakajima, K.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Small axons far outnumber larger fibers in the corticospinal tract, but the function of these small axons remains poorly understood. This is because they are difficult to identify, and therefore their physiology remains obscure. To assess the extent of the mismatch between anatomic and physiological measures, we compared conduction time and velocity in a large number of macaque corticospinal neurons with the distribution of axon diameters at the level of the medullary pyramid, using both light and electron microscopy. At the electron microscopic level, a total of 4,172 axons were sampled from 2 adult male macaque monkeys. We confirmed that there were virtually no unmyelinated fibers in the pyramidal tract. About 14% of pyramidal tract axons had a diameter smaller than 0.50 μm (including myelin sheath), most of these remaining undetected using light microscopy, and 52% were smaller than 1 μm. In the electrophysiological study, we determined the distribution of antidromic latencies of pyramidal tract neurons, recorded in primary motor cortex, ventral premotor cortex, and supplementary motor area and identified by pyramidal tract stimulation (799 pyramidal tract neurons, 7 adult awake macaques) or orthodromically from corticospinal axons recorded at the mid-cervical spinal level (192 axons, 5 adult anesthetized macaques). The distribution of antidromic and orthodromic latencies of corticospinal neurons was strongly biased toward those with large, fast-conducting axons. Axons smaller than 3 μm and with a conduction velocity below 18 m/s were grossly underrepresented in our electrophysiological recordings, and those below 1 μm (6 m/s) were probably not represented at all. The identity, location, and function of the majority of corticospinal neurons with small, slowly conducting axons remains unknown. PMID:24872533

  12. High expression of cytochrome b 5 reductase isoform 3/cytochrome b 5 system in the cerebellum and pyramidal neurons of adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Samhan-Arias, A K; López-Sánchez, C; Marques-da-Silva, D; Lagoa, R; Garcia-Lopez, V; García-Martínez, V; Gutierrez-Merino, C

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome b 5 reductase (Cb 5R) and cytochrome b 5 (Cb 5) form an enzymatic redox system that plays many roles in mammalian cells. In the last 15 years, it has been proposed that this system is involved in the recycling of ascorbate, a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain and that its deregulation can lead to the production of reactive oxygen species that play a major role in oxidative-induced neuronal death. In this work, we have performed a regional and cellular distribution study of the expression of this redox system in adult rat brain by anti-Cb 5R isoform 3 and anti-Cb 5 antibodies. We found high expression levels in cerebellar cortex, labeling heavily granule neurons and Purkinje cells, and in structures such as the fastigial, interposed and dentate cerebellar nuclei. A large part of Cb 5R isoform 3 in the cerebellum cortex was regionalized in close proximity to the lipid raft-like nanodomains, labeled with cholera toxin B, as we have shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging. In addition, vestibular, reticular and motor nuclei located at the brain stem level and pyramidal neurons of somatomotor areas of the brain cortex and of the hippocampus have been also found to display high expression levels of these proteins. All these results point out the enrichment of Cb 5R isoform 3/Cb 5 system in neuronal cells and structures of the cerebellum and brain stem whose functional impairment can account for neurological deficits reported in type II congenital methemoglobinemia, as well as in brain areas highly prone to undergo oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:25850901

  13. Decreased Lin7b Expression in Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons May Contribute to Impaired Corticostriatal Connectivity in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Birgit; Kama, Jibrin A.; Kuhn, Alexandre; Thu, Doris; Orlando, Lianna R.; Dunah, Anthone W.; Gokce, Ozgun; Taylor, David M.; Lambeck, Johann; Friedrich, Bernd; Lindenberg, Katrin S.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Weiller, Cornelius; Young, Anne B.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and regional cortical atrophy indicate cerebral cortical involvement in Huntington disease (HD). To address the hypothesis that abnormal corticostriatal connectivity arises from polyglutamine-related alterations in cortical gene expression, we isolated layer 5 cortical neurons by laser-capture microdissection and analyzed transcriptome-wide mRNA changes in them. Enrichment of transcription factor mRNAs including foxp2, tbr1, and neuroD6, and neurotransmission- and plasticity-related RNAs including sema5A, pclo, ntrk2, cntn1 and lin7b were observed. Layer 5 motor cortex neurons of transgenic R6/2 HD mice also demonstrated numerous transcriptomic changes, including decreased expression of mRNAs encoding the lin7 homolog b, (lin7b, also known as veli-2 and mals2). Decreases in LIN7B and CNTN1 RNAs were also detected in human HD layer 5 motor cortex neurons. lin7b, a scaffold protein implicated in synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth and cellular polarity, was decreased at the protein level in layer 5 cortical neurons in R6/2 mice and human HD brains. Decreases in Lin7b and Lin7a mRNAs were detected in R6/2 cortex as early as 6 weeks of age, suggesting that this is an early pathogenetic event. Thus, decreased cortical LIN7 expression may contribute to abnormal corticostriatal connectivity in HD. PMID:20720508

  14. Age-dependent enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons via GluR5 kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Cui, Changhai; Alkon, Daniel L

    2009-08-01

    Changes in hippocampal synaptic networks during aging may contribute to age-dependent compromise of cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Previous studies have demonstrated that GABAergic synaptic transmission exhibits age-dependent changes. To better understand such age-dependent changes of GABAergic synaptic inhibition, we performed whole-cell recordings from pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of acute hippocampal slices on aged (24-26 months old) and young (2-4 months old) Brown-Norway rats. We found that the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSCs) were significantly increased in aged rats, but the frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs were decreased. Furthermore, the regulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission by GluR5 containing kainate receptors was enhanced in aged rats, which was revealed by using LY382884 (a GluR5 kainate receptor antagonist) and ATPA (a GluR5 kainate receptor agonist). Moreover, we demonstrated that vesicular glutamate transporters are involved in the kainate receptor dependent regulation of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that GABAergic synaptic transmission is potentiated in aged rats, and GluR5 containing kainate receptors regulate the inhibitory synaptic transmission through endogenous glutamate. These alterations of GABAergic input with aging could contribute to age-dependent cognitive decline. PMID:19123252

  15. Calcium current activation kinetics in isolated pyramidal neurones of the Ca1 region of the mature guinea-pig hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kay, A R; Wong, R K

    1987-11-01

    1. Neurones were isolated from the CA1 region of the guinea-pig hippocampus and subjected to the whole-cell mode of voltage clamping, to determine the kinetics of voltage-gated Ca2+ channel activation. 2. Isolated neurones had an abbreviated morphology, having lost most of the distal dendritic tree during the isolation procedure. The electrical compactness of the cells facilitates voltage clamp analysis. 3. Block of sodium and potassium currents revealed a persistent current activated on depolarization above -40 mV, which inactivated slowly when the intracellular medium contained EGTA. The current was blocked by Co2+ and Cd2+, augmented by increases in Ca2+ and could be carried by Ba2+, suggesting that the current is borne by Ca2+. 4. Steady-state activation of the Ca2+ current was found to be well described by the Boltzman equation raised to the second power. 5. The open channel's current-voltage (I-V) relationship rectified in the inward direction and was consistent with the constant-field equation. 6. The kinetics of Ca2+ current onset followed m2 kinetics throughout the range of its activation. Tail current kinetics were in accord with this model. A detailed Hodgkin-Huxley model was derived, defining the activation of this current. 7. The kinetics of the currents observed in this regionally and morphologically defined class of neurones were consistent with the existence of a single kinetic class of channels. PMID:2451732

  16. Association of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes with Girk channels and GABAB receptors in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Wickman, Kevin; Luján, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    In the hippocampus, signaling through G protein-coupled receptors is modulated by Regulators of G protein signaling (Rgs) proteins, which act to stimulate the rate of GTP hydrolysis, and consequently, G protein inactivation. The R7-Rgs subfamily selectively deactivates the G(i/o)-class of Gα subunits that mediate the action of several GPCRs. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, electrophysiology and immunoelectron microscopy techniques to investigate the formation of macromolecular complexes and spatial relationship of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes and its prototypical signaling partners, the GABAB receptor and Girk channel. Co-expression of recombinant GABAB receptors and Girk channels in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the Rgs7/Gβ5 forms complexes with GABAB receptors or Girk channels. Using electrophysiological experiments, we found that GABAB -Girk current deactivation kinetics was markedly faster in cells coexpressing Rgs7/Gβ5. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabeling for Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins was found primarily in the dendritic layers of the hippocampus and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of pyramidal cells and, to a lesser extent, to that of presynaptic terminals. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for Rgs7 and Gβ5 revealed an enrichment of the two proteins around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines, virtually identical to that of Girk2 and GABAB1 . These data support the existence of macromolecular complexes composed of GABAB receptor-G protein-Rgs7-Girk channels in which Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins may preferentialy modulate GABAB receptor signaling through the deactivation of Girk channels on dendritic spines. In contrast, Rgs7 and Girk2 were associated but mainly segregated from GABAB1 in dendritic shafts, where Rgs7/Gβ5 signaling complexes might modulate Girk-dependent signaling via a

  17. Association of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes with Girk channels and GABAB receptors in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Wickman, Kevin; Luján, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In the hippocampus, signalling through G protein-coupled receptors is modulated by Regulators of G protein Signalling (Rgs) proteins, which act to stimulate the rate of GTP hydrolysis, and consequently, G protein inactivation. The R7-Rgs subfamily selectively deactivates the Gi/o-class of Gα subunits that mediate the action of several GPCRs. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, electrophysiology and immunoelectron microscopy techniques to investigate the formation of macromolecular complexes and spatial relationship of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes and its prototypical signalling partners, the GABAB receptor and Girk channel. Co-expression of recombinant GABAB receptors and Girk channels in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the Rgs7/Gβ5 forms complexes with GABAB receptors or Girk channels. Using electrophysiological experiments, we found that GABAB-Girk current deactivation kinetics was markedly faster in cells co-expressing Rgs7/Gβ5. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabelling for Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins was found primarily in the dendritic layers of the hippocampus and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of pyramidal cells and, to a lesser extent, to that of presynaptic terminals. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for Rgs7 and Gβ5 revealed an enrichment of the two proteins around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines, virtually identical to that of Girk2 and GABAB1. These data support the existence of macromolecular complexes composed of GABAB receptor-G protein-Rgs7-Girk channels, in which Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins may preferentially modulate GABAB receptor signalling through the deactivation of Girk channels on dendritic spines. In contrast, Rgs7 and Girk2 were associated but mainly segregated from GABAB1 in dendritic shafts, where Rgs7/Gβ5 signalling complexes might modulate Girk-dependent signalling

  18. A change from HCO3(-)-CO2- to hepes-buffered medium modifies membrane properties of rat CA1 pyramidal neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were obtained from CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. Perfusion with a HCO3(-)-CO2-free, HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4 produced a wide variety of reversible effects on neuronal excitability, compared to responses obtained under standard (21 mM-HCO3-, 5% CO2, pH 7.4) conditions. 2. Introduction of HCO3(-)-CO2-free medium most commonly elicited, within 5-20 min, a fall in resting membrane potential (Vm), a rise in threshold for Na(+)-dependent action potential generation, and a reduction in input resistance. Anomalous inward rectification in the hyperpolarizing direction and subthreshold inward rectification were commonly reduced in HEPES-buffered medium. More prolonged exposure (> or = 25 min) to HCO3(-)-CO2-free medium produced, on occasion, Na+ spike inactivation. 3. The amplitudes of the fast and medium after-hyperpolarizations (AHPs) following a single depolarizing current-evoked action potential were attenuated during perfusion with HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4, as was the composite AHP following a train of action potentials. 4. Perfusion with HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4 reduced the degree of spike frequency adaptation and abolished depolarizing current-evoked burst-firing behaviour when this was present under standard conditions. 5. In tetrodotoxin (TTX)- and tetraethylammonium (TEA)-poisoned neurones, perfusion with HCO3(-)-CO2-free medium at pH 7.4 slightly raised the threshold for activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potentials and slightly reduced their duration, compared to responses obtained in HCO3(-)-CO2-buffered medium at the same pH. The AHP following the Ca2+ spike was, however, markedly attenuated. 6. Perfusion with a low-pH HCO3(-)-CO2-buffered medium (7 mM-HCO3-, 5% CO2, pH 6.9) produced changes qualitatively similar to those observed during perfusion with HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4. Raising the pH of the HEPES-buffered medium to 7.8 or 7.9 reversed inconsistently and then only in part the

  19. Activation of InsP3 receptors is sufficient for inducing graded intrinsic plasticity in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The synaptic plasticity literature has focused on establishing necessity and sufficiency as two essential and distinct features in causally relating a signaling molecule to plasticity induction, an approach that has been surprisingly lacking in the intrinsic plasticity literature. In this study, we complemented the recently established necessity of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3R) in a form of intrinsic plasticity by asking if InsP3R activation was sufficient to induce intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Specifically, incorporation of d-myo-InsP3 in the recording pipette reduced input resistance, maximal impedance amplitude, and temporal summation but increased resonance frequency, resonance strength, sag ratio, and impedance phase lead. Strikingly, the magnitude of plasticity in all these measurements was dependent on InsP3 concentration, emphasizing the graded dependence of such plasticity on InsP3R activation. Mechanistically, we found that this InsP3-induced plasticity depended on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Moreover, this calcium-dependent form of plasticity was critically reliant on the release of calcium through InsP3Rs, the influx of calcium through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels, and on the protein kinase A pathway. Our results delineate a causal role for InsP3Rs in graded adaptation of neuronal response dynamics, revealing novel regulatory roles for the endoplasmic reticulum in neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:25552640

  20. Effect of Dopaminergic D1 Receptors on Plasticity Is Dependent of Serotoninergic 5-HT1A Receptors in L5-Pyramidal Neurons of the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Claire Nicole Jeanne; Callebert, Jacques; Cancela, José-Manuel; Fossier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Major depression and schizophrenia are associated with dysfunctions of serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems mainly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Both serotonin and dopamine are known to modulate synaptic plasticity. 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1ARs) and dopaminergic type D1 receptors are highly represented on dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PyNs) in PFC. How these receptors interact to tune plasticity is poorly understood. Here we show that D1-like receptors (D1Rs) activation requires functional 5HT1ARs to facilitate LTP induction at the expense of LTD. Using 129/Sv and 5-HT1AR-KO mice, we recorded post-synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation in layer 2/3 after activation or inhibition of D1Rs. High frequency stimulation resulted in the induction of LTP, LTD or no plasticity. The D1 agonist markedly enhanced the NMDA current in 129/Sv mice and the percentage of L5PyNs displaying LTP was enhanced whereas LTD was reduced. In 5-HT1AR-KO mice, the D1 agonist failed to increase the NMDA current and orientated the plasticity towards L5PyNs displaying LTD, thus revealing a prominent role of 5-HT1ARs in dopamine-induced modulation of plasticity. Our data suggest that in pathological situation where 5-HT1ARs expression varies, dopaminergic treatment used for its ability to increase LTP could turn to be less and less effective. PMID:25775449

  1. Activity-dependent downregulation of D-type K+ channel subunit Kv1.2 in rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jung Ho; Eom, Kisang; Lee, Kyu-Hee; Ho, Won-Kyung; Lee, Suk-Ho

    2013-11-15

    The intrinsic excitability of neurons plays a critical role in the encoding of memory at Hebbian synapses and in the coupling of synaptic inputs to spike generation. It has not been studied whether somatic firing at a physiologically relevant frequency can induce intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells (CA3-PCs). Here, we show that a conditioning train of 20 action potentials (APs) at 10 Hz causes a persistent reduction in the input conductance and an acceleration of the AP onset time in CA3-PCs, but not in CA1-PCs. Induction of such long-term potentiation of intrinsic excitability (LTP-IE) was accompanied by a reduction in the D-type K(+) current, and was abolished by the inhibition of endocytosis or protein tyrosine kinase (PTK). Consistently, the CA3-PCs from Kv1.2 knock-out mice displayed no LTP-IE with the same conditioning. Furthermore, the induction of LTP-IE depended on the back-propagating APs (bAPs) and intact distal apical dendrites. These results indicate that LTP-IE is mediated by the internalization of Kv1.2 channels from the distal regions of apical dendrites, which is triggered by bAP-induced dendritic Ca(2+) signalling and the consequent activation of PTK. PMID:23981714

  2. Suppression of Ischemia-Induced Hippocampal Pyramidal Neuron Death by Hyaluronan Tetrasaccharide through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sunabori, Takehiko; Koike, Masato; Asari, Akira; Oonuki, Yoji; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are one of the main contributors that induce inflammation under tissue injury and infection. Because excessive inflammation can aggravate disease states, it is important to control inflammation at a moderate level. Herein, we show that hyaluronan (HA) oligomer, HA tetrasaccharide (HA4), could suppress the expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β when stimulated with both TLR2- and TLR4-specific agonists in primary hippocampal neurons. To understand the effect of HA4 against ischemic insult, we performed hypoxic-ischemic (H/I) brain injury against neonatal mice. HA4 treatment significantly prevented hippocampal pyramidal cell death even 7 days after H/I injury, compared with the control mice. Although TLR2 and TLR4 are known as receptors for HA and also act as a receptor for inducing inflammation, only TLR2-deficient mice showed tolerance against H/I injury. Moreover, HA4 administration suppressed gliosis by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, the downstream target of TLR2, which led to the suppression of IL-1β expression. Taken together, our data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of HA4 relies on antagonizing the TLR2/NF-κB pathway to reduce inflammation through suppressing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines after neonatal H/I brain injury. PMID:27301359

  3. Rapid dopaminergic and GABAergic modulation of calcium and voltage transients in dendrites of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Antic, Srdjan D

    2012-01-01

    The physiological responses of dendrites to dopaminergic inputs are poorly understood and controversial. We applied dopamine on one dendritic branch while simultaneously monitoring action potentials (APs) from multiple dendrites using either calcium-sensitive dye, voltage-sensitive dye or both. Dopaminergic suppression of dendritic calcium transients was rapid (<0.5 s) and restricted to the site of dopamine application. Voltage waveforms of backpropagating APs were minimally altered in the same dendrites where dopamine was confirmed to cause large suppression of calcium signals, as determined by dual voltage and calcium imaging. The dopamine effects on dendritic calcium transients were fully mimicked by D1 agonists, partially reduced by D1 antagonist and completely insensitive to protein kinase blockade; consistent with a membrane delimited mechanism. This dopamine effect was unaltered in the presence of L-, R- and T-type calcium channel blockers. The somatic excitability (i.e. AP firing) was not affected by strong dopaminergic stimulation of dendrites. Dopamine and GABA were then sequentially applied on the same dendrite. In contrast to dopamine, the pulses of GABA prohibited AP backpropagation distally from the application site, even in neurons with natural Cl− concentration (patch pipette removed). Thus, the neocortex employs at least two distinct mechanisms (dopamine and GABA) for rapid modulation of dendritic calcium influx. The spatio-temporal pattern of dendritic calcium suppression described in this paper is expected to occur during phasic dopaminergic signalling, when midbrain dopaminergic neurons generate a transient (0.5 s) burst of APs in response to a salient event. PMID:22641784

  4. Interdependent Roles for Accessory KChIP2, KChIP3 and KChIP4 Subunits in the Generation of Kv4-encoded IA Channels in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Aaron J.; Foeger, Nicholas C.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent outward K+ (Kv) current, IA, is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons. IA has long been recognized to play important roles in determining neuronal firing properties and regulating neuronal excitability. Previous work demonstrated that Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 α-subunits are the primary determinants of IA in mouse cortical pyramidal neurons. Accumulating evidence indicates that native neuronal Kv4 channels function in macromolecular protein complexes that contain accessory subunits and other regulatory molecules. The K+ Channel Interacting Proteins (KChIPs) are among the identified Kv4 channel accessory subunits and are thought to be important for the formation and functioning of neuronal Kv4 channel complexes. Molecular genetic, biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were exploited in the experiments described here to examine directly the roles of KChIPs in the generation of functional Kv4-encoded IA channels. These combined experiments revealed that KChIP2, KChIP3 and KChIP4 are robustly expressed in adult mouse posterior (visual) cortex and that all three proteins co-immunoprecipitate with Kv4.2. In addition, in cortical pyramidal neurons from mice lacking KChIP3 (KChIP3−/−), mean IA densities were reduced modestly, whereas in mean IA densities in KChIP2−/− and WT neurons were not significantly different. Interestingly, in both KChIP3−/− and KChIP2−/− cortices the expression levels of the other KChIPs (KChIP2 and 4 or KChIP3 and 4, respectively) were increased. In neurons expressing constructs to mediate simultaneous RNA interference-induced reductions in the expression of KChIP2, 3 and 4, IA densities were markedly reduced and Kv current remodeling was evident. PMID:20943905

  5. RNA-seq profiling of small numbers of Drosophila neurons.

    PubMed

    Abruzzi, Katharine; Chen, Xiao; Nagoshi, Emi; Zadina, Abby; Rosbash, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has a robust circadian clock, which drives a rhythmic behavior pattern: locomotor activity increases in the morning shortly before lights on (M peak) and in the evening shortly before lights off (E peak). This pattern is controlled by ~75 pairs of circadian neurons in the Drosophila brain. One key group of neurons is the M-cells (PDF(+) large and small LNvs), which control the M peak. A second key group is the E-cells, consisting of four LNds and the fifth small LNv, which control the E peak. Recent studies show that the M-cells have a second role in addition to controlling the M peak; they communicate with the E-cells (as well as DN1s) to affect their timing, probably as a function of environmental conditions (Guo, Cerullo, Chen, & Rosbash, 2014). To learn about molecules within the M-cells important for their functional roles, we have adapted methods to manually sort fluorescent protein-expressing neurons of interest from dissociated Drosophila brains. We isolated mRNA and miRNA from sorted M-cells and amplified the resulting DNAs to create deep-sequencing libraries. Visual inspection of the libraries illustrates that they are specific to a particular neuronal subgroup; M-cell libraries contain timeless and dopaminergic cell libraries contain ple/TH. Using these data, it is possible to identify cycling transcripts as well as many mRNAs and miRNAs specific to or enriched in particular groups of neurons. PMID:25662465

  6. Enteric neuronal plasticity and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in hypertrophic rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    Ekblad, E; Sjuve, R; Arner, A; Sundler, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Partial obstruction of the ileum causes a notable hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and enteric neurones in the proximally located intestine. 
Aims—To study the expression of neuromessengers in the hypertrophic ileum of rat as little is known about neuromessenger plasticity under these conditions. To investigate the presence of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in hypertrophic ileum. 
Methods—Ileal hypertrophy was induced by circumferential application of a strip of plastic film for 18-24 days. Immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridisation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry, and ethidium bromide staining were used to investigate the number of enteric neurones expressing neuropeptides and nitric oxide synthase, and the frequency of ICC. 
Results—In the hypertrophic ileum several neuronal populations showed changes in their expression of neuromessengers. Myenteric neurones expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, and galanin were notably increased in number. In submucous ganglia the number of VIP immunoreactive neurones decreased while those expressing VIP mRNA increased. NADPH diaphorase positive submucous neurones increased dramatically while the number of neuronal type nitric oxide synthase expressing ones was unchanged. The number of ICC decreased notably in hypertrophic ileum. 
Conclusion—Enteric neurones change their levels of expression of neuromessengers in hypertrophic ileum. ICC are also affected. The changes are presumably part of an adaptive response to the increased work load. 

 Keywords: enteric nerves; interstitial cells of Cajal; hypertrophy; neuropeptides; nitric oxide; neuronal plasticity PMID:9691923

  7. Blockade by sigma site ligands of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J.; Fletcher, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a series of structurally-dissimilar sigma site ligands were examined on high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity in two preparations of cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones. 2. In mouse hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel currents carried by barium ions (IBa) were reduced with the rank order (IC50 values in microM): 1S,2R-(-)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]- 2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexylamine (7.8) > rimcazole (13) > haloperidol (16) > ifenprodil (18) > opipramol (32) > carbetapentane (40) = 1-benzylspiro[1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-1,4-piperidine] (42) > caramiphen (47) > dextromethorphan (73). At the highest concentrations tested, the compounds almost abolished IBa in the absence of any other pharmacological agent. 3. The current-voltage characteristics of the whole-cell IBa were unaffected by the test compounds. The drug-induced block was rapid in onset and offset, with the exceptions of carbetapentane and caramiphen where full block was achieved only after two to three voltage-activated currents and was associated with an apparent increase in the rate of inactivation of IBa. 4. In rat hippocampal neurones loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fura-2, rises in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration evoked by transient exposure to 50 mM K(+)-containing medium, either in the absence or in the presence of 10 microM nifedipine (to block L-type high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels), were also reversibly attenuated by the sigma ligands. The rank order potencies for the compounds in these experimental paradigms were similar to that observed for blockade of IBa in the electrophysiological studies. 5. These results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, the compounds tested block multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. These actions, which do not appear to be mediated by high-affinity sigma binding sites, may play a role in some of the functional effects

  8. Blockade by sigma site ligands of N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked responses in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, E. J.; Church, J.; Abdel-Hamid, K.; MacDonald, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a range of structurally-dissimilar compounds which possess affinity for sigma binding sites were examined on the responses of cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones to the excitatory amino acid analogues N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate and (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). 2. In mouse hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp, the compounds tested reversibly attenuated NMDA-, but not kainate- or AMPA-, evoked currents with a rank order potency (IC50 values in microM): ifenprodil (0.8) > (+)-N-allylnormetazocine (1.1) > dextromethorphan (1.8) = haloperidol (1.9) > (+)-pentazocine (7.2) > 1S,2R-(-)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl) ethyl]-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexylamine (17) = rimcazole (18) > 1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (37) > opipramol (96) > caramiphen (110) = carbetapentane (112) > > (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (485). 3. The attenuation of NMDA-evoked responses was not mediated through interactions with the agonist, glycine (except haloperidol) or polyamine (except ifenprodil) binding sites on the NMDA receptor-channel complex but, in the light of the voltage- and, in some cases, use-dependent nature of their antagonism, an interaction with the ion channel appears to be a likely mechanism of action for many of the compounds. 4. Micromolar concentrations of selected sigma site ligands also reduced NMDA-evoked rises in intracellular free calcium concentration in Fura-2-loaded cultured hippocampal neurones of the rat with the same rank order potency as observed in the electrophysiological studies. 5. The data indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, the sigma site ligands tested act as NMDA receptor antagonists, an action which does not appear to be mediated by high-affinity sigma binding site(s). The functional effects of micromolar concentrations of sigma site ligands cannot, therefore, be attributed exclusively to interactions with high-affinity sigma binding sites

  9. The Pyramid Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onions, Chris

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the solutions generated by a fifth grade class to the problem of finding the sum of the number of blocks in a pyramid with a bottom layer containing seven blocks. Three methods were recorded: a levels method, a columns method, and a vertical slice method. (MDH)

  10. Characterization of L-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Expression and Function in Developing CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Norlin, Mackenzie S.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) play a major role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Ca2+ influx via VGCCs regulates axonal growth and neuronal migration as well as synaptic plasticity. Specifically, L-type VGCCs have been well characterized to be involved in the formation and refinement of the connections within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The majority of the growth, formation, and refinement in the CNS occurs during the human third trimester. An equivalent developmental time period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks of post-natal life, and the expression pattern of L-type VGCCs during this time period has not been well characterized. In this study, we show that Cav1.2 channels are more highly expressed during this developmental period compared to adolescence (post-natal day 30) and that L-type VGCCs significantly contribute to the overall Ca2+ currents. These findings suggest that L-type VGCCs are functionally expressed during the crucial developmental period. PMID:23415785

  11. Motor Training Promotes Both Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity of Layer II/III Pyramidal Neurons in the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Yasumasa; Ito, Nana; Yamamoto, Yui; Owada, Yuji; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Mitsushima, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Motor skill training induces structural plasticity at dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex (M1). To further analyze both synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the layer II/III area of M1, we subjected rats to a rotor rod test and then prepared acute brain slices. Motor skill consistently improved within 2 days of training. Voltage clamp analysis showed significantly higher α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/N-methyl-d-aspartate (AMPA/NMDA) ratios and miniature EPSC amplitudes in 1-day trained rats compared with untrained rats, suggesting increased postsynaptic AMPA receptors in the early phase of motor learning. Compared with untrained controls, 2-days trained rats showed significantly higher miniature EPSC amplitude and frequency. Paired-pulse analysis further demonstrated lower rates in 2-days trained rats, suggesting increased presynaptic glutamate release during the late phase of learning. One-day trained rats showed decreased miniature IPSC frequency and increased paired-pulse analysis of evoked IPSC, suggesting a transient decrease in presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release. Moreover, current clamp analysis revealed lower resting membrane potential, higher spike threshold, and deeper afterhyperpolarization in 1-day trained rats—while 2-days trained rats showed higher membrane potential, suggesting dynamic changes in intrinsic properties. Our present results indicate dynamic changes in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and intrinsic plasticity in M1 layer II/III neurons after the motor training. PMID:27193420

  12. A microfluidic device to investigate axon targeting by limited numbers of purified cortical projection neuron subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Tharin, Suzanne; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.; Ozdinler, Pembe Hande; Pasquina, Lincoln; Chung, Seok; Varner, Johanna; DeValence, Sarra; Kamm, Roger; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    While much is known about general controls over axon guidance of broad classes of projection neurons (those with long-distance axonal connections), molecular controls over specific axon targeting by distinct neuron subtypes are poorly understood. Corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) are prototypical and clinically important cerebral cortex projection neurons; they are the brain neurons that degenerate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related motor neuron diseases, and their injury is central to the loss of motor function in spinal cord injury. Primary culture of purified immature murine CSMN has been recently established, using either fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or immunopanning, enabling a previously unattainable level of subtype-specific investigation, but the resulting number of CSMN is quite limiting for standard approaches to study axon guidance. We developed a microfluidic system specifically designed to investigate axon targeting of limited numbers of purified CSMN and other projection neurons in culture. The system contains two chambers for culturing target tissue explants, allowing for biologically revealing axonal growth “choice” experiments. This device will be uniquely enabling for investigation of controls over axon growth and neuronal survival of many types of neurons, particularly those available only in limited numbers. PMID:23034677

  13. Neurophysiological modification of CA1 pyramidal neurons in a transgenic mouse expressing a truncated form of disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Clair A; Brown, Jonathan T; Randall, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    A t(1;11) balanced chromosomal translocation transects the Disc1 gene in a large Scottish family and produces genome-wide linkage to schizophrenia and recurrent major depressive disorder. This study describes our in vitro investigations into neurophysiological function in hippocampal area CA1 of a transgenic mouse (DISC1tr) that expresses a truncated version of DISC1 designed to reproduce aspects of the genetic situation in the Scottish t(1;11) pedigree. We employed both patch-clamp and extracellular recording methods in vitro to compare intrinsic properties and synaptic function and plasticity between DISC1tr animals and wild-type littermates. Patch-clamp analysis of CA1 pyramidal neurons (CA1-PNs) revealed no genotype dependence in multiple subthreshold parameters, including resting potential, input resistance, hyperpolarization-activated ‘sag’ and resonance properties. Suprathreshold stimuli revealed no alteration to action potential (AP) waveform, although the initial rate of AP production was higher in DISC1tr mice. No difference was observed in afterhyperpolarizing potentials following trains of 5–25 APs at 50 Hz. Patch-clamp analysis of synaptic responses in the Schaffer collateral commissural (SC) pathway indicated no genotype-dependence of paired pulse facilitation, excitatory postsynaptic potential summation or AMPA/NMDA ratio. Extracellular recordings also revealed an absence of changes to SC synaptic responses and indicated input–output and short-term plasticity were also unaltered in the temporoammonic (TA) input. However, in DISC1tr mice theta burst-induced long-term potentiation was enhanced in the SC pathway but completely lost in the TA pathway. These data demonstrate that expressing a truncated form of DISC1 affects intrinsic properties of CA1-PNs and produces pathway-specific effects on long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24712988

  14. Neurons selective to the number of visual items in the corvid songbird endbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ditz, Helen M.; Nieder, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether anatomical specializations in the endbrains of different vertebrates determine the neuronal code to represent numerical quantity. Therefore, we recorded single-neuron activity from the endbrain of crows trained to judge the number of items in displays. Many neurons were tuned for numerosities irrespective of the physical appearance of the items, and their activity correlated with performance outcome. Comparison of both behavioral and neuronal representations of numerosity revealed that the data are best described by a logarithmically compressed scaling of numerical information, as postulated by the Weber–Fechner law. The behavioral and neuronal numerosity representations in the crow reflect surprisingly well those found in the primate association cortex. This finding suggests that distantly related vertebrates with independently developed endbrains adopted similar neuronal solutions to process quantity. PMID:26056278

  15. Neurons selective to the number of visual items in the corvid songbird endbrain.

    PubMed

    Ditz, Helen M; Nieder, Andreas

    2015-06-23

    It is unknown whether anatomical specializations in the endbrains of different vertebrates determine the neuronal code to represent numerical quantity. Therefore, we recorded single-neuron activity from the endbrain of crows trained to judge the number of items in displays. Many neurons were tuned for numerosities irrespective of the physical appearance of the items, and their activity correlated with performance outcome. Comparison of both behavioral and neuronal representations of numerosity revealed that the data are best described by a logarithmically compressed scaling of numerical information, as postulated by the Weber-Fechner law. The behavioral and neuronal numerosity representations in the crow reflect surprisingly well those found in the primate association cortex. This finding suggests that distantly related vertebrates with independently developed endbrains adopted similar neuronal solutions to process quantity. PMID:26056278

  16. Age-Dependent Neurogenesis and Neuron Numbers within the Olfactory Bulb and Hippocampus of Homing Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Meskenaite, Virginia; Krackow, Sven; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many birds are supreme long-distance navigators that develop their navigational ability in the first months after fledgling but update the memorized environmental information needed for navigation also later in life. We studied the extent of juvenile and adult neurogenesis that could provide such age-related plasticity in brain regions known to mediate different mechanisms of pigeon homing: the olfactory bulb (OB), and the triangular area of the hippocampal formation (HP tr). Newly generated neurons (visualized by doublecortin, DCX) and mature neurons were counted stereologically in 35 pigeon brains ranging from 1 to 168 months of age. At the age of 1 month, both areas showed maximal proportions of DCX positive neurons, which rapidly declined during the first year of life. In the OB, the number of DCX-positive periglomerular neurons declined further over time, but the number of mature periglomerular cells appeared unchanged. In the hippocampus, the proportion of DCX-positive neurons showed a similar decline yet to a lesser extent. Remarkably, in the triangular area of the hippocampus, the oldest birds showed nearly twice the number of neurons as compared to young adult pigeons, suggesting that adult born neurons in these regions expanded the local circuitry even in aged birds. This increase might reflect navigational experience and, possibly, expanded spatial memory. On the other hand, the decrease of juvenile neurons in the aging OB without adding new circuitry might be related to the improved attachment to the loft characterizing adult and old pigeons. PMID:27445724

  17. Correlates of hippocampal neuron number in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V; Ellis, William G; Weiner, Michael W; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C

    2005-06-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia-ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5-7 slabs/case), cut into 50 microm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  18. Correlates of Hippocampal Neuron Number in Alzheimer’s Disease and Ischemic Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V.; Ellis, William G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C.

    2007-01-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia–ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5–7 slabs/case), cut into 50μm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  19. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus.

  20. Differences in Number of Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Associated with Summer and Winter Photoperiods in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Aumann, Tim D.; Raabus, Mai; Tomas, Doris; Prijanto, Agustinus; Churilov, Leonid; Spitzer, Nicholas C.; Horne, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult rodent hypothalamus and midbrain is regulated by environmental cues, including photoperiod, and that this occurs via up- or down-regulation of expression of genes and proteins that are important for dopamine (DA) synthesis in extant neurons (‘DA neurotransmitter switching’). If the same occurs in humans, it may have implications for neurological symptoms associated with DA imbalances. Here we tested whether there are differences in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) and DA transporter (DAT) immunoreactive neurons in the midbrain of people who died in summer (long-day photoperiod, n = 5) versus winter (short-day photoperiod, n = 5). TH and DAT immunoreactivity in neurons and their processes was qualitatively higher in summer compared with winter. The density of TH immunopositive (TH+) neurons was significantly (~6-fold) higher whereas the density of TH immunonegative (TH-) neurons was significantly (~2.5-fold) lower in summer compared with winter. The density of total neurons (TH+ and TH- combined) was not different. The density of DAT+ neurons was ~2-fold higher whereas the density of DAT- neurons was ~2-fold lower in summer compared with winter, although these differences were not statistically significant. In contrast, midbrain nuclear volume, the density of supposed glia (small TH- cells), and the amount of TUNEL staining were the same in summer compared with winter. This study provides the first evidence of an association between environmental stimuli (photoperiod) and the number of midbrain DA neurons in humans, and suggests DA neurotransmitter switching underlies this association. PMID:27428306

  1. Systematic, Cross-Cortex Variation in Neuron Numbers in Rodents and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Christine J.; Cahalane, Diarmuid J.; Finlay, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Uniformity, local variability, and systematic variation in neuron numbers per unit of cortical surface area across species and cortical areas have been claimed to characterize the isocortex. Resolving these claims has been difficult, because species, techniques, and cortical areas vary across studies. We present a stereological assessment of neuron numbers in layers II–IV and V–VI per unit of cortical surface area across the isocortex in rodents (hamster, Mesocricetus auratus; agouti, Dasyprocta azarae; paca, Cuniculus paca) and primates (owl monkey, Aotus trivigratus; tamarin, Saguinus midas; capuchin, Cebus apella); these chosen to vary systematically in cortical size. The contributions of species, cortical areas, and techniques (stereology, “isotropic fractionator”) to neuron estimates were assessed. Neurons per unit of cortical surface area increase across the rostro-caudal (RC) axis in primates (varying by a factor of 1.64–2.13 across the rostral and caudal poles) but less in rodents (varying by a factor of 1.15–1.54). Layer II–IV neurons account for most of this variation. When integrated into the context of species variation, and this RC gradient in neuron numbers, conflicts between studies can be accounted for. The RC variation in isocortical neurons in adulthood mirrors the gradients in neurogenesis duration in development. PMID:23960207

  2. Carbon monoxide improves neuronal differentiation and yield by increasing the functioning and number of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Ana S; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-01

    The process of cell differentiation goes hand-in-hand with metabolic adaptations, which are needed to provide energy and new metabolites. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous cytoprotective molecule able to inhibit cell death and improve mitochondrial metabolism. Neuronal differentiation processes were studied using the NT2 cell line, which is derived from human testicular embryonic teratocarcinoma and differentiates into post-mitotic neurons upon retinoic acid treatment. CO-releasing molecule A1 (CORM-A1) was used do deliver CO into cell culture. CO treatment improved NT2 neuronal differentiation and yield, since there were more neurons and the total cell number increased following the differentiation process. CO supplementation enhanced the mitochondrial population in post-mitotic neurons derived from NT2 cells, as indicated by an increase in mitochondrial DNA. CO treatment during neuronal differentiation increased the extent of the classical metabolic change that occurs during neuronal differentiation, from glycolytic to more oxidative metabolism, by decreasing the ratio of lactate production and glucose consumption. The expression of pyruvate and lactate dehydrogenases was higher, indicating an augmented oxidative metabolism. Moreover, these findings were corroborated by an increased percentage of (13) C incorporation from [U-(13) C]glucose into the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites malate and citrate, and also glutamate and aspartate in CO-treated cells. Finally, under low levels of oxygen (5%), which enhances glycolytic metabolism, some of the enhancing effects of CO on mitochondria were not observed. In conclusion, our data show that CO improves neuronal and mitochondrial yield by stimulation of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and thus oxidative metabolism of NT2 cells during the process of neuronal differentiation. The process of cell differentiation is coupled with metabolic adaptations. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous cytoprotective

  3. Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Kocourek, Martin; Lučan, Radek K.; Porteš, Michal; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Němec, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Some birds achieve primate-like levels of cognition, even though their brains tend to be much smaller in absolute size. This poses a fundamental problem in comparative and computational neuroscience, because small brains are expected to have a lower information-processing capacity. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine numbers of neurons in specific brain regions, here we show that the brains of parrots and songbirds contain on average twice as many neurons as primate brains of the same mass, indicating that avian brains have higher neuron packing densities than mammalian brains. Additionally, corvids and parrots have much higher proportions of brain neurons located in the pallial telencephalon compared with primates or other mammals and birds. Thus, large-brained parrots and corvids have forebrain neuron counts equal to or greater than primates with much larger brains. We suggest that the large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence. PMID:27298365

  4. Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Kocourek, Martin; Lučan, Radek K; Porteš, Michal; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Němec, Pavel

    2016-06-28

    Some birds achieve primate-like levels of cognition, even though their brains tend to be much smaller in absolute size. This poses a fundamental problem in comparative and computational neuroscience, because small brains are expected to have a lower information-processing capacity. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine numbers of neurons in specific brain regions, here we show that the brains of parrots and songbirds contain on average twice as many neurons as primate brains of the same mass, indicating that avian brains have higher neuron packing densities than mammalian brains. Additionally, corvids and parrots have much higher proportions of brain neurons located in the pallial telencephalon compared with primates or other mammals and birds. Thus, large-brained parrots and corvids have forebrain neuron counts equal to or greater than primates with much larger brains. We suggest that the large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence. PMID:27298365

  5. No relative expansion of the number of prefrontal neurons in primate and human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gabi, Mariana; Neves, Kleber; Masseron, Carolinne; Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Torres, Laila; Mota, Bruno; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Human evolution is widely thought to have involved a particular expansion of prefrontal cortex. This popular notion has recently been challenged, although controversies remain. Here we show that the prefrontal region of both human and nonhuman primates holds about 8% of cortical neurons, with no clear difference across humans and other primates in the distribution of cortical neurons or white matter cells along the anteroposterior axis. Further, we find that the volumes of human prefrontal gray and white matter match the expected volumes for the number of neurons in the gray matter and for the number of other cells in the white matter compared with other primate species. These results indicate that prefrontal cortical expansion in human evolution happened along the same allometric trajectory as for other primate species, without modification of the distribution of neurons across its surface or of the volume of the underlying white matter. We thus propose that the most distinctive feature of the human prefrontal cortex is its absolute number of neurons, not its relative volume. PMID:27503881

  6. Metabolic constraint imposes tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Despite a general trend for larger mammals to have larger brains, humans are the primates with the largest brain and number of neurons, but not the largest body mass. Why are great apes, the largest primates, not also those endowed with the largest brains? Recently, we showed that the energetic cost of the brain is a linear function of its numbers of neurons. Here we show that metabolic limitations that result from the number of hours available for feeding and the low caloric yield of raw foods impose a tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons, which explains the small brain size of great apes compared with their large body size. This limitation was probably overcome in Homo erectus with the shift to a cooked diet. Absent the requirement to spend most available hours of the day feeding, the combination of newly freed time and a large number of brain neurons affordable on a cooked diet may thus have been a major positive driving force to the rapid increased in brain size in human evolution. PMID:23090991

  7. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M.; Lau, Dawn H.W.; Mórotz, Gábor M.; De Vos, Kurt J.; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:26459111

  8. Regulation of Cerebral Cortical Size and Neuron Number by Fibroblast Growth Factors: Implications for Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccarino, Flora M.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Smith, Karen Muller; Stevens, Hanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Increased brain size is common in children with autism spectrum disorders. Here we propose that an increased number of cortical excitatory neurons may underlie the increased brain volume, minicolumn pathology and excessive network excitability, leading to sensory hyper-reactivity and seizures, which are often found in autism. We suggest that…

  9. Mossy cells and different subpopulations of pyramidal neurons are immunoreactive for cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in the hippocampal formation of non-human primates and tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri).

    PubMed

    Abrahám, H; Czéh, B; Fuchs, E; Seress, L

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide mRNA was discovered in the rat striatum following cocaine and amphetamine administration. Since both psychostimulants elicit memory-related effects, localization of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in the hippocampal formation may have functional importance. Previous studies demonstrated different cellular localizations of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in humans and in rodents. Mossy cells were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-positive in the human dentate gyrus, whereas granule cells contained this peptide in the rat. In the present study, the localization of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide was examined using immunohistochemistry in the hippocampal formation of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) and in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri). In these species principal neurons of the hippocampal formation were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunoreactive. In both monkeys and tree shrews, mossy cells of the hilus were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-positive whereas granule cells of the dentate gyrus were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-negative. The dense cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunoreactive axonal plexus of the associational pathway outlined the inner one-third of the dentate molecular layer. In the hippocampus of the tree shrew and marmoset monkey, a subset of CA3 pyramidal cells were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunoreactive. In the marmoset monkey, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript labeling was found only in layer V pyramidal cells of the entorhinal cortex, while in the rhesus monkey, pyramidal cells of layers II and III were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunopositive. Our results show that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript positive neurons in the dentate

  10. Neuronal Representation of Numerosity Zero in the Primate Parieto-Frontal Number Network.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Cardenas, Araceli; Moskaleva, Maria; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-05-23

    Neurons in the primate parieto-frontal network represent the number of visual items in a collection, but it is unknown whether this system encodes empty sets as conveying null quantity. We recorded from the ventral intraparietal area (VIP) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys performing a matching task including empty sets and countable numerosities as stimuli. VIP neurons encoded empty sets predominantly as a distinct category from numerosities. In contrast, PFC neurons represented empty sets more similarly to numerosity one than to larger numerosities, exhibiting numerical distance and size effects. Moreover, prefrontal neurons represented empty sets abstractly and irrespective of stimulus variations. Compared to VIP, the activity of numerosity neurons in PFC correlated better with the behavioral outcome of empty-set trials. Our results suggest a hierarchy in the processing from VIP to PFC, along which empty sets are steadily detached from visual properties and gradually positioned in a numerical continuum. These findings elucidate how the brain transforms the absence of countable items, nothing, into an abstract quantitative category, zero. PMID:27112297

  11. Putting the Pyramid into Practice. Science Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Explains the new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide Pyramid, which can help children and adults visualize the basics of sound nutrition. The pyramid chart places five food groups from top to bottom in inverse proportion to the number of servings that should be consumed. Special symbols are used to indicate fat content and added…

  12. Urban Public Health: Is There a Pyramid?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Meirong; Chen, Bin; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Wang, Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH). Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London) are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000–2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development. PMID:23358233

  13. Urban public health: is there a pyramid?

    PubMed

    Su, Meirong; Chen, Bin; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Wang, Jiao

    2013-02-01

    Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH). Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London) are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000-2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development. PMID:23358233

  14. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  15. Axospinous synaptic subtype-specific differences in structure, size, ionotropic receptor expression, and connectivity in apical dendritic regions of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Daniel A.; Geinisman, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of axospinous synapses and their parent spines varies widely. Additionally, many of these synapses are contacted by multiple synapse boutons (MSBs) and show substantial variability in receptor expression. The two major axospinous synaptic subtypes are perforated and nonperforated, but there are several subcategories within these two classes. The present study used serial section electron microscopy to determine whether perforated and nonperforated synaptic subtypes differed with regard to their distribution, size, receptor expression, and connectivity to MSBs in three apical dendritic regions of rat hippocampal area CA1: the proximal and distal thirds of stratum radiatum, and stratum lacunosum-moleculare. All synaptic subtypes were present throughout the apical dendritic regions, but there were several subclass-specific differences. First, segmented, completely partitioned synapses changed in number, proportion, and AMPA receptor expression with distance from the soma beyond that found within other perforated synaptic subtypes. Second, atypically large nonperforated synapses showed NMDA receptor immunoreactivity identical to perforated synapses, levels of AMPA receptor expression intermediate to nonperforated and perforated synapses, and perforated synapse-like changes in structure with distance from the soma. Finally, MSB connectivity was highest in proximal stratum radiatum, but only for those MSBs comprised of nonperforated synapses. The immunogold data suggest that most MSBs would not generate simultaneous depolarizations in multiple neurons or spines, however, because the vast majority of MSBs are comprised of two synapses with abnormally low levels of receptor expression, or involve one synapse with a high level of receptor expression and another with only a low level. PMID:19006199

  16. Brain scaling in mammalian evolution as a consequence of concerted and mosaic changes in numbers of neurons and average neuronal cell size

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Manger, Paul R.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2014-01-01

    Enough species have now been subject to systematic quantitative analysis of the relationship between the morphology and cellular composition of their brain that patterns begin to emerge and shed light on the evolutionary path that led to mammalian brain diversity. Based on an analysis of the shared and clade-specific characteristics of 41 modern mammalian species in 6 clades, and in light of the phylogenetic relationships among them, here we propose that ancestral mammal brains were composed and scaled in their cellular composition like modern afrotherian and glire brains: with an addition of neurons that is accompanied by a decrease in neuronal density and very little modification in glial cell density, implying a significant increase in average neuronal cell size in larger brains, and the allocation of approximately 2 neurons in the cerebral cortex and 8 neurons in the cerebellum for every neuron allocated to the rest of brain. We also propose that in some clades the scaling of different brain structures has diverged away from the common ancestral layout through clade-specific (or clade-defining) changes in how average neuronal cell mass relates to numbers of neurons in each structure, and how numbers of neurons are differentially allocated to each structure relative to the number of neurons in the rest of brain. Thus, the evolutionary expansion of mammalian brains has involved both concerted and mosaic patterns of scaling across structures. This is, to our knowledge, the first mechanistic model that explains the generation of brains large and small in mammalian evolution, and it opens up new horizons for seeking the cellular pathways and genes involved in brain evolution. PMID:25157220

  17. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  18. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  19. Castration and training in a spatial task alter the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of male mice

    PubMed Central

    Benice, Ted S.; Raber, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    New neurons are generated in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus (GCL) throughout adulthood. This process is modulated by many environmental and neurochemical factors. We previously observed that castrated mice, compared to sham-operated mice, perform poorly in the delayed matching to place water-maze task (DMTP). In this study we quantified the number of doublecortin expressing (DCX+) immature neurons and Ki-67 expressing (Ki-67+) proliferating progenitors in mice previously tested in a spatial DMTP task, a non-spatial DMTP, or that received equivalent amounts of handling only. Regardless of DMTP training experience castration reduced immature neuron number in the GCL but had no effect on proliferating progenitors. Compared to handling only, visible DMTP training reduced the immature neuron number but hidden DMTP training had no effect. Castration did not alter these environmental effects. Finally, performance on the spatial DMTP task did not correlate with immature neuron number. In addition, while the number of immature neurons was strongly reduced following cranial irradiation with 137Cs, this treatment did not affect spatial DMTP performance. Thus, in mice, castration disrupts spatial memory and reduces immature neuron number, but there is no strong link between these effects. PMID:20233585

  20. Preserved number of entorhinal cortex layer II neurons in aged macaque monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazzaley, A. H.; Thakker, M. M.; Hof, P. R.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The perforant path, which consists of the projection from the layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex to the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, is a critical circuit involved in learning and memory formation. Accordingly, disturbances in this circuit may contribute to age-related cognitive deficits. In a previous study, we demonstrated a decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 immunofluorescence intensity in the outer molecular layer of aged macaque monkeys. In this study, we used the optical fractionator, a stereological method, to determine if a loss of layer II neurons occurred in the same animals in which the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 alteration was observed. Our results revealed no significant differences in the number of layer II neurons between juvenile, young adult, and aged macaque monkeys. These results suggest that the circuit-specific decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 reported previously occurs in the absence of structural compromise of the perforant path, and thus may be linked to an age-related change in the physiological properties of this circuit.

  1. Absolute number of parvicellular and magnocellular neurons in the red nucleus of the rat midbrain: a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Aghoghovwia, Benjamin E; Oorschot, Dorothy E

    2016-09-01

    The absolute number of parvicellular and magnocellular neurons in the red nucleus was estimated using design-based stereological counting methods and systematic random sampling techniques. Six young adult male rats, and a complete set of serial 40-μm glycolmethacrylate sections for each rat, were used to quantify neuronal numbers. After a random start, a systematic subset (i.e. every third) of the serial sections was used to estimate the total volume of the red nucleus using Cavalieri's method. The same set of sampled sections was used to estimate the number of neurons in a known subvolume (i.e. the numerical density Nv ) by the optical disector method. Multiplication of the total volume by Nv yielded the absolute number of neurons. It was found that the right red nucleus consisted, on average, of 8400 parvicellular neurons (with a coefficient of variation of 0.16) and 7000 magnocellular neurons (0.12). These total neuronal numbers provide important data for the transfer of information through these nuclei and for species comparisons. PMID:27257130

  2. A synaptic organizing principle for cortical neuronal groups

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Rodrigo; Berger, Thomas K.; Markram, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal circuitry is often considered a clean slate that can be dynamically and arbitrarily molded by experience. However, when we investigated synaptic connectivity in groups of pyramidal neurons in the neocortex, we found that both connectivity and synaptic weights were surprisingly predictable. Synaptic weights follow very closely the number of connections in a group of neurons, saturating after only 20% of possible connections are formed between neurons in a group. When we examined the network topology of connectivity between neurons, we found that the neurons cluster into small world networks that are not scale-free, with less than 2 degrees of separation. We found a simple clustering rule where connectivity is directly proportional to the number of common neighbors, which accounts for these small world networks and accurately predicts the connection probability between any two neurons. This pyramidal neuron network clusters into multiple groups of a few dozen neurons each. The neurons composing each group are surprisingly distributed, typically more than 100 μm apart, allowing for multiple groups to be interlaced in the same space. In summary, we discovered a synaptic organizing principle that groups neurons in a manner that is common across animals and hence, independent of individual experiences. We speculate that these elementary neuronal groups are prescribed Lego-like building blocks of perception and that acquired memory relies more on combining these elementary assemblies into higher-order constructs. PMID:21383177

  3. Rebuilding the Food Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willet, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the old food guide pyramid released in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Contradicts the message that fat is bad, which was presented to the public by nutritionists, and the effects of plant oils on cholesterol. Introduces a new food pyramid. (YDS)

  4. Loss of MeCP2 From Forebrain Excitatory Neurons Leads to Cortical Hyperexcitation and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Peterson, Matthew; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder leading to loss of motor and cognitive functions, impaired social interactions, and seizure at young ages. Defects of neuronal circuit development and function are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of RTT. The majority of RTT patients show recurrent seizures, indicating that neuronal hyperexcitation is a common feature of RTT. However, mechanisms underlying hyperexcitation in RTT are poorly understood. Here we show that deletion of Mecp2 from cortical excitatory neurons but not forebrain inhibitory neurons in the mouse leads to spontaneous seizures. Selective deletion of Mecp2 from excitatory but not inhibitory neurons in the forebrain reduces GABAergic transmission in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. Loss of MeCP2 from cortical excitatory neurons reduces the number of GABAergic synapses in the cortex, and enhances the excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Using single-cell deletion of Mecp2 in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, we show that GABAergic transmission is reduced in neurons without MeCP2, but is normal in neighboring neurons with MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 in cortical excitatory neurons plays a critical role in the regulation of GABAergic transmission and cortical excitability. PMID:24523563

  5. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-Paredes, Niurka; Valencia, Concepción; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Arzate, Dulce-María; Baizabal, José-Manuel; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Fuentes-Hernández, Ayari; Zea-Armenta, Iván; Covarrubias, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs), but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+). These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26912775

  6. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Henrik H.; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A.; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  7. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  8. No Reduction of Spindle Neuron Number in Frontoinsular Cortex in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Daniel P.; Semendeferi, Katerina; Courchesne, Eric

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that spindle neurons, an evolutionarily unique type of neuron, might be involved in higher-order social, emotional, and cognitive functions. As such, it was hypothesized that these neurons may be particularly important to the pathophysiology of autism, a disease characterized in part by disruption of higher-order social and…

  9. Remodelling of spared proprioceptive circuit involving a small number of neurons supports functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Edmund R.; Ishiko, Nao; Pessian, Maysam; Tolentino, Kristine; Lee-Kubli, Corinne A.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Zou, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that limited functional recovery can be achieved by plasticity and adaptation of the remaining circuitry in partial injuries in the central nervous system, although the new circuits that arise in these contexts have not been clearly identified or characterized. We show here that synaptic contacts from dorsal root ganglions to a small number of dorsal column neurons, a caudal extension of nucleus gracilis, whose connections to the thalamus are spared in a precise cervical level 1 lesion, underwent remodeling over time. These connections support proprioceptive functional recovery in a conditioning lesion paradigm, as silencing or eliminating the remodelled circuit completely abolishes the recovered proprioceptive function of the hindlimb. Furthermore, we show that blocking repulsive Wnt signalling increases axon plasticity and synaptic connections that drive greater functional recovery. PMID:25597627

  10. Sturge-Weber Syndrome Is Associated with Cortical Dysplasia ILAE Type IIIc and Excessive Hypertrophic Pyramidal Neurons in Brain Resections for Intractable Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Blümcke, Ingmar; Coras, Roland; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Lu, De-Hong; Gui, Qiu-Ping; Hu, Jing-Xia; Zuo, Huan-Cong; Chen, Shi-Yun; Piao, Yue-Shan

    2015-05-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare syndrome characterized by capillary-venous malformations involving skin and brain. Many patients with SWS also suffer from drug-resistant epilepsy. We retrospectively studied a series of six SWS patients with epilepsy and extensive neurosurgical resections. At time of surgery, the patients' age ranged from 11 to 35 years (with a mean of 20.2 years). All surgical specimens were well preserved, which allowed a systematic microscopical inspection utilizing the 2011 ILAE classification for focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Neuropathology revealed dysmorphic-like neurons with hypertrophic cell bodies reminiscent to those described for FCD type IIa in all cases. However, gross architectural abnormalities of neocortical layering typical for FCD type IIa were missing, and we propose to classify this pattern as FCD ILAE type IIIc. In addition, our patients with earliest seizure onset also showed polymicrogyria (PMG; n = 4). The ictal onset zones were identified in all patients by subdural electrodes, and these areas always showed histopathological evidence for FCD type IIIc. Four out of five patients had favorable seizure control after surgery with a mean follow-up period of 1.7 years. We concluded from our study that FCD type IIIc and PMG are frequently associated findings in SWS. FCD type IIIc may play a major epileptogenic role in SWS and complete resection of the associated FCD should be considered a prognostic key factor to achieve seizure control. PMID:25040707