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Sample records for qtl fine mapping

  1. Fine Mapping and Evolution of a QTL Region on Cattle Chromosome 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donthu, Ravikiran

    2009-01-01

    The goal of my dissertation was to fine map the milk yield and composition quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapped to cattle chromosome 3 (BTA3) by Heyen et al. (1999) and to identify candidate genes affecting these traits. To accomplish this, the region between "BL41" and "TGLA263" was mapped to the cattle genome sequence assembly Btau 3.1 and a…

  2. Construction of a high-density linkage map and fine mapping of QTL for growth in Asian seabass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le; Wan, Zi Yi; Bai, Bin; Huang, Shu Qing; Chua, Elaine; Lee, May; Pang, Hong Yan; Wen, Yan Fei; Liu, Peng; Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Lin, Grace; Ye, Bao Qing; Yue, Gen Hua

    2015-01-01

    A high-density genetic map is essential for comparative genomic studies and fine mapping of QTL, and can also facilitate genome sequence assembly. Here, a high density genetic map of Asian seabass was constructed with 3321 SNPs generated by sequencing 144 individuals in a F2 family. The length of the map was 1577.67?cM with an average marker interval of 0.52?cM. A high level of genomic synteny among Asian seabass, European seabass, Nile tilapia and stickleback was detected. Using this map, one genome-wide significant and five suggestive QTL for growth traits were detected in six linkage groups (i.e. LG4, LG5, LG11, LG13, LG14 and LG15). These QTL explained 10.5–16.0% of phenotypic variance. A candidate gene, ACOX1 within the significant QTL on LG5 was identified. The gene was differentially expressed between fast- and slow-growing Asian seabass. The high-density SNP-based map provides an important tool for fine mapping QTL in molecular breeding and comparative genome analysis. PMID:26553309

  3. Fine-mapping QTL for nipple number in the pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number of functional nipples is an important trait in pigs. Selection for increased litter size has resulted in number of live born piglets exceeding the number of functional nipples in prolific sows. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for nipple number have been consistently found in various populat...

  4. Use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) to fine-map quantitative trait loci (QTL) in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in swine at the US Meat Animal Research Center has relied heavily on linkage mapping in either F2 or Backcross families. QTL identified in the initial scans typically have very broad confidence intervals and further refinement of the QTL’s position is needed bef...

  5. A high-resolution linkage map for comparative genome analysis and QTL fine mapping in Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High density linkage maps are essential for comparative analysis of synteny, fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), searching for candidate genes and facilitating genome sequence assembly. However, in most foodfish species, marker density is still low. We previously reported a first generation linkage map with 240 DNA markers and its application to preliminarily map QTL for growth traits in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer). Here, we report a high-resolution linkage map with 790 microsatellites and SNPs, comparative analysis of synteny, fine-mapping of QTL and the identification of potential candidate genes for growth traits. Results A second generation linkage map of Asian seabass was developed with 790 microsatellite and SNP markers. The map spanned a genetic length of 2411.5 cM, with an average intermarker distance of 3.4 cM or 1.1 Mb. This high density map allowed for comparison of the map with Tetraodon nigroviridis genome, which revealed 16 synteny regions between the two species. Moreover, by employing this map we refined QTL to regions of 1.4 and 0.2 cM (or 400 and 50 kb) in linkage groups 2 and 3 in a population containing 380 progeny; potential candidate genes for growth traits in QTL regions were further identified using comparative genome analysis, whose effects on growth traits were investigated. Interestingly, a QTL cluster at Lca371 underlying growth traits of Asian seabass showed similarity to the cathepsin D gene of human, which is related to cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions We constructed a high resolution linkage map, carried out comparative mapping, refined the positions of QTL, identified candidate genes for growth traits and analyzed their effects on growth. Our study developed a framework that will be indispensable for further identification of genes and analysis of molecular variation within the refined QTL to enhance understanding of the molecular basis of growth and speed up genetic improvement of growth performance, and it also provides critical resource for future genome sequence assembly and comparative genomics studies on the evolution of fish genomes. PMID:21457569

  6. Fine Mapping of a Major Insect Resistance QTL in Soybean and its Interaction with Minor Resistance QTLs

    E-print Network

    Parrott, Wayne

    Fine Mapping of a Major Insect Resistance QTL in Soybean and its Interaction with Minor Resistance insect resistance genes can be an important component for managing insects in soybean [Glycine max (L the effec- tiveness of a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgene in soybean. The objectives of this study were

  7. Fine mapping of QTL for twinning and ovulation rate using low density SNP map in conjunction with microsatellite marker information in the USMARC twinning population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USMARC twinning population originated from 307 females and 53 males representing 12 different breeds of cattle and has been under selection for 25 years. The objective of this study was to initiate fine mapping of QTL for twinning and ovulation rate previously found on BTA5. This population ha...

  8. Using a set of TeQing-into-Lemont chromosome segment substitution lines for fine mapping QTL: Case studies on sheath blight resistance, spreading culm, and mesocotyl elongation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A set of backcross introgression lines containing portions of the TeQing genome now introgressed into a Lemont genetic background allows us to fine map rice QTL, and measure their breeding value within U.S. rice genetic and field environments....

  9. FINE MAPPING A QTL AFFECTING OVULATION RATE IN SWINE ON CHROMOSOME 8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovulation rate is an integral component of litter size in swine, but is difficult to directly select upon in commercial swine production. Since a QTL has been detected for ovulation rate at the terminal end of chromosome 8p, genetic markers for this QTL would enable direct selection on ovulation ra...

  10. Fine mapping of qGW1, a major QTL for grain weight in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Han, Lijie; Chen, Jun; Mace, Emma S; Liu, Yishan; Zhu, Mengjiao; Yuyama, Nana; Jordan, David R; Cai, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    We detected seven QTLs for 100-grain weight in sorghum using an F 2 population, and delimited qGW1 to a 101-kb region on the short arm of chromosome 1, which contained 13 putative genes. Sorghum is one of the most important cereal crops. Breeding high-yielding sorghum varieties will have a profound impact on global food security. Grain weight is an important component of grain yield. It is a quantitative trait controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs); however, the genetic basis of grain weight in sorghum is not well understood. In the present study, using an F2 population derived from a cross between the grain sorghum variety SA2313 (Sorghum bicolor) and the Sudan-grass variety Hiro-1 (S. bicolor), we detected seven QTLs for 100-grain weight. One of them, qGW1, was detected consistently over 2 years and contributed between 20 and 40 % of the phenotypic variation across multiple genetic backgrounds. Using extreme recombinants from a fine-mapping F3 population, we delimited qGW1 to a 101-kb region on the short arm of chromosome 1, containing 13 predicted gene models, one of which was found to be under purifying selection during domestication. However, none of the grain size candidate genes shared sequence similarity with previously cloned grain weight-related genes from rice. This study will facilitate isolation of the gene underlying qGW1 and advance our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of grain weight. SSR markers linked to the qGW1 locus can be used for improving sorghum grain yield through marker-assisted selection. PMID:26071275

  11. Fine mapping of Msv1, a major QTL for resistance to Maize Streak Virus leads to development of production markers for breeding pipelines.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sudha K; Babu, Raman; Magorokosho, Cosmos; Mahuku, George; Semagn, Kassa; Beyene, Yoseph; Das, Biswanath; Makumbi, Dan; Lava Kumar, P; Olsen, Michael; Boddupalli, Prasanna M

    2015-09-01

    Msv1 , the major QTL for MSV resistance was delimited to an interval of 0.87 cM on chromosome 1 at 87 Mb and production markers with high prediction accuracy were developed. Maize streak virus (MSV) disease is a devastating disease in the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), which causes significant yield loss in maize. Resistance to MSV has previously been mapped to a major QTL (Msv1) on chromosome 1 that is germplasm and environment independent and to several minor loci elsewhere in the genome. In this study, Msv1 was fine-mapped through QTL isogenic recombinant strategy using a large F 2 population of CML206 × CML312 to an interval of 0.87 cM on chromosome 1. Genome-wide association study was conducted in the DTMA (Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa)-Association mapping panel with 278 tropical/sub-tropical breeding lines from CIMMYT using the high-density genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) markers. This study identified 19 SNPs in the region between 82 and 93 Mb on chromosome 1(B73 RefGen_V2) at a P < 1.00E-04, which coincided with the fine-mapped region of Msv1. Haplotype trend regression identified a haplotype block significantly associated with response to MSV. Three SNPs in this haplotype block at 87 Mb on chromosome 1 had an accuracy of 0.94 in predicting the disease reaction in a collection of breeding lines with known responses to MSV infection. In two biparental populations, selection for resistant Msv1 haplotype demonstrated a reduction of 1.03-1.39 units on a rating scale of 1-5, compared to the susceptible haplotype. High-throughput KASP assays have been developed for these three SNPs to enable routine marker screening in the breeding pipeline for MSV resistance. PMID:26081946

  12. Identification and fine-mapping of a QTL, qMrdd1, that confers recessive resistance to maize rough dwarf disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is a devastating viral disease that results in considerable yield losses worldwide. Three major strains of virus cause MRDD, including maize rough dwarf virus in Europe, Mal de Río Cuarto virus in South America, and rice black-streaked dwarf virus in East Asia. These viral pathogens belong to the genus fijivirus in the family Reoviridae. Resistance against MRDD is a complex trait that involves a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL). The primary approach used to minimize yield losses from these viruses is to breed and deploy resistant maize hybrids. Results Of the 50 heterogeneous inbred families (HIFs), 24 showed consistent responses to MRDD across different years and locations, in which 9 were resistant and 15 were susceptible. We performed trait-marker association analysis on the 24 HIFs and found six chromosomal regions which were putatively associated with MRDD resistance. We then conducted QTL analysis and detected a major resistance QTL, qMrdd1, on chromosome 8. By applying recombinant-derived progeny testing to self-pollinated backcrossed families, we fine-mapped the qMrdd1 locus into a 1.2-Mb region flanked by markers M103-4 and M105-3. The qMrdd1 locus acted in a recessive manner to reduce the disease-severity index (DSI) by 24.2–39.3%. The genetic effect of qMrdd1 was validated using another F6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population in which MRDD resistance was segregating and two genotypes at the qMrdd1 locus differed significantly in DSI values. Conclusions The qMrdd1 locus is a major resistance QTL, acting in a recessive manner to increase maize resistance to MRDD. We mapped qMrdd1 to a 1.2-Mb region, which will enable the introgression of qMrdd1-based resistance into elite maize hybrids and reduce MRDD-related crop losses. PMID:24079304

  13. Fine-mapping of candidate region in Amish and Ashkenazi families confirms linkage of refractive error to a QTL on 1p34-p36

    PubMed Central

    Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Stambolian, Dwight

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A previous genome-wide study in Orthodox Ashkenazi Jewish pedigrees showed significant linkage of ocular refraction to a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) on 1p34-36.1. We carried out a fine-mapping study of this region in Orthodox Ashkenazi Jewish (ASHK) and Old Order Amish (OOA) families to confirm linkage and narrow the candidate region. Methods Families were recruited from ASHK and OOA American communities. The samples included: 402 individuals in 53 OOA families; and 596 members in 68 ASHK families. Families were ascertained to contain multiple myopic individuals. Genotyping of 1,367 SNPs was carried out within a 35cM (~23.9 Mb) candidate QTL region on 1p34-36. Multipoint variance components (VC) and regression-based (REG) linkage analyses were carried out separately in OOA and ASHK groups, and in a combined analysis that included all families. Results Evidence of linkage of refractive error was found in both OOA (VC LOD=3.45, REG LOD=3.38 at ~59 cM) and ASHK families (VC LOD=3.12, REG LOD=4.263 at ~66 cM). Combined analyses showed three highly significant linkage peaks, separated by ~11cM (or 10 Mb), within the candidate region. Conclusion In a fine-mapping linkage study of OOA and ASHK families, we have confirmed linkage of refractive error to a QTL on 1p. The area of linkage has been narrowed down to a gene-rich region at 1p34.2-35.1 containing ~124 genes. PMID:19626131

  14. Fine-mapping of qRfg2, a QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Liu, Yongjie; Guo, Yanling; Yang, Qin; Ye, Jianrong; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2012-02-01

    Stalk rot is one of the most devastating diseases in maize worldwide. In our previous study, two QTLs, a major qRfg1 and a minor qRfg2, were identified in the resistant inbred line '1145' to confer resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. In the present study, we report on fine-mapping of the minor qRfg2 that is located on chromosome 1 and account for ~8.9% of the total phenotypic variation. A total of 22 markers were developed in the qRfg2 region to resolve recombinants. The progeny-test mapping strategy was developed to accurately determine the phenotypes of all recombinants for fine-mapping of the qRfg2 locus. This fine-mapping process was performed from BC(4)F(1) to BC(8)F(1) generations to narrow down the qRfg2 locus into ~300 kb, flanked by the markers SSRZ319 and CAPSZ459. A predicted gene in the mapped region, coding for an auxin-regulated protein, is believed to be a candidate for qRfg2. The qRfg2 locus could steadily increase the resistance percentage by ~12% across different backcross generations, suggesting its usefulness in enhancing maize resistance against Gibberella stalk rot. PMID:22048640

  15. A population of ‘TeQing’-into-‘Lemont’ chromosome segment substitution lines supports QTL discovery, fine-mapping, and determination of breeding values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic maps and populations are important tools for gene/QTL mapping, and for functional genomics research. One of the most phenotypically characterized rice mapping populations is a set of 280 ‘Lemont’/‘TeQing’ recombinant inbred lines (LT-RILs) in which more than 250 agronomically important loci...

  16. Fine mapping QMi-C11 a major QTL controlling root-knot nematodes resistance in Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification and utilization of a high-level of host plant resistance is the most effective and economical approach to control root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita). In an earlier study, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance to root-knot nematode in the M-12...

  17. QTL MAPPING FOR BIRTH WEIGHT ON BOVINE CHROMOSOME 14

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping in livestock allows the identification of genes that determine the genetic variation affecting traits of economic interest. Diverse QTL for growth traits are described in literature, indicating the possibility of QTL mapping for these traits through the scan of...

  18. Bayesian QTL mapping using skewed Student-t distributions

    PubMed Central

    von Rohr, Peter; Hoeschele, Ina

    2002-01-01

    In most QTL mapping studies, phenotypes are assumed to follow normal distributions. Deviations from this assumption may lead to detection of false positive QTL. To improve the robustness of Bayesian QTL mapping methods, the normal distribution for residuals is replaced with a skewed Student-t distribution. The latter distribution is able to account for both heavy tails and skewness, and both components are each controlled by a single parameter. The Bayesian QTL mapping method using a skewed Student-t distribution is evaluated with simulated data sets under five different scenarios of residual error distributions and QTL effects. PMID:11929622

  19. Linkage, QTL, Mapping Populations and

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    segments or genes This can change how we manipulate these traits in breeding #12;A trait is quantitative · Doubled monoploid cross ­ Segregation in one parent - testcross #12;Mapped disease resistance genes assortment · Can arise from intermixture of populations with different gene frequencies · Can also

  20. INVESTIGATION Coding Gene SNP Mapping Reveals QTL Linked to

    E-print Network

    Bernatchez, Louis

    INVESTIGATION Coding Gene SNP Mapping Reveals QTL Linked to Growth and Stress Response in Brook hormone level as well as the relative expression measure- ments of five genes of interest linked to growth investigation has been devoted to QTL identification for gene expression. Here, our objective was to identify

  1. Educational Software for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

    2007-01-01

    This educational software was developed to aid teachers and students in their understanding of how the process of identifying the most likely quantitative trait loci (QTL) position is determined between two flanking DNA markers. The objective of the software that we developed was to: (1) show how a QTL is mapped to a position on a chromosome using…

  2. MetaQTL: a package of new computational methods for the meta-analysis of QTL mapping experiments

    PubMed Central

    Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Goffinet, Bruno; Charcosset, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Background Integration of multiple results from Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) studies is a key point to understand the genetic determinism of complex traits. Up to now many efforts have been made by public database developers to facilitate the storage, compilation and visualization of multiple QTL mapping experiment results. However, studying the congruency between these results still remains a complex task. Presently, the few computational and statistical frameworks to do so are mainly based on empirical methods (e.g. consensus genetic maps are generally built by iterative projection). Results In this article, we present a new computational and statistical package, called MetaQTL, for carrying out whole-genome meta-analysis of QTL mapping experiments. Contrary to existing methods, MetaQTL offers a complete statistical process to establish a consensus model for both the marker and the QTL positions on the whole genome. First, MetaQTL implements a new statistical approach to merge multiple distinct genetic maps into a single consensus map which is optimal in terms of weighted least squares and can be used to investigate recombination rate heterogeneity between studies. Secondly, assuming that QTL can be projected on the consensus map, MetaQTL offers a new clustering approach based on a Gaussian mixture model to decide how many QTL underly the distribution of the observed QTL. Conclusion We demonstrate using simulations that the usual model choice criteria from mixture model literature perform relatively well in this context. As expected, simulations also show that this new clustering algorithm leads to a reduction in the length of the confidence interval of QTL location provided that across studies there are enough observed QTL for each underlying true QTL location. The usefulness of our approach is illustrated on published QTL detection results of flowering time in maize. Finally, MetaQTL is freely available at . PMID:17288608

  3. Mapping dynamic QTL for plant height in triticale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant height is a prime example of a dynamic trait that changes constantly throughout adult development. In this study we utilised a large triticale mapping population, comprising 647 doubled haploid lines derived from 4 families, to phenotype for plant height by a precision phenotyping platform at multiple time points. Results Using multiple-line cross QTL mapping we identified main effect and epistatic QTL for plant height for each of the time points. Interestingly, some QTL were detected at all time points whereas others were specific to particular developmental stages. Furthermore, the contribution of the QTL to the genotypic variance of plant height also varied with time as exemplified by a major QTL identified on chromosome 6A. Conclusions Taken together, our results in the small grain cereal triticale reveal the importance of considering temporal genetic patterns in the regulation of complex traits such as plant height. PMID:24885543

  4. Using TeQing-into-Lemont introgression lines (TILs) to dissect sheath blight resistance QTLs and fine-map a spreading culm gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been using a set of TeQing-into-Lemont introgression lines to fine-map sheath blight resistance QTL. In the course of dissection a QTL region previously mapped on chromosome 9, we discovered a gene for spreading culms (or open plant-type) residing in one half of the QTL region, while the she...

  5. Mapping Isoflavone QTL with Main, Epistatic and QTL × Environment Effects in Recombinant Inbred Lines of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Han, Yingpeng; Zhao, Xue; Li, Yongguang; Teng, Weili; Li, Dongmei; Zhan, Yong; Li, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) isoflavone is important for human health and plant defense system. To identify novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) and epistatic QTL underlying isoflavone content in soybean, F5:6, F5:7 and F5:8 populations of 130 recombinant inbred (RI) lines, derived from the cross of soybean cultivar ‘Zhong Dou 27? (high isoflavone) and ‘Jiu Nong 20? (low isoflavone), were analyzed with 95 new SSR markers. A new linkage map including 194 SSR markers and covering 2,312 cM with mean distance of about 12 cM between markers was constructed. Thirty four QTL for both individual and total seed isoflavone contents of soybean were identified. Six, seven, ten and eleven QTL were associated with daidzein (DZ), glycitein (GC), genistein (GT) and total isoflavone (TI), respectively. Of them 23 QTL were newly identified. The qTIF_1 between Satt423 and Satt569 shared the same marker Satt569 with qDZF_2, qGTF_1 and qTIF_2. The qGTD2_1 between Satt186 and Satt226 was detected in four environments and explained 3.41%-10.98% of the phenotypic variation. The qGTA2_1, overlapped with qGCA2_1 and detected in four environments, was close to the previously identified major QTL for GT, which were responsible for large a effects. QTL (qDZF_2, qGTF_1 and qTIF_2) between Satt144-Satt569 were either clustered or pleiotropic. The qGCM_1, qGTM_1 and qTIM_1 between Satt540-Sat_244 explained 2.02%–9.12% of the phenotypic variation over six environments. Moreover, the qGCE_1 overlapped with qGTE_1 and qTIE_1, the qTIH_2 overlapped with qGTH_1, qGCI_1 overlapped with qDZI_1, qTIL_1 overlapped with qGTL_1, and qTIO_1 overlapped with qGTO_1. In this study, some of unstable QTL were detected in different environments, which were due to weak expression of QTL, QTL by environment interaction in the opposite direction to a effects, and/or epistasis. The markers identified in multi-environments in this study could be applied in the selection of soybean cultivars for higher isoflavone content and in the map-based gene cloning. PMID:25738957

  6. QTL: Why and How UW-Madison PBPG Yandell 2007 1 Gene Mapping

    E-print Network

    Yandell, Brian S.

    /evolution ­ how is the genome organized? ­ identify units of natural selection ­ additive effects may be most 3 2 1 major QTL on linkage map major QTL minor QTL polygenes (modifiers) QTL: Why and How UW estimates of loci: less bias, smaller intervals · improve inference of complex genetic architecture

  7. A sequential quantitative trait locus fine-mapping strategy using recombinant-derived progeny.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Zhang, Dongfeng; Xu, Mingliang

    2012-04-01

    A thorough understanding of the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that underlie agronomically important traits in crops would greatly increase agricultural productivity. Although advances have been made in QTL cloning, the majority of QTLs remain unknown because of their low heritability and minor contributions to phenotypic performance. Here we summarize the key advantages and disadvantages of current QTL fine-mapping methodologies, and then introduce a sequential QTL fine-mapping strategy based on both genotypes and phenotypes of progeny derived from recombinants. With this mapping strategy, experimental errors could be dramatically diminished so as to reveal the authentic genetic effect of target QTLs. The number of progeny required to detect QTLs at various R2 values was calculated, and the backcross generation suitable to start QTL fine-mapping was also estimated. This mapping strategy has proved to be very powerful in narrowing down QTL regions, particularly minor-effect QTLs, as revealed by fine-mapping of various resistance QTLs in maize. Application of this sequential QTL mapping strategy should accelerate cloning of agronomically important QTLs, which is currently a substantial challenge in crops. PMID:22348858

  8. GENE LINKAGE MAPPING OF THE PORCINE CHROMOSOME X REGION HARBOURING QTL FOR FAT DEPOSITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The QTL for backfat thickness and intramuscular fat content on SSCX is well documented in Meishan x Western breed pedigrees. The QTL has been mapped to the chromosome region between microsatellites SW2456 and SW1943. In the French pedigree with more than 1,100 F2 animals the QTL mapped at position 7...

  9. Fine-Scale Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Using Historical Recombinations

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, M.; Guo, S. W.

    1997-01-01

    With increasing popularity of QTL mapping in economically important animals and experimental species, the need for statistical methodology for fine-scale QTL mapping becomes increasingly urgent. The ability to disentangle several linked QTL depends on the number of recombination events. An obvious approach to increase the recombination events is to increase sample size, but this approach is often constrained by resources. Moreover, increasing the sample size beyond a certain point will not further reduce the length of confidence interval for QTL map locations. The alternative approach is to use historical recombinations. We use analytical methods to examine the properties of fine QTL mapping using historical recombinations that are accumulated through repeated intercrossing from an F(2) population. We demonstrate that, using the historical recombinations, both simple and multiple regression models can reduce significantly the lengths of support intervals for estimated QTL map locations and the variances of estimated QTL map locations. We also demonstrate that, while the simple regression model using historical recombinations does not reduce the variances of the estimated additive and dominant effects, the multiple regression model does. We further determine the power and threshold values for both the simple and multiple regression models. In addition, we calculate the Kullback-Leibler distance and Fisher information for the simple regression model, in the hope to further understand the advantages and disadvantages of using historical recombinations relative to F(2) data. PMID:9093869

  10. Development and characterization of 96 microsatellite markers suitable for QTL mapping and accession control in an Arabidopsis core collection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To identify plant genes involved in various key traits, QTL mapping is a powerful approach. This approach is based on the use of mapped molecular markers to identify genomic regions controlling quantitative traits followed by a fine mapping and eventually positional cloning of candidate genes. Mapping technologies using SNP markers are still rather expensive and not feasible in every laboratory. In contrast, microsatellite (also called SSR for Simple Sequence Repeat) markers are technologically less demanding and less costly for any laboratory interested in genetic mapping. Results In this study, we present the development and the characterization of a panel of 96 highly polymorphic SSR markers along the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allowing QTL mapping among accessions of the Versailles 24 core collection that covers a high percentage of the A. thaliana genetic diversity. These markers can be used for any QTL mapping analysis involving any of these accessions. We optimized the use of these markers in order to reveal polymorphism using standard PCR conditions and agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, we showed that the use of only three of these markers allows differentiating all 24 accessions which makes this set of markers a powerful tool to control accession identity or any cross between any of these accessions. Conclusion The set of SSR markers developed in this study provides a simple and efficient tool for any laboratory focusing on QTL mapping in A. thaliana and a simple means to control seed stock or crosses between accessions. PMID:24447639

  11. Comparative mapping of a region on chromosome 10 containing QTL for reproduction in swine.

    PubMed

    Nonneman, D J; Rohrer, G A

    2003-02-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTL) for important reproductive traits (age of puberty, ovulation rate, nipple number and plasma FSH) have been identified on the long arm of porcine chromosome 10. Bi-directional chromosome painting has shown that this region is homologous to human chromosome 10p. Because few microsatellite or type I markers have been placed on SSC10, we wanted to increase the density of known ESTs mapped in this region of the porcine genome. Genes were chosen for their position on human chromosome 10, sequence availability from the TIGR pig gene indices, and their potential as a candidate gene. The PCR primers were designed to amplify across introns or 3'-UTR to maximize single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery. Parents of the mapping population (one sire and seven dams) were amplified and sequenced to find informative markers. The SNPs were genotyped using primer extension and mass spectrometry. These amplification products were also used to probe a BAC library (RPCI-44, Roswell Park Cancer Institute) for positive clones and screened for microsatellites. Six genes from human chromosome 10p (AKR1C2, PRKCQ, ITIH2, ATP5C1, PIP5K2A and GAD2) were mapped in the MARC swine mapping population. Gene order was conserved within these markers from centromere to telomere of porcine chromosome 10q, as compared with human chromosome 10p. Four of these genes (PIP5K2A, ITIH2, GAD2 and AKR1C2), which map under QTL, are potential candidate genes. Identification of porcine homologues near important QTL and development of a comparative map for this chromosome will allow further fine- mapping and positional cloning of candidate genes affecting reproductive traits. PMID:12580785

  12. April 2008 UW-Madison Brian S. Yandell 1 Bayesian QTL Mapping

    E-print Network

    Yandell, Brian S.

    /evolution ­ how is the genome organized? ­ identify units of natural selection ­ additive effects may be most genetic architecture ­ patterns and individual elements of epistasis ­ appropriate estimates of means on linkage map major QTL minor QTL polygenes (modifiers) Intuitive idea of ellipses: Horizontal

  13. A consensus linkage map of oil palm and a major QTL for stem height

    PubMed Central

    Lee, May; Xia, Jun Hong; Zou, Zhongwei; Ye, Jian; Rahmadsyah; Alfiko, Yuzer; Jin, Jingjing; Lieando, Jessica Virginia; Purnamasari, Maria Indah; Lim, Chin Huat; Suwanto, Antonius; Wong, Limsoon; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yue, Gen Hua

    2015-01-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guinensis Jacquin) is the most important source of vegetable oil and fat. Several linkage maps had been constructed using dominant and co-dominant markers to facilitate mapping of QTL. However, dominant markers are not easily transferable among different laboratories. We constructed a consensus linkage map for oil palm using co-dominant markers (i.e. microsatellite and SNPs) and two F1 breeding populations generated by crossing Dura and Pisifera individuals. Four hundreds and forty-four microsatellites and 36 SNPs were mapped onto 16 linkage groups. The map length was 1565.6?cM, with an average marker space of 3.72?cM. A genome-wide scan of QTL identified a major QTL for stem height on the linkage group 5, which explained 51% of the phenotypic variation. Genes in the QTL were predicted using the palm genome sequence and bioinformatic tools. The linkage map supplies a base for mapping QTL for accelerating the genetic improvement, and will be also useful in the improvement of the assembly of the genome sequences. Markers linked to the QTL may be used in selecting dwarf trees. Genes within the QTL will be characterized to understand the mechanisms underlying dwarfing. PMID:25648560

  14. Mapping QTL conferring resistance in maize to gray leaf spot disease caused by Cercospora zeina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gray leaf spot (GLS) is a globally important foliar disease of maize. Cercospora zeina, one of the two fungal species that cause the disease, is prevalent in southern Africa, China, Brazil and the eastern corn belt of the USA. Identification of QTL for GLS resistance in subtropical germplasm is important to support breeding programmes in developing countries where C.?zeina limits production of this staple food crop. Results A maize RIL population (F7:S6) from a cross between CML444 and SC Malawi was field-tested under GLS disease pressure at five field sites over three seasons in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Thirty QTL identified from eleven field trials (environments) were consolidated to seven QTL for GLS resistance based on their expression in at least two environments and location in the same core maize bins. Four GLS resistance alleles were derived from the more resistant parent CML444 (bin 1.10, 4.08, 9.04/9.05, 10.06/10.07), whereas the remainder were from SC Malawi (bin 6.06/6.07, 7.02/7.03, 9.06). QTLs in bin 4.08 and bin 6.06/6.07 were also detected as joint QTLs, each explained more than 11% of the phenotypic variation, and were identified in four and seven environments, respectively. Common markers were used to allocate GLS QTL from eleven previous studies to bins on the IBM2005 map, and GLS QTL “hotspots” were noted. Bin 4.08 and 7.02/7.03 GLS QTL from this study overlapped with hotspots, whereas the bin 6.06/6.07 and bin 9.06 QTLs appeared to be unique. QTL for flowering time (bin 1.07, 4.09) in this population did not correspond to QTL for GLS resistance. Conclusions QTL mapping of a RIL population from the subtropical maize parents CML444 and SC Malawi identified seven QTL for resistance to gray leaf spot disease caused by C.?zeina. These QTL together with QTL from eleven studies were allocated to bins on the IBM2005 map to provide a basis for comparison. Hotspots of GLS QTL were identified on chromosomes one, two, four, five and seven, with QTL in the current study overlapping with two of these. Two QTL from this study did not overlap with previously reported QTL. PMID:24885661

  15. QTL mapping of cucumber fruit flesh thickness by SLAF-seq.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuewen; Lu, Lu; Zhu, Biyun; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-01-01

    Cucumber is an agriculturally and economically important vegetable crop worldwide. Fruit flesh thickness is an important trait for cucumber and also a central determinant of yield, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this trait. In this study, bulked segregant analysis (BSA) combined with specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) was applied to finely map the gene that underlies fruit flesh thickness in cucumber. A 0.19-Mb-long quantitative trait locus on chromosome 2 controlling fruit flesh thickness (QTL fft2.1) was identified and further confirmed by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker-based classical QTL mapping in 138 F2 individuals. Gene prediction of this 0.19-Mb region identified 20 genes. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed higher expression levels of Csa2 M058670.1 (SET domain protein-lysine methyltransferase) in D8 (thick fruit flesh parent) compared with that in XUE1 (thin fruit flesh parent) during fruit development. Sequence alignment analysis of Csa2M058670.1 from thick and thin fruit flesh cucumber lines revealed a 4-bp deletion mutation in the promoter region of this candidate gene, which may result in the loss of Csa2M058670.1 activation in thin fruit flesh lines. The data presented herein suggest that Csa2M058670.1 is a possible candidate gene for controlling flesh thickness in cucumber. PMID:26508560

  16. QTL mapping of cucumber fruit flesh thickness by SLAF-seq

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuewen; Lu, Lu; Zhu, Biyun; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-01-01

    Cucumber is an agriculturally and economically important vegetable crop worldwide. Fruit flesh thickness is an important trait for cucumber and also a central determinant of yield, yet little is known about the underlying mechanism of this trait. In this study, bulked segregant analysis (BSA) combined with specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) was applied to finely map the gene that underlies fruit flesh thickness in cucumber. A 0.19-Mb-long quantitative trait locus on chromosome 2 controlling fruit flesh thickness (QTL fft2.1) was identified and further confirmed by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker-based classical QTL mapping in 138 F2 individuals. Gene prediction of this 0.19-Mb region identified 20 genes. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed higher expression levels of Csa2 M058670.1 (SET domain protein-lysine methyltransferase) in D8 (thick fruit flesh parent) compared with that in XUE1 (thin fruit flesh parent) during fruit development. Sequence alignment analysis of Csa2M058670.1 from thick and thin fruit flesh cucumber lines revealed a 4-bp deletion mutation in the promoter region of this candidate gene, which may result in the loss of Csa2M058670.1 activation in thin fruit flesh lines. The data presented herein suggest that Csa2M058670.1 is a possible candidate gene for controlling flesh thickness in cucumber. PMID:26508560

  17. Functional Multi-Locus QTL Mapping of Temporal Trends in Scots Pine Wood Traits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zitong; Hallingbäck, Henrik R.; Abrahamsson, Sara; Fries, Anders; Gull, Bengt Andersson; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; García-Gil, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of wood properties in conifer species has focused on single time point measurements or on trait means based on heterogeneous wood samples (e.g., increment cores), thus ignoring systematic within-tree trends. In this study, functional QTL mapping was performed for a set of important wood properties in increment cores from a 17-yr-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) full-sib family with the aim of detecting wood trait QTL for general intercepts (means) and for linear slopes by increasing cambial age. Two multi-locus functional QTL analysis approaches were proposed and their performances were compared on trait datasets comprising 2 to 9 time points, 91 to 455 individual tree measurements and genotype datasets of amplified length polymorphisms (AFLP), and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The first method was a multilevel LASSO analysis whereby trend parameter estimation and QTL mapping were conducted consecutively; the second method was our Bayesian linear mixed model whereby trends and underlying genetic effects were estimated simultaneously. We also compared several different hypothesis testing methods under either the LASSO or the Bayesian framework to perform QTL inference. In total, five and four significant QTL were observed for the intercepts and slopes, respectively, across wood traits such as earlywood percentage, wood density, radial fiberwidth, and spiral grain angle. Four of these QTL were represented by candidate gene SNPs, thus providing promising targets for future research in QTL mapping and molecular function. Bayesian and LASSO methods both detected similar sets of QTL given datasets that comprised large numbers of individuals. PMID:25305041

  18. High-Resolution Mapping of the Blood Pressure QTL on Chromosome 7 Using Dahl Rat Congenic Strains

    E-print Network

    Abraham, Nader G.

    High-Resolution Mapping of the Blood Pressure QTL on Chromosome 7 Using Dahl Rat Congenic Strains-sensitive (S) and salt-resistant (R) rats that a blood pressure quan- titative trait locus (QTL) was present-hydroxy- 11-deoxy corticosterone, is very likely to account for the blood pressure QTL on chromosome 7

  19. Inclusive Composite Interval Mapping of QTL by Environment Interactions in Biparental Populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Jiankang; Zhang, Luyan

    2015-01-01

    Identification of environment-specific QTL and stable QTL having consistent genetic effects across a wide range of environments is of great importance in plant breeding. Inclusive Composite Interval Mapping (ICIM) has been proposed for additive, dominant and epistatic QTL mapping in biparental populations for single environment. In this study, ICIM was extended to QTL by environment interaction (QEI) mapping for multi-environmental trials, where the QTL average effect and QEI effects could be properly estimated. Stepwise regression was firstly applied in each environment to identify the most significant marker variables which were then used to adjust the phenotypic values. One-dimensional scanning was then conducted on the adjusted phenotypic values across the environments in order to detect QTL with either average effect or QEI effects, or both average effect and QEI effects. In this way, the genetic background could be well controlled while the conventional interval mapping was applied. An empirical method to determine the threshold of logarithm of odds was developed, and the efficiency of the ICIM QEI mapping was demonstrated in simulated populations under different genetic models. One actual recombinant inbred line population was used to compare mapping results between QEI mapping and single-environment analysis. PMID:26161656

  20. High-resolution mapping of a major effect QTL from wild tomato Solanum habrochaites that influences water relations under root chilling.

    PubMed

    Arms, Erin M; Bloom, Arnold J; St Clair, Dina A

    2015-09-01

    QTL stm9 controlling rapid-onset water stress tolerance in S. habrochaites was high-resolution mapped to a chromosome 9 region that contains genes associated with abiotic stress tolerances. Wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites) exhibits tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought and chilling. Root chilling (6 °C) induces rapid-onset water stress by impeding water movement from roots to shoots. S. habrochaites responds to such changes by closing stomata and maintaining shoot turgor, while cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum) fails to close stomata and wilts. This response (shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling) is controlled by a major QTL (designated stm9) on chromosome 9, which was previously fine-mapped to a 2.7-cM region. Recombinant sub-near-isogenic lines for chromosome 9 were marker-selected, phenotyped for shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling in two sets of replicated experiments (Fall and Spring), and the data were used to high-resolution map QTL stm9 to a 0.32-cM region. QTL mapping revealed a single QTL that was coincident for both the Spring and Fall datasets, suggesting that the gene or genes contributing to shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling reside within the marker interval H9-T1673. In the S. lycopersicum reference genome sequence, this chromosome 9 region is gene-rich and contains representatives of gene families that have been associated with abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26044122

  1. A new method of QTL identification for undersaturated maps.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, A K A; Balestre, M; Lara, L A C; Santos, J B; Bueno Filho, J S S

    2015-01-01

    In many species, low levels of polymorphism prevent the assembly of linkage maps that are used to identify genetic markers related to the expression of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). This study compared two methods of locating QTLs in association studies that do not require a previous estimation of linkage maps. Method I (MI) was a Bayesian multiple marker regression and Method II (MII) combined multiple QTL mapping and "moving away from markers". In this method, markers are not directly regressed to the phenotype, but are used as pivots to search for QTLs along the genome. To compare methods, we simulated 300 individuals from an F2 progeny with two levels of marker loss (20 and 80%). A total of 165 markers and seven QTLs were spread along 11 chromosomes (roughly emulating the genetic structure of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris). A real data example with 186 progenies of a F2:4 generation of the species was analyzed using 59 markers (17 simple sequence repeats, 31 amplified fragment length polymorphisms, and 11 sequence-related amplified polymorphisms). MII was more precise than MI for both levels of marker loss. For real data, MII detected 17 candidate positions for QTLs, whereas MI did not detect any. MII is a powerful method that requires further studies with actual data and other designs such as crossover, and genome-wide studies. PMID:26436387

  2. QTL Mapping of Flowering and Fruiting Traits in Olive

    PubMed Central

    Sadok, Inès Ben; Celton, Jean-Marc; Essalouh, Laila; El Aabidine, Amal Zine; Garcia, Gilbert; Martinez, Sebastien; Grati-Kamoun, Naziha; Rebai, Ahmed; Costes, Evelyne; Khadari, Bouchaib

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenge fruit growers are facing is to balance between tree production and vegetative growth from year to year. To investigate the existence of genetic determinism for reproductive behaviour in olive tree, we studied an olive segregating population derived from a cross between ‘Olivière’ and ‘Arbequina’ cultivars. Our strategy was based on (i) an annual assessment of individual trees yield, and (ii) a decomposition of adult growth units at the crown periphery into quantitative variables related to both flowering and fruiting process in relation to their growth and branching. Genetic models, including the year, genotype effects and their interactions, were built with variance function and correlation structure of residuals when necessary. Among the progeny, trees were either ‘ON’ or ‘OFF’ for a given year and patterns of regular vs. irregular bearing were revealed. Genotype effect was significant on yield but not for flowering traits at growth unit (GU) scale, whereas the interaction between genotype and year was significant for both traits. A strong genetic effect was found for all fruiting traits without interaction with the year. Based on the new constructed genetic map, QTLs with small effects were detected, revealing multigenic control of the studied traits. Many were associated to alleles from ‘Arbequina’. Genetic correlations were found between Yield and Fruit set at GU scale suggesting a common genetic control, even though QTL co-localisations were in spe`cific years only. Most QTL were associated to flowering traits in specific years, even though reproductive traits at GU scale did not capture the bearing status of the trees in a given year. Results were also interpreted with respect to ontogenetic changes of growth and branching, and an alternative sampling strategy was proposed for capturing tree fruiting behaviour. Regular bearing progenies were identified and could constitute innovative material for selection programs. PMID:23690957

  3. Genome-wide QTL mapping of saltwater tolerance in sibling species of Anopheles (malaria vector) mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Smith, H A; White, B J; Kundert, P; Cheng, C; Romero-Severson, J; Andolfatto, P; Besansky, N J

    2015-11-01

    Although freshwater (FW) is the ancestral habitat for larval mosquitoes, multiple species independently evolved the ability to survive in saltwater (SW). Here, we use quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to investigate the genetic architecture of osmoregulation in Anopheles mosquitoes, vectors of human malaria. We analyzed 1134 backcross progeny from a cross between the obligate FW species An. coluzzii, and its closely related euryhaline sibling species An. merus. Tests of 2387 markers with Bayesian interval mapping and machine learning (random forests) yielded six genomic regions associated with SW tolerance. Overlap in QTL regions from both approaches enhances confidence in QTL identification. Evidence exists for synergistic as well as disruptive epistasis among loci. Intriguingly, one QTL region containing ion transporters spans the 2Rop chromosomal inversion that distinguishes these species. Rather than a simple trait controlled by one or a few loci, our data are most consistent with a complex, polygenic mode of inheritance. PMID:25920668

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER High density SNP mapping and QTL analysis for fruit quality

    E-print Network

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    ORIGINAL PAPER High density SNP mapping and QTL analysis for fruit quality characteristics in peach SNP linkage map of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch). A set of 1,536 SNPs were evaluatedM of the peach genome and included 1,037 SNP markers, and Pop-DG map covered 369 cM and included 738 SNPs

  5. Selective Advance for Accelerated Development of Recombinant Inbred QTL Mapping Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant inbred lines, conventionally used for QTL mapping in biparental populations of self-pollinating plant species, afford limited mapping resolution. Intercrossing during line development is sometimes used to counter this disadvantage, but is tedious. It is desirable to improve mapping resol...

  6. Consensus mapping of major resistance genes and independent QTL for quantitative resistance to sunflower downy mildew.

    PubMed

    Vincourt, Patrick; As-Sadi, Falah; Bordat, Amandine; Langlade, Nicolas B; Gouzy, Jerome; Pouilly, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Serre, Frédéric; Godiard, Laurence; Tourvieille de Labrouhe, Denis; Vear, Felicity

    2012-09-01

    Major gene resistance to sunflower downy mildew (Plasmopara halstedii) races 304 and 314 was found to segregate independently from the resistance to races 334, 307 and 304 determined by the gene Pl2, already positioned on Linkage Group (LG) 8 of sunflower molecular maps. Using a consensus SSR-SNP map constructed from the INEDI RIL population and a new RIL population FU × PAZ2, the positions of Pl2 and Pl5 were confirmed and the new gene, denoted Pl21, was mapped on LG13, at 8 cM from Pl5. The two RIL populations were observed for their quantitative resistance to downy mildew in the field and both indicated the existence of a QTL on LG8 at 20-40 cM from the major resistance gene cluster. In addition, for the INEDI population, a strong QTL on LG10, reported previously, was confirmed and a third QTL was mapped on LG7. A growth chamber test methodology, significantly correlated with field results, also revealed the major QTL on LG10, explaining 65 % of variability. This QTL mapped in the same area as a gene involved in stomatal opening and root growth, which may be suggested as a possible candidate to explain the control of this character. These results indicate that it should be possible to combine major genes and other resistance mechanisms, a strategy that could help to improve durability of sunflower resistance to downy mildew. PMID:22576236

  7. Fine mapping implicates two immunity genes in larval resistance to the honey bee brood fungal disease, Chalkbrood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalkbrood infection of honey bee (Apis mellifera) brood by the fungus Ascosphaera apis results in fatal encapsulation of susceptible larvae with a mycelial coat. Recent QTL analysis indicates that some level of physiological resistance exists in individual larvae. We performed a fine mapping anal...

  8. Using a Linkage Mapping Approach to Identify QTL for Day-Neutrality in the Octoploid Strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linkage mapping approach was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with day-neutrality in the commercial strawberry, Fragaria ×ananassa (Duch ex Rozier). Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphic (AFLP) markers were used to build a genetic map with a population of 127 lines develo...

  9. In silico QTL mapping of basal liver iron levels in inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Stela; Lee, Seung-Min; Steele, Teresa M.; Hawthorne, Paula L.; Zapala, Matthew A.; Eskin, Eleazar; Schork, Nicholas J.; Anderson, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Both iron deficiency and iron excess are detrimental in many organisms, and previous studies in both mice and humans suggest that genetic variation may influence iron status in mammals. However, these genetic factors are not well defined. To address this issue, we measured basal liver iron levels in 18 inbred strains of mice of both sexes on a defined iron diet and found ?4-fold variation in liver iron in males (lowest 153 ?g/g, highest 661 ?g/g) and ?3-fold variation in females (lowest 222 ?g/g, highest 658 ?g/g). We carried out a genome-wide association mapping to identify haplotypes underlying differences in liver iron and three other related traits (copper and zinc liver levels, and plasma diferric transferrin levels) in a subset of 14 inbred strains for which genotype information was available. We identified two putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contain genes with a known role in iron metabolism: Eif2ak1 and Igf2r. We also identified four putative QTL that reside in previously identified iron-related QTL and 22 novel putative QTL. The most promising putative QTL include a 0.22 Mb region on Chromosome 7 and a 0.32 Mb region on Chromosome 11 that both contain only one candidate gene, Adam12 and Gria1, respectively. Identified putative QTL are good candidates for further refinement and subsequent functional studies. PMID:21062905

  10. QTL Mapping of Sex Determination Loci Supports an Ancient Pathway in Ants and Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Misato O; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2015-11-01

    Sex determination mechanisms play a central role in life-history characteristics, affecting mating systems, sex ratios, inbreeding tolerance, etc. Downstream components of sex determination pathways are highly conserved, but upstream components evolve rapidly. Evolutionary dynamics of sex determination remain poorly understood, particularly because mechanisms appear so diverse. Here we investigate the origins and evolution of complementary sex determination (CSD) in ants and bees. The honey bee has a well-characterized CSD locus, containing tandemly arranged homologs of the transformer gene [complementary sex determiner (csd) and feminizer (fem)]. Such tandem paralogs appear frequently in aculeate hymenopteran genomes. However, only comparative genomic, but not functional, data support a broader role for csd/fem in sex determination, and whether species other than the honey bee use this pathway remains controversial. Here we used a backcross to test whether csd/fem acts as a CSD locus in an ant (Vollenhovia emeryi). After sequencing and assembling the genome, we computed a linkage map, and conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of diploid male production using 68 diploid males and 171 workers. We found two QTLs on separate linkage groups (CsdQTL1 and CsdQTL2) that jointly explained 98.0% of the phenotypic variance. CsdQTL1 included two tandem transformer homologs. These data support the prediction that the same CSD mechanism has indeed been conserved for over 100 million years. CsdQTL2 had no similarity to CsdQTL1 and included a 236-kb region with no obvious CSD gene candidates, making it impossible to conclusively characterize it using our data. The sequence of this locus was conserved in at least one other ant genome that diverged >75 million years ago. By applying QTL analysis to ants for the first time, we support the hypothesis that elements of hymenopteran CSD are ancient, but also show that more remains to be learned about the diversity of CSD mechanisms. PMID:26544972

  11. QTL Mapping of Sex Determination Loci Supports an Ancient Pathway in Ants and Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Misato O.; Mikheyev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Sex determination mechanisms play a central role in life-history characteristics, affecting mating systems, sex ratios, inbreeding tolerance, etc. Downstream components of sex determination pathways are highly conserved, but upstream components evolve rapidly. Evolutionary dynamics of sex determination remain poorly understood, particularly because mechanisms appear so diverse. Here we investigate the origins and evolution of complementary sex determination (CSD) in ants and bees. The honey bee has a well-characterized CSD locus, containing tandemly arranged homologs of the transformer gene [complementary sex determiner (csd) and feminizer (fem)]. Such tandem paralogs appear frequently in aculeate hymenopteran genomes. However, only comparative genomic, but not functional, data support a broader role for csd/fem in sex determination, and whether species other than the honey bee use this pathway remains controversial. Here we used a backcross to test whether csd/fem acts as a CSD locus in an ant (Vollenhovia emeryi). After sequencing and assembling the genome, we computed a linkage map, and conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of diploid male production using 68 diploid males and 171 workers. We found two QTLs on separate linkage groups (CsdQTL1 and CsdQTL2) that jointly explained 98.0% of the phenotypic variance. CsdQTL1 included two tandem transformer homologs. These data support the prediction that the same CSD mechanism has indeed been conserved for over 100 million years. CsdQTL2 had no similarity to CsdQTL1 and included a 236-kb region with no obvious CSD gene candidates, making it impossible to conclusively characterize it using our data. The sequence of this locus was conserved in at least one other ant genome that diverged >75 million years ago. By applying QTL analysis to ants for the first time, we support the hypothesis that elements of hymenopteran CSD are ancient, but also show that more remains to be learned about the diversity of CSD mechanisms. PMID:26544972

  12. High Resolution QTL Maps Of 31 Traits in Contemporary U.S. Holstein Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution QTL maps of 1586 SNPs affecting 31 dairy traits (top 100 effects per trait)were constructed based on a genome-wide association analysis of 1,654 contemporary U.S. Holstein cows genotyped with 45,878 SNPs. The 31 traits include net merit and its 8 compnent traits, 4 calving traits, an...

  13. MAPPING AND QTL ANALYSIS OF PLANT ARCHITECTURE AND FRUIT YIELD IN MELON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inheritance of plant architecture and fruit yield in melon (Cucumis melo L.; 2n = 2x = 24) is poorly understood, and the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yield-related traits has not been reported. Therefore, a set of 81 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) was developed from a cross betw...

  14. Mapping QTL main and interaction influences on milling quality in elite U.S. rice germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) head-rice yield (HR) is a key export and domestic quality trait whose genetic control is poorly understood. With the goal of identifying genomic regions influencing HR, quantitative-trait-locus (QTL) mapping was carried out for quality-related traits in recombinant inbred line...

  15. Genetic complexity of an obesity QTL (Fob3) revealed by detailed genetic mapping

    E-print Network

    Keightley, Peter

    Genetic complexity of an obesity QTL (Fob3) revealed by detailed genetic mapping Ioannis M, 1230, Slovenia Received: 12 September 2003 / Accepted: 26 January 2004 Abstract Obesity is proving production. While recent advances in genetics have identified a number of monogenic causes of obesity

  16. Mapping phenotypic, expression and transmission ratio distortion QTL using RAD markers in the Lake

    E-print Network

    Bernatchez, Louis

    benthic relative by numerous life history, behavioural, morphological and gene expression traits selection may operate. These include variation in quantitative phenotypic traits, regulation of gene-Sequencing method to a hybrid backcross family to reconstruct a high-density genetic linkage map and perform QTL

  17. Cross-Population Joint Analysis of eQTLs: Fine Mapping and Functional Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Mapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has been shown as a powerful tool to uncover the genetic underpinnings of many complex traits at molecular level. In this paper, we present an integrative analysis approach that leverages eQTL data collected from multiple population groups. In particular, our approach effectively identifies multiple independent cis-eQTL signals that are consistent across populations, accounting for population heterogeneity in allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium patterns. Furthermore, by integrating genomic annotations, our analysis framework enables high-resolution functional analysis of eQTLs. We applied our statistical approach to analyze the GEUVADIS data consisting of samples from five population groups. From this analysis, we concluded that i) jointly analysis across population groups greatly improves the power of eQTL discovery and the resolution of fine mapping of causal eQTL ii) many genes harbor multiple independent eQTLs in their cis regions iii) genetic variants that disrupt transcription factor binding are significantly enriched in eQTLs (p-value = 4.93 × 10-22). PMID:25906321

  18. QTL Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Temephos Resistance in Larvae of the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe del Carmen; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Suarez, Adriana Flores; Black, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae. aegypti larval populations but resistance has evolved in many locations. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling temephos survival in Ae. aegypti larvae were mapped in a pair of F3 advanced intercross lines arising from temephos resistant parents from Solidaridad, México and temephos susceptible parents from Iquitos, Peru. Two sets of 200 F3 larvae were exposed to a discriminating dose of temephos and then dead larvae were collected and preserved for DNA isolation every two hours up to 16 hours. Larvae surviving longer than 16 hours were considered resistant. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at 23 single copy genes and 26 microsatellite loci of known physical positions in the Ae. aegypti genome. In both reciprocal crosses, Multiple Interval Mapping identified eleven QTL associated with time until death. In the Solidaridad×Iquitos (SLD×Iq) cross twelve were associated with survival but in the reciprocal IqxSLD cross, only six QTL were survival associated. Polymorphisms at acetylcholine esterase (AchE) loci 1 and 2 were not associated with either resistance phenotype suggesting that target site insensitivity is not an organophosphate resistance mechanism in this region of México. Conclusions/Significance Temephos resistance is under the control of many metabolic genes of small effect and dispersed throughout the Ae. aegypti genome. PMID:25330200

  19. Gains in QTL detection using an ultra-high density SNP map based on population sequencing relative to traditional RFLP/SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huihui; Xie, Weibo; Wang, Jia; Xing, Yongzhong; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2011-01-01

    Huge efforts have been invested in the last two decades to dissect the genetic bases of complex traits including yields of many crop plants, through quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses. However, almost all the studies were based on linkage maps constructed using low-throughput molecular markers, e.g. restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and simple sequence repeats (SSRs), thus are mostly of low density and not able to provide precise and complete information about the numbers and locations of the genes or QTLs controlling the traits. In this study, we constructed an ultra-high density genetic map based on high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from low-coverage sequences of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of rice, generated using new sequencing technology. The quality of the map was assessed by validating the positions of several cloned genes including GS3 and GW5/qSW5, two major QTLs for grain length and grain width respectively, and OsC1, a qualitative trait locus for pigmentation. In all the cases the loci could be precisely resolved to the bins where the genes are located, indicating high quality and accuracy of the map. The SNP map was used to perform QTL analysis for yield and three yield-component traits, number of tillers per plant, number of grains per panicle and grain weight, using data from field trials conducted over years, in comparison to QTL mapping based on RFLPs/SSRs. The SNP map detected more QTLs especially for grain weight, with precise map locations, demonstrating advantages in detecting power and resolution relative to the RFLP/SSR map. Thus this study provided an example for ultra-high density map construction using sequencing technology. Moreover, the results obtained are helpful for understanding the genetic bases of the yield traits and for fine mapping and cloning of QTLs. PMID:21390234

  20. Coding Gene SNP Mapping Reveals QTL Linked to Growth and Stress Response in Brook Charr (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Christopher; Vagner, Marie; Derôme, Nicolas; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Growth performance and reduced stress response are traits of major interest in fish production. Growth and stress-related quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been already identified in several salmonid species, but little effort has been devoted to charrs (genus Salvelinus). Moreover, most QTL studies to date focused on one or very few traits, and little investigation has been devoted to QTL identification for gene expression. Here, our objective was to identify QTL for 27 phenotypes related to growth and stress responses in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis), which is one of the most economically important freshwater aquaculture species in Canada. Phenotypes included 12 growth parameters, six blood and plasma variables, three hepatic variables, and one plasma hormone level as well as the relative expression measurements of five genes of interest linked to growth regulation. QTL analysis relied on a linkage map recently built from S. fontinalis consisting of both single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, n = 266) and microsatellite (n =81) markers in an F2 interstrain hybrid population (n = 171). We identified 63 growth-related QTL and four stress-related QTL across 18 of the 40 linkage groups of the brook charr linkage map. Percent variance explained, confidence interval, and allelic QTL effects also were investigated to provide insight into the genetic architecture of growth- and stress-related QTL. QTL related to growth performance and stress response that were identified could be classified into two groups: (1) a group composed of the numerous, small-effect QTL associated with some traits related to growth (i.e., weight) that may be under the control of a large number of genes or pleiotropic genes, and (2) a group of less numerous QTL associated with growth (i.e., gene expression) and with stress-related QTL that display a larger effect, suggesting that these QTL are under the control of a limited number of genes of major effect. This study represents a first step toward the identification of genes potentially linked to phenotypic variation of growth and stress response in brook charr. The ultimate goal is to provide new tools for developing Molecular Assisted Selection for this species. PMID:22690380

  1. High-Density Genetic Linkage Map Construction and QTL Mapping of Grain Shape and Size in the Wheat Population Yanda1817 × Beinong6

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiu-Hong; Chen, Yong-Xing; Zhou, Sheng-Hui; Fu, Lin; Chen, Jiao-Jiao; Xiao, Yao; Zhang, Dong; Ouyang, Shu-Hong; Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Cui, Yu; Zhang, De-Yun; Liang, Yong; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Xie, Jing-Zhong; Qin, Jin-Xia; Wang, Guo-Xin; Li, De-Lin; Huang, Yin-Lian; Yu, Mei-Hua; Lu, Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hao; Dang, Chen; Li, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Hui-Ru; Yuan, Cheng-Guo; You, Ming-Shan; Sun, Qi-Xin; Wang, Ji-Rui; Wang, Li-Xin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Han, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic linkage maps are necessary for precisely mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling grain shape and size in wheat. By applying the Infinium iSelect 9K SNP assay, we have constructed a high-density genetic linkage map with 269 F 8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed between a Chinese cornerstone wheat breeding parental line Yanda1817 and a high-yielding line Beinong6. The map contains 2431 SNPs and 128 SSR & EST-SSR markers in a total coverage of 3213.2 cM with an average interval of 1.26 cM per marker. Eighty-eight QTLs for thousand-grain weight (TGW), grain length (GL), grain width (GW) and grain thickness (GT) were detected in nine ecological environments (Beijing, Shijiazhuang and Kaifeng) during five years between 2010–2014 by inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) (LOD?2.5). Among which, 17 QTLs for TGW were mapped on chromosomes 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 3D, 4A, 4D, 5A, 5B and 6B with phenotypic variations ranging from 2.62% to 12.08%. Four stable QTLs for TGW could be detected in five and seven environments, respectively. Thirty-two QTLs for GL were mapped on chromosomes 1B, 1D, 2A, 2B, 2D, 3B, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4D, 5A, 5B, 6B, 7A and 7B, with phenotypic variations ranging from 2.62% to 44.39%. QGl.cau-2A.2 can be detected in all the environments with the largest phenotypic variations, indicating that it is a major and stable QTL. For GW, 12 QTLs were identified with phenotypic variations range from 3.69% to 12.30%. We found 27 QTLs for GT with phenotypic variations ranged from 2.55% to 36.42%. In particular, QTL QGt.cau-5A.1 with phenotypic variations of 6.82–23.59% was detected in all the nine environments. Moreover, pleiotropic effects were detected for several QTL loci responsible for grain shape and size that could serve as target regions for fine mapping and marker assisted selection in wheat breeding programs. PMID:25675376

  2. Detection and mapping of QTL for temperature tolerance and body size in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) using genotyping by sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Meredith V; Seeb, James E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how organisms interact with their environments is increasingly important for conservation efforts in many species, especially in light of highly anticipated climate changes. One method for understanding this relationship is to use genetic maps and QTL mapping to detect genomic regions linked to phenotypic traits of importance for adaptation. We used high-throughput genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to both detect and map thousands of SNPs in haploid Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We next applied this map to detect QTL related to temperature tolerance and body size in families of diploid Chinook salmon. Using these techniques, we mapped 3534 SNPs in 34 linkage groups which is consistent with the haploid chromosome number for Chinook salmon. We successfully detected three QTL for temperature tolerance and one QTL for body size at the experiment-wide level, as well as additional QTL significant at the chromosome-wide level. The use of haploids coupled with GBS provides a robust pathway to rapidly develop genomic resources in nonmodel organisms; these QTL represent preliminary progress toward linking traits of conservation interest to regions in the Chinook salmon genome. PMID:24822082

  3. Graph-regularized dual Lasso for robust eQTL mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Zhishan; Shi, Yu; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: As a promising tool for dissecting the genetic basis of complex traits, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping has attracted increasing research interest. An important issue in eQTL mapping is how to effectively integrate networks representing interactions among genetic markers and genes. Recently, several Lasso-based methods have been proposed to leverage such network information. Despite their success, existing methods have three common limitations: (i) a preprocessing step is usually needed to cluster the networks; (ii) the incompleteness of the networks and the noise in them are not considered; (iii) other available information, such as location of genetic markers and pathway information are not integrated. Results: To address the limitations of the existing methods, we propose Graph-regularized Dual Lasso (GDL), a robust approach for eQTL mapping. GDL integrates the correlation structures among genetic markers and traits simultaneously. It also takes into account the incompleteness of the networks and is robust to the noise. GDL utilizes graph-based regularizers to model the prior networks and does not require an explicit clustering step. Moreover, it enables further refinement of the partial and noisy networks. We further generalize GDL to incorporate the location of genetic makers and gene-pathway information. We perform extensive experimental evaluations using both simulated and real datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively integrate various available priori knowledge and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art eQTL mapping methods. Availability: Software for both C++ version and Matlab version is available at http://www.cs.unc.edu/?weicheng/. Contact: weiwang@cs.ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24931977

  4. Multiparental mapping of plant height and flowering time QTL in partially isogenic sorghum families.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R H; Thurber, C S; Assaranurak, I; Brown, P J

    2014-09-01

    Sorghum varieties suitable for grain production at temperate latitudes show dwarfism and photoperiod insensitivity, both of which are controlled by a small number of loci with large effects. We studied the genetic control of plant height and flowering time in five sorghum families (A-E), each derived from a cross between a tropical line and a partially isogenic line carrying introgressions derived from a common, temperate-adapted donor. A total of 724 F2:3 lines were phenotyped in temperate and tropical environments for plant height and flowering time and scored at 9139 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing. Biparental mapping was compared with multiparental mapping in different subsets of families (AB, ABC, ABCD, and ABCDE) using both a GWAS approach, which fit each QTL as a single effect across all families, and using a joint linkage approach, which fit QTL effects as nested within families. GWAS using all families (ABCDE) performed best at the cloned Dw3 locus, whereas joint linkage using all families performed best at the cloned Ma1 locus. Both multiparental approaches yielded apparently synthetic associations due to genetic heterogeneity and were highly dependent on the subset of families used. Comparison of all mapping approaches suggests that a GA2-oxidase underlies Dw1, and that a mir172a gene underlies a Dw1-linked flowering time QTL. PMID:25237111

  5. Genetic mapping of a 7R Al tolerance QTL in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack).

    PubMed

    Niedziela, A; Bednarek, P T; Labudda, M; Ma?kowski, D R; Anio?, A

    2014-02-01

    Triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) is a relatively new cereal crop. In Poland, triticale is grown on 12 % of arable land ( http://www.stat.gov.pl ). There is an increasing interest in its cultivation due to lowered production costs and increased adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. However, it has an insufficient tolerance to the presence of aluminum ions (Al(3+)) in the soil. The number of genes controlling aluminum tolerance in triticale and their chromosomal location is not known. Two F2 mapping biparental populations (MP1 and MP15) segregating for aluminum (Al) tolerance were tested with AFLP, SSR, DArT, and specific PCR markers. Genetic mapping enabled the construction of linkage groups representing chromosomes 7R, 5R and 2B. Obtained linkage groups were common for both mapping populations and mostly included the same markers. Composite interval mapping (CIM) allowed identification of a single QTL that mapped to the 7R chromosome and explained 25 % (MP1) and 36 % (MP15) of phenotypic variation. The B1, B26 and Xscm150 markers were 0.04 cM and 0.02 cM from the maximum of the LOD function in the MP1 and MP15, respectively and were highly associated with aluminum tolerance as indicated by Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Moreover, the molecular markers B1, B26, Xrems1162 and Xscm92, previously associated with the Alt4 locus that encoded an aluminum-activated malate transporter (ScALMT1) that was involved in Al tolerance in rye (Secale cereale) also mapped within QTL. Biochemical analysis of plants represented MP1 and MP15 mapping populations confirmed that the QTL located on 7R chromosome in both mapping populations is responsible for Al tolerance. PMID:24222435

  6. Composite interval mapping and mixed models reveal QTL associated with performance and carcass traits on chicken chromosomes 1, 3, and 4.

    PubMed

    Rosario, M F; Gazaffi, R; Moura, A S A M T; Ledur, M C; Coutinho, L L; Garcia, A A F

    2014-02-01

    Interval mapping (IM) implemented in QTL Express or GridQTL is widely used, but presents some limitations, such as restriction to a fixed model, risk of mapping two QTL when there may be only one and no discrimination of two or more QTL using both cofactors located on the same and other chromosomes. These limitations were overcome with composite interval mapping (CIM). We reported QTL associated with performance and carcass traits on chicken chromosomes 1, 3, and 4 through implementation of CIM and analysis of phenotypic data using mixed models. Thirty-four microsatellite markers were used to genotype 360 F2 chickens from crosses between males from a layer line and females from a broiler line. Sixteen QTL were mapped using CIM and 14 QTL with IM. Furthermore, of those 30 QTL, six were mapped only when CIM was used: for body weight at 35 days (first and third peaks on GGA4), body weight at 41 days (GGA1B and second peak on GGA4), and weights of back and legs (both on GGA4). Three new regions had evidence for QTL presence: one on GGA1B associated with feed intake 35-41 d at 404 cM (LEI0107-ADL0183) and two on GGA4 associated with weight of back at 163 cM (LEI0076-MCW0240) and weight gain 35-41 d, feed efficiency 35-41 d and weight of legs at 241 cM (LEI0085-MCW0174). We dissected one more linked QTL on GGA4, where three QTL for BW35 and two QTL for BW41 were mapped. Therefore, these new regions mapped here need further investigations using high-density SNP to confirm these QTL and identify candidate genes associated with those traits. PMID:24288072

  7. Multiple QTL for Horticultural Traits and Quantitative Resistance to Phytophthora infestans Linked on Solanum habrochaites Chromosome 11

    PubMed Central

    Haggard, J. Erron; Johnson, Emily B.; St. Clair, Dina A.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, a Phytophthora infestans resistance QTL from Solanum habrochaites chromosome 11 was introgressed into cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Fine mapping of this resistance QTL using near-isogenic lines (NILs) revealed some co-located QTL with undesirable effects on plant size, canopy density, and fruit size traits. Subsequently, higher-resolution mapping with sub-NILs detected multiple P. infestans resistance QTL within this 9.4-cM region of chromosome 11. In our present study, these same sub-NILs were also evaluated for 17 horticultural traits, including yield, maturity, fruit size and shape, fruit quality, and plant architecture traits in replicated field experiments over 2 years. The horticultural trait QTL originally detected by fine mapping each fractionated into two or more QTL at higher resolution. A total of 34 QTL were detected across all traits, with 14% exhibiting significant QTL × environment interactions (QTL × E). QTL for many traits were co-located, suggesting either pleiotropic effects or tight linkage among genes controlling these traits. Recombination in the pericentromeric region of the introgression between markers TG147 and At4g10050 was suppressed to approximately 29.7 Mbp per cM, relative to the genomewide average of 750 kbp per cM. The genetic architecture of many of the horticultural and P. infestans resistance traits that mapped within this chromosome 11 S. habrochaites region is complex. Complicating factors included fractionation of QTL, pleiotropy or tight linkage of QTL for multiple traits, pericentromeric chromosomal location(s), and/or QTL × E. High-resolution mapping of QTL in this region would be needed to determine which specific target QTL could be useful in breeding cultivated tomato. PMID:25504736

  8. Microsatellite mapping of QTL affecting growth, feed consumption, egg production, tonic immobility and body temperature of Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Minvielle, Francis; Kayang, Boniface B; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Miwa, Mitsuru; Vignal, Alain; Gourichon, David; Neau, André; Monvoisin, Jean-Louis; Ito, Shin'ichi

    2005-01-01

    Background The Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) is both an animal model in biology and a commercial bird for egg and meat production. Modern research developments with this bird, however, have been slowed down by the limited information that is available on the genetics of the Japanese quail. Recently, quail genetic maps with microsatellites and AFLP have been produced which open the way to comparative works with the chicken (Gallus gallus), and to QTL detection for a variety of traits. The purpose of this work was to detect for the first time QTL for commercial traits and for more basic characters in an F2 experiment with 434 female quail, and to compare the nature and the position of the detected QTL with those from the first chicken genome scans carried out during the last few years. Results Genome-wide significant or suggestive QTL were found for clutch length, body weight and feed intake on CJA01, age at first egg and egg number on CJA06, and eggshell weight and residual feed intake on CJA20, with possible pleiotropy for the QTL affecting body weight and feed intake, and egg number and age at first egg. A suggestive QTL was found for tonic immobility on CJA01, and chromosome-wide significant QTL for body temperature were detected on CJA01 and CJA03. Other chromosome-wide significant QTL were found on CJA02, CJA05, CJA09 and CJA14. Parent-of-origin effects were found for QTL for body weight and feed intake on CJA01. Conclusion Despite its limited length, the first quail microsatellite map was useful to detect new QTL for rarely reported traits, like residual feed intake, and to help establish some correspondence between the QTL for feed intake, body weight and tonic immobility detected in the present work and those reported on GGA01 in the chicken. Further comparative work is now possible in order to better estimate and understand the genetic similarities and differences of these two Phasianidae species. PMID:15941487

  9. A complete genetic linkage map and QTL analyses for bast fibre quality traits, yield and yield components in jute (Corchorus olitorius L.).

    PubMed

    Topdar, N; Kundu, A; Sinha, M K; Sarkar, D; Das, M; Banerjee, S; Kar, C S; Satya, P; Balyan, H S; Mahapatra, B S; Gupta, P K

    2013-01-01

    We report the first complete microsatellite genetic map of jute (Corchorus olitorius L.; 2n = 2x = 14) using an F6 recombinant inbred population. Of the 403 microsatellite markers screened, 82 were mapped on the seven linkage groups (LGs) that covered a total genetic distance of 799.9 cM, with an average marker interval of 10.7 cM. LG5 had the longest and LG7 the shortest genetic lengths, whereas LG1 had the maximum and LG7 the minimum number of markers. Segregation distortion of microsatellite loci was high (61%), with the majority of them (76%) skewed towards the female parent. Genomewide non-parametric single-marker analysis in combination with multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL)-models (MQM) mapping detected 26 definitive QTLs for bast fibre quality, yield and yield-related traits. These were unevenly distributed on six LGs, as colocalized clusters, at genomic sectors marked by 15 microsatellite loci. LG1 was the QTL-richest map sector, with the densest colocalized clusters of QTLs governing fibre yield, yield-related traits and tensile strength. Expectedly, favorable QTLs were derived from the desirable parents, except for nearly all of those of fibre fineness, which might be due to the creation of new gene combinations. Our results will be a good starting point for further genome analyses in jute. PMID:23821949

  10. High resolution physical map of porcine chromosome 7 QTL region and comparative mapping of this region among vertebrate genomes

    PubMed Central

    Demars, Julie; Riquet, Juliette; Feve, Katia; Gautier, Mathieu; Morisson, Mireille; Demeure, Olivier; Renard, Christine; Chardon, Patrick; Milan, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Background On porcine chromosome 7, the region surrounding the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) contains several Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) influencing many traits including growth, back fat thickness and carcass composition. Previous studies highlighted that a fragment of ~3.7 Mb is located within the Swine Leucocyte Antigen (SLA) complex. Internal rearrangements of this fragment were suggested, and partial contigs had been built, but further characterization of this region and identification of all human chromosomal fragments orthologous to this porcine fragment had to be carried out. Results A whole physical map of the region was constructed by integrating Radiation Hybrid (RH) mapping, BAC fingerprinting data of the INRA BAC library and anchoring BAC end sequences on the human genome. 17 genes and 2 reference microsatellites were ordered on the high resolution IMNpRH212000rad Radiation Hybrid panel. A 1000:1 framework map covering 550 cR12000 was established and a complete contig of the region was developed. New micro rearrangements were highlighted between the porcine and human genomes. A bovine RH map was also developed in this region by mapping 16 genes. Comparison of the organization of this region in pig, cattle, human, mouse, dog and chicken genomes revealed that 1) the translocation of the fragment described previously is observed only on the bovine and porcine genomes and 2) the new internal micro rearrangements are specific of the porcine genome. Conclusion We estimate that the region contains several rearrangements and covers 5.2 Mb of the porcine genome. The study of this complete BAC contig showed that human chromosomal fragments homologs of this heavily rearranged QTL region are all located in the region of HSA6 that surrounds the centromere. This work allows us to define a list of all candidate genes that could explain these QTL effects. PMID:16433907

  11. Comparative QTL Mapping for Seed Weight Between Ryegrass and Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed weight is one of the most important, complex traits in breeding and domestication process for several major food crops (e.g. rice and wheat). Comparative mapping studies provide insight into the evolution of genome organization within species and the understanding important traits conserved dur...

  12. Teamwork: Improved eQTL Mapping Using Combinations of Machine Learning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping is a widely used technique to uncover regulatory relationships between genes. A range of methodologies have been developed to map links between expression traits and genotypes. The DREAM (Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) initiative is a community project to objectively assess the relative performance of different computational approaches for solving specific systems biology problems. The goal of one of the DREAM5 challenges was to reverse-engineer genetic interaction networks from synthetic genetic variation and gene expression data, which simulates the problem of eQTL mapping. In this framework, we proposed an approach whose originality resides in the use of a combination of existing machine learning algorithms (committee). Although it was not the best performer, this method was by far the most precise on average. After the competition, we continued in this direction by evaluating other committees using the DREAM5 data and developed a method that relies on Random Forests and LASSO. It achieved a much higher average precision than the DREAM best performer at the cost of slightly lower average sensitivity. PMID:22911718

  13. Combined QTL and Selective Sweep Mappings with Coding SNP Annotation and cis-eQTL Analysis Revealed PARK2 and JAG2 as New Candidate Genes for Adiposity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Pierre-François; Boitard, Simon; Blum, Yuna; Parks, Brian; Montagner, Alexandra; Mouisel, Etienne; Djari, Anis; Esquerré, Diane; Désert, Colette; Boutin, Morgane; Leroux, Sophie; Lecerf, Frédéric; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Klopp, Christophe; Servin, Bertrand; Pitel, Frédérique; Duclos, Michel Jean; Guillou, Hervé; Lusis, Aldons J.; Demeure, Olivier; Lagarrigue, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Very few causal genes have been identified by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping because of the large size of QTL, and most of them were identified thanks to functional links already known with the targeted phenotype. Here, we propose to combine selection signature detection, coding SNP annotation, and cis-expression QTL analyses to identify potential causal genes underlying QTL identified in divergent line designs. As a model, we chose experimental chicken lines divergently selected for only one trait, the abdominal fat weight, in which several QTL were previously mapped. Using new haplotype-based statistics exploiting the very high SNP density generated through whole-genome resequencing, we found 129 significant selective sweeps. Most of the QTL colocalized with at least one sweep, which markedly narrowed candidate region size. Some of those sweeps contained only one gene, therefore making them strong positional causal candidates with no presupposed function. We then focused on two of these QTL/sweeps. The absence of nonsynonymous SNPs in their coding regions strongly suggests the existence of causal mutations acting in cis on their expression, confirmed by cis-eQTL identification using either allele-specific expression or genetic mapping analyses. Additional expression analyses of those two genes in the chicken and mice contrasted for adiposity reinforces their link with this phenotype. This study shows for the first time the interest of combining selective sweeps mapping, coding SNP annotation and cis-eQTL analyses for identifying causative genes for a complex trait, in the context of divergent lines selected for this specific trait. Moreover, it highlights two genes, JAG2 and PARK2, as new potential negative and positive key regulators of adiposity in chicken and mice. PMID:25653314

  14. Combined QTL and selective sweep mappings with coding SNP annotation and cis-eQTL analysis revealed PARK2 and JAG2 as new candidate genes for adiposity regulation.

    PubMed

    Roux, Pierre-François; Boitard, Simon; Blum, Yuna; Parks, Brian; Montagner, Alexandra; Mouisel, Etienne; Djari, Anis; Esquerré, Diane; Désert, Colette; Boutin, Morgane; Leroux, Sophie; Lecerf, Frédéric; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Klopp, Christophe; Servin, Bertrand; Pitel, Frédérique; Duclos, Michel Jean; Guillou, Hervé; Lusis, Aldons J; Demeure, Olivier; Lagarrigue, Sandrine

    2015-04-01

    Very few causal genes have been identified by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping because of the large size of QTL, and most of them were identified thanks to functional links already known with the targeted phenotype. Here, we propose to combine selection signature detection, coding SNP annotation, and cis-expression QTL analyses to identify potential causal genes underlying QTL identified in divergent line designs. As a model, we chose experimental chicken lines divergently selected for only one trait, the abdominal fat weight, in which several QTL were previously mapped. Using new haplotype-based statistics exploiting the very high SNP density generated through whole-genome resequencing, we found 129 significant selective sweeps. Most of the QTL colocalized with at least one sweep, which markedly narrowed candidate region size. Some of those sweeps contained only one gene, therefore making them strong positional causal candidates with no presupposed function. We then focused on two of these QTL/sweeps. The absence of nonsynonymous SNPs in their coding regions strongly suggests the existence of causal mutations acting in cis on their expression, confirmed by cis-eQTL identification using either allele-specific expression or genetic mapping analyses. Additional expression analyses of those two genes in the chicken and mice contrasted for adiposity reinforces their link with this phenotype. This study shows for the first time the interest of combining selective sweeps mapping, coding SNP annotation and cis-eQTL analyses for identifying causative genes for a complex trait, in the context of divergent lines selected for this specific trait. Moreover, it highlights two genes, JAG2 and PARK2, as new potential negative and positive key regulators of adiposity in chicken and mice. PMID:25653314

  15. QTL mapping for salt tolerance and domestication-related traits in Vigna marina subsp. oblonga, a halophytic species.

    PubMed

    Chankaew, Sompong; Isemura, Takehisa; Naito, Ken; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Tomooka, Norihiko; Somta, Prakit; Kaga, Akito; Vaughan, Duncan A; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-03-01

    QTL mapping in F2 population [V. luteola × V. marina subsp. oblonga] revealed that the salt tolerance in V. marina subsp. oblonga is controlled by a single major QTL. The habitats of beach cowpea (Vigna marina) are sandy beaches in tropical and subtropical regions. As a species that grows closest to the sea, it has potential to be a gene source for breeding salt-tolerant crops. We reported here for the first time, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping for salt tolerance in V. marina. A genetic linkage map was constructed from an F2 population of 120 plants derived from an interspecific cross between V. luteola and V. marina subsp. oblonga. The map comprised 150 SSR markers. The markers were clustered into 11 linkage groups spanning 777.6 cM in length with a mean distance between the adjacent markers of 5.59 cM. The F2:3 population was evaluated for salt tolerance under hydroponic conditions at the seedling and developmental stages. Segregation analysis indicated that salt tolerance in V. marina is controlled by a few genes. Multiple interval mapping consistently identified one major QTL which can explain about 50% of phenotypic variance. The flanking markers may facilitate transfer of the salt tolerance allele from V. marina subsp. oblonga into related Vigna crops. The QTL for domestication-related traits from V. marina are also discussed. PMID:24370961

  16. Interacted QTL Mapping in Partial NCII Design Provides Evidences for Breeding by Design

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Can; Wen, Jia; Jinxing, Tu; Zhang, Yuan Ming

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of heterosis in rice, maize and rapeseed has revolutionized crop production. Although elite hybrid cultivars are mainly derived from the F1 crosses between two groups of parents, named NCII mating design, little has been known about the methodology of how interacted effects influence quantitative trait performance in the population. To bridge genetic analysis with hybrid breeding, here we integrated an interacted QTL mapping approach with breeding by design in partial NCII mating design. All the potential main and interacted effects were included in one full model. If the number of the effects is huge, bulked segregant analysis were used to test which effects were associated with the trait. All the selected effects were further shrunk by empirical Bayesian, so significant effects could be identified. A series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed to validate the new method. Furthermore, all the significant effects were used to calculate genotypic values of all the missing F1 hybrids, and all these F1 phenotypic or genotypic values were used to predict elite parents and parental combinations. Finally, the new method was adopted to dissect the genetic foundation of oil content in 441 rapeseed parents and 284 F1 hybrids. As a result, 8 main-effect QTL and 37 interacted QTL were found and used to predict 10 elite restorer lines, 10 elite sterile lines and 10 elite parental crosses. Similar results across various methods and in previous studies and a high correlation coefficient (0.76) between the predicted and observed phenotypes validated the proposed method in this study. PMID:25822501

  17. QTL detection for forage quality and stem histology in four connected mapping populations of the model legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Lagunes Espinoza, Luz Del Carmen; Julier, Bernadette

    2013-02-01

    Forage quality combines traits related to protein content and energy value. High-quality forages contribute to increase farm autonomy by reducing the use of energy or protein-rich supplements. Genetic analyses in forage legume species are complex because of their tetraploidy and allogamy. Indeed, no genetic studies of quality have been published at the molecular level on these species. Nonetheless, mapping populations of the model species M. truncatula can be used to detect QTL for forage quality. Here, we studied a crossing design involving four connected populations of M. truncatula. Each population was composed of ca. 200 recombinant inbred lines (RIL). We sought population-specific QTL and QTL explaining the whole design variation. We grew parents and RIL in a greenhouse for 2 or 3 seasons and analysed plants for chemical composition of vegetative organs (protein content, digestibility, leaf-to-stem ratio) and stem histology (stem cross-section area, tissue proportions). Over the four populations and all the traits, QTL were found on all chromosomes. Among these QTL, only four genomic regions, on chromosomes 1, 3, 7 and 8, contributed to explaining the variations in the whole crossing design. Surprisingly, we found that quality QTL were located in the same genomic regions as morphological QTL. We thus confirmed the quantitative inheritance of quality traits and tight relationships between quality and morphology. Our findings could be explained by a co-location of genes involved in quality and morphology. This study will help to detect candidate genes involved in quantitative variation for quality in forage legume species. PMID:23099818

  18. LINKAGE MAPPING OF PORCINE DGAT1 TO A REGION OF PORCINE CHROMOSOME 4 THAT CONTAINS QTL FOR GROWTH AND FATNESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT1) is a microsomal enzyme that catalyzes the formation of triglycerides, and maps to human chromosome 8q24.3. Several QTL for growth and fatness have been identified in swine on porcine chromosome 4 (SSC4). Bi-directional chromosome painting and comparative mappin...

  19. Genetic linkage map and QTL analysis of resistance to TSWV and leaf spots in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The allotetraploid peanut genome assembly will be a valuable resource to researchers studying polyploidy species, in addition to peanut genome evolution and domestication other than facilitating QTL analysis and the tools for marker-assisted breeding. Therefore, a peanut linkage map will aid genome ...

  20. LINKAGE AND RH MAPPING OF 10 GENES TO A QTL REGION FOR FATNESS AND MUSCLING TRAITS ON PIG CHROMOSOME X

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study 10 genes located on human chromosome region Xq13.1 - Xq24 homologous to a QTL region for fatness and body conformation traits were linkage and RH mapped in the pig. PCR primers for amplification of porcine genomic DNAs were designed from orthologous human or porcine (HTR2C) sequences. ...

  1. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  2. Development of Genetic Markers Linked to Straighthead Resistance through Fine Mapping in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wengui; Jia, Melissa; Jackson, Aaron; Li, Xiaobai; Jia, Limeng; Huang, Bihu; Xu, Peizhou; Correa-Victoria, Fernando; Li, Shigui

    2012-01-01

    Straighthead, a physiological disorder characterized by sterile florets and distorted spikelets, causes significant yield losses in rice, and occurs in many countries. The current control method of draining paddies early in the season stresses plants, is costly, and wastes water. Development of resistant cultivar is regarded as the most efficient way for its control. We mapped a QTL for straighthead resistance using two recombinant inbred line (RIL) F9 populations that were phenotyped over two years using monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) to induce the symptoms. One population of 170 RILs was genotyped with 136 SSRs and the other population of 91 RILs was genotyped with 159 SSRs. A major QTL qSH-8 was identified in an overlapping region in both populations, and explained 46% of total variation in one and 67% in another population for straighthead resistance. qSH-8 was fine mapped from 1.0 Mbp to 340 kb using 7 SSR markers and further mapped to 290 kb in a population between RM22573 and InDel 27 using 4 InDel markers. SSR AP3858-1 and InDel 11 were within the fine mapped region, and co-segregated with straighthead resistance in both RIL populations, as well as in a collection of diverse global accessions. These results demonstrate that AP3858-1 and InDel 11 can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) for straighthead resistant cultivars, which is especially important because there is no effective way to directly evaluate straighthead resistance. PMID:23285082

  3. A High-Density Genetic Map Identifies a Novel Major QTL for Boron Efficiency in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Low boron (B) seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs) and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14–46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus. PMID:25375356

  4. Association mapping of common bacterial blight resistance QTL in Ontario bean breeding populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Common bacterial blight (CBB), incited by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Host resistance is practically the most effective and environmentally-sound approach to control CBB. Unlike conventional QTL discovery strategies, in which bi-parental populations (F2, RIL, or DH) need to be developed, association mapping-based strategies can use plant breeding populations to synchronize QTL discovery and cultivar development. Results A population of 469 dry bean lines of different market classes representing plant materials routinely developed in a bean breeding program were used. Of them, 395 lines were evaluated for CBB resistance at 14 and 21 DAI (Days After Inoculation) in the summer of 2009 in an artificially inoculated CBB nursery in south-western Ontario. All lines were genotyped using 132 SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) evenly distributed across the genome. Of the 132 SNPs, 26 SNPs had more than 20% missing data, 12 SNPs were monomorphic, and 17 SNPs had a MAF (Minor Allelic Frequency) of less than 0.20, therefore only 75 SNPs were used for association study, based on one SNP per locus. The best possible population structure was to assign 36% and 64% of the lines into Andean and Mesoamerican subgroups, respectively. Kinship analysis also revealed complex familial relationships among all lines, which corresponds with the known pedigree history. MLM (Mixed Linear Model) analysis, including population structure and kinship, was used to discover marker-trait associations. Eighteen and 22 markers were significantly associated with CBB rating at 14 and 21 DAI, respectively. Fourteen markers were significant for both dates and the markers UBC420, SU91, g321, g471, and g796 were highly significant (p ? 0.001). Furthermore, 12 significant SNP markers were co-localized with or close to the CBB-QTLs identified previously in bi-parental QTL mapping studies. Conclusions This study demonstrated that association mapping using a reasonable number of markers, distributed across the genome and with application of plant materials that are routinely developed in a plant breeding program can detect significant QTLs for traits of interest. PMID:21435233

  5. Strategies for fine-mapping complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Sarah L.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of robust and replicable genetic associations for complex disease. However, the identification of the causal variants that underlie these associations has been more difficult. This problem of fine-mapping association signals predates GWAS, but the last few years have seen a surge of studies aimed at pinpointing causal variants using both statistical evidence from large association data sets and functional annotations of genetic variants. Combining these two approaches can often determine not only the causal variant but also the target gene. Recent contributions include analyses of custom genotyping arrays, such as the Immunochip, statistical methods to identify credible sets of causal variants and the addition of functional genomic annotations for coding and non-coding variation to help prioritize variants and discern functional consequence and hence the biological basis of disease risk. PMID:26157023

  6. Power of QTL mapping experiments in commercial Atlantic salmon populations, exploiting linkage and linkage disequilibrium and effect of limited recombination in males.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B J; Gjuvsland, A; Omholt, S

    2006-07-01

    Whereas detection and positioning of genes that affect quantitative traits (quantitative trait loci (QTL)) using linkage mapping uses only information from recombinants in the genotyped generations, linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping uses historical recombinants. Thus, whereas linkage mapping requires large family sizes to detect and accurately position QTL, LD mapping is more dependent on the number of families sampled from the population. In commercial Atlantic salmon breeding programmes, only a small number of individuals per family are routinely phenotyped for traits such as disease resistance and meat colour. In this paper, we assess the power and accuracy of combined linkage disequilibrium linkage analysis (LDLA) to detect QTL in the commercial population using simulation. When 15 half-sib sire families (each sire mated to 30 dams, each dam with 10 progeny) were sampled from the population for genotyping, we were able to detect a QTL explaining 10% of the phenotypic variance in 85% of replicates and position this QTL within 3 cM of the true position in 70% of replicates. When recombination was absent in males, a feature of the salmon genome, power to detect QTL increased; however, the accuracy of positioning the QTL was decreased. By increasing the number of sire families sampled from the population to be genotyped to 30, we were able to increase both the proportion of QTL detected and correctly positioned (even with no recombination in males). QTL with much smaller effect could also be detected. The results suggest that even with the existing recording structure in commercial salmon breeding programmes, there is considerable power to detect and accurately position QTL using LDLA. PMID:16685283

  7. The genetic architecture of zinc and iron content in maize grains as revealed by QTL mapping and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Zhou, Jinfeng; Chen, Jingtang; Zhu, Liying; Zhao, Yongfeng; Huang, Yaqun

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition, especially zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) deficiency in diets, has aroused worldwide attention. Biofortification of food crops has been considered as a promising approach for alleviating this deficiency. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed to dissect the genetic mechanism of Zn and Fe content in maize grains using a total of 218 F2:3 families derived from a cross between inbred lines 178 and P53. Meta-analysis was used to integrate genetic maps and detect Meta-QTL (MQTL) across several independent QTL researches for traits related to Zn or Fe content. Five significant QTLs and 10 MQTLs were detected. Two informative genomic regions, bins 2.07 and 2.08, showed a great importance for Zn and Fe content QTLs. The correlation between Zn and Fe level in maize grains was proposed by MQTLs as 8 of the 10 involved both traits. The results of this study suggest that QTL mapping and meta-analysis is an effective approach to understand the genetic basis of Zn and Fe accumulation in maize grains. PMID:24273427

  8. High-Resolution Genotyping of Wild Barley Introgression Lines and Fine-Mapping of the Threshability Locus thresh-1 Using the Illumina GoldenGate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Schmalenbach, Inga; March, Timothy J.; Bringezu, Thomas; Waugh, Robbie; Pillen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Genetically well-characterized mapping populations are a key tool for rapid and precise localization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and subsequent identification of the underlying genes. In this study, a set of 73 introgression lines (S42ILs) originating from a cross between the spring barley cultivar Scarlett (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) and the wild barley accession ISR42-8 (H. v. ssp. spontaneum) was subjected to high-resolution genotyping with an Illumina 1536-SNP array. The array enabled a precise localization of the wild barley introgressions in the elite barley background. Based on 636 informative SNPs, the S42IL set represents 87.3% of the wild barley genome, where each line contains on average 3.3% of the donor genome. Furthermore, segregating high-resolution mapping populations (S42IL-HRs) were developed for 70 S42ILs in order to facilitate QTL fine-mapping and cloning. As a case study, we used the developed genetic resources to rapidly identify and fine-map the novel locus thresh-1 on chromosome 1H that controls grain threshability. Here, the recessive wild barley allele confers a difficult to thresh phenotype, suggesting that thresh-1 played an important role during barley domestication. Using a S42IL-HR population, thresh-1 was fine-mapped within a 4.3cM interval that was predicted to contain candidate genes involved in regulation of plant cell wall composition. The set of wild barley introgression lines and derived high-resolution populations are ideal tools to speed up the process of mapping and further dissecting QTL, which ultimately clears the way for isolating the genes behind QTL effects. PMID:22384330

  9. Mapping with RAD (restriction-site associated DNA) markers to rapidly identify QTL for stem rust resistance in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Saha, M C; Johnson, E A; Slabaugh, M B

    2011-05-01

    A mapping population was created to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola in Lolium perenne. A susceptible and a resistant plant were crossed to produce a pseudo-testcross population of 193 F(1) individuals. Markers were produced by the restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) process, which uses massively parallel and multiplexed sequencing of reduced-representation libraries. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers were combined with the RAD markers to produce maps for the female (738 cM) and male (721 cM) parents. Stem rust phenotypes (number of pustules per plant) were determined in replicated greenhouse trials by inoculation with a field-collected, genetically heterogeneous population of urediniospores. The F(1) progeny displayed continuous distribution of phenotypes and transgressive segregation. We detected three resistance QTL. The most prominent QTL (qLpPg1) is located near 41 cM on linkage group (LG) 7 with a 2-LOD interval of 8 cM, and accounts for 30-38% of the stem rust phenotypic variance. QTL were detected also on LG1 (qLpPg2) and LG6 (qLpPg3), each accounting for approximately 10% of phenotypic variance. Alleles of loci closely linked to these QTL originated from the resistant parent for qLpPg1 and from both parents for qLpPg2 and qLpPg3. Observed quantitative nature of the resistance may be due to partial-resistance effects against all pathogen genotypes, or qualitative effects completely preventing infection by only some genotypes in the genetically mixed inoculum. RAD markers facilitated rapid construction of new genetic maps in this outcrossing species and will enable development of sequence-based markers linked to stem rust resistance in L. perenne. PMID:21344184

  10. Genome-wide SNP identification for the construction of a high-resolution genetic map of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus): applications to QTL mapping of Vibrio anguillarum disease resistance and comparative genomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Changwei; Niu, Yongchao; Rastas, Pasi; Liu, Yang; Xie, Zhiyuan; Li, Hengde; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yong; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tian, Yongsheng; Sakamoto, Takashi; Chen, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution genetic maps are essential for fine mapping of complex traits, genome assembly, and comparative genomic analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the primary molecular markers used for genetic map construction. In this study, we identified 13,362 SNPs evenly distributed across the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) genome. Of these SNPs, 12,712 high-confidence SNPs were subjected to high-throughput genotyping and assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the genetic linkage map was 3,497.29 cM with an average distance of 0.47 cM between loci, thereby representing the densest genetic map currently reported for Japanese flounder. Nine positive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) forming two main clusters for Vibrio anguillarum disease resistance were detected. All QTLs could explain 5.1–8.38% of the total phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis of the QTL regions on the genome assembly revealed 12 immune-related genes, among them 4 genes strongly associated with V. anguillarum disease resistance. In addition, 246 genome assembly scaffolds with an average size of 21.79 Mb were anchored onto the LGs; these scaffolds, comprising 522.99 Mb, represented 95.78% of assembled genomic sequences. The mapped assembly scaffolds in Japanese flounder were used for genome synteny analyses against zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Flounder and medaka were found to possess almost one-to-one synteny, whereas flounder and zebrafish exhibited a multi-syntenic correspondence. The newly developed high-resolution genetic map, which will facilitate QTL mapping, scaffold assembly, and genome synteny analysis of Japanese flounder, marks a milestone in the ongoing genome project for this species. PMID:25762582

  11. Genome-wide SNP identification for the construction of a high-resolution genetic map of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus): applications to QTL mapping of Vibrio anguillarum disease resistance and comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Changwei; Niu, Yongchao; Rastas, Pasi; Liu, Yang; Xie, Zhiyuan; Li, Hengde; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yong; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tian, Yongsheng; Sakamoto, Takashi; Chen, Songlin

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution genetic maps are essential for fine mapping of complex traits, genome assembly, and comparative genomic analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the primary molecular markers used for genetic map construction. In this study, we identified 13,362 SNPs evenly distributed across the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) genome. Of these SNPs, 12,712 high-confidence SNPs were subjected to high-throughput genotyping and assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the genetic linkage map was 3,497.29 cM with an average distance of 0.47 cM between loci, thereby representing the densest genetic map currently reported for Japanese flounder. Nine positive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) forming two main clusters for Vibrio anguillarum disease resistance were detected. All QTLs could explain 5.1-8.38% of the total phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis of the QTL regions on the genome assembly revealed 12 immune-related genes, among them 4 genes strongly associated with V. anguillarum disease resistance. In addition, 246 genome assembly scaffolds with an average size of 21.79 Mb were anchored onto the LGs; these scaffolds, comprising 522.99 Mb, represented 95.78% of assembled genomic sequences. The mapped assembly scaffolds in Japanese flounder were used for genome synteny analyses against zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Flounder and medaka were found to possess almost one-to-one synteny, whereas flounder and zebrafish exhibited a multi-syntenic correspondence. The newly developed high-resolution genetic map, which will facilitate QTL mapping, scaffold assembly, and genome synteny analysis of Japanese flounder, marks a milestone in the ongoing genome project for this species. PMID:25762582

  12. Mapping and validation of a major QTL affecting resistance to pancreas disease (salmonid alphavirus) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, S; Baranski, M; Thorland, I; Norris, A; Grove, H; Arnesen, P; Bakke, H; Lien, S; Bishop, S C; Houston, R D

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD), caused by a salmonid alphavirus (SAV), has a large negative economic and animal welfare impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. Evidence for genetic variation in host resistance to this disease has been reported, suggesting that selective breeding may potentially form an important component of disease control. The aim of this study was to explore the genetic architecture of resistance to PD, using survival data collected from two unrelated populations of Atlantic salmon; one challenged with SAV as fry in freshwater (POP 1) and one challenged with SAV as post-smolts in sea water (POP 2). Analyses of the binary survival data revealed a moderate-to-high heritability for host resistance to PD in both populations (fry POP 1?h2~0.5; post-smolt POP 2?h2~0.4). Subsets of both populations were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphism markers, and six putative resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified. One of these QTL was mapped to the same location on chromosome 3 in both populations, reaching chromosome-wide significance in both the sire- and dam-based analyses in POP 1, and genome-wide significance in a combined analysis in POP 2. This independently verified QTL explains a significant proportion of host genetic variation in resistance to PD in both populations, suggesting a common underlying mechanism for genetic resistance across lifecycle stages. Markers associated with this QTL are being incorporated into selective breeding programs to improve PD resistance. PMID:25990876

  13. Mapping and validation of a major QTL affecting resistance to pancreas disease (salmonid alphavirus) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Gonen, S; Baranski, M; Thorland, I; Norris, A; Grove, H; Arnesen, P; Bakke, H; Lien, S; Bishop, S C; Houston, R D

    2015-11-01

    Pancreas disease (PD), caused by a salmonid alphavirus (SAV), has a large negative economic and animal welfare impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. Evidence for genetic variation in host resistance to this disease has been reported, suggesting that selective breeding may potentially form an important component of disease control. The aim of this study was to explore the genetic architecture of resistance to PD, using survival data collected from two unrelated populations of Atlantic salmon; one challenged with SAV as fry in freshwater (POP 1) and one challenged with SAV as post-smolts in sea water (POP 2). Analyses of the binary survival data revealed a moderate-to-high heritability for host resistance to PD in both populations (fry POP 1?h(2)~0.5; post-smolt POP 2?h(2)~0.4). Subsets of both populations were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphism markers, and six putative resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified. One of these QTL was mapped to the same location on chromosome 3 in both populations, reaching chromosome-wide significance in both the sire- and dam-based analyses in POP 1, and genome-wide significance in a combined analysis in POP 2. This independently verified QTL explains a significant proportion of host genetic variation in resistance to PD in both populations, suggesting a common underlying mechanism for genetic resistance across lifecycle stages. Markers associated with this QTL are being incorporated into selective breeding programs to improve PD resistance. PMID:25990876

  14. Deploying QTL-seq for rapid delineation of a potential candidate gene underlying major trait-associated QTL in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shouvik; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Bajaj, Deepak; Kujur, Alice; Badoni, Saurabh; Laxmi; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C. L. Laxmipathi; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid high-resolution genome-wide strategy for molecular mapping of major QTL(s)/gene(s) regulating important agronomic traits is vital for in-depth dissection of complex quantitative traits and genetic enhancement in chickpea. The present study for the first time employed a NGS-based whole-genome QTL-seq strategy to identify one major genomic region harbouring a robust 100-seed weight QTL using an intra-specific 221 chickpea mapping population (desi cv. ICC 7184 × desi cv. ICC 15061). The QTL-seq-derived major SW QTL (CaqSW1.1) was further validated by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker-based traditional QTL mapping (47.6% R2 at higher LOD >19). This reflects the reliability and efficacy of QTL-seq as a strategy for rapid genome-wide scanning and fine mapping of major trait regulatory QTLs in chickpea. The use of QTL-seq and classical QTL mapping in combination narrowed down the 1.37 Mb (comprising 177 genes) major SW QTL (CaqSW1.1) region into a 35 kb genomic interval on desi chickpea chromosome 1 containing six genes. One coding SNP (G/A)-carrying constitutive photomorphogenic9 (COP9) signalosome complex subunit 8 (CSN8) gene of these exhibited seed-specific expression, including pronounced differential up-/down-regulation in low and high seed weight mapping parents and homozygous individuals during seed development. The coding SNP mined in this potential seed weight-governing candidate CSN8 gene was found to be present exclusively in all cultivated species/genotypes, but not in any wild species/genotypes of primary, secondary and tertiary gene pools. This indicates the effect of strong artificial and/or natural selection pressure on target SW locus during chickpea domestication. The proposed QTL-seq-driven integrated genome-wide strategy has potential to delineate major candidate gene(s) harbouring a robust trait regulatory QTL rapidly with optimal use of resources. This will further assist us to extrapolate the molecular mechanism underlying complex quantitative traits at a genome-wide scale leading to fast-paced marker-assisted genetic improvement in diverse crop plants, including chickpea. PMID:25922536

  15. Deploying QTL-seq for rapid delineation of a potential candidate gene underlying major trait-associated QTL in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Das, Shouvik; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Kujur, Alice; Badoni, Saurabh; Laxmi; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C L Laxmipathi; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-06-01

    A rapid high-resolution genome-wide strategy for molecular mapping of major QTL(s)/gene(s) regulating important agronomic traits is vital for in-depth dissection of complex quantitative traits and genetic enhancement in chickpea. The present study for the first time employed a NGS-based whole-genome QTL-seq strategy to identify one major genomic region harbouring a robust 100-seed weight QTL using an intra-specific 221 chickpea mapping population (desi cv. ICC 7184 × desi cv. ICC 15061). The QTL-seq-derived major SW QTL (CaqSW1.1) was further validated by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker-based traditional QTL mapping (47.6% R(2) at higher LOD >19). This reflects the reliability and efficacy of QTL-seq as a strategy for rapid genome-wide scanning and fine mapping of major trait regulatory QTLs in chickpea. The use of QTL-seq and classical QTL mapping in combination narrowed down the 1.37 Mb (comprising 177 genes) major SW QTL (CaqSW1.1) region into a 35 kb genomic interval on desi chickpea chromosome 1 containing six genes. One coding SNP (G/A)-carrying constitutive photomorphogenic9 (COP9) signalosome complex subunit 8 (CSN8) gene of these exhibited seed-specific expression, including pronounced differential up-/down-regulation in low and high seed weight mapping parents and homozygous individuals during seed development. The coding SNP mined in this potential seed weight-governing candidate CSN8 gene was found to be present exclusively in all cultivated species/genotypes, but not in any wild species/genotypes of primary, secondary and tertiary gene pools. This indicates the effect of strong artificial and/or natural selection pressure on target SW locus during chickpea domestication. The proposed QTL-seq-driven integrated genome-wide strategy has potential to delineate major candidate gene(s) harbouring a robust trait regulatory QTL rapidly with optimal use of resources. This will further assist us to extrapolate the molecular mechanism underlying complex quantitative traits at a genome-wide scale leading to fast-paced marker-assisted genetic improvement in diverse crop plants, including chickpea. PMID:25922536

  16. Rapid genotyping with DNA micro-arrays for high-density linkage mapping and QTL mapping in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench)

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Shiori; Hara, Takashi; Ueno, Mariko; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Satoru; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Ryo; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    For genetic studies and genomics-assisted breeding, particularly of minor crops, a genotyping system that does not require a priori genomic information is preferable. Here, we demonstrated the potential of a novel array-based genotyping system for the rapid construction of high-density linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. By using the system, we successfully constructed an accurate, high-density linkage map for common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench); the map was composed of 756 loci and included 8,884 markers. The number of linkage groups converged to eight, which is the basic number of chromosomes in common buckwheat. The sizes of the linkage groups of the P1 and P2 maps were 773.8 and 800.4 cM, respectively. The average interval between adjacent loci was 2.13 cM. The linkage map constructed here will be useful for the analysis of other common buckwheat populations. We also performed QTL mapping for main stem length and detected four QTL. It took 37 days to process 178 samples from DNA extraction to genotyping, indicating the system enables genotyping of genome-wide markers for a few hundred buckwheat plants before the plants mature. The novel system will be useful for genomics-assisted breeding in minor crops without a priori genomic information. PMID:25914583

  17. Rapid genotyping with DNA micro-arrays for high-density linkage mapping and QTL mapping in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench).

    PubMed

    Yabe, Shiori; Hara, Takashi; Ueno, Mariko; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Satoru; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Ryo; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2014-12-01

    For genetic studies and genomics-assisted breeding, particularly of minor crops, a genotyping system that does not require a priori genomic information is preferable. Here, we demonstrated the potential of a novel array-based genotyping system for the rapid construction of high-density linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. By using the system, we successfully constructed an accurate, high-density linkage map for common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench); the map was composed of 756 loci and included 8,884 markers. The number of linkage groups converged to eight, which is the basic number of chromosomes in common buckwheat. The sizes of the linkage groups of the P1 and P2 maps were 773.8 and 800.4 cM, respectively. The average interval between adjacent loci was 2.13 cM. The linkage map constructed here will be useful for the analysis of other common buckwheat populations. We also performed QTL mapping for main stem length and detected four QTL. It took 37 days to process 178 samples from DNA extraction to genotyping, indicating the system enables genotyping of genome-wide markers for a few hundred buckwheat plants before the plants mature. The novel system will be useful for genomics-assisted breeding in minor crops without a priori genomic information. PMID:25914583

  18. QTL mapping of agronomic waterlogging tolerance using recombinant inbred lines derived from tropical maize (Zea mays L) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Pervez Haider; Rashid, Zerka; Vinayan, Madhumal Thayil; Almeida, Gustavo Dias; Phagna, Ramesh Kumar; Babu, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Waterlogging is an important abiotic stress constraint that causes significant yield losses in maize grown throughout south and south-east Asia due to erratic rainfall patterns. The most economic option to offset the damage caused by waterlogging is to genetically incorporate tolerance in cultivars that are grown widely in the target agro-ecologies. We assessed the genetic variation in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from crossing a waterlogging tolerant line (CAWL-46-3-1) to an elite but sensitive line (CML311-2-1-3) and observed significant range of variation for grain yield (GY) under waterlogging stress along with a number of other secondary traits such as brace roots (BR), chlorophyll content (SPAD), % stem and root lodging (S&RL) among the RILs. Significant positive correlation of GY with BR and SPAD and negative correlation with S&RL indicated the potential use of these secondary traits in selection indices under waterlogged conditions. RILs were genotyped with 331 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers using KASP (Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR) Platform. QTL mapping revealed five QTL on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10, which together explained approximately 30% of phenotypic variance for GY based on evaluation of RIL families under waterlogged conditions, with effects ranging from 520 to 640 kg/ha for individual genomic regions. 13 QTL were identified for various secondary traits associated with waterlogging tolerance, each individually explaining from 3 to 14% of phenotypic variance. Of the 22 candidate genes with known functional domains identified within the physical intervals delimited by the flanking markers of the QTL influencing GY and other secondary traits, six have previously been demonstrated to be associated with anaerobic responses in either maize or other model species. A pair of flanking SNP markers has been identified for each of the QTL and high throughput marker assays were developed to facilitate rapid introgression of waterlogging tolerance in tropical maize breeding programs. PMID:25884393

  19. QTL Mapping of Agronomic Waterlogging Tolerance Using Recombinant Inbred Lines Derived from Tropical Maize (Zea mays L) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Pervez Haider; Rashid, Zerka; Vinayan, Madhumal Thayil; Almeida, Gustavo Dias; Phagna, Ramesh Kumar; Babu, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Waterlogging is an important abiotic stress constraint that causes significant yield losses in maize grown throughout south and south-east Asia due to erratic rainfall patterns. The most economic option to offset the damage caused by waterlogging is to genetically incorporate tolerance in cultivars that are grown widely in the target agro-ecologies. We assessed the genetic variation in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from crossing a waterlogging tolerant line (CAWL-46-3-1) to an elite but sensitive line (CML311-2-1-3) and observed significant range of variation for grain yield (GY) under waterlogging stress along with a number of other secondary traits such as brace roots (BR), chlorophyll content (SPAD), % stem and root lodging (S&RL) among the RILs. Significant positive correlation of GY with BR and SPAD and negative correlation with S&RL indicated the potential use of these secondary traits in selection indices under waterlogged conditions. RILs were genotyped with 331 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers using KASP (Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR) Platform. QTL mapping revealed five QTL on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10, which together explained approximately 30% of phenotypic variance for GY based on evaluation of RIL families under waterlogged conditions, with effects ranging from 520 to 640 kg/ha for individual genomic regions. 13 QTL were identified for various secondary traits associated with waterlogging tolerance, each individually explaining from 3 to 14% of phenotypic variance. Of the 22 candidate genes with known functional domains identified within the physical intervals delimited by the flanking markers of the QTL influencing GY and other secondary traits, six have previously been demonstrated to be associated with anaerobic responses in either maize or other model species. A pair of flanking SNP markers has been identified for each of the QTL and high throughput marker assays were developed to facilitate rapid introgression of waterlogging tolerance in tropical maize breeding programs. PMID:25884393

  20. REPLICATION OF LONG BONE LENGTH QTL IN THE F9 - F10 LG,SM ADVANCED INTERCROSS

    PubMed Central

    Norgard, Elizabeth A.; Jarvis, Joseph P.; Roseman, Charles C.; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Kenney-Hunt, Jane P.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Pletscher, L. Susan; Wang, Bing; Fawcett, Gloria L.; Leatherwood, Christopher J.; Wolf, Jason B.; Cheverud, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping techniques are frequently used to identify genomic regions associated with variation in phenotypes of interest. However, the F2 intercross and congenic strain populations usually employed have limited genetic resolution resulting in relatively large confidence intervals that greatly inhibit functional confirmation of statistical results. Here, we use the increased resolution of the combined F9 and F10 generations (n=1,455) of the LG,SM advanced intercross to fine-map previously identified QTL associated with the lengths of the humerus, ulna, femur, and tibia. We detected 81 QTL affecting long bone lengths. Of these, 49 were previously identified in the combined F2-F3 population of this intercross while 32 represent novel contributors to trait variance. Pleiotropy analysis suggests that most QTL affect 3-4 long bones or serially homologous limb segments. We also identified 72 epistatic interactions involving 38 QTL and 88 novel regions. This analysis shows that using later generations of an advanced intercross greatly facilitates fine-mapping of confidence intervals, resolving 3 F2-F3 QTL into multiple linked loci and narrowing confidence intervals of other loci, as well as allowing identification of additional QTL. Further characterization of the biological bases of these QTL will help provide a better understanding of the genetics of small variations in long bone length. PMID:19306044

  1. Construction of a linkage map with TRAP markers and identification of QTL for four morphological traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic maps have been constructed using RFLP, AFLP, RAPD and SSR markers in sunflower, and quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying agronomically important traits have been positioned on these maps. In this study, a linkage map containing 202 target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) and 24 S...

  2. Identification and mapping of stable QTL with main and epistasis effect on rice grain yield under upland drought stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses that cause drastic reduction in rice grain yield (GY) in rainfed environments. The identification and introgression of QTL leading to high GY under drought have been advocated to be the preferred breeding strategy to improve drought tolerance of popular rice varieties. Genetic control of GY under reproductive-stage drought stress (RS) was studied in two BC1F4 mapping populations derived from crosses of Kali Aus, a drought-tolerant aus cultivar, with high-yielding popular varieties MTU1010 and IR64. The aim was to identify QTL for GY under RS that show a large and consistent effect for the trait. Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) was used to identify significant markers putatively linked with high GY under drought. Results QTL analysis revealed major-effect GY QTL: qDTY 1.2 , qDTY 2.2 and qDTY 1.3 , qDTY 2.3 (DTY; Drought grain yield) under drought consistently over two seasons in Kali Aus/2*MTU1010 and Kali Aus/2*IR64 populations, respectively. qDTY 1.2 and qDTY 2.2 explained an additive effect of 288 kg ha?1 and 567 kg ha?1 in Kali Aus/2*MTU1010, whereas qDTY 1.3 and qDTY 2.3 explained an additive effect of 198 kg ha?1 and 147 kg ha?1 in Kali Aus/2*IR64 populations, respectively. Epistatic interaction was observed for DTF (days to flowering) between regions on chromosome 2 flanked by markers RM154–RM324 and RM263–RM573 and major epistatic QTL for GY showing interaction between genomic locations on chromosome 1 at marker interval RM488–RM315 and chromosome 2 at RM324–RM263 in 2012 DS and 2013 DS RS in Kali Aus/2*IR64 mapping populations. Conclusion The QTL, qDTY 1.2 , qDTY 1.3 , qDTY 2.2 , and qDTY 2.3, identified in this study can be used to improve GY of mega varieties MTU1010 and IR64 under different degrees of severity of drought stress through marker-aided backcrossing and provide farmers with improved varieties that effectively combine high yield potential with good yield under drought. The observed epistatic interaction for GY and DTF will contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of agronomically important traits and enhance predictive ability at an individualized level in agriculture. PMID:24885990

  3. QTL analysis and candidate gene mapping for the polyphenol content in cider apple.

    PubMed

    Verdu, Cindy F; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  4. QTL Analysis and Candidate Gene Mapping for the Polyphenol Content in Cider Apple

    PubMed Central

    Verdu, Cindy F.; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  5. Integrative Analysis of Low- and High-Resolution eQTL

    PubMed Central

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Overall, Rupert W.; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Wiltshire, Tim; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Miller, Brooke H.; Walker, John R.; Kempermann, Gerd; Su, Andrew I.; Beyer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) is a powerful way of detecting transcriptional regulators at a genomic scale and for elucidating how natural genetic variation impacts gene expression. Power and genetic resolution are heavily affected by the study population: whereas recombinant inbred (RI) strains yield greater statistical power with low genetic resolution, using diverse inbred or outbred strains improves genetic resolution at the cost of lower power. In order to overcome the limitations of both individual approaches, we combine data from RI strains with genetically more diverse strains and analyze hippocampus eQTL data obtained from mouse RI strains (BXD) and from a panel of diverse inbred strains (Mouse Diversity Panel, MDP). We perform a systematic analysis of the consistency of eQTL independently obtained from these two populations and demonstrate that a significant fraction of eQTL can be replicated. Based on existing knowledge from pathway databases we assess different approaches for using the high-resolution MDP data for fine mapping BXD eQTL. Finally, we apply this framework to an eQTL hotspot on chromosome 1 (Qrr1), which has been implicated in a range of neurological traits. Here we present the first systematic examination of the consistency between eQTL obtained independently from the BXD and MDP populations. Our analysis of fine-mapping approaches is based on ‘real life’ data as opposed to simulated data and it allows us to propose a strategy for using MDP data to fine map BXD eQTL. Application of this framework to Qrr1 reveals that this eQTL hotspot is not caused by just one (or few) ‘master regulators’, but actually by a set of polymorphic genes specific to the central nervous system. PMID:21085707

  6. QTL mapping technology using variance components in general pedigrees applied to the poultry industry 

    E-print Network

    Suzanne J, Rowe

    2008-01-01

    The subject area for this thesis is detection of chromosomal regions or QTL causing complex variation at the phenotypic level. In particular, the differentiation of sources of additive and non additive variation. Unlike ...

  7. Genome-Wide Linkage Mapping of QTL for Yield Components, Plant Height and Yield-Related Physiological Traits in the Chinese Wheat Cross Zhou 8425B/Chinese Spring

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fengmei; Wen, Weie; Liu, Jindong; Rasheed, Awais; Yin, Guihong; Xia, Xianchun; Wu, Xiaoxia; He, Zhonghu

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genes for yield components, plant height (PH), and yield-related physiological traits and tightly linked molecular markers is of great importance in marker-assisted selection (MAS) in wheat breeding. In the present study, 246 F8 RILs derived from the cross of Zhou 8425B/Chinese Spring were genotyped using the high-density Illumina iSelect 90K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay. Field trials were conducted at Zhengzhou and Zhoukou of Henan Province, during the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 cropping season under irrigated conditions, providing data for four environments. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of agronomic and physiological traits revealed significant differences (P < 0.01) among RILs, environments, and RILs × environments interactions. Broad-sense heritabilities of all traits including thousand kernel weight (TKW), PH, spike length (SL), kernel number per spike (KNS), spike number/m2 (SN), normalized difference in vegetation index at anthesis (NDVI-A) and at 10 days post-anthesis (NDVI-10), SPAD value of chlorophyll content at anthesis (Chl-A) and at 10 days post-anthesis (Chl-10) ranged between 0.65 and 0.94. A linkage map spanning 3609.4 cM was constructed using 5636 polymorphic SNP markers, with an average chromosome length of 171.9 cM and marker density of 0.64 cM/marker. A total of 866 SNP markers were newly mapped to the hexaploid wheat linkage map. Eighty-six QTL for yield components, PH, and yield-related physiological traits were detected on 18 chromosomes except 1D, 5D, and 6D, explaining 2.3–33.2% of the phenotypic variance. Ten stable QTL were identified across four environments, viz. QTKW.caas-6A.1, QTKW.caas-7AL, QKNS.caas-4AL, QSN.caas-1AL.1, QPH.caas-4BS.2, QPH.caas-4DS.1, QSL.caas-4AS, QSL.caas-4AL.1, QChl-A.caas-5AL, and QChl-10.caas-5BL. Meanwhile, 10 QTL-rich regions were found on chromosome 1BS, 2AL (2), 3AL, 4AL (2), 4BS, 4DS, 5BL, and 7AL exhibiting pleiotropic effects. These QTL or QTL clusters are tightly linked to SNP markers, with genetic distances to the closest SNPs ranging from 0 to 1.5 cM, and could serve as target regions for fine mapping, candidate gene discovery, and MAS in wheat breeding.

  8. Genotyping-by-sequencing based intra-specific genetic map refines a ''QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Deepa; Thudi, Mahendar; Kale, Sandip; Azam, Sarwar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Gaur, Pooran M; Kishor, P B Kavi; Nguyen, Henry; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-04-01

    To enhance the marker density in the "QTL-hotspot" region, harboring several QTLs for drought tolerance-related traits identified on linkage group 04 (CaLG04) in chickpea recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population ICC 4958 × ICC 1882, a genotyping-by-sequencing approach was adopted. In total, 6.24 Gb data from ICC 4958, 5.65 Gb data from ICC 1882 and 59.03 Gb data from RILs were generated, which identified 828 novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic mapping. Together with these new markers, a high-density intra-specific genetic map was developed that comprised 1,007 marker loci spanning a distance of 727.29 cM. QTL analysis using the extended genetic map along with precise phenotyping data for 20 traits collected over one to seven seasons identified 49 SNP markers in the "QTL-hotspot" region. These efforts have refined the "QTL-hotspot" region to 14 cM. In total, 164 main-effect QTLs including 24 novel QTLs were identified. In addition, 49 SNPs integrated in the "QTL-hotspot" region were converted into cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and derived CAPS (dCAPS) markers which can be used in marker-assisted breeding. PMID:25344290

  9. Using a limited mapping strategy to identify major QTL’s for resistance to grapevine powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) and their use in marker-assisted breeding.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A limited genetic mapping strategy was used to develop genetic markers in populations segregating for powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) resistance. A genetic map was constructed and QTL analysis completed on a population derived from Muscadinia rotundifolia cv. Magnolia. In two additional populati...

  10. QTL mapping in multiple populations and development stages reveals dynamic quantitative trait loci for fruit size in cucumbers of different market classes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit size is an important quality trait in cucumber of different market classes. The genetic and molecular basis of fruit size variations in cucumber is not well understood. In this study, we conducted QTL mapping of fruit size in cucumber using three mapping populations developed from cross betwee...

  11. The peach volatilome modularity is reflected at the genetic and environmental response levels in a QTL mapping population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The improvement of fruit aroma is currently one of the most sought-after objectives in peach breeding programs. To better characterize and assess the genetic potential for increasing aroma quality by breeding, a quantity trait locus (QTL) analysis approach was carried out in an F1 population segregating largely for fruit traits. Results Linkage maps were constructed using the IPSC peach 9 K Infinium ® II array, rendering dense genetic maps, except in the case of certain chromosomes, probably due to identity-by-descent of those chromosomes in the parental genotypes. The variability in compounds associated with aroma was analyzed by a metabolomic approach based on GC-MS to profile 81 volatiles across the population from two locations. Quality-related traits were also studied to assess possible pleiotropic effects. Correlation-based analysis of the volatile dataset revealed that the peach volatilome is organized into modules formed by compounds from the same biosynthetic origin or which share similar chemical structures. QTL mapping showed clustering of volatile QTL included in the same volatile modules, indicating that some are subjected to joint genetic control. The monoterpene module is controlled by a unique locus at the top of LG4, a locus previously shown to affect the levels of two terpenoid compounds. At the bottom of LG4, a locus controlling several volatiles but also melting/non-melting and maturity-related traits was found, suggesting putative pleiotropic effects. In addition, two novel loci controlling lactones and esters in linkage groups 5 and 6 were discovered. Conclusions The results presented here give light on the mode of inheritance of the peach volatilome confirming previously loci controlling the aroma of peach but also identifying novel ones. PMID:24885290

  12. Molecular Mapping and Validation of a Major QTL Conferring Resistance to a Defoliating Isolate of Verticillium Wilt in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ze; Guo, Xian; Guo, Yuping; Zhang, Suqing; Zhao, Junsheng; Zhang, Guihua; Song, Xianliang; Sun, Xuezhen

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb is one of the most destructive diseases of cotton. Development and use of a VW resistant variety is the most practical and effective way to manage this disease. Identification of highly resistant genes/QTL and the underlining genetic architecture is a prerequisite for developing a VW resistant variety. A major QTL qVW-c6-1 conferring resistance to the defoliating isolate V991 was identified on chromosome 6 in LHB22×JM11 F2?3 population inoculated and grown in a greenhouse. This QTL was further validated in the LHB22×NNG F2?3 population that was evaluated in an artificial disease nursery of V991 for two years and in its subsequent F4 population grown in a field severely infested by V991. The allele conferring resistance within the QTL qVW-c6-1 region originated from parent LHB22 and could explain 23.1–27.1% of phenotypic variation. Another resistance QTL qVW-c21-1 originated from the susceptible parent JM11 was mapped on chromosome 21, explaining 14.44% of phenotypic variation. The resistance QTL reported herein provides a useful tool for breeding a cotton variety with enhanced resistance to VW. PMID:24781706

  13. The Identification of Two Head Smut Resistance-Related QTL in Maize by the Joint Approach of Linkage Mapping and Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-xiang; Wu, Xun; Jaqueth, Jennifer; Zhang, Dengfeng; Cui, Donghui; Li, Chunhui; Hu, Guanghui; Dong, Huaiyu; Song, Yan-chun; Shi, Yun-su; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Bailin; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Head smut, caused by the fungus Sphacelotheca reiliana (Kühn) Clint, is a devastating threat to maize production. In this study, QTL mapping of head smut resistance was performed using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population from a cross between a resistant line “QI319” and a susceptible line “Huangzaosi” (HZS) with a genetic map constructed from genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data and composed of 1638 bin markers. Two head smut resistance QTL were identified, located on Chromosome 2 (q2.09HR) and Chromosome 5 (q5.03HR), q2.09HR is co-localized with a previously reported QTL for head smut resistance, and the effect of q5.03HR has been validated in backcross populations. It was also observed that pyramiding the resistant alleles of both QTL enhanced the level of resistance to head smut. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) using 277 diverse inbred lines was processed to validate the mapped QTL and to identify additional head smut resistance associations. A total of 58 associated SNPs were detected, which were distributed in 31 independent regions. SNPs with significant association to head smut resistance were detected within the q2.09HR and q5.03HR regions, confirming the linkage mapping results. It was also observed that both additive and epistastic effects determine the genetic architecture of head smut resistance in maize. As shown in this study, the combined strategy of linkage mapping and association analysis is a powerful approach in QTL dissection for disease resistance in maize. PMID:26689370

  14. An Empirical Method for Establishing Positional Confidence Intervals Tailored for Composite Interval Mapping of QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved genetic resolution and availability of sequenced genomes have made positional cloning of moderate-effect QTL (quantitative trait loci) realistic in several systems, emphasizing the need for precise and accurate derivation of positional confidence intervals (CIs). Support interval (SI) meth...

  15. Mapping QTL of Root Morphological Traits at Different Growth Stages in Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roots are a vital organ for absorbing soil moisture and nutrients and influencing drought resistance. The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) with molecular markers may allow the estimation of parameters of genetic architecture and improve root traits by molecular marker-assisted selecti...

  16. Mapping Disease Resistance QTL for Three Foliar Diseases of Maize in a RIL Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern leaf blight (SLB), gray leaf spot (GLS), and northern leaf blight (NLB) are three important foliar diseases impacting maize production. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci for disease resistance (dQTL) for resistance to these diseases in a maize recombinan...

  17. COMPARATIVE MAPPING OF A REGION ON CHROMOSOME 10 CONTAINING QTL FOR REPRODUCTION IN SWINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTL) for important reproductive traits (age of puberty, ovulation rate, nipple number and plasma FSH) have been identified on the long arm of porcine chromosome 10. Bi-directional chromosome painting has shown that this region is homologous to human chromosome 10p. ...

  18. QTL mapping and introgression of yield-related traits from Oryza glumaepatula to cultivated rice ( Oryza sativa) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Brondani, C.; Rangel, N.; Brondani, V.; Ferreira, E.

    2002-05-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa) cultivar development currently faces the task of overcoming yield plateaus, which is difficult due to the narrow genetic base of breeding programs. Oryza glumaepatula is a diploid wild relative of cultivated rice, native to Central and South America, and is therefore a potential source of alleles of agronomic importance to rice breeding programs. We studied 11 agronomic traits in BC(2)F(2) families of the interspecific cross Oryza sativa x O. glumaepatula. Transgressive lines which are almost isogenic to the elite recurrent O. sativa parent were identified for most of these traits. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed by single-point and interval mapping using a molecular map based on 157 microsatellite and STS markers. Marker regions accounting for 14.5 to 72.9% of a phenotypic variation trait were identified in 9 of the 12 rice chromosomes. Positive QTL effects from O. glumaepatula were observed in chromosomal regions associated with tillering and panicle-number traits. PMID:12582630

  19. Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean.

    PubMed

    González, Ana M; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Rodiño, A Paula; De Ron, Antonio M; Capel, Carmen; García-Alcázar, Manuel; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole). A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the cross PMB0225 × PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL) proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs) (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545) involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively) were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25852706

  20. Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana M.; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Rodiño, A. Paula; De Ron, Antonio M.; Capel, Carmen; García-Alcázar, Manuel; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole). A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the cross PMB0225 × PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL) proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs) (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545) involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively) were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25852706

  1. A whole genome scan for QTL affecting milk protein percentage in Italian Holstein cattle, applying selective milk DNA pooling and multiple marker mapping in a daughter design.

    PubMed

    Russo, V; Fontanesi, L; Dolezal, M; Lipkin, E; Scotti, E; Zambonelli, P; Dall'Olio, S; Bigi, D; Davoli, R; Canavesi, F; Medugorac, I; Föster, M; Sölkner, J; Schiavini, F; Bagnato, A; Soller, M

    2012-07-01

    We report on a complete genome scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting milk protein percentage (PP) in the Italian Holstein-Friesian cattle population, applying a selective DNA pooling strategy in a daughter design. Ten Holstein-Friesian sires were chosen, and for each sire, about 200 daughters, each from the high and low tails of estimated breeding value for PP, were used to construct milk DNA pools. Sires and pools were genotyped for 181 dinucleotide microsatellites covering all cattle autosomes. Sire marker allele frequencies in the pools were obtained by shadow correction of peak height in the electropherograms. After quality control, pool data from eight sires were used for all subsequent analyses. The QTL heterozygosity estimate was lower than that of similar studies in other cattle populations. Multiple marker mapping identified 19 QTL located on 14 chromosomes (BTA1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 17, 20, 23 and 27). The sires were also genotyped for seven polymorphic sites in six candidate genes (ABCG2, SPP1, casein kappa, DGAT1, GHR and PRLR) located within QTL regions of BTA6, 14 and 20 found in this study. The results confirmed or excluded the involvement of some of the analysed markers as the causative polymorphic sites of the identified QTL. The QTL identified, combined with genotype data of these candidate genes, will help to identify other quantitative trait genes and clarify the complex QTL patterns observed for a few chromosomes. Overall, the results are consistent with the Italian Holstein population having been under long-term selection for high PP. PMID:22742505

  2. High Resolution QTL Map Of Body Conformation Traits From Genome-Wide Association Analysis In Contemporary U.S. Holstein Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A QTL map of 1,005 SNP markers affecting 18 body conformation traits (top 100 effects per trait) was constructed based on a genome-wide association analysis of 1,654 contemporary U.S. Holstein cows genotyped with the BovineSNP50 (45,878 SNPs). The top 100 effects for each trait explained 38-56% of t...

  3. High Resolution QTL Map Of Net Merit Component Traits And Calving Traits From Genome-Wide Association Analysis In Contemporary U.S. Holstein Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A QTL map of 725 SNPs affecting 13 dairy traits (top 100 effects per trait) was constructed based on a genome-wide association analysis of 1,654 contemporary U.S. Holstein cows genotyped with 45,878 SNPs. The 13 traits were net merit (NM$), its 8 component traits and 4 calving traits. The top 100 ef...

  4. Genetic Mapping and QTL Analysis of Flour Color and Milling Yield Related Traits Using Recombinant Inbred Lines in Hard Red Spring Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour ash content and color are very important properties used to assess flour quality, because they greatly affect the quality of the final product. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing flour color and milling properties of hard red spring wheat were mapped on a ge...

  5. Linkage Relationships Among Multiple QTL for Horticultural Traits and Late Blight (P. infestans) Resistance on Chromosome 5 Introgressed from Wild Tomato Solanum habrochaites

    PubMed Central

    Haggard, J. Erron; Johnson, Emily B.; St. Clair, Dina A.

    2013-01-01

    When the allele of a wild species at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) conferring a desirable trait is introduced into cultivated species, undesirable effects on other traits may occur. These negative phenotypic effects may result from the presence of wild alleles at other closely linked loci that are transferred along with the desired QTL allele (i.e., linkage drag) and/or from pleiotropic effects of the desired allele. Previously, a QTL for resistance to Phytophthora infestans on chromosome 5 of Solanum habrochaites was mapped and introgressed into cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Near-isogenic lines (NILs) were generated and used for fine-mapping of this resistance QTL, which revealed coincident or linked QTL with undesirable effects on yield, maturity, fruit size, and plant architecture traits. Subsequent higher-resolution mapping with chromosome 5 sub-NILs revealed the presence of multiple P. infestans resistance QTL within this 12.3 cM region. In our present study, these sub-NILs were also evaluated for 17 horticultural traits, including yield, maturity, fruit size and shape, fruit quality, and plant architecture traits in replicated field experiments over the course of two years. Each previously detected single horticultural trait QTL fractionated into two or more QTL. A total of 41 QTL were detected across all traits, with ?30% exhibiting significant QTL × environment interactions. Colocation of QTL for multiple traits suggests either pleiotropy or tightly linked genes control these traits. The complex genetic architecture of horticultural and P. infestans resistance trait QTL within this S. habrochaites region of chromosome 5 presents challenges and opportunities for breeding efforts in cultivated tomato. PMID:24122052

  6. Genome-wide association QTL mapping for teat number in a purebred population of Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, A; Okumura, N; Taniguchi, M; Hayashi, T; Hirose, K; Fukawa, K; Ito, T; Matsumoto, T; Uenishi, H; Mikawa, S

    2015-10-01

    Because of increasing litter size in Western pig breeds, additional teats are desirable to increase the capacity for nursing offspring. We applied genome-wide SNP markers to detect QTL regions that affect teat number in a Duroc population. We phenotyped 1024 animals for total teat number. A total of 36 588 SNPs on autosomes were used in the analysis. The estimated heritability for teat number was 0.34 ± 0.05 on the basis of a genomic relationship matrix constructed from all SNP markers. Using a BayesC method, we identified a total of 18 QTL regions that affected teat number in Duroc pigs; 9 of the 18 regions were newly detected. PMID:26202474

  7. Development of genetic markers linked to straighthead resistance through fine mapping in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straighthead, characterized by sterile florets and distorted spikelets, results in significant yield losses in rice and occurs in many countries. The current prevention method of draining paddies early in the season stresses plants, is costly and wastes water. We mapped QTL for straighthead resistan...

  8. Proper Use of Allele-Specific Expression Improves Statistical Power for cis-eQTL Mapping with RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    HU, Yi-Juan; SUN, Wei; TZENG, Jung-Ying; PEROU, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of loci that were found to be associated with complex diseases and the mechanisms can be classified into cis- and trans-acting regulation. At present, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is rapidly replacing expression microarrays to assess gene expression abundance. Unlike microarrays that only measure the total expression of each gene, RNA-seq also provides information on allele-specific expression (ASE), which can be used to distinguish cis-eQTLs from trans-eQTLs and, more importantly, enhance cis-eQTL mapping. However, assessing the cis-effect of a candidate eQTL on a gene requires knowledge of the haplotypes connecting the candidate eQTL and the gene, which cannot be inferred with certainty. The existing two-stage approach that first phases the candidate eQTL against the gene and then treats the inferred phase as observed in the association analysis tends to attenuate the estimated cis-effect and reduce the power for detecting a cis-eQTL. In this article, we provide a maximum-likelihood framework for cis-eQTL mapping with RNA-seq data. Our approach integrates the inference of haplotypes and the association analysis into a single stage, and is thus unbiased and statistically powerful. We also develop a pipeline for performing a comprehensive scan of all local eQTLs for all genes in the genome by controlling for false discovery rate, and implement the methods in a computationally efficient software program. The advantages of the proposed methods over the existing ones are demonstrated through realistic simulation studies and an application to empirical breast cancer data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project. PMID:26568645

  9. mQTL.NMR: an integrated suite for genetic mapping of quantitative variations of (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Hedjazi, Lyamine; Gauguier, Dominique; Zalloua, Pierre A; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-04-21

    High-throughput (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an increasingly popular robust approach for qualitative and quantitative metabolic profiling, which can be used in conjunction with genomic techniques to discover novel genetic associations through metabotype quantitative trait locus (mQTL) mapping. There is therefore a crucial necessity to develop specialized tools for an accurate detection and unbiased interpretability of the genetically determined metabolic signals. Here we introduce and implement a combined chemoinformatic approach for objective and systematic analysis of untargeted (1)H NMR-based metabolic profiles in quantitative genetic contexts. The R/Bioconductor mQTL.NMR package was designed to (i) perform a series of preprocessing steps restoring spectral dependency in collinear NMR data sets to reduce the multiple testing burden, (ii) carry out robust and accurate mQTL mapping in human cohorts as well as in rodent models, (iii) statistically enhance structural assignment of genetically determined metabolites, and (iv) illustrate results with a series of visualization tools. Built-in flexibility and implementation in the powerful R/Bioconductor framework allow key preprocessing steps such as peak alignment, normalization, or dimensionality reduction to be tailored to specific problems. The mQTL.NMR package is freely available with its source code through the Comprehensive R/Bioconductor repository and its own website ( http://www.ican-institute.org/tools/ ). It represents a significant advance to facilitate untargeted metabolomic data processing and quantitative analysis and their genetic mapping. PMID:25803548

  10. Dissection of a complex disease susceptibility region using a Bayesian stochastic search approach to fine mapping

    E-print Network

    Wallace, Chris; Cutler, Antony J.; Pontikos, Nikolas; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Burren, Oliver S.; Cooper, Jason D.; García, Arcadio Rubio; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Guo, Hui; Walker, Neil M.; Smyth, Deborah J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Ban, Maria; Richardson, Sylvia; Todd, John A .; Wicker, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    search algorithm to the fine mapping problem, and demonstrated its improved performance over conventional stepwise and regularised regression through simulation studies. We then applied it to fine map the established multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1...

  11. QTL Mapping in Eggplant Reveals Clusters of Yield-Related Loci and Orthology with the Tomato Genome

    PubMed Central

    Portis, Ezio; Barchi, Lorenzo; Toppino, Laura; Lanteri, Sergio; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Felicioni, Nazzareno; Fusari, Fabio; Barbierato, Valeria; Cericola, Fabio; Valè, Giampiero; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its widespread cultivation and nutritional and economic importance, the eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genome has not been extensively explored. A lack of knowledge of the patterns of inheritance of key agronomic traits has hindered the exploitation of marker technologies to accelerate its genetic improvement. An already established F2 intraspecific population of eggplant bred from the cross ‘305E40’ x ‘67/3’ was phenotyped for 20 agronomically relevant traits at two sites. Up to seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) per trait were identified and the percentage of the phenotypic variance (PV) explained per QTL ranged from 4 to 93%. Not all the QTL were detectable at both sites, but for each trait at least one major QTL (PV explained ?10%) was identified. Although no detectable QTL x environment interaction was found, some QTL identified were location-specific. Many of the fruit-related QTL clustered within specific chromosomal regions, reflecting either linkage and/or pleiotropy. Evidence for putative tomato orthologous QTL/genes was obtained for several of the eggplant QTL. Information regarding the inheritance of key agronomic traits was obtained. Some of the QTL, along with their respective linked markers, may be useful in the context of marker-assisted breeding. PMID:24586828

  12. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis for body weight in Jian carp ( Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) compared with mirror carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ying; Lu, Cuiyun; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Chao; Yu, Juhua; Sun, Xiaowen

    2015-05-01

    We report the genetic linkage map of Jian carp ( Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). An F1 population comprising 94 Jian carp individuals was mapped using 254 microsatellite markers. The genetic map spanned 1 381.592 cM and comprised 44 linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 6.58 cM. We identified eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for body weight (BW) in seven linkage groups, explaining 12.6% to 17.3% of the phenotypic variance. Comparative mapping was performed between Jian carp and mirror carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.), which both have 50 chromosomes. One hundred and ninety-eight Jian carp marker loci were found in common with the mirror carp map, with 186 (93.94%) showing synteny. All 44 Jian carp linkage groups could be one-to-one aligned to the 44 mirror carp linkage groups, mostly sharing two or more common loci. Three QTLs for BW in Jian carp were conserved in mirror carp. QTL comparison suggested that the QTL confidence interval in mirror carp was more precise than the homologous interval in Jian carp, which was contained within the QTL interval in Jian carp. The syntenic relationship and consensus QTLs between the two varieties provide a foundation for genomic research and genetic breeding in common carp.

  13. Combining Next Generation Sequencing with Bulked Segregant Analysis to Fine Map a Stem Moisture Locus in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shenglin; Li, Suying; Ji, Guisu; Ma, Xue; Du, Ruiheng; Liu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum is one of the most promising bioenergy crops. Stem juice yield, together with stem sugar concentration, determines sugar yield in sweet sorghum. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) is a gene mapping technique for identifying genomic regions containing genetic loci affecting a trait of interest that when combined with deep sequencing could effectively accelerate the gene mapping process. In this study, a dry stem sorghum landrace was characterized and the stem water controlling locus, qSW6, was fine mapped using QTL analysis and the combined BSA and deep sequencing technologies. Results showed that: (i) In sorghum variety Jiliang 2, stem water content was around 80% before flowering stage. It dropped to 75% during grain filling with little difference between different internodes. In landrace G21, stem water content keeps dropping after the flag leaf stage. The drop from 71% at flowering time progressed to 60% at grain filling time. Large differences exist between different internodes with the lowest (51%) at the 7th and 8th internodes at dough stage. (ii) A quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling stem water content mapped on chromosome 6 between SSR markers Ch6-2 and gpsb069 explained about 34.7-56.9% of the phenotypic variation for the 5th to 10th internodes, respectively. (iii) BSA and deep sequencing analysis narrowed the associated region to 339 kb containing 38 putative genes. The results could help reveal molecular mechanisms underlying juice yield of sorghum and thus to improve total sugar yield. PMID:25984727

  14. Combining Next Generation Sequencing with Bulked Segregant Analysis to Fine Map a Stem Moisture Locus in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Han, Yucui; Lv, Peng; Hou, Shenglin; Li, Suying; Ji, Guisu; Ma, Xue; Du, Ruiheng; Liu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum is one of the most promising bioenergy crops. Stem juice yield, together with stem sugar concentration, determines sugar yield in sweet sorghum. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) is a gene mapping technique for identifying genomic regions containing genetic loci affecting a trait of interest that when combined with deep sequencing could effectively accelerate the gene mapping process. In this study, a dry stem sorghum landrace was characterized and the stem water controlling locus, qSW6, was fine mapped using QTL analysis and the combined BSA and deep sequencing technologies. Results showed that: (i) In sorghum variety Jiliang 2, stem water content was around 80% before flowering stage. It dropped to 75% during grain filling with little difference between different internodes. In landrace G21, stem water content keeps dropping after the flag leaf stage. The drop from 71% at flowering time progressed to 60% at grain filling time. Large differences exist between different internodes with the lowest (51%) at the 7th and 8th internodes at dough stage. (ii) A quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling stem water content mapped on chromosome 6 between SSR markers Ch6-2 and gpsb069 explained about 34.7-56.9% of the phenotypic variation for the 5th to 10th internodes, respectively. (iii) BSA and deep sequencing analysis narrowed the associated region to 339 kb containing 38 putative genes. The results could help reveal molecular mechanisms underlying juice yield of sorghum and thus to improve total sugar yield. PMID:25984727

  15. QTL-seq: rapid mapping of quantitative trait loci in rice by whole genome resequencing of DNA from two bulked populations.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroki; Abe, Akira; Yoshida, Kentaro; Kosugi, Shunichi; Natsume, Satoshi; Mitsuoka, Chikako; Uemura, Aiko; Utsushi, Hiroe; Tamiru, Muluneh; Takuno, Shohei; Innan, Hideki; Cano, Liliana M; Kamoun, Sophien; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2013-04-01

    The majority of agronomically important crop traits are quantitative, meaning that they are controlled by multiple genes each with a small effect (quantitative trait loci, QTLs). Mapping and isolation of QTLs is important for efficient crop breeding by marker-assisted selection (MAS) and for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the traits. However, since it requires the development and selection of DNA markers for linkage analysis, QTL analysis has been time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here we report the rapid identification of plant QTLs by whole-genome resequencing of DNAs from two populations each composed of 20-50 individuals showing extreme opposite trait values for a given phenotype in a segregating progeny. We propose to name this approach QTL-seq as applied to plant species. We applied QTL-seq to rice recombinant inbred lines and F2 populations and successfully identified QTLs for important agronomic traits, such as partial resistance to the fungal rice blast disease and seedling vigor. Simulation study showed that QTL-seq is able to detect QTLs over wide ranges of experimental variables, and the method can be generally applied in population genomics studies to rapidly identify genomic regions that underwent artificial or natural selective sweeps. PMID:23289725

  16. A Consensus Microsatellite-Based Linkage Map for the Hermaphroditic Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians) and Its Application in Size-Related QTL Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Guofan

    2012-01-01

    Bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) is one of the most economically important aquaculture species in China. In this study, we constructed a consensus microsatellite-based genetic linkage map with a mapping panel containing two hybrid backcross-like families involving two subspecies of bay scallop, A. i. irradians and A. i. concentricus. One hundred sixty-one microsatellite and one phenotypic (shell color) markers were mapped to 16 linkage groups (LGs), which corresponds to the haploid chromosome number of bay scallop. The sex-specific map was 779.2 cM and 781.6 cM long in female and male, respectively, whereas the sex-averaged map spanned 849.3 cM. The average resolution of integrated map was 5.9 cM/locus and the estimated coverage was 81.3%. The proportion of distorted markers occurred more in the hybrid parents, suggesting that the segregation distortion was possibly resulted from heterospecific interaction between genomes of two subspecies of bay scallop. The overall female-to-male recombination rate was 1.13?1 across all linked markers in common to both parents, and considerable differences in recombination also existed among different parents in both families. Four size-related traits, including shell length (SL), shell height (SH), shell width (SW) and total weight (TW) were measured for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Three significant and six suggestive QTL were detected on five LGs. Among the three significant QTL, two (qSW-10 and qTW-10, controlling SW and TW, respectively) were mapped on the same region near marker AiAD121 on LG10 and explained 20.5% and 27.7% of the phenotypic variance, while the third (qSH-7, controlling SH) was located on LG7 and accounted for 15.8% of the phenotypic variance. Six suggestive QTL were detected on four different LGs. The linkage map and size-related QTL obtained in this study may facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) in bay scallop. PMID:23077533

  17. QTL architecture of reproductive fitness characters in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reproductive output is critical to both agronomists seeking to increase seed yield and to evolutionary biologists interested in understanding natural selection. We examine the genetic architecture of diverse reproductive fitness traits in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from a crop (seed oil)?×?wild-like (rapid cycling) genotype of Brassica rapa in field and greenhouse environments. Results Several fitness traits showed strong correlations and QTL-colocalization across environments (days to bolting, fruit length and seed color). Total fruit number was uncorrelated across environments and most QTL affecting this trait were correspondingly environment-specific. Most fitness components were positively correlated, consistent with life-history theory that genotypic variation in resource acquisition masks tradeoffs. Finally, we detected evidence of transgenerational pleiotropy, that is, maternal days to bolting was negatively correlated with days to offspring germination. A QTL for this transgenerational correlation was mapped to a genomic region harboring one copy of FLOWERING LOCUS C, a genetic locus known to affect both days to flowering as well as germination phenotypes. Conclusions This study characterizes the genetic structure of important fitness/yield traits within and between generations in B. rapa. Several identified QTL are suitable candidates for fine-mapping for the improvement of yield in crop Brassicas. Specifically, brFLC1, warrants further investigation as a potential regulator of phenology between generations. PMID:24641198

  18. Ensemble Learning of QTL Models Improves Prediction of Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yang; Holland, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) models can provide useful insights into trait genetic architecture because of their straightforward interpretability but are less useful for genetic prediction because of the difficulty in including the effects of numerous small effect loci without overfitting. Tight linkage between markers introduces near collinearity among marker genotypes, complicating the detection of QTL and estimation of QTL effects in linkage mapping, and this problem is exacerbated by very high density linkage maps. Here we developed a thinning and aggregating (TAGGING) method as a new ensemble learning approach to QTL mapping. TAGGING reduces collinearity problems by thinning dense linkage maps, maintains aspects of marker selection that characterize standard QTL mapping, and by ensembling, incorporates information from many more markers-trait associations than traditional QTL mapping. The objective of TAGGING was to improve prediction power compared with QTL mapping while also providing more specific insights into genetic architecture than genome-wide prediction models. TAGGING was compared with standard QTL mapping using cross validation of empirical data from the maize (Zea mays L.) nested association mapping population. TAGGING-assisted QTL mapping substantially improved prediction ability for both biparental and multifamily populations by reducing both the variance and bias in prediction. Furthermore, an ensemble model combining predictions from TAGGING-assisted QTL and infinitesimal models improved prediction abilities over the component models, indicating some complementarity between model assumptions and suggesting that some trait genetic architectures involve a mixture of a few major QTL and polygenic effects. PMID:26276383

  19. Large-Scale East-Asian eQTL Mapping Reveals Novel Candidate Genes for LD Mapping and the Genomic Landscape of Transcriptional Effects of Sequence Variants

    PubMed Central

    Narahara, Maiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nakamura, Seiji; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Ishii, Miho; Matsubara, Kenichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamada, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Profiles of sequence variants that influence gene transcription are very important for understanding mechanisms that affect phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using genotypes at 1.4 million SNPs and a comprehensive transcriptional profile of 15,454 coding genes and 6,113 lincRNA genes obtained from peripheral blood cells of 298 Japanese individuals, we mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 3,804 cis-eQTLs (within 500 kb from target genes) and 165 trans-eQTLs (>500 kb away or on different chromosomes). Cis-eQTLs were often located in transcribed or adjacent regions of genes; among these regions, 5? untranslated regions and 5? flanking regions had the largest effects. Epigenetic evidence for regulatory potential accumulated in public databases explained the magnitude of the effects of our eQTLs. Cis-eQTLs were often located near the respective target genes, if not within genes. Large effect sizes were observed with eQTLs near target genes, and effect sizes were obviously attenuated as the eQTL distance from the gene increased. Using a very stringent significance threshold, we identified 165 large-effect trans-eQTLs. We used our eQTL map to assess 8,069 disease-associated SNPs identified in 1,436 genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified genes that might be truly causative, but GWAS might have failed to identify for 148 out of the GWAS-identified SNPs; for example, TUFM (P?=?3.3E-48) was identified for inflammatory bowel disease (early onset); ZFP90 (P?=?4.4E-34) for ulcerative colitis; and IDUA (P?=?2.2E-11) for Parkinson's disease. We identified four genes (P<2.0E-14) that might be related to three diseases and two hematological traits; each expression is regulated by trans-eQTLs on a different chromosome than the gene. PMID:24956270

  20. A combinatorial approach of comprehensive QTL-based comparative genome mapping and transcript profiling identified a seed weight-regulating candidate gene in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Khan, Yusuf; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Shree, Tanima; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C. L. L.; Singh, Sube; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Chattopdhyay, Debasis; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    High experimental validation/genotyping success rate (94–96%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (82–96%) of 1536 SNP and 472 SSR markers showing in silico polymorphism between desi ICC 4958 and kabuli ICC 12968 chickpea was obtained in a 190 mapping population (ICC 4958 × ICC 12968) and 92 diverse desi and kabuli genotypes. A high-density 2001 marker-based intra-specific genetic linkage map comprising of eight LGs constructed is comparatively much saturated (mean map-density: 0.94?cM) in contrast to existing intra-specific genetic maps in chickpea. Fifteen robust QTLs (PVE: 8.8–25.8% with LOD: 7.0–13.8) associated with pod and seed number/plant (PN and SN) and 100 seed weight (SW) were identified and mapped on 10 major genomic regions of eight LGs. One of 126.8?kb major genomic region harbouring a strong SW-associated robust QTL (Caq'SW1.1: 169.1–171.3?cM) has been delineated by integrating high-resolution QTL mapping with comprehensive marker-based comparative genome mapping and differential expression profiling. This identified one potential regulatory SNP (G/A) in the cis-acting element of candidate ERF (ethylene responsive factor) TF (transcription factor) gene governing seed weight in chickpea. The functionally relevant molecular tags identified have potential to be utilized for marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:25786576

  1. A combinatorial approach of comprehensive QTL-based comparative genome mapping and transcript profiling identified a seed weight-regulating candidate gene in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Khan, Yusuf; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Shree, Tanima; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C L L; Singh, Sube; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Chattopdhyay, Debasis; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-01-01

    High experimental validation/genotyping success rate (94-96%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (82-96%) of 1536 SNP and 472 SSR markers showing in silico polymorphism between desi ICC 4958 and kabuli ICC 12968 chickpea was obtained in a 190 mapping population (ICC 4958 × ICC 12968) and 92 diverse desi and kabuli genotypes. A high-density 2001 marker-based intra-specific genetic linkage map comprising of eight LGs constructed is comparatively much saturated (mean map-density: 0.94 cM) in contrast to existing intra-specific genetic maps in chickpea. Fifteen robust QTLs (PVE: 8.8-25.8% with LOD: 7.0-13.8) associated with pod and seed number/plant (PN and SN) and 100 seed weight (SW) were identified and mapped on 10 major genomic regions of eight LGs. One of 126.8 kb major genomic region harbouring a strong SW-associated robust QTL (Caq'SW1.1: 169.1-171.3 cM) has been delineated by integrating high-resolution QTL mapping with comprehensive marker-based comparative genome mapping and differential expression profiling. This identified one potential regulatory SNP (G/A) in the cis-acting element of candidate ERF (ethylene responsive factor) TF (transcription factor) gene governing seed weight in chickpea. The functionally relevant molecular tags identified have potential to be utilized for marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:25786576

  2. Genetic Architecture of Ear Fasciation in Maize (Zea mays) under QTL Scrutiny

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Moreira, Pedro; Alves, Mara L.; Satovic, Zlatko; dos Santos, João Pacheco; Santos, João Nina; Souza, João Cândido; Pêgo, Silas E.; Hallauer, Arnel R.; Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota

    2015-01-01

    Maize ear fasciation Knowledge of the genes affecting maize ear inflorescence may lead to better grain yield modeling. Maize ear fasciation, defined as abnormal flattened ears with high kernel row number, is a quantitative trait widely present in Portuguese maize landraces. Material and Methods Using a segregating population derived from an ear fasciation contrasting cross (consisting of 149 F2:3 families) we established a two location field trial using a complete randomized block design. Correlations and heritabilities for several ear fasciation-related traits and yield were determined. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) involved in the inheritance of those traits were identified and candidate genes for these QTL proposed. Results and Discussion Ear fasciation broad-sense heritability was 0.73. Highly significant correlations were found between ear fasciation and some ear and cob diameters and row number traits. For the 23 yield and ear fasciation-related traits, 65 QTL were identified, out of which 11 were detected in both environments, while for the three principal components, five to six QTL were detected per environment. Detected QTL were distributed across 17 genomic regions and explained individually, 8.7% to 22.4% of the individual traits or principal components phenotypic variance. Several candidate genes for these QTL regions were proposed, such as bearded-ear1, branched silkless1, compact plant1, ramosa2, ramosa3, tasselseed4 and terminal ear1. However, many QTL mapped to regions without known candidate genes, indicating potential chromosomal regions not yet targeted for maize ear traits selection. Conclusions Portuguese maize germplasm represents a valuable source of genes or allelic variants for yield improvement and elucidation of the genetic basis of ear fasciation traits. Future studies should focus on fine mapping of the identified genomic regions with the aim of map-based cloning. PMID:25923975

  3. Resistance loci affecting distinct stages of fungal pathogenesis: use of introgression lines for QTL mapping and characterization in the maize - Setosphaeria turcica pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on host-pathogen interactions in a range of pathosystems have revealed an array of mechanisms by which plants reduce the efficiency of pathogenesis. While R-gene mediated resistance confers highly effective defense responses against pathogen invasion, quantitative resistance is associated with intermediate levels of resistance that reduces disease progress. To test the hypothesis that specific loci affect distinct stages of fungal pathogenesis, a set of maize introgression lines was used for mapping and characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) conditioning resistance to Setosphaeria turcica, the causal agent of northern leaf blight (NLB). To better understand the nature of quantitative resistance, the identified QTL were further tested for three secondary hypotheses: (1) that disease QTL differ by host developmental stage; (2) that their performance changes across environments; and (3) that they condition broad-spectrum resistance. Results Among a set of 82 introgression lines, seven lines were confirmed as more resistant or susceptible than B73. Two NLB QTL were validated in BC4F2 segregating populations and advanced introgression lines. These loci, designated qNLB1.02 and qNLB1.06, were investigated in detail by comparing the introgression lines with B73 for a series of macroscopic and microscopic disease components targeting different stages of NLB development. Repeated greenhouse and field trials revealed that qNLB1.06Tx303 (the Tx303 allele at bin 1.06) reduces the efficiency of fungal penetration, while qNLB1.02B73 (the B73 allele at bin 1.02) enhances the accumulation of callose and phenolics surrounding infection sites, reduces hyphal growth into the vascular bundle and impairs the subsequent necrotrophic colonization in the leaves. The QTL were equally effective in both juvenile and adult plants; qNLB1.06Tx303 showed greater effectiveness in the field than in the greenhouse. In addition to NLB resistance, qNLB1.02B73 was associated with resistance to Stewart's wilt and common rust, while qNLB1.06Tx303 conferred resistance to Stewart's wilt. The non-specific resistance may be attributed to pleiotropy or linkage. Conclusions Our research has led to successful identification of two reliably-expressed QTL that can potentially be utilized to protect maize from S. turcica in different environments. This approach to identifying and dissecting quantitative resistance in plants will facilitate the application of quantitative resistance in crop protection. PMID:20529319

  4. Fine Mapping and Identification of BMI Loci in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jian; Schumacher, Fredrick; Lim, Unhee; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Haessler, Jeff; Buyske, Steven; Carlson, Christopher S.; Rosse, Stephanie; B?žková, Petra; Fornage, Myriam; Gross, Myron; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Cooper, Richard; Ehret, Georg; Gu, C. Charles; Houston, Denise; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Jackson, Rebecca; Kuller, Lew; Henderson, Brian; Cheng, Iona; Wilkens, Lynne; Leppert, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Li, Rongling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung H.; Goodloe, Robert; Farber-Eger, Eric; Boston, Jonathan; Dilks, Holli H.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Fowke, Jay; Pooler, Loreall; Graff, Misa; Fernandez-Rhodes, Lindsay; Cochrane, Barbara; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kooperberg, Charles; Matise, Tara C.; Le Marchand, Loic; Crawford, Dana C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; North, Kari E.; Peters, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) primarily performed in European-ancestry (EA) populations have identified numerous loci associated with body mass index (BMI). However, it is still unclear whether these GWAS loci can be generalized to other ethnic groups, such as African Americans (AAs). Furthermore, the putative functional variant or variants in these loci mostly remain under investigation. The overall lower linkage disequilibrium in AA compared to EA populations provides the opportunity to narrow in or fine-map these BMI-related loci. Therefore, we used the Metabochip to densely genotype and evaluate 21 BMI GWAS loci identified in EA studies in 29,151 AAs from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Eight of the 21 loci (SEC16B, TMEM18, ETV5, GNPDA2, TFAP2B, BDNF, FTO, and MC4R) were found to be associated with BMI in AAs at 5.8 × 10?5. Within seven out of these eight loci, we found that, on average, a substantially smaller number of variants was correlated (r2 > 0.5) with the most significant SNP in AA than in EA populations (16 versus 55). Conditional analyses revealed GNPDA2 harboring a potential additional independent signal. Moreover, Metabochip-wide discovery analyses revealed two BMI-related loci, BRE (rs116612809, p = 3.6 × 10?8) and DHX34 (rs4802349, p = 1.2 × 10?7), which were significant when adjustment was made for the total number of SNPs tested across the chip. These results demonstrate that fine mapping in AAs is a powerful approach for both narrowing in on the underlying causal variants in known loci and discovering BMI-related loci. PMID:24094743

  5. Joint QTL linkage mapping for multiple-cross mating design sharing one common parent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nested association mapping (NAM) is a novel genetic mating design that combines the advantages of linkage analysis and association mapping. This design provides opportunities to study the inheritance of complex traits, but also requires more advanced statistical methods. In this paper, we present th...

  6. Construction of a genetic linkage map of an interspecific diploid blueberry population and identification of QTL

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Construction of a genetic linkage map of an interspecific diploid blueberry population con- structed from an interspecific diploid blueberry pop- ulation [(Vaccinium darrowii Fla4B 9 number of diploid blueberry) and totals 1,740 cM. Included on the map are 265 markers based on simple

  7. Bayesian QTL Mappingy pp g Brian S. Yandell

    E-print Network

    Yandell, Brian S.

    of correctly identified QTL · basic science/evolution ­ how is the genome organized? ­ identify units bias, smaller intervals · improve inference of complex genetic architecture ­ patterns and individual on linkage map i (modifiers) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30012 rank order of QTL additiveeffe 54 3 2 g p major QTL minor

  8. Current approaches to fine mapping of antigen–antibody interactions

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, W Mark; Damschroder, Melissa M; Lowe, David C

    2014-01-01

    A number of different methods are commonly used to map the fine details of the interaction between an antigen and an antibody. Undoubtedly the method that is now most commonly used to give details at the level of individual amino acids and atoms is X-ray crystallography. The feasibility of undertaking crystallographic studies has increased over recent years through the introduction of automation, miniaturization and high throughput processes. However, this still requires a high level of sophistication and expense and cannot be used when the antigen is not amenable to crystallization. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers a similar level of detail to crystallography but the technical hurdles are even higher such that it is rarely used in this context. Mutagenesis of either antigen or antibody offers the potential to give information at the amino acid level but suffers from the uncertainty of not knowing whether an effect is direct or indirect due to an effect on the folding of a protein. Other methods such as hydrogen deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry and the use of short peptides coupled with ELISA-based approaches tend to give mapping information over a peptide region rather than at the level of individual amino acids. It is quite common to use more than one method because of the limitations and even with a crystal structure it can be useful to use mutagenesis to tease apart the contribution of individual amino acids to binding affinity. PMID:24635566

  9. A linkage map of transcribed single nucleotide polymorphisms in rohu (Labeo rohita) and QTL associated with resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Production of carp dominates world aquaculture. More than 1.1 million tonnes of rohu carp, Labeo rohita (Hamilton), were produced in 2010. Aeromonas hydrophila is a bacterial pathogen causing aeromoniasis in rohu, and is a major problem for carp production worldwide. There is a need to better understand the genetic mechanisms affecting resistance to this disease, and to develop tools that can be used with selective breeding to improve resistance. Here we use a 6 K SNP array to genotype 21 full-sibling families of L. rohita that were experimentally challenged intra-peritoneally with a virulent strain of A. hydrophila to scan the genome for quantitative trait loci associated with disease resistance. Results In all, 3193 SNPs were found to be informative and were used to create a linkage map and to scan for QTL affecting resistance to A. hydrophila. The linkage map consisted of 25 linkage groups, corresponding to the number of haploid chromosomes in L. rohita. Male and female linkage maps were similar in terms of order, coverage (1384 and 1393 cM, respectively) and average interval distances (1.32 and 1.35 cM, respectively). Forty-one percent of the SNPs were annotated with gene identity using BLAST (cut off E-score of 0.001). Twenty-one SNPs mapping to ten linkage groups showed significant associations with the traits hours of survival and dead or alive (P <0.05 after Bonferroni correction). Of the SNPs showing significant or suggestive associations with the traits, several were homologous to genes of known immune function or were in close linkage to such genes. Genes of interest included heat shock proteins (70, 60, 105 and “small heat shock proteins”), mucin (5b precursor and 2), lectin (receptor and CD22), tributyltin-binding protein, major histocompatibility loci (I and II), complement protein component c7-1, perforin 1, ubiquitin (ligase, factor e4b isoform 2 and conjugation enzyme e2 c), proteasome subunit, T-cell antigen receptor and lymphocyte specific protein tyrosine kinase. Conclusions A panel of markers has been identified that will be validated for use with both genomic and marker-assisted selection to improve resistance of L. rohita to A. hydrophila. PMID:24984705

  10. Construction of Commercial Sweet Cherry Linkage Maps and QTL Analysis for Trunk Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Kaichun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yan, Guohua; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Laibao; Ni, Yang; Duan, Xuwei

    2015-01-01

    A cross between the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivars ‘Wanhongzhu’ and ‘Lapins’ was performed to create a mapping population suitable for the construction of a linkage map. The specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing technique used as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery platform and generated 701 informative genotypic assays; these, along with 16 microsatellites (SSRs) and the incompatibility (S) gene, were used to build a map which comprised 8 linkage groups (LGs) and covered a genetic distance of 849.0 cM. The mean inter-marker distance was 1.18 cM and there were few gaps > 5 cM in length. Marker collinearity was maintained with the established peach genomic sequence. The map was used to show that trunk diameter (TD) is under the control of 4 loci, mapping to 3 different LGs. Different locus influenced TD at a varying stage of the tree’s development. The high density ‘W×L’ genetic linkage map has the potential to enable high-resolution identification of QTLs of agronomically relevant traits, and accelerate sweet cherry breeding. PMID:26516760

  11. Construction of Commercial Sweet Cherry Linkage Maps and QTL Analysis for Trunk Diameter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Kaichun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yan, Guohua; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Laibao; Ni, Yang; Duan, Xuwei

    2015-01-01

    A cross between the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivars 'Wanhongzhu' and 'Lapins' was performed to create a mapping population suitable for the construction of a linkage map. The specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing technique used as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery platform and generated 701 informative genotypic assays; these, along with 16 microsatellites (SSRs) and the incompatibility (S) gene, were used to build a map which comprised 8 linkage groups (LGs) and covered a genetic distance of 849.0 cM. The mean inter-marker distance was 1.18 cM and there were few gaps > 5 cM in length. Marker collinearity was maintained with the established peach genomic sequence. The map was used to show that trunk diameter (TD) is under the control of 4 loci, mapping to 3 different LGs. Different locus influenced TD at a varying stage of the tree's development. The high density 'W×L' genetic linkage map has the potential to enable high-resolution identification of QTLs of agronomically relevant traits, and accelerate sweet cherry breeding. PMID:26516760

  12. Insight into the Genetic Components of Community Genetics: QTL Mapping of Insect Association in a Fast-Growing Forest Tree

    PubMed Central

    DeWoody, Jennifer; Viger, Maud; Lakatos, Ferenc; Tuba, Katalin; Taylor, Gail; Smulders, Marinus J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic sequences underlying insect associations on forest trees will improve the understanding of community genetics on a broad scale. We tested for genomic regions associated with insects in hybrid poplar using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses conducted on data from a common garden experiment. The F2 offspring of a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) cross were assessed for seven categories of insect leaf damage at two time points, June and August. Positive and negative correlations were detected among damage categories and between sampling times. For example, sap suckers on leaves in June were positively correlated with sap suckers on leaves (P<0.001) but negatively correlated with skeletonizer damage (P<0.01) in August. The seven forms of leaf damage were used as a proxy for seven functional groups of insect species. Significant variation in insect association occurred among the hybrid offspring, including transgressive segregation of susceptibility to damage. NMDS analyses revealed significant variation and modest broad-sense heritability in insect community structure among genets. QTL analyses identified 14 genomic regions across 9 linkage groups that correlated with insect association. We used three genomics tools to test for putative mechanisms underlying the QTL. First, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway genes co-located to 9 of the 13 QTL tested, consistent with the role of phenolic glycosides as defensive compounds. Second, two insect association QTL corresponded to genomic hotspots for leaf trait QTL as identified in previous studies, indicating that, in addition to biochemical attributes, leaf morphology may influence insect preference. Third, network analyses identified categories of gene models over-represented in QTL for certain damage types, providing direction for future functional studies. These results provide insight into the genetic components involved in insect community structure in a fast-growing forest tree. PMID:24260320

  13. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stram, Daniel O; Berndt, Sonja I; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis A; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Isaacs, William B; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Henderson, Brian E; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Haiman, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10(-4)-5.6 × 10(-3)) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10(-6)) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation. PMID:26162851

  14. Genetic linkage map construction and QTL identification of juvenile growth traits in Torreya grandis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Torreya grandis Fort. ex Lindl, a conifer species widely distributed in Southeastern China, is of high economic value by producing edible, nutrient seeds. However, knowledge about the genome structure and organization of this species is poorly understood, thereby limiting the effective use of its gene resources. Here, we report on a first genetic linkage map for Torreya grandis using 96 progeny randomly chosen from a half-sib family of a commercially cultivated variety of this species, Torreya grandis Fort. ex Lindl cv. Merrillii. The map contains 262 molecular markers, i.e., 75 random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPD), 119 inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and 62 amplified fragments length polymorphisms (AFLP), and spans a total of 7,139.9 cM, separated by 10 linkage groups. The linkage map was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with juvenile growth traits by functional mapping. We identified four basal diameter-related QTLs on linkage groups 1, 5 and 9; four height-related QTLs on linkage groups 1, 2, 5 and 8. It was observed that the genetic effects of QTLs on growth traits vary with age, suggesting the dynamic behavior of growth QTLs. Part of the QTLs was found to display a pleiotropic effect on basal diameter growth and height growth. PMID:25079139

  15. A statistical model for QTL mapping in polysomic autotetraploids underlying double reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: As a group of economically important species, linkage mapping of polysomic autotetraploids, including potato, sugarcane and rose, is difficult to conduct due to their unique meiotic property of double reduction that allows sister chromatids to enter into the same gamete. We desc...

  16. Precision QTL mapping of downy mildew resistance in Hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop Downy mildew (DM) is an obligate parasite causing severe losses in hop if not controlled. Resistance to this pathogen is a primary goal for hop breeding programs. The objective of this study was to identify QTLs linked to DM resistance. Next-generation-sequencing was performed on a mapping po...

  17. Genetic Mapping of Sulfur Assimilation Genes Reveals a QTL for Onion Bulb Pungency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion exhibits wide genetic and environmental variation in bioactive organosulfur compounds that impart pungency and health benefits. A PCR-based molecular marker map that included candidate genes for sulfur assimilation was used to identify genomic regions affecting pungency in the cross 'W202A' x ...

  18. Preliminary Mapping of the Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) Genome and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Interval Mapping for Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary investigations into the organization of the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) genome have resulted in low to moderate density gender-specific maps constructed from progeny of a backcrossed, short-diapause WCR family. Maps were based upon variation at microsatel...

  19. QTL mapping - Current status and challenges: Comment on "Mapping complex traits as a dynamic system" by L. Sun and R. Wu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nianjun

    2015-06-01

    One of the important objectives of genetic study is to understand the underlying mechanism of complex traits. However, complex traits are complex in terms of their mechanisms. First, multiple genetic variants are involved in different ways. In addition to the main effects (such as additive and dominant effects), these genetic variants may interact with each other [1-4], they may have pleiotropic effects [5,6], there may be genomic imprinting (a phenomenon where some genes are expressed or repressed depending on their parental origin) [7-9] and epigenetic effects [10-14]. In addition, environment often fits in via gene by environment interaction [15,16]. A more complicated genetic interaction between QTLs is from different genomes, i.e. the genome-genome interaction which may involve genomes from the same organisms or even different organisms [17-19]. Biology is multifactorial and dynamic. Complex traits are closely related to developmental changes in an organism's ontogeny, giving time an important role in the formation of complex traits. From the point of view of ecology, the formation of complex traits is extremely complex involving not only the genes of an individual but also the genotypes of its neighbors that co-occur with it [17,18,20-23]. Such complexity makes QTL mapping very challenging.

  20. Mapping and comparative analysis of QTL for crown rust resistance in an Italian x perennial ryegrass population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown rust (Puccinia coronata f.sp. lolli) is a serious fungal foliar disease of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (L. multiflorum L.) which are important forage and turf species. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for crown rust resistance were previously identifie...

  1. Mapping QTL controlling southern leaf blight resistance by combined analysis of three related recombinant inbred line populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to southern leaf blight (SLB) disease caused by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race O were identified in three maize recombinant inbred populations assed in two environments. Each population derived from a cross between a temperate and a tropical maize li...

  2. Discovery and application of insertion-deletion (INDEL) polymorphisms for QTL mapping of early life-history traits in Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For decades, linkage mapping has been one of the most powerful and widely used approaches for elucidating the genetic architecture of phenotypic traits of medical, agricultural and evolutionary importance. However, successful mapping of Mendelian and quantitative phenotypic traits depends critically on the availability of fast and preferably high-throughput genotyping platforms. Several array-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping platforms have been developed for genetic model organisms during recent years but most of these methods become prohibitively expensive for screening large numbers of individuals. Therefore, inexpensive, simple and flexible genotyping solutions that enable rapid screening of intermediate numbers of loci (~75-300) in hundreds to thousands of individuals are still needed for QTL mapping applications in a broad range of organisms. Results Here we describe the discovery of and application of insertion-deletion (INDEL) polymorphisms for cost-efficient medium throughput genotyping that enables analysis of >75 loci in a single automated sequencer electrophoresis column with standard laboratory equipment. Genotyping of INDELs requires low start-up costs, includes few standard sample handling steps and is applicable to a broad range of species for which expressed sequence tag (EST) collections are available. As a proof of principle, we generated a partial INDEL linkage map in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rapidly identified a number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting early life-history traits that are expected to have important fitness consequences in the natural environment. Conclusions The INDEL genotyping enabled fast coarse-mapping of chromosomal regions containing QTL, thus providing an efficient means for characterization of genetic architecture in multiple crosses and large pedigrees. This enables not only the discovery of larger number of QTLs with relatively smaller phenotypic effect but also provides a cost-effective means for evaluation of the frequency of segregating QTLs in outbred populations which is important for further understanding how genetic variation underlying phenotypic traits is maintained in the wild. PMID:20210987

  3. QTL for resistance in Lolium perenne to a mixed population of Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola: use of RAD (restriction site associated DNA) markers to rapidly populate a new linkage map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mapping population was created to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola in Lolium perenne. Susceptible and resistant plants were crossed to produce a pseudo-testcross population. Markers were produced by the Restriction-sit...

  4. Joint QTL analyses for partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae using six nested inbred populations with heterogeneous conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean is controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL). With traditional QTL mapping approaches, power to detect these QTL, frequently of small effect, can be limited by population size. Joint linkage QTL analysis of nested recombinant inbred li...

  5. Genetic Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Detection of Six Economic Traits Using an F2 Population of the Hybrid from Saccharina longissima and Saccharina japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Tao; Feng, Rongfang; Liu, Cui; Chi, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Saccharina (Laminaria) is one of the most important economic seaweeds. Previously, four genetic linkage maps of Saccharina have been constructed and five QTLs have been identified. However, they were not enough for its breeding. In this work, Saccharina longissima (?) and Saccharina japonica (?), which showed obvious differences in morphology and genetics, were applied in hybridization to yield the F2 mapping population with 102 individuals. Using these 102 F2 hybrids, the genetic linkage map of Saccharina was constructed by MapMaker software based on 37 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 22 sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs) and 139 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers. Meanwhile, QTL analysis was performed for six economic traits. The linkage map constructed in this research consisted of 422 marker loci (137 AFLPs, 57 SRAPs and 228 SSRs), which formed 45 linkage groups (LGs) with an average marker space of 7.92 cM; they spanned a total length of 2233.1 cM, covering the whole estimated genome size. A total of 29 QTLs were identified for six economic traits, which explained 1.06 to 64.00% of phenotypic variation, including three QTLs for frond length (FL) and raw weight (RW), five QTLs for frond width (FW), two QTLs for frond fascia width (FFW) and frond thickness (FT), and fourteen QTLs for base shape (BS). The results of this research will improve the breeding efficiency and be beneficial for marker-assisted selection (MAS) schemes in Saccharina breeding. PMID:26010152

  6. QTL mapping of slow-rusting, adult plant resistance to race Ug99 of stem rust fungus in PBW343/Muu RIL population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Singh, Ravi P; Bhavani, Sridhar; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Eugenio, Lopez-Vera Eric

    2013-05-01

    Races of stem rust fungus pose a major threat to wheat production worldwide. We mapped adult plant resistance (APR) to Ug99 in 141 lines of a PBW343/Muu recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population by phenotyping them for three seasons at Njoro, Kenya in field trials and genotyping them with Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. Moderately susceptible parent PBW343 and APR parent Muu displayed mean stem rust severities of 66.6 and 5 %, respectively. The mean disease severity of RILs ranged from 1 to 100 %, with an average of 23.3 %. Variance components for stem rust severity were highly significant (p < 0.001) for RILs and seasons and the heritability (h (2)) for the disease ranged between 0.78 and 0.89. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis identified four consistent genomic regions on chromosomes 2BS, 3BS, 5BL, and 7AS; three contributed by Muu (QSr.cim-2BS, QSr.cim-3BS and QSr.cim-7AS) and one (QSr.cim-5BL) derived from PBW343. RILs with flanking markers for these QTLs had significantly lower severities than those lacking the markers, and combinations of QTLs had an additive effect, significantly enhancing APR. The QTL identified on chromosome 3BS mapped to the matching region as the known APR gene Sr2. Four additional QTLs on chromosomes 1D, 3A, 4B, and 6A reduced disease severity significantly at least once in three seasons. Our results show a complex nature of APR to stem rust where Sr2 and other minor slow rusting resistance genes can confer a higher level of resistance when present together. PMID:23440380

  7. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J.; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Mcdonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Woko?orczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y.; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A.; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V.; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ?38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  8. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans.

    PubMed

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Mcdonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Woko?orczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ?38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  9. Deciphering gamma-decalactone biosynthesis in strawberry fruit using a combination of genetic mapping, RNA-Seq and eQTL analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the basis for volatile organic compound (VOC) biosynthesis and regulation is of great importance for the genetic improvement of fruit flavor. Lactones constitute an essential group of fatty acid-derived VOCs conferring peach-like aroma to a number of fruits including peach, plum, pineapple and strawberry. Early studies on lactone biosynthesis suggest that several enzymatic pathways could be responsible for the diversity of lactones, but detailed information on them remained elusive. In this study, we have integrated genetic mapping and genome-wide transcriptome analysis to investigate the molecular basis of natural variation in ?-decalactone content in strawberry fruit. Results As a result, the fatty acid desaturase FaFAD1 was identified as the gene underlying the locus at LGIII-2 that controls ?-decalactone production in ripening fruit. The FaFAD1 gene is specifically expressed in ripe fruits and its expression fully correlates with the presence of ?-decalactone in all 95 individuals of the mapping population. In addition, we show that the level of expression of FaFAH1, with similarity to cytochrome p450 hydroxylases, significantly correlates with the content of ?-decalactone in the mapping population. The analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) suggests that the product of this gene also has a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway of lactones. Conclusions Altogether, this study provides mechanistic information of how the production of ?-decalactone is naturally controlled in strawberry, and proposes enzymatic activities necessary for the formation of this VOC in plants. PMID:24742100

  10. Genotyping by Sequencing for SNP-Based Linkage Map Construction and QTL Analysis of Chilling Requirement and Bloom Date in Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch

    PubMed Central

    Bielenberg, Douglas Gary; Rauh, Bradley; Fan, Shenghua; Gasic, Ksenija; Abbott, Albert Glenn; Reighard, Gregory Lynn; Okie, William R.; Wells, Christina Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost, high throughput genotyping methods are crucial to marker discovery and marker-assisted breeding efforts, but have not been available for many ‘specialty crops’ such as fruit and nut trees. Here we apply the Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) method developed for cereals to the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a peach F2 mapping population. Peach is a genetic and genomic model within the Rosaceae and will provide a template for the use of this method with other members of this family. Our F2 mapping population of 57 genotypes segregates for bloom time (BD) and chilling requirement (CR) and we have extensively phenotyped this population. The population derives from a selfed F1 progeny of a cross between ‘Hakuho’ (high CR) and ‘UFGold’ (low CR). We were able to successfully employ GBS and the TASSEL GBS pipeline without modification of the original methodology using the ApeKI restriction enzyme and multiplexing at an equivalent of 96 samples per Illumina HiSeq 2000 lane. We obtained hundreds of SNP markers which were then used to construct a genetic linkage map and identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BD and CR. PMID:26430886

  11. Fine scale mapping in the sex locus region of the honey bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Hasselmann, M; Fondrk, M K; Page, R E; Beye, M

    2001-12-01

    Isolating an unknown gene with fine-scale mapping is possible in a "non-model" organism. Sex determination in honey bees consists of a single locus (sex locus) with several complementary alleles. Diploid females are heterozygous at the sex locus, whereas haploid males arise from unfertilized eggs and are hemizygous. The construction of specific inbred crosses facilitates fine scale mapping in the sex locus region of the honey bee. The high recombination rate in the honey bee reduces the physical distance between markers compared with model organisms and facilitates a novel gene isolation strategy based on step-wise creation of new markers within small physical distances. We show that distances less than 25 kb can be efficiently mapped with a mapping population of only 1000 individuals. The procedure described here will accelerate the mapping, analysis and isolation of honey bee genes. PMID:11903630

  12. Rapid Fine Conformational Epitope Mapping Using Comprehensive Mutagenesis and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kowalsky, Caitlin A; Faber, Matthew S; Nath, Aritro; Dann, Hailey E; Kelly, Vince W; Liu, Li; Shanker, Purva; Wagner, Ellen K; Maynard, Jennifer A; Chan, Christina; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2015-10-30

    Knowledge of the fine location of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes on human pathogens affords a better understanding of the structural basis of antibody efficacy, which will expedite rational design of vaccines, prophylactics, and therapeutics. However, full utilization of the wealth of information from single cell techniques and antibody repertoire sequencing awaits the development of a high throughput, inexpensive method to map the conformational epitopes for antibody-antigen interactions. Here we show such an approach that combines comprehensive mutagenesis, cell surface display, and DNA deep sequencing. We develop analytical equations to identify epitope positions and show the method effectiveness by mapping the fine epitope for different antibodies targeting TNF, pertussis toxin, and the cancer target TROP2. In all three cases, the experimentally determined conformational epitope was consistent with previous experimental datasets, confirming the reliability of the experimental pipeline. Once the comprehensive library is generated, fine conformational epitope maps can be prepared at a rate of four per day. PMID:26296891

  13. FINE MAPPING OF GENES REGULATING HEAT LOSS IN MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three mapping populations have been produced from lines of mice that have undergone 16 generations of divergent selection for high and low heat loss using direct calorimetry. Two populations consisted of F2 intercrosses originating from either outbred (MH x ML, n=560) or inbred (IH x IL, n=640) high...

  14. Leveraging Functional-Annotation Data in Trans-ethnic Fine-Mapping Studies.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2015-08-01

    Localization of causal variants underlying known risk loci is one of the main research challenges following genome-wide association studies. Risk loci are typically dissected through fine-mapping experiments in trans-ethnic cohorts for leveraging the variability in the local genetic structure across populations. More recent works have shown that genomic functional annotations (i.e., localization of tissue-specific regulatory marks) can be integrated for increasing fine-mapping performance within single-population studies. Here, we introduce methods that integrate the strength of association between genotype and phenotype, the variability in the genetic backgrounds across populations, and the genomic map of tissue-specific functional elements to increase trans-ethnic fine-mapping accuracy. Through extensive simulations and empirical data, we have demonstrated that our approach increases fine-mapping resolution over existing methods. We analyzed empirical data from a large-scale trans-ethnic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) study and showed that the functional genetic architecture of RA is consistent across European and Asian ancestries. In these data, we used our proposed methods to reduce the average size of the 90% credible set from 29 variants per locus for standard non-integrative approaches to 22 variants. PMID:26189819

  15. Construction of a BAC library and mapping BAC clones to the linkage map of Barramundi, Lates calcarifer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun Ming; Lo, Loong Chueng; Feng, Felicia; Gong, Ping; Li, Jian; Zhu, Ze Yuan; Lin, Grace; Yue, Gen Hua

    2008-01-01

    Background Barramundi (Lates calcarifer) is an important farmed marine food fish species. Its first generation linkage map has been applied to map QTL for growth traits. To identify genes located in QTL responsible for specific traits, genomic large insert libraries are of crucial importance. We reported herein a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and the mapping of BAC clones to the linkage map. Results This BAC library consisted of 49,152 clones with an average insert size of 98 kb, representing 6.9-fold haploid genome coverage. Screening the library with 24 microsatellites and 15 ESTs/genes demonstrated that the library had good genome coverage. In addition, 62 novel microsatellites each isolated from 62 BAC clones were mapped onto the first generation linkage map. A total of 86 BAC clones were anchored on the linkage map with at least one BAC clone on each linkage group. Conclusion We have constructed the first BAC library for L. calcarifer and mapped 86 BAC clones to the first generation linkage map. This BAC library and the improved linkage map with 302 DNA markers not only supply an indispensable tool to the integration of physical and linkage maps, the fine mapping of QTL and map based cloning genes located in QTL of commercial importance, but also contribute to comparative genomic studies and eventually whole genome sequencing. PMID:18366732

  16. Genome-wide interval mapping using SNPs identifies new QTL for growth, body composition and several physiological variables in an F2 intercross between fat and lean chicken lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For decades, genetic improvement based on measuring growth and body composition traits has been successfully applied in the production of meat-type chickens. However, this conventional approach is hindered by antagonistic genetic correlations between some traits and the high cost of measuring body composition traits. Marker-assisted selection should overcome these problems by selecting loci that have effects on either one trait only or on more than one trait but with a favorable genetic correlation. In the present study, identification of such loci was done by genotyping an F2 intercross between fat and lean lines divergently selected for abdominal fatness genotyped with a medium-density genetic map (120 microsatellites and 1302 single nucleotide polymorphisms). Genome scan linkage analyses were performed for growth (body weight at 1, 3, 5, and 7 weeks, and shank length and diameter at 9 weeks), body composition at 9 weeks (abdominal fat weight and percentage, breast muscle weight and percentage, and thigh weight and percentage), and for several physiological measurements at 7 weeks in the fasting state, i.e. body temperature and plasma levels of IGF-I, NEFA and glucose. Interval mapping analyses were performed with the QTLMap software, including single-trait analyses with single and multiple QTL on the same chromosome. Results Sixty-seven QTL were detected, most of which had never been described before. Of these 67 QTL, 47 were detected by single-QTL analyses and 20 by multiple-QTL analyses, which underlines the importance of using different statistical models. Close analysis of the genes located in the defined intervals identified several relevant functional candidates, such as ACACA for abdominal fatness, GHSR and GAS1 for breast muscle weight, DCRX and ASPSCR1 for plasma glucose content, and ChEBP for shank diameter. Conclusions The medium-density genetic map enabled us to genotype new regions of the chicken genome (including micro-chromosomes) that influenced the traits investigated. With this marker density, confidence intervals were sufficiently small (14 cM on average) to search for candidate genes. Altogether, this new information provides a valuable starting point for the identification of causative genes responsible for important QTL controlling growth, body composition and metabolic traits in the broiler chicken. PMID:24079476

  17. Evaluating the Performance of Fine-Mapping Strategies at Common Variant GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Cortes, Adrian; Brown, Matthew A.; Morris, Andrew P.; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    The growing availability of high-quality genomic annotation has increased the potential for mechanistic insights when the specific variants driving common genome-wide association signals are accurately localized. A range of fine-mapping strategies have been advocated, and specific successes reported, but the overall performance of such approaches, in the face of the extensive linkage disequilibrium that characterizes the human genome, is not well understood. Using simulations based on sequence data from the 1000 Genomes Project, we quantify the extent to which fine-mapping, here conducted using an approximate Bayesian approach, can be expected to lead to useful improvements in causal variant localization. We show that resolution is highly variable between loci, and that performance is severely degraded as the statistical power to detect association is reduced. We confirm that, where causal variants are shared between ancestry groups, further improvements in performance can be obtained in a trans-ethnic fine-mapping design. Finally, using empirical data from a recently published genome-wide association study for ankylosing spondylitis, we provide empirical confirmation of the behaviour of the approximate Bayesian approach and demonstrate that seven of twenty-six loci can be fine-mapped to fewer than ten variants. PMID:26406328

  18. Fine-Scale Linkage Mapping Reveals a Small Set of Candidate Genes Influencing Honey Bee Grooming

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Fine-Scale Linkage Mapping Reveals a Small Set of Candidate Genes Influencing Honey Bee Grooming Populations of honey bees in North America have been experiencing high annual colony mortality for 15­20 years growth in colonies is the ability of some lines of honey bees to groom mites from their bodies. To search

  19. Fine Genetic Mapping Localizes Cucumber Scab Resistance Gene Ccu into an R Gene Cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scab caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F9 recombination inbreeding lines (RILs) and 1,944 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucum...

  20. Fine mapping of complex traits in non-model species: using next generation sequencing and advanced intercross lines in Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As for other non-model species, genetic analyses in quail will benefit greatly from a higher marker density, now attainable thanks to the evolution of sequencing and genotyping technologies. Our objective was to obtain the first genome wide panel of Japanese quail SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and to use it for the fine mapping of a QTL for a fear-related behaviour, namely tonic immobility, previously localized on Coturnix japonica chromosome 1. To this aim, two reduced representations of the genome were analysed through high-throughput 454 sequencing: AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) fragments as representatives of genomic DNA, and EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) as representatives of the transcriptome. Results The sequencing runs produced 399,189 and 1,106,762 sequence reads from cDNA and genomic fragments, respectively. They covered over 434 Mb of sequence in total and allowed us to detect 17,433 putative SNP. Among them, 384 were used to genotype two Advanced Intercross Lines (AIL) obtained from three quail lines differing for duration of tonic immobility. Despite the absence of genotyping for founder individuals in the analysis, the previously identified candidate region on chromosome 1 was refined and led to the identification of a candidate gene. Conclusions These data confirm the efficiency of transcript and AFLP-sequencing for SNP discovery in a non-model species, and its application to the fine mapping of a complex trait. Our results reveal a significant association of duration of tonic immobility with a genomic region comprising the DMD (dystrophin) gene. Further characterization of this candidate gene is needed to decipher its putative role in tonic immobility in Coturnix. PMID:23066875

  1. Figure 1: The weighting functions used in our simulation studies of dataset I. Dataset II: fine mapping of disease genes

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    mapping of disease genes The evolutionary model used in generating the dataset II was similar to the model was assumed known. 1 #12;Results on dataset II To illustrate the performance of HapMiner on gene fine mappingFigure 1: The weighting functions used in our simulation studies of dataset I. Dataset II: fine

  2. Fine specificity of autoantibodies to calreticulin: epitope mapping and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Eggleton, P; Ward, F J; Johnson, S; Khamashta, M A; Hughes, G R V; Hajela, V A; Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Staines, N A; Reid, K B M

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular calreticulin (CRT) as well as anti-CRT antibodies have been reported in patients with various autoimmune disorders and CRT has been implicated in ‘epitope spreading’ to other autoantigens such as the Ro/SS-A complex. In addition, antibodies against parasite forms of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, CRT, have been found in patients suffering from onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. In this study, we screened sera for anti-CRT antibodies from patients with active and inactive systemic lupus ertythematosus (SLE) and primary or secondary Sjögren's syndrome. Approximately 40% of all SLE patients were positive for anti-CRT antibodies. The antigenic regions of CRT were determined using full length CRT and fragments of CRT prepared in yeast and Escherichia coli, respectively. Synthetic 15mer peptides corresponding to the major autoantigenic region of CRT (amino acids 1–289), each one overlapping by 12 amino acids, were used to map the B cell epitopes on the CRT protein recognized by autoimmune sera. Major antigenic epitopes were found to be associated with the N-terminal half of the protein in 69% of the SLE sera from active disease patients, while the C-domain was not antigenic. Major epitopes were found to be reactive with antibodies in sera from SLE patients with both active and inactive disease, spanning different regions of the N and P-domains. Sera from both healthy and disease controls and primary Sjögren's syndrome patients were non-reactive to these sequences. Limited proteolysis of CRT with two major leucocyte serine proteases, elastase and cathepsin G, demonstrated that an N-terminal region of CRT is resistant to digestion. Interestingly, some of the epitopes with the highest reactivity belong to the fragments of the protein which bind to C1q and inhibit complement activation. Whether C1q association with CRT is a pathological or protective interaction between these two proteins is currently under investigation. PMID:10792392

  3. QTL mapping of genetic determinants of lipoprotein metabolism in mice: Mutations of the apolipoprotein A-II gene affecting lipoprotein turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, A.; Purcell-Huynh, D.A.; Castellani, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    Cholesterol and lipoproteins represent important risk factors for atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the genes involved in determining lipoprotein levels, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed using a cross between NZB and SM/J mice. Significant LOD scores for loci determining total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL and VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) were obtained. NZB mice have a 7-10 fold higher apoA-II level SM/J. LOD scores of 19.6 (chow) and 10.3 (high fat) were obtained at the apoA-II gene locus. Comparison of apoA-II levels by apoA-II genotype reveals that {approximately}30% of the variance in apoA-II levels can be accounted for by differences within the apoA-II gene. Northern analysis of mRNA from NZB and SM/J mice fed a high fat diet failed to show any significant differences in mRNA levels. The rates of apoA-II protein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis between the two strains were similar, with a rate of 0.16% for NZB and 0.18% for SM/J. Sequencing of NZB and SM/J apoA-II cDNAs revealed a pro5 to gln5 substitution in SM/J. Therefore, differences in the apoA-II levels between NZB and SM/J may be partly due to a structural difference in apoA-II resulting in an increased rate of apoA-II clearance in SM/J. A coincident QTL for HDL at the same chromosome 1 locus suggests that a structural difference in apoA-II may be affecting the rate of HDL clearance. It is of interest to note that the pro5 to gln5 substitution leads to apoA-II amyloid deposition in the SAM mouse.

  4. Inheritance and QTL Mapping of Leaf Nutrient Concentration in a Cotton Inter-Specific Derived RIL Population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiming; Lacape, Jean-Marc; Constable, Greg A; Llewellyn, Danny J

    2015-01-01

    Developing and deploying cotton cultivars with high nutrient uptake, use efficiency and tolerance to nutrient related soil stresses is desirable to assist sustainable soil management. Genetic variation, heritability, selection response and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were investigated for five macronutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg, S) and five micronutrients (Fe, Mn, B, Zn, and Cu) in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population from an inter-specific cross between Gossypium hirsutum cv. Guazuncho 2, and G. barbadense accession VH8-4602. Na and K/Na ratio were also studied as the imbalance between Na and other nutrients is detrimental to cotton growth and development. The concentrations of nutrients were measured for different plant parts of the two parents and for leaf samples of the whole population collected at early to peak flowering in field experiments over two years in a sodic Vertosol soil. Parental contrast was large for most nutrient concentrations in leaves when compared with other plant parts. Segregation for leaf nutrient concentration was observed within the population with transgression for P, K, K/Na ratio and all micronutrients. Genotypic difference was the major factor behind within-population variation for most nutrients, while narrow sense heritability was moderate (0.27 for Mn and Cu, and 0.43 for B). At least one significant QTL was identified for each nutrient except K and more than half of those QTLs were clustered on chromosomes 14, 18 and 22. Selection response was predicted to be low for P and all micronutrients except B, high for K, Na and B, and very high for K/Na ratio. Correlations were more common between macronutrients, Na and K/Na ratio where the nature and strength of the relations varied (r=-0.69 to 0.76). We conclude that there is sufficient genetic diversity between these two tetraploid cotton species that could be exploited to improve cotton nutrient status by introgressing species-unique favourable alleles. PMID:26020945

  5. Metabolomic Quantitative Trait Loci (mQTL) Mapping Implicates the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Cardiovascular Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, William E.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Stevens, Robert; Craig, Damian; Bain, James R.; Grass, Elizabeth; Haynes, Carol; Kwee, Lydia; Qin, Xuejun; Slentz, Dorothy H.; Krupp, Deidre; Muehlbauer, Michael; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Gregory, Simon G.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Shah, Svati H.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of certain circulating short-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (SCDA), long-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (LCDA) and medium chain acylcarnitine (MCA) metabolites are heritable and predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Little is known about the biological pathways that influence levels of most of these metabolites. Here, we analyzed genetics, epigenetics, and transcriptomics with metabolomics in samples from a large CVD cohort to identify novel genetic markers for CVD and to better understand the role of metabolites in CVD pathogenesis. Using genomewide association in the CATHGEN cohort (N = 1490), we observed associations of several metabolites with genetic loci. Our strongest findings were for SCDA metabolite levels with variants in genes that regulate components of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (USP3, HERC1, STIM1, SEL1L, FBXO25, SUGT1) These findings were validated in a second cohort of CATHGEN subjects (N = 2022, combined p = 8.4x10-6–2.3x10-10). Importantly, variants in these genes independently predicted CVD events. Association of genomewide methylation profiles with SCDA metabolites identified two ER stress genes as differentially methylated (BRSK2 and HOOK2). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) pathway analyses driven by gene variants and SCDA metabolites corroborated perturbations in ER stress and highlighted the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) arm. Moreover, culture of human kidney cells in the presence of levels of fatty acids found in individuals with cardiometabolic disease, induced accumulation of SCDA metabolites in parallel with increases in the ER stress marker BiP. Thus, our integrative strategy implicates the UPS arm of the ER stress pathway in CVD pathogenesis, and identifies novel genetic loci associated with CVD event risk. PMID:26540294

  6. Metabolomic Quantitative Trait Loci (mQTL) Mapping Implicates the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Cardiovascular Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kraus, William E; Muoio, Deborah M; Stevens, Robert; Craig, Damian; Bain, James R; Grass, Elizabeth; Haynes, Carol; Kwee, Lydia; Qin, Xuejun; Slentz, Dorothy H; Krupp, Deidre; Muehlbauer, Michael; Hauser, Elizabeth R; Gregory, Simon G; Newgard, Christopher B; Shah, Svati H

    2015-11-01

    Levels of certain circulating short-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (SCDA), long-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (LCDA) and medium chain acylcarnitine (MCA) metabolites are heritable and predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Little is known about the biological pathways that influence levels of most of these metabolites. Here, we analyzed genetics, epigenetics, and transcriptomics with metabolomics in samples from a large CVD cohort to identify novel genetic markers for CVD and to better understand the role of metabolites in CVD pathogenesis. Using genomewide association in the CATHGEN cohort (N = 1490), we observed associations of several metabolites with genetic loci. Our strongest findings were for SCDA metabolite levels with variants in genes that regulate components of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (USP3, HERC1, STIM1, SEL1L, FBXO25, SUGT1) These findings were validated in a second cohort of CATHGEN subjects (N = 2022, combined p = 8.4x10-6-2.3x10-10). Importantly, variants in these genes independently predicted CVD events. Association of genomewide methylation profiles with SCDA metabolites identified two ER stress genes as differentially methylated (BRSK2 and HOOK2). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) pathway analyses driven by gene variants and SCDA metabolites corroborated perturbations in ER stress and highlighted the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) arm. Moreover, culture of human kidney cells in the presence of levels of fatty acids found in individuals with cardiometabolic disease, induced accumulation of SCDA metabolites in parallel with increases in the ER stress marker BiP. Thus, our integrative strategy implicates the UPS arm of the ER stress pathway in CVD pathogenesis, and identifies novel genetic loci associated with CVD event risk. PMID:26540294

  7. Inheritance and QTL Mapping of Leaf Nutrient Concentration in a Cotton Inter-Specific Derived RIL Population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiming; Lacape, Jean-Marc; Constable, Greg A.; Llewellyn, Danny J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing and deploying cotton cultivars with high nutrient uptake, use efficiency and tolerance to nutrient related soil stresses is desirable to assist sustainable soil management. Genetic variation, heritability, selection response and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were investigated for five macronutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg, S) and five micronutrients (Fe, Mn, B, Zn, and Cu) in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population from an inter-specific cross between Gossypium hirsutum cv. Guazuncho 2, and G. barbadense accession VH8-4602. Na and K/Na ratio were also studied as the imbalance between Na and other nutrients is detrimental to cotton growth and development. The concentrations of nutrients were measured for different plant parts of the two parents and for leaf samples of the whole population collected at early to peak flowering in field experiments over two years in a sodic Vertosol soil. Parental contrast was large for most nutrient concentrations in leaves when compared with other plant parts. Segregation for leaf nutrient concentration was observed within the population with transgression for P, K, K/Na ratio and all micronutrients. Genotypic difference was the major factor behind within-population variation for most nutrients, while narrow sense heritability was moderate (0.27 for Mn and Cu, and 0.43 for B). At least one significant QTL was identified for each nutrient except K and more than half of those QTLs were clustered on chromosomes 14, 18 and 22. Selection response was predicted to be low for P and all micronutrients except B, high for K, Na and B, and very high for K/Na ratio. Correlations were more common between macronutrients, Na and K/Na ratio where the nature and strength of the relations varied (r=-0.69 to 0.76). We conclude that there is sufficient genetic diversity between these two tetraploid cotton species that could be exploited to improve cotton nutrient status by introgressing species-unique favourable alleles. PMID:26020945

  8. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%–99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait. PMID:24393130

  9. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  10. Fine mapping QTLs in advanced interbred lines and other outbred populations

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Natalia M.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative genetic studies in model organisms, particularly in mice, have been extremely successful in identifying chromosomal regions that are associated with a wide variety of behavioral and other traits. However, it is now widely understood that identification of the underlying genes will be far more challenging. In the last few years, a variety of populations have been utilized in an effort to more finely map these chromosomal regions with the goal of identifying specific genes. The common property of these newer populations is that linkage disequilibrium spans relatively short distances, which permits fine-scale mapping resolution. This review focuses on advanced intercross lines (AILs) which are the simplest such population. As originally proposed in 1995 by Darvasi and Soller, an AIL is the product of intercrossing two inbred strains beyond the F2 generation. Unlike recombinant inbred strains, AILs are maintained as outbred populations; brother-sister matings are specifically avoided. Each generation of intercrossing beyond the F2 further degrades linkage disequilibrium between adjacent makers, which allows for fine scale mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Advances in genotyping technology and techniques for the statistical analysis of AILs have permitted rapid advances in the application of AILs. We review some of the analytical issues and available software, including QTLRel, EMMA, EMMAX, GEMMA, TASSEL, GRAMMAR, WOMBAT, Mendel and others. PMID:24906874

  11. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, Michael A.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Stewart, Ceri E.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nurnberg, Peter; Altmuller, Janine; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Wardlaw, Andrew J.; Parker, Stuart G.; Connolly, Martin J.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sayers, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The soluble cleaved urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (scuPAR) is a circulating protein detected in multiple diseases, including various cancers, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease, where elevated levels of scuPAR have been associated with worsening prognosis and increased disease aggressiveness. We aimed to identify novel genetic and biomolecular mechanisms regulating scuPAR levels. Elevated serum scuPAR levels were identified in asthma (n=514) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=219) cohorts when compared to controls (n=96). In these cohorts, a genome-wide association study of serum scuPAR levels identified a human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1) promoter polymorphism (rs4253238) associated with serum scuPAR levels in a control/asthma population (P=1.17×10?7), which was also observed in a COPD population (combined P=5.04×10?12). Using a fluorescent assay, we demonstrated that serum KLKB1 enzymatic activity was driven by rs4253238 and is inverse to scuPAR levels. Biochemical analysis identified that KLKB1 cleaves scuPAR and negates scuPAR's effects on primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in vitro. Chymotrypsin was used as a proproteolytic control, while basal HBECs were used as a control to define scuPAR-driven effects. In summary, we reveal a novel post-translational regulatory mechanism for scuPAR using a hypothesis-free approach with implications for multiple human diseases.—Portelli, M. A., Siedlinski, M., Stewart, C. E., Postma, D. S., Nieuwenhuis, M. A., Vonk, J. M., Nurnberg, P., Altmuller, J., Moffatt, M. F., Wardlaw, A. J., Parker, S. G., Connolly, M. J., Koppelman, G. H., Sayers, I. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels. PMID:24249636

  12. Dissecting the Genetic Architecture of Leaf Rust Resistance in Wheat by QTL Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Jose Miguel; Royo, Conxita

    2015-12-01

    Leaf rust is an important disease that causes significant yield losses in wheat. Many studies have reported the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling leaf rust resistance; therefore, QTL meta-analysis has become a useful tool for identifying consensus QTL and refining QTL positions among them. In this study, QTL meta-analysis was conducted using reported results on the number, position, and effects of QTL for leaf rust resistance in bread and durum wheat. Investigation of 14 leaf rust resistance traits from 19 studies involving 20 mapping populations and 33 different parental lines provided information for 144 unique QTL that were projected onto the Wheat Composite 2004 reference map. In total, 35 meta-QTL for leaf rust resistance traits were identified in 17 wheat chromosomes and 13 QTL remained as unique QTL. The results will facilitate further work on the cloning of QTL for pyramiding minor- and partial-effect resistance genes to develop varieties with durable resistance to leaf rust. PMID:26571424

  13. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; William Rayner, N; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stan?áková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to noncoding sequence, implying that association with T2D is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that the T2D risk allele for this SNP increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease. PMID:26551672

  14. Identification of QTL for drought tolerance and characterization of extreme phenotypes in the Buster x Roza mapping population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terminal and intermittent drought limits dry bean production worldwide.The Buster/Roza mapping population (140 F7:9 RILs) has been screened for drought tolerance across multiple years/locations. In 2011 and 2012 the RILs were tested for terminal drought response at two locations: Othello, WA and Sco...

  15. Tagging and mapping of genes and QTL and molecular marker-assisted selection for traits of economic

    E-print Network

    Gepts, Paul

    importance in bean and cowpea J.D. Kellya,* , P. Geptsb , P.N. Miklasc , D.P. Coyned a Crop and Soil Sciences Abstract Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program (B/C CRSP) scientists have successfully.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp). The bean map is approximately 1200 cM with some 500 markers

  16. Validation of rice blast resistance genes in barley using a QTL mapping population and near-isolines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are prior reports of Pyricularia grisea – the causal agent of blast of rice – causing disease in barley. In order to determine the specificity of this resistance in barley, we extended our previous mapping efforts to include blast isolates from barley and rice grown in Thailand and we assesse...

  17. Mapping Blast and Sheath Blight QTL in an Advanced Backcross Bengal/O. nivara (Wild2) Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An advanced backcross mapping population was developed from a cross between ‘Bengal’, a popular southern U.S. tropical japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar, and an accession of the rice ancestral species, O. nivara Sharma & Shastry (IRGC104705). Previous studies identified this O. nivara accessi...

  18. A major QTL introgressed from wild Lycopersicon hirsutum confers chilling tolerance to cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    John Goodstal, F; Kohler, Glenn R; Randall, Leslie B; Bloom, Arnold J; St Clair, Dina A

    2005-09-01

    Many plants of tropical or subtropical origin, such as tomato, suffer damage under chilling temperatures (under 10 degrees C but above 0 degrees C). An earlier study identified several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for shoot turgor maintenance (stm) under root chilling in an interspecific backcross population derived from crossing chilling-susceptible cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and chilling-tolerant wild L. hirsutum. The QTL with the greatest phenotypic effect on stm was located in a 28 cM region on chromosome 9 (designated stm 9), and enhanced chilling-tolerance was conferred by the presence of the Lycopersicon hirsutum allele at this QTL. Here, near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used to verify the effect of stm 9, and recombinant sub-NILs were used to fine map its position. Replicated experiments were performed with NILs and sub-NILs in a refrigerated hydroponic tank in the greenhouse. Sub-NIL data was analyzed using least square means separations, marker-genotype mean t-tests, and composite interval mapping. A dominant QTL controlling shoot turgor maintenance under root chilling was confirmed on chromosome 9 using both NILs and sub-NILs. Furthermore, sub-NILs permitted localization of stm 9 to a 2.7 cM interval within the original 28 cM QTL region. If the presence of the L. hirsutum allele at stm 9 also confers chilling-tolerance in L. esculentum plants grown under field conditions, it has the potential to expand the geographic areas in which cultivated tomato can be grown for commercial production. PMID:16075210

  19. Dissection of a Complex Disease Susceptibility Region Using a Bayesian Stochastic Search Approach to Fine Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Chris; Cutler, Antony J; Pontikos, Nikolas; Pekalski, Marcin L; Burren, Oliver S; Cooper, Jason D; García, Arcadio Rubio; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Guo, Hui; Walker, Neil M; Smyth, Deborah J; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Ban, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Identification of candidate causal variants in regions associated with risk of common diseases is complicated by linkage disequilibrium (LD) and multiple association signals. Nonetheless, accurate maps of these variants are needed, both to fully exploit detailed cell specific chromatin annotation data to highlight disease causal mechanisms and cells, and for design of the functional studies that will ultimately be required to confirm causal mechanisms. We adapted a Bayesian evolutionary stochastic search algorithm to the fine mapping problem, and demonstrated its improved performance over conventional stepwise and regularised regression through simulation studies. We then applied it to fine map the established multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) associations in the IL-2RA (CD25) gene region. For T1D, both stepwise and stochastic search approaches identified four T1D association signals, with the major effect tagged by the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs12722496. In contrast, for MS, the stochastic search found two distinct competing models: a single candidate causal variant, tagged by rs2104286 and reported previously using stepwise analysis; and a more complex model with two association signals, one of which was tagged by the major T1D associated rs12722496 and the other by rs56382813. There is low to moderate LD between rs2104286 and both rs12722496 and rs56382813 (r2 ? 0:3) and our two SNP model could not be recovered through a forward stepwise search after conditioning on rs2104286. Both signals in the two variant model for MS affect CD25 expression on distinct subpopulations of CD4+ T cells, which are key cells in the autoimmune process. The results support a shared causal variant for T1D and MS. Our study illustrates the benefit of using a purposely designed model search strategy for fine mapping and the advantage of combining disease and protein expression data. PMID:26106896

  20. Dissection of a Complex Disease Susceptibility Region Using a Bayesian Stochastic Search Approach to Fine Mapping.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Chris; Cutler, Antony J; Pontikos, Nikolas; Pekalski, Marcin L; Burren, Oliver S; Cooper, Jason D; García, Arcadio Rubio; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Guo, Hui; Walker, Neil M; Smyth, Deborah J; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Ban, Maria; Richardson, Sylvia; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S

    2015-06-01

    Identification of candidate causal variants in regions associated with risk of common diseases is complicated by linkage disequilibrium (LD) and multiple association signals. Nonetheless, accurate maps of these variants are needed, both to fully exploit detailed cell specific chromatin annotation data to highlight disease causal mechanisms and cells, and for design of the functional studies that will ultimately be required to confirm causal mechanisms. We adapted a Bayesian evolutionary stochastic search algorithm to the fine mapping problem, and demonstrated its improved performance over conventional stepwise and regularised regression through simulation studies. We then applied it to fine map the established multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) associations in the IL-2RA (CD25) gene region. For T1D, both stepwise and stochastic search approaches identified four T1D association signals, with the major effect tagged by the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs12722496. In contrast, for MS, the stochastic search found two distinct competing models: a single candidate causal variant, tagged by rs2104286 and reported previously using stepwise analysis; and a more complex model with two association signals, one of which was tagged by the major T1D associated rs12722496 and the other by rs56382813. There is low to moderate LD between rs2104286 and both rs12722496 and rs56382813 (r2 ? 0:3) and our two SNP model could not be recovered through a forward stepwise search after conditioning on rs2104286. Both signals in the two variant model for MS affect CD25 expression on distinct subpopulations of CD4+ T cells, which are key cells in the autoimmune process. The results support a shared causal variant for T1D and MS. Our study illustrates the benefit of using a purposely designed model search strategy for fine mapping and the advantage of combining disease and protein expression data. PMID:26106896

  1. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis for disease resistance using F2 and F5 mapping population derived from the same cross in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Achieving a high dense genetic map in peanut is very challenging due to availability of limited genomic resources, low polymorphism and large genome. Realizing the importance of dense genetic maps in several genetic and breeding applications, a mapping population derived from Tifrunner × GT-C20 (T p...

  2. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5?cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  3. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5?cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  4. Informative markers identification and multivariate analysis of selected DxP for the purpose of QTL mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazirah S., Z.; Maizura, I.; Rajinder, S.; Mohd Isa Z., A.; Ismanizan, I.

    2014-09-01

    A study was carried out to generate a linkage map of oil palm dura x pisifera (DXP) population. A subset of sample from a DXP mapping family was screened using 325 SSR primers, of which 221 were informative. To date, 150 SSRs have been genotyped across the entire DxP population via capillary sequencer, where 73 SSRs had 1:1 segregation ratio, 64 had 1:1:1:1, 3 had 3:1 and ten had 1:2:1 segregation ratios. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests by SPSS revealed that most of the bunch quality components had normal distribution which fulfilled one of the pre-requisites to carry out phenotype-genotype correlation association.

  5. Characterization and mapping of very fine particles in an engine machining and assembly facility.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Peters, Thomas M; Slavin, Thomas J

    2007-05-01

    Very fine particle number and mass concentrations were mapped in an engine machining and assembly facility in the winter and summer. A condensation particle counter (CPC) was used to measure particle number concentrations in the 0.01 microm to 1 microm range, and an optical particle counter (OPC) was used to measure particle number concentrations in 15 channels between 0.3 microm and 20 microm. The OPC measurements were used to estimate the respirable mass concentration. Very fine particle number concentrations were estimated by subtracting the OPC particle number concentrations from 0.3 microm to 1 microm from the CPC number concentrations. At specific locations during the summer visit, an electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure particle size distribution from 0.07 microm to 10 microm in 12 channels. The geometric mean ratio of respirable mass concentration estimated from the OPC to the gravimetrically measured mass concentration was 0.66 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.5. Very fine particle number concentrations in winter were substantially greater where direct-fire natural gas heaters were operated (7.5 x 10(5) particles/cm(3)) than where steam was used for heat (3 x 10(5) particles/cm(3)). During summer when heaters were off, the very fine particle number concentrations were below 10(5) particles/cm(3), regardless of location. Elevated very fine particle number concentrations were associated with machining operations with poor enclosures. Whereas respirable mass concentrations did not vary noticeably with season, they were greater in areas with poorly fitting enclosures (0.12 mg/m(3)) than in areas where state-of-the-art enclosures were used (0.03 mg/m(3)). These differences were attributed to metalworking fluid mist that escaped from poorly fitting enclosures. Particles generated from direct-fire natural gas heater operation were very small, with a number size distribution modal diameter of less than 0.023 microm. Aerosols generated by machining operations had number size distributions modes in the 0.023 microm to 0.1 microm range. However, multiple modes in the mass size distributions estimated from OPC measurements occurred in the 2-20 microm range. Although elevated, very fine particle concentrations and respirable mass concentrations were both associated with poorly enclosed machining operations; the operation of the direct-fire natural gas heaters resulted in the greatest very fine particle concentrations without elevating the respirable mass concentration. These results suggest that respirable mass concentration may not be an adequate indicator for very fine particle exposure. PMID:17454502

  6. QTL mapping provides evidence for lack of association of the avoidance of leaf rust in Hordeum chilense with stomata density.

    PubMed

    Vaz Patto, M C; Rubiales, D; Martín, A; Hernández, P; Lindhout, P; Niks, R E; Stam, P

    2003-05-01

    In cereals, rust fungi are among the most harmful pathogens. Breeders usually rely on short-lived hypersensitivity resistance. As an alternative, "avoidance" may be a more durable defence mechanism to protect plants to rust fungi. In Hordeum chilense avoidance is based on extensive wax covering of stomata, which interferes with the induction of appressorium formation by the rust fungi. High avoidance levels are associated with a higher stoma density on the abaxial leaf epidermis. The avoidance level was assessed as the percentage of germ tube/stoma encounters that did not result in appressorium differentiation by Puccinia hordei, the barley leaf rust fungus. One hundred F(2) individuals from the cross between two H. chilense accessions with contrasting levels of avoidance showed a continuous distribution for avoidance of the rust fungus and for stoma density, indicating quantitative inheritance of the traits. No significant correlation was found between avoidance and stoma density in the segregating F(2) population. In order to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both traits, an improved molecular marker linkage map was constructed, based on the F(2) population. The resulting linkage map spanned 620 cM and featured a total of 437 AFLP markers, thirteen RFLPs, four SCARs, nine SSRs, one STS and two seed storage protein markers. It consisted of seven long and two shorter linkage groups, and was estimated to cover 81% of the H. chilense genome. Restricted multiple interval mapping identified two QTLs for avoidance and three QTLs for stoma density in the abaxial leaf surface. The QTLs for avoidance were mapped on chromosome 3 and 5; those for stoma density on chromosomes 1, 3 and 7. Only the two QTLs regions located on chromosome 3 (one for avoidance and the other for stoma density) overlapped. The wild barley H. chilense has a high crossability with other members of the Triticeae tribe. The knowledge on the location of the QTLs responsible for the avoidance trait is a prerequisite to transfer this favourable agronomic trait from H. chilense to cultivated cereal genomes. PMID:12748780

  7. Fine mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2015-06-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger for celiac disease, risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and observed five new associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Taking these new loci together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  8. Whole genome mapping and QTL analysis in a doubled haploid population derived from the cross between a synthetic hexaploid wheat and hard red spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis allows the identification of genomic regions associated with quantitative traits, which provides an estimation of the number and chromosomal location of genes involved and leads to the identification of molecular markers suitable for marker-assisted selection (...

  9. Synergistic use of RADARSAT-2 Ultra Fine and Fine Quad-Pol data to map oilsands infrastructure land: Object-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xianfeng; Zhang, Ying; Guindon, Bert

    2015-06-01

    The landscape of Alberta's oilsands regions is undergoing extensive change due to the creation of infrastructure associated with the exploration for and extraction of this resource. Since most oil sands mining activities take place in remote forests or wetlands, one of the challenges is to collect up-to date and reliable information about the current state of land. Compared to optical sensors, SAR sensors have the advantage of being able to routinely collect imagery for timely monitoring by regulatory agencies. This paper explores the capability of high resolution RADARSAT-2 Ultra Fine and Fine Quad-Pol imagery for mapping oilsands infrastructure land using an object-based classification approach. Texture measurements extracted from Ultra Fine data are used to support an Ultra Fine based classification. Moreover, a radar vegetation index (RVI) calculated from PolSAR data is introduced for improved classification performance. The RVI is helpful in reducing confusion between infrastructure land and low vegetation covered surfaces. When Ultra Fine and PolSAR data are used in combination, the kappa value of well pads and processing facilities detection reached 0.87. In this study, we also found that core hole sites can be identified from early spring Ultra Fine data. With single-date image, kappa value of core hole sites ranged from 0.61 to 0.69.

  10. Analysis of main effect QTL for thousand grain weight in European winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by genome-wide association mapping.

    PubMed

    Zanke, Christine D; Ling, Jie; Plieske, Jörg; Kollers, Sonja; Ebmeyer, Erhard; Korzun, Viktor; Argillier, Odile; Stiewe, Gunther; Hinze, Maike; Neumann, Felix; Eichhorn, Andrea; Polley, Andreas; Jaenecke, Cornelia; Ganal, Martin W; Röder, Marion S

    2015-01-01

    Grain weight, an essential yield component, is under strong genetic control and at the same time markedly influenced by the environment. Genetic analysis of the thousand grain weight (TGW) by genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed with a panel of 358 European winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties and 14 spring wheat varieties using phenotypic data of field tests in eight environments. Wide phenotypic variations were indicated for the TGW with BLUEs (best linear unbiased estimations) values ranging from 35.9 to 58.2 g with a mean value of 45.4 g and a heritability of H(2) = 0.89. A total of 12 candidate genes for plant height, photoperiodism and grain weight were genotyped on all varieties. Only three candidates, the photoperiodism gene Ppd-D1, dwarfing gene Rht-B1and the TaGW-6A gene were significant explaining up to 14.4, 2.3, and 3.4% of phenotypic variation, respectively. For a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of TGW-QTL genotyping data from 732 microsatellite markers and a set of 7769 mapped SNP-markers genotyped with the 90k iSELECT array were analyzed. In total, 342 significant (-log10 (P-value) ? 3.0) marker trait associations (MTAs) were detected for SSR-markers and 1195 MTAs (-log10(P-value) ? 3.0) for SNP-markers in all single environments plus the BLUEs. After Bonferroni correction, 28 MTAs remained significant for SSR-markers (-log10 (P-value) ? 4.82) and 58 MTAs for SNP-markers (-log10 (P-value) ? 5.89). Apart from chromosomes 4B and 6B for SSR-markers and chromosomes 4D and 5D for SNP-markers, MTAs were detected on all chromosomes. The highest number of significant SNP-markers was found on chromosomes 3B and 1B, while for the SSRs most markers were significant on chromosomes 6D and 3D. Overall, TGW was determined by many markers with small effects. Only three SNP-markers had R(2) values above 6%. PMID:26388877

  11. Analysis of main effect QTL for thousand grain weight in European winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by genome-wide association mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zanke, Christine D.; Ling, Jie; Plieske, Jörg; Kollers, Sonja; Ebmeyer, Erhard; Korzun, Viktor; Argillier, Odile; Stiewe, Gunther; Hinze, Maike; Neumann, Felix; Eichhorn, Andrea; Polley, Andreas; Jaenecke, Cornelia; Ganal, Martin W.; Röder, Marion S.

    2015-01-01

    Grain weight, an essential yield component, is under strong genetic control and at the same time markedly influenced by the environment. Genetic analysis of the thousand grain weight (TGW) by genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed with a panel of 358 European winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties and 14 spring wheat varieties using phenotypic data of field tests in eight environments. Wide phenotypic variations were indicated for the TGW with BLUEs (best linear unbiased estimations) values ranging from 35.9 to 58.2 g with a mean value of 45.4 g and a heritability of H2 = 0.89. A total of 12 candidate genes for plant height, photoperiodism and grain weight were genotyped on all varieties. Only three candidates, the photoperiodism gene Ppd-D1, dwarfing gene Rht-B1and the TaGW-6A gene were significant explaining up to 14.4, 2.3, and 3.4% of phenotypic variation, respectively. For a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of TGW-QTL genotyping data from 732 microsatellite markers and a set of 7769 mapped SNP-markers genotyped with the 90k iSELECT array were analyzed. In total, 342 significant (-log10 (P-value) ? 3.0) marker trait associations (MTAs) were detected for SSR-markers and 1195 MTAs (?log10(P-value) ? 3.0) for SNP-markers in all single environments plus the BLUEs. After Bonferroni correction, 28 MTAs remained significant for SSR-markers (?log10 (P-value) ? 4.82) and 58 MTAs for SNP-markers (?log10 (P-value) ? 5.89). Apart from chromosomes 4B and 6B for SSR-markers and chromosomes 4D and 5D for SNP-markers, MTAs were detected on all chromosomes. The highest number of significant SNP-markers was found on chromosomes 3B and 1B, while for the SSRs most markers were significant on chromosomes 6D and 3D. Overall, TGW was determined by many markers with small effects. Only three SNP-markers had R2 values above 6%. PMID:26388877

  12. A Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross to Fine-Map Quantitative Traits in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-print Network

    Purugganan, Michael D.

    , University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom, 2 Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, 3 Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom Advanced Generation Inter-Cross (MAGIC). This approach is expected to improve the precision with which QTL

  13. Fine-structure map of the human ribosomal protein gene RPS14

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.J.; Roufa, D.J. )

    1992-04-01

    We have used polymerase chain reaction-mediated chemical mutagenesis to analyze the genetic fine structure of a human ribosomal protein gene, RPS14. Eighty-three DNA clones containing 158 random single-base substitution mutations were isolated. Mutant RPS14 alleles were tested for biological activity by transfection into cultured Chinese hamster cells. The resulting data permitted us to construct a map of the S14-coding sequence that is comparable to available fine-structure genetic maps of many prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic gene loci. As predicted from the multiplicity of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions required for ribosomal protein transport and assembly into functional ribosomal subunits, the distribution of null mutations indicated that S14 is composed of multiple, functionally distinct polypeptide domains. Two of the protein's internal domains, designated domains B and D, were essential for S14 biological activity. In contrast, mutations which altered or deleted S14's amino-terminal 20 amino acid residues (domain A) had no observable effect on the protein's assembly and function in mammalian ribosomes. Interestingly, S14 structural domains deduced by in vitro mutagenesis correlate well with RPS14 gene's exon boundaries. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Fine-mapping of breast cancer susceptibility loci characterizes genetic risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; John, Esther M.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Deming, Sandra L.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Nyante, Sarah; Palmer, Julie R.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Stram, Daniel O.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 19 common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Testing of the index signals found through GWAS and fine-mapping of each locus in diverse populations will be necessary for characterizing the role of these risk regions in contributing to inherited susceptibility. In this large study of breast cancer in African-American women (3016 cases and 2745 controls), we tested the 19 known risk variants identified by GWAS and replicated associations (P < 0.05) with only 4 variants. Through fine-mapping, we identified markers in four regions that better capture the association with breast cancer risk in African Americans as defined by the index signal (2q35, 5q11, 10q26 and 19p13). We also identified statistically significant associations with markers in four separate regions (8q24, 10q22, 11q13 and 16q12) that are independent of the index signals and may represent putative novel risk variants. In aggregate, the more informative markers found in the study enhance the association of these risk regions with breast cancer in African Americans [per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, P = 2.8 × 10?24 versus OR = 1.04, P = 6.1 × 10?5]. In this detailed analysis of the known breast cancer risk loci, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk that better characterize their association with breast cancer in women of African ancestry. PMID:21852243

  15. An eQTL mapping approach reveals that rare variants in the SEMA5A regulatory network impact autism risk

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Quinn, Jeffrey Francis; Weiss, Lauren Anne

    2013-01-01

    To date, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variant (CNV) association studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have led to promising signals but not to easily interpretable or translatable results. Our own genome-wide association study (GWAS) showed significant association to an intergenic SNP near Semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) and provided evidence for reduced expression of the same gene. In a novel GWAS follow-up approach, we map an expression regulatory pathway for a GWAS candidate gene, SEMA5A, in silico by using population expression and genotype data sets. We find that the SEMA5A regulatory network significantly overlaps rare autism-specific CNVs. The SEMA5A regulatory network includes previous autism candidate genes and regions, including MACROD2, A2BP1, MCPH1, MAST4, CDH8, CADM1, FOXP1, AUTS2, MBD5, 7q21, 20p, USH2A, KIRREL3, DBF4B and RELN, among others. Our results provide: (i) a novel data-derived network implicated in autism, (ii) evidence that the same pathway seeded by an initial SNP association shows association with rare genetic variation in ASDs, (iii) a potential mechanism of action and interpretation for the previous autism candidate genes and genetic variants that fall in this network, and (iv) a novel approach that can be applied to other candidate genes for complex genetic disorders. We take a step towards better understanding of the significance of SEMA5A pathways in autism that can guide interpretation of many other genetic results in ASDs. PMID:23575222

  16. Three QTL in the honey bee Apis mellifera L. suppress reproduction of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Dieter; Huang, Qiang; Geßner, Cornelia; Rosenkranz, Peter; Frey, Eva; Locke, Barbara; Moritz, Robin F A; Kraus, F B

    2011-12-01

    Varroa destructor is a highly virulent ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee Apis mellifera and a major cause of colony losses for global apiculture. Typically, chemical treatment is essential to control the parasite population in the honey bee colony. Nevertheless a few honey bee populations survive mite infestation without any treatment. We used one such Varroa mite tolerant honey bee lineage from the island of Gotland, Sweden, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling reduced mite reproduction. We crossed a queen from this tolerant population with drones from susceptible colonies to rear hybrid queens. Two hybrid queens were used to produce a mapping population of haploid drones. We discriminated drone pupae with and without mite reproduction, and screened the genome for potential QTL using a total of 216 heterozygous microsatellite markers in a bulk segregant analysis. Subsequently, we fine mapped three candidate target regions on chromosomes 4, 7, and 9. Although the individual effect of these three QTL was found to be relatively small, the set of all three had significant impact on suppression of V. destructor reproduction by epistasis. Although it is in principle possible to use these loci for marker-assisted selection, the strong epistatic effects between the three loci complicate selective breeding programs with the Gotland Varroa tolerant honey bee stock. PMID:22393513

  17. Construction of a first genetic map of distylous Turnera and a fine-scale map of the S-locus region.

    PubMed

    Labonne, J D J; Vaisman, A; Shore, J S

    2008-07-01

    As a prelude to discovery of genes involved in floral dimorphism and incompatibility, a genetic map of distylous Turnera was constructed along with a fine-scale map of the S-locus region. The genetic map consists of 79 PCR-based molecular markers (48 AFLP, 18 RAPD, 9 ISSR, 4 RAMP), 5 isozyme loci, one additional gene, and the S-locus, spanning a total distance of 683.3 cM. The 86 markers are distributed in 5 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number. Molecular markers tightly linked or co-segregating with the S-locus in an initial mapping population of 94 individuals were used to assay an additional 642 progeny to construct a map of the S-locus region. The fine-scale map consists of 2 markers (IS864a and RP45E9) flanking the S-locus at distances of 0.41 and 0.54 cM, respectively, and 3 additional markers (OPK14c, RP45G18, and RP81E18) co-segregating with the S-locus in the total mapping population of 736 individuals. The genetic map constructed will serve as a framework for localization of genes outside the S-locus affecting distyly, while molecular markers of the fine-scale map will be used to initiate chromosome walking to find the genes residing at the S-locus. PMID:18545271

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Fine-Mapping of Causal Autoimmune Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Marson, Alexander; Zhu, Jiang; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Housley, William J.; Beik, Samantha; Shoresh, Noam; Whitton, Holly; Ryan, Russell J.H.; Shishkin, Alexander A.; Hatan, Meital; Carrasco-Alfonso, Marlene J.; Mayer, Dita; Luckey, C. John; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; De Jager, Philip L.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Epstein, Charles B; Daly, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genome-wide association studies have identified loci underlying human diseases, but the causal nucleotide changes and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we developed a fine-mapping algorithm to identify candidate causal variants for 21 autoimmune diseases from genotyping data. We integrated these predictions with transcription and cis-regulatory element annotations, derived by mapping RNA and chromatin in primary immune cells, including resting and stimulated CD4+ T-cell subsets, regulatory T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, B-cells, and monocytes. We find that ~90% of causal variants are noncoding, with ~60% mapping to immune-cell enhancers, many of which gain histone acetylation and transcribe enhancer-associated RNA upon immune stimulation. Causal variants tend to occur near binding sites for master regulators of immune differentiation and stimulus-dependent gene activation, but only 10-20% directly alter recognizable transcription factor binding motifs. Rather, most noncoding risk variants, including those that alter gene expression, affect non-canonical sequence determinants not well-explained by current gene regulatory models. PMID:25363779

  19. Mendelizing all Components of a Pyramid of Three Yield QTL in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers allowed breeders to mendelize quantitative trait loci (QTL) providing another demonstration that quantitative traits are governed by the same principles as single qualitative genes. This research extends the QTL analysis to two and three QTL and tests our ability to mendelize an oligogenic trait. In tomato, agricultural yield is determined by the weight of the fruits harvested per unit area and the total soluble solids (% Brix)–sugars and acids. The current study explores the segregation of multiple independent yield-related QTL that were identified and mapped using introgression lines (IL) of Solanum pennellii in cultivated processing tomato (S. lycopersicum). We screened 45 different double and triple IL-QTL combinations for agricultural yield, to identify QTL pyramids that behaved in an additive manner and were suitable substrate for mendelizing an oligogenic trait. A pyramid of three independent QTL that significantly improved Brix?Yield (BXY - the soluble solids output per unit area) compared to M82 was selected. In the progenies of the tri-hybrid we bred using markers a nearly isogenic ‘immortalized F2.’ While the common mode of QTL–QTL interactions across the 45 IL-QTLs combinations was less than additive, the three QTLs in the selected triple-stack performed in an additive manner which made it an exceptional material for breeding. This study demonstrates that using the phenotypic effect of all 27 possible QTL-alleles combinations it is possible to make reliable predictions about the genotypes that will maximize the yield. PMID:26697048

  20. NSF StatGen 2009 Bayesian Interval Mapping

    E-print Network

    Yandell, Brian S.

    : maximize number of correctly identified QTL · basic science/evolution ­ how is the genome organized genetic architecture ­ patterns and individual elements of epistasis ­ appropriate estimates of means of QTL effects major QTL on linkage map i (modifiers) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 012 rank order of QTL

  1. He I vector magnetic field maps of a sunspot and its superpenumbral fine-structure

    E-print Network

    Schad, T A; Lin, H; Tritschler, A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions, as superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated but also exhibit signatures perhaps induced by symmetry breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere, and further show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux but rather distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also dire...

  2. Fine mapping of chromosome 15q25 implicates ZNF592 in neurosarcoidosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Caleb A; Adrianto, Indra; Levin, Albert M; Iannuzzi, Michael C; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Montgomery, Courtney G

    2015-01-01

    Neurosarcoidosis is a clinical subtype of sarcoidosis characterized by the presence of granulomas in the nervous system. Here, we report a highly significant association with a variant (rs75652600, P = 3.12 × 10?8, odds ratios = 4.34) within a zinc finger gene, ZNF592, from an imputation-based fine-mapping study of the chromosomal region 15q25 in African-Americans with neurosarcoidosis. We validate the association with ZNF592, a gene previously shown to cause cerebellar ataxia, in a cohort of European-Americans with neurosarcoidosis by uncovering low-frequency variants with a similar risk effect size (chr15:85309284, P = 0.0021, odds ratios = 5.36). PMID:26478897

  3. Identification and independent validation of a stable yield and thousand grain weight QTL on chromosome 6A of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Grain yield in wheat is a polygenic trait that is influenced by environmental and genetic interactions at all stages of the plant’s growth. Yield is usually broken down into three components; number of spikes per area, grain number per spike, and grain weight (TGW). In polyploid wheat, studies have identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) which affect TGW, yet few have been validated and fine-mapped using independent germplasm, thereby having limited impact in breeding. Results In this study we identified a major QTL for TGW, yield and green canopy duration on wheat chromosome 6A of the Spark x Rialto population, across 12 North European environments. Using independent germplasm in the form of BC2 and BC4 near isogenic lines (NILs), we validated the three QTL effects across environments. In four of the five experiments the Rialto 6A introgression gave significant improvements in yield (5.5%) and TGW (5.1%), with morphometric measurements showing that the increased grain weight was a result of wider grains. The extended green canopy duration associated with the high yielding/TGW Rialto allele was comprised of two independent effects; earlier flowering and delayed final maturity, and was expressed stably across the five environments. The wheat homologue (TaGW2) of a rice gene associated with increased TGW and grain width was mapped within the QTL interval. However, no polymorphisms were identified in the coding sequence between the parents. Conclusion The discovery and validation through near-isogenic lines of robust QTL which affect yield, green canopy duration, thousand grain weight, and grain width on chromosome 6A of hexaploid wheat provide an important first step to advance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating the complex processes governing grain size and yield in polyploid wheat. PMID:25034643

  4. Multi-ethnic fine-mapping of 14 central adiposity loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Buchkovich, Martin L; Winkler, Thomas W; Heid, Iris M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Fox, Caroline S; Mohlke, Karen L; North, Kari E; Adrienne Cupples, L

    2014-09-01

    The Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium identified 14 loci in European Ancestry (EA) individuals associated with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for body mass index. These loci are wide and narrowing the signals remains necessary. Twelve of 14 loci identified in GIANT EA samples retained strong associations with WHR in our joint EA/individuals of African Ancestry (AA) analysis (log-Bayes factor >6.1). Trans-ethnic analyses at five loci (TBX15-WARS2, LYPLAL1, ADAMTS9, LY86 and ITPR2-SSPN) substantially narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants, some of which are in regions that have evidence of regulatory activity. By leveraging varying linkage disequilibrium structures across different populations, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with strong signals and narrower credible sets from trans-ethnic meta-analysis of central obesity provide more precise localizations of potential functional variants and suggest a possible regulatory role. Meta-analysis results for WHR were obtained from 77 167 EA participants from GIANT and 23 564 AA participants from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium. For fine mapping we interrogated SNPs within ± 250 kb flanking regions of 14 previously reported index SNPs from loci discovered in EA populations by performing trans-ethnic meta-analysis of results from the EA and AA meta-analyses. We applied a Bayesian approach that leverages allelic heterogeneity across populations to combine meta-analysis results and aids in fine-mapping shared variants at these locations. We annotated variants using information from the ENCODE Consortium and Roadmap Epigenomics Project to prioritize variants for possible functionality. PMID:24760767

  5. QTLS associated with resistance to soybean cyst nematode: Meta-analysis of QTL locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is the most important pest of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr) in the world. A total of 17 quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping papers and 62 marker-QTL associations have been reported for resistance to soybean cyst nematode in soybean. C...

  6. Identification of QTL for Two Measures of Feed Efficiency in Nellore-Angus F2 Steers 

    E-print Network

    Luck, John 1986-

    2011-04-29

    contemporary group as independent variables were used for QTL mapping. Steers were genotyped using the BovSNP50v1assay (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA) and 34,980 SNP were used for single marker association and interval analyses in PLINK and GridQTL software...

  7. Pathotype-specific QTL for stem rust resistance in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Slabaugh, M E

    2013-05-01

    A genetic map populated with RAD and SSR markers was created from F1 progeny of a stem rust-susceptible and stem rust-resistant parent of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). The map supplements a previous map of this population by having markers in common with several other Lolium spp. maps including EST-SSR anchor markers from a consensus map published by other researchers. A QTL analysis was conducted with disease severity and infection type data obtained by controlled inoculation of the population with each of two previously characterized pathotypes of Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola that differ in virulence to different host plant genotypes in the F1 population. Each pathotype activated a specific QTL on one linkage group (LG): qLpPg1 on LG7 for pathotype 101, or qLpPg2 on LG1 for pathotype 106. Both pathotypes also activated a third QTL in common, qLpPg3 on LG6. Anchor markers, present on a consensus map, were located in proximity to each of the three QTL. These QTL had been detected also in previous experiments in which a genetically heterogeneous inoculum of the stem rust pathogen activated all three QTL together. The results of this and a previous study are consistent with the involvement of the pathotype-specific QTL in pathogen recognition and the pathotype-nonspecific QTL in a generalized resistance response. By aligning the markers common to other published reports, it appears that two and possibly all three of the stem rust QTL reported here are in the same general genomic regions containing some of the L. perenne QTL reported to be activated in response to the crown rust pathogen (P. coronata). PMID:23361523

  8. Fractionation, Stability, and Isolate-Specificity of QTL for Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Cultivated Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Emily B.; Haggard, J. Erron; St.Clair, Dina A.

    2012-01-01

    Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is susceptible to late blight, a major disease caused by Phytophthora infestans, but quantitative resistance exists in the wild tomato species S. habrochaites. Previously, we mapped several quantitative trait loci (QTL) from S. habrochaites and then introgressed each individually into S. lycopersicum. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) were developed, each containing a single introgressed QTL on chromosome 5 or 11. NILs were used to create two recombinant sub-NIL populations, one for each target chromosome region, for higher-resolution mapping. The sub-NIL populations were evaluated for foliar and stem resistance to P. infestans in replicated field experiments over two years, and in replicated growth chamber experiments for resistance to three California isolates. Each of the original single QTL on chromosomes 5 and 11 fractionated into between two and six QTL for both foliar and stem resistance, indicating a complex genetic architecture. The majority of QTL from the field experiments were detected in multiple locations or years, and two of the seven QTL detected in growth chambers were co-located with QTL detected in field experiments, indicating stability of some QTL across environments. QTL that confer foliar and stem resistance frequently co-localized, suggesting that pleiotropy and/or tightly linked genes control the trait phenotypes. Other QTL exhibited isolate-specificity and QTL × environment interactions. Map-based comparisons between QTL mapped in this study and Solanaceae resistance genes/QTL detected in other published studies revealed multiple cases of co-location, suggesting conservation of gene function. PMID:23050225

  9. High-density fine-mapping of a chromosome 10q26 linkage peak suggests association between

    E-print Network

    Nyholt, Dale R.

    endometriosis and variants close to CYP2C19 Jodie N. Painter, Ph.D.,a Dale R. Nyholt, Ph.D.,a Andrew Morris, Ph peak for endometriosis on chromosome 10q26, and conduct follow-up analyses and a fine-mapping association study across the region to identify new candidate genes for endometriosis. Design: Case

  10. Deriving a global river network map at flexible resolutions from a fine-resolution flow direction map with explicit representation of topographical characteristics in sub-grid scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, D.; Oki, T.; Kanae, S.

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes an improved method to convert a fine-resolution flow direction map into a coarse-resolution river network map for the use in global river routing models. The proposed method attempts to preserve the river network structure of an original fine-resolution map in upscaling procedures, which has not been achieved by previous methods. It is found that the problem in previous methods is mainly due to the traditional way of describing downstream cells of a river network map with a direction toward one of the eight neighboring cells. Instead in the improved method, the downstream cell can be flexibly located onto any cells in the river network map. The improved method is applied to derive global river network maps at various resolutions. It succeeded to preserve the river network structure of the original flow direction map, and consequently realizes automatic construction of river network maps at any resolutions. This enables both higher-resolution approach in global river routing models and inclusion of sub-grid scale topographic features, such as realistic river meanderings and catchment boundaries. Those advantages of the proposed method are expected to enhance ability of global river routing models, providing ways to represent surface water storage and movement such as river discharge and inundated area extent in much finer-scale than ever modeled.

  11. Deriving a global river network map and its sub-grid topographic characteristics from a fine-resolution flow direction map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, D.; Oki, T.; Kanae, S.

    2009-11-01

    This paper proposes an improved method for converting a fine-resolution flow direction map into a coarse-resolution river network map for use in global river routing models. The proposed method attempts to preserve the river network structure of an original fine-resolution map in the upscaling procedure, as this has not been achieved with previous upscaling methods. We describe an improved method in which a downstream cell can be flexibly located on any cell in the river network map. The improved method preserves the river network structure of the original flow direction map and allows automated construction of river network maps at any resolution. Automated construction of a river network map is helpful for attaching sub-grid topographic information, such as realistic river meanderings and drainage boundaries, onto the upscaled river network map. The advantages of the proposed method are expected to enhance the ability of global river routing models by providing ways to more precisely represent surface water storage and movement.

  12. Trans-Ancestral Studies Fine Map the SLE-Susceptibility Locus TNFSF4

    PubMed Central

    Manku, Harinder; Langefeld, Carl D.; Guerra, Sandra G.; Malik, Talat H.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Gregersen, Peter A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Han, Sang-Hoon; Harley, John B.; Jacob, Chaim O.; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Moser, Kathy L.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Park, So-Yeon; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Sawalha, Amr H.; Scofield, R. Hal; Shen, Nan; Stevens, Anne M.; Sun, Celi; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Edberg, Jeff C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Nath, Swapan K.; Tsao, Betty P.; Vyse, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    We previously established an 80 kb haplotype upstream of TNFSF4 as a susceptibility locus in the autoimmune disease SLE. SLE-associated alleles at this locus are associated with inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis and ischaemic stroke. In Europeans, the TNFSF4 causal variants have remained elusive due to strong linkage disequilibrium exhibited by alleles spanning the region. Using a trans-ancestral approach to fine-map the locus, utilising 17,900 SLE and control subjects including Amerindian/Hispanics (1348 cases, 717 controls), African-Americans (AA) (1529, 2048) and better powered cohorts of Europeans and East Asians, we find strong association of risk alleles in all ethnicities; the AA association replicates in African-American Gullah (152,122). The best evidence of association comes from two adjacent markers: rs2205960-T (P?=?1.71×10?34, OR?=?1.43[1.26–1.60]) and rs1234317-T (P?=?1.16×10?28, OR?=?1.38[1.24–1.54]). Inference of fine-scale recombination rates for all populations tested finds the 80 kb risk and non-risk haplotypes in all except African-Americans. In this population the decay of recombination equates to an 11 kb risk haplotype, anchored in the 5? region proximal to TNFSF4 and tagged by rs2205960-T after 1000 Genomes phase 1 (v3) imputation. Conditional regression analyses delineate the 5? risk signal to rs2205960-T and the independent non-risk signal to rs1234314-C. Our case-only and SLE-control cohorts demonstrate robust association of rs2205960-T with autoantibody production. The rs2205960-T is predicted to form part of a decameric motif which binds NF-?Bp65 with increased affinity compared to rs2205960-G. ChIP-seq data also indicate NF-?B interaction with the DNA sequence at this position in LCL cells. Our research suggests association of rs2205960-T with SLE across multiple groups and an independent non-risk signal at rs1234314-C. rs2205960-T is associated with autoantibody production and lymphopenia. Our data confirm a global signal at TNFSF4 and a role for the expressed product at multiple stages of lymphocyte dysregulation during SLE pathogenesis. We confirm the validity of trans-ancestral mapping in a complex trait. PMID:23874208

  13. Genetic fine-mapping of DIPLOSPOROUS in Taraxacum (dandelion; Asteraceae) indicates a duplicated DIP-gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DIPLOSPOROUS (DIP) is the locus for diplospory in Taraxacum, associated to unreduced female gamete formation in apomicts. Apomicts reproduce clonally through seeds, including apomeiosis, parthenogenesis, and autonomous or pseudogamous endosperm formation. In Taraxacum, diplospory results in first division restitution (FDR) nuclei, and inherits as a dominant, monogenic trait, independent from the other apomixis elements. A preliminary genetic linkage map indicated that the DIP-locus lacks suppression of recombination, which is unique among all other map-based cloning efforts of apomeiosis to date. FDR as well as apomixis as a whole are of interest in plant breeding, allowing for polyploidization and fixation of hybrid vigor, respectively. No dominant FDR or apomixis genes have yet been isolated. Here, we zoom-in to the DIP-locus by largely extending our initial mapping population, and by analyzing (local) suppression of recombination and allele sequence divergence (ASD). Results We identified 24 recombinants between two most closely linked molecular markers to DIP in an F1-population of 2227 plants that segregates for diplospory and lacks parthenogenesis. Both markers segregated c. 1:1 in the entire population, indicating a 1:1 segregation rate of diplospory. Fine-mapping showed three amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) closest to DIP at 0.2 cM at one flank and a single AFLP at 0.4 cM at the other flank. Our data lacked strong evidence for ASD at marker regions close to DIP. An unexpected bias towards diplosporous plants among the recombinants (20 out of 24) was found. One third of these diplosporous recombinants showed incomplete penetrance of 50-85% diplospory. Conclusions Our data give interesting new insights into the structure of the diplospory locus in Taraxacum. We postulate a locus with a minimum of two DIP-genes and possibly including one or two enhancers or cis-regulatory elements on the basis of the bias towards diplosporous recombinants and incomplete penetrance of diplospory in some of them. We define the DIP-locus to 0.6 cM, which is estimated to cover ~200-300 Kb, with the closest marker at 0.2 cM. Our results confirm the minor role of suppression of recombination and ASD around DIP, making it an excellent candidate to isolate via a chromosome-walking approach. PMID:20659311

  14. Genomic Correlates of Relationship QTL Involved in Fore- versus Hind Limb Divergence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P.; Noonan, James P.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Cheverud, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Divergence of serially homologous elements of organisms is a common evolutionary pattern contributing to increased phenotypic complexity. Here, we study the genomic intervals affecting the variational independence of fore- and hind limb traits within an experimental mouse population. We use an advanced intercross of inbred mouse strains to map the loci associated with the degree of autonomy between fore- and hind limb long bone lengths (loci affecting the relationship between traits, relationship quantitative trait loci [rQTL]). These loci have been proposed to interact locally with the products of pleiotropic genes, thereby freeing the local trait from the variational constraint due to pleiotropic mutations. Using the known polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) between the parental strains, we characterized and compared the genomic regions in which the rQTL, as well as their interaction partners (intQTL), reside. We find that these two classes of QTL intervals harbor different kinds of molecular variation. SNPs in rQTL intervals more frequently reside in limb-specific cis-regulatory regions than SNPs in intQTL intervals. The intQTL loci modified by the rQTL, in contrast, show the signature of protein-coding variation. This result is consistent with the widely accepted view that protein-coding mutations have broader pleiotropic effects than cis-regulatory polymorphisms. For both types of QTL intervals, the underlying candidate genes are enriched for genes involved in protein binding. This finding suggests that rQTL effects are caused by local interactions among the products of the causal genes harbored in rQTL and intQTL intervals. This is the first study to systematically document the population-level molecular variation underlying the evolution of character individuation. PMID:24065733

  15. Fine-scale mapping of disease genes with multiple mutations via spatial clustering techniques.

    PubMed

    Molitor, John; Marjoram, Paul; Thomas, Duncan

    2003-12-01

    We present a method to perform fine mapping by placing haplotypes into clusters on the basis of risk. Each cluster has a haplotype "center." Cluster allocation is defined according to haplotype centers, with each haplotype assigned to the cluster with the "closest" center. The closeness of two haplotypes is determined by a similarity metric that measures the length of the shared segment around the location of a putative functional mutation for the particular cluster. Our method allows for missing marker information but still estimates the risks of complete haplotypes without resorting to a one-marker-at-a-time analysis. The dimensionality issues that can occur in haplotype analyses are removed by sampling over the haplotype space, allowing for estimation of haplotype risks without explicitly assigning a parameter to each haplotype to be estimated. In this way, we are able to handle haplotypes of arbitrary size. Furthermore, our clustering approach has the potential to allow us to detect the presence of multiple functional mutations. PMID:14631555

  16. Dense fine-mapping study identifies new susceptibility loci for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; Almarri, Mohamed A; Gaffney, Daniel J; Mells, George F; Jostins, Luke; Cordell, Heather J; Ducker, Samantha J; Day, Darren B; Heneghan, Michael A; Neuberger, James M; Donaldson, Peter T; Bathgate, Andrew J; Burroughs, Andrew; Davies, Mervyn H; Jones, David E; Alexander, Graeme J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Sandford, Richard N; Anderson, Carl A

    2012-10-01

    We genotyped 2,861 cases of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) from the UK PBC Consortium and 8,514 UK population controls across 196,524 variants within 186 known autoimmune risk loci. We identified 3 loci newly associated with PBC (at P<5×10(-8)), increasing the number of known susceptibility loci to 25. The most associated variant at 19p12 is a low-frequency nonsynonymous SNP in TYK2, further implicating JAK-STAT and cytokine signaling in disease pathogenesis. An additional five loci contained nonsynonymous variants in high linkage disequilibrium (LD; r2>0.8) with the most associated variant at the locus. We found multiple independent common, low-frequency and rare variant association signals at five loci. Of the 26 independent non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) signals tagged on the Immunochip, 15 have SNPs in B-lymphoblastoid open chromatin regions in high LD (r2>0.8) with the most associated variant. This study shows how data from dense fine-mapping arrays coupled with functional genomic data can be used to identify candidate causal variants for functional follow-up. PMID:22961000

  17. Fine scale mapping of the breast cancer 16q12 locus

    PubMed Central

    Udler, Miriam S.; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Meyer, Kerstin; Struewing, Jeffrey; Maranian, Melanie; Kwon, Erika M.; Zhang, Jinghui; Tyrer, Jonathan; Karlins, Eric; Platte, Radka; Kalmyrzaev, Bolot; Dicks, Ed; Field, Helen; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Prathalingam, Radhika; Teschendorff, Andrew; McArthur, Stewart; Doody, David R.; Luben, Robert; Caldas, Carlos; Bernstein, Leslie; Kolonel, Laurence K.; Henderson, Brian E.; Wu, Anna H.; Le Marchand, Loic; Ursin, Giske; Press, Michael F.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yang, Show-Lin; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Malone, Kathleen E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 16q12 with an unknown biological basis. We used a set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to generate a fine-scale map and narrowed the region of association to a 133 kb DNA segment containing the largely uncharacterized hypothetical gene LOC643714, a short intergenic region and the 5? end of TOX3. Re-sequencing this segment in European subjects identified 293 common polymorphisms, including a set of 26 highly correlated candidate causal variants. By evaluation of these SNPs in five breast cancer case–control studies involving more than 23 000 subjects from populations of European and Southeast Asian ancestry, all but 14 variants could be excluded at odds of <1:100. Most of the remaining variants lie in the intergenic region, which exhibits evolutionary conservation and open chromatin conformation, consistent with a regulatory function. African-American case–control studies exhibit a different pattern of association suggestive of an additional causative variant. PMID:20332101

  18. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications

    PubMed Central

    Alegana, V. A.; Atkinson, P. M.; Pezzulo, C.; Sorichetta, A.; Weiss, D.; Bird, T.; Erbach-Schoenberg, E.; Tatem, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The age-group composition of populations varies considerably across the world, and obtaining accurate, spatially detailed estimates of numbers of children under 5 years is important in designing vaccination strategies, educational planning or maternal healthcare delivery. Traditionally, such estimates are derived from population censuses, but these can often be unreliable, outdated and of coarse resolution for resource-poor settings. Focusing on Nigeria, we use nationally representative household surveys and their cluster locations to predict the proportion of the under-five population in 1 × 1 km using a Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal model. Results showed that land cover, travel time to major settlements, night-time lights and vegetation index were good predictors and that accounting for fine-scale variation, rather than assuming a uniform proportion of under 5 year olds can result in significant differences in health metrics. The largest gaps in estimated bednet and vaccination coverage were in Kano, Katsina and Jigawa. Geolocated household surveys are a valuable resource for providing detailed, contemporary and regularly updated population age-structure data in the absence of recent census data. By combining these with covariate layers, age-structure maps of unprecedented detail can be produced to guide the targeting of interventions in resource-poor settings. PMID:25788540

  19. He i Vector Magnetic Field Maps of a Sunspot and Its Superpenumbral Fine-Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He i triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions because superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization, while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated, but also exhibit signatures that might be induced by symmetry-breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere and furthermore show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear to be finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests that fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux, but are instead distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also directly compare our inverted values with a current-free extrapolation of the chromospheric field. With improved measurements in the future, the average shear angle between the inferred magnetic field and the potential field may offer a means to quantify the non-potentiality of the chromospheric magnetic field to study the onset of explosive solar phenomena.

  20. Fine mapping and resequencing of the PARK16 locus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina; Bjørnarå, Kari Anne; Dizdar, Nil; Fardell, Camilla; Forsgren, Lars; Holmberg, Björn; Larsen, Jan Petter; Linder, Jan; Nissbrandt, Hans; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Dietrichs, Espen; Toft, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    The PARK16 locus, spanning five genes on chromosome 1, was among the first genetic regions to show genome-wide association in Parkinson's disease (PD). Subsequent investigations have found variability in PARK16 top-hits and association patterns across populations, and the implicated genes and mechanisms are currently unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the contribution of PARK16 variability to PD risk in a Scandinavian population. We genotyped 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a case-control sample set of 2570 individuals from Norway and Sweden to fine map the locus. Targeted resequencing of the full coding regions of SLC45A3, NUCKS1, RAB7L1, SLC41A1 and PM20D1 was performed in DNA pools from a subset of 387 patient samples. We find evidence for an association with PD for rs1775143 as well as a haplotype located around the 5' region of RAB7L1, implicating variants which are not in high linkage disequilibrium with the strongest signal from a recent large meta-analysis in Caucasians. We also provide suggestive support for epistasis between RAB7L1 and LRRK2 as previously hypothesized by others. Comparing our results with previous work, allelic heterogeneity at PARK16 appears likely, and further studies are warranted to disentangle the complex patterns of association and pinpoint the functionally relevant variants. PMID:25855069

  1. A high-density SNP Map of sunflower derived from RAD-sequencing facilitating fine-mapping of the rust resistance gene R12.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Zahirul I; Gong, Li; Hulke, Brent S; Pegadaraju, Venkatramana; Song, Qijian; Schultz, Quentin; Qi, Lili

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution genetic map of sunflower was constructed by integrating SNP data from three F2 mapping populations (HA 89/RHA 464, B-line/RHA 464, and CR 29/RHA 468). The consensus map spanned a total length of 1443.84 cM, and consisted of 5,019 SNP markers derived from RAD tag sequencing and 118 publicly available SSR markers distributed in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of sunflower. The maximum interval between markers in the consensus map is 12.37 cM and the average distance is 0.28 cM between adjacent markers. Despite a few short-distance inversions in marker order, the consensus map showed high levels of collinearity among individual maps with an average Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.972 across the genome. The order of the SSR markers on the consensus map was also in agreement with the order of the individual map and with previously published sunflower maps. Three individual and one consensus maps revealed the uneven distribution of markers across the genome. Additionally, we performed fine mapping and marker validation of the rust resistance gene R12, providing closely linked SNP markers for marker-assisted selection of this gene in sunflower breeding programs. This high resolution consensus map will serve as a valuable tool to the sunflower community for studying marker-trait association of important agronomic traits, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, and comparative mapping. PMID:25014030

  2. Association mapping in cacao

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping is becoming important in perennial crops because it is a better alternative to the classical QTL's mapping approaches. The development of large breeding populations (F2, backcrosses and recombinant inbred populations) is a requirement of QTL's discovery; however, this process req...

  3. Epistatic association mapping for alkaline and salinity tolerance traits in the soybean germination stage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Jie; Niu, Yuan; Bu, Su-Hong; Li, Meng; Feng, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Sheng-Xian; Odinga, Medrine Mmayi; Wei, Shi-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity and alkalinity are important abiotic components that frequently have critical effects on crop growth, productivity and quality. Developing soybean cultivars with high salt tolerance is recognized as an efficient way to maintain sustainable soybean production in a salt stress environment. However, the genetic mechanism of the tolerance must first be elucidated. In this study, 257 soybean cultivars with 135 SSR markers were used to perform epistatic association mapping for salt tolerance. Tolerance was evaluated by assessing the main root length (RL), the fresh and dry weights of roots (FWR and DWR), the biomass of seedlings (BS) and the length of hypocotyls (LH) of healthy seedlings after treatments with control, 100 mM NaCl or 10 mM Na2CO3 solutions for approximately one week under greenhouse conditions. A total of 83 QTL-by-environment (QE) interactions for salt tolerance index were detected: 24 for LR, 12 for FWR, 11 for DWR, 15 for LH and 21 for BS, as well as one epistatic QTL for FWR. Furthermore, 86 QE interactions for alkaline tolerance index were found: 17 for LR, 16 for FWR, 17 for DWR, 18 for LH and 18 for BS. A total of 77 QE interactions for the original trait indicator were detected: 17 for LR, 14 for FWR, 4 for DWR, 21 for LH and 21 for BS, as well as 3 epistatic QTL for BS. Small-effect QTL were frequently observed. Several soybean genes with homology to Arabidopsis thaliana and soybean salt tolerance genes were found in close proximity to the above QTL. Using the novel alleles of the QTL detected above, some elite parental combinations were designed, although these QTL need to be further confirmed. The above results provide a valuable foundation for fine mapping, cloning and molecular breeding by design for soybean alkaline and salt tolerance. PMID:24416275

  4. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B.; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas F.; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88–0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10?25). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ?14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08–1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10?09) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06–1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10?11). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06–1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10?05). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-?, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. PMID:25652398

  5. Fine-Grained, Local Maps and Coarse, Global Representations Support Human Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; d'Avossa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    While sensory processes are tuned to particular features, such as an object's specific location, color or orientation, visual working memory (vWM) is assumed to store information using representations, which generalize over a feature dimension. Additionally, current vWM models presume that different features or objects are stored independently. On the other hand, configurational effects, when observed, are supposed to mainly reflect encoding strategies. We show that the location of the target, relative to the display center and boundaries, and overall memory load influenced recall precision, indicating that, like sensory processes, capacity limited vWM resources are spatially tuned. When recalling one of three memory items the target distance from the display center was overestimated, similar to the error when only one item was memorized, but its distance from the memory items' average position was underestimated, showing that not only individual memory items' position, but also the global configuration of the memory array may be stored. Finally, presenting the non-target items at recall, consequently providing landmarks and configurational information, improved precision and accuracy of target recall. Similarly, when the non-target items were translated at recall, relative to their position in the initial display, a parallel displacement of the recalled target was observed. These findings suggest that fine-grained spatial information in vWM is represented in local maps whose resolution varies with distance from landmarks, such as the display center, while coarse representations are used to store the memory array configuration. Both these representations are updated at the time of recall. PMID:25259601

  6. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2.

    PubMed

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Van Asperen, Christi J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-05-15

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ?14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-?, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. PMID:25652398

  7. Fine-grained mapping of mouse brain functional connectivity with resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mechling, Anna E; Hübner, Neele S; Lee, Hsu-Lei; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Harsan, Laura-Adela

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the intrinsic circuit-level functional organization of the brain has benefited tremendously from the advent of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI). In humans, resting-state functional network has been consistently mapped and its alterations have been shown to correlate with symptomatology of various neurological or psychiatric disorders. To date, deciphering the mouse brain functional connectivity (MBFC) with rsfMRI remains a largely underexplored research area, despite the plethora of human brain disorders that can be modeled in this specie. To pave the way from pre-clinical to clinical investigations we characterized here the intrinsic architecture of mouse brain functional circuitry, based on rsfMRI data acquired at 7T using the Cryoprobe technology. High-dimensional spatial group independent component analysis demonstrated fine-grained segregation of cortical and subcortical networks into functional clusters, overlapping with high specificity onto anatomical structures, down to single gray matter nuclei. These clusters, showing a high level of stability and reliability in their patterning, formed the input elements for computing the MBFC network using partial correlation and graph theory. Its topological architecture conserved the fundamental characteristics described for the human and rat brain, such as small-worldness and partitioning into functional modules. Our results additionally showed inter-modular interactions via "network hubs". Each major functional system (motor, somatosensory, limbic, visual, autonomic) was found to have representative hubs that might play an important input/output role and form a functional core for information integration. Moreover, the rostro-dorsal hippocampus formed the highest number of relevant connections with other brain areas, highlighting its importance as core structure for MBFC. PMID:24718287

  8. A note on the efficiencies of sampling strategies in two-stage Bayesian regional fine mapping of a quantitative trait.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijian; Craiu, Radu V; Bull, Shelley B

    2014-11-01

    In focused studies designed to follow up associations detected in a genome-wide association study (GWAS), investigators can proceed to fine-map a genomic region by targeted sequencing or dense genotyping of all variants in the region, aiming to identify a functional sequence variant. For the analysis of a quantitative trait, we consider a Bayesian approach to fine-mapping study design that incorporates stratification according to a promising GWAS tag SNP in the same region. Improved cost-efficiency can be achieved when the fine-mapping phase incorporates a two-stage design, with identification of a smaller set of more promising variants in a subsample taken in stage 1, followed by their evaluation in an independent stage 2 subsample. To avoid the potential negative impact of genetic model misspecification on inference we incorporate genetic model selection based on posterior probabilities for each competing model. Our simulation study shows that, compared to simple random sampling that ignores genetic information from GWAS, tag-SNP-based stratified sample allocation methods reduce the number of variants continuing to stage 2 and are more likely to promote the functional sequence variant into confirmation studies. PMID:25132153

  9. QTL x Genetic Background Interaction: Application to Predicting Progeny Value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Failures of the additive infinitesimal model continue to provide incentive to study other modes of gene action, in particular, epistasis. Epistasis can be modeled as a QTL by genetic background interaction. Association mapping models lend themselves to fitting such an interaction because they often ...

  10. Dynamic QTL analysis of protein content and glutamine synthetase activity in recombinant inbred wheat lines.

    PubMed

    Li, H M; Liang, H; Li, Z; Tang, Z X; Fu, S L; Geng, Y Y; Yan, B J; Ren, Z L

    2015-01-01

    Protein content (PC) is a crucial factor that determines the end-use and nutritional quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a major participant in nitrogen metabolism, can convert inorganic nitrogen into organic nitrogen. Although many studies have been conducted on PC and GS, a dynamic analysis of all of the filling stages has not been conducted. Therefore, 115 F9-10 recombinant inbred wheat lines of 'R131/R142' were used to analyze PC and GS activity during different developmental stages, using the conditional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping method. Twenty-two and six conditional QTL were detected for PC and GS activily, respectively. More QTL in leaf PC were detected during the early filling stages than in the later filling stages. Grain PC QTL displayed different dynamic variations to leaf PC QTL during the entire grain-filling stages. All of the QTL were expressed differently over time, and nine conditional QTL were detected across two filling stages. QTL with similar functions may have tended to group in specific locales. This study provides dynamic genetic information on protein accumulation during grain-filling stages. PMID:26345802

  11. Fine mapping and identification of candidate Bo-or gene controlling orange head of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. Pekinensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange head Chinese cabbage accumulates significant amounts of carotenoids with enhanced nutritional quality. To develop molecular markers for breeding of Chinese cabbage lines with high carotenoid content and to isolate the candidate gene underlying carotenoid synthesis, we performed fine mapping ...

  12. Construction of a genetic linkage map of Thlaspi caerulescens and quantitative trait loci analysis of zinc accumulation.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ana G L; Pieper, Bjorn; Vromans, Jaap; Lindhout, Pim; Aarts, Mark G M; Schat, Henk

    2006-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Thlaspi caerulescens. When compared under conditions of equal Zn availability, considerable variation in the degree of hyperaccumulation is observed among accessions originating from different soil types. This variation offers an excellent opportunity for further dissection of the genetics of this trait. A T. caerulescens intraspecific cross was made between a plant from a nonmetallicolous accession [Lellingen (LE)], characterized by relatively high Zn accumulation, and a plant from a calamine accession [La Calamine (LC)], characterized by relatively low Zn accumulation. Zinc accumulation in roots and shoots segregated in the F3 population. This population was used to construct an LE/LC amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based genetic linkage map and to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Zn accumulation. Two QTL were identified for root Zn accumulation, with the trait-enhancing alleles being derived from each of the parents, and explaining 21.7 and 16.6% of the phenotypic variation observed in the mapping population. Future development of more markers, based on Arabidopsis orthologous genes localized in the QTL regions, will allow fine-mapping and map-based cloning of the genes underlying the QTL. PMID:16539600

  13. Long-range regulatory polymorphisms affecting a GABA receptor constitute a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for social behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andres; Pitts, Jason; Rockman, Matthew V; Chen, William C; Tan, Man-Wah; Kruglyak, Leonid; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation is a social behavior that varies between and within species, providing a model to study the genetic basis of behavioral diversity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, aggregation is regulated by environmental context and by two neuromodulatory pathways, one dependent on the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1 and one dependent on the TGF-? family protein DAF-7. To gain further insight into the genetic regulation of aggregation, we characterize natural variation underlying behavioral differences between two wild-type C. elegans strains, N2 and CB4856. Using quantitative genetic techniques, including a survey of chromosome substitution strains and QTL analysis of recombinant inbred lines, we identify three new QTLs affecting aggregation in addition to the two known N2 mutations in npr-1 and glb-5. Fine-mapping with near-isogenic lines localized one QTL, accounting for 5%-8% of the behavioral variance between N2 and CB4856, 3' to the transcript of the GABA neurotransmitter receptor gene exp-1. Quantitative complementation tests demonstrated that this QTL affects exp-1, identifying exp-1 and GABA signaling as new regulators of aggregation. exp-1 interacts genetically with the daf-7 TGF-? pathway, which integrates food availability and population density, and exp-1 mutations affect the level of daf-7 expression. Our results add to growing evidence that genetic variation affecting neurotransmitter receptor genes is a source of natural behavioral variation. PMID:23284308

  14. GridQTL: HIGH PERFORMANCE QTL ANALYSIS VIA THE GRID

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    including poplars, atlantic salmon, warmblood sport horses, labradors, saltwater crocodiles, as well as moreQTL - A major gene controlling the susceptibility of Atlantic salmon to infectious pancreatic necrosis, which

  15. Fine-mapping quantitative trait loci affecting murine external ear tissue regeneration in the LG/J by SM/J advanced intercross line

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J M; Lawson, H A; Bouckaert, K; Kossenkov, A V; Showe, L C; Cort, L; Blankenhorn, E P; Bedelbaeva, K; Gourevitch, D; Zhang, Y; Heber-Katz, E

    2014-01-01

    External ear hole closure in LG/J mice represents a model of regenerative response. It is accompanied by the formation of a blastema-like structure and the re-growth of multiple tissues, including cartilage. The ability to regenerate tissue is heritable. An F34 advanced intercross line of mice (Wustl:LG,SM-G34) was generated to identify genomic loci involved in ear hole closure over a 30-day healing period. We mapped 19 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for ear hole closure. Individual gene effects are relatively small (0.08?mm), and most loci have co-dominant effects with phenotypically intermediate heterozygotes. QTL support regions were limited to a median size of 2?Mb containing a median of 19 genes. Positional candidate genes were evaluated using differential transcript expression between LG/J and SM/J healing tissue, function analysis and bioinformatic analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in and around positional candidate genes of interest. Analysis of the set of 34 positional candidate genes and those displaying expression differences revealed over-representation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation/DNA damage, cell migration and adhesion, developmentally related genes and metabolism. This indicates that the healing phenotype in LG/J mice involves multiple physiological mechanisms. PMID:24569637

  16. Fine Mapping of Wheat Stripe Rust Resistance Gene Yr26 Based on Collinearity of Wheat with Brachypodium distachyon and Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qingdong; Duan, Yinghui; Yuan, Fengping; Shi, Jingdong; Wang, Qilin; Wu, Jianhui; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    The Yr26 gene, conferring resistance to all currently important races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) in China, was previously mapped to wheat chromosome deletion bin C-1BL-6-0.32 with low-density markers. In this study, collinearity of wheat to Brachypodium distachyon and rice was used to develop markers to saturate the chromosomal region containing the Yr26 locus, and a total of 2,341 F2 plants and 551 F2?3 progenies derived from Avocet S×92R137 were used to develop a fine map of Yr26. Wheat expressed sequence tags (ESTs) located in deletion bin C-1BL-6-0.32 were used to develop sequence tagged site (STS) markers. The EST-STS markers flanking Yr26 were used to identify collinear regions of the rice and B. distachyon genomes. Wheat ESTs with significant similarities in the two collinear regions were selected to develop conserved markers for fine mapping of Yr26. Thirty-one markers were mapped to the Yr26 region, and six of them cosegregated with the resistance gene. Marker orders were highly conserved between rice and B. distachyon, but some rearrangements were observed between rice and wheat. Two flanking markers (CON-4 and CON-12) further narrowed the genomic region containing Yr26 to a 1.92 Mb region in B. distachyon chromosome 3 and a 1.17 Mb region in rice chromosome 10, and two putative resistance gene analogs were identified in the collinear region of B. distachyon. The markers developed in this study provide a potential target site for further map-based cloning of Yr26 and should be useful in marker assisted selection for pyramiding the gene with other resistance genes. PMID:23526955

  17. Fine-scale mapping of vector habitats using very high resolution satellite imagery: a liver fluke case-study.

    PubMed

    De Roeck, Els; Van Coillie, Frieke; De Wulf, Robert; Soenen, Karen; Charlier, Johannes; Vercruysse, Jozef; Hantson, Wouter; Ducheyne, Els; Hendrickx, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The visualization of vector occurrence in space and time is an important aspect of studying vector-borne diseases. Detailed maps of possible vector habitats provide valuable information for the prediction of infection risk zones but are currently lacking for most parts of the world. Nonetheless, monitoring vector habitats from the finest scales up to farm level is of key importance to refine currently existing broad-scale infection risk models. Using Fasciola hepatica, a parasite liver fluke, as a case in point, this study illustrates the potential of very high resolution (VHR) optical satellite imagery to efficiently and semi-automatically detect detailed vector habitats. A WorldView2 satellite image capable of <5m resolution was acquired in the spring of 2013 for the area around Bruges, Belgium, a region where dairy farms suffer from liver fluke infections transmitted by freshwater snails. The vector thrives in small water bodies (SWBs), such as ponds, ditches and other humid areas consisting of open water, aquatic vegetation and/or inundated grass. These water bodies can be as small as a few m2 and are most often not present on existing land cover maps because of their small size. We present a classification procedure based on object-based image analysis (OBIA) that proved valuable to detect SWBs at a fine scale in an operational and semi-automated way. The classification results were compared to field and other reference data such as existing broad-scale maps and expert knowledge. Overall, the SWB detection accuracy reached up to 87%. The resulting fine-scale SWB map can be used as input for spatial distribution modelling of the liver fluke snail vector to enable development of improved infection risk mapping and management advice adapted to specific, local farm situations. PMID:25599638

  18. Fine-Scale Cartography of Human Impacts along French Mediterranean Coasts: A Relevant Map for the Management of Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Holon, Florian; Mouquet, Nicolas; Boissery, Pierre; Bouchoucha, Marc; Delaruelle, Gwenaelle; Tribot, Anne-Sophie; Deter, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem services provided by oceans and seas support most human needs but are threatened by human activities. Despite existing maps illustrating human impacts on marine ecosystems, information remains either large-scale but rough and insufficient for stakeholders (1 km² grid, lack of data along the coast) or fine-scale but fragmentary and heterogeneous in methodology. The objectives of this study are to map and quantify the main pressures exerted on near-coast marine ecosystems, at a large spatial scale though in fine and relevant resolution for managers (one pixel = 20 x 20 m). It focuses on the French Mediterranean coast (1,700 km of coastline including Corsica) at a depth of 0 to 80 m. After completing and homogenizing data presently available under GIS on the bathymetry and anthropogenic pressures but also on the seabed nature and ecosystem vulnerability, we provide a fine modeling of the extent and impacts of 10 anthropogenic pressures on marine habitats. The considered pressures are man-made coastline, boat anchoring, aquaculture, urban effluents, industrial effluents, urbanization, agriculture, coastline erosion, coastal population and fishing. A 1:10 000 continuous habitat map is provided considering 11 habitat classes. The marine bottom is mostly covered by three habitats: infralittoral soft bottom, Posidonia oceanica meadows and circalittoral soft bottom. Around two thirds of the bottoms are found within medium and medium high cumulative impact categories. Seagrass meadows are the most impacted habitats. The most important pressures (in area and intensity) are urbanization, coastal population, coastal erosion and man-made coastline. We also identified areas in need of a special management interest. This work should contribute to prioritize environmental needs, as well as enhance the development of indicators for the assessment of the ecological status of coastal systems. It could also help better apply and coordinate management measures at a relevant scale for biodiversity conservation. PMID:26266542

  19. Fine-Scale Cartography of Human Impacts along French Mediterranean Coasts: A Relevant Map for the Management of Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Holon, Florian; Mouquet, Nicolas; Boissery, Pierre; Bouchoucha, Marc; Delaruelle, Gwenaelle; Tribot, Anne-Sophie; Deter, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem services provided by oceans and seas support most human needs but are threatened by human activities. Despite existing maps illustrating human impacts on marine ecosystems, information remains either large-scale but rough and insufficient for stakeholders (1 km² grid, lack of data along the coast) or fine-scale but fragmentary and heterogeneous in methodology. The objectives of this study are to map and quantify the main pressures exerted on near-coast marine ecosystems, at a large spatial scale though in fine and relevant resolution for managers (one pixel = 20 x 20 m). It focuses on the French Mediterranean coast (1,700 km of coastline including Corsica) at a depth of 0 to 80 m. After completing and homogenizing data presently available under GIS on the bathymetry and anthropogenic pressures but also on the seabed nature and ecosystem vulnerability, we provide a fine modeling of the extent and impacts of 10 anthropogenic pressures on marine habitats. The considered pressures are man-made coastline, boat anchoring, aquaculture, urban effluents, industrial effluents, urbanization, agriculture, coastline erosion, coastal population and fishing. A 1:10 000 continuous habitat map is provided considering 11 habitat classes. The marine bottom is mostly covered by three habitats: infralittoral soft bottom, Posidonia oceanica meadows and circalittoral soft bottom. Around two thirds of the bottoms are found within medium and medium high cumulative impact categories. Seagrass meadows are the most impacted habitats. The most important pressures (in area and intensity) are urbanization, coastal population, coastal erosion and man-made coastline. We also identified areas in need of a special management interest. This work should contribute to prioritize environmental needs, as well as enhance the development of indicators for the assessment of the ecological status of coastal systems. It could also help better apply and coordinate management measures at a relevant scale for biodiversity conservation. PMID:26266542

  20. TAGGING AND MAPPING OF GENES AND QTL AND MOLECULAR MARKER-ASSISTED SELECTION FOR TRAITS OF ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE IN BEAN AND COWPEA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program (B/C CRSP) scientists have successfully integrated consensus maps of the 11 linkage groups in both bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). The bean map is approximately 1200 cM with some 500 markers and an additional 500 marker...

  1. Construction of a genetic linkage map of an interspecific diploid blueberry population and identification of QTL for chilling requirement and cold hardiness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic linkage map has been constructed from an interspecific diploid blueberry population [(Vaccinium darrowii Fla4B x V. corymbosum W85-20) F1#10 x V. corymbosum W85-23] designed to segregate for cold hardiness and chilling requirement. The map is comprised of 12 linkage groups (equivalent to t...

  2. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk

    E-print Network

    Painter, Jodie N.; O’Mara, Tracy A.; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M.; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Carina; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; National Study of Endometrial Cancer Genetics Group (NSECG); CHIBCHA Consortium; Polanco, Ma. Magdalena Echeverry de; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study Group (ANECS); Montgomery, Grant W.; Webb, Penelope M.; Scott, Rodney J.; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Henders, Anjali K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Renner, Stefan P.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B.; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S.; Werner, Henrica M. J.; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; RENDOCAS; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Australian Ovarian Cancer Study (AOCS); Ekici, Arif B.; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; GENICA Network; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-11-06

    (ANECS), Studies of Epidemiology and Risk factors in Cancer Heredity (SEARCH) and National Study of the Genetics of Endometrial Cancer (NSECG GWASs)] and passing our quality control measures iden- tified 18 SNPs that reached genome-wide significance (P... and endometrial cancer for the meta-analysis of the iCOGS fine-mapping dataset, and ANECS, SEARCH and NSECG GWAS datasets. The color of each point indicates the extent of LD with the top SNP rs11263763 (purple). Gene positions are given under the graph...

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS (TO APPEAR) 1 Performance Analysis on an MAP Fine Timing

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Shengli

    Tian, Senior Member, IEEE, and Peter Willett, Fellow, IEEE Abstract-- In this paper we develop a fine. C. R. Berger, S. Zhou, and Peter Willett are supported by ONR grant N00014-07-1-0429. S. Zhou. Willett are with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371

  4. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Momoko; M?gi, Reedik; van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; H?gg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S; Winkler, Thomas W; Willems, Sara M; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Wiltshire, Steven; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R; Groves, Christopher J; Bennett, Amanda J; Lehtim?ki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Karssen, Lennart C; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; de Craen, Anton J M; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D; Samani, Nilesh J; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Slagboom, P Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ?0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated. PMID:26132169

  5. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation

    PubMed Central

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; H?gg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Willems, Sara M.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P.; Willenborg, Christina; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R.; Groves, Christopher J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Lehtim?ki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S.; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M.; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S.; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T.; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ?0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated. PMID:26132169

  6. PRISM: Fine-Grained Resource-Aware Scheduling for MapReduce

    E-print Network

    Boutaba, Raouf

    reduction in job running time. Many large companies, such as Google, Facebook, and Yahoo!, routinely use Map--MapReduce has become a popular model for data-intensive computation in recent years. By breaking down each jobReduce can significantly reduce the running time of data-intensive jobs. However, despite recent efforts

  7. A gene-derived SNP-based high resolution linkage map of carrot including the location of QTL conditioning root and leaf anthocyanin pigmentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Purple carrots accumulate large quantities of anthocyanins in their roots and leaves. These flavonoid pigments possess antioxidant activity and are implicated in providing health benefits. The lack of informative and saturated linkage maps associated with well characterized populations s...

  8. Fine-mapping and comprehensive transcript analysis reveals nonsynonymous variants within a novel 1.17 Mb blood

    E-print Network

    Abraham, Nader G.

    . © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Quantitative trait locus; Hypertension; Dahl rats studies using selectively bred hypertensive rat models provide some advantages over genetic studies.17 Mb blood pressure QTL region on rat chromosome 10 Yasser Saad, Michael R. Garrett, Ezhilarasi

  9. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  10. Fine Resolution Topographic Mapping of the Jovian Moons: A Ka-Band High Resolution Topographic Mapping Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, S. N.; Carsey, F. D.; Turtle, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through use of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  11. Identification and verification of QTL associated with growth traits in two genetic backgrounds of Barramundi (Lates calcarifer).

    PubMed

    Wang, C M; Lo, L C; Feng, F; Zhu, Z Y; Yue, G H

    2008-02-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth traits have previously been mapped in linkage groups (LG) 2, 3 and 23 of Barramundi (Lates carcalifer), but these QTL have not been verified in different genetic backgrounds and environments. Here, we report the identification and verification of QTL for growth traits on LG2, 3, 10 and 23 in F(1) families constructed using brooders from the Singapore Marine Aquaculture Center (MAC) and from wild stocks collected in Thailand (THAI). The previously detected QTL for body weight and length linked to marker Lca371 on LG2 were confirmed in both the MAC and THAI families, whereas other QTL previously mapped to LG3 and 23 were only detected in one of the two families. QTL for body weight and length were identified in the MAC family, but not in the THAI family, in a region where the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and tyrosine hydroxylase 1 (TH1) genes are located on LG10. Significant epistatic interactions were identified between markers Lca287 on LG2 and IGF2 on LG10 for growth trait QTL in the MAC family, but not in the THAI family. Effects of the IGF2, TH1 and parvalbumin 1 candidate genes were family-specific. Our results indicate that some but not all QTL are family-specific in Barramundi. PMID:18076743

  12. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the nuclear restorer gene Rfp for pol CMS in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Liu, Pingwu; Long, Furong; Hong, Dengfeng; He, Qingbiao; Yang, Guangsheng

    2012-08-01

    The Polima (pol) system of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in rapeseed is widely used in China for commercial hybrid seed production. Genetic studies have shown that its fertility restorer gene (Rfp) is monogenic dominant. For fine mapping of the Rfp gene, a near isogenic line comprising 3,662 individuals of BC(14)F(1) generation segregating for the Rfp gene was created. Based on the sequences of two SCAR markers, SCAP0612ST and SCAP0612EM2, developed by Zhao et al. (Genes Genom 30(3):191-196, 2008) and the synteny region of Brassica napus and other Brassica species, 13 markers strongly linked with the Rfp gene were identified. By integrating three of these markers to the published linkage map, the Rfp gene was mapped on linkage group N9 of B. napus. Using these markers, the Rfp locus was narrowed down to a 29.2-kb genomic region of Brassica rapa. Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were predicted in the target region, of these, ORF2, encoding a PPR protein, was the most likely candidate gene of Rfp. These results lay a solid foundation for map-based cloning of the Rfp gene and will be helpful for marker-assisted selection of elite CMS restorer lines. PMID:22614178

  13. A fine structure genomic map of the region of 12q13 containing SAS and CDK4

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, C.Y.; Elkahloun, A.G.; Su, Y.A.

    1994-09-01

    We have recently adapted a method, originally described by Rackwitz, to the rapid restriction mapping of multiple cosmid DNA samples. Linearization of the cosmids at the lambda cohesive site using lambda terminase is followed by partial digestion with selected restriction enzymes and hybridization to oligonucleotides specific for the right or left hand termini. Partial digestions are performed in a microtiter plate thus allowing up to 12 cosmid clones to be digested with one restriction enzyme. We have applied this rapid restriction mapping method to cosmids derived from a region of chromosome 12q13 that has recently been shown to be amplified in a variety of cancers including malignant fibrous histiocytoma, fibrosarcoma, liposarcoma, osteosarcoma and brain tumors. A small segment of this amplification unit containing three genes, SAS (a membrane protein), CDK4 (a cyclin dependent kinase) and OS-9 (a recently described cDNA) has been analyzed with the system described above. This fine structure genomic map will be useful for completing the expression map of this region as well as characterizing its pattern of amplification in tumor specimens.

  14. Fine-scaling mapping of the gene responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimori, Minoru; Nakamura, Yusuke ); Wells, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The authors have constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map in the vicinity of the gene responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). The mutation causing this disease, inherited as an autosomal dominant, predisposes carriers to development of neoplastic tumors in the parathyroid, the endocrine pancreas, and the anterior lobe of the pituitary. The 12 markers on the genetic linkage map reported here span nearly 20 cM, and linkage analysis of MEN1 pedigrees has placed the MEN1 locus within the 8-cM region between D11S480 and D11S546. The markers on this map will be useful for prenatal or presymptomatic diagnosis of individuals in families that segregate a mutant allele of the MEN1 gene.

  15. Fine-resolution maps of acoustic properties at 250?MHz of unstained fixed murine retinal layers.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Daniel; Lloyd, Harriet O; Silverman, Ronald H; Mamou, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Ex vivo assessment of microscale tissue biomechanical properties of the mammalian retina could offer insights into diseases such as keratoconus, and macular degeneration. A 250-MHz scanning acoustic microscope (7-?m resolution) has been constructed to derive two-dimensional quantitative maps of attenuation (?), speed of sound (c), acoustic impedance (Z), bulk modulus (B), and mass density ( ?). The two-dimensional maps were compared to coregistered hematoxylin-and-eosin stained sections. This study is the first to quantitatively assess ??, c, Z, B, and ? of individual retinal layers of mammalian animals at high ultrasound frequencies. Significant differences in these parameters between the layers were demonstrated. PMID:25994737

  16. Identification of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying water soluble protein content in soybean.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiguo; Wen, Zixiang; Li, Haichao; Yuan, Daohua; Li, Jinying; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Zhongwen; Cui, Shiyou; Du, Weiijun

    2013-02-01

    Water soluble protein content (SPC) plays an important role in the functional efficacy of protein in food products. Therefore, for the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with SPC, 212 F(2:9) lines of the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the cross of ZDD09454 × Yudou12 were grown along with the parents, in six different environments (location × year) to determine inheritance and map solubility-related genes. A linkage map comprising of 301 SSR markers covering 3,576.81 cM was constructed in the RIL population. Seed SPC was quantified with a macro-Kjeldahl procedure in samples collected over multiple years from three locations (Nantong in 2007 and 2008, Zhengzhou in 2007 and 2008, and Xinxiang in 2008 and 2009). SPC demonstrated transgressive segregation, indicating a complementary genetic structure between the parents. Eleven putative QTL were associated with SPC explaining 4.5-18.2 % of the observed phenotypic variation across the 6 year/location environments. Among these, two QTL (qsp8-4, qsp8-5) near GMENOD2B and Sat_215 showed an association with SPC in multiple environments, suggesting that they were key QTL related to protein solubility. The QTL × environment interaction demonstrated the complex genetic mechanism of SPC. These SPC-associated QTL and linked markers in soybean will provide important information that can be utilized by breeders to improve the functional quality of soybean varieties. PMID:23052024

  17. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of durable plant genetic resistance to pathogens through strategies of QTL pyramiding and diversification requires in depth knowledge of polygenic resistance within the available germplasm. Polygenic partial resistance to Aphanomyces root rot, caused by Aphanomyces euteiches, one of the most damaging pathogens of pea worldwide, was previously dissected in individual mapping populations. However, there are no data available regarding the diversity of the resistance QTL across a broader collection of pea germplasm. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of Aphanomyces root rot resistance QTL in the four main sources of resistance in pea and compared their genomic localization with genes/QTL controlling morphological or phenological traits and with putative candidate genes. Results Meta-analysis, conducted using 244 individual QTL reported previously in three mapping populations (Puget x 90–2079, Baccara x PI180693 and Baccara x 552) and in a fourth mapping population in this study (DSP x 90–2131), resulted in the identification of 27 meta-QTL for resistance to A. euteiches. Confidence intervals of meta-QTL were, on average, reduced four-fold compared to mean confidence intervals of individual QTL. Eleven consistent meta-QTL, which highlight seven highly consistent genomic regions, were identified. Few meta-QTL specificities were observed among mapping populations, suggesting that sources of resistance are not independent. Seven resistance meta-QTL, including six of the highly consistent genomic regions, co-localized with six of the meta-QTL identified in this study for earliness and plant height and with three morphological genes (Af, A, R). Alleles contributing to the resistance were often associated with undesirable alleles for dry pea breeding. Candidate genes underlying six main meta-QTL regions were identified using colinearity between the pea and Medicago truncatula genomes. Conclusions QTL meta-analysis provided an overview of the moderately low diversity of loci controlling partial resistance to A. euteiches in four main sources of resistance in pea. Seven highly consistent genomic regions with potential use in marker-assisted-selection were identified. Confidence intervals at several main QTL regions were reduced and co-segregation among resistance and morphological/phenological alleles was identified. Further work will be required to identify the best combinations of QTL for durably increasing partial resistance to A. euteiches. PMID:23497245

  18. Prioritization of candidate genes in “QTL-hotspot” region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan AVSK; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the “QTL-hotspot” region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1–5 seasons and 1–5 locations split the “QTL-hotspot” region into two subregions namely “QTL-hotspot_a” (15 genes) and “QTL-hotspot_b” (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined “QTL-hotspot” region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of “QTL-hotspot” for drought tolerance in chickpea. PMID:26478518

  19. Prioritization of candidate genes in "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan Avsk; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1-5 seasons and 1-5 locations split the "QTL-hotspot" region into two subregions namely "QTL-hotspot_a" (15 genes) and "QTL-hotspot_b" (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined "QTL-hotspot" region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of "QTL-hotspot" for drought tolerance in chickpea. PMID:26478518

  20. Fine Mapping and Characterization of Candidate Genes that Control Resistance to Cercospora sojina K. Hara in Two Soybean Germplasm Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Anh-Tung; Harris, Donna K.; Buck, James; Hoskins, Aaron; Serrano, Jonathan; Abdel-Haleem, Hussein; Cregan, Perry; Song, Qijian; Boerma, H. Roger; Li, Zenglu

    2015-01-01

    Frogeye leaf spot (FLS), caused by the fungus Cercospora sojina K. Hara, may cause a significant yield loss to soybean growers in regions with a warm and humid climate. Two soybean accessions, PI 594891 and PI 594774, were identified to carry a high level of resistance similar to that conditioned by the Rcs3 gene in 'Davis'. Previously, we reported that the resistance to FLS in these two plant introductions (PIs) was controlled by a novel gene (s) on chromosome 13 that is different from Rcs3. To fine-map the novel FLS resistance gene(s) in these two PIs, F2: 3 seeds from the crosses between PI 594891 and PI 594774, and the FLS susceptible genotype 'Blackhawk' were genotyped with SNP markers that were designed based on the SoySNP50k iSelect BeadChip data to identify recombinant events and locate candidate genes. Analysis of lines possessing key recombination events helped narrow down the FLS-resistance genomic region in PI 594891 from 3.3 Mb to a 72.6 kb region with five annotated genes. The resistance gene in PI 594774 was fine-mapped into a 540 kb region that encompasses the 72.6 kb region found in PI 594891. Sequencing five candidate genes in PI 594891 identified three genes that have several mutations in the promoter, intron, 5', and 3' UTR regions. qPCR analysis showed a difference in expression levels of these genes in both lines compared to Blackhawk in the presence of C. sojina. Based on phenotype, genotype and haplotype analysis results, these two soybean accessions might carry different resistance alleles of the same gene or two different gene(s). The identified SNPs were used to develop Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP) assays to detect the resistance alleles on chromosome 13 from the two PIs for marker-assisted selection. PMID:25993056

  1. Detection of QTL with effects on osmoregulation capacities in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that the ability to adapt to seawater in teleost fish is modulated by genetic factors. Most studies have involved the comparison of species or strains and little is known about the genetic architecture of the trait. To address this question, we searched for QTL affecting osmoregulation capacities after transfer to saline water in a nonmigratory captive-bred population of rainbow trout. Results A QTL design (5 full-sib families, about 200 F2 progeny each) was produced from a cross between F0 grand-parents previously selected during two generations for a high or a low cortisol response after a standardized confinement stress. When fish were about 18 months old (near 204 g body weight), individual progeny were submitted to two successive hyper-osmotic challenges (30 ppt salinity) 14 days apart. Plasma chloride and sodium concentrations were recorded 24 h after each transfer. After the second challenge, fish were sacrificed and a gill index (weight of total gill arches corrected for body weight) was recorded. The genome scan was performed with 196 microsatellites and 85 SNP markers. Unitrait and multiple-trait QTL analyses were carried out on the whole dataset (5 families) through interval mapping methods with the QTLMap software. For post-challenge plasma ion concentrations, significant QTL (P < 0.05) were found on six different linkage groups and highly suggestive ones (P < 0.10) on two additional linkage groups. Most QTL affected concentrations of both chloride and sodium during both challenges, but some were specific to either chloride (2 QTL) or sodium (1 QTL) concentrations. Six QTL (4 significant, 2 suggestive) affecting gill index were discovered. Two were specific to the trait, while the others were also identified as QTL for post-challenge ion concentrations. Altogether, allelic effects were consistent for QTL affecting chloride and sodium concentrations but inconsistent for QTL affecting ion concentrations and gill morphology. There was no systematic lineage effect (grand-parental origin of QTL alleles) on the recorded traits. Conclusions For the first time, genomic loci associated with effects on major physiological components of osmotic adaptation to seawater in a nonmigratory fish were revealed. The results pave the way for further deciphering of the complex regulatory mechanisms underlying seawater adaptation and genes involved in osmoregulatory physiology in rainbow trout and other euryhaline fishes. PMID:21569550

  2. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) that Underlie SCN Resistance in the Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] ‘PI438489B’ by ‘Hamilton’ Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode caused by Heterodera glycines is the most devastating pest in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Resistance to SCN is complex, polygenic, race-cultivar specific, and controlled by several QTL. Our objective was to identify and map QTL for SCN resistance to races 3 and 5 using a ...

  3. SCAN database: facilitating integrative analyses of cytosine modification and expression QTL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gamazon, Eric R; Zhang, Xu; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Liu, Cong; Szilágyi, Keely L; Dolan, M Eileen; Cox, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Functional annotation of genetic variants including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variations (CNV) promises to greatly improve our understanding of human complex traits. Previous transcriptomic studies involving individuals from different global populations have investigated the genetic architecture of gene expression variation by mapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Functional interpretation of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified enrichment of eQTL in top signals from GWAS of human complex traits. The SCAN (SNP and CNV Annotation) database was developed as a web-based resource of genetical genomic studies including eQTL detected in the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell line samples derived from apparently healthy individuals of European and African ancestry. Considering the critical roles of epigenetic gene regulation, cytosine modification quantitative trait loci (mQTL) are expected to add a crucial layer of annotation to existing functional genomic information. Here, we describe the new features of the SCAN database that integrate comprehensive mQTL mapping results generated in the HapMap CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA) and YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria) LCL samples and demonstrate the utility of the enhanced functional annotation system. PMID:25818895

  4. The Flowering Repressor SVP Underlies a Novel Arabidopsis thaliana QTL Interacting with the Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The timing of flowering initiation is a fundamental trait for the adaptation of annual plants to different environments. Large amounts of intraspecific quantitative variation have been described for it among natural accessions of many species, but the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this genetic variation are mainly being determined in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To find novel A. thaliana flowering QTL, we developed introgression lines from the Japanese accession Fuk, which was selected based on the substantial transgression observed in an F2 population with the reference strain Ler. Analysis of an early flowering line carrying a single Fuk introgression identified Flowering Arabidopsis QTL1 (FAQ1). We fine-mapped FAQ1 in an 11 kb genomic region containing the MADS transcription factor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP). Complementation of the early flowering phenotype of FAQ1-Fuk with a SVP-Ler transgen demonstrated that FAQ1 is SVP. We further proved by directed mutagenesis and transgenesis that a single amino acid substitution in SVP causes the loss-of-function and early flowering of Fuk allele. Analysis of a worldwide collection of accessions detected FAQ1/SVP-Fuk allele only in Asia, with the highest frequency appearing in Japan, where we could also detect a potential ancestral genotype of FAQ1/SVP-Fuk. In addition, we evaluated allelic and epistatic interactions of SVP natural alleles by analysing more than one hundred transgenic lines carrying Ler or Fuk SVP alleles in five genetic backgrounds. Quantitative analyses of these lines showed that FAQ1/SVP effects vary from large to small depending on the genetic background. These results support that the flowering repressor SVP has been recently selected in A. thaliana as a target for early flowering, and evidence the relevance of genetic interactions for the intraspecific evolution of FAQ1/SVP and flowering time. PMID:23382706

  5. Fine mapping and evolution of the major sex determining region in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Taboada, Xoana; Hermida, Miguel; Pardo, Belén G; Vera, Manuel; Piferrer, Francesc; Viñas, Ana; Bouza, Carmen; Martínez, Paulino

    2014-10-01

    Fish sex determination (SD) systems are varied, suggesting evolutionary changes including either multiple evolution origins of genetic SD from nongenetic systems (such as environmental SD) and/or turnover events replacing one genetic system by another. When genetic SD is found, cytological differentiation between the two members of the sex chromosome pair is often minor or undetectable. The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), a valuable commercial flatfish, has a ZZ/ZW system and a major SD region on linkage group 5 (LG5), but there are also other minor genetic and environmental influences. We here report refined mapping of the turbot SD region, supported by comparative mapping with model fish species, to identify the turbot master SD gene. Six genes were located to the SD region, two of them associated with gonad development (sox2 and dnajc19). All showed a high association with sex within families (P = 0), but not at the population level, so they are probably partially sex-linked genes, but not SD gene itself. Analysis of crossovers in LG5 using two families confirmed a ZZ/ZW system in turbot and suggested a revised map position for the master gene. Genetic diversity and differentiation for 25 LG5 genetic markers showed no differences between males and females sampled from a wild population, suggesting a recent origin of the SD region in turbot. We also analyzed associations with markers of the most relevant sex-related linkage groups in brill (S. rhombus), a closely related species to turbot; the data suggest that an ancient XX/XY system in brill changed to a ZZ/ZW mechanism in turbot. PMID:25106948

  6. Fine-resolution multiscale mapping of clay minerals in Australian soils measured with near infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscarra Rossel, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Clay minerals are the most reactive inorganic components of soils. They help to determine soil properties and largely govern their behaviors and functions. Clay minerals also play important roles in biogeochemical cycling and interact with the environment to affect geomorphic processes such as weathering, erosion and deposition. This paper provides new spatially explicit clay mineralogy information for Australia that will help to improve our understanding of soils and their role in the functioning of landscapes and ecosystems. I measured the abundances of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Using a model-tree algorithm, I built rule-based models for each mineral at two depths (0-20 cm, 60-80 cm) as a function of predictors that represent the soil-forming factors (climate, parent material, relief, vegetation and time), their processes and the scales at which they vary. The results show that climate, parent material and soil type exert the largest influence on the abundance and spatial distribution of the clay minerals; relief and vegetation have more local effects. I digitally mapped each mineral on a 3 arc-second grid. The maps show the relative abundances and distributions of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils. Kaolinite occurs in a range of climates but dominates in deeply weathered soils, in soils of higher landscapes and in regions with more rain. Illite is present in varied landscapes and may be representative of colder, more arid climates, but may also be present in warmer and wetter soil environments. Smectite is often an authigenic mineral, formed from the weathering of basalt, but it also occurs on sediments and calcareous substrates. It occurs predominantly in drier climates and in landscapes with low relief. These new clay mineral maps fill a significant gap in the availability of soil mineralogical information. They provide data to for example, assist with research into soil fertility and food production, carbon sequestration, land degradation, dust and climate modeling and paleoclimatic change.

  7. Fine Mapping and Evolution of the Major Sex Determining Region in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Xoana; Hermida, Miguel; Pardo, Belén G.; Vera, Manuel; Piferrer, Francesc; Viñas, Ana; Bouza, Carmen; Martínez, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    Fish sex determination (SD) systems are varied, suggesting evolutionary changes including either multiple evolution origins of genetic SD from nongenetic systems (such as environmental SD) and/or turnover events replacing one genetic system by another. When genetic SD is found, cytological differentiation between the two members of the sex chromosome pair is often minor or undetectable. The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), a valuable commercial flatfish, has a ZZ/ZW system and a major SD region on linkage group 5 (LG5), but there are also other minor genetic and environmental influences. We here report refined mapping of the turbot SD region, supported by comparative mapping with model fish species, to identify the turbot master SD gene. Six genes were located to the SD region, two of them associated with gonad development (sox2 and dnajc19). All showed a high association with sex within families (P = 0), but not at the population level, so they are probably partially sex-linked genes, but not SD gene itself. Analysis of crossovers in LG5 using two families confirmed a ZZ/ZW system in turbot and suggested a revised map position for the master gene. Genetic diversity and differentiation for 25 LG5 genetic markers showed no differences between males and females sampled from a wild population, suggesting a recent origin of the SD region in turbot. We also analyzed associations with markers of the most relevant sex-related linkage groups in brill (S. rhombus), a closely related species to turbot; the data suggest that an ancient XX/XY system in brill changed to a ZZ/ZW mechanism in turbot. PMID:25106948

  8. Fine-scale chromatin interaction maps reveal the cis-regulatory landscape of human lincRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenxiu; Ay, Ferhat; Lee, Choli; Gulsoy, Gunhan; Deng, Xinxian; Cook, Savannah; Hesson, Jennifer; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B.; Krumm, Anton; Shendure, Jay; Blau, C. Anthony; Disteche, Christine M.; Noble, William S.; Duan, ZhiJun

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput methods based on chromosome conformation capture (3C) have greatly advanced our understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) organization of genomes but are limited in resolution by their reliance on restriction enzymes (REs). Here we describe a method called DNase Hi-C for comprehensively mapping global chromatin contacts that uses DNase I for chromatin fragmentation, leading to greatly improved efficiency and resolution compared to Hi-C. Coupling this method with DNA capture technology provides a high-throughput approach for targeted mapping of fine-scale chromatin architecture. We applied targeted DNase Hi-C to characterize the 3D organization of 998 lincRNA (long intergenic noncoding RNA) promoters in two human cell lines, thereby revealing that expression of lincRNAs is tightly controlled by complex mechanisms involving both super-enhancers and the polycomb repressive complex. Our results provide the first glimpse of a cell type-specific 3D organization of lincRNA genes. PMID:25437436

  9. Fine-structure mapping and complementation analysis of nif (nitrogen fixation) genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, T; MacNeil, D; Roberts, G P; Supiano, M A; Brill, W J

    1978-01-01

    Four hundred and eighty-nine independent Nif- strains containing 260 point, 130 millimicron-induced, and 99 deletion mutations in nif in the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome were isolated. Three hundred and ninety insertion and point mutations were mapped with millimicron-induced deletions carried on 44 plasmids derived from pTM4010, a recombinant R factor containing the his-nif region of K. pneumoniae. The 99 chromosomal deletions in the nif region were mapped with 69 derivatives of pTM4010 carrying insertion and point mutations in nif. Complementation analysis between 84 derivatives of pTM4010 carrying nif mutations and Rec- derivatives of the 390 Nif- mutants identified 14 genes. The nif mutations were ordered into 49 deletion groups with a gene order of his...nifQBALFMVSNEKDHJ. Complementation analysis of millimicron-induced, amber, frameshift, and deletion mutations indicates there are five polycistronic and two monocistronic operons: nifQ nifB, nifA nifL, nifF, nifM nifV nifS, nifN nifE, nifK nifD nifH, and nifJ. Transcription is from right to left in all polycistronic operons. PMID:361693

  10. RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Martin; Rogers, Sean M.; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Normandeau, Eric; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Dalziel, Anne C.; Chebib, Jobran; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Parallel changes in body shape may evolve in response to similar environmental conditions, but whether such parallel phenotypic changes share a common genetic basis is still debated. The goal of this study was to assess whether parallel phenotypic changes could be explained by genetic parallelism, multiple genetic routes, or both. We first provide evidence for parallelism in fish shape by using geometric morphometrics among 300 fish representing five species pairs of Lake Whitefish. Using a genetic map comprising 3438 restriction site?associated DNA sequencing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we then identified quantitative trait loci underlying body shape traits in a backcross family reared in the laboratory. A total of 138 body shape quantitative trait loci were identified in this cross, thus revealing a highly polygenic architecture of body shape in Lake Whitefish. Third, we tested for evidence of genetic parallelism among independent wild populations using both a single-locus method (outlier analysis) and a polygenic approach (analysis of covariation among markers). The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism. However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes. These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches. PMID:26002924

  11. Fine genetic mapping of the Co locus controlling columnar growth habit in apple.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tuanhui; Zhu, Yuandi; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad; Keulemans, Johan; Brown, Susan; Xu, Kenong

    2012-05-01

    Tree architecture is an important, complex and dynamic trait affected by diverse genetic, ontogenetic and environmental factors. 'Wijcik McIntosh', a columnar (reduced branching) sport of 'McIntosh' and a valuable genetic resource, has been used intensively in apple-breeding programs for genetic improvement of tree architecture. The columnar growth habit is primarily controlled by the dominant allele of gene Co (columnar) on linkage group-10. But the Co locus is not well mapped and the Co gene remains unknown. To precisely map the Co locus and to identify candidate genes of Co, a sequence-based approach using both peach and apple genomes was used to develop new markers linked more tightly to Co. Five new simple sequence repeats markers were developed (C1753-3520, C18470-25831, C6536-31519, C7223-38004 and C7629-22009). The first four markers were obtained from apple genomic sequences on chromosome-10, whereas the last (C7629-22009) was from an unanchored apple contig that contains an apple expressed sequence tag CV082943, which was identified through synteny analysis between the peach and apple genomes. Genetic mapping of these five markers in four F(1) populations of 528 genotypes and 290 diverse columnar selections/cultivars (818 genotypes in total) delimited the Co locus in a genetic interval with 0.37 % recombination between markers C1753-3520 and C7629-22009. Marker C18470-25831 co-segregates with Co in the 818 genotypes studied. The Co region is estimated to be 193 kb and contains 26 predicted gene in the 'Golden Delicious' genome. Among the 26 genes, three are putative LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB) DOMAIN (LBD) containing transcription factor genes known of essential roles in plant lateral organ development, and are therefore considered as strong candidates of Co, designated MdLBD1, MdLBD2, and MdLBD3. Although more comprehensive studies are required to confirm the function of MdLBD1-3, the present work represents an important step forward to better understand the genetic and molecular control of tree architecture in apple. PMID:22526430

  12. Fine genetic mapping of the gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wicking, C.; Berkman, J.; Wainwright, B.

    1994-08-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, or Gorlin syndrome) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas and diverse developmental defects. The gene responsible for NBCCS, which is most likely to be a tumor suppressor gene, has previously been mapped to 9q22.3-q31 in a 12-cM interval between the microsatellite marker loci D9S12.1 and D9S109. Combined multipoint and haplotype analyses of additional polymorphisms in this region in our collection of Australasian pedigrees have further refined the localization of the gene to between the markers D9S196 and D9S180, an interval reported to be approximately 2 cM. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mapping fine-scale structure near the core-mantle boundary beneath USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies agree that weak (r.m.s of 0.1%) small-scale (~6 km) random velocity fluctuations distributed throughout the lowermost mantle explain globally-averaged PKP precursor amplitudes in the 0.7-2.5 Hz frequency band. Precursor amplitudes in individual seismograms, however, exhibit much variability, suggesting that some regions in the lower mantle are more heterogeneous than others. It is difficult to reliably map differences in scattering strength from single seismograms due to reciprocity considerations, but seismic arrays provide a means to distinguish between source- and receiver-side scattering. We use a traditional beamforming method to measure the slowness and azimuth of scattered energy incident upon the array, and a migration method to map coherent precursor energy to points of origin near the core-mantle boundary. The focus of this paper is to test the robustness of these methods with the wealth of USArray data. We conduct several tests to address the following questions: 1) how well does traditional beamforming agree with results from the migration method?, 2) how consistent are structures resolved by different subsets of receivers for a given event?, 3) how consistent are structures resolved by a given set of stations for distinct, but nearby, events?, and 4) how consistent are structures resolved when using seismograms filtered at different frequencies? The coarse spacing (~75 km) of USArray limits our ability to make reliable slowness measurements because of spatial aliasing. It may be possible, however, to make measurements of longer-period precursors scattered by larger-scale (~100 km) structures. Another possible solution to the spatial aliasing problem is to include additional data from PASSCAL experiments with densely-spaced stations that were deployed as the Transportable Array rolled across North America.

  14. Detection and Validation of QTL Affecting Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance in Rainbow Trout Using Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guangtu; Liu, Sixin; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Rexroad, Caird E.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. Using microsatellite markers in a genome scan, we previously detected significant and suggestive QTL affecting phenotypic variation in survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of BCWD in rainbow trout. In this study, we performed selective genotyping of SNPs from restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequence data from two pedigreed families (2009070 and 2009196) to validate the major QTL from the previous work and to detect new QTL. The use of RAD SNPs in the genome scans increased the number of mapped markers from ~300 to ~5,000 per family. The significant QTL detected in the microsatellites scan on chromosome Omy8 in family 2009070 was validated explaining up to 58% of the phenotypic variance in that family, and in addition, a second QTL was also detected on Omy8. Two novel QTL on Omy11 and 14 were also detected, and the previously suggestive QTL on Omy1, 7 and 25 were also validated in family 2009070. In family 2009196, the microsatellite significant QTL on Omy6 and 12 were validated and a new QTL on Omy8 was detected, but none of the previously detected suggestive QTL were validated. The two Omy8 QTL from family 2009070 and the Omy12 QTL from family 2009196 were found to be co-localized with handling and confinement stress response QTL that our group has previously identified in a separate pedigreed family. With the currently available data we cannot determine if the co-localized QTL are the result of genes with pleiotropic effects or a mere physical proximity on the same chromosome segment. The genetic markers linked to BCWD resistance QTL were used to query the scaffolds of the rainbow trout reference genome assembly and the QTL-positive scaffold sequences were found to include 100 positional candidate genes. Several of the candidate genes located on or near the two Omy8 QTL detected in family 2009070 suggest potential linkages between stress response and the regulation of immune response in rainbow trout. PMID:26376182

  15. Comparison of experimental fine-mapping to in silico prediction results of HIV-1 epitopes reveals ongoing need for mapping experiments

    PubMed Central

    Roider, Julia; Meissner, Tim; Kraut, Franziska; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Stirner, Renate; Bogner, Johannes R; Draenert, Rika

    2014-01-01

    Methods for identifying physiologically relevant CD8 T-cell epitopes are critically important not only for the development of T-cell-based vaccines but also for understanding host–pathogen interactions. As experimentally mapping an optimal CD8 T-cell epitope is a tedious procedure, many bioinformatic tools have been developed that predict which peptides bind to a given MHC molecule. We assessed the ability of the CD8 T-cell epitope prediction tools syfpeithi, ctlpred and iedb to foretell nine experimentally mapped optimal HIV-specific epitopes. Randomly – for any of the subjects' HLA type and with any matching score – the optimal epitope was predicted in seven of nine epitopes using syfpeithi, in three of nine epitopes using ctlpred and in all nine of nine epitopes using iedb. The optimal epitope within the three highest ranks was given in four of nine epitopes applying syfpeithi, in two of nine epitopes applying ctlpred and in seven of nine epitopes applying iedb when screening for all of the subjects' HLA types. Knowing the HLA restriction of the peptide of interest improved the ranking of the optimal epitope within the predicted results. Epitopes restricted by common HLA alleles were more likely to be predicted than those restricted by uncommon HLA alleles. Epitopes with aberrant lengths compared with the usual HLA-class I nonamers were most likely not predicted. Application of epitope prediction tools together with literature searches for already described optimal epitopes narrows down the possibilities of optimal epitopes within a screening peptide of interest. However, in our opinion, the actual fine-mapping of a CD8 T-cell epitope cannot yet be replaced. PMID:24724694

  16. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and uniparental disomy 11p: fine mapping of the recombination breakpoints and evaluation of several techniques.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Valeria; Meneses, Heloisa N M; Fernández, Luis; Martínez-Glez, Victor; Gracia-Bouthelier, Ricardo; F Fraga, Mario; Guillén, Encarna; Nevado, Julián; Gean, Esther; Martorell, Loreto; Marfil, Victoria Esteban; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2011-04-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a phenotypically and genotypically heterogeneous overgrowth syndrome characterized by somatic overgrowth, macroglossia and abdominal wall defects. Other usual findings are hemihyperplasia, embryonal tumours, adrenocortical cytomegaly, ear anomalies, visceromegaly, renal abnormalities, neonatal hypoglycaemia, cleft palate, polydactyly and a positive family history. BWS is a complex, multigenic disorder associated, in up to 90% of patients, with alteration in the expression or function of one or more genes in the 11p15.5 imprinted gene cluster. There are several molecular anomalies associated with BWS and the large proportion of cases, about 85%, is sporadic and karyotypically normal. One of the major categories of BWS molecular alteration (10-20% of cases) is represented by mosaic paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD), namely patients with two paternally derived copies of chromosome 11p15 and no maternal contribution for that. In these patients, in addition to the effects of IGF2 overexpression, a decreased level of the maternally expressed gene CDKN1C may contribute to the BWS phenotype. In this paper, we reviewed a series of nine patients with BWS because of pUPD using several methods with the aim to evaluate the percentage of mosaicism, the methylation status at both loci, the extension of the pUPD at the short arm and the breakpoints of recombination. Fine mapping of mitotic recombination breakpoints by single-nucleotide polymorphism-array in individuals with UPD and fine estimation of epigenetic defects will provide a basis for understanding the aetiology of BWS, allowing more accurate prognostic predictions and facilitating management and surveillance of individuals with this disorder. PMID:21248736

  17. Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome and uniparental disomy 11p: fine mapping of the recombination breakpoints and evaluation of several techniques

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Valeria; Meneses, Heloisa N M; Fernández, Luis; Martínez-Glez, Victor; Gracia-Bouthelier, Ricardo; F Fraga, Mario; Guillén, Encarna; Nevado, Julián; Gean, Esther; Martorell, Loreto; Marfil, Victoria Esteban; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a phenotypically and genotypically heterogeneous overgrowth syndrome characterized by somatic overgrowth, macroglossia and abdominal wall defects. Other usual findings are hemihyperplasia, embryonal tumours, adrenocortical cytomegaly, ear anomalies, visceromegaly, renal abnormalities, neonatal hypoglycaemia, cleft palate, polydactyly and a positive family history. BWS is a complex, multigenic disorder associated, in up to 90% of patients, with alteration in the expression or function of one or more genes in the 11p15.5 imprinted gene cluster. There are several molecular anomalies associated with BWS and the large proportion of cases, about 85%, is sporadic and karyotypically normal. One of the major categories of BWS molecular alteration (10–20% of cases) is represented by mosaic paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD), namely patients with two paternally derived copies of chromosome 11p15 and no maternal contribution for that. In these patients, in addition to the effects of IGF2 overexpression, a decreased level of the maternally expressed gene CDKN1C may contribute to the BWS phenotype. In this paper, we reviewed a series of nine patients with BWS because of pUPD using several methods with the aim to evaluate the percentage of mosaicism, the methylation status at both loci, the extension of the pUPD at the short arm and the breakpoints of recombination. Fine mapping of mitotic recombination breakpoints by single-nucleotide polymorphism-array in individuals with UPD and fine estimation of epigenetic defects will provide a basis for understanding the aetiology of BWS, allowing more accurate prognostic predictions and facilitating management and surveillance of individuals with this disorder. PMID:21248736

  18. Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J.; Schurmann, Claudia; Schramm, Katharina; Kettunen, Johannes; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Li, Yang; Fu, Jingyuan; Karjalainen, Juha; Platteel, Mathieu; Visschedijk, Marijn; Weersma, Rinse K.; Kasela, Silva; Milani, Lili; Tserel, Liina; Peterson, Pärt; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Homuth, Georg; Petersmann, Astrid; Lorbeer, Roberto; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; Wood, Andrew R.; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Knight, Julian C.; Melchiotti, Rossella; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Wang, De Yun; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan H.; Rotzschke, Olaf; Makino, Seiko; Salomaa, Veikko; Strauch, Konstantin; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Metspalu, Andres; Wijmenga, Cisca; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE) meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn’s disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus. PMID:25955312

  19. Fine genetic mapping of the Hyp mutation on mouse chromosome X

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lisheng; Desbarats, M.; Cornibert, S.; Malo, D.; Ecarot, B.

    1996-03-01

    The hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse is the murine homolog of hypophosphatemic vitamin-D-resistant rickets (HYP) in human. Despite extensive investigations in the Hyp mouse, the pathophysiology of this X-linked dominant disorder remains unclear. As a first step toward cloning the Hyp gene, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map in the vicinity of the Hyp locus using two independent backcross panels segregating the Hyp mutation, one generated from an interspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus spretus and the other from an intrasubspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus musculus castaneus. Linkage analyses in 1101 backcross progeny using a total of 23 DNA markers favor the following gene order from the centromere: DXMit13-(DXMit11, DXMit34)-(DXMit36, Alas2)-(Hyp, DXMit80)-DXMit98-(DXMit28, DXMit33, DXMit70)-Pdhal-DXMit20. This study has localized Hyp to a region of approximately 1 cM flanked by the proximal markers DXMit36 and Alas2 and the distal marker DSMit98. One microsatellite marker, DXMit80, was found to be very tightly linked to Hyp, as it was nonrecombinant with Hyp among all the progeny of both backcrosses corresponding to 1101 meioses. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Multiple interval mapping for quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, C H; Zeng, Z B; Teasdale, R D

    1999-01-01

    A new statistical method for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL), called multiple interval mapping (MIM), is presented. It uses multiple marker intervals simultaneously to fit multiple putative QTL directly in the model for mapping QTL. The MIM model is based on Cockerham's model for interpreting genetic parameters and the method of maximum likelihood for estimating genetic parameters. With the MIM approach, the precision and power of QTL mapping could be improved. Also, epistasis between QTL, genotypic values of individuals, and heritabilities of quantitative traits can be readily estimated and analyzed. Using the MIM model, a stepwise selection procedure with likelihood ratio test statistic as a criterion is proposed to identify QTL. This MIM method was applied to a mapping data set of radiata pine on three traits: brown cone number, tree diameter, and branch quality scores. Based on the MIM result, seven, six, and five QTL were detected for the three traits, respectively. The detected QTL individually contributed from approximately 1 to 27% of the total genetic variation. Significant epistasis between four pairs of QTL in two traits was detected, and the four pairs of QTL contributed approximately 10.38 and 14.14% of the total genetic variation. The asymptotic variances of QTL positions and effects were also provided to construct the confidence intervals. The estimated heritabilities were 0.5606, 0.5226, and 0. 3630 for the three traits, respectively. With the estimated QTL effects and positions, the best strategy of marker-assisted selection for trait improvement for a specific purpose and requirement can be explored. The MIM FORTRAN program is available on the worldwide web (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/chkao/). PMID:10388834

  1. Characterization and fine mapping of a light-dependent leaf lesion mimic mutant 1 in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ye, Bangquan; Yin, Junjie; Yuan, Can; Zhou, Xiaogang; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Wang, Jichun; Chen, Weilan; Qin, Peng; Ma, Bintian; Wang, Yuping; Li, Shigui; Chen, Xuewei

    2015-12-01

    Plants that spontaneously produce lesion mimics or spots, without any signs of obvious adversity, such as pesticide and mechanical damage, or pathogen infection, are so-called lesion mimic mutants (lmms). In rice, many lmms exhibit enhanced resistance to pathogens, which provides a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying lmms. We isolated a rice light-dependent leaf lesion mimic mutant 1 (llm1). Lesion spots appeared in the leaves of the llm1 mutant at the tillering stage. Furthermore, the mutant llm1 had similar agronomic traits to wild type rice. Trypan blue and diamiobenzidine staining analyses revealed that the lesion spot formation on the llm1 mutant was due to programmed cell death and reactive oxygen species. The chloroplasts were severely damaged in the llm1 mutant, suggesting that chloroplast damage was associated with the formation of lesion spots in llm1. More importantly, llm1 exhibited enhanced resistance to bacterial blight pathogens within increased expression of pathogenesis related genes (PRs). Using a map-based cloning approach, we delimited the LLM1 locus to a 121-kb interval between two simple sequence repeat markers, RM17470 and RM17473, on chromosome 4. We sequenced the candidate genes on the interval and found that a base mutation had substituted adenine phosphate for thymine in the last exon of LOC_Os04g52130, which led to an amino acid change (Asp(388) to Val) in the llm1 mutant. Our investigation showed that the putative coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) encoded by LOC_Os04g52130 was produced by LLM1 and that amino acid Asp(388) was essential for CPOX function. Our study provides the basis for further investigations into the mechanism underlying lesion mimic initiation associated with LLM1. PMID:26410574

  2. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Painter, Jodie N; O'Mara, Tracy A; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W; Webb, Penelope M; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G; Nyholt, Dale R; Henders, Anjali K; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Renner, Stefan P; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Ekici, Arif B; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Stacey L; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-03-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression. PMID:25378557

  3. Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Jodie N.; O'Mara, Tracy A.; Batra, Jyotsna; Cheng, Timothy; Lose, Felicity A.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Ahmed, Shahana; Ferguson, Kaltin; Healey, Catherine S.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Hillman, Kristine M.; Walpole, Carina; Moya, Leire; Pollock, Pamela; Jones, Angela; Howarth, Kimberley; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; De Polanco, Ma. Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Santos, Erika; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Montgomery, Grant W.; Webb, Penelope M.; Scott, Rodney J.; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Martin, Nicholas G.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Henders, Anjali K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Renner, Stefan P.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Lambrechts, Diether; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Winterhoff, Boris; Dowdy, Sean C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Teoman, Attila; Salvesen, Helga B.; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S.; Werner, Henrica M.J.; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Tzortzatos, Gerasimos; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Ruebner, Matthias; Johnson, Nicola; Peto, Julian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Moisse, Matthieu; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Orr, Nicholas; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Chen, Zhihua; Shah, Mitul; French, Juliet D.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10?14, odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82–0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression. PMID:25378557

  4. QTL meta-analysis in Arabidopsis reveals an interaction between leaf senescence and resource allocation to seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chardon, Fabien; Jasinski, Sophie; Durandet, Monique; Lécureuil, Alain; Soulay, Fabienne; Bedu, Magali; Guerche, Philippe; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Sequential and monocarpic senescence are observed at vegetative and reproductive stages, respectively. Both facilitate nitrogen (N) remobilization and control the duration of carbon (C) fixation. Genetic and environmental factors control N and C resource allocation to seeds. Studies of natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed differences between accessions for leaf senescence phenotypes, seed N and C contents, and N remobilization efficiency-related traits. Here, a quantitative genetics approach was used to gain a better understanding of seed filling regulation in relation to leaf senescence and resource allocation. For that purpose, three Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line populations (Ct-1×Col-0, Cvi-0×Col-0, Bur-0×Col-0) were used to map QTL (quantitative trait loci) for ten traits related to senescence, resource allocation, and seed filling. The use of common markers across the three different maps allowed direct comparisons of the positions of the detected QTL in a single consensus map. QTL meta-analysis was then used to identify interesting regions (metaQTL) where QTL for several traits co-localized. MetaQTL were compared with positions of candidate genes known to be involved in senescence processes and flowering time. Finally, investigation of the correlation between yield and seed N concentration in the three populations suggests that leaf senescence disrupts the negative correlation generally observed between these two traits. PMID:24692652

  5. Identification, Replication, and Fine-Mapping of Loci Associated with Adult Height in Individuals of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Bing; Tayo, Bamidele; Mathias, Rasika A.; Ding, Jingzhong; Nalls, Michael A.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Adoue, Véronique; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Atwood, Larry; Bandera, Elisa V.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Britton, Angela; Casey, Graham; Chanock, Stephen J.; Demerath, Ellen; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Fox, Caroline; Harris, Tamara B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Craig; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lohman, Kurt; Liu, Jiankang; Millikan, Robert C.; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; North, Kari E.; Nyante, Sarah; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Papanicolaou, George; Patel, Sanjay; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Press, Michael F.; Redline, Susan; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rotimi, Charles; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Salako, Babatunde; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stram, Alex H.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Thun, Michael J.; Witte, John S.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Liu, Yongmei; Becker, Diane M.; Cooper, Richard S.; Pastinen, Tomi; Henderson, Brian E.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lettre, Guillaume; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Adult height is a classic polygenic trait of high heritability (h2 ?0.8). More than 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified mostly in populations of European descent, are associated with height. These variants convey modest effects and explain ?10% of the variance in height. Discovery efforts in other populations, while limited, have revealed loci for height not previously implicated in individuals of European ancestry. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results for adult height in 20,427 individuals of African ancestry with replication in up to 16,436 African Americans. We found two novel height loci (Xp22-rs12393627, P?=?3.4×10?12 and 2p14-rs4315565, P?=?1.2×10?8). As a group, height associations discovered in European-ancestry samples replicate in individuals of African ancestry (P?=?1.7×10?4 for overall replication). Fine-mapping of the European height loci in African-ancestry individuals showed an enrichment of SNPs that are associated with expression of nearby genes when compared to the index European height SNPs (P<0.01). Our results highlight the utility of genetic studies in non-European populations to understand the etiology of complex human diseases and traits. PMID:21998595

  6. Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression.

    PubMed

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Saunders, Edward J; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Dadaev, Tokhir; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Ross-Adams, Helen; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Halim, Silvia; Russell, Roslin; Russel, Roslin; Dunning, Alison M; Luccarini, Craig; Dennis, Joe; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Muir, Ken; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Campa, Daniele; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Dan; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Dicks, Ed; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Bojesen, Stig E; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2013-06-15

    Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 5p15 and multiple cancer types have been reported. We have previously shown evidence for a strong association between prostate cancer (PrCa) risk and rs2242652 at 5p15, intronic in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene that encodes TERT. To comprehensively evaluate the association between genetic variation across this region and PrCa, we performed a fine-mapping analysis by genotyping 134 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array or Sequenom MassArray iPlex, followed by imputation of 1094 SNPs in 22 301 PrCa cases and 22 320 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis identified four signals in the promoter or intronic regions of TERT that independently associated with PrCa risk. Gene expression analysis of normal prostate tissue showed evidence that SNPs within one of these regions also associated with TERT expression, providing a potential mechanism for predisposition to disease. PMID:23535824

  7. An example of association mapping in Cacao.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping and genomic selection have become important methodologies in perennial crop breeding improvement programs for accelerating breeding efforts and increasing the efficiency of selection. They are good alternatives to the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping approach.The ...

  8. QTL Mapping of Whitefly Resistance in Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is one of the most damaging insects attacking crops in the world. In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], in addition to causing plant stress and reduced seed size, they also can be vectors of viruses, e.g. soybean crinkle mosaic, and soybean dwarf mosaic. Resistance...

  9. Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping of Meat Quality QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies based on linkage analysis have identified broad areas in the bovine genome associated with meat quality. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analyses have the potential to identify narrower regions and point towards candidate genes. Tenderness and marbling were chosen to be evaluated in a ...

  10. Mapping Drought QTL in Tall Fescue Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue [Lolium arundinacetum (Schreb.) Darbysh.] growth and persistence are adversely affected by the hot-dry summers in the Southern Great Plains (Hopkins, 2005). Both forage yield and drought tolerance are difficult to select for because of large genotype-by-environment interactions. The ob...

  11. Unravelling enzymatic discoloration in potato through a combined approach of candidate genes, QTL, and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Celis-Gamboa, Carolina; de Vos, C. H. Ric; America, Twan; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bachem, Christian W. B.

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic discoloration (ED) of potato tubers was investigated in an attempt to unravel the underlying genetic factors. Both enzyme and substrate concentration have been reported to influence the degree of discoloration and as such this trait can be regarded as polygenic. The diploid mapping population C × E, consisting of 249 individuals, was assayed for the degree of ED and levels of chlorogenic acid and tyrosine. Using this data, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed. Three QTLs for ED have been found on parental chromosomes C3, C8, E1, and E8. For chlorogenic acid a QTL has been identified on C2 and for tyrosine levels, a QTL has been detected on C8. None of the QTLs overlap, indicating the absence of genetic correlations between these components underlying ED, in contrast to earlier reports in literature. An obvious candidate gene for the QTL for ED on Chromosome 8 is polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was previously mapped on chromosome 8. With gene-specific primers for PPO gene POT32 a CAPS marker was developed. Three different alleles (POT32-1, -2, and -3) could be discriminated. The segregating POT32 alleles were used to map the POT32 CAPS marker and QTL analysis was redone, showing that POT32 coincides with the QTL peak. A clear correlation between allele combinations and degree of discoloration was observed. In addition, analysis of POT32 gene expression in a subset of genotypes indicated a correlation between the level of gene expression and allele composition. On average, genotypes having two copies of allele 1 had both the highest degree of discoloration as well as the highest level of POT32 gene expression. PMID:17492422

  12. Unravelling enzymatic discoloration in potato through a combined approach of candidate genes, QTL, and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Werij, Jeroen S; Kloosterman, Bjorn; Celis-Gamboa, Carolina; de Vos, C H Ric; America, Twan; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2007-07-01

    Enzymatic discoloration (ED) of potato tubers was investigated in an attempt to unravel the underlying genetic factors. Both enzyme and substrate concentration have been reported to influence the degree of discoloration and as such this trait can be regarded as polygenic. The diploid mapping population C x E, consisting of 249 individuals, was assayed for the degree of ED and levels of chlorogenic acid and tyrosine. Using this data, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed. Three QTLs for ED have been found on parental chromosomes C3, C8, E1, and E8. For chlorogenic acid a QTL has been identified on C2 and for tyrosine levels, a QTL has been detected on C8. None of the QTLs overlap, indicating the absence of genetic correlations between these components underlying ED, in contrast to earlier reports in literature. An obvious candidate gene for the QTL for ED on Chromosome 8 is polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was previously mapped on chromosome 8. With gene-specific primers for PPO gene POT32 a CAPS marker was developed. Three different alleles (POT32-1, -2, and -3) could be discriminated. The segregating POT32 alleles were used to map the POT32 CAPS marker and QTL analysis was redone, showing that POT32 coincides with the QTL peak. A clear correlation between allele combinations and degree of discoloration was observed. In addition, analysis of POT32 gene expression in a subset of genotypes indicated a correlation between the level of gene expression and allele composition. On average, genotypes having two copies of allele 1 had both the highest degree of discoloration as well as the highest level of POT32 gene expression. PMID:17492422

  13. Identification, replication, and functional fine-mapping of expression quantitative trait loci in primary human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Federico; Cooper, Gregory M; Stanaway, Ian B; Gamazon, Eric R; Smith, Joshua D; Mirkov, Snezana; Ramirez, Jacqueline; Liu, Wanqing; Lin, Yvonne S; Moloney, Cliona; Aldred, Shelly Force; Trinklein, Nathan D; Schuetz, Erin; Nickerson, Deborah A; Thummel, Ken E; Rieder, Mark J; Rettie, Allan E; Ratain, Mark J; Cox, Nancy J; Brown, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of expression quantitative trait loci ("eQTLs") can help to unravel genetic contributions to complex traits. We identified genetic determinants of human liver gene expression variation using two independent collections of primary tissue profiled with Agilent (n?=?206) and Illumina (n?=?60) expression arrays and Illumina SNP genotyping (550K), and we also incorporated data from a published study (n?=?266). We found that ?30% of SNP-expression correlations in one study failed to replicate in either of the others, even at thresholds yielding high reproducibility in simulations, and we quantified numerous factors affecting reproducibility. Our data suggest that drug exposure, clinical descriptors, and unknown factors associated with tissue ascertainment and analysis have substantial effects on gene expression and that controlling for hidden confounding variables significantly increases replication rate. Furthermore, we found that reproducible eQTL SNPs were heavily enriched near gene starts and ends, and subsequently resequenced the promoters and 3'UTRs for 14 genes and tested the identified haplotypes using luciferase assays. For three genes, significant haplotype-specific in vitro functional differences correlated directly with expression levels, suggesting that many bona fide eQTLs result from functional variants that can be mechanistically isolated in a high-throughput fashion. Finally, given our study design, we were able to discover and validate hundreds of liver eQTLs. Many of these relate directly to complex traits for which liver-specific analyses are likely to be relevant, and we identified dozens of potential connections with disease-associated loci. These included previously characterized eQTL contributors to diabetes, drug response, and lipid levels, and they suggest novel candidates such as a role for NOD2 expression in leprosy risk and C2orf43 in prostate cancer. In general, the work presented here will be valuable for future efforts to precisely identify and functionally characterize genetic contributions to a variety of complex traits. PMID:21637794

  14. qSD7-1 is the first dormancy QTL cloned from weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We answered a long-standing question about if the same or linked genes control the association between seed dormancy and grain color in grasses by map-based cloning a cluster of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for dormancy (qSD7-1) and pericarp color (qPC7 or Rc) from rice. A 2-cM region encompassing ...

  15. Identification of QTL for Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) in Soybean Plant Introduction 194639

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia stem rot of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a difficult disease to manage, although some gains have been made through breeding for quantitative resistance. The objective was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling partial ...

  16. Little loss of information due to unknown phase for fine-scale linkage-disequilibrium mapping with single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotype data.

    PubMed

    Morris, A P; Whittaker, J C; Balding, D J

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of a simulation study that indicate that true haplotypes at multiple, tightly linked loci often provide little extra information for linkage-disequilibrium fine mapping, compared with the information provided by corresponding genotypes, provided that an appropriate statistical analysis method is used. In contrast, a two-stage approach to analyzing genotype data, in which haplotypes are inferred and then analyzed as if they were true haplotypes, can lead to a substantial loss of information. The study uses our COLDMAP software for fine mapping, which implements a Markov chain-Monte Carlo algorithm that is based on the shattered coalescent model of genetic heterogeneity at a disease locus. We applied COLDMAP to 100 replicate data sets simulated under each of 18 disease models. Each data set consists of haplotype pairs (diplotypes) for 20 SNPs typed at equal 50-kb intervals in a 950-kb candidate region that includes a single disease locus located at random. The data sets were analyzed in three formats: (1). as true haplotypes; (2). as haplotypes inferred from genotypes using an expectation-maximization algorithm; and (3). as unphased genotypes. On average, true haplotypes gave a 6% gain in efficiency compared with the unphased genotypes, whereas inferring haplotypes from genotypes led to a 20% loss of efficiency, where efficiency is defined in terms of root mean integrated square error of the location of the disease locus. Furthermore, treating inferred haplotypes as if they were true haplotypes leads to considerable overconfidence in estimates, with nominal 50% credibility intervals achieving, on average, only 19% coverage. We conclude that (1). given appropriate statistical analyses, the costs of directly measuring haplotypes will rarely be justified by a gain in the efficiency of fine mapping and that (2). a two-stage approach of inferring haplotypes followed by a haplotype-based analysis can be very inefficient for fine mapping, compared with an analysis based directly on the genotypes. PMID:15077198

  17. Fine mapping of the chromosome 10q11-q21 linkage region in Alzheimer's disease cases and controls

    PubMed Central

    Fallin, Margaret Daniele; Szymanski, Megan; Wang, Ruihua; Gherman, Adrian; Bassett, Susan S.; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported strong linkage on chromosome 10q in pedigrees transmitting Alzheimer's disease through the mother, overlapping with many significant linkage reports including the largest reported study. Here, we report the most comprehensive fine mapping of this region to date. In a sample of 638 late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) cases and controls including 104 maternal LOAD cases, we genotyped 3,884 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 15.2 Mb. We then used imputations and publicly available data to generate an extended dataset including 4,329 SNPs for 1,209 AD cases and 839 controls in the same region. Further, we screened eight genes in this region for rare alleles in 283 individuals by nucleotide sequencing, and we tested for possible monoallelic expression as it might underlie our maternal parent of origin linkage. We excluded the possibility of multiple rare coding risk variants for these genes and monoallelic expression when we could test for it. One SNP, rs10824310 in the PRKG1 gene, showed study-wide significant association without a parent of origin effect, but the effect size estimate is not of sufficient magnitude to explain the linkage, and no association is observed in an independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) report. Further, no causative variants were identified though sequencing. Analysis of cases with maternal disease origin pointed to a few regions of interest that included the genes PRKG1 and PCDH15 and an intergenic interval of 200 Kb. It is likely that non-transcribed rare variants or other mechanisms involving these genomic regions underlie the observed linkage and parent of origin effect. Acquiring additional support and clarifying the mechanisms of such involvement is important for AD and other complex disorder genetics research. PMID:20182759

  18. Fine-structure mapping of the complex locus Odc-rs5 relative to Igk and distal loci.

    PubMed

    Richards-Smith, B A; Elliott, R W

    1992-01-01

    Odc-rs5 was previously identified as a complex locus closely linked to the Igk complex on mouse Chromosome (Chr) 6 and comprising at least five copies of a sequence related to the mRNA encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in the genomes of mice of some inbred strains and at least seven copies in others (Richards-Smith and Elliott, Mammalian Genome 2: 215, 1992). In the present study, Odc-rs5 was shown to be composed of at least seven copies of the ODC sequence in both the Odc-rs5a and Odc-rs5b haplotypes. Based upon the distribution of DNA restriction fragments (RFs) that had previously been associated with Odc-rs5a or Odc-rs5b among 42 mice of inbred laboratory strains having various haplotypes at Igk and in mice of two congenic strains [B6.PL-Ly-2a, Ly-3a(75NS)/Cy and B6.PL-Ly-2a,Ly-3a(85NS)/Cy] and a backcross-derived stock (NAK) known to be recombinant within Igk, a fine structure map of Odc-rs5 was deduced relative to Igk and more distal loci. Odc-rs5-derived RFs were located to three distinct regions within and/or distal to Igk and to a fourth site between (Ly-3, Ly-2) and Raf-1. Additionally, DNAs from 19 mice of inbred strains and random-bred stocks derived from wild progenitors trapped at various locations were analyzed and found to exhibit an unexpected variety of combinations of RFs associated with the two Odc-rs5 haplotypes most frequently observed among inbred laboratory strains of mice. PMID:1362101

  19. Fine Mapping and Functional Studies of Risk Variants for Type 1 Diabetes at Chromosome 16p13.13

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, M. Joseph; Pitsillides, Achilleas; Pickin, Rebecca; Mika, Matthew; Keene, Keith L.; Hou, Xuanlin; Mychaleckyj, Josyf; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the chromosomal region 16p13.13 have been previously associated with risk for several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. To identify and localize specific risk variants for type 1 diabetes in this region and understand the mechanism of their action, we resequenced a 455-kb region in type 1 diabetic patients and unaffected control subjects, identifying 93 novel variants. A panel of 939 SNPs that included 46 of these novel variants was genotyped in 3,070 multiplex families with type 1 diabetes. Forty-eight SNPs, all located in CLEC16A, provided a statistically significant association (P < 5.32 × 10?5) with disease, with rs34306440 being most significantly associated (P = 5.74 × 10?6). The panel of SNPs used for fine mapping was also tested for association with transcript levels for each of the four genes in the region in B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Significant associations were observed only for transcript levels of DEXI, a gene with unknown function. We examined the relationship between the odds ratio for type 1 diabetes and the magnitude of the effect of DEXI transcript levels for each SNP in the region. Among SNPs significantly associated with type 1 diabetes, the common allele conferred an increased risk for disease and corresponded to lower DEXI expression. Our results suggest that the primary mechanism by which genetic variation at CLEC16A contributes to the risk for type 1 diabetes is through reduced expression of DEXI. PMID:25008175

  20. eQED: an efficient method for interpreting eQTL associations using protein networks

    PubMed Central

    Suthram, Silpa; Beyer, Andreas; Karp, Richard M; Eldar, Yonina; Ideker, Trey

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) is an emerging technique in which individuals are genotyped across a panel of genetic markers and, simultaneously, phenotyped using DNA microarrays. Because of the spacing of markers and linkage disequilibrium, each marker may be near many genes making it difficult to finely map which of these genes are the causal factors responsible for the observed changes in the downstream expression. To address this challenge, we present an efficient method for prioritizing candidate genes at a locus. This approach, called ‘eQTL electrical diagrams' (eQED), integrates eQTLs with protein interaction networks by modeling the two data sets as a wiring diagram of current sources and resistors. eQED achieved a 79% accuracy in recovering a reference set of regulator–target pairs in yeast, which is significantly higher than the performance of three competing methods. eQED also annotates 368 protein–protein interactions with their directionality of information flow with an accuracy of approximately 75%. PMID:18319721

  1. Extent of QTL Reuse During Repeated Phenotypic Divergence of Sympatric Threespine Stickleback.

    PubMed

    Conte, Gina L; Arnegard, Matthew E; Best, Jacob; Chan, Yingguang Frank; Jones, Felicity C; Kingsley, David M; Schluter, Dolph; Peichel, Catherine L

    2015-11-01

    How predictable is the genetic basis of phenotypic adaptation? Answering this question begins by estimating the repeatability of adaptation at the genetic level. Here, we provide a comprehensive estimate of the repeatability of the genetic basis of adaptive phenotypic evolution in a natural system. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to discover genomic regions controlling a large number of morphological traits that have diverged in parallel between pairs of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus species complex) in Paxton and Priest lakes, British Columbia. We found that nearly half of QTL affected the same traits in the same direction in both species pairs. Another 40% influenced a parallel phenotypic trait in one lake but not the other. The remaining 10% of QTL had phenotypic effects in opposite directions in the two species pairs. Similarity in the proportional contributions of all QTL to parallel trait differences was about 0.4. Surprisingly, QTL reuse was unrelated to phenotypic effect size. Our results indicate that repeated use of the same genomic regions is a pervasive feature of parallel phenotypic adaptation, at least in sticklebacks. Identifying the causes of this pattern would aid prediction of the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution. PMID:26384359

  2. Mapping multiple disease resistance genes using a barley mapping population evaluated in Peru, Mexico, and the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a well-characterized barley mapping population to determine if barley stripe rust (BSR) resistance QTL mapped in Mexico and the USA were effective against a reported new race in Peru. Essentially the same resistance QTL were detected using data from each of the three environments, indicating...

  3. Resistance to Gray Leaf Spot of Maize: Genetic Architecture and Mechanisms Elucidated through Nested Association Mapping and Near-Isogenic Line Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Jacqueline M.; Poland, Jesse A.; Benson, Brent M.; Stromberg, Erik L.; Nelson, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray leaf spot (GLS), caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis and Cercospora zeina, is one of the most important diseases of maize worldwide. The pathogen has a necrotrophic lifestyle and no major genes are known for GLS. Quantitative resistance, although poorly understood, is important for GLS management. We used genetic mapping to refine understanding of the genetic architecture of GLS resistance and to develop hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying quantitative disease resistance (QDR) loci. Nested association mapping (NAM) was used to identify 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for QDR to GLS, including seven novel QTL, each of which demonstrated allelic series with significant effects above and below the magnitude of the B73 reference allele. Alleles at three QTL, qGLS1.04, qGLS2.09, and qGLS4.05, conferred disease reductions of greater than 10%. Interactions between loci were detected for three pairs of loci, including an interaction between iqGLS4.05 and qGLS7.03. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) were developed to confirm and fine-map three of the 16 QTL, and to develop hypotheses regarding mechanisms of resistance. qGLS1.04 was fine-mapped from an interval of 27.0 Mb to two intervals of 6.5 Mb and 5.2 Mb, consistent with the hypothesis that multiple genes underlie highly significant QTL identified by NAM. qGLS2.09, which was also associated with maturity (days to anthesis) and with resistance to southern leaf blight, was narrowed to a 4-Mb interval. The distance between major leaf veins was strongly associated with resistance to GLS at qGLS4.05. NILs for qGLS1.04 were treated with the C. zeae-maydis toxin cercosporin to test the role of host-specific toxin in QDR. Cercosporin exposure increased expression of a putative flavin-monooxygenase (FMO) gene, a candidate detoxification-related gene underlying qGLS1.04. This integrated approach to confirming QTL and characterizing the potential underlying mechanisms advances the understanding of QDR and will facilitate the development of resistant varieties. PMID:25764179

  4. vol. 159, supplement the american naturalist march 2002 Genetic Mapping in Hybrid Zones

    E-print Network

    Rieseberg, Loren

    vol. 159, supplement the american naturalist march 2002 Genetic Mapping in Hybrid Zones Loren H recombinant populations of sufficient size for QTL mapping. Natural hybrid zones contain recombinant to these problems. For studies of speciation, hybrid zones offer the possibility of map- ping QTL simultaneously

  5. QTL for fibre-related traits in grain × sweet sorghum as a tool for the enhancement of sorghum as a biomass crop.

    PubMed

    Shiringani, Amukelani L; Friedt, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Compared to maize and temperate grasses, sorghum has received less attention in terms of improving cell wall components. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) with main effects, epistatic and pleiotropic effects along with QTL × environment (QE) interactions controlling fibre-related traits in sorghum. Neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, fresh leaf mass, stripped stalk mass, dry stalk mass, fresh biomass and dry biomass were analysed from a population of 188 grain × sweet sorghum recombinant inbred lines. A genetic map consisting of 157 DNA markers was constructed, and QTL were detected using composite interval mapping (CIM). CIM detected more than 5 additive QTL per trait explaining 7.1-24.7% of the phenotypic variation. Abundant co-localization of these QTL was observed across all chromosomes, and the highest cluster was identified on chromosome 6. Searching for candidate genes using the confidence interval of our QTL clusters reveals that these clusters might comprise a set of genes that are tightly linked. Some QTL showed multiple effects; however, the allele for each trait was favouring the parent with the increasing effect. QE interactions were observed for QTL showing multiple effects. Additive × additive interaction was observed for 7 out of 10 traits, indicating the importance of epistatic analysis. However, the phenotypic variation explained by digenic interactions was lower compared to the individual QTL. Our results indicate that various genetic components contribute to fibre-related traits and should be considered during the enhancement of sorghum for lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:21739141

  6. High-Throughput Phenotyping to Detect Drought Tolerance QTL in Wild Barley Introgression Lines

    PubMed Central

    Honsdorf, Nora; March, Timothy John; Berger, Bettina; Tester, Mark; Pillen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Drought is one of the most severe stresses, endangering crop yields worldwide. In order to select drought tolerant genotypes, access to exotic germplasm and efficient phenotyping protocols are needed. In this study the high-throughput phenotyping platform “The Plant Accelerator”, Adelaide, Australia, was used to screen a set of 47 juvenile (six week old) wild barley introgression lines (S42ILs) for drought stress responses. The kinetics of growth development was evaluated under early drought stress and well watered treatments. High correlation (r?=?0.98) between image based biomass estimates and actual biomass was demonstrated, and the suitability of the system to accurately and non-destructively estimate biomass was validated. Subsequently, quantitative trait loci (QTL) were located, which contributed to the genetic control of growth under drought stress. In total, 44 QTL for eleven out of 14 investigated traits were mapped, which for example controlled growth rate and water use efficiency. The correspondence of those QTL with QTL previously identified in field trials is shown. For instance, six out of eight QTL controlling plant height were also found in previous field and glasshouse studies with the same introgression lines. This indicates that phenotyping juvenile plants may assist in predicting adult plant performance. In addition, favorable wild barley alleles for growth and biomass parameters were detected, for instance, a QTL that increased biomass by approximately 36%. In particular, introgression line S42IL-121 revealed improved growth under drought stress compared to the control Scarlett. The introgression line showed a similar behavior in previous field experiments, indicating that S42IL-121 may be an attractive donor for breeding of drought tolerant barley cultivars. PMID:24823485

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Thyroid hormone responsive QTL and the evolution

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Thyroid hormone responsive QTL and the evolution of paedomorphic salamanders SR thyroid hormone (TH) to rescue metamorphic phenotypes in paedomorphic salamanders and then identified.41; published online 1 August 2012 Keywords: Ambystoma; paedomorphosis; evolution; QTL; thyroid hormone

  8. Breed relationships facilitate fine-mapping studies: A 7.8-kb deletion cosegregates with Collie eye anomaly across multiple dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.; Kukekova, Anna V.; Akey, Dayna T.; Goldstein, Orly; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Baysac, Kathleen C.; Mosher, Dana S.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2007-01-01

    The features of modern dog breeds that increase the ease of mapping common diseases, such as reduced heterogeneity and extensive linkage disequilibrium, may also increase the difficulty associated with fine mapping and identifying causative mutations. One way to address this problem is by combining data from multiple breeds segregating the same trait after initial linkage has been determined. The multibreed approach increases the number of potentially informative recombination events and reduces the size of the critical haplotype by taking advantage of shortened linkage disequilibrium distances found across breeds. In order to identify breeds that likely share a trait inherited from the same ancestral source, we have used cluster analysis to divide 132 breeds of dog into five primary breed groups. We then use the multibreed approach to fine-map Collie eye anomaly (cea), a complex disorder of ocular development that was initially mapped to a 3.9-cM region on canine chromosome 37. Combined genotypes from affected individuals from four breeds of a single breed group significantly narrowed the candidate gene region to a 103-kb interval spanning only four genes. Sequence analysis revealed that all affected dogs share a homozygous deletion of 7.8 kb in the NHEJ1 gene. This intronic deletion spans a highly conserved binding domain to which several developmentally important proteins bind. This work both establishes that the primary cea mutation arose as a single disease allele in a common ancestor of herding breeds as well as highlights the value of comparative population analysis for refining regions of linkage. PMID:17916641

  9. Functional screening of an asthma QTL in YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Symula, Derek J.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ueda, Yukihiko; Denefle, Patrice; Stevens, Mary E.; Wang, Zhi-En; Locksley, Richard; Rubin, Edward M.

    1999-07-02

    While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. To screen for genes contributing to an asthma QTL mapped to human chromosome 5q33, the authors characterized a panel of large-insert 5q31 transgenics based on studies demonstrating that altering gene dosage frequently affects quantitative phenotypes normally influenced by that gene. This panel of human YAC transgenics, propagating a one megabase interva2048 chromosome 5q31 containing 23 genes, was screened for quantitative changes in several asthma-associated phenotypes. Multiple independent transgenic lines with altered IgE response to antigen treatment shared a 180 kb region containing 5 genes, including human interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 13 (IL13), which induce IgE class switching in B cells5. Further analysis of these mice and mice transgenic for only murine Il4 and Il13 demonstrated that moderate changes in murine Il4 and Il13 expression affect asthma-associated phenotypes in vivo. This functional screen of large-insert transgenics enabled them to sift through multiple genes in the 5q3 asthma QTL without prior consideration of assumed individual gene function and identify genes that influence the QTL phenotype in vivo.

  10. A major QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Yin, Guangming; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2010-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, the conidial form of Gibberella zeae, is the causal fungal pathogen responsible for Gibberella stalk rot of maize. Using a BC(1)F(1) backcross mapping population derived from a cross between '1145' (donor parent, completely resistant) and 'Y331' (recurrent parent, highly susceptible), two quantitative trait loci (QTLs), qRfg1 and qRfg2, conferring resistance to Gibberella stalk rot have been detected. The major QTL qRfg1 was further confirmed in the double haploid, F(2), BC(2)F(1), and BC(3)F(1) populations. Within a qRfg1 confidence interval, single/low-copy bacterial artificial chromosome sequences, anchored expressed sequence tags, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms, were exploited to develop 59 markers to saturate the qRfg1 region. A step by step narrowing-down strategy was adopted to pursue fine mapping of the qRfg1 locus. Recombinants within the qRfg1 region, screened from each backcross generation, were backcrossed to 'Y331' to produce the next backcross progenies. These progenies were individually genotyped and evaluated for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. Significant (or no significant) difference in resistance reactions between homozygous and heterozygous genotypes in backcross progeny suggested presence (or absence) of qRfg1 in '1145' donor fragments. The phenotypes were compared to sizes of donor fragments among recombinants to delimit the qRfg1 region. Sequential fine mapping of BC(4)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations enabled us to progressively refine the qRfg1 locus to a ~500-kb interval flanked by the markers SSR334 and SSR58. Meanwhile, resistance of qRfg1 to Gibberella stalk rot was also investigated in BC(3)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations. Once introgressed into the 'Y331' genome, the qRfg1 locus could steadily enhance the frequency of resistant plants by 32-43%. Hence, the qRfg1 locus was capable of improving maize resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. PMID:20401458

  11. Genetic contribution to iron status: SNPs related to iron deficiency anaemia and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 calcium channel subunit.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; Remacha, Angel; Vaquero, M Pilar; López-Parra, Ana M

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies associate genetic markers with iron- and erythrocyte-related parameters, but few relate them to iron-clinical phenotypes. Novel SNP rs1375515, located in a subunit of the calcium channel gene CACNA2D3, is associated with a higher risk of anaemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of this SNP with iron-related parameters and iron-clinical phenotypes, and to explore the potential role of calcium channel subunit region in iron regulation. Furthermore, we aim to replicate the association of other SNPs reported previously in our population. We tested 45 SNPs selected via systematic review and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 region, with haematological and biochemical traits in 358 women of reproductive age. Multivariate analyses include back-step logistic regression and decision trees. The results replicate the association of SNPs with iron-related traits, and also confirm the protective effect of both A allele of rs1800562 (HFE) and G allele of rs4895441 (HBS1L-MYB). The risk of developing anaemia is increased in reproductive age women carriers of A allele of rs1868505 (CACNA2D3) and/or T allele of rs13194491 (HIST1H2BJ). Association of SNPs from fine mapping with ferritin and serum iron suggests that calcium channels could be a potential pathway for iron uptake in physiological conditions. PMID:26460247

  12. Host genetics and immune control of HIV-1 infection: fine mapping for the extended human MHC region in an African cohort.

    PubMed

    Prentice, H A; Pajewski, N M; He, D; Zhang, K; Brown, E E; Kilembe, W; Allen, S; Hunter, E; Kaslow, R A; Tang, J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci encoding human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have allelic variants unequivocally associated with differential immune control of HIV-1 infection. Fine mapping based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the extended MHC (xMHC) region is expected to reveal causal or novel factors and to justify a search for functional mechanisms. We have tested the utility of a custom fine-mapping platform (the ImmunoChip) for 172 HIV-1 seroconverters (SCs) and 449 seroprevalent individuals (SPs) from Lusaka, Zambia, with a focus on more than 6400 informative xMHC SNPs. When conditioned on HLA and nongenetic factors previously associated with HIV-1 viral load (VL) in the study cohort, penalized approaches (HyperLasso models) identified an intergenic SNP (rs3094626 between RPP21 and HLA-E) and an intronic SNP (rs3134931 in NOTCH4) as novel correlates of early set-point VL in SCs. The minor allele of rs2857114 (downstream from HLA-DOB) was an unfavorable factor in SPs. Joint models based on demographic features, HLA alleles and the newly identified SNP variants could explain 29% and 15% of VL variance in SCs and SPs, respectively. These findings and bioinformatics strongly suggest that both classic and nonclassic MHC genes deserve further investigation, especially in Africans with relatively short haplotype blocks. PMID:24784026

  13. High-density genetic map construction and identification of a locus controlling weeping trait in an ornamental woody plant (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qixiang; Cheng, Tangren; Yang, Weiru; Pan, Huitang; Zhong, Junjun; Huang, Long; Liu, Enze

    2015-06-01

    High-density genetic map is a valuable tool for fine mapping locus controlling a specific trait especially for perennial woody plants. In this study, we firstly constructed a high-density genetic map of mei (Prunus mume) using SLAF markers, developed by specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq). The linkage map contains 8,007 markers, with a mean marker distance of 0.195 cM, making it the densest genetic map for the genus Prunus. Though weeping trees are used worldwide as landscape plants, little is known about weeping controlling gene(s) (Pl). To test the utility of the high-density genetic map, we did fine-scale mapping of this important ornamental trait. In total, three statistic methods were performed progressively based on the result of inheritance analysis. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis initially revealed that a locus on linkage group 7 was strongly responsible for weeping trait. Mutmap-like strategy and extreme linkage analysis were then applied to fine map this locus within 1.14 cM. Bioinformatics analysis of the locus identified some candidate genes. The successful localization of weeping trait strongly indicates that the high-density map constructed using SLAF markers is a worthy reference for mapping important traits for woody plants. PMID:25776277

  14. High-density genetic map construction and identification of a locus controlling weeping trait in an ornamental woody plant (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qixiang; Cheng, Tangren; Yang, Weiru; Pan, Huitang; Zhong, Junjun; Huang, Long; Liu, Enze

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic map is a valuable tool for fine mapping locus controlling a specific trait especially for perennial woody plants. In this study, we firstly constructed a high-density genetic map of mei (Prunus mume) using SLAF markers, developed by specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq). The linkage map contains 8,007 markers, with a mean marker distance of 0.195 cM, making it the densest genetic map for the genus Prunus. Though weeping trees are used worldwide as landscape plants, little is known about weeping controlling gene(s) (Pl). To test the utility of the high-density genetic map, we did fine-scale mapping of this important ornamental trait. In total, three statistic methods were performed progressively based on the result of inheritance analysis. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis initially revealed that a locus on linkage group 7 was strongly responsible for weeping trait. Mutmap-like strategy and extreme linkage analysis were then applied to fine map this locus within 1.14 cM. Bioinformatics analysis of the locus identified some candidate genes. The successful localization of weeping trait strongly indicates that the high-density map constructed using SLAF markers is a worthy reference for mapping important traits for woody plants. PMID:25776277

  15. Functional Genomic Architecture of Predisposition to Voluntary Exercise in Mice: Expression QTL in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Scott A.; Nehrenberg, Derrick L.; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The biological basis of voluntary exercise is complex and simultaneously controlled by peripheral (ability) and central (motivation) mechanisms. The accompanying natural reward, potential addiction, and the motivation associated with exercise are hypothesized to be regulated by multiple brain regions, neurotransmitters, peptides, and hormones. We generated a large (n = 815) advanced intercross line of mice (G4) derived from a line selectively bred for increased wheel running (high runner) and the C57BL/6J inbred strain. We previously mapped multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to the biological control of voluntary exercise levels, body weight, and composition, as well as changes in body weight and composition in response to short-term exercise. Currently, using a subset of the G4 population (n = 244), we examined the transcriptional landscape relevant to neurobiological aspects of voluntary exercise by means of global mRNA expression profiles from brain tissue. We identified genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) regulating variation in mRNA abundance and determined the mode of gene action and the cis- and/or trans-acting nature of each eQTL. Subsets of cis-acting eQTL, colocalizing with QTL for exercise or body composition traits, were used to identify candidate genes based on both positional and functional evidence, which were further filtered by correlational and exclusion mapping analyses. Specifically, we discuss six plausible candidate genes (Insig2, Socs2, DBY, Arrdc4, Prcp, IL15) and their potential role in the regulation of voluntary activity, body composition, and their interactions. These results develop a potential initial model of the underlying functional genomic architecture of predisposition to voluntary exercise and its effects on body weight and composition within a neurophysiological framework. PMID:22466041

  16. QTL analysis for sugar-regulated leaf senescence supports flowering-dependent and -independent senescence pathways.

    PubMed

    Wingler, Astrid; Purdy, Sarah Jane; Edwards, Sally-Anne; Chardon, Fabien; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2010-01-01

    *The aim of this work was to determine the genetic basis of sugar-regulated senescence and to explore the relationship with other traits, including flowering and nitrogen-use efficiency. *Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for senescence were mapped in the Arabidopsis Bay-0 x Shahdara recombinant-inbred line (RIL) population after growth on glucose-containing medium, which accelerates senescence. The extent of whole-rosette senescence was determined by imaging the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)). *A major QTL on the top of chromosome 4 colocalized with FRI, a major determinant of flowering. This QTL interacted epistatically with a QTL on chromosome 5, where the floral repressor FLC localizes. Vernalization accelerated senescence in late-flowering lines with functional FRI and FLC alleles. Comparison with previous results using the Bay-0 x Shahdara population showed that rapid rosette senescence on glucose-containing medium was correlated with early flowering and high sugar content in compost-grown plants. In addition, correlation was found between the expression of flowering and senescence-associated genes in Arabidopsis accessions. However, an additional QTL on chromosome 3 was not linked to flowering, but to nitrogen-use efficiency. *The results show that whole-rosette senescence is genetically linked to the vernalization-dependent control of flowering, but is also controlled by flowering-independent pathways. PMID:19878465

  17. QTL analysis of fertility restoration in cytoplasmic male sterile pepper.

    PubMed

    Wang, L H; Zhang, B X; Lefebvre, V; Huang, S W; Daubèze, A M; Palloix, A

    2004-09-01

    Fertility restoration of Peterson's cytoplasmic male-sterility in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is quantitative and environment-dependent. QTL analysis of fertility restoration was performed based on the test-cross progeny of 77013A (a strict cytoplasmic-genetic male sterile line) and a doubled haploid population of 114 lines obtained from an F1 hybrid between Yolo wonder (a sterility maintainer line) and Perennial (a fertility-restorer line). The fertility of the test-crossed lines was assessed under greenhouse and open field conditions using three criteria related to pollen or seed production. One major QTL for fertility restoration was mapped to chromosome P6. It was significant in all the environments and for all the traits, accounting for 20-69% of the phenotypic variation, depending on the trait. Four additional minor QTLs were also detected on chromosomes P5, P2, and linkage groups PY3 and PY1, accounting for 7-17% of the phenotypic variation. Most of the alleles increasing fertility originated from the restorer parent, except for two alleles at minor QTLs. Phenotypic analysis and genetic dissection indicated that breeding pepper for complete sterility of female lines and high hybrid fertility requires complex combinations of alleles from both parents and a strict control of the environment. PMID:15173931

  18. QTL mapping, association mapping and marker assisted breeding in lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of elite lettuce cultivars is a lengthy process that involves cross-pollination, several rounds of selection, development of homozygous genotypes, and testing of material performance. Use of molecular markers linked to the genes allows for rapid and frequently more accurate selection of ...

  19. Inheritance and Identification of a Major Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) that Confers Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and a Novel QTL for Plant Height in Sweet Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Harris-Shultz, Karen R; Davis, Richard F; Knoll, Joseph E; Anderson, William; Wang, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    Southern root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) are a pest on many economically important row crop and vegetable species and management relies on chemicals, plant resistance, and cultural practices such as crop rotation. Little is known about the inheritance of resistance to M. incognita or the genomic regions associated with resistance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). In this study, an F2 population (n = 130) was developed between the resistant sweet sorghum cultivar 'Honey Drip' and the susceptible sweet cultivar 'Collier'. Each F2 plant was phenotyped for stalk weight, height, juice Brix, root weight, total eggs, and eggs per gram of root. Strong correlations were observed between eggs per gram of root and total eggs, height and stalk weight, and between two measurements of Brix. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to generate single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The G-Model, single marker analysis, interval mapping, and composite interval mapping were used to identify a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 3 for total eggs and eggs per gram of root. Furthermore, a new QTL for plant height was also discovered on chromosome 3. Simple sequence repeat markers were developed in the total eggs and eggs per gram of root QTL region and the markers flanking the resistance gene are 4.7 and 2.4 cM away. These markers can be utilized to move the southern root-knot nematode resistance gene from Honey Drip to any sorghum line. PMID:26574655

  20. Genetic dissection of a major anthocyanin QTL contributing to pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation between sister species of Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yao-Wu; Sagawa, Janelle M; Young, Riane C; Christensen, Brian J; Bradshaw, Harvey D

    2013-05-01

    Prezygotic barriers play a major role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, which is a prerequisite for speciation. However, despite considerable progress in identifying genes and mutations responsible for postzygotic isolation, little is known about the genetic and molecular basis underlying prezygotic barriers. The bumblebee-pollinated Mimulus lewisii and the hummingbird-pollinated M. cardinalis represent a classic example of pollinator-mediated prezygotic isolation between two sister species in sympatry. Flower color differences resulting from both carotenoid and anthocyanin pigments contribute to pollinator discrimination between the two species in nature. Through fine-scale genetic mapping, site-directed mutagenesis, and transgenic experiments, we demonstrate that a single-repeat R3 MYB repressor, ROSE INTENSITY1 (ROI1), is the causal gene underlying a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the largest effect on anthocyanin concentration and that cis-regulatory change rather than coding DNA mutations cause the allelic difference between M. lewisii and M. cardinalis. Together with the genomic resources and stable transgenic tools developed here, these results suggest that Mimulus is an excellent platform for studying the genetics of pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation and the molecular basis of morphological evolution at the most fundamental level-gene by gene, mutation by mutation. PMID:23335333

  1. Association mapping of four important traits using the USDA rice mini-core collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in diploids reveals only a slice of the genetic architecture for a trait because only two alleles that differ between the two parental lines segregate. Association mapping provides an effective method to identify QTL that have effects across a broad sp...

  2. Genetic Architecture of Maize Kernel Quality in the Nested Association Mapping (NAM) Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many studies have been conducted to identify genes (quantitative trait loci; QTL) underlying kernel quality traits. However, these studies were limited to analyzing two parents at once and often resulted in low resolution mapping of QTL. The maize nested association mapping (NAM) population is a r...

  3. The Orion Nebula in the Far-Infrared: high-J CO and fine-structure lines mapped by FIFI-LS/SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Randolf; Looney, Leslie; Cox, Erin; Fischer, Christian; Iserlohe, Christof; Krabbe, Alfred

    2015-08-01

    The Orion Nebula is the closest massive star forming region allowing us to study the physical conditions in such a region with high spatial resolution. We used the far infrared integral-field spectrometer, FIFI-LS, on-board the airborne observatory SOFIA to study the atomic and molecular gas in the Orion Nebula at medium spectral resolution.The large maps obtained with FIFI-LS cover the nebula from the BN/KL-object to the bar in several fine structure lines. These spectral maps are the largest and highest spatially resolved to date. They allow us to study the conditions of the photon-dominated region and the interface to the molecular cloud with unprecedented detail.Another investigation targeted the molecular gas in the BN/KL region of the Orion Nebula, which is stirred up by a violent explosion about 500 years ago. The explosion drives a wide angled molecular outflow. We present maps of several high-J CO observations (J in the range of 10 to 30), allowing us to analyse of the heated molecular gas.The observations were taken during the commissioning of FIFI-LS last year and as recent as this March. The results are still preliminary as the data reduction and calibration is still under development.

  4. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140?dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  5. QTL for resistance to summer mortality and OsHV-1 load in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Sauvage, C; Boudry, P; de Koning, D-J; Haley, C S; Heurtebise, S; Lapègue, S

    2010-08-01

    Summer mortality is a phenomenon severely affecting the aquaculture production of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas). Although its causal factors are complex, resistance to mortality has been described as a highly heritable trait, and several pathogens including the virus Ostreid Herpes virus type 1 (OsHV-1) have been associated with this phenomenon. A QTL analysis for survival of summer mortality and OsHV-1 load, estimated using real-time PCR, was performed using five F(2) full-sib families resulting from a divergent selection experiment for resistance to summer mortality. A consensus linkage map was built using 29 SNPs and 51 microsatellite markers. Five significant QTL were identified and assigned to linkage groups V, VI, VII and IX. Analysis of single full-sib families revealed differential QTL segregation between families. QTL for the two-recorded traits presented very similar locations, highlighting the interest of further study of their respective genetic controls. These QTL show substantial genetic variation in resistance to summer mortality, and present new opportunities for selection for resistance to OsHV-1. PMID:20096029

  6. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Seed Germination and Seedling Vigor in Brassica rapa Reveals QTL Hotspots and Epistatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Basnet, Ram K.; Duwal, Anita; Tiwari, Dev N.; Xiao, Dong; Monakhos, Sokrat; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G. F.; Groot, Steven P. C.; Bonnema, Guusje; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of seed germination and seedling vigor is largely unknown in Brassica species. We performed a study to evaluate the genetic basis of these important traits in a B. rapa doubled haploid population from a cross of a yellow-seeded oil-type yellow sarson and a black-seeded vegetable-type pak choi. We identified 26 QTL regions across all 10 linkage groups for traits related to seed weight, seed germination and seedling vigor under non-stress and salt stress conditions illustrating the polygenic nature of these traits. QTLs for multiple traits co-localized and we identified eight hotspots for quantitative trait loci (QTL) of seed weight, seed germination, and root and shoot lengths. A QTL hotspot for seed germination on A02 mapped at the B. rapa Flowering Locus C (BrFLC2). Another hotspot on A05 with salt stress specific QTLs co-located with the B. rapa Fatty acid desaturase 2 (BrFAD2) locus. Epistatic interactions were observed between QTL hotspots for seed germination on A02 and A10 and with a salt tolerance QTL on A05. These results contribute to the understanding of the genetics of seed quality and seeding vigor in B. rapa and can offer tools for Brassica breeding. PMID:26648948

  7. Fine genetic map of mouse chromosome 10 around the polycystic kidney disease gene, jcpk, and ankyrin 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bryda, E.C.; Ling, H.; Rathbun, D.E.

    1996-08-01

    A chlorambucil (CHL)-induced mutation of the jcpk (juvenile congenital polycystic kidney disease) gene causes a severe early onset polycystic kidney disease. In an intercross involving Mus musculus castaneus, jcpk was precisely mapped 0.2 cM distal to D10Mit115 and 0.8 cM proximal to D10Mit173. In addition, five genes, Cdc2a, Col6al, Col6a2, Bcr, and Ank3 were mapped in both this jcpk intercross and a (BALB/c X CAST/Ei)F{sub 1} x BALB/c backcross. All five genes were eliminated as possible candidates for jcpk based on the mapping data. The jcpk intercross allowed the orientation of the Ank3 gene relative to the centromere to be determined. D10Mit115, D10Mit173, D10Mit199, and D10Mit200 were separated genetically in this cross. The order and genetic distances of all markers and gene loci mapped in the jcpk intercross were consistent with those derived from the BALB/c backcross, indicating that the CHL-induced lesion has not generated any gross chromosomal abnormalities detectable in these studies. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  8. QTL conferring fusarium crown rot resistance in the elite bread wheat variety EGA Wylie.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi; Kilian, Andrzej; Yan, Guijun; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR) is one of the most damaging cereal diseases in semi-arid regions worldwide. The genetics of FCR resistance in the bread wheat (Triticum eastivum L.) variety EGA Wylie, the most resistant commercial variety available, was studied by QTL mapping. Three populations of recombinant inbred lines were developed with this elite variety as the resistant parent. Four QTL conferring FCR resistance were detected and resistance alleles of all of them were derived from the resistant parent EGA Wylie. One of these loci was located on the short arm of chromosome 5D (designated as Qcrs.cpi-5D). This QTL explains up to 31.1% of the phenotypic variance with an LOD value of 9.6. The second locus was located on the long arm of chromosome 2D (designated as Qcrs.cpi-2D) and explained up to 20.2% of the phenotypic variance with an LOD value of 4.5. Significant effects of both Qcrs.cpi-5D and Qcrs.cpi-2D were detected in each of the three populations assessed. Another two QTL (designated as Qcrs.cpi-4B.1 and Qcrs.cpi-4B.2, respectively) were located on the short arm of chromosome 4B. These two QTL explained up to 16.9% and 18.8% of phenotypic variance, respectively. However, significant effects of Qcrs.cpi-4B.1 and Qcrs.cpi-4B.2 were not detected when the effects of plant height was accounted for by covariance analysis. The elite characteristics of this commercial variety should facilitate the incorporation of the resistance loci it contains into breeding programs. PMID:24776887

  9. QTL Conferring Fusarium Crown Rot Resistance in the Elite Bread Wheat Variety EGA Wylie

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Kilian, Andrzej; Yan, Guijun; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR) is one of the most damaging cereal diseases in semi-arid regions worldwide. The genetics of FCR resistance in the bread wheat (Triticum eastivum L.) variety EGA Wylie, the most resistant commercial variety available, was studied by QTL mapping. Three populations of recombinant inbred lines were developed with this elite variety as the resistant parent. Four QTL conferring FCR resistance were detected and resistance alleles of all of them were derived from the resistant parent EGA Wylie. One of these loci was located on the short arm of chromosome 5D (designated as Qcrs.cpi-5D). This QTL explains up to 31.1% of the phenotypic variance with an LOD value of 9.6. The second locus was located on the long arm of chromosome 2D (designated as Qcrs.cpi-2D) and explained up to 20.2% of the phenotypic variance with an LOD value of 4.5. Significant effects of both Qcrs.cpi-5D and Qcrs.cpi-2D were detected in each of the three populations assessed. Another two QTL (designated as Qcrs.cpi-4B.1 and Qcrs.cpi-4B.2, respectively) were located on the short arm of chromosome 4B. These two QTL explained up to 16.9% and 18.8% of phenotypic variance, respectively. However, significant effects of Qcrs.cpi-4B.1 and Qcrs.cpi-4B.2 were not detected when the effects of plant height was accounted for by covariance analysis. The elite characteristics of this commercial variety should facilitate the incorporation of the resistance loci it contains into breeding programs. PMID:24776887

  10. Fine-scale mapping of the FGFR2 breast cancer risk locus: putative functional variants differentially bind FOXA1 and E2F1.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Kerstin B; O'Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A; Lux, Michael P; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias, Jose I; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D P; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-12-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ER? to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PMID:24290378

  11. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kerstin B.; O’Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias, Jose I.; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ER? to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PMID:24290378

  12. QTL Analysis of Kernel-Related Traits in Maize Using an Immortalized F2 Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmin; Li, Weihua; Fu, Zhiyuan; Ding, Dong; Li, Haochuan; Qiao, Mengmeng; Tang, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Kernel size and weight are important determinants of grain yield in maize. In this study, multivariate conditional and unconditional quantitative trait loci (QTL), and digenic epistatic analyses were utilized in order to elucidate the genetic basis for these kernel-related traits. Five kernel-related traits, including kernel weight (KW), volume (KV), length (KL), thickness (KT), and width (KWI), were collected from an immortalized F2 (IF2) maize population comprising of 243 crosses performed at two separate locations over a span of two years. A total of 54 unconditional main QTL for these five kernel-related traits were identified, many of which were clustered in chromosomal bins 6.04–6.06, 7.02–7.03, and 10.06–10.07. In addition, qKL3, qKWI6, qKV10a, qKV10b, qKW10a, and qKW7a were detected across multiple environments. Sixteen main QTL were identified for KW conditioned on the other four kernel traits (KL, KWI, KT, and KV). Thirteen main QTL were identified for KV conditioned on three kernel-shape traits. Conditional mapping analysis revealed that KWI and KV had the strongest influence on KW at the individual QTL level, followed by KT, and then KL; KV was mostly strongly influenced by KT, followed by KWI, and was least impacted by KL. Digenic epistatic analysis identified 18 digenic interactions involving 34 loci over the entire genome. However, only a small proportion of them were identical to the main QTL we detected. Additionally, conditional digenic epistatic analysis revealed that the digenic epistasis for KW and KV were entirely determined by their constituent traits. The main QTL identified in this study for determining kernel-related traits with high broad-sense heritability may play important roles during kernel development. Furthermore, digenic interactions were shown to exert relatively large effects on KL (the highest AA and DD effects were 4.6% and 6.7%, respectively) and KT (the highest AA effects were 4.3%). PMID:24586932

  13. Spatial and temporal patterns of chronic wasting disease: Fine-scale mapping of a wildlife epidemic in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osnas, E.E.; Heisey, D.M.; Rolley, R.E.; Samuel, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases threaten wildlife populations and human health. Understanding the spatial distributions of these new diseases is important for disease management and policy makers; however, the data are complicated by heterogeneities across host classes, sampling variance, sampling biases, and the space-time epidemic process. Ignoring these issues can lead to false conclusions or obscure important patterns in the data, such as spatial variation in disease prevalence. Here, we applied hierarchical Bayesian disease mapping methods to account for risk factors and to estimate spatial and temporal patterns of infection by chronic wasting disease (CWD) in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) of Wisconsin, USA. We found significant heterogeneities for infection due to age, sex, and spatial location. Infection probability increased with age for all young deer, increased with age faster for young males, and then declined for some older animals, as expected from disease-associated mortality and age-related changes in infection risk. We found that disease prevalence was clustered in a central location, as expected under a simple spatial epidemic process where disease prevalence should increase with time and expand spatially. However, we could not detect any consistent temporal or spatiotemporal trends in CWD prevalence. Estimates of the temporal trend indicated that prevalence may have decreased or increased with nearly equal posterior probability, and the model without temporal or spatiotemporal effects was nearly equivalent to models with these effects based on deviance information criteria. For maximum interpretability of the role of location as a disease risk factor, we used the technique of direct standardization for prevalence mapping, which we develop and describe. These mapping results allow disease management actions to be employed with reference to the estimated spatial distribution of the disease and to those host classes most at risk. Future wildlife epidemiology studies should employ hierarchical Bayesian methods to smooth estimated quantities across space and time, account for heterogeneities, and then report disease rates based on an appropriate standardization. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of chronic wasting disease: fine-scale mapping of a wildlife epidemic in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Osnas, Erik E; Heisey, Dennis M; Rolley, Robert E; Samuel, Michael D

    2009-07-01

    Emerging infectious diseases threaten wildlife populations and human health. Understanding the spatial distributions of these new diseases is important for disease management and policy makers; however, the data are complicated by heterogeneities across host classes, sampling variance, sampling biases, and the space-time epidemic process. Ignoring these issues can lead to false conclusions or obscure important patterns in the data, such as spatial variation in disease prevalence. Here, we applied hierarchical Bayesian disease mapping methods to account for risk factors and to estimate spatial and temporal patterns of infection by chronic wasting disease (CWD) in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) of Wisconsin, U.S.A. We found significant heterogeneities for infection due to age, sex, and spatial location. Infection probability increased with age for all young deer, increased with age faster for young males, and then declined for some older animals, as expected from disease-associated mortality and age-related changes in infection risk. We found that disease prevalence was clustered in a central location, as expected under a simple spatial epidemic process where disease prevalence should increase with time and expand spatially. However, we could not detect any consistent temporal or spatiotemporal trends in CWD prevalence. Estimates of the temporal trend indicated that prevalence may have decreased or increased with nearly equal posterior probability, and the model without temporal or spatiotemporal effects was nearly equivalent to models with these effects based on deviance information criteria. For maximum interpretability of the role of location as a disease risk factor, we used the technique of direct standardization for prevalence mapping, which we develop and describe. These mapping results allow disease management actions to be employed with reference to the estimated spatial distribution of the disease and to those host classes most at risk. Future wildlife epidemiology studies should employ hierarchical Bayesian methods to smooth estimated quantities across space and time, account for heterogeneities, and then report disease rates based on an appropriate standardization. PMID:19688937

  15. Fine mapping of foxglove aphid (Aulacorthum solani) resistance gene Raso1 in soybean and its effect on tolerance to Soybean dwarf virus transmitted by foxglove aphid

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Shizen; Miyake, Noriyuki; Takeuchi, Toru; Kousaka, Fumiko; Hiura, Satoshi; Kanehira, Osamu; Saito, Miki; Sayama, Takashi; Higashi, Ayako; Ishimoto, Masao; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Fujita, Shohei

    2012-01-01

    Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) causes serious dwarfing, yellowing and sterility in soybean (Glycine max). The soybean cv. Adams is tolerant to SbDV infection in the field and exhibits antibiosis to foxglove aphid (Aulacorthum solani), which transmits SbDV. This antibiosis (termed “aphid resistance”) is required for tolerance to SbDV in the field in segregated progenies of Adams. A major quantitative trait locus, Raso1, is reported for foxglove aphid resistance. Our objectives were to fine map Raso1 and to reveal whether Raso1 alone is sufficient to confer both aphid resistance and SbDV tolerance. We introduced Raso1 into cv. Toyomusume by backcrossing and investigated the degree of aphid antibiosis to foxglove aphid and the degree of tolerance to SbDV in the field. All Raso1-introduced backcross lines showed aphid resistance. Interestingly, only one Raso1-introduced backcross line (TM-1386) showed tolerance to SbDV in the field. The results demonstrated Raso1 alone is sufficient to confer aphid resistance but insufficient for SbDV tolerance. Tolerance to SbDV was indicated to require additional gene(s) to Raso1. Additionally, Raso1 was mapped to a 63-kb interval on chromosome 3 of the Williams 82 sequence assembly (Glyma1). This interval includes a nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat encoding gene and two other genes in the Williams 82 soybean genome sequence. PMID:23136500

  16. Construction of a high-density, high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Qin, Zhenkui; Waldbieser, Geoff; Wang, Ruijia; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Danzmann, Roy G; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-02-01

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present work, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic map for channel catfish with three large resource families genotyped using the catfish 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 54,342 SNPs were placed on the linkage map, which to our knowledge had the highest marker density among aquaculture species. The estimated genetic size was 3,505.4 cM with a resolution of 0.22 cM for sex-averaged genetic map. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 4,495.1 cM in females and 2,593.7 cM in males, presenting a ratio of 1.7 : 1 between female and male in recombination fraction. After integration with the previously established physical map, over 87% of physical map contigs were anchored to the linkage groups that covered a physical length of 867 Mb, accounting for ?90% of the catfish genome. The integrated map provides a valuable tool for validating and improving the catfish whole-genome assembly and facilitates fine-scale QTL mapping and positional cloning of genes responsible for economically important traits. PMID:25428894

  17. Construction of a high-density, high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Qin, Zhenkui; Waldbieser, Geoff; Wang, Ruijia; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Danzmann, Roy G.; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present work, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic map for channel catfish with three large resource families genotyped using the catfish 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 54,342 SNPs were placed on the linkage map, which to our knowledge had the highest marker density among aquaculture species. The estimated genetic size was 3,505.4 cM with a resolution of 0.22 cM for sex-averaged genetic map. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 4,495.1 cM in females and 2,593.7 cM in males, presenting a ratio of 1.7 : 1 between female and male in recombination fraction. After integration with the previously established physical map, over 87% of physical map contigs were anchored to the linkage groups that covered a physical length of 867 Mb, accounting for ?90% of the catfish genome. The integrated map provides a valuable tool for validating and improving the catfish whole-genome assembly and facilitates fine-scale QTL mapping and positional cloning of genes responsible for economically important traits. PMID:25428894

  18. Fine mapping of the McLeod locus (XK) to a 150-380-kb region in Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.F.; Monaco, A.P. ); Blonden, L.A.J.; Ommen, G.J.B. van ); Affara, N.A.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A. ); Lehrach, H. )

    1992-02-01

    McLeod syndrome characterized by acanthocytosis and the absence of a red-blood-cell Kell antigen (Kx), is a multisystem disorder involving a late-onset myopathy, splenomegaly, and neurological defects. The locus for this syndrome has been mapped, by deletion analysis, to a region between the loci for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). In this study, the authors describe a new marker, 3BH/R 0.3 (DXS 709), isolated by cloning the deletion breakpoint of a DMD patient. A long-range restriction map of Xp21, encompassing the gene loci for McLeod and CGD, was constructed, and multiple CpG islands were found clustered in a 700-kb region. Using the new marker, they have limited the McLeod syndrome critical region to 150-380-kb. Within this interval, two CpG-rich islands which may represent candidate sites for the McLeod gene were identified.

  19. Fine-Scale Mapping of the 5q11.2 Breast Cancer Locus Reveals at Least Three Independent Risk Variants Regulating MAP3K1

    PubMed Central

    Glubb, Dylan M.; Maranian, Mel J.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O’Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M. Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Brown, Melissa A.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; French, Juliet D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer individuals and control individuals from 52 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified three independent risk signals: the strongest associations were with 15 correlated variants (iCHAV1), where the minor allele of the best candidate, rs62355902, associated with significantly increased risks of both estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+: odds ratio [OR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21–1.27, ptrend = 5.7 × 10?44) and estrogen-receptor-negative (ER?: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.05–1.15, ptrend = 3.0 × 10?4) tumors. After adjustment for rs62355902, we found evidence of association of a further 173 variants (iCHAV2) containing three subsets with a range of effects (the strongest was rs113317823 [pcond = 1.61 × 10?5]) and five variants composing iCHAV3 (lead rs11949391; ER+: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.87–0.93, pcond = 1.4 × 10?4). Twenty-six percent of the prioritized candidate variants coincided with four putative regulatory elements that interact with the MAP3K1 promoter through chromatin looping and affect MAP3K1 promoter activity. Functional analysis indicated that the cancer risk alleles of four candidates (rs74345699 and rs62355900 [iCHAV1], rs16886397 [iCHAV2a], and rs17432750 [iCHAV3]) increased MAP3K1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed diminished GATA3 binding to the minor (cancer-protective) allele of rs17432750, indicating a mechanism for its action. We propose that the cancer risk alleles act to increase MAP3K1 expression in vivo and might promote breast cancer cell survival. PMID:25529635

  20. A fine-scale recombination map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor reveals faster change in humans than in chimpanzees and a strong impact of GC-biased gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Munch, Kasper; Mailund, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien Y; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2014-03-01

    Recombination is a major determinant of adaptive and nonadaptive evolution. Understanding how the recombination landscape has evolved in humans is thus key to the interpretation of human genomic evolution. Comparison of fine-scale recombination maps of human and chimpanzee has revealed large changes at fine genomic scales and conservation over large scales. Here we demonstrate how a fine-scale recombination map can be derived for the ancestor of human and chimpanzee, allowing us to study the changes that have occurred in human and chimpanzee since these species diverged. The map is produced from more than one million accurately determined recombination events. We find that this new recombination map is intermediate to the maps of human and chimpanzee but that the recombination landscape has evolved more rapidly in the human lineage than in the chimpanzee lineage. We use the map to show that recombination rate, through the effect of GC-biased gene conversion, is an even stronger determinant of base composition evolution than previously reported. PMID:24190946

  1. QTL analysis of plant development and fruit traits in pepper and performance of selective phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Barchi, Lorenzo; Lefebvre, Véronique; Sage-Palloix, Anne-Marie; Lanteri, Sergio; Palloix, Alain

    2009-04-01

    A QTL analysis was performed to determine the genetic basis of 13 horticultural traits conditioning yield in pepper (Capsicum annuum). The mapping population was a large population of 297 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) originating from a cross between the large-fruited bell pepper cultivar 'Yolo Wonder' and the small-fruited chilli pepper 'Criollo de Morelos 334'. A total of 76 QTLs were detected for 13 fruit and plant traits, grouped in 28 chromosome regions. These QTLs explained together between 7% (internode growth time) and 91% (fruit diameter) of the phenotypic variation. The QTL analysis was also performed on two subsets of 141 and 93 RILs sampled using the MapPop software. The smaller populations allowed for the detection of a reduced set of QTLs and reduced the overall percentage of trait variation explained by QTLs. The frequency of false positives as well as the individual effect of QTLs increased in reduced population sets as a result of reduced sampling. The results from the QTL analysis permitted an overall glance over the genetic architecture of traits considered by breeders for selection. Colinearities between clusters of QTLs controlling fruit traits and/or plant development in distinct pepper species and in related solanaceous crop species (tomato and eggplant) suggests that shared mechanisms control the shape and growth of different organs throughout these species. PMID:19219599

  2. Fine Mapping and Characterization of the L-Polymerase-Binding Domain of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sourimant, Julien; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Gaillard, Anne-Laure; Chevret, Didier; Galloux, Marie; Gault, Elyanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The minimum requirement for an active RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a complex made of two viral proteins, the polymerase large protein (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). Here we have investigated the domain on P that is responsible for this critical P-L interaction. By use of recombinant proteins and serial deletions, an L binding site was mapped in the C-terminal region of P, just upstream of the N-RNA binding site. The role of this molecular recognition element of about 30 amino acid residues in the L-P interaction and RNA polymerase activity was evaluated in cellula using an RSV minigenome system and site-directed mutagenesis. The results highlighted the critical role of hydrophobic residues located in this region. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants. Since no vaccine and no good antivirals against RSV are available, it is essential to better understand how the viral machinery functions in order to develop new antiviral strategies. Like all negative-strand RNA viruses, RSV codes for its own machinery to replicate and transcribe its genome. The core of this machinery is composed of two proteins, the phosphoprotein (P) and the large protein (L). Here, using recombinant proteins, we have mapped and characterized the P domain responsible for this L-P interaction and the formation of an active L-P complex. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanism of action of RSV RNA polymerase and allow us to define a new target for the development of drugs against RSV. PMID:25653447

  3. Identification and fine mapping of nuclear and nucleolar localization signals within the human ribosomal protein S17.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S17 (RPS17) is mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a bone marrow disorder that fails to produce sufficient red blood cells leading to anemia. Recently, an RPS17 protein sequence was also found to be naturally inserted in the genome of hepatitis E virus (HEV) from patients chronically-infected by HEV. The role of RPS17 in HEV replication and pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of knowledge about how RPS17 functions at a molecular level. Understanding the biological function of RPS17 is critical for elucidating its role in virus infection and DBA disease processes. In this study we probed the subcellular distribution of normal and mutant RPS17 proteins in a human liver cell line (Huh7). RPS17 was primarily detected within the nucleus, and more specifically within the nucleoli. Using a transient expression system in which RPS17 or truncations were expressed as fusions with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP), we were able to identify and map, for the first time, two separate nuclear localization signals (NLSs), one to the first 13 amino acids of the amino-terminus of RPS17 and the other within amino acids 30-60. Additionally, we mapped amino acid sequences required for nucleolar accumulation of RPS17 to amino acids 60-70. Amino acids 60-70 possess a di-RG motif that may be necessary for nucleolar retention of RPS17. The results from this study enhance our knowledge of RSP17 and will facilitate future mechanistic studies about the roles of RSP17 in hepatitis E and DBA disease processes. PMID:25853866

  4. Fine Epitope Mapping of the Central Immunodominant Region of Nucleoprotein from Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongliang; Li, Yang; Zhao, Jing; Deng, Fei; Duan, Xiaomei; Kou, Chun; Wu, Ting; Li, Yijie; Wang, Yongxing; Ma, Ji; Yang, Jianhua; Hu, Zhihong; Zhang, Fuchun; Zhang, Yujiang; Sun, Surong

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), a severe viral disease known to have occurred in over 30 countries and distinct regions, is caused by the tick-borne CCHF virus (CCHFV). Nucleocapsid protein (NP), which is encoded by the S gene, is the primary antigen detectable in infected cells. The goal of the present study was to map the minimal motifs of B-cell epitopes (BCEs) on NP. Five precise BCEs (E1, 247FDEAKK252; E2a, 254VEAL257; E2b, 258NGYLNKH264; E3, 267EVDKA271; and E4, 274DSMITN279) identified through the use of rabbit antiserum, and one BCE (E5, 258NGYL261) recognized using a mouse monoclonal antibody, were confirmed to be within the central region of NP and were partially represented among the predicted epitopes. Notably, the five BCEs identified using the rabbit sera were able to react with positive serum mixtures from five sheep which had been infected naturally with CCHFV. The multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed high conservation of the identified BCEs among ten CCHFV strains from different areas. Interestingly, the identified BCEs with only one residue variation can apparently be recognized by the positive sera of sheep naturally infected with CCHFV. Computer-generated three-dimensional structural models indicated that all the antigenic motifs are located on the surface of the NP stalk domain. This report represents the first identification and mapping of the minimal BCEs of CCHFV-NP along with an analysis of their primary and structural properties. Our identification of the minimal linear BCEs of CCHFV-NP may provide fundamental data for developing rapid diagnostic reagents and illuminating the pathogenic mechanism of CCHFV. PMID:25365026

  5. Bayesian mapping of multiple quantitative trait loci from incomplete inbred line cross data.

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, M J; Arjas, E

    1998-01-01

    A novel fine structure mapping method for quantitative traits is presented. It is based on Bayesian modeling and inference, treating the number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) as an unobserved random variable and using ideas similar to composite interval mapping to account for the effects of QTLs in other chromosomes. The method is introduced for inbred lines and it can be applied also in situations involving frequent missing genotypes. We propose that two new probabilistic measures be used to summarize the results from the statistical analysis: (1) the (posterior) QTL intensity, for estimating the number of QTLs in a chromosome and for localizing them into some particular chromosomal regions, and (2) the locationwise (posterior) distributions of the phenotypic effects of the QTLs. Both these measures will be viewed as functions of the putative QTL locus, over the marker range in the linkage group. The method is tested and compared with standard interval and composite interval mapping techniques by using simulated backcross progeny data. It is implemented as a software package. Its initial version is freely available for research purposes under the name Multimapper at URL http://www.rni.helsinki.fi/mjs. PMID:9539450

  6. Screening of candidate genes and fine mapping of drought tolerance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 4 in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Lin; Wu, Yun-Hua; Liu, Hao-Jie; Mao, Wei-Wei; Du, Juan; Xiu, Hai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Xia; Yan, Yu-Wei; Liu, Guo-Lan; Liu, Hong-Yan; Hu, Song-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Due to severe water resource shortage, genetics of and breeding for DT (drought tolerance) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) have become one of the hot research topics. Identification of grain yield QTLs (quantitative trait loci) directly related to the DT trait of rice can provide useful information for breeding new drought-resistant and water-saving rice varieties via marker-assisted selection. A population of 105 advanced BILs (backcross introgression lines) derived from a cross between Zhenshan97B and IRAT109 in Zhenshan97B background were grown under drought stress in a field experiment and phenotypic traits were investigated. The results showed that in the target interval of RM273-RM255 on chromosome 4, three main-effect QTLs related to panicle length, panicle number, and spikelet number per panicle were identified (LOD [logarithm of the odds] > 2.0). The panicle length-related QTL had two loci located in the neighboring intervals of RM17308-RM17305 and RM17349-RM17190, which explained 18.80% and 20.42%, respectively, of the phenotypic variation, while the panicle number-related QTL was identified in the interval of RM1354-RM17308, explaining 11.47% of the phenotypic variation. As far as the spikelet number per panicle-related QTL was concerned, it was found to be located in the interval of RM17308-RM17305, which explained 28.08% of the phenotypic variation. Using the online Plant-GE query system, a total of 13 matched ESTs (expressed sequence tags) were found in the target region, and of the 13 ESTs, 12 had corresponding predicted genes. For instance, the two ESTs CB096766 and CA765747 were corresponded to the same predicted gene LOC_Os04g46370, while the other four ESTs, CA754286, CB000011, CX056247, and CX056240, were corresponded to the same predicted gene LOC_Os04g46390. PMID:26640678

  7. High-precision genetic mapping of behavioral traits in the diversity outbred mouse population

    PubMed Central

    Logan, R W; Robledo, R F; Recla, J M; Philip, V M; Bubier, J A; Jay, J J; Harwood, C; Wilcox, T; Gatti, D M; Bult, C J; Churchill, G A; Chesler, E J

    2013-01-01

    Historically our ability to identify genetic variants underlying complex behavioral traits in mice has been limited by low mapping resolution of conventional mouse crosses. The newly developed Diversity Outbred (DO) population promises to deliver improved resolution that will circumvent costly fine-mapping studies. The DO is derived from the same founder strains as the Collaborative Cross (CC), including three wild-derived strains. Thus the DO provides more allelic diversity and greater potential for discovery compared to crosses involving standard mouse strains. We have characterized 283 male and female DO mice using open-field, light–dark box, tail-suspension and visual-cliff avoidance tests to generate 38 behavioral measures. We identified several quantitative trait loci (QTL) for these traits with support intervals ranging from 1 to 3 Mb in size. These intervals contain relatively few genes (ranging from 5 to 96). For a majority of QTL, using the founder allelic effects together with whole genome sequence data, we could further narrow the positional candidates. Several QTL replicate previously published loci. Novel loci were also identified for anxiety- and activity-related traits. Half of the QTLs are associated with wild-derived alleles, confirming the value to behavioral genetics of added genetic diversity in the DO. In the presence of wild-alleles we sometimes observe behaviors that are qualitatively different from the expected response. Our results demonstrate that high-precision mapping of behavioral traits can be achieved with moderate numbers of DO animals, representing a significant advance in our ability to leverage the mouse as a tool for behavioral genetics PMID:23433259

  8. QTL analysis of citrus tristeza virus-citradia interaction.

    PubMed

    Asins, M J; Bernet, G P; Ruiz, C; Cambra, M; Guerri, J; Carbonell, E A

    2004-02-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has caused the death of millions of trees grafted on sour orange ( Citrus aurantium). However, this rootstock is very well adapted to the Mediterranean, semi-arid conditions. The aim of the present research is to genetically analyze the accumulation of CTV in a progeny derived from the cross between C. aurantium and Poncirus trifoliata, both resistant to CTV isolate T-346. Graft propagation of 104 hybrids was done on healthy sweet orange as a rootstock. Three months later, each rootstock was graft inoculated with two patches of infected tissue (isolate T-346). One, 2, and sometimes, 3 and 4 years after inoculation, hybrids and infected patches were tested for CTV by tissue-blot immuno-assay. Additionally, CTV multiplication was evaluated every year as the optical density of double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay reactions. Linkage maps for P. trifoliata based on 63 markers, and for C. aurantium based on 157 markers, were used. Most molecular markers were microsatellites and IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphisms). Some analogues of resistance and expressed sequences were also included for candidate gene analysis. Resistance against CTV was analyzed as a quantitative trait (CTV accumulation) by QTL (quantitative trait loci) analysis to avoid the assumption of monogenic control. Three major resistance QTLs were detected where the P. trifoliata resistance gene, Ctv-R, had been previously located in other progenies. Up to five minor QTLs were detected ( Ctv-A(1) to Ctv-A(5)). A significant epistatic interaction involving Ctv-R(1) and Ctv-A(1) was also found. An analogue of a resistance gene is a candidate for Ctv-A(3), and two expressed sequences are candidates for Ctv-A(1) and Ctv-A(5). Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of CTV genes QTL P20 and P25 (coat protein) in susceptible hybrids, was carried out to test whether or not any QTL accumulation was a defeated resistance gene. Since the same haplotype of the virus was visualized independently on the CTV titer, differences in the amount of virions are not explained through the selection of CTV genotypes by the host, but through differences among citradias in CTV replication and/or movement. PMID:14614564

  9. Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) meta-analysis and comparative genomics for candidate gene prediction in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In crop species, QTL analysis is commonly used for identification of factors contributing to variation of agronomically important traits. As an important pasture species, a large number of QTLs have been reported for perennial ryegrass based on analysis of biparental mapping populations. Further characterisation of those QTLs is, however, essential for utilisation in varietal improvement programs. Results A bibliographic survey of perennial ryegrass trait-dissection studies identified a total of 560 QTLs from previously published papers, of which 189, 270 and 101 were classified as morphology-, physiology- and resistance/tolerance-related loci, respectively. The collected dataset permitted a subsequent meta-QTL study and implementation of a cross-species candidate gene identification approach. A meta-QTL analysis based on use of the BioMercator software was performed to identify two consensus regions for pathogen resistance traits. Genes that are candidates for causal polymorphism underpinning perennial ryegrass QTLs were identified through in silico comparative mapping using rice databases, and 7 genes were assigned to the p150/112 reference map. Markers linked to the LpDGL1, LpPh1 and LpPIPK1 genes were located close to plant size, leaf extension time and heading date-related QTLs, respectively, suggesting that these genes may be functionally associated with important agronomic traits in perennial ryegrass. Conclusions Functional markers are valuable for QTL meta-analysis and comparative genomics. Enrichment of such genetic markers may permit further detailed characterisation of QTLs. The outcomes of QTL meta-analysis and comparative genomics studies may be useful for accelerated development of novel perennial ryegrass cultivars with desirable traits. PMID:23137269

  10. Fine mapping of ZNF804A and genome wide significant evidence for its involvement in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hywel J; Norton, Nadine; Dwyer, Sarah; Moskvina, Valentina; Nikolov, Ivan; Carroll, Liam; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Williams, Nigel M; Morris, Derek W; Quinn, Emma M; Giegling, Ina; Ikeda, Masashi; Wood, Joel; Lencz, Todd; Hultman, Christina; Lichtenstein, Paul; Thiselton, Dawn; Maher, Brion S; Malhotra, Anil K; Riley, Brien; Kendler, Kenneth S; Gill, Michael; Sullivan, Patrick; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Kirov, George; Holmans, Peter; Corvin, Aiden; Rujescu, Dan; Craddock, Nicholas; Owen, Michael J; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome wide association study reported evidence for association between rs1344706 within ZNF804A (encoding zinc finger protein 804A) and schizophrenia (P=1.61 ×10?7), and stronger evidence when the phenotype was broadened to include bipolar disorder (P=9.96 ×10?9). Here we provide additional evidence for association through meta-analysis of a larger dataset (schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder N = 18945, schizophrenia plus bipolar disorder N =21274, controls N =38675). We also sought to better localize the association signal using a combination of de novo polymorphism discovery in exons, pooled de novo polymorphism discovery spanning the genomic sequence of the locus and high density LD mapping. Meta-analysis provided evidence for association between rs1344706 that surpasses widely accepted benchmarks of significance by several orders of magnitude for both schizophrenia (P=2.5 ×10?11, OR=1.10, 95% CI 1.07–1.14) and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder combined (P=4.1 ×10?13, OR=1.11, 95% CI 1.07–1.14). After de novo polymorphism discovery and detailed association analysis, rs1344706 remained the most strongly associated marker in the gene. The allelic association at the ZNF804A locus is now one of the most compelling in schizophrenia to date, and supports the accumulating data suggesting overlapping genetic risk between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:20368704

  11. Characterization and fine mapping of thermo-sensitive chlorophyll deficit mutant1 in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Wang, Jiayu; Yao, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jinquan; Wang, Xiaoxue; Xu, Zhengjin; Chen, Wenfu

    2015-03-01

    Chlorophyll content is one of the most important traits controlling crop biomass and economic yield in rice. Here, we isolated a spontaneous rice mutant named thermo-sensitive chlorophyll deficit 1 (tscd1) derived from a backcross recombinant inbred line population. tscd1 plants grown normally from the seedling to tiller stages showed yellow leaves with reduced chlorophyll content, but showed no significant differences after the booting stage. At temperatures below 22°C, the tscd1 mutant showed the most obvious yellowish phenotype. With increasing temperature, the yellowish leaves gradually turned green and approached a normal wild type color. Wild type and tscd1 mutant plants had obviously different chloroplast structures and photosynthetic pigment precursor contents, which resulted in underdevelopment of chloroplasts and a yellowish phenotype in tscd1. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant character was controlled by a recessive nuclear gene. Through map-based cloning, we located the tscd1 gene in a 34.95 kb region on the long arm of chromosome 2, containing two BAC clones and eight predicted candidate genes. Further characterization of the tscd1 gene is underway. Because it has a chlorophyll deficit phenotype before the tiller stage and little influence on growth vigor, it may play a role in ensuring the purity of hybrids. PMID:26069446

  12. Speed-Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Using Microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the genetic architecture of complex traits is important for human health, agriculture, and understanding adaptive evolution, but is challenging because high resolution quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping requires evaluation of thousands of recombinant individuals for the trait and clo...

  13. Fine mapping of a palea defective 1 (pd1), a locus associated with palea and stamen development in rice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chunyan; Liang, Xinxing; Chu, Ruizhen; Duan, Min; Cheng, Jinping; Ding, Zhengquan; Wang, Jianfei

    2015-12-01

    KEY MESSAGE : pd1 , a genetic factor in a 69 kb region between RM11239 and RM11245 on rice chromosome 1, controls stamen number and palea development. Spikelets are important organs that store photosynthetic products in rice. Spikelet development directly affects grain yield and rice quality. Here, we report a palea defective (pd1) mutant identified from selfing progenies of indica cv. 93-11 after (60)Co ? ray treatment. pd1 mutant flowers only had four stamens (wild-type has six), but pollen fertility was not affected. Compared with 93-11 palea, pd1 mutant palea showed smaller and flatter leaf, which caused the lemma to bend excessively inward. pd1 mutants had only 46 % seed setting rate and 21.6 g 1000-grain weight, which led to two-thirds loss of grain yield. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that pd1 mutants had reduced epidermal cell size and reduced numbers of fibrous sclerenchyma cells in both palea and lemma. To analyze the genetic factors involved, we crossed pd1 mutants with three japonica cultivars and generated F1 and F2 populations. The F1 phenotype and F2 segregation ratio indicated that a recessive gene controlled the mutant traits. Using the F2 population, we found that pd1 mapped between the simple sequence repeat markers RM11236 and RM11280 on rice chromosome 1. From a segregating population of 2836 plants, 77 recombinants were screened by RM11236 and RM11280. High-resolution linkage analysis narrowed the pd1 locus to a 69 kb region between RM11239 and RM11245 that contained 10 open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence alignment and quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis of these ORFs between 93-11 and pd1 mutant plants found no unequivocal evidence to identify the pd1 gene. PMID:26441054

  14. Association mapping provides insights into the origin and the fine structure of the sorghum aluminum tolerance locus, AltSB.

    PubMed

    Caniato, Fernanda F; Hamblin, Martha T; Guimaraes, Claudia T; Zhang, Zhiwu; Schaffert, Robert E; Kochian, Leon V; Magalhaes, Jurandir V

    2014-01-01

    Root damage caused by aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major cause of grain yield reduction on acid soils, which are prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions of the world where food security is most tenuous. In sorghum, Al tolerance is conferred by SbMATE, an Al-activated root citrate efflux transporter that underlies the major Al tolerance locus, AltSB, on sorghum chromosome 3. We used association mapping to gain insights into the origin and evolution of Al tolerance in sorghum and to detect functional variants amenable to allele mining applications. Linkage disequilibrium across the AltSB locus decreased much faster than in previous reports in sorghum, and reached basal levels at approximately 1000 bp. Accordingly, intra-locus recombination events were found to be extensive. SNPs and indels highly associated with Al tolerance showed a narrow frequency range, between 0.06 and 0.1, suggesting a rather recent origin of Al tolerance mutations within AltSB. A haplotype network analysis suggested a single geographic and racial origin of causative mutations in primordial guinea domesticates in West Africa. Al tolerance assessment in accessions harboring recombinant haplotypes suggests that causative polymorphisms are localized to a ?6 kb region including intronic polymorphisms and a transposon (MITE) insertion, whose size variation has been shown to be positively correlated with Al tolerance. The SNP with the strongest association signal, located in the second SbMATE intron, recovers 9 of the 14 highly Al tolerant accessions and 80% of all the Al tolerant and intermediately tolerant accessions in the association panel. Our results also demonstrate the pivotal importance of knowledge on the origin and evolution of Al tolerance mutations in molecular breeding applications. Allele mining strategies based on associated loci are expected to lead to the efficient identification, in diverse sorghum germplasm, of Al tolerant accessions able maintain grain yields under Al toxicity. PMID:24498106

  15. Fine Mapping of the Interaction between C4b-Binding Protein and Outer Membrane Proteins LigA and LigB of Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Breda, Leandro C D; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica M; da Silva, Ludmila B; Barbosa, Angela S; Blom, Anna M; Yung-Fu, Chang; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    The complement system consists of more than 40 proteins that participate in the inflammatory response and in pathogen killing. Complement inhibitors are necessary to avoid the excessive consumption and activation of this system on host cells. Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires are able to escape from complement activation by binding to host complement inhibitors Factor H [FH] and C4b-binding protein (C4BP) while non-pathogenic leptospires are rapidly killed in the presence of fresh serum. In this study, we demonstrate that complement control protein domains (CCP) 7 and 8 of C4BP ?-chain interact with the outer membrane proteins LcpA, LigA and LigB from the pathogenic leptospire L. interrogans. The interaction between C4BP and LcpA, LigA and LigB is sensitive to ionic strength and inhibited by heparin. We fine mapped the LigA and LigB domains involved in its binding to C4BP and heparin and found that both interactions are mediated through the bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains 7 and 8 (LigA7-8 and LigB7-8) of both LigA and LigB and also through LigB9-10. Therefore, C4BP and heparin may share the same binding sites on Lig proteins. PMID:26517116

  16. Fine Mapping of the Interaction between C4b-Binding Protein and Outer Membrane Proteins LigA and LigB of Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Leandro C. D.; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica M.; da Silva, Ludmila B.; Barbosa, Angela S.; Blom, Anna M.; Yung-Fu, Chang; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The complement system consists of more than 40 proteins that participate in the inflammatory response and in pathogen killing. Complement inhibitors are necessary to avoid the excessive consumption and activation of this system on host cells. Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires are able to escape from complement activation by binding to host complement inhibitors Factor H [FH] and C4b-binding protein (C4BP) while non-pathogenic leptospires are rapidly killed in the presence of fresh serum. In this study, we demonstrate that complement control protein domains (CCP) 7 and 8 of C4BP ?-chain interact with the outer membrane proteins LcpA, LigA and LigB from the pathogenic leptospire L. interrogans. The interaction between C4BP and LcpA, LigA and LigB is sensitive to ionic strength and inhibited by heparin. We fine mapped the LigA and LigB domains involved in its binding to C4BP and heparin and found that both interactions are mediated through the bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains 7 and 8 (LigA7-8 and LigB7-8) of both LigA and LigB and also through LigB9-10. Therefore, C4BP and heparin may share the same binding sites on Lig proteins. PMID:26517116

  17. Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele: Evidence for Synthetic Association in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Edward J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F.; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-01-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P?=?2.62×10?14). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  18. Fine-mapping the HOXB region detects common variants tagging a rare coding allele: evidence for synthetic association in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Gronberg, Henrik; Aly, Markus; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Canzian, Federico; Campa, Daniele; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-02-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P?=?2.62×10(-14)). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  19. COMPARISONS OF QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCUS MAPPING PROPERTIES BETWEEN TWO METHODS OF RECOMBINANT INBRED LINE DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The theoretical comparisons for QTL mapping properties were conducted between bulk-based recombinant inbred (RI) populations and single seed descent (SSD) RI populations by Monte Carlo simulations based on various population sizes, heritabilities, and QTL effects. The comparisons included estimatio...

  20. Linkage mapping of domestication loci in a large maize-teosinte backcross resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultimate objective of QTL mapping is cloning genes responsible for quantitative traits. However, projects seldom go beyond segments narrower than 5 cM without subsequent breeding and genotyping lines to identify additional crossovers in a genomic region of interest. We report on a QTL analysis ...

  1. Probability genotype imputation method and integrated weighted lasso for QTL identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many QTL studies have two common features: (1) often there is missing marker information, (2) among many markers involved in the biological process only a few are causal. In statistics, the second issue falls under the headings “sparsity” and “causal inference”. The goal of this work is to develop a two-step statistical methodology for QTL mapping for markers with binary genotypes. The first step introduces a novel imputation method for missing genotypes. Outcomes of the proposed imputation method are probabilities which serve as weights to the second step, namely in weighted lasso. The sparse phenotype inference is employed to select a set of predictive markers for the trait of interest. Results Simulation studies validate the proposed methodology under a wide range of realistic settings. Furthermore, the methodology outperforms alternative imputation and variable selection methods in such studies. The methodology was applied to an Arabidopsis experiment, containing 69 markers for 165 recombinant inbred lines of a F8 generation. The results confirm previously identified regions, however several new markers are also found. On the basis of the inferred ROC behavior these markers show good potential for being real, especially for the germination trait Gmax. Conclusions Our imputation method shows higher accuracy in terms of sensitivity and specificity compared to alternative imputation method. Also, the proposed weighted lasso outperforms commonly practiced multiple regression as well as the traditional lasso and adaptive lasso with three weighting schemes. This means that under realistic missing data settings this methodology can be used for QTL identification. PMID:24378210

  2. EFFECT OF POPULATION SIZE ON THE ESTIMATION OF BARLEY STRIPE RUST QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The limited population sizes used in many quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection experiments can lead to underestimation of QTL number, overestimation of QTL effects, and failure to quantify QTL interactions. We used the barley/barley stripe rust pathosystem to evaluate the effect of population si...

  3. HOW DOES POPULATION SIZE AFFECT THE ESTIMATION OF BARLEY STRIPE RUST RESISTANCE QTL?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The limited population sizes used in many quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection experiments can lead to underestimation of QTL number, overestimation of QTL effects, and failure to quantify QTL interactions. We used the barley/barley stripe rust pathosystem to evaluate the effect of population si...

  4. INVESTIGATION Do Large Effect QTL Fractionate? A Case Study

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    to one or multiple linked genes. Similarly, when QTL for several traits colocalize, it is usually unclear whether this is due to the pleiotropic action of a single gene or multiple linked genes, each affecting of tightly linked genes. These authors have suggested that such large effect QTL, upon closer examina- tion

  5. Spreading culm locus discovered while dissecting a sheath blight resistance QTL within a set of TeQing-into-Lemont introgression lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new gene-mapping population comprised of 123 TeQing-into-Lemont backcross introgression lines (TILs) was developed for the purpose of providing a uniquely efficient avenue for verifying, molecularly tagging, and incorporating desired TeQing QTL into improved U.S. rice varieties. The TILs were bei...

  6. Toward a better understanding of the genomic region harboring Fusarium head blight resistance QTL Qfhs.ndsu-3AS in durum wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wild emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccoides)-derived Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance quantitative trait locus (QTL) Qfhs.ndsu-3AS previously mapped to the short arm of chromosome 3A (3AS) in a population of recombinant inbred chromosome lines (RICLs). This study aimed to attain a better unders...

  7. Major QTL for Carrot Color are Associated with Carotenoid Biosynthetic Genes and Interact Epistatically in a Domesticated x Wild Carrot Cross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild carrot roots are white and do not accumulate pigments while the cultivated carrot is one of the richest sources of carotenoid pigments – mainly provitamin A alpha and beta carotenes. In this study we performed QTL analyses for pigment content on a carotenoid biosynthesis function map based on t...

  8. Sequencing of a QTL-rich region of the Theobroma cacao genome using pooled BACs and the identification of trait specific candidate genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: BAC-based physical maps provide for sequencing across an entire genome or selected sub-genome regions of biological interest. Using the minimum tiling path as a guide, it is possible to select specific BAC clones from prioritized genome sections such as a genetically defined QTL interv...

  9. Genotypic effects of the Texel Muscling QTL (TM-QTL) on meat quality in purebred Texel lambs.

    PubMed

    Lambe, N R; Richardson, R I; Macfarlane, J M; Nevison, I; Haresign, W; Matika, O; Bünger, L

    2011-10-01

    Texel Muscling QTL (TM-QTL) increases loin muscling in lambs inheriting it from their sire only. This study investigated TM-QTL effects on meat quality in 209 Texel lambs that were CT-scanned then slaughtered at 20weeks (carcasses aged for ~1week). Loin meat quality traits included: CT-measured muscle density (predicting intramuscular fat); mechanical tenderness using Volodkevich-type jaws or MIRINZ tenderometer; intramuscular fat; sensory eating quality (sub-sample of 40 lambs). Volodkevich tenderness was also measured in the leg (Vastis lateralis). TM-QTL genotypes were determined, giving 40 non-carriers (+/+), 70 heterozygotes-53 inheriting TM-QTL from the sire (TM/+) and 17 from the dam (+/TM), 34 homozygote TM-QTL lambs (TM/TM) and 65 uncertain. Multiple regression identified no genotype effects on meat quality. For MIRINZ-measured loin tenderness only, contrasts revealed a significant additive effect of TM-QTL (1.27kgF difference between homozygotes). However, the taste panel identified no significant differences between +/+ and TM/TM lambs. Results show little evidence of TM-QTL affecting meat quality. PMID:21592676

  10. New candidate genes for the fine regulation of the colour of grapes

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Laura; Malacarne, Giulia; Lorenzi, Silvia; Troggio, Michela; Mattivi, Fulvio; Moser, Claudio; Grando, Maria Stella

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, great progress has been made in clarifying the main determinants of anthocyanin accumulation in grape berry skin. However, the molecular details of the fine variation among cultivars, which ultimately contributes to wine typicity, are still not completely understood. To shed light on this issue, the grapes of 170 F1 progeny from the cross ‘Syrah’×’Pinot Noir’ were characterized at the mature stage for the content of 15 anthocyanins during four growing seasons. This huge data set was used in combination with a dense genetic map to detect genomic regions controlling the anthocyanin pathway both at key enzymatic points and at particular branches. Genes putatively involved in fine tuning the global regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis were identified by exploring the gene predictions in the QTL (quantitative trait locus) confidence intervals and their expression profile during berry development in offspring with contrasting anthocyanin accumulation. New information on some aspects which had scarcely been investigated so far, such as anthocyanin transport into the vacuole, or completely neglected, such as acylation, is provided. These genes represent a valuable resource in grapevine molecular-based breeding programmes to improve both fruit and wine quality and to tailor wine sensory properties according to consumer demand. PMID:26071528

  11. Molecular dissection of interspecific variation between Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense (cotton) by a backcross-self approach: II. Fiber fineness.

    PubMed

    Draye, Xavier; Chee, Peng; Jiang, Chun-Xiao; Decanini, Laura; Delmonte, Terrye A; Bredhauer, Robert; Smith, C Wayne; Paterson, Andrew H

    2005-08-01

    A backcross-self population from a cross between Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense was used to dissect the molecular basis of genetic variation governing two parameters reflecting lint fiber fineness and to compare the precision of these two measurements. By applying a detailed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) map to 3,662 BC(3)F(2) plants from 24 independently derived BC(3) families, we were able to detect 32 and nine quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fiber fineness and micronaire (MIC), respectively. The discovery of larger numbers of QTLs in this study than previously found in other studies based on F(2) populations grown in favorable environments reflects the ability of the backcross-self design to resolve smaller QTL effects. Although the two measurements differed dramatically in the number of QTLs detected, seven of the nine MIC QTLs were also associated with fiber fineness. This supports other data in suggesting that fiber fineness more accurately reflects the underlying physical properties of cotton fibers and, consequently, is a preferable trait for selection. "Negative transgression," with the majority of BC(3)F(2) families showing average phenotypes that were poorer than that of the inferior parent, suggests that many of the new gene combinations formed by interspecific hybridization are maladaptive and may contribute to the lack of progress in utilizing G. barbadense in conventional breeding programs to improve upland cotton. PMID:15995865

  12. High-density genetic linkage map construction and identification of fruit-related QTLs in pear using SNP and SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Li, Lei-Ting; Li, Meng; Khan, M. Awais; Li, Xiu-Gen; Chen, Hui; Yin, Hao; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Pear (Pyrus spp) is an important fruit crop, grown in all temperate regions of the world, with global production ranked after grape and apples among deciduous tree crops. A high-density linkage map is a valuable tool for fine mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) and map-based gene cloning. In this study, we firstly constructed a high-density linkage map of pear using SNPs integrated with SSRs, developed by the rapid and robust technology of restriction-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). The linkage map consists of 3143 SNP markers and 98 SSRs, 3241 markers in total, spanning 2243.4 cM, with an average marker distance of 0.70 cM. Anchoring SSRs were able to anchor seventeen linkage groups to their corresponding chromosomes. Based on this high-density integrated pear linkage map and two years of fruit phenotyping, a total of 32 potential QTLs for 11 traits, including length of pedicel (LFP), single fruit weight (SFW), soluble solid content (SSC), transverse diameter (TD), vertical diameter (VD), calyx status (CS), flesh colour (FC), juice content (JC), number of seeds (NS), skin colour (SC), and skin smooth (SS), were identified and positioned on the genetic map. Among them, some important fruit-related traits have for the first time been identified, such as calyx status, length of pedicel, and flesh colour, and reliable localization of QTLs were verified repeatable. This high-density linkage map of pear is a worthy reference for mapping important fruit traits, QTL identification, and comparison and combination of different genetic maps. PMID:25129128

  13. Empirical Bayesian elastic net for multiple quantitative trait locus mapping.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Xu, S; Cai, X

    2015-01-01

    In multiple quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, a high-dimensional sparse regression model is usually employed to account for possible multiple linked QTLs. The QTL model may include closely linked and thus highly correlated genetic markers, especially when high-density marker maps are used in QTL mapping because of the advancement in sequencing technology. Although existing algorithms, such as Lasso, empirical Bayesian Lasso (EBlasso) and elastic net (EN) are available to infer such QTL models, more powerful methods are highly desirable to detect more QTLs in the presence of correlated QTLs. We developed a novel empirical Bayesian EN (EBEN) algorithm for multiple QTL mapping that inherits the efficiency of our previously developed EBlasso algorithm. Simulation results demonstrated that EBEN provided higher power of detection and almost the same false discovery rate compared with EN and EBlasso. Particularly, EBEN can identify correlated QTLs that the other two algorithms may fail to identify. When analyzing a real dataset, EBEN detected more effects than EN and EBlasso. EBEN provides a useful tool for inferring high-dimensional sparse model in multiple QTL mapping and other applications. An R software package 'EBEN' implementing the EBEN algorithm is available on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN). PMID:25204301

  14. Trans-Ethnic Fine-Mapping of Lipid Loci Identifies Population-Specific Signals and Allelic Heterogeneity That Increases the Trait Variance Explained

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Waite, Lindsay L.; Jackson, Anne U.; Sheu, Wayne H-H.; Buyske, Steven; Absher, Devin; Arnett, Donna K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Carty, Cara L.; Cheng, Iona; Cochran, Barbara; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Dumitrescu, Logan; Eaton, Charles B.; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Henderson, Brian E.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Kim, Eric; Kinnunen, Leena; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lee, Wen-Jane; Le Marchand, Loic; Lin, Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Lingaas-Holmen, Oddgeir; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Narisu, Narisu; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Schumacher, Fred; Stan?áková, Alena; Sundvall, Jouko; Sung, Yun-Ju; Swift, Amy J.; Wang, Wen-Chang; Wilkens, Lynne; Wilsgaard, Tom; Young, Alicia M.; Adair, Linda S.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; B?žková, Petra; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Francis S.; Duggan, David; Feranil, Alan B.; Ho, Low-Tone; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Juang, Jyh-Ming J.; Kesäniemi, Antero Y.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lee, I-Te; Leppert, Mark F.; Matise, Tara C.; Moilanen, Leena; Njølstad, Inger; Peters, Ulrike; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ?100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, in individuals of African American (n?=?6,832), East Asian (n?=?9,449), and European (n?=?10,829) ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1×10?4 in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies. PMID:23555291

  15. Fine mapping of the uterine leiomyoma locus on 1q43 close to a lncRNA in the RGS7-FH interval

    PubMed Central

    Aissani, Brahim; Zhang, Kui; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Menko, Fred H; Wiener, Howard W

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in fumarate hydratase (FH) on chromosome 1q43 cause a rare cancer syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), but are rare in nonsyndromic and common uterine leiomyoma (UL) or fibroids. Studies suggested that variants in FH or in a linked gene may also predispose to UL. We re-sequenced 2.3?Mb of DNA spanning FH in 96 UL cases and controls from the multiethnic NIEHS-uterine fibroid study, and in 18 HLRCC-associated UL probands from European families then selected 221 informative SNPs for follow-up genotyping. We report promising susceptibility associations with UL peaking at rs78220092 (P=7.0×10?5) in the RGS7-FH interval in African Americans. In race-combined analyses and in meta-analyses (n=916), we identified promising associations with risk peaking upstream of a non-protein coding RNA (lncRNA) locus located in the RGS7-FH interval closer to RGS7, and associations with tumor size peaking in the distal phospholipase D family, member 5 (PLD5) gene at rs2654879 (P=1.7×10?4). We corroborated previously reported FH mutations in nine out of the 18 HLRCC-associated UL cases and identified two missense mutations in FH in only two nonsyndromic UL cases and one control. Our fine association mapping and integration of existing gene profiling data showing upregulated expression of the lncRNA and downregulation of PLD5 in fibroids, as compared to matched myometrium, suggest a potential role of this genomic region in UL pathogenesis. While the identified variations at 1q43 represent a potential risk locus for UL, future replication analyses are required to substantiate our observation. PMID:26113603

  16. Fine mapping of the rice Bph1 gene, which confers resistance to the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens stal), and development of STS markers for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young-Soon; Ji, Hyeonso; Yun, Doh-Won; Ahn, Byoung-Ohg; Lee, Myung Chul; Suh, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Chun Seok; Ahn, Eok Keun; Jeon, Yong-Hee; Jin, Il-Doo; Sohn, Jae-Keun; Koh, Hee-Jong; Eun, Moo-Young

    2008-08-31

    The brown planthopper (BPH) is a major insect pest in rice, and damages these plants by sucking phloem-sap and transmitting viral diseases. Many BPH resistance genes have been identified in indica varieties and wild rice accessions, but none has yet been cloned. In the present study we report fine mapping of the region containing the Bph1 locus, which enabled us to perform marker-aided selection (MAS). We used 273 F8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between Cheongcheongbyeo, an indica type variety harboring Bph1 from Mudgo, and Hwayeongbyeo, a BPH susceptible japonica variety. By random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis using 656 random 10-mer primers, three RAPD markers (OPH09, OPA10 and OPA15) linked to Bph1 were identified and converted to SCAR (sequence characterized amplified region) markers. These markers were found to be contained in two BAC clones derived from chromosome 12: OPH09 on OSJNBa0011B18, and both OPA10 and OPA15 on OSJNBa0040E10. By sequence analysis of ten additional BAC clones evenly distributed between OSJNBa0011B18 and OSJNBa0040E10, we developed 15 STS markers. Of these, pBPH4 and pBPH14 flanked Bph1 at distances of 0.2 cM and 0.8 cM, respectively. The STS markers pBPH9, pBPH19, pBPH20, and pBPH21 co-segregated with Bph1. These markers were shown to be very useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in breeding populations of 32 F6 RILs from a cross between Andabyeo and IR71190, and 32 F5 RILs from a cross between Andabyeo and Suwon452. PMID:18612237

  17. The phenotypic difference discards sib-pair QTL linkage information

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, F.A. |

    1997-03-01

    Kruglyak and Lander provide an important synthesis of methods for (IBD) sib-pair linkage mapping, with an emphasis on the use of complete multipoint inheritance information for each sib pair. These procedures are implemented in the computer program MAPMAKER/SIBS, which performs interval mapping for dichotomous and quantitative traits. The authors present three methods for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs): a variant of the commonly used Haseman-Elston regression approach, a maximum-likelihood procedure involving variance components, and a rank-based nonparametric procedure. These approaches and related work use the magnitude of the difference in the sibling phenotype values for each sib pair as the observation for analysis. Linkage is detected if siblings sharing more alleles IBD have similar phenotypes (i.e., a small difference in the phenotype values), while siblings sharing fewer alleles IBD have less similar phenotypes. Such techniques have been used to detect linkage for a number of quantitative traits. However, the exclusive reliance on the phenotypic differences may be due in large part to historical inertia. A likelihood argument is presented here to show that, under certain classical assumptions, the phenotypic differences do not contain the full likelihood information for QTL mapping. Furthermore, considerable gains in power to detect linkage can be achieved with an expanded likelihood model. The development here is related to previous work, which incorporates the full set of phenotypic data using likelihood and robust quasi-likelihood methods. The purpose of this letter is not to endorse a particular approach but to spur research in alternative and perhaps more powerful linkage tests. 17 refs.

  18. Hordoindolines are associated with a major endosperm-texture QTL in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Beecher, B; Bowman, J; Martin, J M; Bettge, A D; Morris, C F; Blake, T K; Giroux, M J

    2002-06-01

    Endosperm texture has a tremendous impact on the end-use quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Cultivars of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), a close relative of wheat, also vary measurably in grain hardness. However, in contrast to wheat, little is known about the genetic control of barley grain hardness. Puroindolines are endosperm-specific proteins found in wheat and its relatives. In wheat, puroindoline sequence variation controls the majority of wheat grain texture variation. Hordoindolines, the puroindoline homologs of barley, have been identified and mapped. Recently, substantial allelic variation was found for hordoindolines among commercial barley cultivars. Our objective was to determine the influence of hordoindoline allelic variation upon grain hardness and dry matter digestibility in the 'Steptoe' x 'Morex' mapping population. This population is segregating for hordoindoline allele type, which was measured by a HinA/HinB/Gsp composite marker. One-hundred and fifty lines of the 'Steptoe' x 'Morex' population were grown in a replicated field trial. Grain hardness was estimated by near-infrared reflectance (NIR) and measured using the single kernel characterization system (SKCS). Variation attributable to the HinA/HinB/Gsp locus averaged 5.7 SKCS hardness units (SKCS U). QTL analysis revealed the presence of several areas of the genome associated with grain hardness. The largest QTL mapped to the HinA/HinB/Gsp region on the short arm of chomosome 7 (5H). This QTL explains 22% of the SKCS hardness difference observed in this study. The results indicate that the Hardness locus is present in barley and implicates the hordoindolines in endosperm texture control. PMID:12033628

  19. QTL analysis of cadmium and zinc accumulation in the heavy metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Deniau, A X; Pieper, B; Ten Bookum, W M; Lindhout, P; Aarts, M G M; Schat, H

    2006-09-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens (Tc; 2n = 14) is a natural Zn, Cd and Ni hyperaccumulator species belonging to the Brassicaceae family. It shares 88% DNA identity in the coding regions with Arabidopsis thaliana (At) (Rigola et al. 2006). Although the physiology of heavy metal (hyper)accumulation has been intensively studied, the molecular genetics are still largely unexplored. We address this topic by constructing a genetic map based on AFLP markers and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). To establish a genetic map, an F(2) population of 129 individuals was generated from a cross between a plant from a Pb/Cd/Zn-contaminated site near La Calamine, Belgium, and a plant from a comparable site near Ganges (GA), France. These two accessions show different degrees of Zn and, particularly, Cd accumulation. We analyzed 181 AFLP markers (of which 4 co-dominant) and 13 co-dominant EST sequences-based markers and mapped them to seven linkage groups (LGs), presumably corresponding to the seven chromosomes of T. caerulescens. The total length of the genetic map is 496 cM with an average density of one marker every 2.5 cM. This map was used for Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping in the F(2). For Zn as well as Cd concentration in root we mapped two QTLs. Three QTLs and one QTL were mapped for Zn and Cd concentration in shoot, respectively. These QTLs explain 23.8-60.4% of the total variance of the traits measured. We found only one common locus (LG6) for Zn and Cd (concentration in root) and one common locus for shoot and root concentrations of Zn (LG1) and of Cd (LG3). For all QTLs, the GA allele increased the trait value except for two QTLs for Zn accumulation in shoot (LG1 and LG4) and one for Zn concentration in root (LG1). PMID:16850314

  20. Large-Scale SNP Discovery and Genotyping for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Tea Plant Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-Lei; Jin, Ji-Qiang; Li, Chun-Fang; Wang, Rong-Kai; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Yao, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps are important tools in plant genomics and breeding. The present study reports the large-scale discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic map construction in tea plant. We developed a total of 6,042 valid SNP markers using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), and subsequently mapped them into the previous framework map. The final map contained 6,448 molecular markers, distributing on fifteen linkage groups corresponding to the number of tea plant chromosomes. The total map length was 3,965 cM, with an average inter-locus distance of 1.0 cM. This map is the first SNP-based reference map of tea plant, as well as the most saturated one developed to date. The SNP markers and map resources generated in this study provide a wealth of genetic information that can serve as a foundation for downstream genetic analyses, such as the fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), map-based cloning, marker-assisted selection, and anchoring of scaffolds to facilitate the process of whole genome sequencing projects for tea plant. PMID:26035838

  1. High-resolution analysis of a QTL for resistance to Stagonospora nodorum glume blotch in wheat reveals presence of two distinct resistance loci in the target interval.

    PubMed

    Shatalina, Margarita; Messmer, Monika; Feuillet, Catherine; Mascher, Fabio; Paux, Etienne; Choulet, Frédéric; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2014-03-01

    Stagonospora nodorum glume blotch (SNG), caused by the necrotrophic fungus Stagonospora nodorum, is one of the economically important diseases of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Resistance to SNG is known to be quantitative and previous studies of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance to SNG on the short arm of chromosome 3B. To localize this QTL (QSng.sfr-3BS) with high resolution, we constructed a genetic map for the QTL target region using information from sequenced flow-sorted chromosomes 3B of the two parental cultivars 'Arina' and 'Forno', the physical map of chromosome 3B of cultivar 'Chinese Spring' and BAC-clone sequences. The mapping population of near-isogenic lines (NIL) was evaluated for SNG resistance in field infection tests. NILs segregated for disease resistance as well as for plant height; additionally, we observed a high environmental influence on the trait. Our analysis detected a strong negative correlation of SNG resistance and plant height. Further analysis of the target region identified two linked loci associated with SNG resistance. One of them was also associated with plant height, revealing an effect of QSng.sfr-3BS on plant height that was hidden in the RIL population. This result demonstrates an unexpectedly high genetic complexity of resistance controlled by QSng.sfr-3BS and shows the importance of the study of QTL in mendelized form in NILs. PMID:24306318

  2. Search for QTL affecting the shape of the egg laying curve of the Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Minvielle, Francis; Kayang, Boniface B; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Miwa, Mitsuru; Vignal, Alain; Gourichon, David; Neau, André; Monvoisin, Jean-Louis; Ito, Shin' ichi

    2006-01-01

    Background Egg production is of critical importance in birds not only for their reproduction but also for human consumption as the egg is a highly nutritive and balanced food. Consequently, laying in poultry has been improved through selection to increase the total number of eggs laid per hen. This number is the cumulative result of the oviposition, a cyclic and repeated process which leads to a pattern over time (the egg laying curve) which can be modelled and described individually. Unlike the total egg number which compounds all variations, the shape of the curve gives information on the different phases of egg laying, and its genetic analysis using molecular markers might contribute to understand better the underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to perform the first QTL search for traits involved in shaping the egg laying curve, in an F2 experiment with 359 female Japanese quail. Results Eight QTL were found on five autosomes, and six of them could be directly associated with egg production traits, although none was significant at the genome-wide level. One of them (on CJA13) had an effect on the first part of the laying curve, before the production peak. Another one (on CJA06) was related to the central part of the curve when laying is maintained at a high level, and the four others (on CJA05, CJA10 and CJA14) acted on the last part of the curve where persistency is determinant. The QTL for the central part of the curve was mapped at the same position on CJA06 than a genome-wide significant QTL for total egg number detected previously in the same F2. Conclusion Despite its limited scope (number of microsatellites, size of the phenotypic data set), this work has shown that it was possible to use the individual egg laying data collected daily to find new QTL which affect the shape of the egg laying curve. Beyond the present results, this new approach could also be applied to longitudinal traits in other species, like growth and lactation in ruminants, for which good marker coverage of the genome and theoretical models with a biological significance are available. PMID:16677378

  3. Mapping quantitative trait loci using the MCMC procedure in SAS.

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Hu, Z

    2011-02-01

    The MCMC procedure in SAS (called PROC MCMC) is particularly designed for Bayesian analysis using the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The program is sufficiently general to handle very complicated statistical models and arbitrary prior distributions. This study introduces the SAS/MCMC procedure and demonstrates the application of the program to quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. A real life QTL mapping experiment in wheat female fertility trait was used as an example for the demonstration. The fertility trait phenotypes were described under three different models: (1) the Poisson model, (2) the Bernoulli model and (3) the zero-truncated Poisson model. One QTL was identified on the second chromosome. This QTL appears to control the switch of seed-producing ability of female plants but does not affect the number of seeds produced once the switch is turned on. PMID:20551982

  4. Mapping quantitative trait loci using the MCMC procedure in SAS

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Hu, Z

    2011-01-01

    The MCMC procedure in SAS (called PROC MCMC) is particularly designed for Bayesian analysis using the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The program is sufficiently general to handle very complicated statistical models and arbitrary prior distributions. This study introduces the SAS/MCMC procedure and demonstrates the application of the program to quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. A real life QTL mapping experiment in wheat female fertility trait was used as an example for the demonstration. The fertility trait phenotypes were described under three different models: (1) the Poisson model, (2) the Bernoulli model and (3) the zero-truncated Poisson model. One QTL was identified on the second chromosome. This QTL appears to control the switch of seed-producing ability of female plants but does not affect the number of seeds produced once the switch is turned on. PMID:20551982

  5. Genetic analysis of a murine QTL for diet restriction on chromosome 15.

    PubMed

    Newell, Breanne L; Kechris, Katerina; McQueen, Matt B; Johnson, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Diet restriction (DR), the implementation of a reduced calorie diet, without starvation, increases lifespan in a number of model organisms including mammals. How DR extends lifespan remains unclear. Genetic studies have shown that life extension is not a universal response to DR; instead, the effects of DR are strain dependent. We previously mapped a quantitative trait locus (QTL) specifying differential response to DR to chromosome 15 in the inbred long-sleep (ILS)?×?inbred short-sleep (ISS) recombinant inbred panel of mice. This QTL named Fedr2 (fuel efficiency response to DR)-2 modifies body weight (BW) and hair growth (HG) in response to DR. The QTL has been previously mapped using the ISS.Lore5(LA) (5LA) congenic strain. Here, we have used the reciprocal congenic strain ILS.Lore5(SA) (5SA) to further investigate Fedr2. The 5LA congenic showed increased ability to maintain BW and HG under DR. For the reciprocal congenic, 5SA, we expected the reciprocal response that the 5SA congenic would have a lesser ability to maintain BW and HG under DR. This expectation was mostly met. The Fedr2 (S) allele conferred lower BW maintenance under DR in both females and males. For females, the difference in BW was significant for the entirety of DR, and for males, the difference became significant at week 17 of DR. For HG, the Fedr2 (S) allele conferred decreased HG ability under DR in males, but not for females. These results highlight the genetic basis for variation in DR response and support the previous observations that Fedr2 mediates BW and HG during DR. PMID:25651884

  6. GENETIC ASSOCIATION MAPPING AND GENOME ORGANIZATION OF MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping, a high-resolution method for mapping QTL based on linkage disequilibrium, holds great promise for the dissection of complex genetic traits. Recent assembly and characterization of maize association mapping panels, development of improved statistical methods, and successful asso...

  7. The genetics of winterhardiness in barley: Perspectives from genome-wide association mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winterhardiness is a complex trait that involves low temperature (LT) tolerance, vernalization sensitivity and photoperiod sensitivity. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for these traits were first identified using biparental mapping populations; candidate genes for all loci have since been identified a...

  8. eQTL Epistasis – Challenges and Computational Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang; Wuchty, Stefan; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    The determination of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) epistasis – a form of functional interaction between genetic loci that affect gene expression – is an important step toward the thorough understanding of gene regulation. Since gene expression has emerged as an “intermediate” molecular phenotype eQTL epistasis might help to explain the relationship between genotype and higher level organismal phenotypes such as diseases. A characteristic feature of eQTL analysis is the big number of tests required to identify associations between gene expression and genetic loci variability. This problem is aggravated, when epistatic effects between eQTLs are analyzed. In this review, we discuss recent algorithmic approaches for the detection of eQTL epistasis and highlight lessons that can be learned from current methods. PMID:23755066

  9. Applying genome-wide gene-based expression quantitative trait locus mapping to study population ancestry and pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene-based analysis has become popular in genomic research because of its appealing biological and statistical properties compared with those of a single-locus analysis. However, only a few, if any, studies have discussed a mapping of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in a gene-based framework. Neither study has discussed ancestry-informative eQTL nor investigated their roles in pharmacogenetics by integrating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based eQTL (s-eQTL) and gene-based eQTL (g-eQTL). Results In this g-eQTL mapping study, the transcript expression levels of genes (transcript-level genes; T-genes) were correlated with the SNPs of genes (sequence-level genes; S-genes) by using a method of gene-based partial least squares (PLS). Ancestry-informative transcripts were identified using a rank-score-based multivariate association test, and ancestry-informative eQTL were identified using Fisher’s exact test. Furthermore, key ancestry-predictive eQTL were selected in a flexible discriminant analysis. We analyzed SNPs and gene expression of 210 independent people of African-, Asian- and European-descent. We identified numerous cis- and trans-acting g-eQTL and s-eQTL for each population by using PLS. We observed ancestry information enriched in eQTL. Furthermore, we identified 2 ancestry-informative eQTL associated with adverse drug reactions and/or drug response. Rs1045642, located on MDR1, is an ancestry-informative eQTL (P = 2.13E-13, using Fisher’s exact test) associated with adverse drug reactions to amitriptyline and nortriptyline and drug responses to morphine. Rs20455, located in KIF6, is an ancestry-informative eQTL (P = 2.76E-23, using Fisher’s exact test) associated with the response to statin drugs (e.g., pravastatin and atorvastatin). The ancestry-informative eQTL of drug biotransformation genes were also observed; cross-population cis-acting expression regulators included SPG7, TAP2, SLC7A7, and CYP4F2. Finally, we also identified key ancestry-predictive eQTL and established classification models with promising training and testing accuracies in separating samples from close populations. Conclusions In summary, we developed a gene-based PLS procedure and a SAS macro for identifying g-eQTL and s-eQTL. We established data archives of eQTL for global populations. The program and data archives are accessible at http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/eQTL/HapMapII.htm. Finally, the results from our investigations regarding the interrelationship between eQTL, ancestry information, and pharmacodynamics provide rich resources for future eQTL studies and practical applications in population genetics and medical genetics. PMID:24779372

  10. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  11. Toward the Positional Cloning of qBlsr5a, a QTL Underlying Resistance to Bacterial Leaf Streak, Using Overlapping Sub-CSSLs in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jinliang; Guan, Huazhong; Lin, Degong; Li, Chunlan; Lan, Tao; Duan, Yuanlin; Mao, Damei; Wu, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial leaf steak (BLS) is one of the most destructive diseases in rice. Studies have shown that BLS resistance in rice is quantitatively inherited, controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A QTL with relatively large effect, qBlsr5a, was previously mapped in a region of ?380 kb on chromosome 5. To fine map qBlsr5a further, a set of overlapping sub-chromosome segment substitution lines (sub-CSSLs) were developed from a large secondary F2 population (containing more than 7000 plants), in which only the chromosomal region harboring qBlsr5a was segregated. By genotyping the sub-CSSLs with molecular markers covering the target region and phenotyping the sub-CSSLs with artificial inoculation, qBlsr5a was delimited to a 30.0-kb interval, in which only three genes were predicted. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the three putative genes did not show significant response to the infection of BLS pathogen in both resistant and susceptible parental lines. However, two nucleotide substitutions were found in the coding sequence of gene LOC_Os05g01710, which encodes the gamma chain of transcription initiation factor IIA (TFIIA?). The nucleotide substitutions resulted in a change of the 39th amino acid from valine (in the susceptible parent) to glutamic acid (in the resistant parent). Interestingly, the resistant parent allele of LOC_Os05g01710 is identical to xa5, a major gene resistant to bacterial leaf blight (another bacterial disease of rice). These results suggest that LOC_Os05g01710 is very possibly the candidate gene of qBlsr5a. PMID:24752581

  12. Structural mapping: how to study the genetic architecture of a phenotypic trait through its formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chunfa; Shen, Lianying; Lv, Yafei; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Xiaoling; Feng, Sisi; Li, Xin; Sui, Yihan; Pang, Xiaoming; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for genetic mapping are to simply associate the genotypes of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the phenotypic variation of a complex trait. A more mechanistic strategy has emerged to dissect the trait phenotype into its structural components and map specific QTLs that control the mechanistic and structural formation of a complex trait. We describe and assess such a strategy, called structural mapping, by integrating the internal structural basis of trait formation into a QTL mapping framework. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been instrumental for describing the structural components of a phenotypic trait and their interactions. By building robust mathematical models on circuit EIS data and embedding these models within a mixture model-based likelihood for QTL mapping, structural mapping implements the EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of QTL genotype-specific EIS parameters. The uniqueness of structural mapping is to make it possible to test a number of hypotheses about the pattern of the genetic control of structural components. We validated structural mapping by analyzing an EIS data collected for QTL mapping of frost hardiness in a controlled cross of jujube trees. The statistical properties of parameter estimates were examined by simulation studies. Structural mapping can be a powerful alternative for genetic mapping of complex traits by taking account into the biological and physical mechanisms underlying their formation. PMID:23104859

  13. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling growth and wood quality traits in Eucalyptus grandis using a maternal half-sib family and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Bertolucci, F L; Penchel, R; Sederoff, R R

    1996-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping, BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  14. QTL mapping of resistance to Powdery Mildew in lettuce.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erysiphe cichoracearam causes powdery mildew on most compositae including lettuce and chicory. Variation in susceptibility has been documented both in cultivated lettuce and wild relatives. Little is known about the genetic architecture of resistance to the pathogen, but monogenic resistance has bee...

  15. Evaluation and QTL mapping of phosphorous concentration in soybean seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient required for many biological and metabolic plant functions. Phosphate is the form of P used by plants. Reducing the amount of P in the seed can further aide breeding efforts to reduce the amount of P released into the environment due to the indigestibilit...

  16. QTL mapping of resistance to sorghum downy mildew in maize 

    E-print Network

    Sabry, Ahmed Mohamed-Bashir

    2004-09-30

    ) and highly resistant inbred P345C4S2B46-2-2-1-2-B-B-B (yellow). The phenotypic expression was assessed on F2:3 families in a wide range of environments under natural field infection and in a controlled greenhouse screening method. Heritability estimates...

  17. QTL MAPPING WITH NEAR-ISOGENIC LINES IN MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A set of 89 near-isogenic lines (NILs) of maize was created using marker-assisted selection. Nineteen genomic regions, identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism loci and chosen to represent portions of all 10 maize chromosomes, were introgressed by backcrossing three generations from d...

  18. Drosophila immunity: QTL mapping, genetic variation and molecular evolution 

    E-print Network

    Fytrou, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila is involved in a wide range of interactions with parasites and pathogens (parasitoid wasps, bacteria, fungi, viruses). Drosophila hosts vary greatly at the species, population and individual level, in their ...

  19. Analysis of 133 meioses places the genes for nevoid basal cell carcinoma (gorlin) syndrome and fanconi anemia group C in a 2.6-cM interval and contributes to the fine map of 9q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Farndon, P.A.; Hardy, C.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-15

    Four disease genes (NBCCS, ESS1, XPAC, FACC) map to 9q22.3-q31. A fine map of this region was produced by linkage and haplotype analysis using 12 DNA markers. The gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin) has an important role in congenital malformations and carcinogenesis. Phase-known recombinants in a study of 133 meioses place NBCCS between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S176. Haplotype analysis in a two-generation family suggests that NBCCS lies in a smaller interval of 2.6 cM centromeric to D9S287. These flanking markers will be useful clinically for gene tracking. Recombinants also map FACC (Fanconi anemia, group C) to the same region, between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S287. The recombination rate between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S53 in males is 8.3% and 13.2% in females, giving a sex-specific male:female ratio of 1:1.6 and a sex-averaged map distance of 10.4 cM. No double recombinants were detected, in agreement with the apparently complete level of interference predicted from the male chiasmata map. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Gancho; Yin, Tongming; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  1. Composite Interval Mapping Based on Lattice Design for Error Control May Increase Power of Quantitative Trait Locus Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhongwen; Zhao, Tuanjie; Xing, Guangnan; Gai, Junyi; Guan, Rongzhan

    2015-01-01

    Experimental error control is very important in quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Although numerous statistical methods have been developed for QTL mapping, a QTL detection model based on an appropriate experimental design that emphasizes error control has not been developed. Lattice design is very suitable for experiments with large sample sizes, which is usually required for accurate mapping of quantitative traits. However, the lack of a QTL mapping method based on lattice design dictates that the arithmetic mean or adjusted mean of each line of observations in the lattice design had to be used as a response variable, resulting in low QTL detection power. As an improvement, we developed a QTL mapping method termed composite interval mapping based on lattice design (CIMLD). In the lattice design, experimental errors are decomposed into random errors and block-within-replication errors. Four levels of block-within-replication errors were simulated to show the power of QTL detection under different error controls. The simulation results showed that the arithmetic mean method, which is equivalent to a method under random complete block design (RCBD), was very sensitive to the size of the block variance and with the increase of block variance, the power of QTL detection decreased from 51.3% to 9.4%. In contrast to the RCBD method, the power of CIMLD and the adjusted mean method did not change for different block variances. The CIMLD method showed 1.2- to 7.6-fold higher power of QTL detection than the arithmetic or adjusted mean methods. Our proposed method was applied to real soybean (Glycine max) data as an example and 10 QTLs for biomass were identified that explained 65.87% of the phenotypic variation, while only three and two QTLs were identified by arithmetic and adjusted mean methods, respectively. PMID:26076140

  2. QTL MAPPING OF RESISTANCE TO GRAY LEAF SPOT IN RYEGRASS: CONSISTENCY OF QTL BETWEEN TWO MAPPING POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray leaf spot (GLS) is a serious fungal disease on the important turf and forage species, perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) caused by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea. Early reports suggest little resistance is present in perennial ryegrass cultivars. However, greenhouse inoculations in o...

  3. Fine-Mapping Resolves Eae23 into Two QTLs and Implicates ZEB1 as a Candidate Gene Regulating Experimental Neuroinflammation in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Stridh, Pernilla; Thessen Hedreul, Melanie; Beyeen, Amennai Daniel; Adzemovic, Milena Z.; Laaksonen, Hannes; Gillett, Alan; Öckinger, Johan; Marta, Monica; Lassmann, Hans; Becanovic, Kristina; Jagodic, Maja; Olsson, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Background To elucidate mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS), we studied genetic regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats, assuming a conservation of pathogenic pathways. In this study, we focused on Eae23, originally identified to regulate EAE in a (LEW.1AV1xPVG.1AV1)F2 cross. Our aim was to determine whether one or more genes within the 67 Mb region regulate EAE and to define candidate risk genes. Methodology/Principal Findings We used high resolution quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in the 10th generation (G10) of an advanced intercross line (AIL) to resolve Eae23 into two QTLs that independently regulate EAE, namely Eae23a and Eae23b. We established a congenic strain to validate the effect of this region on disease. PVG alleles in Eae23 resulted in significant protection from EAE and attenuated CNS inflammation/demyelination. Disease amelioration was accompanied with increased levels of Foxp3+ cells in the CNS of the congenic strain compared to DA. We then focused on candidate gene investigation in Eae23b, a 9 Mb region linked to all clinical phenotypes. Affymetrix exon arrays were used to study expression of the genes in Eae23b in the parental strains, where none showed differential expression. However, we found lower expression of exon 4 of ZEB1, which is specific for splice-variant Zfhep1. ZEB1 is an interleukin 2 (IL2) repressor involved in T cell development. The splice-specific variance prompted us to next analyze the expression of ZEB1 and its two splice variants, Zfhep1 and Zfhep2, in both lymph node and spleen. We demonstrated that ZEB1 splice-variants are differentially expressed; severity of EAE and higher IL2 levels were associated with down-regulation of Zfhep1 and up-regulation of Zfhep2. Conclusions/Significance We speculate that the balance between splice-variants of ZEB1 could influence the regulation of EAE. Further functional studies of ZEB1 and the splice-variants may unravel novel pathways contributing to MS pathogenesis and inflammation in general. PMID:20856809

  4. Thai jasmine rice carrying QTLch9 (SubQTL) is submergence tolerant.

    PubMed

    Siangliw, M; Toojinda, T; Tragoonrung, S; Vanavichit, A

    2003-01-01

    Submergence tolerance is an important agronomic trait for rice grown in South-East Asia, where flash flooding occurs frequently and unpredictably during the monsoons. Although mapping locations of one major and several minor quantitative trait loci (QTL) were known previously, improving submergence tolerance in agronomically desirable types of rice has not been achieved. KDML105 is jasmine rice widely grown in rain-fed lowland regions of Thailand. This cultivar is very intolerant of submergence stress. To improve submergence tolerance in this cultivar, three submergence-tolerant cultivars, FR13A, IR67819F2-CA-61 and IR49830-7-1-2-2, were cross-pollinated with KDML105. Transferring the major QTL for submergence tolerance was facilitated by four back-crossings to the recipient KDML105. Molecular markers tightly linked to the gene(s) involved were developed to facilitate molecular genotyping. We demonstrated that individuals of a BC4F3 line that retained a critical region on chromosome 9 transferred from tolerant lines were also tolerant of complete submergence while retaining all the agronomically desirable traits of KDML105. In addition, effects of secondary QTLch2 were detected statistically in back-cross progenies. Effects of secondary QTLch7 were not statistically significant. The close association between tightly linked markers of the tolerance locus on chromosome 9 and submergence tolerance in the field demonstrates the considerable promise of using these markers in lowland rice breeding programmes for selecting increased submergence tolerance. PMID:12509345

  5. Identification of a major QTL controlling the content of B-type starch granules in Aegilops

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Griffiths, Simon; Leigh, Fiona; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Simmonds, James; Uauy, Cristobal; Trafford, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Starch within the endosperm of most species of the Triticeae has a unique bimodal granule morphology comprising large lenticular A-type granules and smaller near-spherical B-type granules. However, a few wild wheat species (Aegilops) are known to lack B-granules. Ae. peregrina and a synthetic tetraploid Aegilops with the same genome composition (SU) were found to differ in B-granule number. The synthetic tetraploid had normal A- and B-type starch granules whilst Ae. peregrina had only A-granules because the B-granules failed to initiate. A population segregating for B-granule number was generated by crossing these two accessions and was used to study the genetic basis of B-granule initiation. A combination of Bulked Segregant Analysis and QTL mapping identified a major QTL located on the short arm of chromosome 4S that accounted for 44.4% of the phenotypic variation. The lack of B-granules in polyploid Aegilops with diverse genomes suggests that the B-granule locus has been lost several times independently during the evolution of the Triticeae. It is proposed that the B-granule locus is susceptible to silencing during polyploidization and a model is presented to explain the observed data based on the assumption that the initiation of B-granules is controlled by a single major locus per haploid genome. PMID:21227932

  6. R/qtlDesign: inbred line cross experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Sen, ?aunak; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Broman, Karl W.; Churchill, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    An investigator planning a QTL (quantitative trait locus) experiment has to choose which strains to cross, the type of cross, genotyping strategies, and the number of progeny to raise and phenotype. To help make such choices, we have developed an interactive program for power and sample size calculations for QTL experiments, R/qtlDesign. Our software includes support for selective genotyping strategies, variable marker spacing, and tools to optimize information content subject to cost constraints for backcross, intercross, and recombinant inbred lines from two parental strains. We review the impact of experimental design choices on the variance attributable to a segregating locus, the residual error variance, and the effective sample size. We give examples of software usage in real-life settings. The software is available at http://www.biostat.ucsf.edu/sen/software.html. PMID:17347894

  7. Robust Linear Models for Cis-eQTL Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rantalainen, Mattias; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Holmes, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) analysis enables characterisation of functional genetic variation influencing expression levels of individual genes. In outbread populations, including humans, eQTLs are commonly analysed using the conventional linear model, adjusting for relevant covariates, assuming an allelic dosage model and a Gaussian error term. However, gene expression data generally have noise that induces heavy-tailed errors relative to the Gaussian distribution and often include atypical observations, or outliers. Such departures from modelling assumptions can lead to an increased rate of type II errors (false negatives), and to some extent also type I errors (false positives). Careful model checking can reduce the risk of type-I errors but often not type II errors, since it is generally too time-consuming to carefully check all models with a non-significant effect in large-scale and genome-wide studies. Here we propose the application of a robust linear model for eQTL analysis to reduce adverse effects of deviations from the assumption of Gaussian residuals. We present results from a simulation study as well as results from the analysis of real eQTL data sets. Our findings suggest that in many situations robust models have the potential to provide more reliable eQTL results compared to conventional linear models, particularly in respect to reducing type II errors due to non-Gaussian noise. Post-genomic data, such as that generated in genome-wide eQTL studies, are often noisy and frequently contain atypical observations. Robust statistical models have the potential to provide more reliable results and increased statistical power under non-Gaussian conditions. The results presented here suggest that robust models should be considered routinely alongside other commonly used methodologies for eQTL analysis. PMID:25992607

  8. Replicated high-density genetic maps of two great tit populations reveal fine-scale genomic departures from sex-equal recombination rates.

    PubMed

    van Oers, K; Santure, A W; De Cauwer, I; van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Sheldon, B C; Visser, M E; Slate, J; Groenen, M A M

    2014-03-01

    Linking variation in quantitative traits to variation in the genome is an important, but challenging task in the study of life-history evolution. Linkage maps provide a valuable tool for the unravelling of such trait-gene associations. Moreover, they give insight into recombination landscapes and between-species karyotype evolution. Here we used genotype data, generated from a 10k single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip, of over 2000 individuals to produce high-density linkage maps of the great tit (Parus major), a passerine bird that serves as a model species for ecological and evolutionary questions. We created independent maps from two distinct populations: a captive F2-cross from The Netherlands (NL) and a wild population from the United Kingdom (UK). The two maps contained 6554 SNPs in 32 linkage groups, spanning 2010 cM and 1917 cM for the NL and UK populations, respectively, and were similar in size and marker order. Subtle levels of heterochiasmy within and between chromosomes were remarkably consistent between the populations, suggesting that the local departures from sex-equal recombination rates have evolved. This key and surprising result would have been impossible to detect if only one population was mapped. A comparison with zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata, chicken Gallus gallus and the green anole lizard Anolis carolinensis genomes provided further insight into the evolution of avian karyotypes. PMID:24149651

  9. Quantitative trait loci mapping of phenotypic plasticity and genotype–environment interactions in plant and insect performance

    PubMed Central

    Tétard-Jones, C.; Kertesz, M. A.; Preziosi, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Community genetic studies generally ignore the plasticity of the functional traits through which the effect is passed from individuals to the associated community. However, the ability of organisms to be phenotypically plastic allows them to rapidly adapt to changing environments and plasticity is commonly observed across all taxa. Owing to the fitness benefits of phenotypic plasticity, evolutionary biologists are interested in its genetic basis, which could explain how phenotypic plasticity is involved in the evolution of species interactions. Two current ideas exist: (i) phenotypic plasticity is caused by environmentally sensitive loci associated with a phenotype; (ii) phenotypic plasticity is caused by regulatory genes that simply influence the plasticity of a phenotype. Here, we designed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping experiment to locate QTL on the barley genome associated with barley performance when the environment varies in the presence of aphids, and the composition of the rhizosphere. We simultaneously mapped aphid performance across variable rhizosphere environments. We mapped main effects, QTL × environment interaction (QTL×E), and phenotypic plasticity (measured as the difference in mean trait values) for barley and aphid performance onto the barley genome using an interval mapping procedure. We found that QTL associated with phenotypic plasticity were co-located with main effect QTL and QTL×E. We also located phenotypic plasticity QTL that were located separately from main effect QTL. These results support both of the current ideas of how phenotypic plasticity is genetically based and provide an initial insight into the functional genetic basis of how phenotypically plastic traits may still be important sources of community genetic effects. PMID:21444311

  10. Fine mapping and characterization of Sr21, a temperature-sensitive diploid wheat resistance gene effective against the Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici Ug99 race group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new race of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal pathogen of stem rust of wheat, designated TTKSK (also known as Ug99) and its variants are virulent to most of the stem rust resistance genes currently deployed in wheat cultivars worldwide. Therefore, identification, mapping and deployment ...

  11. Uncertainty Analysis in the Creation of a Fine-Resolution Leaf Area Index (LAI) Reference Map for Validation of Moderate Resolution LAI Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The validation process for a moderate resolution leaf area index (LAI) product (i.e., MODIS) involves the creation of a high spatial resolution LAI reference map (Lai-RM), which when scaled to the moderate LAI resolution (i.e., >1 km) allows for comparison and analysis with this ...

  12. Fine physical and genetic mapping of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 originating from wild emmer(Triticum dicoccoides)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important wheat diseases in the world. In this study, a single dominant powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 was identified in the IW172 wild emmer accession and mapped to the distal region of chromosome arm 7AL (bin7A...

  13. Genetic control of soybean seed oil: II. QTL and genes that increase oil concentration without decreasing protein or with increased seed yield.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-06-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed oil is the primary global source of edible oil and a major renewable and sustainable feedstock for biodiesel production. Therefore, increasing the relative oil concentration in soybean is desirable; however, that goal is complex due to the quantitative nature of the oil concentration trait and possible effects on major agronomic traits such as seed yield or protein concentration. The objectives of the present study were to study the relationship between seed oil concentration and important agronomic and seed quality traits, including seed yield, 100-seed weight, protein concentration, plant height, and days to maturity, and to identify oil quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are co-localized with the traits evaluated. A population of 203 F4:6 recombinant inbred lines, derived from a cross between moderately high oil soybean genotypes OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe, was developed and grown across multiple environments in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. Among the 11 QTL associated with seed oil concentration in the population, which were detected using either single-factor ANOVA or multiple QTL mapping methods, the number of QTL that were co-localized with other important traits QTL were six for protein concentration, four for seed yield, two for 100-seed weight, one for days to maturity, and one for plant height. The oil-beneficial allele of the QTL tagged by marker Sat_020 was positively associated with seed protein concentration. The oil favorable alleles of markers Satt001 and GmDGAT2B were positively correlated with seed yield. In addition, significant two-way epistatic interactions, where one of the interacting markers was solely associated with seed oil concentration, were identified for the selected traits in this study. The number of significant epistatic interactions was seven for yield, four for days to maturity, two for 100-seed weight, one for protein concentration, and one for plant height. The identified molecular markers associated with oil-related QTL in this study, which also have positive effects on other important traits such as seed yield and protein concentration, could be used in the soybean marker breeding programs aimed at developing either higher seed yield and oil concentration or higher seed protein and oil concentration per hectare. Alternatively, selecting complementary parents with greater breeding values due to positive epistatic interactions could lead to the development of higher oil soybean cultivars. PMID:23536049

  14. A QTL on Chromosome 10 Modulates Cone Photoreceptor Number in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Irene E.; Raven, Mary A.; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This investigation examines the genetic sources of marked variation in cone photoreceptor number among inbred lines of mice, identifying candidate genes that may control the proliferation, differentiation, or survival of this neuronal population. Methods. Cone photoreceptor populations were counted in C57BL/6J (B6/J) and A/J strains, and 26 recombinant inbred (RI) strains derived from them. Eyes from RI strains were also collected for microarray analysis. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was carried out by simple and composite interval mapping and validated using a consomic line. Candidate genes were evaluated based on genetic variance between the parental strains and analysis of gene expression. Expression data, deposited in GeneNetwork (www.GeneNetwork.org), were used to generate a coexpression network of established cone photoreceptor genes as a reference standard. Results. B6/J has 70% more cone photoreceptors than A/J. A significant QTL was mapped to chromosome 10 (Chr 10) and confirmed using B6.A<10> mice. Of 19 positional candidate genes, one—the myeloblastosis oncogene (Myb)—stood out. Myb has a potentially damaging missense mutation, high retinal expression, and a known role in cell proliferation. The ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 gene (Enpp1) was a second strong candidate, with an expression pattern that covaried with cone photoreceptors and that was differentially expressed between the parental strains. Enpp1 and several other candidate genes covaried with multiple genes within the cone photoreceptor gene network. Conclusions. The mouse retina shows marked variation in cone photoreceptor number, some of which must be controlled by polymorphisms in a gene or genes on Chr 10. PMID:21330668

  15. Genetic and Molecular Basis of QTL of Diabetes in Mouse: Genes and Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Jiao, Yan; Xiong, Qing; Wang, Cong-Yi; Gerling, Ivan; Gu, Weikuan

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study has been conducted of all available reports in PubMed and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) to examine the genetic and molecular basis of quantitative genetic loci (QTL) of diabetes with the main focus on genes and polymorphisms. The major question is, What can the QTL tell us? Specifically, we want to know whether those genome regions differ from other regions in terms of genes relevant to diabetes. Which genes are within those QTL regions, and, among them, which genes have already been linked to diabetes? whether more polymorphisms have been associated with diabetes in the QTL regions than in the non-QTL regions. Our search revealed a total of 9038 genes from 26 type 1 diabetes QTL, which cover 667,096,006 bp of the mouse genomic sequence. On one hand, a large number of candidate genes are in each of these QTL; on the other hand, we found that some obvious candidate genes of QTL have not yet been investigated. Thus, the comprehensive search of candidate genes for known QTL may provide unexpected benefit for identifying QTL genes for diabetes. PMID:19471607

  16. Identification of novel QTL for leaf traits in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several leaf traits of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.), including leaf area (LA), leaf shape (LS) and specific leaf weight (SLW) may be related to soybean yield. The objective of this study was to identify novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) for LA, LS and SLW in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) popul...

  17. Fast eQTL Analysis for Twin Studies.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhaoyu; Xia, Kai; Chung, Wonil; Sullivan, Patrick F; Zou, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Twin data are commonly used for studying complex psychiatric disorders, and mixed effects models are one of the most popular tools for modeling dependence structures between twin pairs. However, for eQTL (expression quantitative trait loci) data where associations between thousands of transcripts and millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms need to be tested, mixed effects models are computationally inefficient and often impractical. In this paper, we propose a fast eQTL analysis approach for twin eQTL data where we randomly split twin pairs into two groups, so that within each group the samples are unrelated, and we then apply a multiple linear regression analysis separately to each group. A score statistic that automatically adjusts the (hidden) correlation between the two groups is constructed for combining the results from the two groups. The proposed method has well-controlled type I error. Compared to mixed effects models, the proposed method has similar power but drastically improved computational efficiency. We demonstrate the computational advantage of the proposed method via extensive simulations. The proposed method is also applied to a large twin eQTL data from the Netherlands Twin Register. PMID:25865703

  18. LINKAGE DISEQUILBRIUM AND ASSOCIATION ANALYSIS FOR QTL DISCOVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence and haplotype diversities as well as the level of linkage disequilibrium (LD) are important considerations for assessing the likelihood of successfully applying association analysis for QTL or gene discovery. In its simplest form association analysis (originally proposed by Risch and Merika...

  19. QTL DATA AT MAIZEGDB: CURATION AND "THEN SOME"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Discovery of candidate genes for agronomically important traits, such as disease or pest resistance often begins with one or more quantitative trait locus (QTL) experiments. Each experiment approximates the chromosomal locations sites (QTLs) that contribute to expression of the trait. These loci may...

  20. INVESTIGATION Genetic Dissection of a Major Anthocyanin QTL

    E-print Network

    Bradshaw, Toby

    INVESTIGATION Genetic Dissection of a Major Anthocyanin QTL Contributing to Pollinator in sympatry. Flower color differences resulting from both carotenoid and anthocyanin pigments contribute on anthocyanin concentration and that cis-regulatory change rather than coding DNA mutations cause the allelic

  1. Genetic fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the Gossypium hirsutum Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) mutant on chromosome 22(D).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yurong; Ding, Mingquan; Cao, Yuefen; Yang, Fen; Zhang, Hua; He, Shae; Dai, Huaqin; Hao, Huanfeng; Rong, Junkang

    2015-12-01

    Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) is a Gossypium hirsutum mutant that is controlled by a dominant gene that arrests the development of cotton fiber after anthesis. Two F2 mapping populations were developed from mutant (Li1 × H7124) F1 plants in 2012 and 2013; each was composed of 142 and 1024 plants, respectively. Using these populations, Li1 was mapped to a 0.3-cM region in which nine single-strand conformation polymorphism markers co-segregated with the Li1 locus. In the published G. raimondii genome, these markers were mapped to a region of about 1.2 Mb (the Li1 region) and were separated by markers that flanked the Li1 locus in the genetic map, dividing the Li1 region into three segments. Thirty-six genes were annotated by the gene prediction software FGENESH (Softberry) in the Li1 region. Twelve genes were candidates of Li1, while the remaining 24 genes were identified as transposable elements, DNA/RNA polymerase superfamily or unknown function genes. Among the 12 candidate genes, those encoding ribosomal protein s10, actin protein, ATP synthase, and beta-tubulin 5 were the most-promising candidates of the Li1 mutant because the function of these genes is closely related to fiber development. High-throughput RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR revealed that these candidate genes had obvious differential gene expression between mutant and wild-type plants at the fiber elongation stage, strengthening the inference that they could be the most likely candidate gene of the Li1 mutant phenotype. PMID:26037218

  2. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H; Raorane, Manish L; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M; Mutte, Sumanth K; Vardarajan, Adithi R; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor 'no apical meristem' (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  3. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H.; Raorane, Manish L.; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M.; Mutte, Sumanth K.; Vardarajan, Adithi R.; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C.; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor ‘no apical meristem’ (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  4. An operational methodology for riparian land cover fine scale regional mapping for the study of landscape influence on river ecological status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormos, T.; Kosuth, P.; Souchon, Y.; Villeneuve, B.; Durrieu, S.; Chandesris, A.

    2010-12-01

    Preservation and restoration of river ecosystems require an improved understanding of the mechanisms through which they are influenced by landscape at multiple spatial scales and particularly at river corridor scale considering the role of riparian vegetation for regulating and protecting river ecological status and the relevance of this specific area for implementing efficient and realistic strategies. Assessing correctly this influence over large river networks involves accurate broad scale (i.e. at least regional) information on Land Cover within Riparian Areas (LCRA). As the structure of land cover along rivers is generally not accessible using moderate-scale satellite imagery, finer spatial resolution imagery and specific mapping techniques are needed. For this purpose we developed a generic multi-scale Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) scheme able to produce LCRA maps in different geographic context by exploiting information available from very high spatial resolution imagery (satellite or airborne) and/or metric to decametric spatial thematic data on a given study zone thanks to fuzzy expert knowledge classification rules. A first experimentation was carried out on the Herault river watershed (southern of France), a 2650 square kilometers basin that presents a contrasted landscape (different ecoregions) and a total stream length of 1150 Km, using high and very high multispectral remotely-sensed images (10m Spot5 multispectral images and 0.5m aerial photography) and existing spatial thematic data. Application of the OBIA scheme produced a detailed (22 classes) LCRA map with an overall accuracy of 89% and a Kappa index of 83% according to a land cover pressures typology (six categories). A second experimentation (using the same data sources) was carried out on a larger test zone, a part of the Normandy river network (25 000 square kilometers basin; 6000 km long river network; 155 ecological stations). This second work aimed at elaborating a robust statistical eco-regional model to study links between land cover spatial indicators calculated at local and watershed scales, and river ecological status assessed with macroinvertebrate indicators. Application of the OBIA scheme produced a detailed (62 classes) LCRA map which allowed the model to highlight influence of specific land use patterns: (i) the significant beneficial effect of 20-m riparian tree vegetation strip near a station and 20-m riparian grassland strip along the upstream network of a station and (ii) the negative impact on river ecological status of urban areas and roads on the upstream flood plain of a station. Results of these two experimentations highlight that (i) the application of an OBIA scheme using multi-source spatial data provides an efficient approach for mapping and monitoring LCRA that can be implemented operationally at regional or national scale and (ii) and the interest of using LCRA-maps derived from very high spatial resolution imagery (satellite or airborne) and/or metric spatial thematic data to study landscape influence on river ecological status and support managers in the definition of optimized riparian preservation and restoration strategies.

  5. Construction of a Genetic Linkage Map and Identification of QTLs for Seed Weight and Seed Size Traits in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Goyal, Richa; Chahota, R K; Sharma, Tilak R; Abdin, M Z; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    Seed weight and seed size both are quantitative traits and have been considered as important components of grain yield, thus identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed traits in lentil (Lens culinaris) would be beneficial for the improvement of grain yield. Hence the main objective of this study was to identify QTLs for seed traits using an intraspecific mapping population derived from a cross between L. culinaris cv. Precoz (seed weight-5.1g, seed size-5.7mm) and L. culinaris cv. L830 (seed weight-2.2g, seed size-4mm) comprising 126 F8-RILs. For this, two microsatellite genomic libraries enriched for (GA/CT) and (GAA/CTT) motif were constructed which resulted in the development of 501 new genomic SSR markers. Six hundred forty seven SSR markers (including 146 previously published) were screened for parental polymorphism and 219 (33.8%) were found to be polymorphic among the parents. Of these 216 were mapped on seven linkage groups at LOD4.0 spanning 1183.7cM with an average marker density of 5.48cM. Phenotypic data from the RILs was used to identify QTLs for the seed weight and seed size traits by single marker analysis (SMA) followed by composite interval mapping (CIM) which resulted in one QTL each for the 2 traits (qSW and qSS) that were co-localized on LG4 and explained 48.4% and 27.5% of phenotypic variance respectively. The current study would serve as a strong foundation for further validation and fine mapping for utilization in lentil breeding programs. PMID:26436554

  6. Construction of a Genetic Linkage Map and Identification of QTLs for Seed Weight and Seed Size Traits in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Priyanka; Goyal, Richa; Chahota, R. K.; Sharma, Tilak R.; Abdin, M. Z.; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    Seed weight and seed size both are quantitative traits and have been considered as important components of grain yield, thus identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed traits in lentil (Lens culinaris) would be beneficial for the improvement of grain yield. Hence the main objective of this study was to identify QTLs for seed traits using an intraspecific mapping population derived from a cross between L. culinaris cv. Precoz (seed weight-5.1g, seed size-5.7mm) and L. culinaris cv. L830 (seed weight-2.2g, seed size-4mm) comprising 126 F8-RILs. For this, two microsatellite genomic libraries enriched for (GA/CT) and (GAA/CTT) motif were constructed which resulted in the development of 501 new genomic SSR markers. Six hundred forty seven SSR markers (including 146 previously published) were screened for parental polymorphism and 219 (33.8%) were found to be polymorphic among the parents. Of these 216 were mapped on seven linkage groups at LOD4.0 spanning 1183.7cM with an average marker density of 5.48cM. Phenotypic data from the RILs was used to identify QTLs for the seed weight and seed size traits by single marker analysis (SMA) followed by composite interval mapping (CIM) which resulted in one QTL each for the 2 traits (qSW and qSS) that were co-localized on LG4 and explained 48.4% and 27.5% of phenotypic variance respectively. The current study would serve as a strong foundation for further validation and fine mapping for utilization in lentil breeding programs. PMID:26436554

  7. QTL Analysis of Head Splitting Resistance in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) Using SSR and InDel Makers Based on Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yanbin; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong

    2015-01-01

    Head splitting resistance (HSR) in cabbage is an important trait closely related to both quality and yield of head. However, the genetic control of this trait remains unclear. In this study, a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from an intra-cross between head splitting-susceptible inbred cabbage line 79–156 and resistant line 96–100 was obtained and used to analyze inheritance and detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for HSR using a mixed major gene/polygene inheritance analysis and QTL mapping. HSR can be attributed to additive-epistatic effects of three major gene pairs combined with those of polygenes. Negative and significant correlations were also detected between head Hsr and head vertical diameter (Hvd), head transverse diameter (Htd) and head weight (Hw). Using the DH population, a genetic map was constructed with simple sequence repeat (SSR) and insertion–deletion (InDel) markers, with a total length of 1065.9 cM and average interval length of 4.4 cM between adjacent markers. Nine QTLs for HSR were located on chromosomes C3, C4, C7, and C9 based on 2 years of phenotypic data using both multiple-QTL mapping and inclusive composite interval mapping. The identified QTLs collectively explained 39.4 to 59.1% of phenotypic variation. Three major QTLs (Hsr 3.2, 4.2, 9.2) showing a relatively larger effect were robustly detected in different years or with different mapping methods. The HSR trait was shown to have complex genetic mechanisms. Results from QTL mapping and classical genetic analysis were consistent. The QTLs obtained in this study should be useful for molecular marker-assisted selection in cabbage breeding and provide a foundation for further research on HSR genetic regulation. PMID:26406606

  8. Fine mapping of the Autosomal Dominant Split Hand/Split Foot Locus on Chromosome 7, Band q21.3-q22.1

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Stephen W.; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Allen, Todd; Kim, Julia; Geshuri, Dorrit; Nunes, Mark; Soder, Sylvia; Stephens, Karen; Pagon, Roberta A.; Patton, Michael A.; Berg, Mary Anne; Donlon, Tim; Rivera, Horacio; Pfeiffer, R. A.; Naritomi, Kenji; Hughes, Helen; Genuardi, Maurizio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Neri, Giovanni; Lovrein, Everett; Magenis, Ellen; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Evans, James P.

    1994-01-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHFD) is a human developmental defect characterized by missing digits, fusion of remaining digits, and a deep median cleft in the hands and feet. Cytogenetic studies of deletions and translocations associated with this disorder have indicated that an autosomal dominant split hand/split foot locus (gene SHFD1) maps to 7q21-q22. To characterize the SHFD1 locus, somatic cell hybrid lines were constructed from cytogenetically abnormal individuals with SHFD. Molecular analysis resulted in the localization of 93 DNA markers to one of 10 intervals surrounding the SHFD1 locus. The translocation breakpoints in four SHFD patients were encompassed by the smallest region of overlap among the SHFD-associated deletions. The order of DNA markers in the SHFD1 critical region has been defined as PON–D7S812–SHFD1–D7S811–ASNS. One DNA marker, D7S811, detected altered restriction enzyme fragments in three patients with translocations when examined by pulsed-field gel electro-phoresis (PFGE). These data map SHFD1, a gene that is crucial for human limb differentiation, to a small interval in the q21.3-q22.1 region of human chromosome 7. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:8023840

  9. Atomic far-IR fine-structure line mapping of L1630, M17, and W3: Comparison of (O I) and (C II) distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. E.; Jaffe, Dan T.; Zhou, Shudong

    1995-01-01

    We mapped the distribution of atomic far-IR line emission from (O I) and (C II) over parsec scales in the Galactic star-forming regions L1630, M17, and W3 using the MPE Far-Infrared Fabry-Perot Imaging spectrometer (FIFI) on board the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The lines mapped include (O I) 63 microns, (O I) 146 microns, and (C II) 158 microns. Comparison of the intensities and ratios of these lines with models of photodissociation regions (e.g., Tielens & Hollenbach 1985, ApJ, 344, 770) allows us to derive temperatures and densities of the primarily neutral atomic gas layers lying on the surfaces of UV-illuminated molecular gas. In general, the (C II) line arises ubiquitously throughout the molecular clouds while the (O I) lines are mainly confined to warm, dense gas (T is greater than 100 K, n is greater than 10(exp 4)/cu cm) near the sites of O and B stars. The distribution of (C II) in the star-forming clouds implies that the (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of molecular clumps throughout the clouds, rather than only at the boundary layer between molecular gas and H II regions.

  10. Fine mapping of the tomato I-3 gene for fusarium wilt resistance and elimination of a co-segregating resistance gene analogue as a candidate for I-3.

    PubMed

    Hemming, M N; Basuki, S; McGrath, D J; Carroll, B J; Jones, D A

    2004-07-01

    The I-3 gene from the wild tomato species Lycopersicon pennellii confers resistance to race 3 of the devastating vascular wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. As an initial step in a positional cloning strategy for the isolation of I-3, we converted restriction fragment length polymorphism and conserved orthologue set markers, known genes and a resistance gene analogue (RGA) mapping to the I-3 region into PCR-based sequence characterised amplified region (SCAR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers. Additional PCR-based markers in the I-3 region were generated using the randomly amplified DNA fingerprinting (RAF) technique. SCAR, CAPS and RAF markers were used for high-resolution mapping around the I-3 locus. The I-3 gene was localised to a 0.3-cM region containing a RAF marker, eO6, and an RGA, RGA332. RGA332 was cloned and found to correspond to a putative pseudogene with at least two loss-of-function mutations. The predicted pseudogene belongs to the Toll interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich-repeat sub-class of plant disease resistance genes. Despite the presence of two RGA332 homologues in L. esculentum, DNA gel blot and PCR analysis suggests that no other homologues are present in lines carrying I-3 that could be alternative candidates for the gene. PMID:15045176

  11. Fine mapping of Best`s macular dystrophy localizes the gene in close proximity to but distinct from the D11S480/ROM1 loci

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, C.; Weissenbach, J.; Wadelius, C.

    1994-12-01

    The Best`s macular dystrophy (BMD) gene has previously been mapped to the 11q13 region. In this study, recombination data localizes the BMD gene to the 6-cM genetic interval between the markers Fc{epsilon}RI and D11S480/ROM1 in a large Swedish 12-generation BMD family. Mutation analyses of the candidate gene ROM1 did not reveal any mutations that could explain the disease phenotype. However, one recombination event between intragenic ROM1 polymorphisms and the BMD phenotype was detected. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that mutations in the ROM1 gene cause BMD. Identification of the disease gene will elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism in BMD, which may also be of importance in other retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration. 50 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Fine resolution genetic mapping of galamin-GMAP (GALN) excludes a candidate gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    fGuida, L.C.; Kerr, L.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-09-01

    Galamin is a 30 amino acid peptide in the human that has been suggested to potentiate the release of growth hormone; inhibit insulin secretion; play a role in gonadotropin modulation, in neuronal regeneration, and in the control of satiety; may mediate estrogen`s mitogenic role in development of prolactinomas; and may be associated with the development of pituitary hyperplasia in hGHRH transgenic mice. The preprogalanin gene, GALN, is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, hypothalamus, duodenum and pancreas. A second peptide, GMAP, is produced by proteolysis of preprogalanin, but is of unknown function. We previously isolated a 200 kb YAC containing the human galanin gene and localized it to chromosome 11q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene has also been assigned to 11q13. Tumors in MEN1 develop in the anterior pituitary, parathroid glands, neuroendocrine pancreas and the duodenum, which is similar to the expression specificity of GALN. Based on the similar gene localization and expression, we tested GALN as a candidate gene for MEN1. Studies of chromosome 11q13 have defined a genetic map, cen-D11S480-PYGM-MEN1-D11S146-INT2-tel. Whereas PCR analysis of a panel of radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrids from 11q13 mapped GALN distal to PYGM, and within the 1NT2 segregation group, the use of two-color FISH suggested a localization of GALN proximal to 1NT2. Subsequently, TaqI and SinI RFLPs in the GALN gene were identified and genotyped in a 228 member Venezuelan reference pedigree. Multipoint analysis suggested the order; cen-D11S480-[FAEES-III, GALN]-INT2-D11S527, with this order having 100:1 odds vs. placement of GALN distal to INT2. Since other studies place FAEES-III distal of MEN1, our studies exclude the GALN gene from having a role in MEN1.

  13. Fine-mapping and identification of a candidate gene underlying the d2 dwarfing phenotype in pearl millet, Cenchrus americanus (L.) Morrone.

    PubMed

    Parvathaneni, Rajiv K; Jakkula, Vinod; Padi, Francis K; Faure, Sebastien; Nagarajappa, Nethra; Pontaroli, Ana C; Wu, Xiaomei; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Devos, Katrien M

    2013-03-01

    Pearl millet is one of the most important subsistence crops grown in India and sub-Saharan Africa. In many cereal crops, reduced height is a key trait for enhancing yield, and dwarf mutants have been extensively used in breeding to reduce yield loss due to lodging under intense management. In pearl millet, the recessive d2 dwarfing gene has been deployed widely in commercial germplasm grown in India, the United States, and Australia. Despite its importance, very little research has gone into determining the identity of the d2 gene. We used comparative information, genetic mapping in two F2 populations representing a total of some 1500 progeny, and haplotype analysis of three tall and three dwarf inbred lines to delineate the d2 region by two genetic markers that, in sorghum, define a region of 410 kb with 40 annotated genes. One of the sorghum genes annotated within this region is ABCB1, which encodes a P-glycoprotein involved in auxin transport. This gene had previously been shown to underlie the economically important dw3 dwarf mutation in sorghum. The cosegregation of ABCB1 with the d2 phenotype, its differential expression in the tall inbred ICMP 451 and the dwarf inbred Tift 23DB, and the similar phenotype of stacked lower internodes in the sorghum dw3 and pearl millet d2 mutants suggest that ABCB1 is a likely candidate for d2. PMID:23450459

  14. Fine-Mapping and Identification of a Candidate Gene Underlying the d2 Dwarfing Phenotype in Pearl Millet, Cenchrus americanus (L.) Morrone

    PubMed Central

    Parvathaneni, Rajiv K.; Jakkula, Vinod; Padi, Francis K.; Faure, Sebastien; Nagarajappa, Nethra; Pontaroli, Ana C.; Wu, Xiaomei; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Devos, Katrien M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearl millet is one of the most important subsistence crops grown in India and sub-Saharan Africa. In many cereal crops, reduced height is a key trait for enhancing yield, and dwarf mutants have been extensively used in breeding to reduce yield loss due to lodging under intense management. In pearl millet, the recessive d2 dwarfing gene has been deployed widely in commercial germplasm grown in India, the United States, and Australia. Despite its importance, very little research has gone into determining the identity of the d2 gene. We used comparative information, genetic mapping in two F2 populations representing a total of some 1500 progeny, and haplotype analysis of three tall and three dwarf inbred lines to delineate the d2 region by two genetic markers that, in sorghum, define a region of 410 kb with 40 annotated genes. One of the sorghum genes annotated within this region is ABCB1, which encodes a P-glycoprotein involved in auxin transport. This gene had previously been shown to underlie the economically important dw3 dwarf mutation in sorghum. The cosegregation of ABCB1 with the d2 phenotype, its differential expression in the tall inbred ICMP 451 and the dwarf inbred Tift 23DB, and the similar phenotype of stacked lower internodes in the sorghum dw3 and pearl millet d2 mutants suggest that ABCB1 is a likely candidate for d2. PMID:23450459

  15. Construction of High-Density Genetic Map in Barley through Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gaofeng; Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Tan, Cong; Li, Chengdao

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps in barley are usually constructed from a limited number of molecular markers such as SSR (simple sequence repeat) and DarT (diversity arrays technology). These markers must be first developed before being used for genotyping. Here, we introduce a new strategy based on sequencing progeny of a doubled haploid population from Baudin × AC Metcalfe to construct a genetic map in barley. About 13,547 polymorphic SNP tags with >93% calling rate were selected to construct the genetic map. A total of 12,998 SNP tags were anchored to seven linkage groups which spanned a cumulative 967.6 cM genetic distance. The high-density genetic map can be used for QTL mapping and the assembly of WGS and BAC contigs. The genetic map was evaluated for its effectiveness and efficiency in QTL mapping and candidate gene identification. A major QTL for plant height was mapped at 105.5 cM on chromosome 3H. This QTL with LOD value of 13.01 explained 44.5% of phenotypic variation. This strategy will enable rapid and efficient establishment of high-density genetic maps in other species. PMID:26182149

  16. Construction of High-Density Genetic Map in Barley through Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gaofeng; Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiao-qi; Tan, Cong; Li, Chengdao

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps in barley are usually constructed from a limited number of molecular markers such as SSR (simple sequence repeat) and DarT (diversity arrays technology). These markers must be first developed before being used for genotyping. Here, we introduce a new strategy based on sequencing progeny of a doubled haploid population from Baudin × AC Metcalfe to construct a genetic map in barley. About 13,547 polymorphic SNP tags with >93% calling rate were selected to construct the genetic map. A total of 12,998 SNP tags were anchored to seven linkage groups which spanned a cumulative 967.6 cM genetic distance. The high-density genetic map can be used for QTL mapping and the assembly of WGS and BAC contigs. The genetic map was evaluated for its effectiveness and efficiency in QTL mapping and candidate gene identification. A major QTL for plant height was mapped at 105.5 cM on chromosome 3H. This QTL with LOD value of 13.01 explained 44.5% of phenotypic variation. This strategy will enable rapid and efficient establishment of high-density genetic maps in other species. PMID:26182149

  17. Ultra-high density intra-specific genetic linkage maps accelerate identification of functionally relevant molecular tags governing important agronomic traits in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Shree, Tanima; Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Saxena, Maneesha S; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-01-01

    We discovered 26785 and 16573 high-quality SNPs differentiating two parental genotypes of a RIL mapping population using reference desi and kabuli genome-based GBS assay. Of these, 3625 and 2177 SNPs have been integrated into eight desi and kabuli chromosomes, respectively in order to construct ultra-high density (0.20-0.37 cM) intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage maps. One of these constructed high-resolution genetic map has potential to identify 33 major genomic regions harbouring 35 robust QTLs (PVE: 17.9-39.7%) associated with three agronomic traits, which were mapped within <1 cM mean marker intervals on desi chromosomes. The extended LD (linkage disequilibrium) decay (~15 cM) in chromosomes of genetic maps have encouraged us to use a rapid integrated approach (comparative QTL mapping, QTL-region specific haplotype/LD-based trait association analysis, expression profiling and gene haplotype-based association mapping) rather than a traditional QTL map-based cloning method to narrow-down one major seed weight (SW) robust QTL region. It delineated favourable natural allelic variants and superior haplotype-containing one seed-specific candidate embryo defective gene regulating SW in chickpea. The ultra-high-resolution genetic maps, QTLs/genes and alleles/haplotypes-related genomic information generated and integrated strategy for rapid QTL/gene identification developed have potential to expedite genomics-assisted breeding applications in crop plants, including chickpea for their genetic enhancement. PMID:25942004

  18. Fine-scale genetic mapping of a hybrid sterility factor between Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana: the varied and elusive functions of "speciation genes"

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hybrid male sterility (HMS) is a usual outcome of hybridization between closely related animal species. It arises because interactions between alleles that are functional within one species may be disrupted in hybrids. The identification of genes leading to hybrid sterility is of great interest for understanding the evolutionary process of speciation. In the current work we used marked P-element insertions as dominant markers to efficiently locate one genetic factor causing a severe reduction in fertility in hybrid males of Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana. Results Our mapping effort identified a region of 9 kb on chromosome 3, containing three complete and one partial coding sequences. Within this region, two annotated genes are suggested as candidates for the HMS factor, based on the comparative molecular characterization and public-source information. Gene Taf1 is partially contained in the region, but yet shows high polymorphism with four fixed non-synonymous substitutions between the two species. Its molecular functions involve sequence-specific DNA binding and transcription factor activity. Gene agt is a small, intronless gene, whose molecular function is annotated as methylated-DNA-protein-cysteine S-methyltransferase activity. High polymorphism and one fixed non-synonymous substitution suggest this is a fast evolving gene. The gene trees of both genes perfectly separate D. simulans and D. mauritiana into monophyletic groups. Analysis of gene expression using microarray revealed trends that were similar to those previously found in comparisons between whole-genome hybrids and parental species. Conclusions The identification following confirmation of the HMS candidate gene will add another case study leading to understanding the evolutionary process of hybrid incompatibility. PMID:21144061

  19. A comparative meta-analysis of QTL between intraspecific Gossypium hirsutum interspecific populations and Gossypium hirsutum x Gossypium barbadense populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent Meta-analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in tetraploid cotton (Gossypium spp.) has identified regions of the genome with high concentrations of various trait QTL called clusters, and specific trait QTL called hotspots. The Meta-analysis included all population types of Gossypium mixing ...

  20. Place of work and residential exposure to ambient air pollution and birth outcomes in Scotland, using geographically fine pollution climate mapping estimates

    PubMed Central

    Dibben, Chris; Clemens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A relationship between ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes has been found in a large number of studies that have mainly used a nearest monitor methodology. Recent research has suggested that the effect size may have been underestimated in these studies. This paper examines associations between birth outcomes and ambient levels of residential and workplace sulphur dioxide, particulates and Nitrogen Dioxide estimated using an alternative method – pollution climate mapping. Methods Risk of low birthweight and mean birthweight (for n=21,843 term births) and risk of preterm birth (for n=23,086 births) were modelled against small area annual mean ambient air pollution concentrations at work and residence location adjusting for potential confounding factors for singleton live births (1994–2008) across Scotland. Results Odds ratios of low birthweight of 1.02 (95% CI, 1.01–1.03) and 1.07 (95% CI, 1.01–1.12) with concentration increases of 1 µg/m3 for NO2 and PM10 respectively. Raised but insignificant risks of very preterm birth were found with PM10 (relative risk ratio=1.08; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.17 per 1 µg/m3) and NO2 (relative risk ratio=1.01; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.03 per 1 µg/m3). An inverse association between mean birthweight and mean annual NO2(?1.24 g; 95% CI, ?2.02 to ?0.46 per 1 µg/m3) and PM10 (?5.67 g; 95% CI, ?9.47 to ?1.87 per 1 µg/m3). SO2 showed no significant associations. Conclusions This study highlights the association between air pollution exposure and reduced newborn size at birth. Together with other recent work it also suggests that exposure estimation based on the nearest monitor method may have led to an under-estimation of the effect size of pollutants on birth outcomes. PMID:26005952

  1. Fine mapping of juvenile primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) on 1q21-q31 and exculsion of adult-POAG from the respective region

    SciTech Connect

    Child, A.; Sarfarazi, M.; Crick, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile POAG is an autosomal dominant eye disorder which has recently been mapped to 1q21-q24, in a region of 14-23 cM. We report here linkage analysis of 9 microsatellite repeat markers spanning this region in families from England, Scotland and Sardinia. We have observed no recombinants with D1S433 (Z=2.86) and obtained looser linkage with D1S196 ({theta}=0.03; Z=6.38), D1S431 ({theta}=0.14; Z=2.74), D1S210 ({theta}=0.06; Z=1.32), D1S452 ({theta}=0.18; Z=0.729) and D1S242 ({theta}=0.08; Z=2.29). In one family, a critical recombinant in an affected individual localizes the J-POAG locus between D1S452 and D1S242 in a 3 cM region. However, other recombinants in two normal individuals from different families suggests that J-POAG may be localized in a 1 cM distance between D1S433 and D1S431. These unaffected individuals have well passed the age-of-onset in their respective pedigrees. This result suggests that either these two recombinant individuals are gene carriers (i.e., non-penetrants) or there are more than one gene in this region causing the same disease. The possibility of the latter is less likely, since in addition to a total of 4 non-penetrant individuals in our panel, other such cases have also been reported previously. This in turn suggests that the precentage of non-penetrant cases in J-POAG may be considerably higher than it was previously appreciated. Study of 14 families with adult-onset POAG revealed no segregation with the above-mentioned linked microsatellite markers. Our findings confirm, for the first time, that adult-POAG is genetically distinct from the J-POAG. Genetic linkage study of adult families with additional STRPs is currently in progress.

  2. Fast empirical Bayesian LASSO for multiple quantitative trait locus mapping

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Bayesian shrinkage technique has been applied to multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping to estimate the genetic effects of QTLs on quantitative traits from a very large set of possible effects including the main and epistatic effects of QTLs. Although the recently developed empirical Bayes (EB) method significantly reduced computation comparing with the fully Bayesian approach, its speed and accuracy are limited by the fact that numerical optimization is required to estimate the variance components in the QTL model. Results We developed a fast empirical Bayesian LASSO (EBLASSO) method for multiple QTL mapping. The fact that the EBLASSO can estimate the variance components in a closed form along with other algorithmic techniques render the EBLASSO method more efficient and accurate. Comparing with the EB method, our simulation study demonstrated that the EBLASSO method could substantially improve the computational speed and detect more QTL effects without increasing the false positive rate. Particularly, the EBLASSO algorithm running on a personal computer could easily handle a linear QTL model with more than 100,000 variables in our simulation study. Real data analysis also demonstrated that the EBLASSO method detected more reasonable effects than the EB method. Comparing with the LASSO, our simulation showed that the current version of the EBLASSO implemented in Matlab had similar speed as the LASSO implemented in Fortran, and that the EBLASSO detected the same number of true effects as the LASSO but a much smaller number of false positive effects. Conclusions The EBLASSO method can handle a large number of effects possibly including both the main and epistatic QTL effects, environmental effects and the effects of gene-environment interactions. It will be a very useful tool for multiple QTL mapping. PMID:21615941

  3. Genetic Linkage Map will aid the Whole genome Sequence Assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The allotetraploid peanut genome assembly will be a valuable resource to researchers studying polyploidy species, in addition to peanut genome evolution and domestication other than facilitating QTL analysis and the tools for marker-assisted breeding. Therefore, a peanut linkage map will aid genome ...

  4. A Model Selection-Based Interval-Mapping Method for Autopolyploids

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dachuang; Craig, Bruce A.; Doerge, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    While extensive progress has been made in quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for diploid species, similar progress in QTL mapping for polyploids has been limited due to the complex genetic architecture of polyploids. To date, QTL mapping in polyploids has focused mainly on tetraploids with dominant and/or codominant markers. Here, we extend this view to include any even ploidy level under a dominant marker system. Our approach first selects the most likely chromosomal marker configurations using a Bayesian selection criterion and then fits an interval-mapping model to each candidate. Profiles of the likelihood-ratio test statistic and the maximum-likelihood estimates (MLEs) of parameters including QTL effects are obtained via the EM algorithm. Putative QTL are then detected using a resampling-based significance threshold, and the corresponding parental configuration is identified to be the underlying parental configuration from which the data are observed. Although presented via pseudo-doubled backcross experiments, this approach can be readily extended to other breeding systems. Our method is applied to single-dose restriction fragment autotetraploid alfalfa data, and the performance is investigated through simulation studies. PMID:15687274

  5. Fine-Mapping the Wheat Snn1 Locus Conferring Sensitivity to the Parastagonospora nodorum Necrotrophic Effector SnTox1 Using an Eight Founder Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population.

    PubMed

    Cockram, James; Scuderi, Alice; Barber, Toby; Furuki, Eiko; Gardner, Keith A; Gosman, Nick; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Phan, Huyen P; Rose, Gemma A; Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P; Mackay, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is an important pathogen of one of the world's most economically important cereal crops, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). P. nodorum produces necrotrophic protein effectors that mediate host cell death, providing nutrients for continuation of the infection process. The recent discovery of pathogen effectors has revolutionized disease resistance breeding for necrotrophic diseases in crop species, allowing often complex genetic resistance mechanisms to be broken down into constituent parts. To date, three effectors have been identified in P. nodorum. Here we use the effector, SnTox1, to screen 642 progeny from an eight-parent multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (i.e., MAGIC) population, genotyped with a 90,000-feature single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The MAGIC founders showed a range of sensitivity to SnTox1, with transgressive segregation evident in the progeny. SnTox1 sensitivity showed high heritability, with quantitative trait locus analyses fine-mapping the Snn1 locus to the short arm of chromosome 1B. In addition, a previously undescribed SnTox1 sensitivity locus was identified on the long arm of chromosome 5A, termed here QSnn.niab-5A.1. The peak single-nucleotide polymorphism for the Snn1 locus was converted to the KASP genotyping platform, providing breeders and researchers a simple and cheap diagnostic marker for allelic state at Snn1. PMID:26416667

  6. Fine-Mapping the Wheat Snn1 Locus Conferring Sensitivity to the Parastagonospora nodorum Necrotrophic Effector SnTox1 Using an Eight Founder Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, James; Scuderi, Alice; Barber, Toby; Furuki, Eiko; Gardner, Keith A.; Gosman, Nick; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Phan, Huyen P.; Rose, Gemma A.; Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P.; Mackay, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is an important pathogen of one of the world’s most economically important cereal crops, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). P. nodorum produces necrotrophic protein effectors that mediate host cell death, providing nutrients for continuation of the infection process. The recent discovery of pathogen effectors has revolutionized disease resistance breeding for necrotrophic diseases in crop species, allowing often complex genetic resistance mechanisms to be broken down into constituent parts. To date, three effectors have been identified in P. nodorum. Here we use the effector, SnTox1, to screen 642 progeny from an eight-parent multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (i.e., MAGIC) population, genotyped with a 90,000-feature single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The MAGIC founders showed a range of sensitivity to SnTox1, with transgressive segregation evident in the progeny. SnTox1 sensitivity showed high heritability, with quantitative trait locus analyses fine-mapping the Snn1 locus to