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Sample records for pyrolyzed cobalt tetramethoxy

  1. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  2. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xianxia; Hu, Xin-Xin; Ding, Xin-Long; Kong, Hai-Chuan; Sha, Hao-Dong; Lin, He; Wen, Wen; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, Zhi; Ma, Zi-Feng; Yang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  3. Pyrolyzed binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Baitao; Wang, Mian; Zhou, Xiuxiu; Wang, Xiujun; Liu, Bingchuan; Li, Baikun

    2015-10-01

    A novel platinum (Pt)-free cathodic materials binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine (Bi-CoPc) pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300-1000 °C) were examined as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, and compared with unpyrolyzed Bi-CoPc/C and Pt cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs). The results showed that the pyrolysis process increased the nitrogen abundance on Bi-CoPc and changed the nitrogen types. The Bi-CoPc pyrolyzed at 800 °C contained a significant amount of pyrrolic-N, and exhibited a high electrochemical catalytic activity. The power density and current density increased with temperature: Bi-CoPc/C-800 > Bi-CoPc/C-1000 > Bi-CoPc/C-600 > Bi-CoPc/C-300 > Bi-CoPc/C. The SCMFC with Bi-CoPc/C-800 cathode had a maximum power density of 604 mW m(-2). The low cost Bi-CoPc compounds developed in this study showed a potential in air-breathing MFC systems, with the proper pyrolysis temperature being chosen. PMID:26142820

  4. Experimental identification of the active sites in pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole-4-toluenesulfinic acid as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Hao-Dong; Yuan, Xianxia; Li, Lin; Ma, Zhong; Ma, Zi-Feng; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-06-01

    A series of carbon supported cobalt-polypyrrole-4-toluenesulfinic acid have been pyrolyzed in an argon atmosphere at 800 °C, then structurally characterized and electrochemically evaluated as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts in aqueous 0.5 M sulfuric acid. The structures are cobalt bonded to nitrogen species (Co-Nx) along with metallic cobalt and cobalt oxide. When the cobalt loading in the compound is less than 1.0 wt%, the predominate form is Co-Nx, when the loading is higher than 1.0 wt%, metallic Co and Co oxide particles co-exist with the Co-Nx compound. At a Co loading of ∼1.0 wt%, the catalyst gives the best ORR activity. Both metallic Co and Co oxide are not active for catalyzing ORR, and block the catalytically active Co-Nx species from the surface and reduce the catalytic activity since the diffusion limiting current density on a rotating disk electrode (RDE) increases when the electrode blocking agents are washed away with acid.

  5. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  6. Pyrolyzed carbon film diodes.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kirstin C; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Baker, Lane A

    2013-11-13

    We have previously reported pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC) as a conductive carbon electrode material for use with micropipets, atomic force microscopy probes, and planar electrodes. Advantages of carbon electrode fabrication from PPC include conformal coating of high-aspect ratio micro/nanoscale features and the benefits afforded by chemical vapor deposition of carbon polymers. In this work, we demonstrate chemical surface doping of PPC through the use of previously reported methods. Chemically treated PPC films are characterized by multiple spectroscopic and electronic measurements. Pyrolyzed parylene C and doped PPC are used to construct diodes that are examined as both p-n heterojunction and Schottky barrier diodes. Half-wave rectification is achieved with PPC diodes and demonstrates the applicability of PPC as a conductive and semiconductive material in device fabrication. PMID:24090451

  7. Cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    Cobalt is typical a by- or co-product with copper or nickel. The average crustal abundance of cobalt is 23 pans per million. Cobalt-containing minerals include cobaltite, skutterudite, and linnaeite. Due to the diversity of cobalt deposits, several techniques are used to extract the ore. The copper/cobalt-bearing ores of Zaire are extracted by open pit and underground methods. In Zambia, similar deposits are mined using modified sublevel, and cut-and-fill underground stoping methods. The sulfide and oxide ore concentrates mined in Zaire are roasted and leached in sulfuric acid. Copper is subsequently recovered by electrolysis, and cobalt is precipitated in the form of a hydrate. Finally, the hydrate is dissolved in acid and cobalt is recovered by electrolysis.

  8. Tetramethoxy-Aminorhodamine (TMARh): A Bichromophore, an Improved Fluorophore, and a pH Switch.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Shi, Dong; Laursen, Bo W

    2016-05-17

    Rhodamine is one of the most widely used fluorescent dyes. Here, a new synthetic pathway to the popular dyes is reported and the effect of adding four methoxy groups to the molecular structure is investigated. Tetramethoxy-aminorhodamine (TMARh) is found to show superior pH switching compared to the rhodamine without the four methoxy groups, owing to changed properties of the dark "off" state and increased fluorescence intensity in the protonated "on" state. PMID:26995766

  9. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  10. Apparatus and method for pyrolyzing biomass material

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, J.P.; Reed, T.B.

    1981-08-21

    A technique for pyrolyzing biomass materials is disclosed wherein a hot surface is provided having a predetermined temperature which is sufficient to pyrolyze only the surface strata of the biomass material without substantially heating the interior of the biomass material thereby providing a large temperature gradient from the surface strata inwardly of the relatively cool biomass materials. Relative motion and physical contact is produced between the surface strata and the hot surface for a sufficient period of time for ablative pyrolyzation by heat conduction to occur with minimum generation of char.

  11. Cobalt silica magnetic nanoparticles with functional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadala, Michael L.; Zalich, Michael A.; Fulks, David B.; St. Pierre, Tim G.; Dailey, James P.; Riffle, Judy S.

    2005-05-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles encased in polysiloxane block copolymers have been heated at 600-700 °C to form protective shells around the particles, which contain crosslinked Si-O structures, and to anneal the cobalt. Methods to functionalize and modify the surfaces of the pyrolyzed/annealed silica-cobalt complexes with amines, isocyanates, poly(ethylene oxide), poly( L-lactide) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are presented.

  12. Pyrolyzed-parylene based sensors and method of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method (and resulting structure) for fabricating a sensing device. The method includes providing a substrate comprising a surface region and forming an insulating material overlying the surface region. The method also includes forming a film of carbon based material overlying the insulating material and treating to the film of carbon based material to pyrolyzed the carbon based material to cause formation of a film of substantially carbon based material having a resistivity ranging within a predetermined range. The method also provides at least a portion of the pyrolyzed carbon based material in a sensor application and uses the portion of the pyrolyzed carbon based material in the sensing application. In a specific embodiment, the sensing application is selected from chemical, humidity, piezoelectric, radiation, mechanical strain or temperature.

  13. Coke Accumulation on Catalysts used in a Fluidized Bed Pyrolyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have examined the impact of various solid catalysts on the product distribution resulting from the pyrolysis of biomass. Though catalysts do have a discernible impact, this impact is small. In our bench-top pyrolyzer designed as a catalyst screening tool, we measure bulk product distribution as...

  14. Co-pyrolyzing plastic mulch waste with animal manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolyzing various livestock and agricultural wastes produces power and value-added byproducts. It also substantially reduces ultimate waste volume to be disposed of and improves soil fertility and promotes carbon sequestration via soil application of biochar. Researchers found that manure-derived ...

  15. Cobalt poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pigments (Cobalt Blue) Magnets Some metal-on-metal hip implants Tires Cobalt was once used as a stabilizer in beer foam. It caused a condition called "beer-drinker's heart," which resulted in heart muscle weakness. This list may not be all-inclusive.

  16. Chars pyrolyzed from oil palm wastes for activated carbon preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Lua, A.C.; Guo, J.

    1999-01-01

    Chars pyrolyzed from extracted oil palm fibers for the preparation of activated carbons were studied. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and hold time on density, porosity, yield, BET and micropore surface areas, total pore volume, and pore size distributions of chars were investigated. The optimum conditions for pyrolysis were found to be at a pyrolysis temperature of 850 C for a hold time of 3.5 h. Scanning electron micrographs of the char surfaces verified the presence of porosities. The experimental results showed that it was feasible to produce chars with high BET and micropore surface areas from extracted oil palm fibers. The resulting chars will be subjected to steam or carbon dioxide activation to prepare activated carbons for use as gas adsorbents for air pollution control.

  17. Transient behavior of a coconut shell pyrolyzer: A mathematical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chowdhury, R.; Biswas, G.K.

    1996-10-01

    A mathematical model based on the mechanistic approach to the reaction kinetics of pyrolysis reactions and the realistic analysis of the interaction between simultaneous heat and mass transfer along with the chemical reaction has been developed for the design of smoothly running pyrolyzers. The model of a fixed-bed pyrolysis reactor has been proposed on the basis of the dimensionless parameters with respect to time and radial position. The variation of physical parameters like bed voidage, heat capacity, diffusivity, density, thermal conductivity, etc., on temperature and conversion has been taken into account. A deactivation model has also been incorporated to explain the behavior of pyrolysis reactions at temperatures above 673 K. The simulated results of the model have been explained by comparing them with the experimental results.

  18. Cobalt poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wear and tear of some cobalt/chromium metal-on-metal hip implants. This type of implant is an ... hip socket that is created by fitting a metal ball into a metal cup. Sometimes, metal particles ( ...

  19. Anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Won; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a critical role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders and strokes. The inhibition of platelet function is beneficial for the treatment and prevention of these diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (EATN), a neolignan isolated from Myristica fragrans, using human platelets. EATN preferentially inhibited thrombin- and platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation without affecting platelet damage in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 3.2 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.3 μM, respectively. However, much higher concentrations of EATN were required to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid. EATN also inhibited thrombin-induced serotonin and ATP release, and thromboxane B2 formation in human platelets. Moreover, EATN caused an increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in thrombin-activated human platelets. Therefore, we conclude that the inhibitory mechanism of EATN on platelet aggregation may increase cAMP levels and subsequently inhibit intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by interfering with a common signaling pathway rather than by directly inhibiting the binding of thrombin or PAF to their receptors. This is the first report of the anti-platelet activity of EATN isolated from M. fragrans. PMID:23296979

  20. Pyrolyzed feather fibers for adsorbent and high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoz, Erman

    Chicken feather fibers (CFF) are problematic and costly for the poultry industry in terms of managing maintenance and disposal. Considering their great availability, low cost, and unique protein structure, CFF can be an environmentally friendly and bio-renewable candidate to replace petroleum products. CFF's low degradation and melting temperature render them useless at high temperatures. Pyrolysis methods were developed for CFF by using two temperature steps to convert them into high temperature resistant and adsorbent fibers while retaining their original physical appearance and affine dimensions. An intermolecular crosslinking mechanism in the first step of pyrolysis at 215 ºC for 24 h provided an intact fibrous structure with no subsequent melting. The evidence obtained from the thermal, bulk, and surface analysis techniques was indication of the simultaneous side chain degradation, polypeptide backbone scission, disulfide bond cleavage, and isopeptide crosslinking. The variation in the reaction kinetics of disulfide bond cleavage and isopeptide crosslinking played an important role in the melting transition. Consequently, long-lasting heat treatments below the melting point provided sufficient crosslinks in the protein matrix to keep the fibrous structure intact. Water-insoluble and crosslinked CFF reinforced the triglyceride-fatty acid based composites by providing a 15 fold increase in storage and tensile modulus at room temperature. These thermally stable fibers can be used instead of CFF in composites which may require high temperature compounding and molding processes. The second step of pyrolysis at 400--450 ºC for 1 h resulted in microporous fibers with a micropore volume of ˜0.18 cm3/g STP and with a narrower pore size distribution than commercial activated carbons through thermal degradation. Nearly all accessible pores in the microporous pyrolyzed chicken feather fibers (PCFF) had diameters less than 1 nm and therefore, showed a potential to be

  1. Simultaneous Decoupled Detection of Dopamine and Oxygen using Pyrolyzed Carbon Microarrays and FSCV

    PubMed Central

    Zachek, Matthew K.; Takmakov, Pavel; Moody, Ben; Wightman, R. Mark; McCarty, Gregory S.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated structures utilizing pyrolyzed photoresist have been shown to be a useful for monitoring electrochemical processes. These previous studies, however, were limited to constant potential measurements and slow scan voltammetry. Work described in this report utilizes microfabrication processes to produce devices that enable multiple fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) waveforms to be applied to different electrodes on a single substrate. This enabled the simultaneous, decoupled, detection of dopamine and oxygen. This paper describes the fabrication process of these arrays and shows that pyrolyzed photoresist electrodes possess comparable surface chemistry and electrochemical properties to PAN type, T-650, carbon fiber microelectrodes using background-subtracted FSCV. The functionality of the array is discussed in terms of the degree of crosstalk in response to flow injections of physiologically relevant concentrations of dopamine and oxygen. Finally, other applications of pyrolyzed photoresist microelectrode arrays are shown, including: spatially resolved detection of analytes and combining FSCV with amperometry for the detection of dopamine. PMID:19552423

  2. Heavy metal and phenol adsorption properties of biochars from pyrolyzed switchgrass and woody biomass in correlation with surface structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, three types of biomass, switchgrass (SG), hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW) were either fast pyrolyzed (FP) in a fluidized-bed reactor at 500 degree C or slow pyrolyzed at 500 degree C (for 1hr) and at 700 degree C (for 0.5hr) with the biochar produced at 500 degree C further steam activ...

  3. Cleaning Water Contaminated with Heavy Metal Ions Using Pyrolyzed Biochar Adsorbents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extraction of pollutants from water using activated biochar materials is a low cost, sustainable approach for providing safe water in developing countries. The adsorption of copper ions, Cu (II), onto banana peels that were dried, pyrolyzed and activated was studied and compa...

  4. Cobalt free maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Floreen, S.

    1984-04-17

    The subject invention is directed to ferrous-base alloys, particularly to a cobalt-free maraging steel of novel chemistry characterized by a desired combination of strength and toughness, notwithstanding that cobalt is non-essential.

  5. Inexpensive method for producing macroporous silicon particulates (MPSPs) with pyrolyzed polyacrylonitrile for lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Madhuri; Sinsabaugh, Steven L.; Isaacson, Mark J.; Wong, Michael S.; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most exciting areas in lithium ion batteries is engineering structured silicon anodes. These new materials promise to lead the next generation of batteries with significantly higher reversible charge capacity than current technologies. One drawback of these materials is that their production involves costly processing steps, limiting their application in commercial lithium ion batteries. In this report we present an inexpensive method for synthesizing macroporous silicon particulates (MPSPs). After being mixed with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and pyrolyzed, MPSPs can alloy with lithium, resulting in capacities of 1000 mAhg−1 for over 600+ cycles. These sponge-like MPSPs with pyrolyzed PAN (PPAN) can accommodate the large volume expansion associated with silicon lithiation. This performance combined with low cost processing yields a competitive anode material that will have an immediate and direct application in lithium ion batteries. PMID:23139860

  6. Functionalization and characterization of pyrolyzed polymer based carbon microstructures for bionanoelectronics platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Mieko; Mehta, Beejal; Vahidi, Nasim W.; Khosla, Ajit; Kassegne, Sam

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the investigation of surface-treatment of chemically inert graphitic carbon microelectrodes (derived from pyrolyzed photoresist polymer) for improving their attachment chemistry with DNA molecular wires and ropes as part of a bionanoelectronics platform is reported. Polymer microelectrodes were fabricated on a silicon wafer using standard negative lithography procedures with negative-tone photoresist. These microelectrode structures were then pyrolyzed and converted to a form of conductive carbon that is referred to as PP (pyrolyzed polymer) carbon throughout this paper. Functionalization of the resulting pyrolyzed structures was done using nitric, sulfuric, 4-amino benzoic acids (4-ABA), and oxygen plasma etching and the surface modifications confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and electron dispersion x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Post surface-treatment analysis of microelectrodes with FTIR and Raman spectroscopy showed signature peaks characteristics of carboxyl functional groups while EDS showed an increase in oxygen content in the surface-treatment procedures (except 4-ABA) indicating an increase in carboxyl functional group. These functional groups form the basis for peptide bond with aminated oligonucleotides that in turn could be used as molecular wires and interconnects in a bionanoelectronics platform. Post-pyrolysis analysis using EDS showed relatively higher oxygen concentrations at the edges and location of defects compared to other locations on these microelectrodes. In addition, electrochemical impedance measurements showed metal-like behavior of PP carbon with high conductivity (|Z| <1 KΩ) and no detectable detrimental effect of oxygen plasma surface-treatment on electrical characteristic. In general, characterization results—taken together—indicated that oxygen plasma surface-treatment produced more reliable, less damaging, and consistently repeatable generation of carboxyl functional

  7. Solubility of cobalt in cement.

    PubMed

    Fregert, S; Gruvberger, B

    1978-02-01

    Unlike chromate, cobalt occurring as cobalt oxides in cement is not water-soluble in a detectable amount. Cobalt oxides are to some extent soluble in the presence of amino acids with which cobalt forms complexes. Such complexes can elicit patch test reactions. It is postulated that cobalt is more readily dissolved by forming complexes in eczematous skin than in normal skin. This may explain why cobalt sensitization in cement eczemas is secondary to chromate sensitivity. PMID:657784

  8. Marine cobalt resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxides in the open oceans are more enriched in cobalt than any other widely distributed sediments or rocks. Concentrations of cobalt exceed 1 percent in ferromanganese crusts on seamounts, ocean ridges, and other raised areas of the ocean. The cobalt-rich crusts may be the slowest growing of any earth material, accumulating one molecular layer every 1 to 3 months. Attention has been drawn to crusts as potential resources because they contain cobalt, manganese, and platinum, three of the four priority strategic metals for the United States. Moreover, unlike abyssal nodules, whose recovery is complicated by their dominant location in international waters, some of the most cobalt-rich crusts occur within the exclusive economic zone of the United States and other nations. Environmental impact statements for crust exploitation are under current development by the Department of the Interior.

  9. Effect of pyrolyzed carbon black on asphalt cement. Part 2. Asphalt binder. Final report, September 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Lovell, C.W.

    1996-02-20

    Scrap tires derived from automobiles have become a large environmental problem in the United States. In the study, research is carried out to investigate the potential use of tire-derived pyrolyzed carbon black from scrap tires as an asphalt cement modifier. The asphlat cements used in the research were AC10 and AC20. Penetration and softening point tests were performed to obtain the consistency of the asphalt cements. The pyrolyzed carbon black, as provided by Wolf Industries, was combined with the asphalt cement in the following percentages: 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. Penetration, softening point and ductility tests were performed to determine the temperature susceptibility of the modified binder as altered by the pyrolyzed carbon black. In order that the results are comparable to previous testing, commercial carbon black purchased from CABOT Industry was also used as a modifier in the tests. The same test procedures were applied to the asphalt cements modified by commercial carbon black. The test results contained in the report illustrate the viability of the pyrolyzed carbon black as an asphalt modifier. Recommendations are provided to facilitate further research on this particular project. A preliminary assessment of a test road using the pyrolyzed carbon is appended.

  10. R&D on Micro-pyrolyzer for Solid Wastes Using High Temperature Steam and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    An innovative micro-gasification system for solid wastes is proposed in this paper, whose technical feasibility is demonstrated by using rubber chips as a fuel. In this system, a batch-type fixed-bed pyrolyzer combined with a high temperature steam/air reformer is employed. In the present investigation, it is shown that supply of high temperature air into the pyrolyzer significantly increases the heating value of the pyrolysis gas. With the use of high temperature steam/air mixture as an oxidant for reforming, almost complete reforming of the tar components can be done and they are decomposed into CO, H2 and other hydrocarbon gases with reasonable decrease of the heating value of the reformed gas compared with that of the pyrolysis gas. With packing ceramic balls in the reformer, reforming reactions can be accelerated. The experimental results demonstrate that almost soot and tar free clean reformed gas with the heating value of above 1000kcal/Nm3 can be generated from rubber chips.

  11. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  12. Biodiesel production from waste cooking oil using a heterogeneous catalyst from pyrolyzed rice husk.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zheng, Yan; Chen, Yixin; Zhu, Xifeng

    2014-02-01

    A solid acid catalyst was prepared by sulfonating pyrolyzed rice husk with concentrated sulfuric acid, and the physical and chemical properties of the catalyst were characterized in detail. The catalyst was then used to simultaneously catalyze esterification and transesterification to produce biodiesel from waste cooking oil (WCO). In the presence of the as-prepared catalyst, the free fatty acid (FFA) conversion reached 98.17% after 3h, and the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield reached 87.57% after 15 h. By contrast, the typical solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15 obtained only 95.25% and 45.17% FFA conversion and FAME yield, respectively. Thus, the prepared catalyst had a high catalytic activity for simultaneous esterification and transesterification. In addition, the catalyst had excellent stability, thereby having potential use as a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production from WCO with a high FFA content. PMID:24405650

  13. Wrought cobalt- base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarstrom, D. L.

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strengths and resistance to hot corrosion attack. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-so-lution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth ele-ments to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes® 230TMalloy, is discussed briefly.

  14. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpoor, Amir A.; Erb, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Due to their excellent wear and corrosion properties, nanocrystalline cobalt and several cobalt alloys made by electrodeposition are currently being developed as environmentally benign replacement coatings for hard chromium electrodeposits. The focus of this study is on the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt, which are currently not well understood. A comparison is presented for hardness, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties and fracture surface analysis of both nanocrystalline (grain size: 12 nm) and conventional polycrystalline (grain size: 4.8 m) cobalt. It is shown that the hardness and tensile strength of nanocrystalline cobalt is 2-3 times higher than for polycrystalline cobalt. However, in contrast to other nanocrystalline materials tested previously, nanocrystalline cobalt retains considerable ductility with elongation to fracture values up to 7%.

  15. Effect of dense phase of fluidized bed pyrolyzer on the devolatilization behavior of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Li Haibin; Chen Yong; Wang Yang

    1998-12-31

    Pyrolysis of coal in fluidized beds were investigated by many researchers. The results of both experiments and model simulations were published. However, there are deviations between the results of different researchers; one of the most important reasons is that the designated features of there experimental devices are different. For example, different freeboard temperature or height will lead to different product compositions. In this paper, the effect of dense phase of fluidized bed on product distribution is discussed when the effect of freeboard is minimized. Shenmu coal ({minus}45 + 80 mesh) was pyrolyzed in a special designed fluidized bed reactor with I.D. of 48mm and a cone-shaped distributor. The temperature of dense phase and freeboard can be controlled respectively. The relationship between gas phase product yield and dense phase temperature was obtained. The results show that the yields of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} increase dramatically with increasing dense phase temperature. However, liquid yield reaches the maximum in the dense phase temperature range of 600--650 C. By comparing with the results of former researchers, it can be seen that the volatile can undergo serious secondary reactions when the freeboard temperature is high, even when the residence time is very short. The results of this paper are believed to represent the more accurate trend of the effect of bed temperature on gas phase product yield because the vapor phase secondary reactions were minimized in this experiment.

  16. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while it increased following analytical pyrolysis. The same results were obtained for 4-vinylguaiacol and E-isoeugenol, which were the major secondary products produced in the present study. Compared to the yields of these major products obtained via analytical pyrolysis, the yields from the auger reactor were very low, indicating that the auger reactor process had a longer vapor residence time than the analytical pyrolysis process, resulting in the acceleration of secondary reactions of the pyrolysates. The pH values and densities of the bio-oils produced in the auger reactor were similar to those reported by researchers using woody biomass, despite their lower viscosities. From these results, it was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature and residence time of the pyrolysates played a significant role in determining the characteristics of the cedar bio-oil. PMID:27047705

  17. Biochar pyrolyzed at two temperatures affects Escherichia coli transport through a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Carl H; Abit, Sergio M

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of biochar into soils has been proposed as a means to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. An added environmental benefit is that biochar has also been shown to increase soil retention of nutrients, heavy metals, and pesticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether biochar amendments affect the transport of Escherichia coli through a water-saturated soil. We looked at the transport of three E. coli isolates through 10-cm columns packed with a fine sandy soil amended with 2 or 10% (w/w) poultry litter biochar pyrolyzed at 350 or 700°C. For all three isolates, mixing the high-temperature biochar at a rate of 2% into the soil had no impact on transport behavior. When added at a rate of 10%, a reduction of five orders of magnitude in the amount of E. coli transported through the soil was observed for two of the isolates, and a 60% reduction was observed for the third isolate. Mixing the low-temperature biochar into the soil resulted in enhanced transport through the soil for two of the isolates, whereas no significant differences in transport behavior were observed between the low-temperature and high-temperature biochar amendments for one isolate. Our results show that the addition of biochar can affect the retention and transport behavior of E. coli and that biochar application rate, biochar pyrolysis temperature, and bacterial surface characteristics were important factors determining the transport of E. coli through our test soil. PMID:22218181

  18. Self-assembled and pyrolyzed carbon aerogels: an overview of their preparation mechanisms, properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahbakhsh, Ahmad; Bahramian, Ahmad Reza

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the synthesis conditions and mechanisms for the fabrication of different types of carbon aerogels, as well as the structural and functional properties of these materials, is presented here. In this overview, carbon aerogels are classified into three major categories: (i) conventional pyrolyzed organic-based carbon aerogels, which are products of the pyrolysis process of organic aerogels; (ii) self-assembled carbon aerogels, which are products of a reduction process; and (iii) nanocomposite carbon aerogels. Synthesis mechanisms for the sol-gel process of organic aerogels are reviewed using different mechanisms suggested in the literature. Moreover, the overall fabrication process of self-assembled carbon aerogels (graphene and carbon nanotube aerogels) is covered and the suggested mechanism for the gelation process of self-assembled carbon aerogels during the reduction process is investigated using reported mechanisms. The structural performance and functional properties (electrochemical and thermal properties) of different types of carbon aerogels are covered in detail. Moreover, different structural features of carbon aerogels and the influence of synthesis conditions on these structural characteristics are assessed and compared. Based on the literature results covered in this review paper, carbon aerogels are perfect candidates for the fabrication of ultra-low density supercapacitors, as well as thermal insulating materials.

  19. Self-assembled and pyrolyzed carbon aerogels: an overview of their preparation mechanisms, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Allahbakhsh, Ahmad; Bahramian, Ahmad Reza

    2015-09-14

    An overview of the synthesis conditions and mechanisms for the fabrication of different types of carbon aerogels, as well as the structural and functional properties of these materials, is presented here. In this overview, carbon aerogels are classified into three major categories: (i) conventional pyrolyzed organic-based carbon aerogels, which are products of the pyrolysis process of organic aerogels; (ii) self-assembled carbon aerogels, which are products of a reduction process; and (iii) nanocomposite carbon aerogels. Synthesis mechanisms for the sol-gel process of organic aerogels are reviewed using different mechanisms suggested in the literature. Moreover, the overall fabrication process of self-assembled carbon aerogels (graphene and carbon nanotube aerogels) is covered and the suggested mechanism for the gelation process of self-assembled carbon aerogels during the reduction process is investigated using reported mechanisms. The structural performance and functional properties (electrochemical and thermal properties) of different types of carbon aerogels are covered in detail. Moreover, different structural features of carbon aerogels and the influence of synthesis conditions on these structural characteristics are assessed and compared. Based on the literature results covered in this review paper, carbon aerogels are perfect candidates for the fabrication of ultra-low density supercapacitors, as well as thermal insulating materials. PMID:26245296

  20. PCCHEMEQ: Prediction of the flue gas compositions for incinerator and pyrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Patel V.; Shukla, A. )

    1992-11-01

    As a result of reduction in available waste disposal space throughout North America and Europe, serious considerations are being given to waste minimization, recovery of energy from waste and other disposal techniques. One of the alternative techniques is combustion of waste. This process produces waste gases which might require further treatment in order to satisfy environmental regulations. Chemical equilibrium codes have found applications in predicting the reaction products from combustion and pyrolysis processes. Several software programs are available in the literature for the above applications. The purpose of this review is to discuss a new software, PCCHEMEQ, available from T.C. International, 2533 Hazy Hollow, St. Antonio, TX 78255 (Telephone - (512) 798-0957). PCCHEMEQ is a software package for predicting the flue gas compositions from incinerators and pyrolyzers. It is a thermal equilibrium program with calculations encompassing a large group of elements. The program can also perform the mass and energy balances for combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, rocket fuel burning, thermal cracking processes and slag/glass/soil melting.

  1. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, Paul K.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  2. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  3. Coordination Complexes of Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gregory M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment involving the synthesis and spectral studies of cobalt complexes that not only give general chemistry students an introduction to inorganic synthesis but allows them to conduct a systematic study on the effect of different ligands on absorption spectra. Background information, procedures, and experimental results are…

  4. Novel pyrolyzed polyaniline-grafted silicon nanoparticles encapsulated in graphene sheets as Li-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe-Fei; Zhang, Hangyu; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yadong; Stanciu, Lia; Xie, Jian

    2014-04-23

    A simple method to fabricate graphene-encapsulated pyrolyzed polyaniline-grafted Si nanoparticles has been developed. Instead of using Si nanoparticles with a native oxide layer, HF-treated Si nanoparticles were employed in this work. The uniqueness of this method is that, first, a PANI layer over the Si nanoparticles was formed via the surface-initiated polymerization of aniline on the surface of aniline-functionalized Si nanoparticles; then, the PANI-grafted Si nanoparticles were wrapped by the GO sheets via π-π interaction and electrostatic attraction between the GO and the PANI. Finally, the GO and PANI were pyrolyzed, and this pyrolyzed PANI layer tightly binds the graphene sheets and the Si nanoparticles together in the composite. The composite materials exhibit better cycling stability and Coulombic efficiency as anodes in lithium ion batteries, as compared to pure Si nanoparticles and physically mixed graphene/Si composites. After 300 cycles at a current density of 2 A/g, the composite electrodes can still deliver a specific capacity of about 900 mAh/g, which corresponds to ∼76% capacity retention. The enhanced performance can be attributed to the absence of surface oxides, the better electronic conductivity, faster ion diffusion rate, and the strong interaction between the graphene sheets and the tightly bound carbon-coated Si nanoparticles. PMID:24703375

  5. A hybrid-assembly approach towards nitrogen-doped graphene aerogel supported cobalt nanoparticles as high performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruili; Jin, Yeqing; Xu, Peimin; Xing, Xia; Yang, Yuxing; Wu, Dongqing

    2016-02-15

    As a novel electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), nitrogen-doped graphene aerogel supported cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NGA) is archived by a hybrid-assembly of graphene oxide (GO), o-phthalonitrile and cobalt acetate and the following thermal treatment. The hybrid-assembly process successfully combines the ionic assembly of GO sheets and Co ions with the coordination between o-phthalonitrile and Co ions, which can be converted to nitrogen doped carbon and Co nanoparticles in the pyrolysis process under nitrogen flow. Remarkable features of Co-NGA including the macroporous graphene scaffolds, high surface area, and N/Co-doping effect can lead to a high catalytic efficiency for ORR. As the results, the composites pyrolyzed at 600°C (Co-NGA600) shows excellent electrocatalytic activities and kinetics for ORR in basic media, which are comparable with those of Pt/C catalyst, together with superior durability. PMID:26609926

  6. Chalcogenide Cobalt telluride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Bishnu; Dulal, Rajendra; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    Cobalt telluride nanotubes are grown using wet chemical and hydrothermal syntheses. Wet chemical synthesized nanotubes display nearly 1: 1 Co to Te ratio. On the other hand, CoTe nanotubes synthesized using hydrothermal method show excess Co content leading to the compound Co58Te42. Both CoTe and Co58Te42 display magnetic properties, but with totally different characteristics. The Curie temperature of CoTe is higher than 400 K. However, the Tc of Co58Te42 is below 50 K. Transport properties of cobalt telluride (CoTe) nanotube devices show that they exhibit p-type semiconducting behavior. The magnetoresistance measured at 10 K show a magnetoresistance of 54%. . National Science Foundation under ECCS-0845501 and NSF-MRI, DMR-0922997.

  7. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  8. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice PMID:16863591

  9. Factors controlling the abundance of organic sulfur in flash pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous kerogens from Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmo, A.M.; Stankiewicz, B.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Pratt, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene + dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in the type of primary organic input and/or to variations in rates of bacterial sulfate reduction. A concomitant increase in S/C and O/C ratios determined in situ using the electron microprobe is observed in AOM and alginites and may be related to a progressive oxidation of the organic matter during sulfurization. The S/C ratio of the AOM is systematically higher than the S C ratio of the alginites. Combined with a thiophene distribution characteristic of pyrolyzates of Type II organic matter, the higher S/C of AOM in Sergipe kerogens suggests that sulfurization and incorporation of low-molecular weight lipids derived from normal marine organic matter into the kerogen structure predominated over direct sulfurization of highly aliphatic algal biomacromolecules.The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene+dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in

  10. Use of pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive (part 3. Air-cooled furnace slag). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

    1996-11-20

    Scrap tires, generated at the rate of over 242 million each year in the United States, are recognized as one of the most significant environmental problems. Most of these scrap tires have been disposed of in landfills, stockpiles, and illegal dumps (EPA 1991). There is a need to find more useful, environmentally friendly applications for these tires. Extensive researches have been conducted in the past years on the utilization of the scrap tires. The use of scrap tires for asphalt pavement, which is complicated by the complex behavior of asphalt, has received major attention. This research aims to describe the performance of mixtures of asphalt using pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive.

  11. Cobalt source calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-12-03

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10{sup 5} rad/h to 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10{sup 6} to 9.27 x 10{sup 5}. This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10{sup 7} rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe{sup 2+} ions ionize to Fe{sup 3+}. When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate.

  12. Use of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified activated carbon as air-cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m(2), which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m(2)) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m(2)). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. PMID:23902951

  13. Splitting water with cobalt.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2011-08-01

    The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs regarding the design of cheap, sustainable, and efficient systems for the conversion and storage of renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. The production of hydrogen, a fuel with remarkable properties, through sunlight-driven water splitting appears to be a promising and appealing solution. While the active sites of enzymes involved in the overall water-splitting process in natural systems, namely hydrogenases and photosystem II, use iron, nickel, and manganese ions, cobalt has emerged in the past five years as the most versatile non-noble metal for the development of synthetic H(2)- and O(2)-evolving catalysts. Such catalysts can be further coupled with photosensitizers to generate photocatalytic systems for light-induced hydrogen evolution from water. PMID:21748828

  14. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  15. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose Using Nano Zeolite and Zeolite/Matrix Catalysts in a GC/Micro-Pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose, as a model compound of biomass, was catalyzed over zeolite (HY,.HZSM-5) and zeolite/matrix (HY/Clay, HM/Clay) in a GC/micro-pyrolyzer at 500 degrees C, to produce the valuable products. The catalysts used were pure zeolite and zeolite/matrix including 20 wt% matrix content, which were prepared into different particle sizes (average size; 0.1 mm, 1.6 mm) to study the effect of the particle size of the catalyst for the distribution of product yields. Catalytic pyrolysis had much more volatile products as light components and less content of sugars than pyrolysis only. This phenomenon was strongly influenced by the particle size of the catalyst in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Also, in zeolite and zeolite/matrix catalysts the zeolite type gave the dominant impact on the distribution of product yields. PMID:27483802

  16. Sterane distribution of solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Changes with biodegradation of crude oil in the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curiale, J.A.; Harrison, W.E.; Smith, G.

    1983-01-01

    Solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) of southeastern Oklahoma have been shown to originate from near-surface alteration of crude oil (Curiale, 1981; Curiale and Harrison, 1981). Pyrolysis of these solids has been employed to compare the sterane distribution of geographically proximate oils to that of the bitumens. The ratio of rearranged to regular steranes is higher in the pyrolyzates than in the oils, a finding consistent with a bitumen origin due to biodegradation of oil. The remaining presence of steranes, particularly regular steranes, in the bitumens suggests that sterane occlusion may have occurred prior to or during the alteration process, thus removing tetracyclic compounds from the influence of microbial attack. These data suggest that pyrolysis- GC MS offers a viable approach to correlation problems involving solid bitumens. ?? 1983.

  17. An Evaluation of the Functionality of Advanced Fuel Research Prototype Dry Pyrolyzer for Destruction of Solid Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Wignarajah, K.; Howard, Kevin; Serio, Mike; Kroo, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The prototype dry pyrolyser delivered to Ames Research Center is the end-product of a Phase I1 Small Business Initiative Research (SBIR) project. Some of the major advantages of pyrolysis for processing solid wastes are that it can process solid wastes, it permits elemental recycling while conserving oxygen use, and it can function as a pretreatment for combustion processes. One of the disadvantages of pyrolysis is the formation of tars. By controlling the rate of heating, tar formation can be minimized. This paper presents data on the pyrolysis of various space station wastes. The performance of the pyrolyser is also discussed and appropriate modifications suggested to improve the performance of the dry pyrolyzer.

  18. Formation of graphitic structures in cobalt- and nickel-doped carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ruowen; Baumann, Theodore F; Cronin, Steve; Dresselhaus, Gene; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Satcher, Joe H

    2005-03-29

    We have prepared carbon aerogels (CAs) doped with cobalt or nickel through sol-gel polymerization of formaldehyde with the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, followed by ion exchange with M(NO3)2 (where M = Co2+ or Ni2+), supercritical drying with liquid CO2, and carbonization at temperatures between 400 and 1050 degrees C under a N2 atmosphere. The nanostructures of these metal-doped carbon aerogels were characterized by elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Metallic nickel and cobalt nanoparticles are generated during the carbonization process at about 400 and 450 degrees C, respectively, forming nanoparticles that are approximately 4 nm in diameter. The sizes and size dispersion of the metal particles increase with increasing carbonization temperatures for both materials. The carbon frameworks of the Ni- and Co-doped aerogels carbonized below 600 degrees C mainly consist of interconnected carbon particles with a size of 15-30 nm. When the samples are pyrolyzed at 1050 degrees C, the growth of graphitic nanoribbons with different curvatures is observed in the Ni- and Co-doped carbon aerogel materials. The distance of graphite layers in the nanoribbons is approximately 0.38 nm. These metal-doped CAs retain the overall open cell structure of metal-free CAs, exhibiting high surface areas and pore diameters in the micro- and mesoporic region. PMID:15779927

  19. Wrought cobalt-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Klarstrom, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strength and resistance to hot corrosion attach. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-solution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth elements to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes 230 alloy, is discussed briefly.

  20. Cobalt Alums. A Demonstration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Claus E.; Steenberg, Paul

    2002-08-01

    The demonstration experiment describes the isolation of [Co(H2O)6]3+ both as the pure blue crystalline cesium cobalt alum, CsCo(SO4)2·12H2O, and as a light greenish-blue solid solution of ammonium cobalt alum in (NH4)Al(SO4)2·12H2O. The hexaaquacobalt(III) ion is prepared chemically by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, taking advantage of the stabilization of CoIII relative to CoII by complexation with the carbonate ligand. A brief description of alum structure and a characterization of alum subclasses are included.

  1. Controlling the misuse of cobalt in horses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Chan, George H M; Wan, Terence S M; Curl, Peter; Riggs, Christopher M; Hurley, Michael J; Sykes, David

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is a well-established inducer of hypoxia-like responses, which can cause gene modulation at the hypoxia inducible factor pathway to induce erythropoietin transcription. Cobalt salts are orally active, inexpensive, and easily accessible. It is an attractive blood doping agent for enhancing aerobic performance. Indeed, recent intelligence and investigations have confirmed cobalt was being abused in equine sports. In this paper, population surveys of total cobalt in raceday samples were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Urinary threshold of 75 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 2 ng/mL could be proposed for the control of cobalt misuse in raceday or in-competition samples. Results from administration trials with cobalt-containing supplements showed that common supplements could elevate urinary and plasma cobalt levels above the proposed thresholds within 24 h of administration. It would therefore be necessary to ban the use of cobalt-containing supplements on raceday as well as on the day before racing in order to implement and enforce the proposed thresholds. Since the abuse with huge quantities of cobalt salts can be done during training while the use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements are also allowed, different urinary and plasma cobalt thresholds would be required to control cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. This could be achieved by setting the thresholds above the maximum urinary and plasma cobalt concentrations observed or anticipated from the normal use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements. Urinary threshold of 2000 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 10 ng/mL were thus proposed for the control of cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. PMID:25256240

  2. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  3. Heavy metal and phenol adsorptive properties of biochars from pyrolyzed switchgrass and woody biomass in correlation with surface properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanxue; Boateng, Akwasi A; Qi, Phoebe X; Lima, Isabel M; Chang, Jianmin

    2013-03-30

    In this work, the surface structures of biochars, derived from three types of biomass, switchgrass (SG), hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW) through either fast pyrolysis (FP) in a fluidized-bed reactor (at 500 °C) or slow pyrolysis (at 500° and 700 °C), were studied in detail, and compared with that of the activated carbons obtained by steam activation of the slow pyrolyzed biochars (at 500 °C). The surface acidic functional groups were determined quantitatively by the Boehm Titration method. The adsorptive properties of heavy metals, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) onto the biochars and the activated carbons were investigated by the adsorption isotherms and SEM images, and correlated with the surface properties. ATR-FTIR and GC techniques were used to analyze the adsorptive behavior of phenol onto the biochars and activated carbons, and the results demonstrated that phenol adsorption capability is directly proportional to the micropore surface area as well as the combined level of the accessible carboxylic and lactonic groups. The relative adsorption capacity with respect to the biomass precursor follows the order: SW > HW > SG. PMID:23454371

  4. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  5. Risk analysis of pyrolyzed biochar made from paper mill effluent treatment plant sludge for bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Devi, Parmila; Saroha, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    The risk analysis was performed to study the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals in biochar obtained from pyrolysis of sludge of pulp and paper mill effluent treatment plant. The sludge was pyrolyzed at different temperatures (200-700°C) and the resultant biochar were analyzed for fractionation of heavy metals by sequential extraction procedure. It was observed that all the heavy metals get enriched in biochar matrix after pyrolysis, but the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of the heavy metals in biochar were significantly reduced as the mobile and bioavailable heavy metal fractions were transformed into the relatively stable fractions. Moreover, it was observed that the leaching potential of heavy metals decreased after pyrolysis and the best results were obtained for biochar pyrolyzed at 700°C. PMID:24762760

  6. Cosine (Cobalt Silicide Growth Through Nitrogen-Induced Epitaxy) Process For Epitaxial Cobalt Silicide Formation For High Performance Sha

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Shin, Chan Soo; Gall, Daniel; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-09-28

    A method for forming an epitaxial cobalt silicide layer on a MOS device includes sputter depositing cobalt in an ambient to form a first layer of cobalt suicide on a gate and source/drain regions of the MOS device. Subsequently, cobalt is sputter deposited again in an ambient of argon to increase the thickness of the cobalt silicide layer to a second thickness.

  7. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-06-15

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase.

  8. The respiratory effects of cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W.; Morgan, W.K.; Perkins, D.G.; Rubin, A. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied seven subjects with certain manifestations of cobalt-induced lung disease. All worked with cobalt and were involved in either the production or use of hard metal. The mode of presentation varied from an acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis that cleared completely when exposure ceased to progressive severe interstitial fibrosis of the lungs. In one subject reexposure was followed by a recurrence of the symptoms. All subjects showed restrictive ventilatory impairment and a reduction of their diffusing capacity. The radiologic appearances varied greatly. While two subjects had clear roentgenograms with small lung volumes, others had a micronodular pattern or small blotchy nodular infiltrates, and one had diffuse reticulonodulation as is seen in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. The pathologic appearances varied between desquamative interstitial pneumonia and overt mural fibrosis of the alveoli. Six of the seven patients had multinucleated giant cells in their biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

  9. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  10. Technical and business considerations of cobalt hydrometallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, Edgar; Åkre, Torjus; Asselin, Edouard

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 55,000 tonnes of cobalt are produced annually worldwide, which represents an estimated 1-3 billion in annual sales depending on cobalt price changes. Cobalt is a common impurity in both non-ferrous mineral sulfide and oxide processing. In this paper some business and technical considerations are presented to facilitate the decision-making process required to produce either an intermediate or a finished cobalt product via a hydrometallurgical route. Methods currently available and practiced for the recovery of cobalt are considered, and process requirements up- and down-stream associated with each chosen method are discussed. In particular, some environmental, energy, or other sustainable development implications of each process are mentioned. An outlook on the future of the cobalt industry and anticipated future trends is included.

  11. Magnetic dipolar interaction induced cobalt nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maogang; Dai, Qilin; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-02-19

    The dipolar interaction of magnetic nanoparticles is of intense interest to engineer material self-assembly for anisotropic functional nanostructures. Here we report the solution synthesis of cobalt nanowires, where the one-dimensional nanowire formation is ultimately dependent on the magnetic dipolar interaction to realize in situ assembly of cobalt nanoparticles. The morphology transition of cobalt nanostructures is well controlled via the ligand-free synthesis and thermal decomposition of zero-valent cobalt precursor. This study provides a self-assembly approach to the development of anisotropic cobalt nanostructures and a better understanding of nucleation parameters, which are demonstrated to correlate strongly with the size and morphology of final cobalt nanowires. This approach may be extended to other magnetic materials for the control of their nanostructure and magnetic performance. PMID:26783195

  12. Relative transition probabilities of cobalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roig, R. A.; Miller, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results of determinations of neutral-cobalt transition probabilities measured relative to Co I 4150.43 A and Co II 4145.15 A, using a gas-driven shock tube as the spectroscopic light source. Results are presented for 139 Co I lines in the range from 3940 to 6640 A and 11 Co II lines in the range from 3840 to 4730 A, which are estimated to have reliabilities ranging from 8 to 50%.

  13. Mineral resource of the month: cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

  14. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  15. Mechanically driven centrifugal pyrolyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Linck, Martin Brendan; Bush, Phillip Vann

    2012-03-06

    An apparatus for fast pyrolysis of biomass and other solid organic materials including a vertically oriented cylindrical vessel having a solids outlet proximate the bottom thereof, a vapor outlet, a top wall forming at least one opening, and an adjacent heated side wall. Disposed within the cylindrical vessel and extending through the at least one opening in the top wall is a rotor having a rotatable shaft coincident with the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical vessel to which is attached at least one substantially vertically oriented blade having one edge connected directly or indirectly with the rotatable shaft and having an opposite edge spaced apart from the heated side wall, whereby a non-radial, preferably tangential, force is imparted on the feedstock in the cylindrical vessel. Also disclosed is a method for fast pyrolysis of biomass and other solid organic materials.

  16. Does the feedstock origin of pyrolyzed materials influence the leaching quality and quantity of dissolved organic carbon from soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suddick, E.; Spencer, R. G.; Pereira, E. I.; Six, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Soils play a major role in the global C cycle and can be both a source of C emissions to the atmosphere and also a C sink. In order to sequester vast quantities of C and increase soil C stocks, which may be used to partly offset greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the future, new technologies are needed. Recently, there has been an abundance of interest in the use of pyrolyzed biomass C, termed biochar, as an amendment to terrestrial ecosystems to provide a large and long term sink of C. However, the stability and permanence of this black C source in soil is still relatively unknown and the uncertainty surrounding its turnover time may have implications for both C sequestration and the fate and transport of dissolved organic C leached to nearby water resources. Biochar can be derived from a multitude of feed stocks (e.g. walnut shells, wood chippings, poultry litter) and under a variety of pyrolysis conditions (e.g. high temperature or low temperatures); each process and feed stock can yield very different materials that has many different physical (e.g. surface area) and chemical (e.g. CEC, C and N content) properties. Each feed stock and pyrolysis condition may consequently contribute to a distinct recalcitrance in soil. Therefore, we undertook a pot trial to evaluate the chemical characteristics of leachate from soils incubated with biochars derived from 15 different feed stocks. Using optical property parameters such as SUVA, chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) slope parameter and fluorescence characteristics, we were able to determine the C leaching potential of each feedstock. Preliminary data suggests that there are distinct variations in optical properties with feed stock origin, for example an algae digestate showed a lower absorbance at 350 nm (a350) (25.7 m-1) and a steeper spectral slope at 290-350 nm (S290-350 x10-3) (17.7 nm-1) indicative of the presence of lower molecular weight compounds compared to control treatment with a signature typical

  17. Cobalt Reduction Guidelines, Revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This report, which updates and supersedes an earlier report (EPRI NP-6737) on the same subject, describes methods for establishing a program to identify nuclear power plant valves with high-cobalt hardfacing that are potential significant contributors to the cobalt inventory that is irradiated in the reactor core. The resulting radioactive cobalt isotope, cobalt-60, is a major contributor to plant radiation levels and therefore occupational doses received by plant operational and maintenance personnel. A methodology to determine whether hardfacing is actually required on specific valves is also described as is the physical, mechanical and wear properties of high-cobalt and potential replacement cobalt-free hardfacing and trim alloys. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. Current world-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The regulatory and industry code issues related to replacing and/or changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The actions and responsibilities of utility management in implementing an effective cobalt-reduction program are also delineated.

  18. Cobalt and nickel content of Asian cements.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L; Kwok, S F; Gan, S L

    1986-09-01

    The total cobalt and nickel concentration of 11 brands of Asian cement ranged from 8.1 to 14.2 micrograms/g and 14.9 to 28.5 micrograms/g, respectively. These metals exist mainly as insoluble salts; the water-soluble concentration of cobalt and nickel in the cements ranged from 0.39 to 0.65 micrograms/g and from 0-1.2 micrograms/g, respectively. 1.5% (4/272) of construction workers in a prefabrication construction factory had cobalt sensitivity. All had allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement. No worker had isolated cobalt sensitivity and cement dermatitis. It appeared that sensitization to cobalt in cement occurs only secondarily to an existing cement dermatitis. 1.8% (5/272) workers had nickel sensitivity: 2 with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel in their watches, 2 were asymptomatic and 1 had allergic contact dermatitis to chromate and cobalt in cement. The low prevalence of cobalt and nickel sensitivity from cement was probably related to the low concentration of soluble cobalt and nickel salts in the cement. However, these insoluble salts can form soluble complexes with body fluids on eczematous skin and sensitize the skin. PMID:2946537

  19. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of cobalt metal.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Brorby, Gregory P; Mittal, Liz; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-08-01

    Cobalt compounds (metal, salts, hard metals, oxides, and alloys) are used widely in various industrial, medical and military applications. Chronic inhalation exposure to cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate has caused lung cancer in rats and mice, as well as systemic tumors in rats. Cobalt compounds are listed as probable or possible human carcinogens by some agencies, and there is a need for quantitative cancer toxicity criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has derived a provisional inhalation unit risk (IUR) of 0.009 per μg/m(3) based on a chronic inhalation study of soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate; however, a recent 2-year cancer bioassay affords the opportunity to derive IURs specifically for cobalt metal. The mechanistic data support that the carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) is likely to involve oxidative stress, and thus, non-linear/threshold mechanisms. However, the lack of a detailed MOA and use of high, toxic exposure concentrations in the bioassay (≥1.25 mg/m(3)) preclude derivation of a reference concentration (RfC) protective of cancer. Several analyses resulted in an IUR of 0.003 per μg/m(3) for cobalt metal, which is ∼3-fold less potent than the provisional IUR. Future research should focus on establishing the exposure-response for key precursor events to improve cobalt metal risk assessment. PMID:27177823

  20. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eddie L.; Simmers, Christa; Knight, D. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion.

  1. Cobalt and possible oxidant-mediated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nemery, B; Lewis, C P; Demedts, M

    1994-06-30

    The occurrence of interstitial lung disease similar to hard metal lung disease in diamond polishers who had been exposed to cobalt (in the absence of tungsten carbide) through the use of polishing disks containing microdiamonds sintered with cobalt, led us to experimentally test the hypothesis that cobalt has pro-oxidant activity in lung tissue. Several experiments were carried out in which we measured indices of oxidant stress, mainly changes in the oxidation state of glutathione and in the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway, upon exposure of hamster pulmonary tissue to CoCl2 in vivo by intratracheal instillation, or in vitro by incubating lung slices. These experiments indicated that cobalt ions are capable of causing thiol oxidation in lung tissue as an early manifestation of oxidant stress, but more studies are needed to establish the relevance of this mechanism in the causation of lung disease in subjects exposed to cobalt-containing dusts. PMID:7939609

  2. Exposure to cobalt in the production of cobalt and cobalt compounds and its effect on the heart

    PubMed Central

    Linna, A; Oksa, P; Groundstroem, K; Halkosaari, M; Palmroos, P; Huikko, S; Uitti, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether exposure to cobalt in cobalt plants has any measurable effect on the cardiovascular system. Methods: Occupational, cross sectional study, using a self administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and laboratory tests in which 203 male workers with at least one year of exposure to cobalt and 94 unexposed controls participated. Echocardiography was performed on a subset of 122 most highly exposed cobalt workers, of which 109 were analysed, and on 60 controls, of which 57 were analysed. Analysis of covariance and a multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. Results: Two of the echocardiography parameters measured were associated with cobalt exposure. In the higher exposure group the left ventricular isovolumic relaxation time (mean 53.3, 49.1, and 49.7 ms in the high exposure, low exposure, and control groups respectively) and the deceleration time of the velocity of the early rapid filling wave (mean 194.3, 180.5, and 171.7 ms for those in the high exposure, low exposure, and control groups respectively) were prolonged, indicating altered left ventricular relaxation and early filling. Conclusion: Cumulative exposure to cobalt was found to be associated with the results of Doppler echocardiography measurements, indicating altered diastole. This finding supports the hypothesis that cobalt accumulation in the myocardium could affect myocardial function. Whether this finding has clinical implications remains to be evaluated. PMID:15477280

  3. Electronic transitions of cobalt monoboride.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y W; Pang, H F; Cheung, A S-C

    2011-11-28

    Electronic transition spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 495 and 560 nm has been observed and analyzed using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser-ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B(2)H(6)) seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded, which included transitions of both Co(10)B and Co(11)B isotopic species. Our analysis showed that the observed transition bands are ΔΩ = 0 transitions with Ω" = 2 and Ω" = 3 lower states. Four transition systems have been assigned, namely, the [18.1](3)Π(2)-X(3)Δ(2), the [18.3](3)Φ(3)-X(3)Δ(3), the [18.6]3- X(3)Δ(3), and the [19.0]2-X(3)Δ(2) systems. The bond length, r(o), of the X(3)Δ(3) state of CoB is determined to be 1.705 Å. The observed rotational lines showed unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the nuclei, which conforms to the Hund's case (a(β)) coupling scheme. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the CoB spectrum. PMID:22128936

  4. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the... and to prevent “gushing.” (b) Food containing any added cobaltous salts is deemed to be adulterated...

  5. Surface Chemistry and Precursor Material Effects on the Performance of Pyrolyzed Nanofibers as Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebl, Andrew James

    Next-generation lithium-ion batteries to meet consumer demands and new applications require the development of new electrode materials. Electrospinning of polymers is a simple and effective method to create one-dimensional, self-supporting materials, with no inactive components after pyrolysis. Composites of these nanofibers and high-capacity lithium materials have been demonstrated to possess superior reversible capacity than state-of-the-art commercial anodes. Despite impressive reversible discharge capacities polyacrylonitrile-based composites are not ready for adoption in commercial applications. These materials suffer from irreversible losses of Li to formation on the electrode of the solid electrolyte interphase during the first charge of the cell. This thesis work has taken two approaches to engineer high-performing nanofiber-based electrodes. First, the chemistry at the interface of the electrode and the electrolyte has been changed by depositing new surfaces. Attempts to create a graphitic fiber surface via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition did not result in an improvement of the irreversible losses. However, the experiments did demonstrate the growth of large surface area carbon nanowalls on the pyrolyzed electrospun fibers, creating a material which could serve as a substrate in catalysis or as an electrode for composite ultra-capacitors. Additionally, passivation surfaces were deposited by atomic layer deposition and molecular layer deposition. These new surfaces were employed to reduce the irreversible consumption of lithium by moving the charge transfer reaction to the interface of the carbon and the new material. The removal the lithium from the solvent prior to charge transfer limits the irreversible reduction of solvent by metallic lithium. Alumina films grown by atomic layer deposition reduced lithium losses to the solid electrolyte interphase by up to 42% for twenty deposition cycles. This large improvement in irreversible capacity

  6. Comparative study on the performance of pyrolyzed and plasma-treated iron(II) phthalocyanine-based catalysts for oxygen reduction in pH neutral electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnisch, Falk; Savastenko, Natalie A.; Zhao, Feng; Steffen, Hartmut; Brüser, Volker; Schröder, Uwe

    The performance of pyrolyzed and plasma-treated non-precious catalysts for the oxygen reduction is discussed in the light of their application in microbial fuel cells. An Ar-radio frequency (RF) plasma treatment is applied to enhance the electrochemical activity of iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc)-based catalysts. The electrochemical properties of the catalysts are analyzed by galvanodynamic linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometric experiments. Surface elemental analysis of the catalysts is examined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The influence of plasma power and treatment time on the elemental surface concentration and performance of the catalysts is investigated. The electrochemical activity, expressed in terms of the current density at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, is up to 40% higher for the plasma-treated samples than for pyrolyzed ones. It is found that optimal treatment time was 30 min and optimal plasma power was 150 W for the best electroactivity of FePc-based catalysts. From the results of XPS data, it is revealed that Ar-plasma treatment of the catalysts leads to an increase in the oxygen and nitrogen concentration on the catalysts surface. A correlation is found between the activity and surface concentration of oxygen and nitrogen on the catalysts' surface.

  7. Skin reactivity to metallic cobalt in patients with a positive patch test to cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    de Fine Olivarius, F; Menné, T

    1992-10-01

    458 consecutive patients were patch tested with a metallic cobalt disc as a supplement to the standard series. 23 patients had a positive reaction to CoCl2 1% pet. Of these, 19 were tested with the cobalt disc. 11 had a positive reaction and 5 a questionable reaction. There were no positive reactions to the cobalt disc in patients with a negative patch test to CoCl2 1% pet. Patch testing with CoCl2 1% pet. diagnoses all patients with allergy to metallic cobalt, but the test method is limited by a high number of irritant and questionable reactions. PMID:1451489

  8. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J M; Coker, V S; Moise, S; Wincott, P L; Vaughan, D J; Tuna, F; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Telling, N D

    2013-06-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 -xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt-iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe(2+) site with Co(2+), with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  9. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  10. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  11. Nanocrystalline cobalt oxides for carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kun; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2007-09-01

    Thin Films of nanocrystalline cobalt oxide were formed by sol-gel method. Structure, optical properties and surface properties of these films were investigated by numerous characterization techniques. These films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates below 500°C. . Micropatterns of cobalt oxide thin films were also fabricated on glass and silicon substrates by employing a lift-off method. Crystal size of these nanocrystalline cobalt films could be successfully controllable by varying the amount of cobalt precursors and number of layers. These films were used as the seeding layers for carbon nanotube growth in a CVD process By changing the concentration of monomer precursors in the solgel coating solutions, different size nanoclusters hence different size carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in CVD process. This method can be used for controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for many different applications. In this paper, detail of these experimental results will be presented.

  12. Verification timer for AECL 780 Cobalt unit.

    PubMed

    Smathers, J B; Holly, F E

    1984-05-01

    To obtain verification of the proper time setting of the motorized run down timer for a AECL 780 Cobalt Unit, a digital timer is described, which can be added to the system for under $300. PMID:6735762

  13. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  14. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. PMID:27615181

  15. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  16. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  17. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  18. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  19. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  20. Synergetic interactions improve cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Li, Tianchi; Liu, Chuan; Quan, Xie; Chen, Lijie; Wang, Aijie; Chen, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide is a promising reduction process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries, but suffers from consumption of large amount of reductants and energy, and generation of excess secondary polluted sludge. Thus, effective and environmental friendly processes are needed to improve the existing process limitations. Here we reported microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to effectively reduce Co(III) in lithium cobalt oxide with concomitant energy generation. There was a synergetic interaction in MFCs, leading to a more rapid Co(III) leaching at a rate 3.4 times the sum of rates by conventional chemical processes and no-acid controls. External resistor, solid/liquid ratio, solution conductivity, pH and temperature affected system performance. This study provides a new process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with concomitant energy generation from MFCs. PMID:23211478

  1. Decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 by cobalt. Evidence for a role of cobalt protoporphyrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, J F; Sinclair, P R; Healey, J F; Smith, E L; Bonkowsky, H L

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of cultured chick-embryo hepatocytes to increasing concentrations of CoCl2 in the presence of allylisopropylacetamide results in formation of cobalt protoporphyrin, with a reciprocal decrease in haem and cytochrome P-450. Treatment of rats with CoCl2 (84 mumol/kg) and 5-aminolaevulinate (0.2 mmol/kg) also results in formation of cobalt protoporphyrin and a decrease in cytochrome P-450 in the liver. Hepatic microsomal fractions from rats treated with phenobarbital, CoCl2 and 5-aminolaevulinate were analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cobalt protoporphyrin was associated mainly with proteins of 50000-53000 mol.wt. The results suggest that the formation of cobalt protoporphyrin occurred at the expense of the synthesis of haem, leading to a decrease in cytochrome P-450. Furthermore, the cobalt protoporphyrin that was formed may itself have been incorporated into apocytochrome P-450. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7115319

  2. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    SciTech Connect

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  3. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  4. Equilibrium phase boundary between hcp-cobalt and fcc-cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cynn, Hyunchae; Lipp, Magnus J.; Evans, William J.; Baer, Bruce J.

    In 2000 (Yoo et al., PRL), fcc-cobalt was reported as a new high pressure phase transforming from ambient hcp-cobalt starting at around 105 GPa and 300 K. Both cobalts coexist up to 150 GPa and thereafter only fcc-cobalt was found to be the only stable phase to 200 GPa. Our recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction data on cobalt are at odds with the previous interpretation. We will present our new finding and elaborate on our understanding in terms of the equilibrium phase boundary of cobalt. We will also compare our previous work on xenon (Cynn et al., 2001, PRL) with our new results on cobalt. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Portions of this work were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), APS, Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award No. DENA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award No. DE-FG02-99ER45775. The Advanced Photon Source is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  11. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Huang, Tao

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  12. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  14. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  15. Nickel cobalt phosphorous low stress electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolytic plating process is provided for electrodepositing a nickel or nickel cobalt alloy which contains at least about 2% to 25% by atomic volume of phosphorous. The process solutions contains nickel and optionally cobalt sulfate, hypophosphorous acid or a salt thereof, boric acid or a salt thereof, a monodentate organic acid or a salt thereof, and a multidentate organic acid or a salt thereof. The pH of the plating bath is from about 3.0 to about 4.5. An electroplating process is also provided which includes electroplating from the bath a nickel or nickel cobalt phosphorous alloy. This process can achieve a deposit with high microyield of at least about 84 kg/mm.sup.2 (120 ksi) and a density lower than pure nickel of about 8.0 gm/cc. This process can be used to plate a deposit of essentially zero stress at plating temperatures from ambient to 70.degree. C.

  16. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  17. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  18. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crockett, R.N.; Chapman, G.R.; Forrest, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Major world resources of cobalt are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of cobalt on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  19. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  20. Cobalt plaque therapy of posterior uveal melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.A.; Augsburger, J.J.; Brady, L.W.; Day, J.L.

    1982-10-01

    One hundred patients with choroidal melanomas who were treated by the authors with cobalt plaque radiotherapy were analyzed with regard to tumor regression, visual results, complications, and mortality rate. The follow-up period at the time of this writing ranged from one to five years. These preliminary observations indicate that cobalt plaque radiotherapy induces tumor regression in 96% of cases, preserves useful vision in many cases and has fewer complications during the one- to five-year follow-up period than previously believed.

  1. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  2. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C.; Amamou, W.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2014-05-07

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  3. Cobalt processing - flask positioner location sensing system

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors offer unique opportunities for economical production of /sup 60/Co in the adjuster rods used for xenon override and maximization of core output. Cobalt is effectively a by-product in CANDU reactors with the standards stainless steel adjuster rods replaced with cobalt adjuster rods. The Flask Positioner unit is a part of the cobalt adjuster element processing system (CAEPS) equipment which is used for removing irradiated cobalt adjuster elements from the reactor and safely transporting them to the irradiated fuel bay, where they are dismantled and prepared for shipment. The flask positioner equipment is similar to a crane, carries the CAEPS flask and locates it in an accurate position concentric with any adjuster site centerline. This enables the required operations for safe transfer of the irradiated adjuster element into the flask. The positioner is located above the reactivity mechanism deck. The CAEPS system has been made operational on several CANDU reactors. The location sensing system has been demonstrated to work very satisfactorily on all installations.

  4. Localized comedo formation after cobalt irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Myskowski, P.L.; Safai, B.

    1981-10-01

    Following Cobalt-60 irradiation for a left frontotemporal tumor, a 61-year-old woman developed comedones on the forehead. These changes responded to conventional acne therapy with retinoic acid. Multiple acneigenic factors were implicated in the pathogenesis of her lesions.

  5. Sintered diamond compacts using metallic cobalt binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, W. F.; Katzman, H.

    1972-01-01

    Method is developed for sintering diamond powder which uses metallic cobalt as binder. Present samples show maximum microhardness of over 3000 kg/sq mm on Knoop scale. Material may be used as hard surface coating or may compete with cubic boron nitride as abrasive grain.

  6. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A. J.; Amamou, W.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Kawakami, R. K.; Hammel, P. C.

    2014-05-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  7. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  8. Controlled cobalt doping of magnetosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Staniland, Sarah; Williams, Wyn; Telling, Neil; Van Der Laan, Gerrit; Harrison, Andrew; Ward, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize iron into magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles that are surrounded by lipid vesicles. These 'magnetosomes' have considerable potential for use in bio- and nanotechnological applications because of their narrow size and shape distribution and inherent biocompatibility. The ability to tailor the magnetic properties of magnetosomes by chemical doping would greatly expand these applications; however, the controlled doping of magnetosomes has so far not been achieved. Here, we report controlled in vivo cobalt doping of magnetosomes in three strains of the bacterium Magnetospirillum. The presence of cobalt increases the coercive field of the magnetosomes--that is, the field necessary to reverse their magnetization--by 36-45%, depending on the strain and the cobalt content. With elemental analysis, X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, we estimate the cobalt content to be between 0.2 and 1.4%. These findings provide an important advance in designing biologically synthesized nanoparticles with useful highly tuned magnetic properties. PMID:18654488

  9. Cobalt Biogeochemistry in the South Atlantic: A Full-Depth Zonal Ocean Section of Total Dissolved Cobalt, and Development of a High Throughput Cobalt ICP-MS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, A. E.; Saito, M. A.; Goepfert, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    This study presents the first high-resolution full-depth zonal section of total dissolved cobalt from a recent cruise transecting the South Atlantic Ocean along approximately 11S. This section demonstrates that current electrochemical analytical techniques are capable of producing the high precision and high resolution datasets for total dissolved cobalt expected to be generated as a part of the international GEOTRACES Program. The micronutritive role of cobalt may affect community structure in different regions of the oceans, a compelling reason to include cobalt in the trace element analyses planned for the GEOTRACES Program. This cobalt section reveals an advective source of cobalt from the African coast near Namibia, which we propose to be due to the Benguela Current interacting with reducing shelf sediments. These high concentrations of cobalt were also observed within the oxygen minimum zone that extends across much of the South Atlantic basin in this section, and are likely indicative of redox cycling of cobalt in the water column. Nutrient-like vertical structure of cobalt was observed in the surface waters across the majority of the basin due to biological utilization, and the expected hybrid-type trend is observed at depth, with scavenging of cobalt below the nutricline. Deepwater concentrations of cobalt were around 50pM across the basin below 3000m. Analysis of the shelf-life of refrigerated filtered samples stored without acidification for electrochemical cobalt analysis demonstrated that those samples which were collected specifically within oxygen minimum zones may underestimate cobalt if not analyzed within a few weeks of collection. These results motivate our on-going development of a method to measure cobalt in acidified samples via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The benefit of this technique would be twofold: acidification would extend the shelf-life of the samples significantly, and samples would be preserved identically

  10. Analysis of switchgrass-derived bio-oil and associated aqueous phase generated in a semi-pilot scale auger pyrolyzer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ren, Shoujie; Ye, X. Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbé, Ncole

    2016-03-30

    To efficiently utilize water-soluble compounds in bio-oil and evaluate the potential effects of these compounds on processes such as microbial electrolysis, our study investigated the physico-chemical properties of bio-oil and the associated aqueous phase generated from switchgrass using a semi-pilot scale auger pyrolyzer. Combining separation and detection strategies with organic solvent extraction, an array of analytical instruments and methods were used to identify and quantify the chemical constituents. Separation of an aqueous phase from crude bio-oil was achieved by adding water (water: crude bio-oil at 4:1 in weight), which resulted in a partition of 61 wt.% of the organic compoundsmore » into a bio-oil aqueous phase (BOAP). GC/MS analysis for BOAP identified over 40 compounds of which 16 were quantified. Acetic acid, propionic acid, and levoglucosan are the major components in BOAP. In addition, a significant portion of chemicals that have the potential to be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels were extracted to BOAP (77 wt.% of the alcohols, 61 wt.% of the furans, and 52 wt.% of the phenolic compounds in crude bio-oil). Valorization of the BOAP may require conversion methods capable of accommodating a very broad substrate specificity. Ultimately, a better separation strategy is needed to selectively remove the acidic and polar components from crude bio-oil to improve economic feasibility of biorefinery operations.« less

  11. Comparison of pyrolytic products produced from inorganic-rich and demineralized rice straw (Oryza sativa L.) by fluidized bed pyrolyzer for future biorefinery approach.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Soo-Min; Cho, Tae-Su; Yeo, Hwanmyeong; Choi, Joon-Weon

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of inorganic constituents on the fast pyrolysis of the biomass and to determine the yields as well as physicochemical properties of pyrolytic products. The pyrolytic products were obtained from raw and demineralized rice straw using a fluidized bed type pyrolyzer at different temperatures. As pyrolysis temperature increased, total biooil yield gradually decreased from 46.6 to 29.6 wt.% for the raw-straw, and from 55.4 to 35.3 wt.% for the demineralized rice straw. For demineralized rice straw, higher pyrolysis temperatures promoted gasification reactions but reduced char formations. However, char yield for the raw-straw was relatively unaffected by temperature due to an increase in carbonization reactions that were catalyzed by some inorganics. Certain inorganic constituents in the biomass were distinctively distributed in the biooil, and ICP-ES and GC/MS analysis indicated that some inorganics may be chemically bound to cell wall components. PMID:23220113

  12. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  13. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L.; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  14. Low-cobalt single crystal Rene 150

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of cobalt content on a single crystal version of the advanced, high gamma prime content turbine airfoil alloy Rene 150 were investigated. Cobalt contents under investigation include 12 wt.% (composition level of Rene 150), 6 wt.%, and 0 wt.%. Preliminary test results are presented and compared with the properties of standard DS Rene 150. DTA results indicate that the liquidus goes through a maximum of about 1435 C near 6 wt.% Co. The solidus remains essentially constant at 1390 C with decreasing Co content. The gamma prime solvus appears to go through a minimum of about 1235 C near 6 wt.% Co content. Preliminary as-cast tensile and stress rupture results are presented along with heat treat schedules and future test plans.

  15. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  16. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  17. Hard Machinable Machining of Cobalt Super Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čep, Robert; Janásek, Adam; Petrů, Jana; Čepová, Lenka; Sadílek, Marek; Kratochvíl, Jiří

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with difficult-to-machine cobalt super alloys. The main aim is to test the basic properties of cobalt super alloys and propose suitable cutting materials and machining parameters under the designation 188 when machining. Although the development of technology in chipless machining such as moulding, precision casting and other manufacturing methods continues to advance, machining is still the leading choice for piece production, typical for energy and chemical engineering. Nowadays, super alloys are commonly used in turbine engines in regions that are subject to high temperatures, which require high strength, high temperature resistance, phase stability, as well as corrosion or oxidation resistance.

  18. Influence of cobalt on fermentative methylation.

    PubMed

    Claridge, C A; Rossomano, V Z; Buono, N S; Gourevitch, A; Lein, J

    1966-03-01

    Streptomyces rishiriensis produces at least five closely related antibiotics. Strain selection yielded a culture producing only the most active component, coumermycin A. Hydrolysis of this antibiotic by barium hydroxide yielded both 5-methyl-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, which could be separated by paper chromatography. Coumermycin A was thus shown to be two fractions, designated A(1) and A(2) depending upon the nature of the pyrrole carboxylic acid portion. The addition of cobalt to the fermentation medium at a level as low as 0.01 mug/ml shifted the fermentation exclusively to the production of coumermycin A(1). Other ions were ineffective, except nickel, whose activity could be explained by the presence of contaminating cobalt. PMID:5959861

  19. Cobalt recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2002-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports on metals recycling. It defines and quantifies the 1998 flow of cobalt-bearing materials in the United States, from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of cobalt?s many and diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 1998, an estimated 32 percent of U.S. cobalt supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of cobalt consumed from new scrap to that from old scrap was estimated to be 50:50. Of all the cobalt in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 68 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of different nanostructures of cobalt phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Badsar, M.; Edrissi, M.

    2010-09-15

    In this research, different nanostructures of cobalt phosphate were successfully prepared. Flowerlike cobalt phosphate and platelike ammonium cobalt phosphate were made by coprecipitation method without any use of surfactant or capping agent as structure directors. Reverse micelle route in water/CTAB/n-hexanol microemulsion system was used to synthesize cobalt phosphate nanoparticles. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), chemical analysis, and BET. The SEM images showed that the flowerlike nanostructure is an arrangement of cobalt phosphate plates. TEM images revealed that the nanoparticles are spherical with the diameter of 30-50 nm. The purity of cobalt phosphate nanoparticles was confirmed by chemical analysis. Finally, the possible mechanisms which can describe the formation of these nanostructures were discussed.

  1. Interfacial Structure Dependent Spin Mixing Conductance in Cobalt Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Tokaç, M; Bunyaev, S A; Kakazei, G N; Schmool, D S; Atkinson, D; Hindmarch, A T

    2015-07-31

    Enhancement of Gilbert damping in polycrystalline cobalt thin-film multilayers of various thicknesses, overlayered with copper or iridium, was studied in order to understand the role of local interface structure in spin pumping. X-ray diffraction indicates that cobalt films less than 6 nm thick have strong fcc(111) texture while thicker films are dominated by hcp(0001) structure. The intrinsic damping for cobalt thicknesses above 6 nm is weakly dependent on cobalt thickness for both overlayer materials, and below 6 nm the iridium overlayers show higher damping enhancement compared to copper overlayers, as expected due to spin pumping. The interfacial spin mixing conductance is significantly enhanced in structures where both cobalt and iridium have fcc(111) structure in comparison to those where the cobalt layer has subtly different hcp(0001) texture at the interface. PMID:26274431

  2. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  3. Atomically flat ultrathin cobalt ferrite islands.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Laura; Quesada, Adrián; Munuera, Carmen; Fernández, Jose F; García-Hernández, Mar; Foerster, Michael; Aballe, Lucía; de la Figuera, Juan

    2015-10-21

    A route for fabricating structurally perfect cobalt ferrite magnetic nanostructures is demonstrated. Ultrathin islands of up to 100 μm(2) with atomically flat surfaces and free from antiphase boundaries are developed. The extremely low defect concentration leads to a robust magnetic order, even for thicknesses below 1 nm, and exceptionally large magnetic domains. This approach allows the evaluation of the influence of specific extrinsic effects on domain wall pinning. PMID:26306027

  4. Cobalt(II) Complex of a Diazoalkane Radical Anion.

    PubMed

    Bonyhady, Simon J; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Wedgwood, Nicole; Dugan, Thomas R; Eklund, Andrew G; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2015-06-01

    β-Diketiminate cobalt(I) precursors react with diphenyldiazomethane to give a compound that is shown by computational studies to be a diazoalkane radical anion antiferromagnetically coupled to a high-spin cobalt(II) ion. Thermolysis of this complex results in formal N-N cleavage to give a cobalt(II) ketimide complex. Experimental evaluation of the potential steps in the mechanism suggests that free azine is a likely intermediate in this reaction. PMID:25986783

  5. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  6. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  7. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  8. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  9. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of metallic cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jinhee; Saly, Mark; Kanjolia, Ravi; Chabal, Yves; University of Texas at Dallas Collaboration; SAFC Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Metallic cobalt has rich catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties, which makes it critical to have a better control of Co thin film deposition for various applications. This work focuses on the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of cobalt using (tertiarybutylallyl)cobalttricarbonyl (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 and dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) on H-terminated Si to uncover the growth mechanisms. The first pulse of (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 reacts with surface H--Si bonds completely, forming one monolayer of metallic silicide. In situ infrared absorption spectra show that further deposition of Co is made possible only after linear carbonyl groups which remain after the first (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 pulse as the surface ligand are removed by subsequent ALD cycles. Further ALD cycles give rise to metallic Co growth through ligand exchange after a nucleation period of 8--10 cycles. The derived growth rate of cobalt is 0.6 +/- 0.1 Å/cycle. The resultant Co film shows low concentration of carbon and nitrogen impurities in the bulk according to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

  11. Development toxicity of cobalt in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Paternain, J.L.; Domingo, J.L.; Corbella, J.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the potential developmental toxicity of cobalt, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given by gavage a daily dose of 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg cobalt(II) chloride on d 6-15 of gestation. Females were sacrificed on d 20. Maternal effects included significant reductions in weight gain and food consumption, particularly at 100 mk/kg x d. Hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and reticulocytes were increased significantly in the 100-mg/kg x d group. No treatment-related changes were recorded in the number of corpora lutea, total implants, resorptions, the number of live and dead fetuses, fetal size parameters, or fetal sex distribution data. Increased incidence of stunted fetuses per litter was the only adverse finding at 50 and 100 mg/kg x d group. However, this increase was not statistically significant. Examination of fetuses for gross external abnormalities, skeletal malformation, or ossification variations revealed that cobalt did not produce teratogenicity or significant fetotoxicity in the rat at doses as high as 100 mg/kg x d.

  12. Kinetics of cobalt cementation on zinc powder

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, A.M.; Palmas, S.; Dernini, S.

    1995-09-01

    The cementation process may be considered an interesting method to treat dilute solutions containing metal ions. The aim of the process may be either the removal of pollutant metals or the recovery of economically valuable metals such as Ag from spent photographic liquors. The kinetics of cobalt cementation on Zn powder from zinc sulfate concentrated solutions in the presence of copper and antimony ions was investigated in stirred tank reactors. The composition of the solutions was in the range usually utilized in industrial zinc electrowinning plants. The results showed that the reaction occurs by means of the formation of crystallization nuclei of noble metals on the zinc powder, followed by the cementation of cobalt ions on these newly-formed nuclei. Mass transfer to the reaction surface is shown to be the controlling step in copper and antimony reduction, and an equation correlating mass transfer coefficients has been determined. A kinetic equation, which interprets the influence of stirring speed and solution composition on cobalt cementation, has also been proposed.

  13. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  14. Compact magnetooptical isolator with cobalt ferrite on silicon photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanaga, Megumi; Shoji, Yuya; Takamura, Yota; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    In the telecom wavelength range, the magnetooptical effect of cobalt ferrites is approximately 10 times larger than that of conventional magnetooptical materials such as yttrium iron garnets. In this study, we focus on an application of cobalt ferrite to a magnetooptical isolator that is to be miniaturized and made suitable for integration. First, we prepare polycrystalline cobalt ferrite films deposited on a silicon substrate using a MgO buffer layer. Next, we fabricate a waveguide optical isolator of silicon waveguides by the partial deposition of the cobalt ferrite films. An optical isolation ratio of 5.5 dB is demonstrated.

  15. Solvent extraction of cobalt from laterite-ammoniacal leach liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, D.N.; Siemens, R.E.; Rhoads, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines is developing a method to recover Ni, Co, and Cu from laterites containing less than 1.2% Ni and 0.25% Co. The method consists of the following basic unit operations: (1) reduction roasting, (2) leaching, (3) solvent extraction, and (4) electrowinning. The method reflects three Bureau of Mines objectives: (1) recovery of critical minerals that are domestically in short supply from low-grade domestic laterites, (2) lower processing energy requirements, and (3) solution recycling. This report deals with the extraction of cobalt and the preparation of a suitable cobalt electrolyte by solvent extraction from liquor produced by this method. Nickel and copper are coextracted with LIX64N from an ammoniacal ammonium sulfate leach liquor containing about 1.00 g/1 Ni, 0.30 g/1 Co, 0.03 g/1 Cu, and 0.02 g/1 Zn. Cobalt (III) in the nickel-copper barren raffinate is reduced to cobalt (II) with cobalt metal. Reduction of cobalt (III) to cobalt (II) greatly aids subsequent extraction. Commercially available XI-51 extracts about 94% of the cobalt from the treated raffinate in one stage in a laboratory mixer-settler continuous circuit. Ammonia loaded on the solvent is removed in two washing steps. About 94% of the cobalt then is stripped from the XI-51 in one stage with spent cobalt electrolyte containing about 77 g/1 Co and 18 g/1 sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). Electrolytes containing less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also may be used. Preliminary data indicate that coextracted zinc may be removed from pregnant cobalt electrolyte containing 3 g/1 or less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ with di-(2 ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA).

  16. Method of pyrolyzing brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, W.; Heberlein, I.; Ossowski, M.; Paul, H.; Rummel, A.; Seher, G.

    1985-08-06

    A two-step method and apparatus are disclosed based on the fluidized bed principle, for the production of coke, rich gas and pyrolysis tar, with the object of executing the method in a compact apparatus arrangement, with high energy efficiency and high throughput capacity. This is accomplished by a sequence in which the fine grains removed from the drying vapor mixture are removed from the actual pyrolysis process, and a hot gas, alien to the carbonization, is used as fluidization medium in the pyrolysis reactor, and with a hot gas-high performance separator being used for the dust separation from the pyrolysis gas, with the combustion exhaust gas produced in the combustion chamber being used for the indirect heating of the fluidization medium, for the pre-heating of the gas, which is alien to the carbonization, and for the direct heating in the dryer. The dryer has a double casing in the area of the fluidized bed, and a mixing chamber is arranged directly underneath its initial flow bottom, while the pyrolysis reactor is directly connected to the combustion chamber and the pre-heater.

  17. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  18. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  19. [The cobalt lung in diamond cutters: a new disease].

    PubMed

    Demedts, M; Gyselen, A

    1989-01-01

    Although for forty years already broncho-pulmonary pathology has been described in workers exposed to hard-metal (i.e. alloys of tungsten carbide and cobalt) and although cobalt is considered the offending agent of this hazard, these abnormalities have almost not been found after exposure to cobalt alone except in animal experiments. Recently we detected clearcut broncho-pulmonary pathology in 48 diamond polishers (i.e. nearly 1% of those exposed) attributable to the ultrafine cobalt dust from the cutting surface of polishing disks, in which it was used as a cementing matrix for microdiamonds without any tungsten carbide. Nineteen of these patients presented with a fibrosing alveolitis documented in 6 by lung biopsy and in 12 by broncho-alveolar lavage, both of which revealed characteristic multinucleated giant cells. Thirteen suffered from asthma of occupational origin, in 9 proven by cobalt-inhalation tests, and in 5 by peak flow measurements at the workplace. Sixteen had mixed bronchial and alveolar pathology or were incompletely documented. A cross-sectional study in about 200 diamond polishers showed a significant correlation between exposure to cobalt and decrease in lung function. The strikingly harmful effects of cobalt can be explained by the chronic exposure to very small particles with markedly increased solubility. The pathogenesis of the broncho-pulmonary pathology may be attributed to the cytotoxic as well as to the sensitising (i.e. allergic and/or idiosyncratic) actions of cobalt. PMID:2561412

  20. Effect of cobalt on Escherichia coli metabolism and metalloporphyrin formation

    PubMed Central

    Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E.

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity in Escherichia coli resulting from high concentrations of cobalt has been explained by competition of cobalt with iron in various metabolic processes including Fe–S cluster assembly, sulfur assimilation, production of free radicals and reduction of free thiol pool. Here we present another aspect of increased cobalt concentrations in the culture medium resulting in the production of cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX), which was incorporated into heme proteins including membrane-bound cytochromes and an expressed human cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). The presence of CoPPIX in cytochromes inhibited their electron transport capacity and resulted in a substantially decreased respiration. Bacterial cells adapted to the increased cobalt concentration by inducing a modified mixed acid fermentative pathway under aerobiosis. We capitalized on the ability of E. coli to insert cobalt into PPIX to carry out an expression of CoPPIX-substituted heme proteins. The level of CoPPIX-substitution increased with the number of passages of cells in a cobalt-containing medium. This approach is an inexpensive method to prepare cobalt-substituted heme proteins compared to in vitro enzyme reconstitution or in vivo replacement using metalloporphyrin heme analogs and seems to be especially suitable for complex heme proteins with an additional coenzyme, such as human CBS. PMID:21184140

  1. Potential for cobalt recovery from lateritic ores in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, R.

    2012-04-01

    Cobalt is one of the 'critical metals' identified under the EU Raw Materials Initiative. Annually the global mine production of cobalt is around 55,000 tonnes,with Europe's industries consuming around 30% of that figure. Currently Europe produces around 27 tonnes of cobalt from mines in Finland although new capacity is planned. Co-bearing nickel laterite ores being mined in Greece, Macedonia and Kosovo where the cobalt is currently not being recovered (ores have typical analyses of 0.055% Co and >1% Ni,). These ores are currently treated directly in pyrometallurgical plants to recover the contained nickel and this process means there is no separate cobalt product produced. Hydrometallurgical treatment of mineralogically suitable laterite ores can recover the cobalt; for example Cuba recovers 3,500 tonnes of cobalt from its laterite mining operations, which are of a similar scale to the current European operations. Implementation of hydrometallurgical techniques is in its infancy in Europe with one deposit in Turkey planning to use atmospheric heap leaching to recover nickel and copper from oxide-dominated ores. More widespread implementation of these methods to mineralogically suitable ore types could unlock the highly significant undeveloped resources (with metal contents >0.04% Co and >1% Ni), which have been defined throughout the Balkans eastwards into Turkey. At a conservative estimate, this region has the potential to supply up to 30% of the EU cobalt requirements.

  2. Experimental evaluation of cobalt behavior on BWR fuel rod surface

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, H.; Asakura, Y.; Sakagami, M.; Uchida, S. )

    1988-06-01

    Cobalt behavior on the boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod surface was experimentally evaluated at 285 C and with various pH values. Adsorption of cobalt ions on hematite particles proceeded via the exchange reaction of cobalt ion with the surface hydroxyl of the hematite. The equilibrium constant for the adsorption at 285 C was found to be -- 570 times as large as that at 20 C. The adsorbate formed cobalt ferrite at the rate of 3.4 x 10/sup -2/ g-Co/g-Co adsorbed/h. The dissolution rates of cobalt ferrite and cobalt oxide particles were found to depend on (H/sup -/)/sup 1.1/ and (H/sup -/)/sup 1.2/, respectively, where (H/sup -/) means the H/sup -/ concentration. Cobalt ions were released from these oxides when O/sup 2-/ ions in them combined with two aqueous protons to form water at the oxide-water interface. Cobalt behavior on the fuel rod surface under BWR conditions was discussed using the experimental results.

  3. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure. PMID:25896363

  4. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  5. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism.

  6. Effects of cobalt in lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagshaw, N. B.

    The effects of cobalt additions (0.1-1 g/1) to the electrolyte have been studied by anodic corrosion tests on sheets of various alloys, and by continuous charge, cycling and charge retention tests on thick plate automotive-type of batteries. Positive grid corrosion decreases with increase in cobalt concentration but the effect is less marked for alloys with high intrinsic corrosion resistance. Cobalt oxidizes some types of separator even at a relatively low concentration. The top-of-charge voltage is reduced by the presence of cobalt, the effect occurring mainly at the positive plate. Cobalt causes increased open-circuit losses but the effect is fairly small at low concentrations (0.1-0.15 g/1).

  7. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  8. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids.

    PubMed

    Vu, A D; Coraux, J; Chen, G; N'Diaye, A T; Schmid, A K; Rougemaille, N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  9. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    DOEpatents

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  10. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  11. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

    1980-10-01

    In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

  12. Cold-Sprayed Nanostructured Pure Cobalt Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold-sprayed pure cobalt coatings were deposited on carbon-steel substrate. Submicrometer particles for spraying were produced via cryomilling. Deposits were produced using different processing conditions (gas temperature and pressure, nozzle-to-substrate distance) to evaluate the resulting variations in grain size dimension, microhardness, adhesion strength, and porosity. The coating mechanical properties improved greatly with higher temperature and carrying-gas pressure. The coating microstructure was analyzed as a function of spraying condition by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, revealing many different microstructural features for coatings experiencing low or high strain rates during deposition.

  13. Fischer-Tropsch cobalt catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.; Marcelin, G.; Singleton, A.

    1994-12-31

    Based on the information provided in patents assigned to Gulf, Shell, Exxon, and Statoil, a series of catalysts has been prepared consisting of 12-20 wt% cobalt, a second metal promoter (Ru or Re), and an oxide promoter such as lanthana, zirconia, or alkali oxide, the support being alumina, silica, or titania. All catalysts have been extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts have been evaluated in terms of their activity, selectivity both in a fixed bed reactor and in a slurry bubble column reactor, and the results correlated with their physico-chemical properties.

  14. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  15. Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide in self-driven microbial fuel cell - Microbial electrolysis cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liping; Yao, Binglin; Wu, Dan; Quan, Xie

    2014-08-01

    Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide requires to firstly leach cobalt from particles LiCoO2 and then recover cobalt from aqueous Co(II). A self-driven microbial fuel cell (MFC)-microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) system can completely carry out these two processes, in which Co(II) is firstly released from particles LiCoO2 on the cathodes of MFCs and then reduced on the cathodes of MECs which are powered by the cobalt leaching MFCs. A cobalt leaching rate of 46 ± 2 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 1.5 ± 0.1 g Co g-1 COD (MFCs) and a Co(II) reduction rate of 7 ± 0 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 0.8 ± 0.0 g Co g-1 COD (MECs), as well as a overall system cobalt yield of 0.15 ± 0.01 g Co g-1 Co can be achieved in this self-driven MFC-MEC system. Coulombic efficiencies reach 41 ± 1% (anodic MFCs), 75 ± 0% (anodic MECs), 100 ± 2% (cathodic MFCs), and 29 ± 1% (cathodic MECs) whereas overall system efficiency averages 34 ± 1%. These results provide a new process of linking MFCs to MECs for complete recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with no external energy consumption.

  16. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Irshad, M. I. Mohamed, N. M.; Ahmad, F. Abdullah, M. Z.

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  17. Cobalt distribution during copper matte smelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, T. S.; Swinbourne, D. R.; Lehner, T.

    2006-04-01

    Many smelter operators subscribe to the “precautionary principle” and wish to understand the behavior of the metals and impurities during smelting, especially how they distribute between product and waste phases and whether these phases lead to environmental, health, or safety issues. In copper smelting, copper and other elements are partitioned between copper matte, iron silicate slag, and possibly the waste gas. Many copper concentrates contain small amounts of cobalt, a metal of considerable value but also of some environmental interest. In this work, the matte/slag distribution ratio (weight percent) of cobalt between copper matte (55 wt pct) and iron silicate slag was thermodynamically modeled and predicted to be approximately 5. Experiments were performed using synthetic matte and slag at 1250 °C under a low oxygen partial pressure and the distribution ratio was found to be 4.3, while between industrial matte and slag, the ratio was found to be 1.8. Both values are acceptably close to each other and to the predicted value, given the errors inherent in such measurements. The implications of these results for increasingly sustainable copper production are discussed.

  18. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleineidam, M.; Augsburger, J.J. ); Hernandez, C.; Glennon, P.; Brady, L.W. )

    1993-07-15

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined. PMID:23069009

  20. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Hilmen, A.M.; Bergene, E.

    1995-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an attractive possibility for conversion of natural gas into high quality liquid fuels. Due to its low water-gas shift activity, good activity/selectivity properties and relatively low price, cobalt is the choice of catalytic metal for natural gas conversion via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxygen is mainly rejected as water. In this paper we describe the influence of water on supported cobalt catalysts. The deactivation of supported Co catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor using synthesis gas feeds containing varying concentrations of water vapour.

  1. Magnetoelastic coupling in epitaxial cobalt ferrite/barium titanate heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Welke, Martin; Bern, Francis; Ziese, Michael; Denecke, Reinhard

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-thin cobalt ferrite films have been synthesised on ferroelectric barium titanate crystals. The cobalt ferrite films exhibit a magnetic response to strain induced by structural changes in the barium titanate substrate, suggesting a pathway to multiferroic coupling. These structural changes are achieved by heating through the phase transition temperatures of barium titanate. In addition the ferromagnetic signal of the substrate itself is taken into account, addressing the influence of impurities or defects in the substrate. The cobalt ferrite/barium titanate heterostructure is a suitable oxidic platform for future magnetoelectric applications with an established ferroelectric substrate and widely tuneable magnetic properties by changing the transition metal in the ferrite film.

  2. Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis on Cobalt Oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Norskov, Jens K.; García-Mota, Monica; Bell, Alexis T.

    2012-02-01

    The oxidation of water for hydrogen production using sunlight is of high importance to photo-fuel cell research. The electrochemical approach via heterogeneous catalysis to water splitting is a very promising route. The key challenge of this method lies in reduction of the loses, i.e., over-potential, for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the anode. In this work, we investigate the dependence of theoretical over-potential of OER on type of anode by applying standard density functional theory (DFT). We attempt to explain recent experimental observation of enhanced activity on gold supported Cobalt Oxide surfaces [1]. We explore variety of possible CoO structures and associated surfaces which could emerge under operating conditions of catalyst. Finally, we also explore the influence of environment and admixtures of CoO with other elements. [4pt] [1] B.S. Yeo, A.T. Bell, AT, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 5587-5593 (2011).

  3. Aqua-bromidobis(dimethyl-glyoximato)cobalt(III).

    PubMed

    Meera, Parthasarathy; Amutha Selvi, Madhavan; Jothi, Pachaimuthu; Dayalan, Arunachalam

    2011-04-01

    In the title complex, [CoBr(C(4)H(7)N(2)O(2))(2)(H(2)O)], a crystallo-graphic mirror plane bis-ects the mol-ecule, perpendicular to the glyoximate ligands. The geometry around the cobalt(III) atom is approximately octa-hedral with the four glyoximate N atoms forming the square base. A bromide ion and the O atom of a water mol-ecule occupy the remaining coordination sites. The N-Co-N bite angles are 82.18 (4) and 80.03 (16)°. The glyoximate moieties form strong intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The coordinated water mol-ecule forms an inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with a glyoximate O atom, thereby generating supra-molecular chains parallel to [010]. PMID:21753964

  4. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  5. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheric at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting.

  6. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  7. Cobalt Oxide Hollow Nanoparticles Derived by Bio-Templating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    We present here the first fabrication of hollow cobalt oxide nanoparticles produced by a protein-regulated site-specific reconstitution process in aqueous solution and describe the metal growth mechanism in the ferritin interior.

  8. Determination of traces of cobalt in soils: A field method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almond, H.

    1953-01-01

    The growing use of geochemical prospecting methods in the search for ore deposits has led to the development of a field method for the determination of cobalt in soils. The determination is based on the fact that cobalt reacts with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol to yield a pink compound that is soluble in carbon tetrachloride. The carbon tetrachloride extract is shaken with dilute cyanide to complex interfering elements and to remove excess reagent. The cobalt content is estimated by comparing the pink color in the carbon tetrachloride with a standard series prepared from standard solutions. The cobalt 2-nitroso-1-naphtholate system in carbon tetrachloride follows Beer's law. As little as 1 p.p.m. can be determined in a 0.1-gram sample. The method is simple and fast and requires only simple equipment. More than 40 samples can be analyzed per man-day with an accuracy within 30% or better.

  9. Recovery of Silver and Cobalt from Laboratory Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Donald F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for recovering silver and cobalt from laboratory wastes (including those resulting from student experiments) are presented. The procedures are generally applicable since only common, inexpensive laboratory reagents are needed. (JN)

  10. Studies of the Codeposition of Cobalt Hydroxide and Nickel Hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. H.; Murthy, M.; VanZee, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: chemistry, experimental measurements, planar film model development, impregnation model development, results and conclusion. Also included: effect of cobalt concentration on deposition/loading; effect of current density on loading distribution.

  11. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheres at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C, a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C, the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled; values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35104

  12. Battery related cobalt and REE flows in WEEE treatment.

    PubMed

    Sommer, P; Rotter, V S; Ueberschaar, M

    2015-11-01

    In batteries associated with waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), battery systems can be found with a higher content of valuable and critical raw materials like cobalt and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the general mix of portable batteries. Based on a material flow model, this study estimates the flows of REE and cobalt associated to WEEE and the fate of these metals in the end-of-life systems. In 2011, approximately 40 Mg REE and 325 Mg cobalt were disposed of with WEEE-batteries. The end-of-life recycling rate for cobalt was 14%, for REE 0%. The volume of waste batteries can be expected to grow, but variation in the battery composition makes it difficult to forecast the future secondary raw material potential. Nevertheless, product specific treatment strategies ought to be implemented throughout the stages of the value chain. PMID:26054962

  13. Size-dependent dissociation of carbon monoxide on cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tuxen, Anders; Carenco, Sophie; Chintapalli, Mahati; Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Escudero, Carlos; Pach, Elzbieta; Jiang, Peng; Borondics, Ferenc; Beberwyck, Brandon; Alivisatos, A Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Pong, Way-Faung; Guo, Jinghua; Perez, Ruben; Besenbacher, Flemming; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-02-13

    In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to study the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide molecules on cobalt nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4 to 15 nm. The majority of CO molecules adsorb molecularly on the surface of the nanoparticles, but some undergo dissociative adsorption, leading to oxide species on the surface of the nanoparticles. We found that the tendency of CO to undergo dissociation depends critically on the size of the Co nanoparticles. Indeed, CO molecules dissociate much more efficiently on the larger nanoparticles (15 nm) than on the smaller particles (4 nm). We further observed a strong increase in the dissociation rate of adsorbed CO upon exposure to hydrogen, clearly demonstrating that the CO dissociation on cobalt nanoparticles is assisted by hydrogen. Our results suggest that the ability of cobalt nanoparticles to dissociate hydrogen is the main parameter determining the reactivity of cobalt nanoparticles in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. PMID:23339635

  14. Formation of cobalt silicide by ion beam mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ye; Burte, Edmund P.; Ryssel, Heiner

    1991-07-01

    The formation of cobalt silicides by arsenic ion implantation through a cobalt film which causes a mixing of the metal with the silicon substrate was investigated. Furthermore, cobalt suicides were formed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Sheet resistance and silicide phases of implanted Co/Si samples depend on the As dose. Ion beam mixing at doses higher than 5 × 10 15 cm -2 and RTA at temperatures T ⩾ 900° C result in almost equal values of Rs. RBS and XRD spectra of these samples illustrate the formation of a homogeneous CoSi 2 layer. Significant lateral growth of cobalt silicide beyond the edge of patterned SiO 2 was observed in samples which were only subjected to an RTA process ( T ⩾ 900 ° C), while this lateral suicide growth could be reduced efficiently by As implantation prior to RTA.

  15. Use of phosphate for separation of cobalt from iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    North, V.; Wells, R.C.

    1942-01-01

    The well-known tendency of cobalt to be retained by the iron-alumina precipitate produced by ammonia has generally been ascribed to a specific adsorption by the large surface of this gelatinous precipitate. Whatever its cause, it can be overcome by precipitating the iron as phosphate at a pH of 3.5. The precipitate is easily filterable and practically all the cobalt passes into the filtrate.

  16. Annealing effects on microstrain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Deotale, Anjali Jain Nandedkar, R. V.; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, M. N.; Upadhyay, Anuj

    2014-04-24

    Cobalt oxide nanoparticles in different phases have been synthesized using ash supported method. The effect of isochronal annealing on micro-strain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles has been studied. The lattice strain contribution to the x-ray diffraction line broadening in the nanoparticles was analyzed using Williamson Hall (W-H) plot. It is observed that micro-strain was released at higher annealing temperature.

  17. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl2.6H2O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  18. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  19. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  20. Pulsed Laser Synthesized Magnetic Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hari; Gupta, Ram; Ghosh, Kartik; Kahol, Pawan; Delong, Robert; Wanekawa, Adam

    2011-03-01

    Nanomaterials research has become a major attraction in the field of advanced materials research in the area of Physics, Chemistry, and Materials Science. Biocompatible and chemically stable magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles have biomedical applications that includes drug delivery, cell and DNA separation, gene cloning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This research is aimed at the fabrication of magnetic cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a safe, cost effective, and easy to handle technique that is capable of producing nanoparticles free of any contamination. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized at room temperature using cobalt foil by pulsed laser ablation technique. These cobalt oxide nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS). The magnetic cobalt oxides nanoparticles were stabilized in glucose solutions of various concentrations in deionized water. The presence of UV-Vis absorption peak at 270 nm validates the nature of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. The DLLS size distributions of nanoparticles are in the range of 110 to 300 nm, which further confirms the presence nanoparticles. This work is partially supported by National Science Foundation (DMR- 0907037).

  1. Coordination tuning of cobalt phosphates towards efficient water oxidation catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunah; Park, Jimin; Park, Inchul; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Kim, Sun Hee; Nam, Ki Tae; Kang, Kisuk

    2015-01-01

    The development of efficient and stable water oxidation catalysts is necessary for the realization of practically viable water-splitting systems. Although extensive studies have focused on the metal-oxide catalysts, the effect of metal coordination on the catalytic ability remains still elusive. Here we select four cobalt-based phosphate catalysts with various cobalt- and phosphate-group coordination as a platform to better understand the catalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. Although they exhibit various catalytic activities and stabilities during water oxidation, Na2CoP2O7 with distorted cobalt tetrahedral geometry shows high activity comparable to that of amorphous cobalt phosphate under neutral conditions, along with high structural stability. First-principles calculations suggest that the surface reorganization by the pyrophosphate ligand induces a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry, where water molecules can favourably bind, resulting in a low overpotential (∼0.42 eV). Our findings emphasize the importance of local cobalt coordination in the catalysis and suggest the possible effect of polyanions on the water oxidation chemistry. PMID:26365091

  2. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Bergene, E.; Adnanes, E.

    1995-12-31

    As a result of the highly exothermic nature of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, heat transfer considerations limit the maximum conversion per pass in fixed-bed processes, whereas slurry reactors can operate at higher conversions. During Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on cobalt catalysts, high conversions will generate high partial pressures of water at the reactor exit, due to the low water gas shift activity of cobalt. In addition, the extensive back-mixing in slurry reactors will give a relatively uniform concentration profile in the reactor, characterized by a high concentration of water and low reactant concentrations. From the commercial iron-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in fixed-bed (Arge) reactors it is known that the catalyst deactivates by oxidation of iron by CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O near the exit of the reactor. Although bulk oxidation of cobalt during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is not thermodynamically favored, it was early speculated that surface oxidation of cobalt could occur during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of the present work is to describe the influence of water on the deactivation behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported cobalt catalysts. The possibility of cobalt oxidation during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was investigated by model studies.

  3. Cobalt mineral exploration and supply from 1995 through 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The global mining industry has invested a large amount of capital in mineral exploration and development over the past 15 years in an effort to ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet future increases in demand for minerals. Exploration data have been used to identify specific sites where this investment has led to a significant contribution in global mineral supply of cobalt or where a significant increase in cobalt production capacity is anticipated in the next 5 years. This report provides an overview of the cobalt industry, factors affecting mineral supply, and circumstances surrounding the development, or lack thereof, of key mineral properties with the potential to affect mineral supply. Of the 48 sites with an effective production capacity of at least 1,000 metric tons per year of cobalt considered for this study, 3 producing sites underwent significant expansion during the study period, 10 exploration sites commenced production from 1995 through 2008, and 16 sites were expected to begin production by 2013 if planned development schedules are met. Cobalt supply is influenced by economic, environmental, political, and technological factors affecting exploration for and production of copper, nickel, and other metals as well as factors affecting the cobalt industry. Cobalt-rich nickel laterite deposits were discovered and developed in Australia and the South Pacific and improvements in laterite processing technology took place during the 1990s and early in the first decade of the 21st century when mining of copper-cobalt deposits in Congo (Kinshasa) was restricted because of regional conflict and lack of investment in that country's mining sector. There was also increased exploration for and greater importance placed on cobalt as a byproduct of nickel mining in Australia and Canada. The emergence of China as a major refined cobalt producer and consumer since 2007 has changed the pattern of demand for cobalt, particularly from Africa and

  4. Cobalt(I) Olefin Complexes: Precursors for Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Purity Cobalt Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jeff A; Pugh, Thomas; Johnson, Andrew L; Kingsley, Andrew J; Richards, Stephen P

    2016-07-18

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a family of organometallic cobalt(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and diene ligands. The molecular structures of the complexes cyclopentadienyl-cobalt(I) diolefin complexes are described, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis and thermal stability studies of the complexes highlighted the isoprene, dimethyl butadiene, and cyclohexadiene derivatives [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2CHC(Me)CH2)] (1), [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2C(Me)C(Me)CH2)] (2), and [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-C6H8)] (4) as possible cobalt metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was employed using precursor 1, to synthesize thin films of metallic cobalt on silicon substrates under an atmosphere (760 torr) of hydrogen (H2). Analysis of the thin films deposited at substrate temperatures of 325, 350, 375, and 400 °C, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal temperature-dependent growth features. Films grown at these temperatures are continuous, pinhole-free, and can be seen to be composed of hexagonal particles clearly visible in the electron micrograph. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show the films to be highly crystalline, high-purity metallic cobalt. Raman spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of cobalt silicides at the substrate/thin film interface. PMID:27348614

  5. Nickel-cobalt alloy nanosheets obtained from reductive hydrothermal-treatment of nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh; Jolagah, Ali; Afrasiabi, Hasan-ali

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An anionic layered material, nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reductive hydrothermal-treatment of the layered precursor produced an alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloy is a bimetallic nanostructured nickel-cobalt and a soft magnet material. -- Abstract: Nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate, a layered material was synthesized by the co-precipitation method using urea as precipitant agent. This anionic layered material with hexagonal structure is constructed from nickel and cobalt ions within the layers and carbonate anions between the layers. Nickel-cobalt alloy with pure cubic phase was obtained by a reductive hydrothermal-treatment of the layered precursor. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the initial layered material and its metallic alloy product. That is, the nickel-cobalt alloy has really produced via a wet chemical route for the first time. Magnetic measurement revealed that the alloy sample is a soft magnet material.

  6. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  7. Electromagnetic containerless reaction of samarium with cobalt for the formation of samarium-cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. W.; Das, D. K.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The electromagnetic levitation technique has been used to obtain nearly stoichiometric SmCo5, with the reaction temperature controlled by a gas jet. The results of several experiments carried out at a 450 kHz, 25 kw RF power levitation facility using different reaction times and cooling rates are presented. It is shown that reaction rates achieved with the levitation technique are larger than the expected diffusion rate in the system liquid samarium-solid cobalt. It is also shown that substantial mixing occurs in the RF-levitated melt.

  8. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Swapna S.; Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: {yields} Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. {yields} The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. {yields} The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. {yields} Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. {yields} Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and NaBH{sub 4}. A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The

  9. Magnetization measurements on fine cobalt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaud, M.; Broto, J. M.; Rakoto, H.; Ousset, J. C.; Osuna, J.; Ould Ely, T.; Amiens, C.; Chaudret, B.; Askenazy, S.

    1998-05-01

    We measure the magnetization of fine cobalt particles by SQUID and pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. These measurements have been made on two samples (C1, C2) with nonagglomerated particles. The analysis of the magnetic meaurements evidences very narrow log-normal size distribution centered around 1.5 nm (≅150 atoms) and 1.9 nm (≅310 atoms) for C1 and C2, respectively. Magnetization at 4.2 K seems to saturate in fields up to 5 T leading to an enhanced mean magnetic moment per atom compared to bulk value (1.72 μB). However, magnetization measurements up to 35 T do not permit to reach saturation, and show a continuous increase of μCo reaching 2.1±0.1 μB (C1) and 1.9±0.1 μB (C2). The effective magnetic anisotropies are found to be larger than those of bulk materials and decrease with increasing particle size. These features are associated with the large influence of the surface atoms.

  10. COBALT-60 Gamma Irradiation of Shrimp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Nancy L. B.

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine were measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

  11. Spinel cobalt ferrite by complexometric synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thang, Pham D.; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H. A.

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O 4) have been synthesized using complexometric method in which ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid C 10H 16N 2O 8 (EDTA) acts as a complexing agent. The crystallographic structure, microstructure and magnetic properties of the synthesized powder were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The material crystallized in cubic spinel structure with lattice parameter of about 8.38 Å. Depending on the calcining temperature, the particle size of the powders varies in the range of hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers. A desired relative density above 95% of the theoretical value is obtained for the bulk sample after sintering. The calcined powders and sintered sample exhibit saturation magnetizations around 80 Am 2/kg which is expected for inverse CoFe 2O 4. With increasing calcining temperature the coercivity of these samples decreases. This simple synthesis route leads to a reproducible and stoichiometric material.

  12. Water Adsorption on Free Cobalt Cluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Jamshidi, Zahra; Visscher, Lucas; Waters, L B F M

    2015-11-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con(+)-H2O (n = 6-20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in the 200-1700 cm(-1) spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm(-1) frequency of the free water bending vibration, indicating that the water molecule remains intact upon adsorption. For n = 6, the frequency of this band is blue-shifted, but it gradually converges to the free water value with increasing cluster size. In the lower-frequency range (200-650 cm(-1)) the spectra contain several bands which show a very regular frequency evolution, suggesting that the exact cluster geometry has little effect on the water-surface interaction. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out at the OPBE/TZP level for three representative sizes (n = 6, 9, 13) and indicate that the vibrations responsible for the resonances correspond to bending and torsional modes between the cluster and water moieties. The potential energy surfaces describing these interactions are very shallow, making the calculated harmonic frequencies and IR intensities very sensitive to small geometrical perturbations. We conclude that harmonic frequency calculations on (local) minima structures provide insufficient information for these types of cluster complexes and need to be complemented with calculations that provide a more extensive sampling of the potential energy surface. PMID:26447780

  13. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.L.B.

    1993-01-01

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

  14. Structure of yttrium cobaltate from neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, A.; Berliner, R.; Smith, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    The crystal structure of YCoO{sub 3} has been determined from Rietveld analysis of the powder neutron diffraction data at 17, 100, and 300 K. At each temperature, the structure is a distorted perovskite with orthorhombic symmetry, space group Pbnm (Z = 4). The lattice parameters, at 300 K, are 5.1388 (5) x 5.4191(5) x 7.3658(7) {angstrom}. Structural analysis indicates that the formal valence of cobalt in YCoO{sub 3} is +3. Analysis of the Co-O distances and the absence of magnetic structure indicates that the majority of the Co{sup 3+} ions in YCoO{sub 3} are in the low-spin (i.e. t{sub 2g}{sup 6}e{sub g}{sup 0}) state. The data also show that perhaps 10% of the CO{sup 3+} ions at 300 K (but insignificant fractions at 100 and 17 K) are in the high-spin state.

  15. Determination of cobalt in samples containing cobalt and tungsten carbide by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Firriolo, J.M.; Kutzman, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    A method has been developed to determine the amount of cobalt (Co) in atmospheric dust samples which include free and sintered Co. Cobalt and tungsten carbide (WC) mixtures ranging from 0-100% Co were prepared for atomic absorption analysis by dissolving the Co in aqua regia. Using this method, the amount of Co in the samples assayed ranged from 90.9-100.1% of that gravimetrically added to the mixtures. The results of this aqua regia dissolution procedure for Co were compared to a hydrofluoric acid method which solubilized both the Co and the WC. Application of the aqua regia dissolution method to samples of sintered WC and Co dust resulted in complete recovery of the Co from these materials. These results were supported by x-ray analysis of the samples before and after dissolution of the Co with aqua regia. The described procedure is advantageous because it avoids the use of highly-caustic hydrofluoric acid and the results are quickly available.

  16. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: Molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, S.; Dhananjay, S.; Anju, B. Lilly, G.; Sai Ram, M.

    2008-09-15

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NF{kappa}B inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NF{kappa}B in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NF{kappa}B. The lower levels of NF{kappa}B observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NF{kappa}B DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT.

  17. Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Electrodeposited Cobalt Film

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, Md S; Taylor, B. J.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Thompson, James R; Sinclair, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt films were electrodeposited onto both iron and copper substrates from an aqueous solution containing a mixture of cobalt sulfate, boric acid, sodium citrate, and vanadyl sulfate. The structural, intermetallic diffusion and magnetic properties of the electrodeposited films were studied. Cobalt electrodeposition was carried out in a passively divided cell aided by addition of vanadyl sulfate to keep the counter electrode clean. The divided electrolytic cell with very negative current densities cause the electrodeposited Co to adopt a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, which is more magnetically reversible than the hexagonally close-packed (hcp) structured Co. The coercive field is also significantly less in the fcc-electrodeposited cobalt than in the hcp. SEM images show dense, uniform Co films without any cracks or porosity. Beside the deposition current, thickness of the film was also found to affect the crystal orientation particularly on iron substrates. Diffusion of cobalt film into the iron substrate was studied under reduced environment and a fast process was observed.

  18. Graphene/cobalt nanocarrier for hyperthermia therapy and MRI diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hatamie, Shadie; Ahadian, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Iraji Zad, Azam; Saber, Reza; Parseh, Benyamin; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are promising materials for theranostic nanomedicine applications, which are defined as the ability to diagnose, provide targeted therapy and monitor the response to the therapy. In this study, the composites were synthesized via chemical method, using graphene oxide as the source material and assembling cobalt nanoparticles of 15nm over the surface of graphene sheets. Various characterization techniques were then employed to reveal the morphology, size and structure of the nanocomposites, such as X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. Using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, cobalt concentration in the nanocomposites was found to be 80%. In addition, cytotoxicity of graphene/cobalt nanocomposites were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide or MTT assay. MTT viability assay exhibited biocompatibility to L929 mouse fibroblasts cells, under a high dose of 100μg/mL over 24h. Hyperthermia results showed the superior conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat at 350kHz frequency for 0.01 and 0.005g/L of the nanocomposites solution. The measured heat generation and energy transfer results were anticipated by the finite element analysis, conducted for the 3D structure. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics also showed that negatively charge graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are suitable for T1-weighted imaging. PMID:27351138

  19. 40 CFR 721.10599 - Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10599 Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical... cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  2. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  3. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  4. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  5. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  7. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  8. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on fiber digestion and cobalamin levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B*12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptona...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  10. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  14. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  15. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on digestion and cobalamin levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonat...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  1. The effect of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on degradation of aluminide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on the behavior of aluminide coatings is studied in burner rig cyclic oxidation tests at 1100C. It is determined that aluminide coatings on alloys with higher cobalt offer better oxidation protection than the same coatings on alloys containing less cobalt.

  2. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  3. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  4. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10599 - Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10599 Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical... cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  9. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  10. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  11. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  12. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  13. Toxicity of cobalt. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity effects of cobalt. Citations include cobalt fetotoxicity, renal toxicity, bioaccumulation, contact dermatitis, carcinogencity, and respiratory disorders. Toxicology assays and industrial sources of cobalt poisoning are considered. In vivo and in vitro human and animal studies are described. (Contains a minimum of 129 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Lignite recovery of cobalt(+3) from an ammoniacal ammonium sulfate solution. Report of investigations/1984

    SciTech Connect

    Slavens, G.J.; Traut, D.E.; Penner, L.R.; Henry, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines has devised technology to recover cobalt, nickel, and byproduct copper from domestic lateritic material using an oxidative, ammoniacal ammonium sulfate leach. Nickel, cobalt, and copper were recovered by solvent extraction and electrowinning. To reduce the cost and complexity of cobalt recovery, an alternate method using lignite to extract Co(+3) was investigated as reported herein.

  15. Thermal fatigue resistance of cobalt-modified UDIMET 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of comparative thermal fatigue resistances of five cobalt composition modifications of UDIMET 700 from fluidized bed tests is described. Cobalt compositional levels of 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8, 17.0 percent were being investigated in both the bare and coated (NiCrAlY overlay) conditions. Triplicate tests of each variation including duplicate tests of three control alloys are under investigation. Fluidized beds were maintained at 550 and 1850 F for the first 5500 cycles at which time the hot bed was increased to 1922 F. Immersion time in each bed is always 3 minutes. Upon the completion of 10,000 cycles, it appears that the 8.6 percent cobalt level gives the best thermal fatigue life. Considerable deformation of the test bars was observed.

  16. Nanosize cobalt boride particles: Control of the size and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Pileni, M. P.

    1997-02-01

    Cobalt boride is obtained by the reduction of cobalt (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate, Co(AOT) 2, by sodium borohydride either in reverse micelles or in a diphasic system. In Co(AOT) 2/Na(AOT)/H 2O reverse micellar solution, the size and polydispersity of the Co 2B particles is controlled by the size of the water droplets, which increases from 4 to 7.5 nm by increasing the water content. In a diphasic system of Co(AOT) 2/isooctane and sodium borohydride in aqueous solution, large and polydisperse particles of cobalt boride are formed (˜ 10 nm), and their magnetization properties are presented. The smallest particles are in a superparamagnetic regime at room temperature, whereas the largest particles show ferromagnetic behavior.

  17. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  18. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  19. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III ); Brodzinski, R.L. ); Marcum, J. )

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Regression of posterior uveal melanomas following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cruess, A.F.; Augsburger, J.J.; Shields, J.A.; Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Day, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    A method has been devised for evaluating the rate and extent of regression of the first 100 consecutive patients with a posterior uveal melanoma that had been managed by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy at Wills Eye Hospital. It was found that the average posterior uveal melanoma in the series did not regress rapidly to a flat, depigmented scar but shrank slowly and persisted as a residual mass approximately 50% of the thickness of the original tumor at 54 months following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. The authors also found that the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who subsequently developed metastatic melanoma were not appreciably different from the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who remained well systemically. These observations indicate that the rate and extent of regression of posterior uveal melanomas following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy are poor indicators of the prognosis of the affected patients for subsequent development of clinical metastatic disease.

  1. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. PMID:23137676

  2. Sorption and desorption of cobalt by Oscillatoria anguistissima.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, P; Gupta, R; Saxena, R K

    1999-07-01

    Oscillatoria anguistissima rapidly adsorbs appreciable amounts of cobalt from the aqueous solutions within 15 min of initial contact with the metal solution. O. anguistissima showed a high sequestration of cobalt at low equilibrium concentrations, and it followed the Freundlich model of adsorption. The adsorption is a strongly pH-dependent and temperature-independent phenomenon. The presence of Mg2+ and Ca2+ (100-200 ppm) resulted in decline in Co2+ adsorption capacity of Oscillatoria biomass. Sulphate and nitrate (0. 75-10 mM) drastically reduced the extent of Co2+ biosorption. The biosorption of cobalt is an ion-exchange process as the Co2+ binding was accompanied by release of a large amounts of Mg2+ ions. Na2CO3 (1.0 mM) resulted in about 76% desorption of Co2+ from the loaded biomass. PMID:10387117

  3. Recovery of cobalt and copper from complex sulfide concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dannenberg, R.O.; Gardner, P.C.; Crane, S.R.; Seidel, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Bureau conducted bench-scale research on a process for treating cobaltite concentrates, comprising (1) oxidative pressure leaching, (2) jarosite precipitation followed by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ oxidation and pH control to remove iron and arsenic, (3) copper solvent extraction with a mixed hydroxyoxime-amine extractant, (4) copper electrowinning from recirculating acidic strip liquor, (5) selective cobalt extraction from copper solvent extraction raffinate with a phosphinic and extractant, and (6) electrowinning of cobalt from a recirculating weak acid strip liquor. Overall cobalt and copper recoveries were 91.7 and 84.1 pct, respectively. Electrowon products assayed 99.8 pct Co and 99.89 ct Cu.

  4. Mycobacterial Cells Have Dual Nickel-Cobalt Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Duncan R.; Chapman, Kaye E.; Waldron, Kevin J.; Tottey, Stephen; Kendall, Sharon; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Andreini, Claudia; Hinds, Jason; Stoker, Neil G.; Robinson, Nigel J.; Cavet, Jennifer S.

    2011-01-01

    A novel ArsR-SmtB family transcriptional repressor, KmtR, has been characterized from mycobacteria. Mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lacking kmtR show elevated expression of Rv2025c encoding a deduced CDF-family metal exporter. KmtR-dependent repression of the cdf and kmtR operator-promoters was alleviated by nickel and cobalt in minimal medium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence anisotropy show binding of purified KmtR to nucleotide sequences containing a region of dyad symmetry from the cdf and kmtR operator-promoters. Incubation of KmtR with cobalt inhibits DNA complex assembly and metal-protein binding was confirmed. KmtR is the second, to NmtR, characterized ArsR-SmtB sensor of nickel and cobalt from M. tuberculosis suggesting special significance for these ions in this pathogen. KmtR-dependent expression is elevated in complete medium with no increase in response to metals, whereas NmtR retains a response to nickel and cobalt under these conditions. KmtR has tighter affinities for nickel and cobalt than NmtR consistent with basal levels of these metals being sensed by KmtR but not NmtR in complete medium. More than a thousand genes encoding ArsR-SmtB-related proteins are listed in databases. KmtR has none of the previously defined metal-sensing sites. Substitution of His88, Glu101, His102, His110, or His111 with Gln generated KmtR variants that repress the cdf and kmtR operator-promoters even in elevated nickel and cobalt, revealing a new sensory site. Importantly, ArsR-SmtB sequence groupings do not correspond with the different sensory motifs revealing that only the latter should be used to predict metal sensing. PMID:17726022

  5. Temporal Variability of Tungsten and Cobalt in Fallon, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Paul R.; Speakman, Robert J.; Ridenour, Gary; Witten, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Since 1997, Fallon, Nevada, has experienced a cluster of childhood leukemia that has been declared “one of the most unique clusters of childhood cancer ever reported.” Multiple environmental studies have shown airborne tungsten and cobalt to be elevated within Fallon, but the question remains: Have these metals changed through time in correspondence with the onset of the leukemia cluster? Methods We used dendrochemistry, the study of element concentrations through time in tree rings, in Fallon to assess temporal variability of airborne tungsten and cobalt since the late 1980s. The techniques used in Fallon were also tested in a different town (Sweet Home, OR) that has airborne tungsten from a known source. Results The Sweet Home test case confirms the accuracy of dendrochemistry for showing temporal variability of environmental tungsten. Given that dendrochemistry works for tungsten, tree-ring chemistry shows that tungsten increased in Fallon relative to nearby comparison towns beginning by the mid-1990s, slightly before the onset of the cluster, and cobalt has been high throughout the last ~ 15 years. Other metals do not show trends through time in Fallon. Discussion Results in Fallon suggest a temporal correspondence between the onset of excessive childhood leukemia and elevated levels of tungsten and cobalt. Although environmental data alone cannot directly link childhood leukemia with exposure to metals, research by others has shown that combined exposure to tungsten and cobalt can be carcinogenic to humans. Conclusion Continued biomedical research is warranted to directly test for linkage between childhood leukemia and tungsten and cobalt. PMID:17520058

  6. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  7. Low energy sputtering of cobalt by cesium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, A.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental facility to investigate low energy (less than 500 eV) sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. Results are reported on the sputtering yield of cobalt by cesium ions in the 100 to 500 eV energy range at a pressure of 1 times 10(exp -6) Torr. The target was electroplated on a copper substrate. The sputtered atoms were collected on a cobalt foil surrounding the target. Co-57 was used as a tracer to determine the sputtering yield.

  8. Countercation-sensitive electrochromism of cobalt hexacyanoferrate films

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, P.J.; Malik, M.A.; Miecznikowski, K.; Wolkiewicz, A.; Zamponi, S.; Berrettoni, M.; Marassi, R.

    1996-01-01

    Cobalt(II) hexacyanoferrate(III,II) a system analogous to prussian blue, is a unique electrochromic material: its color is not only dependent on the oxidation potential, but also on the nature of the countercations sorbed from electrolyte during reduction. The electrodeposition of cobalt hexacyanoferrate thin films, their voltammetric behavior and spectroelectrochemical identity are reported here in potassium and sodium electrolytes. The oxidized film is purple brown in both electrolytes, but following reduction, the system turns olive-brown in 1 M KCl and becomes green in 1 M NaCl.

  9. Hydrogen Evolution Catalyzed by Cobalt Diimine-Dioxime Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged ten years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, i.e. close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in non-aqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts

  10. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Hemaunt; Srivastava, R. C.; Pal Singh, Jitendra; Negi, P.; Agrawal, H. M.; Das, D.; Hwa Chae, Keun

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy3+ substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy3+concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy3+ substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution.

  11. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-05-19

    Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged 10 years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, that is, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in nonaqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly, we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts in the

  12. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    PubMed

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. PMID:25428034

  13. Cobalt-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Yin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Shengping

    2016-01-15

    A well-defined nonprecious metal cobalt(II) catalyst based on a pincer PNP ligand has been employed for the efficient N-alkylation of both aromatic and aliphatic amines with alcohols. A subtle change of reaction conditions (simply adding 4 Å molecular sieves) was observed to readily switch the resulting products (amines vs imines) with high chemoselectivity. A range of alcohols and amines including both aromatic and aliphatic substrates were efficiently converted to secondary amines in good-to-excellent yields when 2 mol % cobalt catalyst was used. Additional experiments indicate that a hydrogen-borrowing mechanism is responsible for the tandem acceptorless dehydrogenation/condensation/hydrogenation process. PMID:26695594

  14. Copper and cobalt in aquatic mosses and stream sediments from the Idaho Cobalt Belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, J.A.; Modreski, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of stream sediments and aquatic mosses were collected from nine sites across several mineralized zones at the southeasternmost extension of the Idaho Cobalt Belt. Because the steepness of the terrain and the attendant high flow rate of the streams made it difficult to obtain adequate sediment samples, mosses were considered as an alternative sampling medium. The results not only showed that the Cu and Co content of the mosses correlated almost perfectly with that of the sediments, but that the contrast between samples taken from mineralized and background areas was greater in mosses, especially for Co. Maximum concentrations of 35,000 ??g/g Cu and 2000 ??g/g Co were observed in the ash of mosses, compared to maximum concentrations of 1700 ??g/g and 320 ??g/g, respectively, in the associated sediments. Species identification was considered unimportant, which should dispel some reluctance to use mosses in mineral exploration. ?? 1984.

  15. Egg-Box Structure in Cobalt Alginate: A New Approach to Multifunctional Hierarchical Mesoporous N-Doped Carbon Nanofibers for Efficient Catalysis and Energy Storage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials with both doped heteroatom and porous structure represent a new class of carbon nanostructures for boosting electrochemical application, particularly sustainable electrochemical energy conversion and storage applications. We herein demonstrate a unique large-scale sustainable biomass conversion strategy for the synthesis of earth-abundant multifunctional carbon nanomaterials with well-defined doped heteroatom level and multimodal pores through pyrolyzing electrospinning renewable natural alginate. The key part for our chemical synthesis is that we found that the egg-box structure in cobalt alginate nanofiber can offer new opportunity to create large mesopores (∼10–40 nm) on the surface of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers. The as-prepared hierarchical carbon nanofibers with three-dimensional pathway for electron and ion transport are conceptually new as high-performance multifunctional electrochemical materials for boosting the performance of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), lithium ion batteries (LIBs), and supercapacitors (SCs). In particular, they show amazingly the same ORR activity as commercial Pt/C catalyst and much better long-term stability and methanol tolerance for ORR than Pt/C via a four-electron pathway in alkaline electrolyte. They also exhibit a large reversible capacity of 625 mAh g–1 at 1 A g–1, good rate capability, and excellent cycling performance for LIBs, making them among the best in all the reported carbon nanomaterials. They also represent highly efficient carbon nanomaterials for SCs with excellent capacitive behavior of 197 F g–1 at 1 A g–1 and superior stability. The present work highlights the importance of biomass-derived multifunctional mesoporous carbon nanomaterials in enhancing electrochemical catalysis and energy storage. PMID:27162980

  16. Egg-Box Structure in Cobalt Alginate: A New Approach to Multifunctional Hierarchical Mesoporous N-Doped Carbon Nanofibers for Efficient Catalysis and Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Daohao; Lv, Chunxiao; Liu, Long; Xia, Yanzhi; She, Xilin; Guo, Shaojun; Yang, Dongjiang

    2015-08-26

    Carbon nanomaterials with both doped heteroatom and porous structure represent a new class of carbon nanostructures for boosting electrochemical application, particularly sustainable electrochemical energy conversion and storage applications. We herein demonstrate a unique large-scale sustainable biomass conversion strategy for the synthesis of earth-abundant multifunctional carbon nanomaterials with well-defined doped heteroatom level and multimodal pores through pyrolyzing electrospinning renewable natural alginate. The key part for our chemical synthesis is that we found that the egg-box structure in cobalt alginate nanofiber can offer new opportunity to create large mesopores (∼10-40 nm) on the surface of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers. The as-prepared hierarchical carbon nanofibers with three-dimensional pathway for electron and ion transport are conceptually new as high-performance multifunctional electrochemical materials for boosting the performance of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), lithium ion batteries (LIBs), and supercapacitors (SCs). In particular, they show amazingly the same ORR activity as commercial Pt/C catalyst and much better long-term stability and methanol tolerance for ORR than Pt/C via a four-electron pathway in alkaline electrolyte. They also exhibit a large reversible capacity of 625 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1), good rate capability, and excellent cycling performance for LIBs, making them among the best in all the reported carbon nanomaterials. They also represent highly efficient carbon nanomaterials for SCs with excellent capacitive behavior of 197 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and superior stability. The present work highlights the importance of biomass-derived multifunctional mesoporous carbon nanomaterials in enhancing electrochemical catalysis and energy storage. PMID:27162980

  17. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-04-29

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  18. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-05-13

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  19. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  20. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  1. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

  2. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  3. Tracking the metal of the goblins: cobalt's cycle of use.

    PubMed

    Harper, E M; Kavlak, G; Graedel, T E

    2012-01-17

    Cobalt is a vital element in many technological applications, which, together with its increasing end-use in batteries, makes it important to quantify its cycle of use. We have done so for the planet as a whole and for the three principal cobalt-using countries - China, Japan, and the United States - for 2005. Together, China, Japan, and the United States accounted for approximately 65% of the cobalt fabricated and manufactured into end-use products (a total of 37 Gg Co). A time residence model allowed calculations of in-use stock accumulation and recycled and landfilled flows. China had the largest accumulation of in-use stock at some 4.3 Gg Co, over half of which was comprised of consumer battery stock. More than half of the stock accumulation in the United States was estimated to be in aircraft, rocket, and gas turbine engines, with a total in-use stock accumulation of approximately 3 Gg Co. The largest amounts of cobalt landfilled in China, the United States, and the planet were from the "chemical and other uses" category, and Japan's largest landfilled flow was in consumer batteries. PMID:22142288

  4. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the role of cobalt in Udimet 700, a representative nickel-base superalloy containing 17 percent or more cobalt. The study spans the spectrum of microstructural, microchemical, and mechanical behavior aspects which together form a basis for superalloy performance in jet engines. The results suggest that cobalt affects the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, which leads to enhanced gamma-prime volume fraction and to the stabilization of MC-type carbides and sigma phase. However, these microstructural and microchemical changes are too slight to significantly affect the strength and ductile properties. Depending on the heat treatment, the creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt-sensitive. In the coarse-grained, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17 percent Co can be replaced by nickel without decreasing the creep and stress rupture resistance. These findings are discussed with reference to existing theories and experimental data obtained by other workers.

  5. Co-Cu-Si (Cobalt-Copper-Silicon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materials Science International Team MSIT

    This document is part of Subvolume C2 'Non-Ferrous Metal Systems. Part 2: Selected Copper Systems' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It provides data of the ternary system Cobalt-Copper-Silicon.

  6. Reaction of ethanol on oxidized and metallic cobalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Matthew P.; Vohs, John M.

    2011-02-01

    The reaction of ethanol on metallic and oxidized cobalt surfaces was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to determine the dependence of the reaction pathways on the cobalt oxidation state. The primary reaction for ethoxide species on metallic cobalt surfaces was decarbonylation producing CO, H 2 and carbon. This reaction was facile and occurred below 400 K. In contrast, CoO x surfaces which predominantly contained Co 2+ were selective for the dehydrogenation of ethoxide groups to produce acetaldehyde at 400 K. A fraction of the acetaldehyde molecules produced by this pathway were further oxidized to acetate which decomposed to produce CO 2 at 495 K. More highly oxidized Co surfaces that contained both CO 2+ and Co 3+ were active for the complete oxidation of ethanol producing CO, CO 2, and H 2O as the primary products. The insights that these results provide for understanding the mechanism of the steam reforming of ethanol on cobalt catalysts is discussed.

  7. A Mercurial Route to a Cobalt Dihydrogen Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-03-30

    Recent results by Heinekey and co-workers provide evidence for an unusual route to a cobalt dihydrogen complex. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  8. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures. PMID:21449452

  9. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  10. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-04

    A computer search of both the open and the patent literature was conducted in order to ascertain the current state of cobalt-based catalyst technology for F-T synthesis. Two series of literature searches were conducted, one dealing specifically with cobalt catalysts for F-T synthesis and the other focusing on the preparation and/or characterization of supported cobalt catalysts including those not used for F-T synthesis. An initial screening of the literature was carried out by examining the 942 abstracts obtained from these searches. The main objective of this initial screening was the selection of the most pertinent publications for this work. out of the 230 patent references obtained from the computer search, about 90 were found to be directly related the preparation of cobalt catalysts and their use in FT synthesis. Copies of patents (78 patents) not available within the group have been ordered but not yet received. Based on a preliminary analysis,of the abstracts of the most pertinent patents a distribution among the various patent assignees is given in Table 1. As can be seen in Table 1, most of the patents for Co FT catalysts have been assigned to very few companies, the first four, i.e. Exxon, Shell, Gulf, and Statoil representing the most relevant ones. This preliminary analysis of the patent literature permitted a selection of a number of benchmark catalysts the formulations of which will be based on the patents of these four companies.

  11. Segregation of Fischer-Tropsch reactants on cobalt nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E A; Le, D; Jewell, A D; Murphy, C J; Rahman, T S; Sykes, E C H

    2014-06-21

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy, we have visualized the segregation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, the two reactants in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, on cobalt nanoparticles at catalytically relevant coverages. Density functional theory was used to interrogate the relevant energetics. PMID:24825772

  12. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478356

  13. Arthroprosthetic cobaltism: identification of the at-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Tower, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    MoM hip bearings are being scrutinized due to high early failure rates and concerns that the results of the revision surgeries will be poor. However, orthopedic surgeons and the general medical community are unaware that patients with MoM bearings are also at risk for cobaltism. Medical providers need to know that hip arthroplasty implantees that present with symptom complexes that include tinnitus, deafness, vertigo, visual changes, rashes, hypothyroidism, tremor, dyspnea on exertion, mood disorders, dementia, heart failure, and peripheral neuropathy may be presenting arthroprosthetic cobaltism. These patients need to be asked if they have had a hip replacement and if so what type. For those patients implanted with a MoM bearing or those with a history of hip revision for a failed ceramic bearing obtaining a [Co] is indicated. MoM implantees with renal failure are a particularly high risk for cobaltism. A [Co] can be measured by many reference laboratories from royal blue top trace elements tube of venous blood. Venipuncture with a standard needle is adequate as long as a red stoppered tube is drawn first. The radiographic appearance of a MoM bearing is readily apparent to an orthopedic surgeon. The patient's operative report will usually specify the bearing type. Given that the publicity of the recent ASR bearing recall medical providers will be contacted by worried patients concerned about their hip implants. Most patients with hip replacements will not know the brand or material of their bearings. Providing patients with copies of their hip implant inventory might avoid worry by the majority of patients with hip arthroplasties that are not at risk. Patients with a cobalt levels of greater than 7 mcg/l bear observation of neurologic and cardiac function. Those patients with levels greater than 20 should be advised to have revision of their hip arthroplasty to a bearing that eliminates cobalt. Most patients implanted with MoM bearing have cobalt levels greater

  14. Magnetic and microwave absorption properties of self-assemblies composed of core-shell cobalt-cobalt oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongzhu; Bi, Hong; Wang, Peihong; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhiwei; Shen, Lei; Liu, Xiansong

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell structure cobalt-cobalt oxide nanocomposites were directly synthesized via annealing Co nanocrystals in air at 300 °C. Their microstructure and magnetic properties were characterized by XRD, TEM, XPS and VSM, respectively. The microwave absorbing properties of the nanocomposite powders by dispersing them in wax were investigated in the 2-18 GHz frequency range. The sample that was annealed for 1 h exhibits the maximum reflection loss of -30.5 dB and a bandwidth of less than -10 dB covering the 12.6-17.3 GHz range with the coating thickness of only 1.7 mm. At the same thickness, the sample annealed for 3 h exhibits the maximum reflection loss of -24 dB and a bandwidth that almost covers the whole X-band (8-11.5 GHz). With increase in the insulating cobalt oxide shell, the enhanced permeability could contribute to the decrease of eddy current loss, and the permittivity could be easily adjusted; thus, the microwave absorption properties of the cobalt oxide nanocrystals could be easily adjusted. PMID:25559407

  15. Separation of cobalt from synthetic intermediate and decontamination radioactive wastes using polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.V.S.; Lal, K.B.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Ahmed, J.

    1997-12-01

    Studies have been carried out on the removal of radioactive cobalt ({sup 60}Co) from synthetic intermediate level waste (ILW) and decontamination waste using neat polyurethane (PU) foam as well as n-tributyl phosphate-polyurethane (TBP-PU) foam. The radioactive cobalt has been extracted on the PU foam as cobalt thiocyanate from the ILW. Maximum removal of cobalt has been observed when the concentration of thiocyanate in the solution is about 0.4 M. Cobalt can be separated from decontamination waste containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and iron(II). The extent of extraction of cobalt is slow and the separation of iron and cobalt is better with the neat PU foam compared to the TBP-PU foam. The presence of iron in the decontamination waste facilitates the extraction of cobalt thiocyanate on the PU foam. Column studies have been carried out in order to extend these studies to the plant scale. The capacities of the PU foams for cobalt have been determined. The effect of density and the surface area of PU foam have been investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral studies have been conducted to find out the interaction between PU foam and cobalt thiocyanate species.

  16. Shape and Size of Cobalt Nanoislands Formed Spontaneously on Cobalt Terraces during Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arghya; Navarro, Violeta; Frenken, Joost W M; van Bavel, Alexander P; Kuipers, Herman P C E; Saeys, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt-based catalysts undergo a massive and spontaneous reconstruction to form uniform triangular nanoislands under Fischer-Tropsch (FT) conditions. This reconstruction is driven by the unusual and synergistic adsorption of square-planar carbon and CO at the 4-fold edge sites of the nanoislands, driving the formation of triangular islands. The size of the nanoislands is determined by the balance between energy gain from creating C/CO-covered edges and energy penalty to create C/CO-covered corners. For carbon chemical potentials corresponding to FT conditions, triangular Co islands with 45 Co atoms (about 2 nm) are the most stable surface structure. Decreasing the carbon chemical potential and hence the stability of square-planar carbon favors the formation of larger islands, until reconstruction becomes unfavorable and CO-covered terraces are thermodynamically the most stable. The predicted structure of the islands is consistent with in situ scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained for the first time under realistic FT reaction conditions on a Co(0001) surface. PMID:27176712

  17. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial

  18. A preliminary evaluation of stream sediment sampling for the detection of cobalt mineralization in the Bou Azzer District, Morocco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of 28 stream sediment samples collected in the Bou Azzer district, Morocco, show that this sampling technique may be useful in locating the cobalt arsenide mineralization that exists in this area. The absence of exceptionally high values of cobalt and arsenic, the nearly lognormal distribution of cobalt values, and the lack of correlation between the highest values of cobalt and arsenic were unanticipated results that do not support the use of this sampling technique. However, highest values of several metals, including cobalt, were associated with an identified area of cobalt mineralization, and high cobalt was present near a second area in which cobalt mineralization is suspected. Although probably mostly reflecting the geochemistry of unexposed ultramafic rocks, the association of these metals with mineralization shows that this type of sampling can independently locate areas of known or potential cobalt mineralization.

  19. Pairwise cobalt doping of boron carbides with cobaltocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, A. Yu.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Carlson, L.; LaGraffe, D.; Brand, J. I.; Dowben, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    We have performed Co K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements of Co-doped plasma enhanced chemical vapor phase deposition (PECVD) grown "C2B10Hx" semiconducting boron carbides, using cobaltocene. Cobalt does not dope PECVD grown boron carbides as a random fragment of the cobaltocene source gas. The Co atoms are fivefold boron coordinated (R=2.10±0.02Å) and are chemically bonded to the icosahedral cages of B10CHx or B9C2Hy. Pairwise Co doping occurs, with the cobalt atoms favoring sites some 5.28±0.02Å apart.

  20. Iron, lead, and cobalt absorption: similarities and dissimilarities

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.C.; Conrad, M.E.; Holland, R.

    1981-01-01

    Using isolated intestinal segments in rats, the absorption of iron, lead, and cobalt was increased in iron deficiency and decreased in iron loading. Similarly, the absorption of these metals was decreased in transfusional erythocytosis, after intravenous iron injection and after parenteral endotoxin injection. Acute bleeding or abbreviated intervals of dietary iron deprivation resulted in increased iron absorption from isolated intestinal segments and in intact animals, while the absorption of lead and cobalt was unaffected. These results suggest that the specificity of the mucosal metal absorptive mechanism is either selectively enhanced for iron absorption by phlebotomy or brief periods of dietary iron deprivation, or that two or more mucosal pathways for iron absorption may exist.

  1. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. PMID:27423021

  2. Cobalt Hexacyanoferrate as Cathode Material for Na+ Secondary Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takachi, Masamitsu; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2013-02-01

    We investigated structural and electrochemical properties of thin film electrodes of cobalt hexacyanoferrate, NaxCo[Fe(CN)6]0.902.9H2O, against x. The compound exhibits a high capacity of 135 mAh/g and an average operating voltage of 3.6 V against Na, with a good cyclability. The discharge curve exhibits two plateaus at ≈3.8 and ≈3.4 V, which are ascribed to the reduction processes of Fe3+ and Co3+, respectively. The ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles reveal the robust nature of the host framework against Na+ intercalation/deintercalation. Thus, cobalt hexacyanoferrate is a promising candidate for the cathode material of sodium-ion secondary battery (SIB).

  3. Accurate determination of cobalt traces in several biological reference materials.

    PubMed

    Dybczyński, R; Danko, B

    1994-01-01

    A newly devised, very accurate ("definitive") method for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in biological materials was validated by the analysis of several certified reference materials. The method is based on a combination of neutron activation and selective and quantitative postirradiation isolation of radiocobalt from practically all other radionuclides by ion-exchange and extraction chromatography followed by gamma-ray spectrometric measurement. The significance of criteria that should be fulfilled in order to accept a given result as obtained by the "definitive method" is emphasized. In view of the demonstrated very good accuracy of the method, it is suggested that our values for cobalt content in those reference materials in which it was originally not certified (SRM 1570 spinach, SRM 1571 orchard leaves, SRM 1577 bovine liver, and Czechoslovak bovine liver 12-02-01) might be used as provisional certified values. PMID:7710879

  4. Pairwise cobalt doping of boron carbides with cobaltocene

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatov, A. Yu.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Carlson, L.; LaGraffe, D.; Brand, J. I.; Dowben, P. A.

    2007-10-15

    We have performed Co K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements of Co-doped plasma enhanced chemical vapor phase deposition (PECVD) grown 'C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub x}' semiconducting boron carbides, using cobaltocene. Cobalt does not dope PECVD grown boron carbides as a random fragment of the cobaltocene source gas. The Co atoms are fivefold boron coordinated (R=2.10{+-}0.02 A) and are chemically bonded to the icosahedral cages of B{sub 10}CH{sub x} or B{sub 9}C{sub 2}H{sub y}. Pairwise Co doping occurs, with the cobalt atoms favoring sites some 5.28{+-}0.02 A apart.

  5. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  6. Hierarchical cobalt-based hydroxide microspheres for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cui, Bai; Derr, Olivia; Yao, Zhibo; Qin, Zhaotong; Deng, Xiangyun; Li, Jianbao; Lin, Hong

    2014-02-01

    3D hierarchical cobalt hydroxide carbonate hydrate (Co(CO3)0.5(OH).0.11H2O) has been synthesized featuring a hollow urchin-like structure by a one-step hydrothermal method at modest temperature on FTO glass substrates. The functionalities of precursor surfactants were isolated and analyzed. A plausible formation mechanism of the spherical urchin-like microclusters has been furnished through time-dependent investigations. Introduction of other transitional metal doping (Cu, Ni) would give rise to a substantial morphological change associated with a surface area drop. The directly grown cobalt-based hydroxide composite electrodes were found to be capable of catalyzing oxygen evolution reaction (OER) under both neutral pH and alkaline conditions. The favorable 3D dendritic morphology and porous structure provide large surface areas and possible defect sites that are likely responsible for their robust electrochemical activity.

  7. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution in acidic water with molecular cobalt tetraazamacrocycles.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Charles C L; Uyeda, Christopher; Peters, Jonas C

    2012-02-15

    A series of water-soluble molecular cobalt complexes of tetraazamacrocyclic ligands are reported for the electrocatalytic production of H(2) from pH 2.2 aqueous solutions. The comparative data reported for this family of complexes shed light on their relative efficiencies for hydrogen evolution in water. Rotating disk electrode voltammetry data are presented for each of the complexes discussed, as are data concerning their respective pH-dependent electrocatalytic activity. In particular, two diimine-dioxime complexes were identified as exhibiting catalytic onset at comparatively low overpotentials relative to other reported homogeneous cobalt and nickel electrocatalysts in aqueous solution. These complexes are stable at pH 2.2 and produce hydrogen with high Faradaic efficiency in bulk electrolysis experiments over time intervals ranging from 2 to 24 h. PMID:22280515

  8. Electrodeposition of cobalt-chromium alloy from trivalent chromium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dasarathy, H.; Riley, C.; Coble, H.D. . Dept. of Chemistry and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy was deposited from plating solutions containing cobalt(II) chloride and chromium(III) chloride at 3.5 pH. The deposits were obtained using both single and mixed complex solutions. Deposit morphology showed significant dependence on the complexing agent(s) used. Partitioning of the two components in the deposit as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy depended on plating parameters such as concentration ratio of the two salts in the solution, complexing agent, type of current (both dc and pulsed current were studied), and current density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra collected from as-deposited alloy revealed the presence of both oxides and metals. X-ray diffraction spectra for the alloy deposit indicated solid solution formation.

  9. Thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine: Structure and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyamer, Darya D.; Sukhikh, Aleksandr S.; Krasnov, Pavel O.; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Morozova, Natalya B.; Basova, Tamara V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPcF4) were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition and their structure was studied using UV-vis, polarization dependent Raman spectroscopy, XRD and atomic force microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations (DFT) have been employed in order to determine the detailed assignment of the bands in the CoPcF4 IR and Raman spectra. The electrical sensor response of CoPcF4 films to ammonia vapours was investigated and compared with that of unsubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine films. In order to explain the difference in sensitivity of the unsubstituted and fluorinated phthalocyanines to ammonia, the nature and properties of chemical binding between CoPc derivatives and NH3 were described by quantum-chemical calculations utilizing DFT method. The effect of post-deposition annealing on surface morphology and gas sensing properties of CoPcF4 films was also studied.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of a cobalt-60 beam

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Ballon, D.; Chui, C.; Mohan, R.

    1987-05-01

    We have used the Stanford Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code to compute photon spectra from an AECL Theratron 780 cobalt-60 unit. Particular attention has been paid to the careful modeling of the geometry and material construction of the cobalt-60 source capsule, source housing, and collimator assembly. From our simulation, we conclude that the observed increase in output of the machine with increasing field size is caused by scattered photons from the primary definer and the adjustable collimator. We have also used the generated photon spectra as input to a pencil beam model to calculate the tissue--air ratios in water and compared it to a model which uses a monochromatic photon energy of 1.25 MeV.

  11. Effects of cobalt on structure, microchemistry and properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the basic mechanical properties and microstructure of wrought nickel-base superalloys has been investigated experimentally by systematically replacing cobalt by nickel in Udimet 700 (17 wt% Co) commonly used in gas turbine (jet engine) applications. It is shown that the room temperature tensile yield strength and tensile strength only slightly decrease in fine-grained (disk) alloys and are basically unaffected in coarse-grained (blading) alloys as cobalt is removed. Creep and stress rupture resistances at 760 C are found to be unaffected by cobalt level in the blading alloys and decrease sharply only when the cobalt level is reduced below 8 vol% in the disk alloys. The effect of cobalt is explained in terms of gamma prime strengthening kinetics.

  12. Effect of particle size on CO hydrogenation activity of silica supported cobalt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Suiwen; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M. )

    1990-08-09

    Two series of silica supported cobalt catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, one by varying the calcination temperature (200-400{degree}C, 3 wt % Co) and the other by changing the cobalt loading (1-10 wt % Co). Examination by ESCA, XRD, and H{sub 2} chemisorption showed that Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} is the dominant phase. The cobalt phase is reduced to cobalt metal at 400{degree}C. The cobalt particle sizes obtained from ESCA correlated well with those derived from H{sub 2} chemisorption and XRD line broadening. The turnover frequency of Co/SiO{sub 2} for CO hydrogenation was invariant with cobalt dispersion in the range of 6-20% dispersion.

  13. Copper catalysis for enhancement of cobalt leaching and acid utilization efficiency in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaxuan; Shen, Jingya; Huang, Liping; Wu, Dan

    2013-11-15

    Enhancement of both cobalt leaching from LiCoO2 and acid utilization efficiency (AUE) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was successfully achieved by the addition of Cu(II). A dosage of 10mg/L Cu(II) improved both cobalt leaching up to 308% and AUE of 171% compared to the controls with no presence of Cu(II). The apparent activation energy of cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs was only 11.8 kJ/mol. These results demonstrate cobalt leaching in MFCs using Cu(II) as a catalyst may be an effective strategy for cobalt recovery and recycle of spent Li-ion batteries, and the evidence of influence factors including solid/liquid ratio, temperature, and pH and solution conductivity can contribute to improving understanding of and optimizing cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs. PMID:24007993

  14. Cobalt-Catalyzed Enantioselective Vinylation of Activated Ketones and Imines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; Huang, Rui-Zhi; Zhao, Yu

    2016-05-25

    We present here an unprecedented cobalt-catalyzed enantioselective vinylation of α-ketoesters, isatins, and imines to deliver a range of synthetically useful allylic alcohols and amines in high enantiopurity. This method employs commercially available and easy to handle catalysts and reagents and exhibits a high degree of practicality. The efficiency, selectivity, and operational simplicity of this catalytic system coupled with the substrate generality render this method a valuable tool in organic synthesis. PMID:27139596

  15. Protective Agent-Free Synthesis of Colloidal Cobalt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Balela, M. D. L.; Lockman, Z.; Azizan, A.; Matsubara, E.; Amorsolo, A. V. Jr.

    2010-03-11

    Spherical colloidal cobalt (Co) nanoparticles of about 2-7 nm were synthesized by hydrazine reduction in ethylene glycol at 80 deg. C. The mean diameter of the Co nanoparticles was varied to some extent by changing the pH, temperature, Co(II) chloride hexahydrate concentration, and amount of hydrazine. The Co particle size was reduced by decreasing Co(II) chloride concentration and increasing amount of hydrazine.

  16. Certain physical properties of cobalt and nickel borides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostetskiy, I. I.; Lvov, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity, the thermal conductivity, and the thermal emf of cobalt and nickel borides were studied. In the case of the nickel borides the magnetic susceptibility and the Hall coefficient were determined at room temperature. The results are discussed with allowance for the current carrier concentration, the effect of various mechanisms of current-carrier scattering and the location of the Fermi level in relation to the 3d band.

  17. Towards the elimination of excessive cobalt supplementation in racing horses: A pharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Kinobe, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element for many vital physiological functions. Cobalt is also known to stabilise hypoxia-inducible transcription factors leading to increased expression of erythropoietin which activates production of red blood cells. This implies that cobalt can be used to enhance aerobic performance in racing horses. If this becomes a pervasive practice, the welfare of racing animals would be at risk because cobalt is associated with cardiovascular, haematological, thyroid gland and reproductive toxicity as observed in laboratory animals and humans. It is expected that similar effects may manifest in horses but direct evidence on equine specific effects of cobalt and the corresponding exposure conditions leading to such effects is lacking. Available pharmacokinetic data demonstrates that intravenously administered cobalt has a long elimination half-life (42-156 h) and a large volume of distribution (0.94 L/kg) in a horse implying that repeated administration of cobalt would accumulate in tissues over time attaining equilibrium after ~9-33 days. Based on these pharmacokinetic data and surveys of horses post racing, threshold cobalt concentrations of 2-10 μg/L in plasma and 75-200 μg/L in urine have been recommended. However, there is no clearly defined, presumably normal cobalt supplementation regimen for horses and characterisation of potential adverse effects of any established threshold cobalt concentrations has not been done. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of the existing literature on the pharmacological effects of cobalt in horses with some recommendations on what gaps to bridge to enable the determination of optimal threshold cobalt concentrations in racing horses. PMID:26850547

  18. Physicochemical state of cobalt and chromium in natural waters of the arid zone of the USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Isamatov, E.E.; Kist, A.A.; Kulmatov, R.A.; Volkov, A.A.; Rakhmatov, U.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss results of a comprehensive study of the environmental and chemical behavior of trace amounts of cobalt and chromium ions and compounds in waters of the Aral Sea and Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers in the Soviet Union. The methods used in the determinations include thermodynamic assessments of the ionic composition of the waters and a direct determination of the cobalt and chromium compounds using neutron activation analysis and isotopic and ion exchange analysis for chromium 51 and cobalt 60.

  19. Fabrication of Discrete Nanosized Cobalt Particles Encapsulated Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Majewska, M; Ren, F; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with encapsulated nanosized cobalt particles have been synthesized by a facile and scalable method. In this approach, SWNT were filled with a cobalt acetylacetonate solution in dichloromethane by ultrasonication. In a second step, exposure to hydrogen at different temperatures released discrete cobalt particles of controllable size inside the SWNT cavity. The SWNT-Co particles systems were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  20. Structure and magnetism in rare earth strontium-doped cobaltates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Michael; Morales, Liliana; Wallwork, Kia; Avdeev, Maxim; Withers, Ray; Goossens, Darren

    2006-11-01

    Substantial interest has recently been generated by rare earth cobaltate compounds as cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. We have synthesised a wide range of single-phase perovskite-based rare earth cobaltates (Ln 1-xSr xCoO 3-δ) (Ln=La 3+-Yb 3+). A combination of electron and X-ray diffraction of these phases reveals a complex family of tetragonal and orthorhombic superstructures. The nature of structural and magnetic ordering relies on both cation and oxygen vacancy distribution. Phase boundaries exists between compounds containing large, medium and small rare earths (between Nd 3+ and Sm 3+, and also between Gd 3+ and Dy 3+) and also at different Sr-doping levels. Powder neutron diffraction has been used in conjunction with the other techniques to reveal cation and oxygen vacancy ordering within these materials. These phases show mixed valence (3+/4+) cobalt oxidation states that increases with Sr content. A range of magnetic behaviours has been observed, including ordered antiferromagnetism at elevated temperatures (>300 K) in Ho 0.2Sr 0.8CoO 2.75.

  1. Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy vs enucleation for posterior uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Gamel, J.W.; Lauritzen, K.; Brady, L.W. )

    1990-05-15

    We compared the survival of 302 patients with a primary choroidal or ciliary body melanoma treated by cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1982 with the survival of 134 patients treated by enucleation during the same period. Tumor size, location of the anterior margin of the tumor, and patient age at the time of treatment were identified as simultaneous significant clinical variables for predicting melanoma-specific mortality by multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling. We computed a prognostic index for each patient based on this model and found that patients in the enucleation group had slightly higher values of this index than did patients in the cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy group. Risk ratios for the treatment effect computed from a Cox model incorporating prognostic index and the treatment variable were found to be approximately equal to 1, both for analysis of melanoma-specific mortality and total mortality. These results indicate that when one controls for differences in prognostic index between the groups, cobalt-60 plaque therapy and enucleation are essentially equivalent in their effect on survival.

  2. Suitability of cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials for magnetoelastic sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nlebedim, Ikenna Catjetan; Jiles, David C

    2015-02-01

    The results of a study on the suitability of materials derived from cobalt ferrite for sensor and actuator applications are presented. The mechanism responsible for the superior sensor properties of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti and other cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials is believed to be due to the tetrahedral site preference of Ge4+ and its co-substitution with Co2+. Results also showed that the higher strain derivative of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti-substitution is due to a higher magnetostrictive coupling in response to applied field in the material.

  3. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R Jr; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co3O4 into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. c2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cobalt cluster effects in zirconium promoted Co/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, A.; Claeys, M.; Steen, E. van

    1999-07-01

    The effect of zirconium addition to the catalyst formulation of Co/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalysts was investigated. With increasing zirconium content the strong interaction between silica and cobalt is reduced and a somewhat weaker cobalt-zirconium interaction is observed. Therefore the degree of reduction of catalysts, which were reduced at 400 C for 16 h, increases strongly. The cobalt crystallite size increases with increasing zirconium content, leading to smaller cobalt metal surface areas for the freshly reduced catalyst. Cobalt particles can be found in clusters on the silica support. The size of cobalt clusters decreases and thus the number of cobalt particles within a cluster decreases with increasing zirconium content. At steady-state conditions the CO-conversion of the promoted catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis increases with increasing zirconium content. The C{sub 5+}-selectivity and the secondary hydrogenation activity pass a maximum with increasing zirconium content. The observed changes in activity and selectivity are explained in terms of an increase in the amount of metallic cobalt available under reaction conditions, leading to an increased activity, and a decrease in the cobalt cluster size, which diminishes the probability for secondary reactions. Furthermore, it was concluded that secondary double bond isomerization can be catalyzed to some extent by zirconia.

  5. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R.; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-02-20

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry.

  6. Influence of initial particle size on the magnetostriction of sintered cobalt ferrite derived from nanocrystalline powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaja Mohaideen, K.; Joy, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    The role of initial particle size on the magnetostriction coefficient of sintered cobalt ferrite derived from nanocrystalline powders is studied. Nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite with different sizes in the range 3-80 nm are synthesized by an autocombustion method using metal nitrates and glycine. It has been observed that the initial particle size of the starting powders has a strong influence on the magnetostrictive behavior of sintered cobalt ferrite. Highest magnetostrictive strain and strain derivative are obtained for sintered ferrite derived from nanoparticles of size < 5 nm. The results show that higher magnetostriction coefficient for sintered cobalt ferrite can be achieved by compacting nanocrystalline particles of very small size.

  7. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  8. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  9. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  10. Cobalt substitution studies on bovine erythrocyte superoxide dismutase: evidence for a novel cobalt-superoxide dismutase derivative.

    PubMed

    Salvato, B; Beltramini, M; Ricchelli, F; Tallandini, L

    1989-09-14

    Three cobalt derivatives of bovine erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) have been prepared under different pH conditions using a cobalt-thiocyanate complex which has already proved to yield specific substitutions on other copper proteins. The cobalt-protein derivatives have been characterized by optical, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies. One derivative, referred to as Co2Co2-protein, contains Co(II) ions specifically bound at both Zn(II) and Cu(II) sites. On the basis of their spectroscopic properties, the other two derivatives can be referred as E2Co2- and Co2E2-superoxide dismutase, with cobalt substituting, respectively, at the zinc and the copper sites leaving the contiguous site empty (E). The Co2E2-protein complex represents a novel derivative, since it has never been described in literature. The optical spectrum in the visible region of Co2-Co2-protein well corresponds to the sum of the spectra of the other two derivatives. The circular dichroism spectrum of Co2Co2-derivative, however, is not the sum of individual E2Co2- and Co2E2-proteins, suggesting that the presence of Co(II) in one site strongly affects the geometry of the neighbouring site. Some discrepancies between our spectroscopic data and those reported in literature are discussed. The results obtained from fluorescence experiments indicate that Co(II) ions exert a different quenching effect on the tyrosine emission, depending on whether they are located in the Zn(II) or in the Cu(II) site. The fluorescence quenching can be attributed to a 'heavy atom' and 'paramagnetic ion' effect by Co(II) ions. PMID:2790051

  11. Hydroxamate-induced spectral perturbations of cobalt Aeromonas aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, S H; Prescott, J M

    1987-06-25

    The absorption spectrum of cobalt(II)-substituted Aeromonas aminopeptidase is markedly perturbed by the presence of equimolar concentrations of D-amino acid hydroxamates and acyl hydroxamates that have previously been shown to be powerful inhibitors of this enzyme (Wilkes, S. H., and Prescott, J. M. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 13517-13521). D-Valine hydroxamate produces the most distinctive perturbation, splitting the characteristic 527 nm absorption peak of the cobalt enzyme to form peaks at 564, 520, and 487 nm with molar extinction values of 126, 98, and 67 M-1 cm-1, respectively. A qualitatively similar perturbation, albeit with lower extinction values, results from the addition of D-leucine hydroxamate, whereas D-alanine hydroxamate perturbs the spectrum, but does not evoke the peak at 564 nm. In contrast, hydroxamates of L-valine and L-leucine in concentrations equi-molar to that of the enzyme produce only faint indications of change in the spectrum, but the hydroxamates of several other L-amino acids perturb the spectrum essentially independently of the identity of the side chain and in a qualitatively different manner from that of D-valine hydroxamate and D-leucine hydroxamate. At the high enzyme:substrate ratios used in the spectral experiments, L-leucine hydroxamate and L-valine hydroxamate proved to be rapidly hydrolyzed, hence their inability to perturb the spectrum of the cobalt-substituted enzyme during the time course of a spectral experiment. Values of kcat for L-amino acid hydroxamates, all of which are good reversible inhibitors of the hydrolysis of L-leucine-p-nitroanilide by Aeromonas aminopeptidase, were found to range from 0.01 min-1 to 5.6 min-1 for the native enzyme and from 0.27 min-1 to 108 min-1 for the cobalt-substituted enzyme; their km values toward the cobalt aminopeptidase range from 1.2 X 10(-7) M to 1.9 X 10(-5) M. The mutual exclusivity of binding for hydroxamate inhibitors and 1-butaneboronic acid, previously shown by kinetics

  12. Processing of functionally graded tungsten carbide-cobalt-diamond composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Mohit

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts (PDCs) are widely used as drill bit cutters in rock drilling and as tool bits in machining non-ferrous materials. A typical PDC comprises a thin layer of sintered polycrystalline diamond bonded to a tungsten carbide-cobalt substrate. A well recognized failure mechanism is delamination at the interface between diamond and cemented carbide. High stresses at the diamond/carbide interface, due to thermal expansion and modulus mismatch, are the primary cause of in-service failure under impact loading conditions. This work was undertaken to develop a tungsten carbide-cobalt-diamond composite, which has a continuously graded interface between the diamond and tungsten carbide. The process developed comprised the following steps: (i) generation of a pore size gradient by electrochemical etching of cobalt from the surface of a partially sintered tungsten carbide-cobalt preform; (ii) chemical vapor infiltration of the porous preform with carbon by catalytic decomposition of a methane/hydrogen mixture, resulting in a graded carbon concentration; and (iii) consolidation of the carbon infiltrated preforms at 8GPa/1500°C to complete densification and to transform the carbon into diamond. Thus, the final product consists of a functionally graded WC-Co-diamond composite, with controlled distribution of the constituent phases. Tungsten carbide-cobalt powders with mean tungsten carbide particle size of 0.8mum(micro-grain) and 100 nm(nano-grain) were used as starting materials. Processing conditions were adjusted to obtain an optimal distribution of carbon in porous preforms. After high pressure/high temperature consolidation, both micro- and nano-composites showed a diffused interface between inner and outer regions of the fully dense materials. A micro-composite showed columnar-like tungsten carbide grains and faceted diamond grains in the outer region of the sintered material. The grain size of the diamond in this region was ˜2mum, and the

  13. Heat treatment of cobalt-chromium alloy wire.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, G M; Tomlinson, J L

    1976-04-01

    This study shows that the ability of cobalt-chromium wire to resist permanent deformation is definitely affected by the temperature of heat treatment. For each temperature of heat treatment up to 1200 degrees F there is progressively greater resistance to permanent deformation; at temperatures of heat treatment above 1200 degrees F, however, there is a rapid decline in resistance to permanent deformation due to partial annealing. The maximum resistance to permanent deformation occurs from heat treatment in the temperature range of 1100 degrees to 1200 degrees F. A clinician desiring maximum resistance to permanent deformation from a .016 inches x .022 inches cobalt-chromium archwire should heat-treat the wire at 1100 degrees to 1200 degrees F for 5 minutes in a dental furnace. If the wire was in a highly work-hardened condition as were the wire specimens of this study, he could expect an increase in resistance to permanent deformation of approximately 174 percent. Heat treatment at lower temperatures could be used in situations requiring less than maximum resistance to permanent deformation. Heat treatment at 900 degrees F would give approximately a 95 percent increase in resistance to permanent deformation. Of course, heat treatment would not be indicated when the desired level of resistance to permanent deformation was not greater than the amount exhibited in the untreated wires of this study. When an electrical resistance heat-treatment unit and 950 degrees F temper-indicating paste were used, the clinician would expect increased resistance to permanent deformation similar to that seen in the wires heat-treated with a dental furnace at 800 degrees and 900 degrees F, i.e., about half of that obtained by the 1200 degrees F treatment. This study has determined the effects that various temperatures of heat treatment have on the resistance to permanent deformation of cobalt-chromium wire specimens which were formed into a specific pattern of loops. The following

  14. An hydrothermal experimental study of the cobalt-cobalt oxide redox buffer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemke, K.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Bischoff, J.L.; Bird, D.K.

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium aqueous hydrogen concentration and corresponding energies of reaction, ??Grxno(T, P), for the reaction Co(s) + H2O(l) = CoO(s) + H2(aq) have been determined at temperatures between 256 and 355 ??C and at 400 bar. Steady-state concentrations of hydrogen were approached in experiments under conditions of both H2 excess and deficiency containing the solids Co, CoO and liquid water. All experiments were carried out in flexible gold and titanium reactors with the capability of on-line fluid sampling. Measured equilibrium molal concentrations of H2(aq) at 256, 274, 300, 324 and 355 ??C are 0.81(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3 1.11(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3, 1.92(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3, 3.71(?? 0.06) ?? 10- 3, 7.54(?? 0.12) ?? 10- 3, respectively, and corresponding values of ??Grxno(T, P) in units kJ ?? mol- 1 are 31.4(?? 0.1), 31.0(?? 0.1), 29.8(?? 0.1), 27.7(?? 0.5) and 25.5(?? 0.9), respectively. Using published heat capacity data for Co(s) and CoO(s) and - 79.6 J ?? mol- 1 ?? K- 1 for the entropy of formation of CoO we calculated for this study a value for ??GCoO,Tr,Pro = - 214.5(?? 0.9) kJ ?? mol- 1 and ??HCoO,Tr,Pro = - 238.3(?? 0.9) kJ ?? mol- 1 at 25 ??C and 1 bar. The value of ??HCoO,Tr,Pro determined in this study compares well with the reported calorimetric value of - 238.9(?? 1.2) kJ ?? mol- 1 [Boyle, B.J., King, E.G., Conway, K.C., 1954. Heats of formation of nickel and cobalt oxides (NiO and CoO) by combustion calorimetry. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 76, 3835-3837]. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions. PMID:26998798

  16. 77 FR 3750 - Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License; Cobalt Technologies, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License; Cobalt Technologies, Inc... notice of its intent to grant to Cobalt Technologies, Inc., a revocable, nonassignable,...

  17. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The United States imports over 90% of its cobalt, chromium, columbium, and tantalum, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. Research progress in understanding the roles of cobalt and some possible substitutes effects on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed.

  18. A Rapid Synthetic Method for the Preparation of Two Tris-Cobalt(III) Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Donald C.; Rillema, D. Paul

    1989-01-01

    Reports a method of preparation for tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine)cobalt(III) that will shorten the preparation time by approximately 3 hours. Notes the time for synthesis and isolation of compound one was 1 hour (yield 38 percent) while compound two took 50 minutes (yield 71%). (MVL)

  19. Effects of Cobalt on Structure, Microchemistry and Properties of a Wrought Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Robert N.; Tien, John K.

    1982-06-01

    Cobalt in a 17 pct cobalt containing wrought nickel-base superalloy is systematically substituted for by nickel in order to determine the role of cobalt. The eventual goal is to reduce the levels of cobalt, a critical strategic element, in superalloys. It is found that the strengthening γ microstructure is highly heat treatment sensitive. Reducing cobalt did not result in a reduction of the fine γ precipitates after a coarse grain type (blading) heat treatment, but did after a fine grain type (disk) heat treatment. Representative mechanical properties were determined for each case to isolate microstructural and microchemistry effects. Ambient yield strength and tensile strength were seen to decrease by no more than 15 pct and 7 pct, respectively, even when all the cobalt was removed. The decrease in strength is quantitatively discussed and shown to be consistent with the observed microstructural results and microchemistry results obtained using STEM/EDS. Elevated temperature creep and stress rupture resistances were concluded to be affected by alloy cobalt content through its effect on strengthening γ volume fraction. Significant decreases in these properties were observed for the lower cobalt content alloys. Long term aging, precipitate coarsening, and carbide stability results are also presented and discussed.

  20. Hollow Cobalt Selenide Microspheres: Synthesis and Application as Anode Materials for Na-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ko, You Na; Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-03-16

    The electrochemical properties of hollow cobalt oxide and cobalt selenide microspheres are studied for the first time as anode materials for Na-ion batteries. Hollow cobalt oxide microspheres prepared by one-pot spray pyrolysis are transformed into hollow cobalt selenide microspheres by a simple selenization process using hydrogen selenide gas. Ultrafine nanocrystals of Co3O4 microspheres are preserved in the cobalt selenide microspheres selenized at 300 °C. The initial discharge capacities for the Co3O4 and cobalt selenide microspheres selenized at 300 and 400 °C are 727, 595, and 586 mA h g(-1), respectively, at a current density of 500 mA g(-1). The discharge capacities after 40 cycles for the same samples are 348, 467, and 251 mA h g(-1), respectively, and their capacity retentions measured from the second cycle onward are 66, 91, and 50%, respectively. The hollow cobalt selenide microspheres have better rate performances than the hollow cobalt oxide microspheres. PMID:26918934

  1. Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkyne Hydrosilylation and Sequential Vinylsilane Hydroboration with Markovnikov Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ziqing; Yang, Ji; Huang, Zheng

    2016-08-26

    A pyridinebis(oxazoline) cobalt complex is a very efficient precatalyst for the hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes with Ph2 SiH2 , providing α-vinylsilanes with high (Markovnikov) regioselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance. The vinylsilane products can be further converted into geminal borosilanes through Markovnikov hydroboration with pinacolborane and a bis(imino)pyridine cobalt catalyst. PMID:27479796

  2. Cobalt catalysts for the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons and for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mauldin, C.H.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a catalyst useful for the conversion at reaction conditions of methanol or synthesis gas to hydrocarbons by contact with a catalyst. The catalyst cobalt and thorium in catalytically active amounts, and rhenium, composited with an inorganic oxide support in weight ratio of rhenium:cobalt ranging from about 0.025:1 to about 0.10:1.

  3. The impact of rare earth cobalt permanent magnets on electromechanical device design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.; Studer, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Specific motor designs which employ rare earth cobalt magnets are discussed with special emphasis on their unique properties and magnetic field geometry. In addition to performance improvements and power savings, high reliability devices are attainable. Both the mechanism and systems engineering should be aware of the new performance levels which are currently becoming available as a result of the rare earth cobalt magnets.

  4. [Activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rat organs under cobalt and mercury chloride injection].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rats under cobalt and mercury chloride injection was investigated. The calpains activity increase in the lungs, heart, liver and kidneys was revealed after 2 h cobalt chloride action. The mercury chloride gives a reliable increase of calcium-dependent neutral proteinases only in the kidneys. PMID:14574747

  5. Chitosan-modified cobalt oxide nanoparticles stimulate TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Tripathy, Satyajit; Ghosh, Totan; Das, Balaram; Das, Debasis; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop chitosan-based delivery of cobalt oxide nanoparticles to human leukemic cells and investigate their specific induction of apoptosis. The physicochemical properties of the chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The solubility of chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles was higher at acidic pH, which helps to release more cobalt ions into the medium. Chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles showed good compatibility with normal cells. However, our results showed that exposure of leukemic cells (Jurkat cells) to chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles caused an increase in reactive oxygen species generation that was abolished by pretreatment of cells with the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. The apoptosis of Jurkat cells was confirmed by flow-cytometric analysis. Induction of TNF-α secretion was observed from stimulation of Jurkat cells with chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles. We also tested the role of TNF-α in the induction of Jurkat cell death in the presence of TNF-α and caspase inhibitors. Treatment of leukemic cells with a blocker had a greater effect on cancer cell viability. From our findings, oxidative stress and caspase activation are involved in cancer cell death induced by chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles. PMID:24445996

  6. Cobalt(III)Hexaammine-Dependent Photocrosslinks in the Hairpin Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer-Chant, Christina M.; Heckman, Joyce E.; Lambert, Dominic; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We have utilized the hairpin ribozyme, an RNA enzyme whose structure has been solved by high-resolution methods, to develop a new tool for mapping nucleobase-stacking interactions and potential metal-binding sites in RNA molecules. This tool involves the photoactivation of a specifically bound cobalt(III)hexaammine molecule at wavelengths corresponding to excitation of the metal ion complex only; no base excitation is involved. The photoexcitation initiates a process which strongly promotes the formation of a novel covalent bond or crosslink between one base (termed the “first base”), which is close in space to the excited cobalt(III)hexaammine complex, and another base upon which the first base is closely stacked. These crosslinked species can be isolated and sequenced; their activities can be analyzed to ensure that the crosslinked structures represent an active conformation of the molecule. We have shown that, as in electron transfer in DNA, several criteria must be met to result in the successful formation of these crosslinks. These include the appropriate oxidation potential of the first donor base, the stacking and close interaction of the two donor bases involved in the crosslink, and the binding of a specific cobalt(III)hexaammine molecule to the first donor base. Additionally, we have determined that this crosslinking is pH-sensitive, although the cause of this sensitivity remains unknown. This tool has proven useful in the past for the analysis of the hairpin ribozyme folded structure, and has been applied to identifying potential metal-binding sites on the hairpin and extended hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:24295878

  7. Synthesis and properties of a few 1-D cobaltous fumarates

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Sanchay J.; Das, Birinchi K.

    2012-08-15

    Metal fumarates are often studied in the context of metal organic framework solids. Preparation, structure and properties of three cobalt(II) fumarates, viz. [Co(fum)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O 1, [Co(fum)(py){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] 2, and [Co(fum)(4-CNpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] 3 (fum=fumarate, py=pyridine, 4-CNpy=4-cyanopyridine) are described. All three are chain polymers involving bridging fumarato ligands between each pair of octahedral Co(II) centres, but while the first one is zigzag in structure, the latter two are linear. Indexed powder X-ray diffraction patterns, solid state electronic spectra and magnetic properties of the species are reported. Thermal decomposition behaviour of the compounds suggests that they may be suitable as precursors to make Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} via pyrolysis below 600 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: Structure and properties of three chain-polymeric cobalt(II) fumarates are described. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three fumarate bridged 1-D coordination polymers of cobalt(II) are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer While Co(II) fumarate pentahydrate is zigzag, the species having both pyridine and water as co-ligands are linear in structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prominent lines in the powder X-ray diffraction patterns have been indexed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal decomposition of the species yields Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} as the final product.

  8. Preparation-morphology-performance relationships in cobalt aerogels as supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Geneva R; Hung-Low, Fernando; Gumeci, Cenk; Bassett, Will P; Korzeniewski, Carol; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2014-02-12

    The ability to direct the morphology of cobalt sol-gel materials by using the simple synthetic parameters in epoxide-driven polycondensations has been dramatically demonstrated, and the influence of such morphological differences upon the supercapacity of the materials has been explored. Precursor salt, epoxide, and solvent all influence the speed of the sol-gel transition and the size and shape of the features observed in the as-prepared materials, thereby leading to highly varied microstructures including spheres, sponge-like networks, and plate assemblies of varied size. These morphological features of the as-prepared cobalt aerogels were observed for the first time by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). The as-prepared aerogel materials were identified by powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry as weakly crystalline or amorphous cobalt basic salts with the general formula Co(OH)(2-n)X(n) where X = Cl or NO3 according to the precursor salt used in the synthesis. For all samples, the morphology was preserved through mild calcining to afford spinel phase Co3O4 in a variety of microstructures. Wide-ranging specific surface areas were determined for the as-prepared and calcined phases by physisorption analysis in agreement with the morphologies observed by HRSEM. The Co3O4 aerogels were evaluated for their supercapacitive performance by cyclic voltammetry. The various specimens exhibit capacitances ranging from 110 to 550 F g(-1) depending upon the attributes of the particular aerogel material, and the best specimen was found to have good cycle stability. These results highlight the epoxide-driven sol-gel condensation as a versatile preparative route that provides wide scope in materials' properties and enables the analysis of structure-performance relationships in metal oxide materials. PMID:24417220

  9. Cobalt-based magnetic nanocomposites: fabrication, fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tianlong; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, magnetic nanocomposites (MNC) have aroused significant scientific and technological interests because their properties strongly rely on the interplay between those of the constituent components. Here, using three types of cobalt-based MNCs, we demonstrate how their physical behaviour, including thermal, electrical and magnetic, can be strongly affected by such interplays. First, using Aucore-Coshell nanoparticles (NPs), we demonstrate that their thermal stabilities are critically dependent on various boundaries and they structurally transform from the core-shells to the peanut structures via several intermediate states by a series of energy minimizations including the grain boundaries, Co/Au interface and strain. Second, the microstructures of the MNC are co-determined by the properties of the individual components, which in turn will strongly affect their overall properties. We illustrate this by a careful study of the electron transport in cobalt/poly (3-hexylthiophene, 2, 5-diyl) (P3HT) hybrid thin films, and show that they satisfy a fluctuation-induced tunnelling model that is strongly depended on their microstructures; moreover, a magnetoresistance in these thin films was also observed. Finally, the magnetic properties and phase stability of MNCs can also be strongly altered as a result of this interplay. Three phase transformations are observed in cobalt ferrofluids for T ~ 10-300 K, namely second order magnetic phase transformations (blocked-unblocked transition) at the blocking temperature of the magnetic NP, first order magnetic and structural phase transformations at the solvent melting temperature, TM, and second order premelting transformation at TPM < T < TM. These transformations show specific magnetic signatures in field-cool and zero-field-cool magnetization measurements and are qualitatively in agreement with predictions using M-spectrum theory.

  10. Treatment of spent electropolishing solution for removal of cobalt-60

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.; Youngblood, E.L.; Macon, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing (IMET) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory electropolishes various types of irradiated metal specimens prior to examination of metallurgical and mechanical properties. The standard electropolishing solution used at IMET for most specimens consists of a 7:1 methanol/sulfuric acid mixture, with smaller amounts of a 3:1 methanol/nitric acid solution and a 10:6:1 methanol/2-butoxyethanol/perchloric acid solution also being used. Cobalt-60 is the primary source of gamma radiation in the spent solutions, with lesser amounts from manganese-54 and iron-59. A treatment method is needed to remove most of the Co-60 from these solutions to allow the waste solutions to be contact-handled for disposal. A wide range of adsorbents was tested for removing cobalt from the electropolishing solutions. No adsorbent was found that would treat full strength solution, but a complexing ion exchange resin (Chelex 100, BioRad Labs, or Amberlite IRC-718, Rohm and Haas Co.) will remove cobalt and other heavy metals from partially neutralized (pH=3) solution. A 5 wt% sodium hydroxide solution is used for pH adjustment, since more concentrated caustic caused sodium sulfate precipitates to form. Lab-scale column tests have shown that about 10 bed volumes of methanol/sulfuric acid solution, 30 bed volumes of methanol/nitric acid solution or 15 bed volumes of methanol/2-butoxyethanol/perchloric acid solution can be treated prior to initial Co-60 breakthrough.

  11. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  12. Development of high efficiency 100% aqueous cobalt electrolyte dye-sensitised solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hanna; Jiang, Roger; Ye, Sofie; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2016-03-28

    In this study we report the application of three cobalt redox shuttles in 100% aqueous electrolyte dye-sensitised solar cells (DSCs). By using chloride as a counter-ion for cobalt bipyridine, cobalt phenanthroline and cobalt bipyridine pyrazole, the redox shuttles were made water soluble; no surfactant or further treatment was necessary. A simple system of merely the redox shuttles and 1-methylbenzimidazole (MBI) in water as an electrolyte in combination with an organic dye and a mesoporous PEDOT counter electrode was optimised. The optimisation resulted in an average efficiency of 5.5% (record efficiency of 5.7%) at 1 sun. The results of this study present promising routes for further improvements of aqueous cobalt electrolyte DSCs. PMID:26931779

  13. Tailoring the oxidation state of cobalt through halide functionality in sol-gel silica

    PubMed Central

    Olguin, Gianni; Yacou, Christelle; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2013-01-01

    The functionality or oxidation state of cobalt within a silica matrix can be tailored through the use of cationic surfactants and their halide counter ions during the sol-gel synthesis. Simply by adding surfactant we could significantly increase the amount of cobalt existing as Co3O4 within the silica from 44% to 77%, without varying the cobalt precursor concentration. However, once the surfactant to cobalt ratio exceeded 1, further addition resulted in an inhibitory mechanism whereby the altered pyrolysis of the surfactant decreased Co3O4 production. These findings have significant implications for the production of cobalt/silica composites where maximizing the functional Co3O4 phase remains the goal for a broad range of catalytic, sensing and materials applications. PMID:24022785

  14. Structural, morphological, and electrical characteristics of the electrodeposited cobalt oxide electrode for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kandalkar, Sunil G.; Lee, Hae-Min; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Chang-Koo

    2011-01-15

    Cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were prepared through electrodeposition on copper substrates using an ammonia-complexed cobalt chloride solution. The structural and morphological properties of the film were studied using an X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy, and the results showed that the electrodeposited cobalt oxide film had a nanocrystalline and porous structure. The electrochemical behavior of the electrodeposited cobalt oxide electrode was evaluated in a KOH solution using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The electrodeposited cobalt oxide electrode exhibited a specific capacitance of 235 F/g at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. The specific energy and the specific power of the electrode were 4.0 Wh/kg and 1.33 kW/kg, respectively.

  15. Effective Pincer Cobalt Precatalysts for Lewis Acid Assisted CO2 Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Spentzos, Ariana Z; Barnes, Charles L; Bernskoetter, Wesley H

    2016-08-15

    The pincer ligand MeN[CH2CH2(P(i)Pr2)]2 ((iPr)PNP) was employed to support a series of cobalt(I) complexes, which were crystallographically characterized. A cobalt monochloride species, ((iPr)PNP)CoCl, served as a precursor for the preparation of several cobalt precatalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, including a cationic dicarbonyl cobalt complex, [((iPr)PNP)Co(CO)2](+). When paired with the Lewis acid lithium triflate, [((iPr)PNP)Co(CO)2](+) affords turnover numbers near 30 000 (at 1000 psi, 45 °C) for CO2-to-formate hydrogenation, which is a notable increase in activity from previously reported homogeneous cobalt catalysts. Though mechanistic information regarding the function of the precatalysts remains limited, multiple experiments suggest the active species is a molecular, homogeneous [((iPr)PNP)Co] complex. PMID:27454669

  16. Effects of cobalt on the microstructure of Udimet 700. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Cobalt, a critical and "strategic" alloying element in many superalloys, was systematically substituted by nickel in experimental alloys Udimet 700 containing 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8 and the standard 17.0 wt.% cobalt. Electrolytic and chemical extraction techniques, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and optical microscopy were used for the microstructural studies. The total weight fraction of gamma' was not significantly affected by the cobalt content, although a difference in the size and quantities of the primary and secondary gamma' phases was apparent. The lattice parameters of the gamma' were found to increase with increasing cobalt content while the lattice mismatch between the gamma matrix and gamma' phases decreased. Other significant effects of cobalt on the weight fraction, distribution and formation of the carbide and boride phases as well as the relative stability of the experimental alloys during long-time aging are also discussed.

  17. Consequence of cobalt on structural, optical and dielectric properties in ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Amir; Ahmed, S.; Shah, N. A.; Anis-ur-Rehman, M.; Khan, E. U.; Basit, M.

    2015-09-01

    The critical role of cobalt dopant in ZnO nanostructures with different cobalt concentrations has been explored on the basis of structural, optical and dielectric mechanisms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the Co+2 ions replace Zn+2 ions in the ZnO matrix, producing lattice strain. Diffused Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) shows a red shift in optical energy band gap with increase in cobalt content, along with the presence of transitions in high spin states due to tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt ions. The dielectric characterization explains the disparity in dynamic dielectric parameters like capacitance, dielectric constant, tangent loss, AC conductivity and impedance as a function of frequency. Capacitance and both static and dynamic dielectric constants found to be decreasing with cobalt addition. The anomaly in these pronounced parameters can address the key problems of the material at higher frequencies device operation.

  18. Effect of cobalt incorporation and lithium enrichment in lithium nickel manganese oxides.

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.; Belharouak, I.; Wu, H.; Dambournet, D.; Amine, K.

    2010-05-10

    Candidate cathode materials of cobalt-incorporated and lithium-enriched Li{sub (1+x)}Ni{sub 0.25}Co{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub (2.175+x/2)} (x=0.225-0.65) have been prepared by a coprecipitation method and a solid-state reaction. We systematically investigated the effect of both cobalt presence and lithium concentration on the structure, physical properties, and electrochemical behavior of the studied samples. The electrochemical performance of the cobalt-containing compounds showed much less dependence on the variation in the lithium amounts compared to the cobalt-free counterpart. The study demonstrated that even with cobalt incorporation, proper lithium content is the key to desirable cathode materials with nanostructured primary particles that are indispensable to achieve high capacity and high rate capability and, therefore, both improved energy and power densities for lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Comparison of the dietary cobalt intake in three different Australian diets.

    PubMed

    Hokin, Bevan; Adams, Michelle; Ashton, John; Louie, Honway

    2004-01-01

    Differences in the dietary intake of cobalt were assessed for vegans, lacto-ovo-vegetarian and non-vegetarian Australians using food intake logs, and daily or average trend recall over three months. A significant decrease in cobalt intake was observed for the lacto-ovo-vegetarian population compared with the intake in vegans and omnivores. There is no RDI for cobalt, however, the cobalt intake of Australians was similar to that reported in other countries. Microflora above the terminal ileum have been shown to produce significant amounts of biologically available vitamin B12. This study was unable to demonstrate a correlation between elemental cobalt intake and serum vitamin B12 concentrations in humans, as has been shown in vitro. PMID:15331342

  20. Microstructure and characterization of a novel cobalt coating prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Cheng; He, Yedong

    2015-10-01

    A novel cobalt coating was prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition (CPED). The kinetics of the electrode process in cathode plasma electrolytic deposition was studied. The composition and microstructure of the deposited coatings were investigated by SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM. The novel cobalt coatings were dense and uniform, showing a typically molten morphology, and were deposited with a rather fast rate. Different from the coatings prepared by conventional electrodeposition or chemical plating, pure cobalt coatings with face center cubic (fcc) structure were obtained by CPED. The deposited coatings were nanocrystalline structure with an average grain size of 40-50 nm, exhibited high hardness, excellent adhesion with the stainless steels, and superior wear resistance. The properties of the novel cobalt coatings prepared by CPED have been improved significantly, as compared with that prepared by conventional methods. It reveals that cathode plasma electrolytic deposition is an effective way to prepare novel cobalt coatings with high quality.

  1. Facile fabrication of cobalt oxalate nanostructures with superior specific capacitance and super-long cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanhua; Si, Conghui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wanfeng; Dong, Chaoqun; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2016-04-01

    Transition metal oxalate materials have shown huge competitive advantages for applications in supercapacitors. Herein, nanostructured cobalt oxalate supported on cobalt foils has been facilely fabricated by anodization, and could directly serve as additive/binder-free electrodes for supercapacitors. The as-prepared cobalt oxalate electrodes present superior specific capacitance of 1269 F g-1 at the current density of 6 A g-1 in the galvanostatic charge/discharge test. Moreover, the retained capacitance is as high as 87.2% as the current density increases from 6 A g-1 to 30 A g-1. More importantly, the specific capacitance of cobalt oxalate retains 91.9% even after super-long cycling of 100,000 cycles. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor assembled with cobalt oxalate (positive electrode) and activated carbon (negative electrode) demonstrates excellent capacitive performance with high energy density and power density.

  2. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  3. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-24

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ∼30nm and ∼48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  4. Mapping the magnetic and crystal structure in cobalt nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Betancourt, Israel; Sanchez, John E.; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Ponce, Arturo; Maqableh, Mazin M.; Stadler, Bethanie J. H.

    2015-07-14

    Using off-axis electron holography under Lorentz microscopy conditions to experimentally determine the magnetization distribution in individual cobalt (Co) nanowires, and scanning precession-electron diffraction to obtain their crystalline orientation phase map, allowed us to directly visualize with high accuracy the effect of crystallographic texture on the magnetization of nanowires. The influence of grain boundaries and disorientations on the magnetic structure is correlated on the basis of micromagnetic analysis in order to establish the detailed relationship between magnetic and crystalline structure. This approach demonstrates the applicability of the method employed and provides further understanding on the effect of crystalline structure on magnetic properties at the nanometric scale.

  5. Polyamide preparation with pentaamine cobalt (III) complex catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.Y.M.; Ball, L.E.; Coffey, G.P.

    1987-11-17

    A process is described for preparing a polyamide containing amide groups as integral parts of the main polymer chain comprising polymerizing a polyamide forming system, chosen from (1) an alpha, beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid and ammonia, (2) an ammonium salt of an alpha, beta unsaturated carboxylic acid, (3) an alpha, beta-unsaturated nitrile and water, (4) an alpha, beta-unsaturated amine and ammonia, (5) or a beta-amino propionic acid or its alkyl derivatives, in contact with a catalyst comprising a pentaamine cobalt (III) complex.

  6. Cobalt dicarbollide containing polymer resins for cesium and strontium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Duke, J.R. Jr.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1994-04-01

    Cobalt(III) dicarbollide [(C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11}){sub 2}Co]{sup {minus}} (CB{sub 2}) is being investigated for Cs and Sr extraction from nuclear waste. Because organic solvents should be avoided, bonding of CB{sub 2} to resins were investigated. CB{sub 2} was successfully covalently bonded to polystyrene and polybenzimidazole resins. Tetrahydrofuran was the most efficient solvent for grafting. Analysis is being performed, and separation coefficients are also being determined. 3 figs, 8 refs.

  7. Effect of the capping agents on cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, L.; Longo, A.; Giannici, F.; Martorana, A.

    2009-11-01

    The achievement of high information density and fast recording rate in memory devices crucially depends on the structure of magnetic domains. In this paper cobalt nanoparticles are synthesised using two capping agents (TOA, ODA) and two different preparation routes: thermal decomposition (TD) and Solvated Metal Atom Dispersion (SMAD). The interaction of capping agents with free metal clusters and their influence on Co nanoparticles size, atomic structure and oxidation state is investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  8. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. PMID:24768702

  9. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids with a homogeneous cobalt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Elsevier, Cornelis J; de Bruin, Bas

    2015-10-16

    The reduction of esters and carboxylic acids to alcohols is a highly relevant conversion for the pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industries and for biomass conversion. It is commonly performed using stoichiometric reagents, and the catalytic hydrogenation of the acids previously required precious metals. Here we report the homogeneously catalyzed hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to alcohols using earth-abundant cobalt. This system, which pairs Co(BF4)2·6H2O with a tridentate phosphine ligand, can reduce a wide range of esters and carboxylic acids under relatively mild conditions (100°C, 80 bar H2) and reaches turnover numbers of up to 8000. PMID:26472903

  10. Low-Pressure Cobalt-Catalyzed Enantioselective Hydrovinylation of Vinylarenes.

    PubMed

    Movahhed, Sohajl; Westphal, Julia; Dindaroğlu, Mehmet; Falk, Anna; Schmalz, Hans-Günther

    2016-05-23

    An efficient and practical protocol for the enantioselective cobalt-catalyzed hydrovinylation of vinylarenes with ethylene at low (1.2 bar) pressure has been developed. As precatalysts, stable [L2 CoCl2 ] complexes are employed that are activated in situ with Et2 AlCl. A modular chiral TADDOL-derived phosphine-phosphite ligand was identified that allows the conversion of a broad spectrum of substrates, including heterocyclic vinylarenes and vinylferrocene, to smoothly afford the branched products with up to 99 % ee and virtually complete regioselectivity. Even polar functional groups, such as OH, NH2 , CN, and CO2 R, are tolerated. PMID:26998912

  11. Hot corrosion of S-57, 1 cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    A cobalt base alloy, S-57, was hot corrosion tested in Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion gases at maximum alloy temperatures of 900 and 1000 C. Various salt concentrations were injected into the burner: 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 ppm synthetic sea salt and 4 ppm sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). S-57 underwent accelerated corrosion only under the most severe test conditions, for example, 4 ppm Na2SO4 at 900 C. The process of the accelerated corrosion was primarily sulfidation.

  12. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ˜30nm and ˜48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  13. Mapping the magnetic and crystal structure in cobalt nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Betancourt, Israel; Sanchez, John E.; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Maqableh, Mazin M.; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Stadler, Bethanie J. H.; Ponce, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Using off-axis electron holography under Lorentz microscopy conditions to experimentally determine the magnetization distribution in individual cobalt (Co) nanowires, and scanning precession-electron diffraction to obtain their crystalline orientation phase map, allowed us to directly visualize with high accuracy the effect of crystallographic texture on the magnetization of nanowires. The influence of grain boundaries and disorientations on the magnetic structure is correlated on the basis of micromagnetic analysis in order to establish the detailed relationship between magnetic and crystalline structure. This approach demonstrates the applicability of the method employed and provides further understanding on the effect of crystalline structure on magnetic properties at the nanometric scale. PMID:26221057

  14. Diffusion of Chromium in Alpha Cobalt-Chromium Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeton, John W

    1951-01-01

    Diffusion of chromium in cobalt-chromium solid solutions was investigated in the range 0 to 40 atomic percent at temperatures of 1360 degrees, 1300 degrees, 1150 degrees, and 10000 degrees c. The diffusion coefficients were found to be relatively constant within the composition range covered by each specimen. The activation heat of diffusion was determined to be 63,000 calories per mole. This value agrees closely with the value of 63,400 calories per mole calculated by means of the Dushman-Langmuir equation.

  15. Dosimetry under pencil eye shields for cobalt-60 radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chenery, S.G.; Leung, P.M.K.

    1981-05-01

    The use of pencil eye shields to reduce the dose to the anterior chamber of the eye during radiotherapy with Cobalt-60 beams has been evaluated. It was found that the optimum shield placement is about 1 cm from the surface. This keeps the size of the penumbra and the effect of electron contamination at a minimum. The dose under such shields is mainly produced by the transmission through the shield and the scattered radiation both from within the phantom and from the collimator. While the scattered component is a function of the beam size and otherwise cannot be altered, the transmission can easily be reduced to a negligible level.

  16. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-30

    The effects of copper on Fischer-Tropsch activity, selectivity and water-gas shift activity were studied over a wide range of syngas conversion. Three catalyst compositions were prepared for this study: (a) 100Fe/4.6Si/1.4K, (b) 100Fe/4.6Si/0.10Cu/1.4K and (c) 100Fe/4.6Si/2.0Cu/1.4K. The results are reported in Task 2. The literature review for cobalt catalysts is approximately 90% complete. Due to the size of the document, it has been submitted as a separate report labeled Task 6.

  17. Thermal evolution of cobalt deposits on Co3O4(111): atomically dispersed cobalt, two-dimensional CoO islands, and metallic Co nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mehl, S; Ferstl, P; Schuler, M; Toghan, A; Brummel, O; Hammer, L; Schneider, M A; Libuda, J

    2015-09-28

    Cobalt oxide nanomaterials show high activity in several catalytic reactions thereby offering the potential to replace noble metals in some applications. We have developed a well-defined model system for partially reduced cobalt oxide materials aiming at a molecular level understanding of cobalt-oxide-based catalysis. Starting from a well-ordered Co3O4(111) film on Ir(100), we modified the surface by deposition of metallic cobalt. Growth, structure, and adsorption properties of the cobalt-modified surface were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) using CO as a probe molecule. The deposition of a submonolayer of cobalt at 300 K leads to the formation of atomically dispersed cobalt ions distorting the surface layer of the Co3O4 film. Upon annealing to 500 K the Co ions are incorporated into the surface layer forming ordered two-dimensional CoO islands on the Co3O4 grains. At 700 K, Co ions diffuse from the CoO islands into the bulk and the ordered Co3O4(111) surface is restored. Deposition of larger amounts of Co at 300 K leads to formation of metallic Co aggregates on the dispersed cobalt phase. The metallic particles sinter at 500 K and diffuse into the bulk at 700 K. Depending on the degree of bulk reduction, extended Co3O4 grains switch to the CoO(111) structure. All above structures show characteristic CO adsorption behavior and can therefore be identified by IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. PMID:26299410

  18. Molecular mechanisms of cobalt-catalyzed hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Several cobalt complexes catalyze the evolution of hydrogen from acidic solutions, both homogeneously and at electrodes. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these transformations remain unresolved, largely owing to the fact that key reactive intermediates have eluded detection. One method of stabilizing reactive intermediates involves minimizing the overall reaction free-energy change. Here, we report a new cobalt(I) complex that reacts with tosylic acid to evolve hydrogen with a driving force of just 30 meV/Co. Protonation of CoI produces a transient CoIII-H complex that was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The CoIII-H intermediate decays by second-order kinetics with an inverse dependence on acid concentration. Analysis of the kinetics suggests that CoIII-H produces hydrogen by two competing pathways: a slower homolytic route involving two CoIII-H species and a dominant heterolytic channel in which a highly reactive CoII-H transient is generated by CoI reduction of CoIII-H. PMID:22949704

  19. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles at 100 mA g(-1)), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g(-1) at 10 A g(-1)). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes. PMID:27479691

  20. Lithium cobalt oxide thin film and its electrochromism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guang; Haas, Terry E.; Goldner, Ronald B.

    1989-06-01

    Thin films of lithium cobalt oxide have been prepared by RF-sputtering from powdered LiCoO2. These films permit reversible electrolytic removal of lithium ions upon application of an anodic voltage in a propylene carbonate-lithium perchlorate electrolyte, the films changing in color from a pale amber transparent state to a dark brown. A polycrystalline columnar film structure was revealed with SEM and TEM. X ray examination of the films suggests that the layered rhombohedral LiCoO2 structure is the major crystalline phase present. Oxidation-reduction titration and atomic absorption were used for the determination of the film stoichiometry. The results show that the as deposited-films on glass slides are lithium deficient (relative to the starting material) and show a high average cobalt oxidation state near +3.5. The measurements of dc conductivity suggest a band to band conduction at high temperature (300 to 430 K) and hopping conduction in localized states at low temperature (4 to 270 K). The thermoelectric power data show that the films behave as p-type semiconductors. Transmission and reflectance measurements from 400 nm to 2500 nm show significant near-IR reflectivity.

  1. Oriented attachment explains cobalt ferrite nanoparticle growth in bioinspired syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Annalena; Hetaba, Walid; Wißbrock, Marco; Löffler, Stefan; Mill, Nadine; Eckstädt, Katrin; Dreyer, Axel; Ennen, Inga; Sewald, Norbert; Schattschneider, Peter; Hütten, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Oriented attachment has created a great debate about the description of crystal growth throughout the last decade. This aggregation-based model has successfully described biomineralization processes as well as forms of inorganic crystal growth, which could not be explained by classical crystal growth theory. Understanding the nanoparticle growth is essential since physical properties, such as the magnetic behavior, are highly dependent on the microstructure, morphology and composition of the inorganic crystals. In this work, the underlying nanoparticle growth of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in a bioinspired synthesis was studied. Bioinspired syntheses have sparked great interest in recent years due to their ability to influence and alter inorganic crystal growth and therefore tailor properties of nanoparticles. In this synthesis, a short synthetic version of the protein MMS6, involved in nanoparticle formation within magnetotactic bacteria, was used to alter the growth of cobalt ferrite. We demonstrate that the bioinspired nanoparticle growth can be described by the oriented attachment model. The intermediate stages proposed in the theoretical model, including primary-building-block-like substructures as well as mesocrystal-like structures, were observed in HRTEM measurements. These structures display regions of substantial orientation and possess the same shape and size as the resulting discs. An increase in orientation with time was observed in electron diffraction measurements. The change of particle diameter with time agrees with the recently proposed kinetic model for oriented attachment. PMID:24605288

  2. Tuning of magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno-Mattei, Y.; Roman, F.; Perales-Perez, O.; Tomar, M. S.; Voyles, P. M.; Stratton, W. G.

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) possesses excellent chemical stability, good mechanical hardness, and a large positive first order crystalline anisotropy constant, making it a promising candidate for magneto-optical recording media. In addition to precise control of the composition and structure of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, its practical application will require the capability to control particle size at the nanoscale. The results of a synthesis approach in which size control is achieved by modifying the oversaturation conditions during ferrite formation in water through a modified coprecipitation approach are reported. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction, and TEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of the nanoscale cobalt ferrite. M-H measurements verified the strong influence of synthesis conditions on crystal size and hence, on the magnetic properties of ferrite nanocrystals. The room-temperature coercivity values increased from 460 up to 4626 Oe under optimum synthesis conditions determined from a 2{sup 3} factorial design.

  3. Cobalt Nanoparticle Inks for Printed High Frequency Applications on Polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelo, Mikko; Myllymäki, Sami; Juuti, Jari; Uusimäki, Antti; Jantunen, Heli

    2015-12-01

    In this work the high frequency properties of low curing temperature cobalt nanoparticle inks printed on polycarbonate substrates were investigated. The inks consisted of 30-70 vol.% metallic cobalt nanoparticles and poly (methylene methacrylate) polymer, having excellent adhesion on polycarbonate and a curing temperature of 110°C. The influence of binder material content on the electromagnetic properties of the ink was investigated using the shorted microstrip transmission-line perturbation method. Changes in mechanical properties were evaluated with adhesion tests using the pull-out strength test and the ASTM D 3359-B cross-hatch tape peel test. The microstructure of the printed patterns was investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The inks remained mechanically durable with metal contents up to 60 vol.%, achieving pull-off strength of up to 5.2 MPa and the highest marks in adhesion of the tape peel test. The inks obtained a relative permeability of 1.5-3 in the 45 MHz-10 GHz band with a magnetic loss tangent of 0.01-0.06. The developed inks can be utilized in various printed electronics applications such as antenna miniaturization, antenna substrates and magnetic sensors or sensing.

  4. Mechanical strength of laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Baba, N; Watanabe, I; Liu, J; Atsuta, M

    2004-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the output energy of laser welding and welding methods on the joint strength of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. Two types of cast Co-Cr plates were prepared, and transverse sections were made at the center of the plate. The cut surfaces were butted against one another, and the joints welded with a laser-welding machine at several levels of output energy with the use of two methods. The fracture force required to break specimens was determined by means of tensile testing. For the 0.5-mm-thick specimens, the force required to break the 0.5-mm laser-welded specimens at currents of 270 and 300 A was not statistically different (p > 0.05) from the results for the nonwelded control specimens. The force required to break the 1.0-mm specimens double-welded at a current of 270 A was the highest value among the 1.0-mm laser-welded specimens. The results suggested that laser welding under the appropriate conditions improved the joint strength of cobalt- chromium alloy. PMID:15116400

  5. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g‑1 at 100 mA g‑1), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g‑1 after 100 cycles at 100 mA g‑1), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g‑1 at 10 A g‑1). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes.

  6. Size effects and Hall-Petch relation in polycrystalline cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurier, Gwendoline; Hug, Eric; Martinez, Mayerling; Dubos, Pierre-Antoine; Keller, Clément

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline hexagonal close-packed cobalt was investigated over a large range of grain size d in order to examine the occurrence of size effects. Crystallographic texture and amount of face centred cubic allotropic phase were maintained unchanged thanks to appropriate heat treatment procedures. The Hall-Petch (HP) relation exhibits two distinct behaviours from the very beginning of plastic strain levels. The conventional HP law is fulfilled for a number of grains across the thickness t higher than a critical value (t/d)c = 14. For t/d lower than (t/d)c, a multicrystalline regime is evidenced highlighting a strong reduction in flow stress. The high value of (t/d)c is related to the low-stacking fault energy of cobalt in the basal plane. The size effect is predominant in the first work hardening stage where slip mechanisms and stacking faults predominate. In the second stage, driven by mechanical twinning processes, this effect is less sensitive. Finally, the size effect could also affect the end of the elastic stage, in link with nonlinear elasticity mechanisms.

  7. Impact of wastewater reuse on cobalt status in Egyptian environment.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sabour, M F

    2003-05-01

    Cobalt is used in the manufacture of alloys, catalysts in the petroleum industry, catalytic converters, and paint pigments. Thus the potential for Co releases into the environment is highly increased. Use of waste sludges and sewage effluent to fertilize and irrigate soils has also increased soil Co concentrations. Total cobalt contents of alluvial delta soil of Egypt show considerable variation ranging from 13.1 to 64.7 ppm. The impact of either wastewater irrigation or industrial activities on soil total Co was obvious due to accumulation of organic matter and solid waste in the surface soil samples. Food crops and vegetables should not be grown on soil highly contaminated by Co. It is noteworthy that the delayed neutron activation analysis (DNAA) technique could be used successfully for total Co determination due to its high sensitivity. It is quit clearly that dust samples of Cairo City contains higher Co level, as compared to Suez Canal Region (Ismailia, Port Said an El-Sues cities). The high values in Cairo City may be due to the existence of industries around the city and the intensive traffic. To minimize Co environmental hazards, waste effluents should be treated on site. Thus, levels of potentially toxic Co needs to be continuously monitored and should be removed during several treatment processes before the disposal of these wastes. PMID:12938992

  8. Synthesis and characterization of mononuclear, pseudotetrahedral cobalt(III) compounds.

    PubMed

    Kozhukh, Julia; Minier, Mikael A; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-01-20

    The preparation and characterization of two mononuclear cobalt(III) tropocoronand complexes, [Co(TC-5,5)](BF4) and [Co(TC-6,6)](BPh4), are reported. The cobalt(III) centers exist in rare pseudotetrahedral conformations, with twist angles of 65° and 74° for the [Co(TC-5,5](+) and [Co(TC-6,6)](+) species, respectively. Structural and electrochemical characteristics are compared with those of newly synthesized [Ga(TC-5,5)](GaCl4) and [Ga(TC-6,6)](GaCl4) analogues. The spin state of the pseudotetrahedral [Co(TC-6,6)](BPh4) compound was determined to be S = 2, a change in spin state from the value of S = 1 that occurs in the square-planar and distorted square-planar complexes, [Co(TC-3,3)](X) (X = BPh4, BAr'4) and [Co(TC-4,4)](BPh4), respectively. PMID:25531129

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Mononuclear, Pseudotetrahedral Cobalt(III) Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of two mononuclear cobalt(III) tropocoronand complexes, [Co(TC-5,5)](BF4) and [Co(TC-6,6)](BPh4), are reported. The cobalt(III) centers exist in rare pseudotetrahedral conformations, with twist angles of 65° and 74° for the [Co(TC-5,5]+ and [Co(TC-6,6)]+ species, respectively. Structural and electrochemical characteristics are compared with those of newly synthesized [Ga(TC-5,5)](GaCl4) and [Ga(TC-6,6)](GaCl4) analogues. The spin state of the pseudotetrahedral [Co(TC-6,6)](BPh4) compound was determined to be S = 2, a change in spin state from the value of S = 1 that occurs in the square-planar and distorted square-planar complexes, [Co(TC-3,3)](X) (X = BPh4, BAr′4) and [Co(TC-4,4)](BPh4), respectively. PMID:25531129

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for adaptive cobalt tomotherapy: A proposal

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Tomas; Eyles, David; John, Schreiner L; Battista, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides excellent soft tissue contrast for oncology applications. We propose to combine a MRI scanner with a helical tomotherapy (HT) system to enable daily target imaging for improved conformal radiation dose delivery to a patient. HT uses an intensity-modulated fan-beam that revolves around a patient, while the patient slowly advances through the plane of rotation, yielding a helical beam trajectory. Since the use of a linear accelerator to produce radiation may be incompatible with the pulsed radiofrequency and the high and pulsed magnetic fields required for MRI, it is proposed that a radioactive Cobalt-60 (60Co) source be used instead to provide the radiation. An open low field (0.25 T) MRI system is proposed where the tomotherapy ring gantry is located between two sets of Helmholtz coils that can generate a sufficiently homogenous main magnetic field. It is shown that the two major challenges with the design, namely acceptable radiation dose rate (and therefore treatment duration) and moving parts in strong magnetic field, can be addressed. The high dose rate desired for helical tomotherapy delivery can be achieved using two radiation sources of 220TBq (6000Ci) each on a ring gantry with a source to axis-of-rotation distance of 75 cm. In addition to this, a dual row multi-leaf collimator (MLC) system with 15 mm leaf width at isocentre and relatively large fan beam widths between 15 and 30 mm per row shall be employed. In this configuration, the unit would be well-suited for most pelvic radiotherapy applications where the soft tissue contrast of MRI will be particularly beneficial. Non-magnetic MRI compatible materials must be used for the rotating gantry. Tungsten, which is non-magnetic, can be used for primary collimation of the fan-beam as well as for the MLC, which allows intensity modulated radiation delivery. We propose to employ a low magnetic Cobalt compound, sycoporite (CoS) for the Cobalt source material itself

  11. Cobalt in ferromanganese crusts as a monitor of hydrothermal discharge on the Pacific sea floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Lane-Bostwick, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxide crusts, which accumulate on unsedimented surfaces in the open ocean1-6, derive most of their metal content from dissolved and particulate matter in ambient bottom water7,8, in proportions modified by the variable scavenging efficiency of the oxide phase for susceptible ions9. They differ in this respect from abyssal nodules, much of whose metals are remobilized from host sediments. Here we present maps of cobalt concentration and inferred accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts from the Pacific Ocean. We propose that depletion of cobalt in Pacific crusts measures the location and intensity of submarine hydrothermal discharge. Use of the 'cobalt chronometer', an algorithm inversely relating cobalt content and crust growth rate, permits mapping of the accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts with only indirect recourse to radioactivity-based dating methods. These maps show that crusts in hydrothermal areas grow from two to more than four orders of magnitude faster than in the Central Pacific Ocean. Cobalt-enriched crusts are found where water masses are most isolated from continental-coastal and hydrothermal sources of metals, now and in the past. This relationship can resolve the problem of cobalt enrichment in crusts without recourse to hypotheses invoking special cobalt sources or enrichment mechanisms. ?? 1988 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Thermal-fatigue and oxidation resistance of cobalt-modified Udimet 700 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Barrow, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Comparative thermal-fatigue and oxidation resistances of cobalt-modified wrought Udimet 700 alloy (obtained by reducing the cobalt level by direct substitution of nickel) were determined from fluidized-bed tests. Bed temperatures were 1010 and 288 C (1850 and 550 C) for the first 5500 symmetrical 6-min cycles. From cycle 5501 to the 14000-cycle limit of testing, the heating bed temperature was increased to 1050 C (1922 F). Cobalt levels between 0 and 17 wt% were studied in both the bare and NiCrAlY overlay coated conditions. A cobalt level of about 8 wt% gave the best thermal-fatigue life. The conventional alloy specification is for 18.5% cobalt, and hence, a factor of 2 in savings of cobalt could be achieved by using the modified alloy. After 13500 cycles, all bare cobalt-modified alloys lost 10 to 13 percent of their initial weight. Application of the NiCrAlY overlay coating resulted in weight losses of 1/20 to 1/100 of that of the corresponding bare alloy.

  13. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Bazylewski, Paul F.; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P.C.; Hunt, Adrian H.; McDermott, Eamon J. G.; Leedahl, Brett D.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications. PMID:26486966

  14. Micronucleus test and erythropoiesis: effect of cobalt on the induction of micronuclei by mutagens.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Shimizu, H; Nagae, Y; Fukumoto, M; Okonogi, H; Kadokura, M

    1993-01-01

    The micronucleus test is used widely as an in vivo short-term assay for potential carcinogens. In the present study, results of the micronucleus test were affected by cobalt dichloride pretreatment. Cobalt dichloride was used to induce erythropoietin, a growth factor for erythropoiesis. The increase in mutagen-induced micronucleus response following cobalt pretreatment, therefore, may have been due to a change in the rate of erythropoiesis. The greatest interaction between cobalt pretreatment and mutagen treatment for the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE) occurred when mice were injected with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) 12-24 hr after pretreatment with cobalt dichloride and killed 30 hr later. Increased sensitivity of the micronucleus test was attributable to the administration of mutagen during the differentiation and multiplication of erythroblast, which is presumed to have been accelerated by pretreatment with cobalt dichloride. An increased induction of MPCE in the bone marrow by two chemicals--benzo(a)pyrene, 2-naphthylamine--was also observed following pretreatment with cobalt dichloride. PMID:8359151

  15. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylewski, Paul F.; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P. C.; Hunt, Adrian H.; McDermott, Eamon J. G.; Leedahl, Brett D.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-10-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications.

  16. Mobile Phones: Potential Sources of Nickel and Cobalt Exposure for Metal Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mucci, Tania; Chong, Melanie; Lorton, Mark Davis; Fonacier, Luz

    2013-01-01

    The use of cellular phones has risen exponentially with over 300 million subscribers. Nickel has been detected in cell phones and reports of contact dermatitis attributable to metals are present in the literature. We determined nickel and cobalt content in popular cell phones in the United States. Adults (>18 years) who owned a flip phone, Blackberry®, or iPhone® were eligible. Seventy-two cell phones were tested using SmartPractice's® commercially available nickel and cobalt spot tests. Test areas included buttons, keypad, speakers, camera, and metal panels. Of the 72 cell phones tested, no iPhones or Droids® tested positive for nickel or cobalt. About 29.4% of Blackberrys [95% confidence interval (CI), 13%–53%] tested positive for nickel; none were positive for cobalt. About 90.5% of flip phones (95% CI, 70%–99%) tested positive for nickel and 52.4% of flip phones (95% CI, 32%–72%) tested positive for cobalt. Our study indicates that nickel and cobalt are present in popular cell phones. Patients with known nickel or cobalt allergy may consider their cellular phones as a potential source of exposure. Further studies are needed to examine whether there is a direct association with metal content in cell phones and the manifestation of metal allergy. PMID:24380018

  17. Studies on KIT-6 Supported Cobalt Catalyst for Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanamani, M.; Jacobs, G; Graham, U; Ma, W; Pendyala, V; Ribeiro, M; Davis, B

    2010-01-01

    KIT-6 molecular sieve was used as a support to prepare cobalt catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) using an incipient wetness impregnation method to produce cobalt loadings of 15 and 25 wt%. The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission election microscopy (STEM), extended X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy. The catalytic properties for FTS were evaluated using a 1L CSTR reactor. XRD, pore size distribution, and STEM analysis indicate that the KIT-6 mesostructure remains stable during and after cobalt impregnation and tends to form smaller cobalt particles, probably located inside the mesopores. The mesoporous KIT-6 exhibited a slightly higher cobalt dispersion compared to amorphous SiO{sub 2} supported catalyst. With the higher Co loading (25 wt%) on KIT-6, partial structural collapse was observed after the FTS reaction. Compared to an amorphous SiO{sub 2} supported cobalt catalyst, KIT-6 supported cobalt catalyst displayed higher methane selectivity at a similar Co loading, likely due to diffusion effects.

  18. Cobalt and nickel stabilize stem cell transcription factor OCT4 through modulating its sumoylation and ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Lu, Yinghua; Chen, Wen-Chi; Jiang, Yongping; Cheng, Tao; Ma, Yupo; Lu, Lou; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell research can lead to the development of treatments for a wide range of ailments including diabetes, heart disease, aging, neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord injury, and cancer. OCT4 is a master regulator of self-renewal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. OCT4 also plays a crucial role in reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Given known vivo reproductive toxicity of cobalt and nickel metals, we examined the effect of these metals on expression of several stem cell factors in embryonic Tera-1 cells, as well as stem cells. Cobalt and nickel induced a concentration-dependent increase of OCT4 and HIF-1α, but not NANOG or KLF4. OCT4 induced by cobalt and nickel was due primarily to protein stabilization because MG132 stabilized OCT4 in cells treated with either metals and because neither nickel nor cobalt significantly modulated its steady-state mRNA level. OCT4 stabilization by cobalt and nickel was mediated largely through reactive oxygen species (ROS) as co-treatment with ascorbic acid abolished OCT4 increase. Moreover, nickel and cobalt treatment increased sumoylation and mono-ubiquitination of OCT4 and K123 was crucial for mediating these modifications. Combined, our observations suggest that nickel and cobalt may exert their reproductive toxicity through perturbing OCT4 activity in the stem cell compartment. PMID:24497960

  19. The nature of graphene-metal bonding probed by Raman spectroscopy: the special case of cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Esparza, Inés; Fan, Jiyu; Michalik, Jan M.; Alfredo Rodríguez, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; María de Teresa, José

    2016-03-01

    The nature of graphene-metal bonding is crucial for the performance of graphene-based electronic devices. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique for probing the electronic behaviour of graphene-metal interfaces. The changes in the Raman spectrum of pristine graphene upon contact with standard metal layers are reported here. In particular, the study is focused on metallization by electron-beam evaporation using chromium or titanium (commonly used as an adhesion layer to improve the bonding of other metals such as gold) and nickel or cobalt (ferromagnetic materials used for spintronics). The results obtained indicate that the main changes in the Raman spectra can be explained in terms of a biaxial strain generated by graphene trying to match the crystalline lattice of the metal. In the case of cobalt, we find that the strong binding of some cobalt atoms to graphene generates a spectrum with a duplication of the characteristic graphene peaks: those corresponding to cobalt physisorbed to graphene and those corresponding to cobalt chemisorbed to graphene, strongly redshifted. Such special behaviour of the graphene-cobalt interface is correlated to the low contact resistance and the enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of cobalt on graphene.

  20. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bazylewski, Paul F; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P C; Hunt, Adrian H; McDermott, Eamon J G; Leedahl, Brett D; Kukharenko, Andrey I; Cholakh, Seif O; Kurmaev, Ernst Z; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications. PMID:26486966

  1. Cobalt whole blood concentrations in healthy adult male volunteers following two-weeks of ingesting a cobalt supplement.

    PubMed

    Tvermoes, Brooke E; Finley, Brent L; Unice, Kenneth M; Otani, Joanne M; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Galbraith, David A

    2013-03-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the marketing and sales of dietary supplements, energy drinks, and other consumer products that may contain relatively high concentrations of essential elements. Cobalt-containing supplements are readily available in the U.S. and have been marketed to consumers as energy enhancers. However, little information is available regarding cobalt (Co) body burden and steady-state blood concentrations following the intake of Co dietary supplements. We assessed Co whole blood concentrations in four healthy adult male volunteers who ingested a commercially available Co supplement (0.4 mg Co/day) for 15 or 16 days. Pre-supplementation blood Co concentrations were less than the reporting limit of 0.5 μg/L, consistent with background concentrations reported to range between 0.1 and 0.4 μg/L. The mean whole blood Co concentration in the volunteers after 15 or 16 days of dosing was 3.6 μg Co/L and ranged from 1.8 to 5.1 μg Co/L. The mean observed concentration in the study group was approximately 9-36 times greater than background concentrations. Further studies of Co whole blood concentrations following supplementation over longer time periods with additional monitoring of physiological parameters may provide useful information for evaluating the health of persons who take various doses of Co. PMID:23207477

  2. Development of a stable cobalt-ruthenium Fisher-Tropsch catalyst. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1995-02-01

    The reverse micelle catalyst preparation method has been used to prepare catalysts on four supports: magnesium oxide, carbon, alumina- titania and steamed Y zeolite. These catalysts were not as active as a reference catalyst prepared during previous contracts to Union Carbide Corp. This catalyst was supported on steamed Y zerolite support and was impregnated by a pore-filling method using a nonaqueous solvent. Additional catalysts were prepared via pore- filling impregnation of steamed Y zeolites. These catalysts had levels of cobalt two to three and a half times as high as the original Union Carbide catalyst. On a catalyst volume basis they were much more active than the previous catalyst; on an atom by atom basis the cobalt was about of the same activity, i.e., the high cobalt catalysts` cobalt atoms were not extensively covered over and deactivated by other cobalt atoms. The new, high activity, Y zerolite catalysts were not as stable as the earlier Union Carbide catalyst. However, stability enhancement of these catalysts should be possible, for instance, through adjustment of the quantity and/or type of trace metals present. A primary objective of this work was determination whether small amounts of ruthenium could enhance the activity of the cobalt F-T catalyst. The reverse micelle catalysts were not activated by ruthenium, indeed scanning transmission electronic microscopy (STEM) analysis provided some evidence that ruthenium was not present in the cobalt crystallites. Ruthenium did not seem to activate the high cobalt Y zeolite catalyst either, but additional experiments with Y zeolite-supported catalysts are required. Should ruthenium prove not to be an effective promoter under the simple catalyst activation procedure used in this work, more complex activation procedures have been reported which are claimed to enhance the cobalt/ruthenium interaction and result in activity promotion by ruthenium.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties of a low-cobalt wrought superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.

    1993-08-01

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, cobalt was subjected to significant supply and market pressures. Those pressures caused renewed attention to the use of cobalt in aircraft engines. A NASA-sponsored program called Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) was created in response to the supply problems with cobalt and other aerospace metals. Among the work performed in the COSAM program and simultaneously by others were several studies on laboratory-size heats of wrought nickel-base super-alloys. These studies suggested that the cobalt levels of the alloys might be reduced by about half, with minimal negative impact on mechanical properties. The Lewis Research Center procured a 1365-kg (3000-lb) heat of a modified Waspaloy having a reduced cobalt level. This article reports the results of a program performed at four gas turbine manufacturers which evaluated the mechanical properties of forgings fabricated from that heat. The alloy chemistry selected reduced the nominal cobalt level from 13.5 to 7.75 wt%. To compensate for the anticipated strength reduction caused by a slight reduction in the amount of γ, the nominal aluminum was increased from 1.3 to 1.5% and the titanium was increased from 3.0 to 3.2%. The increase in aluminum and titanium were intended to increase the amount of γ in the al-loy. Tensile, creep-rupture, low-cycle fatigue, and cyclic crack growth tests were performed. In addition the effect of hydrogen on the alloy was determined. It was concluded that, in the event of a cobalt short-age, a low-cobalt modification of Waspaloy alloy could be substituted for Waspaloy with little develop-ment in those applications that are not creep-rupture limited. With some additional development to better control the grain size, it is probable that most of the current Waspaloy requirements might be met with a lower cobalt alloy.

  4. Evaluation of mechanical properties of a low-cobalt wrought superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dreshfield, R.L. . Lewis Research Center)

    1993-08-01

    In the late 1970's and early 1980's, cobalt was subjected to significantly supply and market pressures. Those pressures caused renewed attention to the use of cobalt in aircraft engines. A NASA-sponsored program called Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) was created in response to the supply problems with cobalt and other aerospace metals. Among the work performed in the COSAM program and simultaneously by others were several studies on laboratory-size heats of wrought nickel-base super-alloys. These studies suggested that the cobalt levels of the alloys might be reduced by about half, with minimal negative impact on mechanical properties. The Lewis Research Center procured a 1,365-kg (3,000-lb) heat of a modified Waspaloy having a reduced cobalt level. This article reports the results of a program performed at four gas turbine manufacturers which evaluated the mechanical properties of forgings fabricated from that heat. The alloy chemistry selected reduced the nominal cobalt level from 13.5 to 7.75 wt %. To compensate for the anticipated strength reduction caused by a slight reduction in the amount of [gamma][prime], the nominal aluminum was increased from 1.3 to 1.5% and the titanium was increased from 3.0 to 3.2%. The increase in aluminum and titanium were intended to increase the amount of [gamma][prime] in the alloy. Tensile, creep-rupture, low-cycle fatigue, and cyclic crack growth tests were performed. In addition the effect of hydrogen on the alloy was determined. It was concluded that, in the event of a cobalt shortage, a low-cobalt modification of Waspaloy alloy could be substituted for Waspaloy with little development in those applications that are not creep-rupture limited. With some additional development to better control the grain size, it is probable that most of the current Waspaloy requirements might be met with a lower cobalt alloy.

  5. Determination of trace cobalt concentrations in human serum by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kajic, Petra; Milosev, Ingrid; Pihlar, Boris; Pisot, Venceslav

    2003-01-01

    The goal of our study was to develop an accurate and reliable method for determining trace cobalt concentrations in human serum. The method was used to determine cobalt in the sera of healthy persons and patients with orthopaedic implants containing cobalt - a possible source of systemic release of cobalt into the human body. This goal is of vital interest since cobalt and its compounds are classified by IARC as potentially carcinogenic to humans. We used an electrochemical method, adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV), which made possible the low detection limit and high sensitivity needed for measurements in human serum. The serum was acid digested by a combination of H2SO4, HNO3 and H2O2 in a 10 mL Kjeldhal flask. The digested sample was then dissolved in 0.1 mol/L ammonia buffer, pH 9.0 +/- 0.2. The determination is based on the adsorptive collection of the complex of cobalt (II) with dimethylglyoxime on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The optimum values of adsorption potential and time were determined to be -0.8 V and 60 s. The optimisation of the sample digestion protocol and measurement procedures ensured the reliable assessment of low cobalt concentrations, down to 0.03 microg/L. The mean concentration of serum cobalt in four healthy persons was 0.11 +/- 0.06 microg/L, and in four patients with total hip replacements 0.34 +/- 0.07 microg/L. This method will be used routinely for measuring serum cobalt levels in patients with total hip replacements. PMID:14968926

  6. Systems and Methods for the Electrodeposition of a Nickel-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogozalek, Nance Jo (Inventor); Wistrand, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrodepositing a nickel-cobalt alloy using a rotating cylinder electrode assembly with a plating surface and an electrical contact. The assembly is placed within a plating bath and rotated while running a plating cycle. Nickel-cobalt alloy deposition is selectively controlled by controlling current density distribution and/or cobalt content in the plating bath while running the plating cycle to deposit an alloy of a desired yield strength onto the plating surface in a single plating cycle. In various embodiments, the rotating cylinder may be used as an insitu monitoring method to assist in obtaining the properties desired.

  7. Effects of cobalt on the hot workability of nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Collier, J. P.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the workability of nickel-base superalloys is examined with reference to experimental results for four heats of alloys based on the Nimonic 115 composition with varying amounts of nickel substituted for the nominal 14 percent cobalt. It is shown that Co lowers the gamma-prime solvus, which in turn lowers the Cr23C6 carbide solvus. It is further shown that these solvus temperatures bracket the hot working range for the alloys. However, thermomechanical processing modifications reflecting the effect of Co on the gamma-prime and carbide solvi are shown to restore the workability and the properties of alloys with little or no cobalt.

  8. A novel process from cobalt nanowire to Co3O4 nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Yang, Shaoguang; Huang, Lisheng; Gu, Benxi; Du, Youwei

    2004-11-01

    Cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanotubes were synthesized by calcining cobalt nanowires embedded in an anodic alumina template (AAT) in air. The morphologies and phases of the nanowires/nanotubes were studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. A hypothesis of the tube formation process is presented and illustrated by experimental results. According to the experimental results, it is concluded that competition between the oxidation and the evaporation of cobalt nanocrystals plays a crucial role in the formation of such tube-like nanostructures of Co3O4.

  9. Processing technologies for extracting cobalt from domestic resources. Information Circular/1988

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the cobalt processing technologies for the major domestic resources is presented. The processing technologies for the Blackbird, Madison Mine, Duluth Gabbro, iron ore pyrite, laterites, and manganese sea nodules are nearly complete, but the economics are not favorable. Research on these resources should be limited to approaches that promise to cut the total processing costs by at least 50 pct. The most-promising sources of cobalt are the spent-copper leach solutions and siegenite from the Missouri lead ores. Research on cobalt processing from these two sources needs to be completed.

  10. Supported, Alkali-Promoted Cobalt Oxide Catalysts for NOx Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Morris D. Argyle

    2005-12-31

    A series of cobalt oxide catalysts supported on alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized with varying contents of cobalt and of added alkali metals, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. Unsupported cobalt oxide catalysts and several cobalt oxide catalysts supported ceria (CeO{sub 2}) with varying contents of cobalt with added potassium were also prepared. The catalysts were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and were examined for NO{sub x} decomposition activity. The CoO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and particularly the CoO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts show N{sub 2}O decomposition activity, but none of the catalysts (unsupported Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} or those supported on ceria or alumina) displayed significant, sustained NO decomposition activity. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts, N{sub 2}O decomposition activity was observed over a range of reaction temperatures beginning about 723 K, but significant (>50%) conversions of N{sub 2}O were observed only for reaction temperatures >900 K, which are too high for practical commercial use. However, the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts display N{sub 2}O decomposition rates similar to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts at much lower reaction temperatures, with activity beginning at {approx}573 K. Conversions of >90% were achieved at 773 K for the best catalysts. Catalytic rates per cobalt atom increased with decreasing cobalt content, which corresponds to increasing edge energies obtained from the UV-visible spectra. The decrease in edge energies suggests that the size and dimensionality of the cobalt oxide surface domains increase with increasing cobalt oxide content. The rate data normalized per mass of catalyst that shows the activity of the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts increases with increasing cobalt oxide content. The combination of these data suggest that supported cobalt oxide species similar to bulk Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are inherently more active than

  11. Boryl-mediated reversible H2 activation at cobalt: catalytic hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, and transfer hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Pin; Peters, Jonas C

    2013-10-16

    We describe the synthesis of a cobalt(I)-N2 complex (2) supported by a meridional bis-phosphino-boryl (PBP) ligand. Complex 2 undergoes a clean reaction with 2 equiv of dihydrogen to afford a dihydridoboratocobalt dihydride (3). The ability of boron to switch between a boryl and a dihydridoborate conformation makes possible the reversible conversion of 2 and 3. Complex 3 reacts with HMe2N-BH3 to give a hydridoborane cobalt tetrahydridoborate complex. We explore this boryl-cobalt system in the context of catalytic olefin hydrogenation as well as amine-borane dehydrogenation/transfer hydrogenation. PMID:24079337

  12. Structure and Morphology Study of Cobalt Oxide Doped Silica Nanocomposite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drasovean, Romana; Monteiro, Regina; Cherif, Mourad

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt oxide doped silica films were synthesized by a dip-coating technique. Initial compounds were cobalt acetate Co(CH3COO)2ṡ4H2O and tetraethoxysilane Si(OC2H5)4. The chemical composition was studied by X-ray diffraction and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The morphology analyses were carried out by means of atomic force microscopy. The average diameter of cobalt oxide dispersed particles increases with the molar ratio Co:Si and with the aging time of the initial colloidal solution.

  13. Investigation of Megavoltage Digital Tomosynthesis using a Cobalt-60 Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Amy

    The ability for megavoltage computed tomography patient setup verification using a cobalt-60 (Co-60) gamma ray source has been established in the context of cobalt tomotherapy. However, it would be beneficial to establish improved cobalt imaging that could be used on more conventional units. In terms of safety and efficiency, this imaging technique would provide the patient with less exposure to radiation. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is an imaging modality that may provide improved depth localization and in-plane visibility compared to conventional portal imaging in modern Co-60 radiation therapy. DT is a practical and efficient method of achieving depth localization from a limited gantry rotation and a limited number of projections. In DT, each plane of the imaging volume can be brought into focus by relatively displacing the composite images and superimposing the shifted dataset according to the acquisition geometry. Digital flat-panel technology has replaced the need for multiple film exposures and therefore the speed of imaging and capabilities for image processing has put DT in the forefront of both clinical and industrial imaging applications. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate the performance of an experimental system for megavoltage digital tomosynthesis ( MVDT) imaging using a Co-60 gamma ray source. Linear and isocentric acquisition geometries are implemented using tomographic angles of 20--60° and 10--60 projections. Reconstruction algorithms are designed for both acquisition geometries. Using the backprojection approach, the data are shifted and added to reconstruct focal planes of interest. Depth localization and its dependence on tomographic angle and projection density are visualized with an anthropomorphic head phantom. High contrast resolution at localized depths is quantified using the modulation transfer function approach. Results show that focal-plane visibility is improved for larger tomographic angles and that focal

  14. Cobalt, manganese, and iron near the Hawaiian Islands: A potential concentrating mechanism for cobalt within a cyclonic eddy and implications for the hybrid-type trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Abigail E.; Saito, Mak A.; Maiti, Kanchan; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2008-05-01

    The vertical distributions of cobalt, iron, and manganese in the water column were studied during the E-Flux Program (E-Flux II and III), which focused on the biogeochemistry of cold-core cyclonic eddies that form in the lee of the Hawaiian Islands. During E-Flux II (January 2005) and E-Flux III (March 2005), 17 stations were sampled for cobalt ( n=147), all of which demonstrated nutrient-like depletion in surface waters. During E-Flux III, two depth profiles collected from within a mesoscale cold-core eddy, Cyclone Opal, revealed small distinct maxima in cobalt at ˜100 m depth and a larger inventory of cobalt within the eddy. We hypothesize that this was due to a cobalt concentrating effect within the eddy, where upwelled cobalt was subsequently associated with sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) via biological activity and was released at a depth coincident with nearly complete POC remineralization [Benitez-Nelson, C., Bidigare, R.R., Dickey, T.D., Landry, M.R., Leonard, C.L., Brown, S.L., Nencioli, F., Rii, Y.M., Maiti, K., Becker, J.W., Bibby, T.S., Black, W., Cai, W.J., Carlson, C.A., Chen, F., Kuwahara, V.S., Mahaffey, C., McAndrew, P.M., Quay, P.D., Rappe, M.S., Selph, K.E., Simmons, M.P., Yang, E.J., 2007. Mesoscale eddies drive increased silica export in the subtropical Pacific Ocean. Science 316, 1017-1020]. There is also evidence for the formation of a correlation between cobalt and soluble reactive phosphorus during E-Flux III relative to the E-Flux II cruise that we suggest is due to increased productivity, implying a minimum threshold of primary production below which cobalt-phosphate coupling does not occur. Dissolved iron was measured in E-Flux II and found in somewhat elevated concentrations (˜0.5 nM) in surface waters relative to the iron depleted waters of the surrounding Pacific [Fitzwater, S.E., Coale, K.H., Gordon, M.R., Johnson, K.S., Ondrusek, M.E., 1996. Iron deficiency and phytoplankton growth in the equatorial Pacific. Deep

  15. Absolute oscillator strengths for lines of neutral cobalt between 2276 A and 9357 A and a redetermination of the solar cobalt abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Scalo, J. M.; Testerman, L.; Whaling, W.

    1982-09-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths of neutral cobalt have been determined from hook measurements for 159 transitions and emission intensity measurements for 314 transitions between 2276 Å and 9357 Å. Ninety-five of these transitions were subjected to the procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling which fits combined absorption and emission data to a set of consistent, optimum, relative oscillator strengths and upper level lifetimes. These relative values were normalized to the radiative lifetimes of Figger et al. and of Marek and Vogt obtained by pulsed laser fluorescence. Absolute oscillator strengths for 362 transitions and 36 lifetimes were determined. Typical uncertainties in the reported absolute oscillator strengths are ±15-25% (2/3 confidence level). Equivalent widths were obtained for nineteen solar cobalt lines with the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These widths were used to redetermine the solar cobalt abundance, assuming the photospheric model of Holweger and a microturbulence velocity of 1.0 km s-1. The adopted solar cobalt abundance is the mean value log Co/NH> + 12 = 4.92 ± 0.08 (±19%), from the 19 cobalt transitions. This value is in excellent agreement with the solar values of Ross and Aller, of Biemont, and of Holweger and that of Cameron for carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Absolute oscillator strengths for lines of neutral cobalt between 2276 A and 9357 A and a redetermination of the solar cobalt abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, B.L.; Smith, P.L.; Scalo, J.M.; Testerman, L.; Whaling, W.

    1982-09-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths of neutral cobalt have been determined from hook measurements for 159 transitions and emission intensity measurements for 314 transitions between 2276 A and 9357 A. Ninety-five of these transitions were subjected to the procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling which fits combined absorption and emission data to a set of consistent, optimum, relative oscillator strengths and upper level lifetimes. These relative values were normalized to the radiative lifetimes of Figger et al. and of Marek and Vogt obtained by pulsed laser fluorescence. Absolute oscillator strengths for 362 transitions and 36 lifetimes were determined. Typical uncertainties in the reported absolute oscillator strengths are +- 15-25% (2/3 confidence level). Equivalent widths were obtained for nineteen solar cobalt lines with the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These widths were used to redetermine the solar cobalt abundance, assuming the photospheric model of Holweger and a microturbulence velocity of 1.0 km s/sup -1/. The adopted solar cobalt abundance is the mean value log +12 = 4.92 +- 0.08 ( +- 19%), from the 19 cobalt transitions. This value is in excellent agreement with the solar values of Ross and Aller, of Biemont, and of Holweger and that of Cameron for carbonaceous chondrites.

  17. Vitamin C interaction with cobalt-ammine cations. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of cobalt-pentammine and cobalt-tetrammine sugar complexes containing L-ascorbate anion.

    PubMed

    Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    1986-11-01

    Interaction between [Co(NH3)5Cl]Cl2, [Co(NH3)4Cl2]Cl and L-ascorbic acid has been investigated in aqueous solution and solid complexes of the type [Co(NH3)5 ascorbate]Cl2 X H2O and [Co(NH3)4 ascorbate]Cl2 X H2O have been isolated and characterized by 13C-NMR, FT-IR and electron absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic and other evidence suggested that the sugar anion binds monodentately in the [Co(NH3)5 ascorbate]2+ cation via the ionized O3 oxygen atom and bidentately in [Co(NH3)4 ascorbate]2+ through the O1 and O4 oxygen atoms, resulting in a six-coordinate geometry around the Co(III) ion. The intermolecular sugar hydrogen-bonding network is perturbed upon sugar metalation and the sugar moiety shows a similar conformation to that of the sodium ascorbate compound in these series of cobalt-ammine complexes. PMID:3814746

  18. Cobalt doped lanthanum chromite material suitable for high temperature use

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.

    1986-12-23

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, subject to thermal cycling temperatures of between about 25 C and about 1,200 C, capable of electronic interconnection to at least one other electrochemical cell and capable of operating in an environment containing oxygen and a fuel, is made; where the cell has a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where an improved interconnect material is applied along a portion of a supporting electrode; where the interconnect is made of a chemically modified lanthanum chromite, containing cobalt as the important additive, which interconnect allows for adjustment of the thermal expansion of the interconnect material to more nearly match that of other cell components, such as zirconia electrolyte, and is stable in oxygen containing atmospheres such as air and in fuel environments. 2 figs.

  19. Cobalt doped lanthanum chromite material suitable for high temperature use

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, subject to thermal cycling temperatures of between about 25.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C., capable of electronic interconnection to at least one other electrochemical cell and capable of operating in an environment containing oxygen and a fuel, is made; where the cell has a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where an improved interconnect material is applied along a portion of a supporting electrode; where the interconnect is made of a chemically modified lanthanum chromite, containing cobalt as the important additive, which interconnect allows for adjustment of the thermal expansion of the interconnect material to more nearly match that of other cell components, such as zirconia electrolyte, and is stable in oxygen containing atmospheres such as air and in fuel environments.

  20. Characterization of cobalt-dipped nickel electrodes with fibrex substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngman, Carolyn A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Nickel electrodes using fibrous substrates have poorer initial utilization of the active material than those using conventional nickel sinter substrates. Previous investigators had shown that utilization can be dramatically improved by dipping these electrodes in a cobalt solution immediately after the electrochemical impregnation, before formation and cycling is carried out. The present study looked at the gas evolution behavior of dipped and undipped electrodes, impedance curves, and the charge-discharge curves to try to understand the reasons for the improvement in utilization. Impedance measurements under open circuit conditions indicate that some of the improvement is due to a reduction in the ohmic resistance of the surface layer of the particles, in agreement with earlier work. The charge-discharge curves suggest that there may also be an additional increase in the ohmic resistance of the surface layer of the undipped electrode during charging.

  1. Electrodeposited cobalt sulfide hole collecting layer for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zampetti, Andrea; De Rossi, Francesca; Brunetti, Francesca; Reale, Andrea; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2014-08-11

    In polymer solar cells based on the blend of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, the hole collecting layer has to be endowed with its ionization potential close to or greater than that of P3HT (∼5 eV). Conductive polymer blends such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and metal oxides such as vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) satisfy this requirement and have been the most common materials used so far in bulk heterojunction structures. We report here cobalt sulfide (CoS) to be a promising hole collecting material deposited by convenient and room temperature electrodeposition. By simply tuning the CoS electrodeposition parameters, power conversion efficiencies similar (within 15%) to a reference structure with PEDOT:PSS were obtained.

  2. Direct evidence for charge stripes in a layered cobalt oxide.

    PubMed

    Babkevich, P; Freeman, P G; Enderle, M; Prabhakaran, D; Boothroyd, A T

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that static stripe-like charge order is generic to the hole-doped copper oxide superconductors and competes with superconductivity. Here we show that a similar type of charge order is present in La5/3Sr1/3CoO4, an insulating analogue of the copper oxide superconductors containing cobalt in place of copper. The stripe phase we have detected is accompanied by short-range, quasi-one-dimensional, antiferromagnetic order, and provides a natural explanation for the distinctive hourglass shape of the magnetic spectrum previously observed in neutron-scattering measurements of La2-xSrxCoO4 and many hole-doped copper oxide superconductors. The results establish a solid empirical basis for theories of the hourglass spectrum built on short-range, quasi-static, stripe correlations. PMID:27212023

  3. Photorefractive properties of cobalt-doped strontium barium niobate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogodaev, N V; Ivleva, Lyudmila I; Lykov, P A; Polozkov, N M; Osiko, Vyacheslav V

    1999-05-31

    The two-wave interaction (at {lambda} = 488 nm) in strontium barium niobate crystals doped with cobalt ions (Co:SBN) was studied. The experimental dependences of the gain coefficient on the grating period and of the grating response time on the writing beam intensity were used to calculate the Debye screening length, the diffusion length, the dark conductivity, and the effective concentration of carrier traps for a series of Co:SBN crystals with different dopant concentrations. The crystals were shown to have high coupling coefficients ({Gamma} = 33 cm{sup -1}) and short optical response times ({tau} = 140 ms for I = 1 W cm{sup -2} ). This, in combination with a high photorefractive sensitivity (S = 39 cm{sup 2} J{sup -1} ), determines the efficiency of their use in the storage of optical information and in laser phase conjugation. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Magnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanocrystals For an Energy Storage Concentration Cell.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Donatelli, Greg; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-22

    Energy-storage concentration cells are based on the concentration gradient of redox-active reactants; the increased entropy is transformed into electric energy as the concentration gradient reaches equilibrium between two half cells. A recyclable and flow-controlled magnetic electrolyte concentration cell is now presented. The hybrid inorganic-organic nanocrystal-based electrolyte, consisting of molecular redox-active ligands adsorbed on the surface of magnetic nanocrystals, leads to a magnetic-field-driven concentration gradient of redox molecules. The energy storage performance of concentration cells is dictated by magnetic characteristics of cobalt ferrite nanocrystal carriers. The enhanced conductivity and kinetics of redox-active electrolytes could further induce a sharp concentration gradient to improve the energy density and voltage switching of magnetic electrolyte concentration cells. PMID:27440206

  5. Magnetic properties engineering of nanopatterned cobalt antidot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaidatzis, Andreas; del Real, Rafael P.; Alvaro, Raquel; Palma, Juan Luis; Anguita, José; Niarchos, Dimitrios; Vázquez, Manuel; Escrig, Juan; García-Martín, José Miguel

    2016-05-01

    We report on the study of arrays of 60 nm wide cobalt antidots, nanopatterned using focused ion beam milling. Square and hexagonal symmetry arrays have been studied, with varying antidot densities and lattice constant from 150 up to 300 nm. We find a strong increase of the arrays’ magnetic coercivity with respect to the unpatterned film, which is monotonic as the antidot density increases. Additionally, there is a strong influence of the array symmetry to the in-plane magnetic anisotropy: square arrays exhibit fourfold symmetry and hexagonal arrays exhibit sixfold symmetry. The above findings are corroborated by magnetic imaging and micromagnetic modeling, which show the magnetic structure of the arrays to depend strongly on the array morphology.

  6. Single-electron tunneling at room temperature in cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, H.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    2002-02-01

    We report on the observation of the Coulomb blockade with Coulomb staircases at room temperature in cobalt nanoparticles, with sizes ranging between 1 and 4 nm. A monolayer of these particles is supported by a thin 1-2 nm thick Al2O3 film, deposited on a smooth Au(111) surface. The local electrical transport on isolated Co clusters was investigated with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tunnel contact of the STM tip allowed us to observe single-electron tunneling in the double barrier system STM-tip/Co/Al2O3/Au. Very high values of the Coulomb blockade of up to 1.0 V were reproducibly measured at room temperature on different particles with this setup. The current-voltage characteristics fit well by simulations based on the orthodox theory of single-electron tunneling.

  7. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M.

    2015-10-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts.

  8. Magnetic relaxation of diluted and self-assembled cobalt nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Wen, G. H.; Xiao, Gang; Sun, Shouheng

    2003-04-01

    We have studied the magnetic relaxation of monodispersed 4 nm cubic ɛ-cobalt nanocrystals in both randomly oriented and pre-aligned assemblies. The blocking temperature TB, for the closely packed Co nanocrystal assemblies, is 30% higher than that of the highly diluted and well-dispersed Co nanocrystal-organic composites. This increase is attributed to the strong magnetic dipole interaction induced from the close packing of the nanocrystals. It is found that the frequency-dependent susceptibility data, obtained from the diluted samples, can be fitted to the half-circle Argand Diagrams, indicating a single barrier (or very narrow energy distribution) of the nanocrystals. This agrees well with the physical observation from TEM that the nanocrystals are monodispersed. The long time magnetic relaxation measurements reveal that energy barrier distribution in a pre-aligned nanocrystal assembly is significantly different from that in a randomly oriented one.

  9. Direct evidence for charge stripes in a layered cobalt oxide

    PubMed Central

    Babkevich, P.; Freeman, P. G.; Enderle, M.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that static stripe-like charge order is generic to the hole-doped copper oxide superconductors and competes with superconductivity. Here we show that a similar type of charge order is present in La5/3Sr1/3CoO4, an insulating analogue of the copper oxide superconductors containing cobalt in place of copper. The stripe phase we have detected is accompanied by short-range, quasi-one-dimensional, antiferromagnetic order, and provides a natural explanation for the distinctive hourglass shape of the magnetic spectrum previously observed in neutron-scattering measurements of La2−xSrxCoO4 and many hole-doped copper oxide superconductors. The results establish a solid empirical basis for theories of the hourglass spectrum built on short-range, quasi-static, stripe correlations. PMID:27212023

  10. Electrodeposited cobalt sulfide hole collecting layer for polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetti, Andrea; De Rossi, Francesca; Brunetti, Francesca; Reale, Andrea; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2014-08-01

    In polymer solar cells based on the blend of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, the hole collecting layer has to be endowed with its ionization potential close to or greater than that of P3HT (˜5 eV). Conductive polymer blends such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and metal oxides such as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) satisfy this requirement and have been the most common materials used so far in bulk heterojunction structures. We report here cobalt sulfide (CoS) to be a promising hole collecting material deposited by convenient and room temperature electrodeposition. By simply tuning the CoS electrodeposition parameters, power conversion efficiencies similar (within 15%) to a reference structure with PEDOT:PSS were obtained.

  11. Cobalt iontophoresis of sensory nerves in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    El-Bermani, A W; Chang, T L

    1979-02-01

    By iontophoretically introducing, first, cobalt and, subsequently, sulfide ions into the vagus nerve, it is possible to trace sensory nerves to their endings in the rat lung. Nerve fibers and terminals are found predominantly in the adventitia of the airways and blood vessels. Some nerves are found in the submucosa of the bronchi and bronchioles. Some are found in the cardiac muscle on the periphery of pulmonary veins, and a few nerves are seen to end among smooth muslces of the blood vessels and the airways. At least three types of nerve endings can be identified at the light microscopic level: (1) free nerve endings; (2) brush-like endings; (3) knob-like terminals. PMID:760496

  12. An evaluated neutronic data file for elemental cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, P.; Lawson, R.; Meadows, J.; Sugimoto, M.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Howerton, R.

    1988-08-01

    A comprehensive evaluated neutronic data file for elemental cobalt is described. The experimental data base, the calculational methods, the evaluation techniques and judgments, and the physical content are outlined. The file contains: neutron total and scattering cross sections and associated properties, (n,2n) and (n,3n) processes, neutron radiative capture processes, charged-particle-emission processes, and photon-production processes. The file extends from 10/sup /minus/5/ eV to 20 MeV, and is presented in the ENDF/B-VI format. Detailed attention is given to the uncertainties and correlations associated with the prominent neutron-induced processes. The numerical contents of the file have been transmitted to the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. 143 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Periodic magnetic domains in single-crystalline cobalt filament arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Wang, Fan; Jia, Fei; Li, Jingning; Liu, Kai; Huang, Sunxiang; Luan, Zhongzhi; Wu, Di; Chen, Yanbin; Zhu, Jianmin; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic structures with controlled domain wall pattern may be applied as potential building blocks for three-dimensional magnetic memory and logic devices. Using a unique electrochemical self-assembly method, we achieve regular single-crystalline cobalt filament arrays with specific geometric profile and crystallographic orientation, and the magnetic domain configuration can be conveniently tailored. We report the transition of periodic antiparallel magnetic domains to compressed vortex magnetic domains depending on the ratio of height to width of the wires. A "phase diagram" is obtained to describe the dependence of the type of magnetic domain and the geometrical profiles of the wires. Magnetoresistance of the filaments demonstrates that the contribution of a series of 180∘ domain walls is over 0.15 % of the zero-field resistance ρ (H =0 ) . These self-assembled magnetic nanofilaments, with controlled periodic domain patterns, offer an interesting platform to explore domain-wall-based memory and logic devices.

  14. Reflection of cold atoms by a cobalt single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbusch, P.; Retter, J. A.; Hall, B. V.; Hinds, E. A.; Lison, F.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    2000-05-01

    We have demonstrated that a cobalt single crystal can be used to make a remarkably smooth retro-reflector for cold paramagnetic atoms. The crystal is cut so that its surface lies in the (0001) plane and the atoms are reflected by the magnetic field above the surface due to the self-organized pattern of magnetic domains in the material. We find that the reflectivity for suitably polarized atoms exceeds 90% and may well be unity. We use the angular spread of a reflected atom cloud to measure the roughness of the mirror. We find that the angular variation of the equivalent hard reflecting surface is (3.1±0.3°)rms for atoms dropped onto the mirror from a height of 2 cm.

  15. Controlled crystalline structure and surface stability of cobalt nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuping; Beerman, Michael; Pakhomov, Alexandre B; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2005-04-21

    The synthesis of monodispersed 10 nm cobalt nanocrystals with controlled crystal morphology and investigation of the surface stability of these nanocrystals are described. Depending on the surfactants used, single crystalline or multiple grain nanocrystals can be reproducibly produced. The relative surface stability of these nanocrystals is analyzed using the temperature dependences of the dc magnetic susceptibility. The novel method, which allows sensitive monitoring of the surface stability, is based on the observation that, with particle oxidation, an anomalous peak appears at 8 K in zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. It is found that the surfactant protective layer is more important for long-term stability at room temperature, while the high-temperature oxidation rate is controlled by the crystal morphology of the nanoparticles. PMID:16851825

  16. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L.G.; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts. PMID:26487368

  17. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L G; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts. PMID:26487368

  18. Large-scale synthesis and photoluminescence of cobalt tungstate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cuiling; Guo, Donglin; Hu, Chenguo; Chen, Yanxue; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Hulin; Wang, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Single-crystalline wolframite-type monoclinic structure cobalt tungstate (CoWO4) nanowires were obtained by a solvothermal method at 180 °C for 24 h with a width of 20 nm and length of 200 to 400 nm. Besides the strong blue-green light emission at 10-250 K, we found much stronger and broader near-infrared emission ranging from 700-1000 nm at about 300 K under the excitation wavelength of 325 nm. The emission and the dependence of emission intensity on temperature are discussed by introducing the effect of Co vacancies. This near-infrared emission material might have potential applications in infrared detection or stealth technology.

  19. Magnetic and ultrasonic studies on stable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Nabeel Rashin, M; Hemalatha, J

    2014-03-01

    Stable cobalt ferrite nanofluids of various concentrations have been prepared through co-precipitation method. Structural and morphological studies of nanoparticles are made with the help of X-ray diffraction technique and Transmission Electron Microscope respectively and it is found that the particles exhibit face centered cubic structure with an average size of 14 nm. The magnetic properties of the nanofluids have been analyzed at room temperature which revealed ferromagnetic behavior and also the very low value of coupling constant which ensures the negligible interparticle interaction in the absence of magnetic field. Ultrasonic investigations have been made for the nanofluids at different temperatures and magnetic fields. The temperature effects are explained with the help of open and close-packed water structure. The inter particle interactions of surface modified CoFe2O4 particles and the cluster formation at higher concentrations are realized through the variations in ultrasonic parameters. PMID:24188514

  20. Aqua­bromidobis(dimethyl­glyoximato)cobalt(III)

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Parthasarathy; Amutha Selvi, Madhavan; Jothi, Pachaimuthu; Dayalan, Arunachalam

    2011-01-01

    In the title complex, [CoBr(C4H7N2O2)2(H2O)], a crystallo­graphic mirror plane bis­ects the mol­ecule, perpendicular to the glyoximate ligands. The geometry around the cobalt(III) atom is approximately octa­hedral with the four glyoximate N atoms forming the square base. A bromide ion and the O atom of a water mol­ecule occupy the remaining coordination sites. The N—Co—N bite angles are 82.18 (4) and 80.03 (16)°. The glyoximate moieties form strong intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The coordinated water mol­ecule forms an inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond with a glyoximate O atom, thereby generating supra­molecular chains parallel to [010]. PMID:21753964

  1. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by Cobalt Oxido Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Bediako, D Kwabena; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G

    2016-01-01

    The contemporary demand to generate fuels from solar energy has stimulated intense effort to develop water splitting catalysts that can be coupled to light-absorbing materials. Cobalt oxido catalyst (Co-OECs) films deposited from buffered Co(II) solutions have emerged as arguably the most studied class of heterogeneous oxygen evolution catalysts. The interest in these materials stems from their formation by self-assembly, their self-healing properties, and their promising catalytic activity under a variety of conditions. The structure and function of these catalysts are reviewed here together with studies of molecular Co-O cluster compounds, which have proven invaluable in elucidating the chemistry of the Co-OECs. PMID:26245626

  2. Total body irradiation with a sweeping {sup 60}Cobalt beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, S.; El-Khatib, E.

    1995-09-30

    This article describes the physical, technical, and dosimetric aspects of total body irradiation (TBI). The continuous head swivel motion of a standard {sup 60}Cobalt unit has been used to obtain a sweeping beam that encompases the entire length of the patient in TBI. A perspex beam flattener designed to remove the inverse square fall-off in beam intensity along the sweep axis provides a 90% field length of 200 cm in air at a treatment source-to-skin distance of 160 cm. The anterior-posterior parallel pair setup permits accurate placement of customized lead compensators to limit the dose to lungs. Measured beam profiles, dose buildup curves, and percentage depth dose for the technique are presented. With compensators in place, the variation in lung dose is shown to be within {plus_minus}5% of the prescribed tumor dose. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Direct evidence for charge stripes in a layered cobalt oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkevich, P.; Freeman, P. G.; Enderle, M.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2016-05-01

    Recent experiments indicate that static stripe-like charge order is generic to the hole-doped copper oxide superconductors and competes with superconductivity. Here we show that a similar type of charge order is present in La5/3Sr1/3CoO4, an insulating analogue of the copper oxide superconductors containing cobalt in place of copper. The stripe phase we have detected is accompanied by short-range, quasi-one-dimensional, antiferromagnetic order, and provides a natural explanation for the distinctive hourglass shape of the magnetic spectrum previously observed in neutron-scattering measurements of La2-xSrxCoO4 and many hole-doped copper oxide superconductors. The results establish a solid empirical basis for theories of the hourglass spectrum built on short-range, quasi-static, stripe correlations.

  4. Itinerant Magnetism in Yttrium COBALT(2) and Related Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Donald William

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the pseudo-binary systems Y(Co,Al) _2, Y(Co,Si)_2, Y_{.7}Sc_ {.3}(Co,Al)_2, and Sc(Co,Si)_2. Measurements were made of magnetic susceptibility from 2 to 400K, resistivity from 1.5 to 300K, specific heat from 1.5 to 25K, and lattice constant at room temperature. In addition, some of the same measurements were made for (Y,Sc)Co_2 , Zr(Co,Al)_2 and Zr(Co,Si) _2. YCo_2 is a strongly paramagnetic system with a broad maximum in magnetic susceptibility versus temperature. A functional form for this maximum has been derived by proponents of fermi liquid theory. YCo _2 (and some related systems described in this work) can be driven to weak itinerant ferromagnetism by partial substitution of aluminum for cobalt. This can be explained qualitatively by either rigid band depletion or lattice expansion, either of which should increase the density of states at the fermi level. In this study we found that lattice expansion driven from the cobalt site was necessary for the appearance of ferromagnetism. Depletion of the d-electron band shifted the magnetic susceptibility maximum to lower temperatures without causing ferromagnetism; thus a rigid band model would appear inappropriate for ferromagnetism in these systems. The behavior of susceptibility in this study (as a function of impurity concentration) may represent an example of a modification of fermi liquid theory proposed in 1968, and correlates with the impurity behavior observed for the resistivity and specific heat. In addition, the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of YCo_2 was found to have a strong field dependence at low magnetic fields. It is shown that this dependence may be explained by the presence of a ferromagnetic impurity with a high ordering temperature.

  5. Cobalt excretion test for the assessment of body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, J; Olatunbosun, D; Corbett, W E; Valberg, L S

    1971-05-01

    Iron absorption is under delicate control and the level of absorption is adjusted to comply with the body's need for iron. To measure the intestinal setting for iron absorption, and thereby indirectly assess body iron requirements, cobaltous chloride labelled with (57)Co or (60)Co was given by mouth and the percentage of the test dose excreted in the urine in 24 hours was measured in a gamma counter. Seventeen control subjects with normal iron stores excreted 18% (9-23%) of the dose. Increased excretion, 31% (23-42%), was found in 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia and in 15 patients with depleted iron stores in the absence of anemia. In contrast, 12 patients with anemia due to causes other than iron deficiency excreted amounts of radiocobalt within the normal control range. In patients with iron deficiency, replenishment of iron stores by either oral or parenteral iron caused the previously high results to return to normal.Excretion of the test dose was normal in portal cirrhosis with normal iron stores but it was markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis complicated by either iron deficiency or endogenous iron overload. It was also raised in primary hemochromatosis. Excretion of the dose was reduced in gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Gastrointestinal surgery and inflammatory disease of the lower small intestine had no effect on the results except that some patients with steatorrhea had diminished excretion.The cobalt excretion test provides the clinician with a tool for the assessment of iron absorption, the detection of a reduction in body iron stores below the level that is normal for the subject in question, the differentiation of iron deficiency anemia from anemia due to other causes, and the investigation of patients with iron-loading disorders. PMID:5578125

  6. Physical and electrochemical study of cobalt oxide nano- and microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Alburquenque, D.; Vargas, E.; Denardin, J.C.; Escrig, J.; Marco, J.F.; Gautier, J.L.

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt oxide nanocrystals of size 17–21 nm were synthesized by a simple reaction between cobalt acetate (II) and dodecylamine. On the other hand, micrometric Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was prepared using the ceramic method. The structural examination of these materials was performed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). XRD studies showed that the oxides were pure, well-crystallized, spinel cubic phases with a-cell parameter of 0.8049 nm and 0.8069 nm for the nano and micro-oxide, respectively. The average particle size was 19 nm (nano-oxide) and 1250 μm (micro-oxide). Morphological studies carried out by SEM and TEM analyses have shown the presence of octahedral particles in both cases. Bulk and surface properties investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), point zero charge (pzc), FTIR and cyclic voltammetry indicated that there were no significant differences in the composition on both materials. The magnetic behavior of the samples was determined using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compounds showed paramagnetic character and no coercivity and remanence in all cases. Galvanostatic measurements of electrodes formed with nanocrystals showed better performance than those built with micrometric particles. - Highlights: • Spinel Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and microparticles with same structure but with different cell parameters, particle size and surface area were synthesized. • Oxide nanoparticles showed better electrochemical behavior than micrometric ones due to area effect.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Use of a Cobalt(II) Complex as an NMR Shift Reagent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Harold M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures for preparing acetylacetonate complex of cobalt(II), followed by spectrophotometric analysis to characterize the material, with additional characterization methods supplied by students to provide open-ended dimension for the experiment. (SK)

  8. Fischer-Tropsch activity for non-promoted cobalt-on-alumina catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    Cobalt catalysts, and processes employing these inventive catalysts, for hydrocarbon synthesis. The inventive catalyst comprises cobalt on an alumina support and is not promoted with any noble or near noble metals. In one aspect of the invention, the alumina support preferably includes a dopant in an amount effective for increasing the activity of the inventive catalyst. The dopant is preferably a titanium dopant. In another aspect of the invention, the cobalt catalyst is preferably reduced in the presence of hydrogen at a water vapor partial pressure effective to increase the activity of the cobalt catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis. The water vapor partial pressure is preferably in the range of from 0 to about 0.1 atmospheres.

  9. Structure of catabolite activator protein with cobalt(II) and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramya R.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2014-04-15

    The crystal structure of E. coli catabolite activator protein with bound cobalt(II) and sulfate ions at 1.97 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure of cyclic AMP–catabolite activator protein (CAP) from Escherichia coli containing cobalt(II) chloride and ammonium sulfate is reported at 1.97 Å resolution. Each of the two CAP subunits in the asymmetric unit binds one cobalt(II) ion, in each case coordinated by N-terminal domain residues His19, His21 and Glu96 plus an additional acidic residue contributed via a crystal contact. The three identified N-terminal domain cobalt-binding residues are part of a region of CAP that is important for transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters. Sulfate anions mediate additional crystal lattice contacts and occupy sites corresponding to DNA backbone phosphate positions in CAP–DNA complex structures.

  10. An investigation of fluidized bed electrowinning of cobalt using 50 and 1000 Amp cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, M.; Evans, J. W.

    1982-09-01

    50 Amp and 1000 Amp cells equipped with fluidized bed cathodes were used to investigate the electrowinning of cobalt from sulfate solutions. The catholytes employed ranged in cobalt concentration from 100 to 4.8 grams per liter of cobalt and from acid (pH ≃1) to near neutral (pH ≃6). Superficial current densities up to 1.09 A cm-2 were used. The cells were equipped with a nearly impermeable diaphragm, permitting the use of an anolyte of composition different from that of the catholyte. The current efficiency for cobalt deposition (as conveniently determined by measuring the rate of hydrogen evolution), electrical energy consumption, and appearance of the deposit were studied as a function of catholyte composition. Reasonable current efficiencies were observed. The electrical energy consumptions were much higher than that of conventional electrowinning, but this was shown to be due to the anode chamber and diaphragm resistance losses rather than the fluidized cathode.

  11. Biological and protein-binding studies of newly synthesized polymer-cobalt(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, G; Pradeep, I; Arunachalam, S; Vignesh, S; Arthur James, R; Arun, R; Premkumar, K

    2016-03-01

    The polymer-cobalt(III) complexes, [Co(bpy)(dien)BPEI]Cl3 · 4H2O (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, dien = diethylentriamine, BPEI = branched polyethyleneimine) were synthesized and characterized. The interaction of these complexes with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated under physiological conditions using various physico-chemical techniques. The results reveal that the fluorescence quenching of serum albumins by polymer-cobalt(III) complexes took place through static quenching. The binding of these complexes changed the molecular conformation of the protein considerably. The polymer-cobalt(III) complex with x = 0.365 shows antimicrobial activity against several human pathogens. This complex also induces cytotoxicity against MCF-7 through apoptotic induction. However, further studies are needed to decipher the molecular mode of action of polymer-cobalt(III) complex and for its possible utilization in anticancer therapy. PMID:26278128

  12. Impedance spectroscopy studies in cobalt ferrite-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, Sweety; Kumar, Sunil; Kar, Manoranjan

    2016-05-01

    (1-x)Cobalt ferrite-(x)reduced graphene oxidenanocomposites with x=0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 were prepared by the ultrasonic method. The crystal symmetry modification due to reduced graphene oxide and cobalt ferrite interaction has been studied by employing the X-ray diffraction technique. Morphology of the samples was studied by the Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Study on electrical properties of the cobalt ferrite-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites explores the possible application of these composites as anode material. Impedance decreases with an increase in frequency as well as temperature, which supports an increase in ac electrical conductivity. The modified Debye relaxation model can explain the behavior of impedance in cobalt ferrite-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites.

  13. Cobalt-catalysed site-selective intra- and intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuesong; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Hao; Li, Guigen; Ge, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-catalysed sp2 C–H bond functionalization has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of the low cost of cobalt complexes and interesting modes of action in the process. In comparison, much less efforts have been devoted to the sp3 carbons. Here we report the cobalt-catalysed site-selective dehydrogenative cyclization of aliphatic amides via a C–H bond functionalization process on unactivated sp3 carbons with the assistance of a bidentate directing group. This method provides a straightforward synthesis of monocyclic and spiro β- or γ-lactams with good to excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. In addition, a new procedure has been developed to selectively remove the directing group, which enables the synthesis of free β- or γ-lactam compounds. Furthermore, the first cobalt-catalysed intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons is also realized. PMID:25753366

  14. Influence of silicon on friction and wear of iron-cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear experiments were conducted with ternary ordered alloys of iron and cobalt containing various amounts of silicon to 5 weight percent. The friction and wear of these alloys were compared to those for binary iron-cobalt alloys in the ordered and disordered states and to those for the conventionally used bearing material, 440-C. Environments in which experiments were conducted included air, argon, and 0.25percent stearic acid in hexadecane. Results indicate that a ternary iron - cobalt - 5-percent-silicon alloy exhibits lower friction and wear than the simple binary iron-cobalt alloy. It exhibits lower wear than 440-C in all three environments. Friction was lower for the alloy in argon than in air. Auger analysis of the surface of the ternary alloy indicated segregation of silicon at the surface as a result of sliding.

  15. A Photoinduced Cobalt-Catalyzed Synthesis of Pyrroles through in Situ-Generated Acylazirines.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Stefan; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Opatz, Till

    2016-05-20

    Tetrasubstituted pyrroles can be synthesized in a one-pot procedure from isoxazoles. The process includes the photoinduced in situ formation of acylazirines combined with a subsequent cobalt(II)-catalyzed ring expansion with 1,3-diketones. PMID:27081704

  16. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles can enter inside the cells by crossing plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bossi, Elena; Zanella, Daniele; Gornati, Rosalba; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The ability of nanoparticles (NPs) to be promptly uptaken by the cells makes them both dangerous and useful to human health. It was recently postulated that some NPs might cross the plasma membrane also by a non-endocytotic pathway gaining access to the cytoplasm. To this aim, after having filled mature Xenopus oocytes with Calcein, whose fluorescence is strongly quenched by divalent metal ions, we have exposed them to different cobalt NPs quantifying quenching as evidence of the increase of the concentration of Co2+ released by the NPs that entered into the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that cobalt oxide NPs, but not cobalt nor cobalt oxide NPs that were surrounded by a protein corona, can indeed cross plasma membranes. PMID:26924527

  17. Theoretical studies of the structure and properties of cobalt-substituted aluminophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, N.J.; Hay, P.J.; Redondo, A.

    1998-12-31

    Quantum chemical and atomistic forcefield based methods have been used to investigate models for the substitution of cobalt into aluminophosphate molecular sieves. Atomistic methods based on the Mott-Littleton approach were used to develop approximate models for cobalt substituted at the aluminum site in the AlPO{sub 4}-5 structure and from these structures clusters were constructed for quantum chemical calculations. The effect of termination with both hydride and hydroxyl groups was assessed. Full and constrained geometry optimization were performed to obtain geometrical parameters for the models which were compared to experimental data. Further calculations were performed on adducts consisting of the cluster models and small molecules to determine whether direct binding to the cobalt center is possible. The calculations were used to determine the stability of models proposed in the literature. Cobalt-substituted aluminophosphates have been shown to be active catalysts in a number of reactions including the homogeneous oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone.

  18. Preparation and Properties of Monodisperse Magnetic Cobalt Colloids Grafted with Polyisobutene.

    PubMed

    Pathmamanoharan; Philipse

    1998-09-15

    A single-step method to synthesize monodisperse metallic cobalt particles of diameter around 8 nm is described. The particles are sterically stabilized by modified polyisobutene and form stable ferrofluids in toluene. The core-shell cobalt spheres have a narrow size distribution and are nonaggregated. Various techniques, such as infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analysis establishes the presence of grafted modified polyisobutene on the surface of cobalt particles. The hydrodynamic thickness of the grafted polyisobutene calculated from sedimentation and viscosity measurements and independently from the dynamic light scattering is ca. 10 nm. The dependence of magnetization has been measured for ferrofluid, showing superparamagnetic behavior above 247 K. Due to anisotropy, superposition of magnetic curves is not observed below this temperature. The concentration dependence of the sedimentation coefficient agrees qualitatively with the theory for dipolar spheres. SAXS data on concentrated ferrofluid dispersion indicate interpenetration of polyisobutene chains grafted to the cobalt particles. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9735197

  19. The surface sulfur doping induced enhanced performance of cobalt catalysts in oxygen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Zhu, Zhengju; Yin, Huajie; Su, Xintai; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Wang, Dan; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-08-01

    A novel surface sulfur (S) doped cobalt (Co) catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is theoretically designed through the optimisation of the electronic structure of highly reactive surface atoms which is also validated by electrocatalytic OER experiments. PMID:27377872

  20. An investigation of fluidized bed electrowinning of cobalt using 50 and 1000 Amp cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, M.; Evans, J. W.

    1991-12-01

    50 Amp and 1000 Amp cells equipped with fluidized bed cathodes were used to investigate the electrowinning of cobalt from sulfate solutions. The catholytes employed ranged in cobalt concentration from 100 to 4.8 grams per liter of cobalt and from acid (pH ≏1) to near neutral (pH-6). Superficial current densities up to 1.09 A cm-2 were used. The cells were equipped with a nearly impermeable diaphragm, permitting the use of an anolyte of composition different from that of the catholyte. The current efficiency for cobalt deposition (as conveniently determined by measuring the rate of hydrogen evolution), electrical energy consumption, and appearance of the deposit were studied as a function of catholyte composition. Reasonable current efficiencies were observed. The electrical energy consumptions were much higher than that of conventional electrowinning, but this was shown to be due to the anode chamber and diaphragm resistance losses rather than the fluidized cathode.

  1. Cleavage of the C-O-C bond on size-selected subnanometer cobalt catalysts and on ALD-cobalt coated nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, W.; Lee, S.; Libera, J. A.; Elam, J. W.; Vajda, S.; Marshall, C. L.; Yale Univ.

    2011-02-15

    The cleavage of the C-O-C bond was studied under oxidizing conditions on nanostructured membrane supported cobalt-based catalysts using a cellulose model surrogate, 1-methoxy-2-methyl-2-propanol. The cobalt catalysts were found to break the C-O-C bond, producing alcohols and/or ketones by further oxidation. The size-selected sub-nanometer size cobalt clusters exhibited a per metal activity of up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than the with atomic layer deposition uniformly coated membranes. The large difference in activity is attributed to the high fraction of the surface atoms of the subnanometer clusters. The positioning of the clusters at the entrance vs. exit of the catalytic membrane allows for a control of the contact time and consequently of the selectivity of the catalyst.

  2. Cleavage of the glycosidic C-O-C bond on size-selected subnanometer cobalt catalysts and on ALD-cobalt coated nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, W.; Lee, S.; Libera, J. A.; Elam, J. W.; Vajda, S.; Marshall, C. L.

    2011-02-15

    The cleavage of the C-O-C bond was studied under oxidizing conditions on nanostructured membrane supported cobalt-based catalysts using a cellulose model surrogate, 1-methoxy-2-methyl-2-propanol. The cobalt catalysts were found to break the C-O-C bond, producing alcohols and/or ketones by further oxidation. The size-selected sub-nanometer size cobalt clusters exhibited a per metal activity of up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than the with atomic layer deposition uniformly coated membranes. The large difference in activity is attributed to the high fraction of the surface atoms of the subnanometer clusters. The positioning of the clusters at the entrance vs. exit of the catalytic membrane allows for a control of the contact time and consequently of the selectivity of the catalyst.

  3. In situ fabrication and characterization of cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Min; Jiao, Qingze; Zhao, Yun

    2013-12-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal process using NaHSO{sub 3} as the reducing agent and 1-propyl-3-hexadecylimidazolium bromide as the structure growth-directing template. The reduction of graphene oxide and the in situ formation of cobalt ferrite nanorods were accomplished in a one-step reaction. The structure and morphology of as-obtained composites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Uniform rod-like cobalt ferrites with diameters of about 100 nm and length of about 800 nm were homogeneously distributed on the graphene sheets. The hybrid materials showed a saturation magnetization of 42.5 emu/g and coercivity of 495.1 Oe at room temperature. The electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vector network analyzer. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of − 25.8 dB was observed at 16.1 GHz for the cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < − 10 dB) ranged from 13.5 to 18.0 GHz. The composites exhibited better absorbing properties than the cobalt ferrite nanorods and the mixture of cobalt ferrite nanorods and graphene. - Highlights: • Reduction of GO and formation of ferrites were accomplished in a one-step reaction. • Ionic liquid was used to control 1D growth of ferrite nanorods for the first time. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites showed dielectric and magnetic loss. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites exhibited better absorbing properties.

  4. Lithium ferrate and lithium cobaltate cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.; Bloom, I.; Indacochea, J.E.; Kucera, G.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this research is to develop cathodes for the molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) having a performance approaching that of the lithiated nickel oxide cathode and a significantly greater life, particularly in pressurized MCFCs. To meet this objective, cathodes containing either doubly doped lithium ferrate or lithium cobaltate are being developed. In this project, the authors are optimizing the composition, microstructure, and loading density of the doubly doped lithium ferrate cathode and the lithium cobaltate cathodes.

  5. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-22

    The level of nuclear plant radiation exposure due to activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. Laboratory pin-on-disc and rolling contact wear tests were used to evaluate the wear performance of several coatings. Based on the results of these tests, multilayer Cr-nitride coatings and ion nitriding are the most promising approaches.

  6. The antitumor effect of locoregional magnetic cobalt ferrite in dog mammary adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şincai, Mariana; Gângǎ, Diana; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau

    2001-01-01

    The endocytosis of nanosized magnetic particles by tumor cells led to numerous tests to establish the use of this phenomenon in antitumor therapy. The direct antitumor effect of a biocompatible cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid directly inoculated in bitch mammary tumors was studied. A direct correlation between tumor cell lysis and cobalt ferrite was established in tumors. Massive endocytosis of magnetic particles was observed 1 h after the contact of magnetic fluid with tumor cells.

  7. Combinatorial incorporation of fluoride and cobalt ions into calcium phosphates to stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Zeinab Tahmasebi; Gharraee, Nazli; Malhotra, Angad; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-02-01

    Bone healing requires two critical mechanisms, angiogenesis and osteogenesis. In order to improve bone graft substitutes, both mechanisms should be addressed simultaneously. While the individual effects of various bioinorganics have been studied, an understanding of the combinatorial effects is lacking. Cobalt and fluoride ions, in appropriate concentrations, are known to individually favor the vascularization and mineralization processes, respectively. This study investigated the potential of using a combination of fluoride and cobalt ions to simultaneously promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis in human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Using a two-step biomimetic method, wells of tissue culture plates were coated with a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer without or with the incorporation of cobalt, fluoride, or both. In parallel, hMSCs were cultured on uncoated well plates, and cultured with cobalt and/or fluoride ions within the media. The results revealed that cobalt ions increased the expression of angiogenic markers, with the effects being stronger when the ions were added as a dissolved salt in cell medium as compared to incorporation into CaP. Cobalt ions generally suppressed the ALP activity, the expression of osteogenic genes, and the level of mineralization, regardless of delivery method. Fluoride ions, individually or in combination with cobalt, significantly increased the expression of many of the selected osteogenic markers, as well as mineral deposition. This study demonstrates an approach to simultaneously target the two essential mechanisms in bone healing: angiogenesis and osteogenesis. The incorporation of cobalt and fluoride into CaPs is a promising method to improve the biological performance of fully synthetic bone graft substitutes. PMID:26929187

  8. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  9. Synthesis of cobalt oxides thin films fractal structures by laser chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Haniam, P; Kunsombat, C; Chiangga, S; Songsasen, A

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  10. Synthesis of cobalt alloy through smelting method and its characterization as prosthesis bone implant

    SciTech Connect

    Aminatun, Putri, N.S Efinda Indriani, Arista Himawati, Umi Hikmawati, Dyah Suhariningsih

    2014-09-25

    Cobalt-based alloys are widely used as total hip and knee replacements because of their excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance, fatigue strength and biocompatibility. In this work, cobalt alloys with variation of Cr (28.5; 30; 31.5; 33, and 34.5% wt) have been synthesized by smelting method began with the process of compaction, followed by smelting process using Tri Arc Melting Furnace at 200A. Continued by homogenization process at recrystallization temperature (1250° C) for 3 hours to allow the atoms diffuses and transform into γ phase. The next process is rolling process which is accompanied by heating at 1200° C for ± 15 minutes and followed by quenching. This process is repeated until the obtained thickness of ± 1 mm. The evaluated material properties included microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness value. It was shown that microstructure of cobalt alloys with variation of Cr is dominant by γ phase, thus making the entire cobalt alloys have high hardness. It was also shown from the surface morphology of entire cobalt alloys sample indicated the whole process of synthesis that had good solubility were at flat surface area. Hardness value test showed all of cobalt alloys sample had high hardness, just variation of 33% Cr be in the range of ASTMF75, it were 345,24 VHN which is potential to be applied as an implant prosthesis.

  11. Effect of Er doping on the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Prathapani, Sateesh; Vinitha, M.; Das, D.; Jayaraman, T. V.

    2014-05-07

    Nanocrystalline particulates of Er doped cobalt-ferrites CoFe{sub (2−x)}Er{sub x}O{sub 4} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04), were synthesized, using sol-gel assisted autocombustion method. Co-, Fe-, and Er- nitrates were the oxidizers, and malic acid served as a fuel and chelating agent. Calcination (400–600 °C for 4 h) of the precursor powders was followed by sintering (1000 °C for 4 h) and structural and magnetic characterization. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of single phase of spinel for the compositions x = 0, 0.01, and 0.02; and for higher compositions an additional orthoferrite phase formed along with the spinel phase. Lattice parameter of the doped cobalt-ferrites was higher than that of pure cobalt-ferrite. The observed red shift in the doped cobalt-ferrites indicates the presence of induced strain in the cobalt-ferrite matrix due to large size of the Er{sup +3} compared to Fe{sup +3}. Greater than two-fold increase in coercivity (∼66 kA/m for x = 0.02) was observed in doped cobalt-ferrites compared to CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (∼29 kA/m)

  12. Synthesis of cobalt nanowires in aqueous solution under an external magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Sun, Lijuan; Wang, Hu; Xie, Kenan; Long, Qin; Lai, Xuefei

    2016-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the majority of related experiments, which are carried out in organic solvents at high temperatures and pressures, cobalt nanowires were synthesized by chemical reduction in aqueous solution with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as surfactant under moderate conditions for the first time, while an external magnetic field of 40 mT was applied. Uniform linear cobalt nanowires with relatively smooth surfaces and firm structure were obtained and possessed an average diameter of about 100 nm with a coating layer of PVP. By comparison, the external magnetic field and PVP were proven to have a crucial influence on the morphology and the size of the synthesized cobalt nanowires. The prepared cobalt nanowires are crystalline and mainly consist of cobalt as well as a small amount of platinum. Magnetic measurements showed that the resultant cobalt nanowires were ferromagnetic at room temperature. The saturation magnetization (M s) and the coercivity (H c) were 112.00 emu/g and 352.87 Oe, respectively. PMID:27547616

  13. Synthesis of cobalt alloy through smelting method and its characterization as prosthesis bone implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminatun, Putri, N. S. Efinda; Indriani, Arista; Himawati, Umi; Hikmawati, Dyah; Suhariningsih

    2014-09-01

    Cobalt-based alloys are widely used as total hip and knee replacements because of their excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance, fatigue strength and biocompatibility. In this work, cobalt alloys with variation of Cr (28.5; 30; 31.5; 33, and 34.5% wt) have been synthesized by smelting method began with the process of compaction, followed by smelting process using Tri Arc Melting Furnace at 200A. Continued by homogenization process at recrystallization temperature (1250° C) for 3 hours to allow the atoms diffuses and transform into γ phase. The next process is rolling process which is accompanied by heating at 1200° C for ± 15 minutes and followed by quenching. This process is repeated until the obtained thickness of ± 1 mm. The evaluated material properties included microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness value. It was shown that microstructure of cobalt alloys with variation of Cr is dominant by γ phase, thus making the entire cobalt alloys have high hardness. It was also shown from the surface morphology of entire cobalt alloys sample indicated the whole process of synthesis that had good solubility were at flat surface area. Hardness value test showed all of cobalt alloys sample had high hardness, just variation of 33% Cr be in the range of ASTMF75, it were 345,24 VHN which is potential to be applied as an implant prosthesis.

  14. Synthesis of cobalt nanowires in aqueous solution under an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Sun, Lijuan; Wang, Hu; Xie, Kenan; Long, Qin; Lai, Xuefei; Liao, Li

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of related experiments, which are carried out in organic solvents at high temperatures and pressures, cobalt nanowires were synthesized by chemical reduction in aqueous solution with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as surfactant under moderate conditions for the first time, while an external magnetic field of 40 mT was applied. Uniform linear cobalt nanowires with relatively smooth surfaces and firm structure were obtained and possessed an average diameter of about 100 nm with a coating layer of PVP. By comparison, the external magnetic field and PVP were proven to have a crucial influence on the morphology and the size of the synthesized cobalt nanowires. The prepared cobalt nanowires are crystalline and mainly consist of cobalt as well as a small amount of platinum. Magnetic measurements showed that the resultant cobalt nanowires were ferromagnetic at room temperature. The saturation magnetization (M s) and the coercivity (H c) were 112.00 emu/g and 352.87 Oe, respectively. PMID:27547616

  15. Size dependent reduction-oxidation-reduction behaviour of cobalt oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sadasivan, Sajanikumari; Bellabarba, Ronan M; Tooze, Robert P

    2013-11-21

    Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal particles led to solid spheres, hollow spheres or core-shell structures depending on the size of the initial metal particle. Further re-reduction of the oxidized structures was also observed to be size dependent. The hollow oxide shells formed by the large particles (29 nm) fragmented into smaller particles on reduction, while the hollow shells of the medium sized particles (11 nm) did not re-disperse on further reduction. Similarly, no re-dispersion was observed in the case of the small particles (6 nm). This model study provides useful insights into the size dependent behavior of metal/metal oxide particles during oxidation/reduction. This has important implications in petrochemical industry where cobalt is used as a catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch process. PMID:24065040

  16. Mass spectrometric and modeling investigations of bimetallic silver-cobalt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, Ewald; van Hoof, Thibaut; Veldeman, Nele; Neukermans, Sven; Hou, Marc; Lievens, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The stability of bimetallic silver-cobalt clusters with less than 50 atoms is studied experimentally and their associated geometries are predicted by classical modeling. The clusters are created by laser vaporization and inert gas condensation. Their mass distribution is analyzed with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For clusters containing mainly silver, we find strong quantum size effects related to itinerant behavior of the silver and cobalt valence electrons. In the case of clusters containing mainly cobalt, no pronounced size effects appear in the mass spectra. Photofragmentation experiments reveal that neutral silver atom evaporation is the favorable channel, suggesting that the AgCo bonds are weaker than the CoCo bonds. Consistently, and for both sets of clusters, Metropolis Monte-Carlo simulations predict these clusters to have icosahedral based structures that may depend on temperature. In clusters containing mainly silver, cobalt sits at the cluster center and fragmentation proceeds by the evaporation of silver surface atoms. In clusters containing mainly cobalt, silver atoms also locate at the periphery and are more weakly bound to the cluster than cobalt surface atoms.

  17. Plasma boriding of a cobalt-chromium alloy as an interlayer for nanostructured diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Jubinsky, Matthew; Catledge, Shane A.

    2015-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings can potentially improve the wear resistance of cobalt-chromium medical implant surfaces, but the high cobalt content in these alloys acts as a catalyst to form graphitic carbon. Boriding by high temperature liquid baths and powder packing has been shown to improve CVD diamond compatibility with cobalt alloys. We use the microwave plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD process to deposit interlayers composed primarily of the borides of cobalt and chromium. The use of diborane (B2H6) in the plasma feedgas allows for the formation of a robust boride interlayer for suppressing graphitic carbon during subsequent CVD of nano-structured diamond (NSD). This metal-boride interlayer is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings on a CoCrMo alloy. Migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer is significantly reduced and undetectable on the surface of the subsequently-grown NSD coating. The effects of PECVD boriding are compared for a range of substrate temperatures and deposition times and are evaluated using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Boriding of CoCrMo results in adhered nanostructured diamond coatings with low surface roughness.

  18. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  19. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  20. Yttrium-doped cobalt nanoferrites prepared by sol-gel combustion method and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Shobana, M K; Nam, Wonjong; Choe, Heeman

    2013-05-01

    Ferrites are extremely important magnetic ceramics in the production of electronic components because they reduce the energy losses by the induced currents acting as electrical insulators. Similarly, the spinel-structured cobalt-based ferrites are promising materials for stress, torsion sensors and energy storage applications (anode materials in lithium batteries, fuel cells and solar cells). Therefore, many studies have focused on cobalt ferrites obtained using conventional techniques. Different sintering conditions, types and levels of substitution result in different microstructures and magnetostriction coefficients under a wide range of preparation conditions. Despite many attempts, there are no specific reports on the trivalent substitution of yttrium in cobalt ferrite to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, yttrium-doped cobalt ferrite was prepared with different concentrations to identify the crystallite size with respect to the yttrium concentration, temperature and changes in the structural and electrical properties. In addition, the resistance of the nanostructured yttrium-doped cobalt ferrites nanopowders was analyzed. The resistance was increased by the addition of yttrium to cobalt ferrites. PMID:23858896

  1. Size dependent reduction-oxidation-reduction behaviour of cobalt oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadasivan, Sajanikumari; Bellabarba, Ronan M.; Tooze, Robert P.

    2013-10-01

    Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal particles led to solid spheres, hollow spheres or core-shell structures depending on the size of the initial metal particle. Further re-reduction of the oxidized structures was also observed to be size dependent. The hollow oxide shells formed by the large particles (29 nm) fragmented into smaller particles on reduction, while the hollow shells of the medium sized particles (11 nm) did not re-disperse on further reduction. Similarly, no re-dispersion was observed in the case of the small particles (6 nm). This model study provides useful insights into the size dependent behavior of metal/metal oxide particles during oxidation/reduction. This has important implications in petrochemical industry where cobalt is used as a catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch process.Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal

  2. Cobalt oxide and nitride particles supported on mesoporous carbons as composite electrocatalysts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Shao, Leng-Leng; Gao, Ze-Min; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2015-07-01

    The composite electrocatalysts of cobalt oxide/mesoporous carbon and cobalt nitride/mesoporous carbon are synthesized via a convenient oxidation and subsequent ammonia nitridation of cobalt particles-incorporated mesoporous carbon, respectively. The cobalt oxide and nitride particles are uniformly imbedded in mesoporous carbon matrix, forming the unique composites with high surface area and mesopore architecture, and the resultant composites are evaluated as counter electrode materials, exhibiting good catalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide. The composites of cobalt nitride and mesoporous carbon are superior to the counterparts of cobalt oxide and mesoporous carbon in catalyzing the triiodide reduction, and the dye-sensitized solar cell with the composites achieves an optimum power conversion efficiency of 5.26%, which is comparable to the one based on the conventional Pt counter electrode (4.88%).

  3. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  4. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics of cobalt nanoparticles and individual ferromagnetic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-01

    The ultrafast magnetization dynamics of magnetic materials can be investigated using femtosecond laser pulses to perform femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr and Faraday measurements [1]. In this talk, we will focus on the magnetization dynamics of cobalt nanoparticles which are either ferromagnetic or super-paramagnetic at room temperature and on the dynamics of individual ferromagnetic dots. In the first case (Co nanoparticles), we will demonstrate that the magnetization dynamics preceding the fluctuations over the anisotropy energy barrier is coherent but exhibits a strongly damped precession [2]. These results, which have been obtained with a three dimensional analysis of the magnetization vector [3] will be discussed in the context of the N'eel-Brown models involving the gyromagnetic character of the magnetization. We will also examine the dynamics of self-organized supra-crystals of cobalt nanoparticles [4]. In the second case, we will present the ultrafast magnetization dynamics of individual ferromagnetic dots (CoPt3, Permalloy, Nickel) made either by e-beam lithography or induced optically on thin films deposited on sapphire and glass substrates. The technique employed is the magneto-optical pump probe imaging (MOPPI) which allows performing time resolved magneto-optical Kerr images with with spatial and temporal resolutions of 300 nm and 150 fs [5]. The study of the demagnetization of the dots for different laser intensities shows that it is possible to write and read ultrafast monodomains on thin films. [3pt] [1] E. Beaurepaire, J.-C. Merle, A. Daunois, J.-Y. Bigot Phys. Rev. Lett., 76, 4250 (1996) [0pt] [2] L.H.F. Andrade, A. Laraoui, M. Vomir, D. Muller, J.-P. Stoquert, C. Estournès, E. Beaurepaire, J.-Y. Bigot Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 127401 (2006). [0pt] [3] M. Vomir, L. H.F. Andrade, L. Guidoni, E. Beaurepaire, J.-Y. Bigot Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 237601 (2005). [0pt] [4] I. Lisiecki, V. Halt'e, C. Petit, M.-P. Pileni, J.-Y. Bigot Adv. Mater., 20, 4176 (2008

  5. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge

  6. Monte Carlo study of MLC fields for cobalt therapy machine

    PubMed Central

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Rani, Roopa A.; Kumar, Anil; Reddy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    An automated Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) system has been developed as add-on for the cobalt-60 teletherapy machines available in India. The goal of the present computational study is to validate the MLC design using Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. The study was based on the Kirloskar-supplied Phoenix model machines that closely match the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) theratron-80 machine. The MLC is a retrofit attachment to the collimator assembly, with 14 non-divergent leaf pairs of 40 mm thick, 7 mm wide, and 150 mm long tungsten alloy plates with rounded edges and 20 mm tongue and 2 mm groove in each leaf. In the present work, the source and collimator geometry has been investigated in detail to arrive at a model that best represents the measured dosimetric data. The authors have studied in detail the proto-I MLC built for cobalt-60. The MLC field sizes were MC simulated for 2 × 2 cm2 to 14 × 14 cm2 square fields as well as irregular fields, and the percent depth dose (PDD) and profile data were compared with ROPS† treatment planning system (TPS). In addition, measured profiles using the IMATRIXX system‡ were also compared with the MC simulations. The proto-I MLC can define radiation fields up to 14 × 14 cm2 within 3 mm accuracy. The maximum measured leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was 3.4% and interleaf leakage observed was 7.3%. Good agreement between MC results, ROPS and IMATRIXX results has been observed. The investigation also supports the hypothesis that optical and radiation field coincidence exists for the square fields studied with the MLC. Plots of the percent depth dose (PDD) data and profile data for clinically significant irregular fields have also been presented. The MC model was also investigated to speed up the calculations to allow calculations of clinically relevant conformal beams. †Radiation Oncology Planning System (ROPS) is supplied by Tirumala Jyothi Computer Systems described at https

  7. Magnetoelastic properties of cobalt-nickel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anapolsky, Abraham

    Cobalt-nickel alloys show large values of magnetostriction, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and a martensitic phase transformation at temperatures around 0 K. Collectively, these properties make Co-Ni alloys good candidates for the so-called giant magnetostrictive effect. Magnetostrictive (and giant magnetostrictive) alloys can be used to replace complex machinery (such as actuators) in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). For this reason, researchers have been investigating the magnetostrictive properties of thin films. I grew and characterized films in the composition range Co: 10 wt% Ni to Co: 35 wt% Ni. Films were grown by electron beam evaporation and a variety of techniques including SEM, TEM, x-ray diffraction, and SQUID magnetometry were used to characterize the films. A thorough background in elastic and non-elastic mechanisms of deformation (in relation to magnetostriction) is discussed. These topics include a semi-classical treatment of magnetoelasticity, superelasticity, and martensitic transformations. An important result of this thesis is the complete magnetic and physical characterization for the entire range of Co-Ni thin films that undergo martensitic transformation. Extensive analysis of morphology, microstructure, phase, and magnetic data, developed a consistent picture of Co-Ni polycrystalline thin films in the composition range mentioned above. Another important result was the development of a novel technique for measuring the value of the magnetostriction coefficient in thin films. The in-plane component of magnetostriction ( lips ) is determined by fitting a theoretical model (based on the Stoner-Wohlforth theory for uniaxial systems) to magnetization vs temperature (M vs T) data for cobalt-nickel thin films. My theoretical model predicts the effect of an imposed stress (or strain) on the in-plane component of saturation magnetization ( Mips ). The imposed stress (or strain) is due to a mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion

  8. The regioselective hydroformylation of vinylsilanes. A remarkable difference in the selectivity and reactivity of cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Crudden, C.M.; Alper, H.

    1994-06-03

    Rhodium, iridium, and cobalt complexes were evaluated as catalysts for hydroformylation of vinylsilanes. Regioselectivities, product structures, and reaction yields were widely variable for these catalysts.

  9. Targeting Toll-like receptor 4 prevents cobalt-mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Helen; Mawdesley, Amy Elizabeth; Holland, James Patrick; Kirby, John Andrew; Deehan, David John; Tyson-Capper, Alison Jane

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt-chrome alloy is a widely used biomaterial in joint replacements, dental implants and spinal rods. Although it is an effective and biocompatible material, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) have arisen in a minority of patients, particularly in those with metal-on-metal bearing hip replacements. There is currently no treatment for ARMD and once progressive, early revision surgery of the implant is necessary. Therapeutic agents to prevent, halt or reverse ARMD would therefore be advantageous. Cobalt ions activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor responsible for inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We hypothesised that anti-TLR4 neutralising antibodies, reported to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation, could prevent the inflammatory response to cobalt ions in an in vitro macrophagecell culture model. This study shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody inhibited cobalt-mediated increases in pro-inflammatory IL8, CCL20 and IL1A expression, as well as IL-8 secretion. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody did not prevent the effect of cobalt ions on either IL-8 or IL1A expression, although it did have a small effect on the CCL20 response. Interestingly, both antibodies inhibited cobalt-mediated neutrophil migration although the greater effect was observed with the monoclonal antibody. In summary our data shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody can inhibit cobalt-mediated inflammatory responses while a polyclonal antibody only inhibits the effect of specific cytokines. Anti-TLR4 antibodies have therapeutic potential in ARMD although careful antibody design is required to ensure that the LPS response is preserved. PMID:26840091

  10. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Malard, Veronique; Berenguer, Frederic; Prat, Odette; Ruat, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Gerard; Quemeneur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to 59 Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxicogenomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and biomarker research. Results A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BNIP3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for biomarker research. Of those, TIMP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative biomarker of cobalt toxicity was identified. PMID:17553155

  11. Factors affecting the selectivity of the oxidation of methyl p-toluate by cobalt(III).

    PubMed

    Sumner, Charles E; Morrill, Kent A; Howell, Jeff S; Little, James

    2008-03-17

    The anaerobic oxidation of methyl p-toluate by cobalt(III) in acetic acid was investigated. Observed products were 4-carbomethoxybenzaldehyde (2), 4-carbomethoxybenzoic acid (3), 4-carbomethoxybenzyl acetate (1), 4,4'-dicarbomethoxybibenzyl (6), methyl 2,4-dimethylbenzoate (8), and methyl 3,4-dimethylbenzoate (9). Deuterium isotope labeling showed that 2 was not formed from 1, but appeared to be formed directly from methyl p-toluate via 4-carbomethoxybenzyl alcohol (5). The ratio of (2 + 3) to 1 was 0.5 with [py3Co3O(OAc)5OH[PF6] and 1.0 with cobaltic acetate. Cobaltic acetate was generated in situ by the reaction of cobaltous acetate and peracetic acid. When the oxidation was carried out in the presence of chromium (0.05 equiv based on cobalt), the ratio increased dramatically and no 6 was observed. Other transition metals such as vanadium, molybdenum, and manganese had a similar effect, but were not as effective as chromium. Chromium was observed to form a mixed-metal cluster complex with cobalt. Treatment of an acetic acid solution of cobaltous acetate and methyl isonicotinate with K2CrO4 produced a solid tentatively identified as [(MIN)3Co2CrO(OAc)6][CrO4H] (MIN = methyl isonicotinate). The selectivity for the oxidation of methyl p-toluate exhibited by the mixed-metal cluster complex was similar to that observed by the addition of chromium to oxidations using [py3Co3O(OAc)5OH[PF6]. PMID:18225893

  12. Computational Characterization of Redox Non-Innocence in Cobalt-Bis(Diaryldithiolene)-Catalyzed Proton Reduction.

    PubMed

    Panetier, Julien A; Letko, Christopher S; Tilley, T Don; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-01-12

    Localized orbital bonding analysis (LOBA) was employed to probe the oxidation state in cobalt-bis(diaryldithiolene)-catalyzed proton reduction in nonaqueous media. LOBA calculations provide both the oxidation state and chemically intuitive views of bonding in cobalt-bis(diaryldithiolene) species and therefore allow characterization of the role of the redox non-innocent dithiolene ligand. LOBA results show that the reduction of the monoanion species [1Br](-) is metal-centered and gives a cobalt(II) ion species, [1Br](2-), coordinated to two dianionic ene-1,2-dithiolates. This electronic configuration is in agreement with the solution magnetic moment observed for the analogous salt [1F](2-) (μeff = 2.39 μB). Protonation of [1Br](2-) yields the cobalt(III)-hydride [1Br(CoH)](-) species in which the Co-H bond is computed to be highly covalent (Löwdin populations close to 0.50 on cobalt and hydrogen atoms). Further reduction of [1Br(CoH)](-) forms a more basic cobalt(II)-H intermediate [1Br(CoH)](2-) (S = 0) from which protonation at sulfur gives a S-H bond syn to the Co-H bond. Formation of a cobalt-dihydrogen [1Br(CoH2)](-) intermediate is calculated to occur via a homocoupling (H(•) + H(•) → H2) step with a free energy of activation of 5.9 kcal/mol in solution (via C-PCM approach). PMID:26598074

  13. Targeting Toll-like receptor 4 prevents cobalt-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Helen; Mawdesley, Amy Elizabeth; Holland, James Patrick; Kirby, John Andrew; Deehan, David John; Tyson-Capper, Alison Jane

    2016-02-16

    Cobalt-chrome alloy is a widely used biomaterial in joint replacements, dental implants and spinal rods. Although it is an effective and biocompatible material, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) have arisen in a minority of patients, particularly in those with metal-on-metal bearing hip replacements. There is currently no treatment for ARMD and once progressive, early revision surgery of the implant is necessary. Therapeutic agents to prevent, halt or reverse ARMD would therefore be advantageous. Cobalt ions activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor responsible for inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We hypothesised that anti-TLR4 neutralising antibodies, reported to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation, could prevent the inflammatory response to cobalt ions in an in vitro macrophage cell culture model. This study shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody inhibited cobalt-mediated increases in pro-inflammatory IL8, CCL20 and IL1A expression, as well as IL-8 secretion. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody did not prevent the effect of cobalt ions on either IL-8 or IL1A expression, although it did have a small effect on the CCL20 response. Interestingly, both antibodies inhibited cobalt-mediated neutrophil migration although the greater effect was observed with the monoclonal antibody. In summary our data shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody can inhibit cobalt-mediated inflammatory responses while a polyclonal antibody only inhibits the effect of specific cytokines. Anti-TLR4 antibodies have therapeutic potential in ARMD although careful antibody design is required to ensure that the LPS response is preserved. PMID:26840091

  14. Physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of borided cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    1987-01-01

    Unsupported and alumina-supported borided cobalt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of anhydrous cobalt acetate at 25/sup 0/C using B/sub 2/H/sub 6//THF or NaBH/sub 4//diglyme solution as the reducing agent. These catalysts were further activated in H/sub 2/ at 250/sup 0/C prior to use. The physical and chemical properties of these catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis, BET surface area measurements, H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption measurements, X-ray Diffraction, and Temperature Programmed Desorption of CO. The catalytic properties of these catalysts for hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons were investigated at 160 - 300/sup 0/C, 1 and 10 atm, and H/sub 2//CO ratio of 2 in a differential conversion range of less than 8%. The data show that unsupported, Na-free, borided cobalt is much more active than Na-containing borided cobalt and pure cobalt on a site basis. Similarly, CoB/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is more than an order of magnitude more active than Co/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is more than an order of magnitude more active than Co/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ but has similar selectivity; its selectivity for C/sub 5//sup +/ hydrocarbons, however, is very high (> 75 wt%) at low reaction temperatures (e.g. 170/sup 0/C) or at low H/sub 2//CO ratios (e.g. less than or equal to 1). The observed changes in catalytic and adsorption behavior are consistent with an electron-donor model in which boron atoms donate electrons to cobalt. Na was found to lower catalytic activity of cobalt while increasing selectivity for light hydrocarbons, olefins, and CO/sub 2/ products.

  15. Selected aspects of the action of cobalt ions in the human body.

    PubMed

    Czarnek, Katarzyna; Terpiłowska, Sylwia; Siwicki, Andrzej K

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is widespread in the natural environment and can be formed as an effect of anthropogenic activity. This element is used in numerous industrial applications and nuclear power plants. Cobalt is an essential trace element for the human body and can occur in organic and inorganic forms. The organic form is a necessary component of vitamin B12 and plays a very important role in forming amino acids and some proteins in nerve cells, and in creating neurotransmitters that are indispensable for correct functioning of the organism. Its excess or deficiency will influence it unfavourably. Salts of cobalt have been applied in medicine in the treatment of anaemia, as well as in sport as an attractive alternative to traditional blood doping. Inorganic forms of cobalt present in ion form, are toxic to the human body, and the longer they are stored in the body, the more changes they cause in cells. Cobalt gets into the body in several ways: firstly, with food; secondly by the respiratory system; thirdly, by the skin; and finally, as a component of biomaterials. Cobalt and its alloys are fundamental components in orthopaedic implants and have been used for about 40 years. The corrosion of metal is the main problem in the construction of implants. These released metal ions may cause type IV inflammatory and hypersensitivity reactions, and alternations in bone modelling that lead to aseptic loosening and implant failure. The ions of cobalt released from the surface of the implant are absorbed by present macrophages, which are involved in many of the processes associated with phagocytose orthopaedic biomaterials particles and release pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and prostaglandin. PMID:26557039

  16. Selected aspects of the action of cobalt ions in the human body

    PubMed Central

    Terpiłowska, Sylwia; Siwicki, Andrzej K.

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is widespread in the natural environment and can be formed as an effect of anthropogenic activity. This element is used in numerous industrial applications and nuclear power plants. Cobalt is an essential trace element for the human body and can occur in organic and inorganic forms. The organic form is a necessary component of vitamin B12 and plays a very important role in forming amino acids and some proteins in nerve cells, and in creating neurotransmitters that are indispensable for correct functioning of the organism. Its excess or deficiency will influence it unfavourably. Salts of cobalt have been applied in medicine in the treatment of anaemia, as well as in sport as an attractive alternative to traditional blood doping. Inorganic forms of cobalt present in ion form, are toxic to the human body, and the longer they are stored in the body, the more changes they cause in cells. Cobalt gets into the body in several ways: firstly, with food; secondly by the respiratory system; thirdly, by the skin; and finally, as a component of biomaterials. Cobalt and its alloys are fundamental components in orthopaedic implants and have been used for about 40 years. The corrosion of metal is the main problem in the construction of implants. These released metal ions may cause type IV inflammatory and hypersensitivity reactions, and alternations in bone modelling that lead to aseptic loosening and implant failure. The ions of cobalt released from the surface of the implant are absorbed by present macrophages, which are involved in many of the processes associated with phagocytose orthopaedic biomaterials particles and release pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and prostaglandin. PMID:26557039

  17. Recovery of cobalt, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium from an aqueous ammonia and ammonium salt solution by coextracting molybdenum and vanadium and sequential extraction of nickel and cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Hubred, G.L.; Van Leirsburg, D.A.

    1984-02-28

    A method is claimed for recovering metal values from an aqueous stream. The metal values are preferably obtained from leaching spent hydroprocessing catalysts, and include nickel, cobalt, vanadium and molybdenum. The metal values are extracted, isolated and purified by liquid, liquid extraction techniques.

  18. Synthesis of cobalt-containing mesoporous catalysts using the ultrasonic-assisted "pH-adjusting" method: Importance of cobalt species in styrene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baitao; Zhu, Yanrun; Jin, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-containing SBA-15 and MCM-41 (Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41) mesoporous catalysts were prepared via ultrasonic-assisted "pH-adjusting" technique in this study. Their physiochemical structures were comprehensively characterized and correlated with catalytic activity in oxidation of styrene. The nature of cobalt species depended on the type of mesoporous silica as well as pH values. The different catalytic performance between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41 catalysts originated from cobalt species. Cobalt species were homogenously incorporated into the siliceous framework of Co-SBA-15 in single-site Co(II) state, while Co3O4 particles were loaded on Co-MCM-41 catalysts. The styrene oxidation tests showed that the single-site Co(II) state was more beneficial to the catalytic oxidation of styrene. The higher styrene conversion and benzaldehyde selectivity over Co-SBA-15 catalysts were mainly attributed to single-site Co(II) state incorporated into the framework of SBA-15. The highest conversion of styrene (34.7%) with benzaldehyde selectivity of 88.2% was obtained over Co-SBA-15 catalyst prepared at pH of 7.5, at the mole ratio of 1:1 (styrene to H2O2) at 70 °C.

  19. Interface and nanostructure evolution of cobalt germanides on Ge(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Grzela, T. Schubert, M. A.; Koczorowski, W.; Capellini, G.; Czajka, R.; Radny, M. W.; Curson, N.; Schofield, S. R.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-02-21

    Cobalt germanide (Co{sub x}Ge{sub y}) is a candidate system for low resistance contact modules in future Ge devices in Si-based micro and nanoelectronics. In this paper, we present a detailed structural, morphological, and compositional study on Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} formation on Ge(001) at room temperature metal deposition and subsequent annealing. Scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction clearly demonstrate that room temperature deposition of approximately four monolayers of Co on Ge(001) results in the Volmer Weber growth mode, while subsequent thermal annealing leads to the formation of a Co-germanide continuous wetting layer which evolves gradually towards the growth of elongated Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} nanostructures. Two types of Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} nanostructures, namely, flattop- and ridge-type, were observed and a systematic study on their evolution as a function of temperature is presented. Additional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements allowed us to monitor the reaction between Co and Ge in the formation process of the Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} continuous wetting layer as well as the Co{sub x}Ge{sub y} nanostructures.

  20. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.