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Sample records for quadratic programming algorithm

  1. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Linear Programming and Quadratic Programming Algorithms for Control Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc; Acosta, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation (NextGen) transport aircraft configurations being investigated as part of the NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project have more control surfaces, or control effectors, than existing transport aircraft configurations. Conventional flight control is achieved through two symmetric elevators, two antisymmetric ailerons, and a rudder. The five effectors, reduced to three command variables, produce moments along the three main axes of the aircraft and enable the pilot to control the attitude and flight path of the aircraft. The NextGen aircraft will have additional redundant control effectors to control the three moments, creating a situation where the aircraft is over-actuated and where a simple relationship does not exist anymore between the required effector deflections and the desired moments. NextGen flight controllers will incorporate control allocation algorithms to determine the optimal effector commands and attain the desired moments, taking into account the effector limits. Approaches to solving the problem using linear programming and quadratic programming algorithms have been proposed and tested. It is of great interest to understand their relative advantages and disadvantages and how design parameters may affect their properties. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the effector commands with respect to the desired moments and show on some examples that the solutions provided using the l2 norm of quadratic programming are less sensitive than those using the l1 norm of linear programming.

  3. Sequential quadratic programming-based fast path planning algorithm subject to no-fly zone constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Shunjian; Sun, Mingwei; Yi, Haidong; Wang, Zenghui; Chen, Zengqiang

    2016-08-01

    Path planning plays an important role in aircraft guided systems. Multiple no-fly zones in the flight area make path planning a constrained nonlinear optimization problem. It is necessary to obtain a feasible optimal solution in real time. In this article, the flight path is specified to be composed of alternate line segments and circular arcs, in order to reformulate the problem into a static optimization one in terms of the waypoints. For the commonly used circular and polygonal no-fly zones, geometric conditions are established to determine whether or not the path intersects with them, and these can be readily programmed. Then, the original problem is transformed into a form that can be solved by the sequential quadratic programming method. The solution can be obtained quickly using the Sparse Nonlinear OPTimizer (SNOPT) package. Mathematical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness and rapidity of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Phosphorescence lifetime analysis with a quadratic programming algorithm for determining quencher distributions in heterogeneous systems.

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, S A; Wilson, D F

    1994-01-01

    A new method for analysis of phosphorescence lifetime distributions in heterogeneous systems has been developed. This method is based on decomposition of the data vector to a linearly independent set of exponentials and uses quadratic programming principles for x2 minimization. Solution of the resulting algorithm requires a finite number of calculations (it is not iterative) and is computationally fast and robust. The algorithm has been tested on various simulated decays and for analysis of phosphorescence measurements of experimental systems with descrete distributions of lifetimes. Critical analysis of the effect of signal-to-noise on the resolving capability of the algorithm is presented. This technique is recommended for resolution of the distributions of quencher concentration in heterogeneous samples, of which oxygen distributions in tissue is an important example. Phosphors of practical importance for biological oxygen measurements: Pd-meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (PdTCPP) and Pd-meso-porphyrin (PdMP) have been used to provide experimental test of the algorithm. PMID:7858142

  5. Energy management of a power-split plug-in hybrid electric vehicle based on genetic algorithm and quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng; Mi, Chris Chunting; Xiong, Rui; Xu, Jun; You, Chenwen

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces an online and intelligent energy management controller to improve the fuel economy of a power-split plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Based on analytic analysis between fuel-rate and battery current at different driveline power and vehicle speed, quadratic equations are applied to simulate the relationship between battery current and vehicle fuel-rate. The power threshold at which engine is turned on is optimized by genetic algorithm (GA) based on vehicle fuel-rate, battery state of charge (SOC) and driveline power demand. The optimal battery current when the engine is on is calculated using quadratic programming (QP) method. The proposed algorithm can control the battery current effectively, which makes the engine work more efficiently and thus reduce the fuel-consumption. Moreover, the controller is still applicable when the battery is unhealthy. Numerical simulations validated the feasibility of the proposed controller.

  6. Partial discharge localization in power transformers based on the sequential quadratic programming-genetic algorithm adopting acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Long; Liu, Hua-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Partial discharge (PD) in power transformers is one of the prime reasons resulting in insulation degradation and power faults. Hence, it is of great importance to study the techniques of the detection and localization of PD in theory and practice. The detection and localization of PD employing acoustic emission (AE) techniques, as a kind of non-destructive testing, plus due to the advantages of powerful capability of locating and high precision, have been paid more and more attention. The localization algorithm is the key factor to decide the localization accuracy in AE localization of PD. Many kinds of localization algorithms exist for the PD source localization adopting AE techniques including intelligent and non-intelligent algorithms. However, the existed algorithms possess some defects such as the premature convergence phenomenon, poor local optimization ability and unsuitability for the field applications. To overcome the poor local optimization ability and easily caused premature convergence phenomenon of the fundamental genetic algorithm (GA), a new kind of improved GA is proposed, namely the sequence quadratic programming-genetic algorithm (SQP-GA). For the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, the sequence quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm which is used as a basic operator is integrated into the fundamental GA, so the local searching ability of the fundamental GA is improved effectively and the premature convergence phenomenon is overcome. Experimental results of the numerical simulations of benchmark functions show that the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, is better than the fundamental GA in the convergence speed and optimization precision, and the proposed algorithm in this paper has outstanding optimization effect. At the same time, the presented SQP-GA in the paper is applied to solve the ultrasonic localization problem of PD in transformers, then the ultrasonic localization method of PD in transformers based on the SQP-GA is proposed. And

  7. A duality theorem-based algorithm for inexact quadratic programming problems: Application to waste management under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X. M.; Huang, G. H.; Fan, Y. R.; Li, Y. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a duality theorem-based algorithm (DTA) for inexact quadratic programming (IQP) is developed for municipal solid waste (MSW) management under uncertainty. It improves upon the existing numerical solution method for IQP problems. The comparison between DTA and derivative algorithm (DAM) shows that the DTA method provides better solutions than DAM with lower computational complexity. It is not necessary to identify the uncertain relationship between the objective function and decision variables, which is required for the solution process of DAM. The developed method is applied to a case study of MSW management and planning. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated for supporting long-term MSW management and planning. They could provide more information as well as enable managers to make better decisions to identify desired MSW management policies in association with minimized cost under uncertainty.

  8. Quadratic Programming for Allocating Control Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Gurkirpal

    2005-01-01

    A computer program calculates an optimal allocation of control effort in a system that includes redundant control actuators. The program implements an iterative (but otherwise single-stage) algorithm of the quadratic-programming type. In general, in the quadratic-programming problem, one seeks the values of a set of variables that minimize a quadratic cost function, subject to a set of linear equality and inequality constraints. In this program, the cost function combines control effort (typically quantified in terms of energy or fuel consumed) and control residuals (differences between commanded and sensed values of variables to be controlled). In comparison with prior control-allocation software, this program offers approximately equal accuracy but much greater computational efficiency. In addition, this program offers flexibility, robustness to actuation failures, and a capability for selective enforcement of control requirements. The computational efficiency of this program makes it suitable for such complex, real-time applications as controlling redundant aircraft actuators or redundant spacecraft thrusters. The program is written in the C language for execution in a UNIX operating system.

  9. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-12-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  10. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  11. Degenerate nonlinear programming with a quadratic growth condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2000-01-01

    We show that the quadratic growth condition and the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification (MFCQ) imply that local minima of nonlinear programs are isolated stationary points. As a result, when started sufficiently close to such points, an L1 exact penalty sequential quadratic programming algorithm will induce at least R-linear convergence of the iterates to such a local minimum. We construct an example of a degenerate nonlinear program with a unique local minimum satisfying the quadratic growth and the MFCQ but for which no positive semidefinite augmented Lagrangian exists. We present numerical results obtained using several nonlinear programming packages on this example and discuss its implications for some algorithms.

  12. Fast Approximate Quadratic Programming for Graph Matching

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Conroy, John M.; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J.; Kratzer, Steven G.; Harley, Eric T.; Fishkind, Donniell E.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Priebe, Carey E.

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance. PMID:25886624

  13. Fast approximate quadratic programming for graph matching.

    PubMed

    Vogelstein, Joshua T; Conroy, John M; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J; Kratzer, Steven G; Harley, Eric T; Fishkind, Donniell E; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Priebe, Carey E

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance. PMID:25886624

  14. Phase recovery based on quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan Bing; Ge, Xiao Juan; Cheng, Ya Dong; Ni, Na

    2014-11-01

    Most of the information of optical wavefront is encoded in the phase which includes more details of the object. Conventional optical measuring apparatus is relatively easy to record the intensity of light, but can not measure the phase of light directly. Thus it is important to recovery the phase from the intensity measurements of the object. In recent years, the methods based on quadratic programming such as PhaseLift and PhaseCut can recover the phase of general signal exactly for overdetermined system. To retrieve the phase of sparse signal, the Compressive Phase Retrieval (CPR) algorithm combines the l1-minimization in Compressive Sensing (CS) with low-rank matrix completion problem in PhaseLift, but the result is unsatisfied. This paper focus on the recovery of the phase of sparse signal and propose a new method called the Compressive Phase Cut Retrieval (CPCR) by combining the CPR algorithm with the PhaseCut algorithm. To ensure the sparsity of the recovered signal, we use CPR method to solve a semi-definite programming problem firstly. Then apply linear transformation to the recovered signal, and set the phase of the result as the initial value of the PhaseCut problem. We use TFOCS (a library of Matlab-files) to implement the proposed CPCR algorithm in order to improve the recovered results of the CPR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve the accuracy of the CPR algorithm, and overcome the shortcoming of the PhaseCut method that it can not recover the sparse signal effectively.

  15. A quadratic weight selection algorithm. [for optimal flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is presented which determines a positive semi-definite state weighting matrix in the linear-quadratic optimal control design problem. The algorithm chooses the weighting matrix by placing closed-loop eigenvalues and eigenvectors near desired locations using optimal feedback gains. A simplified flight control design example is used to illustrate the algorithms capabilities.

  16. An alternative method on quadratic programming problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasril, Y.; Mohd, I. B.; Mustaffa, I.; Aminuddin, MMM.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we proposed an alternative approach to find the optimum solution of quadratic programming problems (QPP) in its original form without additional information such as slack variable, surplus variable or artificial variable as done in other favourite methods. This approached is based on the violated constraints by the unconstrained optimum. The optimal solution of QPP obtained by searching from initial point to another point alongside of feasible region.

  17. Nios II hardware acceleration of the epsilon quadratic sieve algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Botella, Guillermo; Castillo, Encarnacion; García, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    The quadratic sieve (QS) algorithm is one of the most powerful algorithms to factor large composite primes used to break RSA cryptographic systems. The hardware structure of the QS algorithm seems to be a good fit for FPGA acceleration. Our new ɛ-QS algorithm further simplifies the hardware architecture making it an even better candidate for C2H acceleration. This paper shows our design results in FPGA resource and performance when implementing very long arithmetic on the Nios microprocessor platform with C2H acceleration for different libraries (GMP, LIP, FLINT, NRMP) and QS architecture choices for factoring 32-2048 bit RSA numbers.

  18. A path-following interior-point algorithm for linear and quadratic problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.J.

    1993-12-01

    We describe an algorithm for the monotone linear complementarity problem that converges for many positive, not necessarily feasible, starting point and exhibits polynomial complexity if some additional assumptions are made on the starting point. If the problem has a strictly complementary solution, the method converges subquadratically. We show that the algorithm and its convergence extend readily to the mixed monotone linear complementarity problem and, hence, to all the usual formulations of the linear programming and convex quadratic programming problems.

  19. Sequential quadratic programming method for determining the minimum energy path.

    PubMed

    Burger, Steven K; Yang, Weitao

    2007-10-28

    A new method, referred to as the sequential quadratic programming method, is presented for determining minimum energy paths. The method is based on minimizing the points representing the path in the subspace perpendicular to the tangent of the path while using a penalty term to prevent kinks from forming. Rather than taking one full step, the minimization is divided into a number of sequential steps on an approximate quadratic surface. The resulting method can efficiently determine the reaction mechanism, from which transition state can be easily identified and refined with other methods. To improve the resolution of the path close to the transition state, points are clustered close to this region with a reparametrization scheme. The usefulness of the algorithm is demonstrated for the Muller-Brown potential, amide hydrolysis, and an 89 atom cluster taken from the active site of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase for the reaction which catalyzes 2-oxo-4-hexenedioate to the intermediate 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate. PMID:17979319

  20. Reduced order parameter estimation using quasilinearization and quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, Adam J.; Putti, Mario; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2012-06-01

    The ability of a particular model to accurately predict how a system responds to forcing is predicated on various model parameters that must be appropriately identified. There are many algorithms whose purpose is to solve this inverse problem, which is often computationally intensive. In this study, we propose a new algorithm that significantly reduces the computational burden associated with parameter identification. The algorithm is an extension of the quasilinearization approach where the governing system of differential equations is linearized with respect to the parameters. The resulting inverse problem therefore becomes a linear regression or quadratic programming problem (QP) for minimizing the sum of squared residuals; the solution becomes an update on the parameter set. This process of linearization and regression is repeated until convergence takes place. This algorithm has not received much attention, as the QPs can become quite large, often infeasible for real-world systems. To alleviate this drawback, proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to reduce the size of the linearized model, thereby reducing the computational burden of solving each QP. In fact, this study shows that the snapshots need only be calculated once at the very beginning of the algorithm, after which no further calculations of the reduced-model subspace are required. The proposed algorithm therefore only requires one linearized full-model run per parameter at the first iteration followed by a series of reduced-order QPs. The method is applied to a groundwater model with about 30,000 computation nodes where as many as 15 zones of hydraulic conductivity are estimated.

  1. Blind deconvolution estimation of fluorescence measurements through quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Gutierrez-Navarro, Omar; Arce-Santana, Edgar R.; Skala, Melissa C.; Walsh, Alex J.; Jo, Javier A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-deconvolution of the instrument response from fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data is usually necessary for accurate fluorescence lifetime estimation. In many applications, however, the instrument response is not available. In such cases, a blind deconvolution approach is required. An iterative methodology is proposed to address the blind deconvolution problem departing from a dataset of FLIM measurements. A linear combination of a base conformed by Laguerre functions models the fluorescence impulse response of the sample at each spatial point in our formulation. Our blind deconvolution estimation (BDE) algorithm is formulated as a quadratic approximation problem, where the decision variables are the samples of the instrument response and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions. In the approximation cost function, there is a bilinear dependence on the decision variables. Hence, due to the nonlinear nature of the estimation process, an alternating least-squares scheme iteratively solves the approximation problem. Our proposal searches for the samples of the instrument response with a global perspective, and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions locally at each spatial point. First, the iterative methodology relies on a least-squares solution for the instrument response, and quadratic programming for the scaling coefficients applied just to a subset of the measured fluorescence decays to initially estimate the instrument response to speed up the convergence. After convergence, the final stage computes the fluorescence impulse response at all spatial points. A comprehensive validation stage considers synthetic and experimental FLIM datasets of ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques and human breast cancer cell samples that highlight the advantages of the proposed BDE algorithm under different noise and initial conditions in the iterative scheme and parameters of the proposal.

  2. Detection of code spread OFDM based on 0-1 integer quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghariani, Ali; Zoltowski, Michael D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we introduce Integer Quadratic Programming (MIQP) approach to optimally detect QPSK Code Spread OFDM (CS-OFDM) by formulating the problem as a combinatorial optimization problem. The Branch and Bound (BB) algorithm is utilized to solve this integer quadratic programming problem. Furthermore, we propose combined preprocessing steps that can be applied prior to BB so that the computational complexity of the optimum receiver is reduced. The first step in this combination is to detect as much as possible symbols using procedures presented in [9], which is basically based on the gradient of quadratic function. The second step detects the undetected symbols from the first step using MMSE estimator. The result of the latter step will be used to predict the initial upper bound of the BB algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed preprocessing combination when applied prior to BB provides optimal performance with a significantly reduced computational complexity.

  3. An efficient algorithm for computing the roots of general quadratic, cubic and quartic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Munir; Hammad, Sali; Mahmood, Ibtihal

    2014-10-01

    While the solution to deriving the roots of the general quadratic equation is adequately covered in a typical classroom environment, the same is not true for the general cubic and quartic equations. To the best of our knowledge, we do not see the roots of the general cubic or quartic equation discussed in any typical algebra textbook at the undergraduate level. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm in order to calculate the roots of the general quadratic, cubic and quartic equations. Examples are given to demonstrate the usefulness of this proposed algorithm.

  4. CAD of control systems: Application of nonlinear programming to a linear quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1983-01-01

    The familiar suboptimal regulator design approach is recast as a constrained optimization problem and incorporated in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) package where both design objective and constraints are quadratic cost functions. This formulation permits the separate consideration of, for example, model following errors, sensitivity measures and control energy as objectives to be minimized or limits to be observed. Efficient techniques for computing the interrelated cost functions and their gradients are utilized in conjunction with a nonlinear programming algorithm. The effectiveness of the approach and the degree of insight into the problem which it affords is illustrated in a helicopter regulation design example.

  5. A reduced successive quadratic programming strategy for errors-in-variables estimation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tjoa, I.-B.; Biegler, L. T.; Carnegie-Mellon Univ.

    1992-01-01

    Parameter estimation problems in process engineering represent a special class of nonlinear optimization problems, because the maximum likelihood structure of the objective function can be exploited. Within this class, the errors in variables method (EVM) is particularly interesting. Here we seek a weighted least-squares fit to the measurements with an underdetermined process model. Thus, both the number of variables and degrees of freedom available for optimization increase linearly with the number of data sets. Large optimization problems of this type can be particularly challenging and expensive to solve because, for general-purpose nonlinear programming (NLP) algorithms, the computational effort increases at least quadratically with problem size. In this study we develop a tailored NLP strategy for EVM problems. The method is based on a reduced Hessian approach to successive quadratic programming (SQP), but with the decomposition performed separately for each data set. This leads to the elimination of all variables but the model parameters, which are determined by a QP coordination step. In this way the computational effort remains linear in the number of data sets. Moreover, unlike previous approaches to the EVM problem, global and superlinear properties of the SQP algorithm apply naturally. Also, the method directly incorporates inequality constraints on the model parameters (although not on the fitted variables). This approach is demonstrated on five example problems with up to 102 degrees of freedom. Compared to general-purpose NLP algorithms, large improvements in computational performance are observed.

  6. MM Algorithms for Geometric and Signomial Programming.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kenneth; Zhou, Hua

    2014-02-01

    This paper derives new algorithms for signomial programming, a generalization of geometric programming. The algorithms are based on a generic principle for optimization called the MM algorithm. In this setting, one can apply the geometric-arithmetic mean inequality and a supporting hyperplane inequality to create a surrogate function with parameters separated. Thus, unconstrained signomial programming reduces to a sequence of one-dimensional minimization problems. Simple examples demonstrate that the MM algorithm derived can converge to a boundary point or to one point of a continuum of minimum points. Conditions under which the minimum point is unique or occurs in the interior of parameter space are proved for geometric programming. Convergence to an interior point occurs at a linear rate. Finally, the MM framework easily accommodates equality and inequality constraints of signomial type. For the most important special case, constrained quadratic programming, the MM algorithm involves very simple updates. PMID:24634545

  7. MM Algorithms for Geometric and Signomial Programming

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Kenneth; Zhou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    This paper derives new algorithms for signomial programming, a generalization of geometric programming. The algorithms are based on a generic principle for optimization called the MM algorithm. In this setting, one can apply the geometric-arithmetic mean inequality and a supporting hyperplane inequality to create a surrogate function with parameters separated. Thus, unconstrained signomial programming reduces to a sequence of one-dimensional minimization problems. Simple examples demonstrate that the MM algorithm derived can converge to a boundary point or to one point of a continuum of minimum points. Conditions under which the minimum point is unique or occurs in the interior of parameter space are proved for geometric programming. Convergence to an interior point occurs at a linear rate. Finally, the MM framework easily accommodates equality and inequality constraints of signomial type. For the most important special case, constrained quadratic programming, the MM algorithm involves very simple updates. PMID:24634545

  8. Tilt measurement and compensation algorithm for holographic data storage with optimized quadratic windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kyungchan; Lim, Sung-Yong; Lee, Jae-seong; Jeong, Wooyoung; Yang, Hyunseok

    2016-09-01

    In holographic data storage, tilt is one of the critical disturbances. There are two types of tilt: tangential and radial. In real systems, tangential and radial tilt occur simultaneously. Thus, it is difficult to measure and compensate for tilt. In this study, using a quadratic window, which compares the intensity of a certain area, a tilt error signal was generated and compensated for with the proposed algorithm. The compensated image obtained satisfied a 0.3 dB tolerance.

  9. A non-linear programming approach to the computer-aided design of regulators using a linear-quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1985-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a non-linear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer-aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer.

  10. Airborne gravimetry data sparse reconstruction via L1-norm convex quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Peng; Wu, Mei-Ping; Tang, Gang

    2015-06-01

    In practice, airborne gravimetry is a sub-Nyquist sampling method because of the restrictions imposed by national boundaries, financial cost, and database size. In this study, we analyze the sparsity of airborne gravimetry data by using the discrete Fourier transform and propose a reconstruction method based on the theory of compressed sensing for large-scale gravity anomaly data. Consequently, the reconstruction of the gravity anomaly data is transformed to a L1-norm convex quadratic programming problem. We combine the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm (PCG) and the improved interior-point method (IPM) to solve the convex quadratic programming problem. Furthermore, a flight test was carried out with the homegrown strapdown airborne gravimeter SGA-WZ. Subsequently, we reconstructed the gravity anomaly data of the flight test, and then, we compared the proposed method with the linear interpolation method, which is commonly used in airborne gravimetry. The test results show that the PCG-IPM algorithm can be used to reconstruct large-scale gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and more effectiveness than the linear interpolation method.

  11. Automatic circuit redesign for delay fault testability using constrained quadratic 0-1 programming

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, M.; Shaik, I.

    1994-12-31

    We discuss three methods of automatically redesigning Very Large Scale Integrated circuits so that they can test themselves for excessive delay. A delay fault occurs when a circuit signal arrives too late as it propagates through the circuit. A hazard is the occurrence of multiple circuit signal transitions in a very short time interval. For delay fault testing to be accurate, we must eliminate hazards in the circuit by adding hardware. Our three methods for determining where to place this additional hardware are: (1) Good machine simulation using a higher-order Boolean algebra, (2) A graph algorithm to bound the enumeration of paths and find points where hazards appear, and (3) Quadratic 0-1 Programming to balance all cycles in the circuit graph. We discuss the mathematics of these three methods, present results, and discuss the inadequacies of each method. We conclude by proposing a greedy algorithm that combines two of these methods to make added hardware.

  12. A Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm for accurate tracking of two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwakar, S. V.; Das, Sarit K.; Sundararajan, T.

    2009-12-01

    A new Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm is presented which provides an accurate and continuous representation of the interface in a multiphase domain and facilitates the direct estimation of local interfacial curvature. The fluid interface in each of the mixed cells is represented by piecewise parabolic curves and an initial discontinuous PLIC approximation of the interface is progressively converted into a smooth quadratic spline made of these parabolic curves. The conversion is achieved by a sequence of predictor-corrector operations enforcing function ( C0) and derivative ( C1) continuity at the cell boundaries using simple analytical expressions for the continuity requirements. The efficacy and accuracy of the current algorithm has been demonstrated using standard test cases involving reconstruction of known static interface shapes and dynamically evolving interfaces in prescribed flow situations. These benchmark studies illustrate that the present algorithm performs excellently as compared to the other interface reconstruction methods available in literature. Quadratic rate of error reduction with respect to grid size has been observed in all the cases with curved interface shapes; only in situations where the interface geometry is primarily flat, the rate of convergence becomes linear with the mesh size. The flow algorithm implemented in the current work is designed to accurately balance the pressure gradients with the surface tension force at any location. As a consequence, it is able to minimize spurious flow currents arising from imperfect normal stress balance at the interface. This has been demonstrated through the standard test problem of an inviscid droplet placed in a quiescent medium. Finally, the direct curvature estimation ability of the current algorithm is illustrated through the coupled multiphase flow problem of a deformable air bubble rising through a column of water.

  13. Identify Secretory Protein of Malaria Parasite with Modified Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm and Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong-E

    2016-06-01

    Malaria parasite secretes various proteins in infected red blood cell for its growth and survival. Thus identification of these secretory proteins is important for developing vaccine or drug against malaria. In this study, the modified method of quadratic discriminant analysis is presented for predicting the secretory proteins. Firstly, 20 amino acids are divided into five types according to the physical and chemical characteristics of amino acids. Then, we used five types of amino acids compositions as inputs of the modified quadratic discriminant algorithm. Finally, the best prediction performance is obtained by using 20 amino acid compositions, the sensitivity of 96 %, the specificity of 92 % with 0.88 of Mathew's correlation coefficient in fivefold cross-validation test. The results are also compared with those of existing prediction methods. The compared results shown our method are prominent in the prediction of secretory proteins. PMID:26286010

  14. Identify Beta-Hairpin Motifs with Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm Based on the Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    YongE, Feng; GaoShan, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Successful prediction of the beta-hairpin motif will be helpful for understanding the of the fold recognition. Some algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of beta-hairpin motifs. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on the amino acid sequences. Here, we proposed a novel model for predicting beta-hairpin structure based on the chemical shift. Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in not beta-hairpin and beta-hairpin motifs. Secondly, we used these chemical shifts as features combined with three algorithms to predict beta-hairpin structure. Finally, we achieved the best prediction, namely sensitivity of 92%, the specificity of 94% with 0.85 of Mathew’s correlation coefficient using quadratic discriminant analysis algorithm, which is clearly superior to the same method for the prediction of beta-hairpin structure from 20 amino acid compositions in the three-fold cross-validation. Our finding showed that the chemical shift is an effective parameter for beta-hairpin prediction, suggesting the quadratic discriminant analysis is a powerful algorithm for the prediction of beta-hairpin. PMID:26422468

  15. Programming parallel vision algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    Computer vision requires the processing of large volumes of data and requires parallel architectures and algorithms to be useful in real-time, industrial applications. The INSIGHT dataflow language was designed to allow encoding of vision algorithms at all levels of the computer vision paradigm. INSIGHT programs, which are relational in nature, can be translated into a graph structure that represents an architecture for solving a particular vision problem or a configuration of a reconfigurable computational network. The authors consider here INSIGHT programs that produce a parallel net architecture for solving low-, mid-, and high-level vision tasks.

  16. Development of C++ Application Program for Solving Quadratic Equation in Elementary School in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandele, Samuel Oye; Adekunle, Adeyemi Suraju

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to design, develop and test a c++ application program CAP-QUAD for solving quadratic equation in elementary school in Nigeria. The package was developed in c++ using object-oriented programming language, other computer program that were also utilized during the development process is DevC++ compiler, it was used for…

  17. A Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm Hybridized with Tabu Search for the Quadratic Assignment Problem.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wee Loon; Wibowo, Antoni; Desa, Mohammad Ishak; Haron, Habibollah

    2016-01-01

    The quadratic assignment problem (QAP) is an NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem with a wide variety of applications. Biogeography-based optimization (BBO), a relatively new optimization technique based on the biogeography concept, uses the idea of migration strategy of species to derive algorithm for solving optimization problems. It has been shown that BBO provides performance on a par with other optimization methods. A classical BBO algorithm employs the mutation operator as its diversification strategy. However, this process will often ruin the quality of solutions in QAP. In this paper, we propose a hybrid technique to overcome the weakness of classical BBO algorithm to solve QAP, by replacing the mutation operator with a tabu search procedure. Our experiments using the benchmark instances from QAPLIB show that the proposed hybrid method is able to find good solutions for them within reasonable computational times. Out of 61 benchmark instances tested, the proposed method is able to obtain the best known solutions for 57 of them. PMID:26819585

  18. A Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm Hybridized with Tabu Search for the Quadratic Assignment Problem

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wee Loon; Wibowo, Antoni; Desa, Mohammad Ishak; Haron, Habibollah

    2016-01-01

    The quadratic assignment problem (QAP) is an NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem with a wide variety of applications. Biogeography-based optimization (BBO), a relatively new optimization technique based on the biogeography concept, uses the idea of migration strategy of species to derive algorithm for solving optimization problems. It has been shown that BBO provides performance on a par with other optimization methods. A classical BBO algorithm employs the mutation operator as its diversification strategy. However, this process will often ruin the quality of solutions in QAP. In this paper, we propose a hybrid technique to overcome the weakness of classical BBO algorithm to solve QAP, by replacing the mutation operator with a tabu search procedure. Our experiments using the benchmark instances from QAPLIB show that the proposed hybrid method is able to find good solutions for them within reasonable computational times. Out of 61 benchmark instances tested, the proposed method is able to obtain the best known solutions for 57 of them. PMID:26819585

  19. Item Pool Construction Using Mixed Integer Quadratic Programming (MIQP). GMAC® Research Report RR-14-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.; Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to construct multiple highly equivalent item pools simultaneously, and compares the results from mixed integer programming (MIP). Three different MIP/MIQP models were implemented and evaluated using real CAT item pool data with 23 different content areas and a goal of equal information…

  20. Application of Sequential Quadratic Programming to Minimize Smart Active Flap Rotor Hub Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Leyland, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In an analytical study, SMART active flap rotor hub loads have been minimized using nonlinear programming constrained optimization methodology. The recently developed NLPQLP system (Schittkowski, 2010) that employs Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) as its core algorithm was embedded into a driver code (NLP10x10) specifically designed to minimize active flap rotor hub loads (Leyland, 2014). Three types of practical constraints on the flap deflections have been considered. To validate the current application, two other optimization methods have been used: i) the standard, linear unconstrained method, and ii) the nonlinear Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG) method with constraints. The new software code NLP10x10 has been systematically checked out. It has been verified that NLP10x10 is functioning as desired. The following are briefly covered in this paper: relevant optimization theory; implementation of the capability of minimizing a metric of all, or a subset, of the hub loads as well as the capability of using all, or a subset, of the flap harmonics; and finally, solutions for the SMART rotor. The eventual goal is to implement NLP10x10 in a real-time wind tunnel environment.

  1. A Conjugate Gradient Algorithm with Function Value Information and N-Step Quadratic Convergence for Unconstrained Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangrong; Zhao, Xupei; Duan, Xiabin; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the conjugate gradient (CG) method achieves global convergence—with at most a linear convergence rate—because CG formulas are generated by linear approximations of the objective functions. The quadratically convergent results are very limited. We introduce a new PRP method in which the restart strategy is also used. Moreover, the method we developed includes not only n-step quadratic convergence but also both the function value information and gradient value information. In this paper, we will show that the new PRP method (with either the Armijo line search or the Wolfe line search) is both linearly and quadratically convergent. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the new PRP algorithm is competitive with the normal CG method. PMID:26381742

  2. Constraint identification and algorithm stabilization for degenerate nonlinear programs.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2003-01-01

    In the vicinity of a solution of a nonlinear programming problem at which both strict complementarity and linear independence of the active constraints may fail to hold, we describe a technique for distinguishing weakly active from strongly active constraints. We show that this information can be used to modify the sequential quadratic programming algorithm so that it exhibits superlinear convergence to the solution under assumptions weaker than those made in previous analyses.

  3. Interval-parameter robust quadratic programming for water quality management under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Nie, S. L.; Mo, D. W.

    2008-07-01

    Effective planning of water quality management is important for facilitating sustainable socio-economic development in watershed systems. An interval-parameter robust quadratic programming (IRQP) method is developed by incorporating techniques of robust programming and interval quadratic programming within a general optimization framework. The IRQP improves upon existing quadratic programming methods, and can tackle uncertainties presented as interval numbers and fuzzy sets as well as their combinations. Moreover, it can deal with nonlinearities in the objective function such that economies-of-scale effects can be reflected. The developed method is applied to a case study of a water quality management under uncertainty. A number of decision alternatives are generated based on the interval solutions as well as the projected applicable conditions. They represent multiple decision options with various environmental and economic considerations. Willingness to accept a low economic revenue will guarantee satisfying the water quality requirements. A strong desire to acquire a high benefit will run the risk of violating environmental criteria.

  4. An algorithm for the solution of dynamic linear programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    1989-01-01

    The algorithm's objective is to efficiently solve Dynamic Linear Programs (DLP) by taking advantage of their special staircase structure. This algorithm constitutes a stepping stone to an improved algorithm for solving Dynamic Quadratic Programs, which, in turn, would make the nonlinear programming method of Successive Quadratic Programs more practical for solving trajectory optimization problems. The ultimate goal is to being trajectory optimization solution speeds into the realm of real-time control. The algorithm exploits the staircase nature of the large constraint matrix of the equality-constrained DLPs encountered when solving inequality-constrained DLPs by an active set approach. A numerically-stable, staircase QL factorization of the staircase constraint matrix is carried out starting from its last rows and columns. The resulting recursion is like the time-varying Riccati equation from multi-stage LQR theory. The resulting factorization increases the efficiency of all of the typical LP solution operations over that of a dense matrix LP code. At the same time numerical stability is ensured. The algorithm also takes advantage of dynamic programming ideas about the cost-to-go by relaxing active pseudo constraints in a backwards sweeping process. This further decreases the cost per update of the LP rank-1 updating procedure, although it may result in more changes of the active set that if pseudo constraints were relaxed in a non-stagewise fashion. The usual stability of closed-loop Linear/Quadratic optimally-controlled systems, if it carries over to strictly linear cost functions, implies that the saving due to reduced factor update effort may outweigh the cost of an increased number of updates. An aerospace example is presented in which a ground-to-ground rocket's distance is maximized. This example demonstrates the applicability of this class of algorithms to aerospace guidance. It also sheds light on the efficacy of the proposed pseudo constraint relaxation

  5. A recurrent neural network with exponential convergence for solving convex quadratic program and related linear piecewise equations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Youshen; Feng, Gang; Wang, Jun

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a recurrent neural network for solving strict convex quadratic programming problems and related linear piecewise equations. Compared with the existing neural networks for quadratic program, the proposed neural network has a one-layer structure with a low model complexity. Moreover, the proposed neural network is shown to have a finite-time convergence and exponential convergence. Illustrative examples further show the good performance of the proposed neural network in real-time applications. PMID:15312842

  6. Algorithmic advances in stochastic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.P.

    1993-07-01

    Practical planning problems with deterministic forecasts of inherently uncertain parameters often yield unsatisfactory solutions. Stochastic programming formulations allow uncertain parameters to be modeled as random variables with known distributions, but the size of the resulting mathematical programs can be formidable. Decomposition-based algorithms take advantage of special structure and provide an attractive approach to such problems. We consider two classes of decomposition-based stochastic programming algorithms. The first type of algorithm addresses problems with a ``manageable`` number of scenarios. The second class incorporates Monte Carlo sampling within a decomposition algorithm. We develop and empirically study an enhanced Benders decomposition algorithm for solving multistage stochastic linear programs within a prespecified tolerance. The enhancements include warm start basis selection, preliminary cut generation, the multicut procedure, and decision tree traversing strategies. Computational results are presented for a collection of ``real-world`` multistage stochastic hydroelectric scheduling problems. Recently, there has been an increased focus on decomposition-based algorithms that use sampling within the optimization framework. These approaches hold much promise for solving stochastic programs with many scenarios. A critical component of such algorithms is a stopping criterion to ensure the quality of the solution. With this as motivation, we develop a stopping rule theory for algorithms in which bounds on the optimal objective function value are estimated by sampling. Rules are provided for selecting sample sizes and terminating the algorithm under which asymptotic validity of confidence interval statements for the quality of the proposed solution can be verified. Issues associated with the application of this theory to two sampling-based algorithms are considered, and preliminary empirical coverage results are presented.

  7. Quadratic programming-based approach for autonomous vehicle path planning in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Han, Jianda; Wu, Huaiyu

    2012-07-01

    Path planning for space vehicles is still a challenging problem although considerable progress has been made over the past decades. The major difficulties are that most of existing methods only adapt to static environment instead of dynamic one, and also can not solve the inherent constraints arising from the robot body and the exterior environment. To address these difficulties, this research aims to provide a feasible trajectory based on quadratic programming(QP) for path planning in three-dimensional space where an autonomous vehicle is requested to pursue a target while avoiding static or dynamic obstacles. First, the objective function is derived from the pursuit task which is defined in terms of the relative distance to the target, as well as the angle between the velocity and the position in the relative velocity coordinates(RVCs). The optimization is in quadratic polynomial form according to QP formulation. Then, the avoidance task is modeled with linear constraints in RVCs. Some other constraints, such as kinematics, dynamics, and sensor range, are included. Last, simulations with typical multiple obstacles are carried out, including in static and dynamic environments and one of human-in-the-loop. The results indicate that the optimal trajectories of the autonomous robot in three-dimensional space satisfy the required performances. Therefore, the QP model proposed in this paper not only adapts to dynamic environment with uncertainty, but also can satisfy all kinds of constraints, and it provides an efficient approach to solve the problems of path planning in three-dimensional space.

  8. Quadratic eigenvalue problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Day, David Minot

    2007-04-01

    In this report we will describe some nonlinear eigenvalue problems that arise in the areas of solid mechanics, acoustics, and coupled structural acoustics. We will focus mostly on quadratic eigenvalue problems, which are a special case of nonlinear eigenvalue problems. Algorithms for solving the quadratic eigenvalue problem will be presented, along with some example calculations.

  9. AESOP: An interactive computer program for the design of linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    AESOP is a computer program for use in designing feedback controls and state estimators for linear multivariable systems. AESOP is meant to be used in an interactive manner. Each design task that the program performs is assigned a "function" number. The user accesses these functions either (1) by inputting a list of desired function numbers or (2) by inputting a single function number. In the latter case the choice of the function will in general depend on the results obtained by the previously executed function. The most important of the AESOP functions are those that design,linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters. The user interacts with the program when using these design functions by inputting design weighting parameters and by viewing graphic displays of designed system responses. Supporting functions are provided that obtain system transient and frequency responses, transfer functions, and covariance matrices. The program can also compute open-loop system information such as stability (eigenvalues), eigenvectors, controllability, and observability. The program is written in ANSI-66 FORTRAN for use on an IBM 3033 using TSS 370. Descriptions of all subroutines and results of two test cases are included in the appendixes.

  10. Design and cost analysis of rapid aquifer restoration systems using flow simulation and quadratic programming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L.J.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed two-dimensional flow simulation of a complex ground-water system is combined with quadratic and linear programming to evaluate design alternatives for rapid aquifer restoration. Results show how treatment and pumping costs depend dynamically on the type of treatment process, and capacity of pumping and injection wells, and the number of wells. The design for an inexpensive treatment process minimizes pumping costs, while an expensive process results in the minimization of treatment costs. Substantial reductions in pumping costs occur with increases in injection capacity or in the number of wells. Treatment costs are reduced by expansions in pumping capacity or injecion capacity. The analysis identifies maximum pumping and injection capacities.-from Authors

  11. An efficient ensemble of radial basis functions method based on quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Renhe; Liu, Li; Long, Teng; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Radial basis function (RBF) surrogate models have been widely applied in engineering design optimization problems to approximate computationally expensive simulations. Ensemble of radial basis functions (ERBF) using the weighted sum of stand-alone RBFs improves the approximation performance. To achieve a good trade-off between the accuracy and efficiency of the modelling process, this article presents a novel efficient ERBF method to determine the weights through solving a quadratic programming subproblem, denoted ERBF-QP. Several numerical benchmark functions are utilized to test the performance of the proposed ERBF-QP method. The results show that ERBF-QP can significantly improve the modelling efficiency compared with several existing ERBF methods. Moreover, ERBF-QP also provides satisfactory performance in terms of approximation accuracy. Finally, the ERBF-QP method is applied to a satellite multidisciplinary design optimization problem to illustrate its practicality and effectiveness for real-world engineering applications.

  12. SEMI-DEFINITE PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES FOR STRUCTURED QUADRATIC INVERSE EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    LIN, MATTHEW M.; DONG, BO; CHU, MOODY T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade or so, semi-definite programming (SDP) has emerged as a powerful tool capable of handling a remarkably wide range of problems. This article describes an innovative application of SDP techniques to quadratic inverse eigenvalue problems (QIEPs). The notion of QIEPs is of fundamental importance because its ultimate goal of constructing or updating a vibration system from some observed or desirable dynamical behaviors while respecting some inherent feasibility constraints well suits many engineering applications. Thus far, however, QIEPs have remained challenging both theoretically and computationally due to the great variations of structural constraints that must be addressed. Of notable interest and significance are the uniformity and the simplicity in the SDP formulation that solves effectively many otherwise very difficult QIEPs. PMID:25392603

  13. Trigonometric quadratic B-spline subdomain Galerkin algorithm for the Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Buket; Dag, Idris; Gorgulu, Melis Zorsahin

    2015-12-01

    A variant of the subdomain Galerkin method has been set up to find numerical solutions of the Burgers' equation. Approximate function consists of the combination of the trigonometric B-splines. Integration of Burgers' equation has been achived by aid of the subdomain Galerkin method based on the trigonometric B-splines as an approximate functions. The resulting first order ordinary differential system has been converted into an iterative algebraic equation by use of the Crank-Nicolson method at successive two time levels. The suggested algorithm is tested on somewell-known problems for the Burgers' equation.

  14. Enhanced algorithms for stochastic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, A.S.

    1993-09-01

    In this dissertation, we present some of the recent advances made in solving two-stage stochastic linear programming problems of large size and complexity. Decomposition and sampling are two fundamental components of techniques to solve stochastic optimization problems. We describe improvements to the current techniques in both these areas. We studied different ways of using importance sampling techniques in the context of Stochastic programming, by varying the choice of approximation functions used in this method. We have concluded that approximating the recourse function by a computationally inexpensive piecewise-linear function is highly efficient. This reduced the problem from finding the mean of a computationally expensive functions to finding that of a computationally inexpensive function. Then we implemented various variance reduction techniques to estimate the mean of a piecewise-linear function. This method achieved similar variance reductions in orders of magnitude less time than, when we directly applied variance-reduction techniques directly on the given problem. In solving a stochastic linear program, the expected value problem is usually solved before a stochastic solution and also to speed-up the algorithm by making use of the information obtained from the solution of the expected value problem. We have devised a new decomposition scheme to improve the convergence of this algorithm.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of DBSCAN, K-Means, and Quadratic Variation Algorithms for Automatic Identification of Swallows from Swallowing Accelerometry Signals

    PubMed Central

    Dudik, Joshua M.; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical auscultation with high resolution sensors is currently under consideration as a method of automatically screening for specific swallowing abnormalities. To be clinically useful without human involvement, any devices based on cervical auscultation should be able to detect specified swallowing events in an automatic manner. Methods In this paper, we comparatively analyze the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise algorithm (DBSCAN), a k-means based algorithm, and an algorithm based on quadratic variation as methods of differentiating periods of swallowing activity from periods of time without swallows. These algorithms utilized swallowing vibration data exclusively and compared the results to a gold standard measure of swallowing duration. Data was collected from 23 subjects that were actively suffering from swallowing difficulties. Results Comparing the performance of the DBSCAN algorithm with a proven segmentation algorithm that utilizes k-means clustering demonstrated that the DBSCAN algorithm had a higher sensitivity and correctly segmented more swallows. Comparing its performance with a threshold-based algorithm that utilized the quadratic variation of the signal showed that the DBSCAN algorithm offered no direct increase in performance. However, it offered several other benefits including a faster run time and more consistent performance between patients. All algorithms showed noticeable differen-tiation from the endpoints provided by a videofluoroscopy examination as well as reduced sensitivity. Conclusions In summary, we showed that the DBSCAN algorithm is a viable method for detecting the occurrence of a swallowing event using cervical auscultation signals, but significant work must be done to improve its performance before it can be implemented in an unsupervised manner. PMID:25658505

  16. Quadratic Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Quadratic friction involves a discontinuous damping term in equations of motion in order that the frictional force always opposes the direction of the motion. Perhaps for this reason this topic is usually omitted from beginning texts in differential equations and physics. However, quadratic damping is more realistic than viscous damping in many…

  17. User's guide for SOL/QPSOL: a Fortran package for quadratic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, P.E.; Murray, W.; Saunders, M.A.; Wright, M.H.

    1983-07-01

    This report forms the user's guide for Version 3.1 of SOL/QPSOL, a set of Fortran subroutines designed to locate the minimum value of an arbitrary quadratic function subject to linear constraints and simple upper and lower bounds. If the quadratic function is convex, a global minimum is found; otherwise, a local minimum is found. The method used is most efficient when many constraints or bounds are active at the solution. QPSOL treats the Hessian and general constraints as dense matrices, and hence is not intended for large sparse problems. This document replaces the previous user's guide of June 1982.

  18. Multi-isotopic transuranic waste interrogation using delayed neutron nondestructive assay and iterative quadratic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei

    1997-11-01

    Nuclear safeguards for Special Nuclear Materials is to protect the nuclear materials against malevolent use and to insure their peaceful usage. The nondestructive assay technique (NDA) offers an efficient and proliferation resistance method for nuclear safeguards technology. NDA techniques were investigated for multi-isotopic transuranic waste interrogation. This work was originally intended for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development at Argonne National Laboratory. One major feature of the IFR is its integral fuel cycle based on a pyrometallurgical process. More than 99% of transuranics produced in the fuel are returned to the makeup fuel and burned in the reactor. With the long-lived actinides removed from the waste stream, the waste produced will decay sufficiently in 300 years dropping below the cancer risk level of natural uranium ore and easing the perceived waste management problem. The feasibility of using nondestructive assay techniques for the IFR fuel cycle waste interrogation were studied. A special DNNDA experimental device was designed and analysis techniques were developed. The DNNDA technique uses the delayed neutrons emitted after the activation of a 14 MeV neutron source as the characteristic signature for each fissionable isotope. A tantalum/polyethylene filter was employed to enhance the discrimination between the fissile and the fissionable isotopes. Spontaneous fissions from 240Pu were also measured to assist the mass assay. A nonlinear overdetermined system was established based on the DNNDA measurements. An Iterative Quadratic Programming (IQP) method was applied to perform the estimates. The IQP method has several advantages over the linear least squares and Kalman filter methods, it has the flexibility of adding additional constraints, it has superlinear global convergence and it can be utilized for nonlinear problems. The results show that using the IQP method with the DNNDA technique is quite promising for multi-isotopic assay

  19. KENO-VI: A Monte Carlo Criticality Program with generalized quadratic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses KENO-VI which is a new version of the KENO monte Carlo Criticality Safety developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of KENO-VI is to provide a criticality safety code similar to KENO-V.a that possesses a more general and flexible geometry package. KENO-VI constructs and processes geometry data as sets of quadratic equations. A lengthy set of simple, easy-to-use geometric functions, similar to those provided in KENO-V.a., and the ability to build more complex geometric shapes represented by sets of quadratic equations are the heart of the geometry package in KENO-VI. The code`s flexibility is increased by allowing intersecting geometry regions, hexagonal as well as cuboidal arrays, and the ability to specify an array boundary that intersects the array.

  20. Genetic algorithms as discovery programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, M.R.; Liepins, G.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical counterparts to natural selection and gene recombination. As such, they have provided one of the few significant breakthroughs in machine learning. Used with appropriate reward functions and apportionment of credit, they have been successfully applied to gas pipeline operation, x-ray registration and mathematical optimization problems. This paper discusses the basics of genetic algorithms, describes a few successes, and reports on current progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in applications to set covering and simulated robots.

  1. AQMAN; linear and quadratic programming matrix generator using two-dimensional ground-water flow simulation for aquifer management modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L.J.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN-77 computer program code that helps solve a variety of aquifer management problems involving the control of groundwater hydraulics. It is intended for use with any standard mathematical programming package that uses Mathematical Programming System input format. The computer program creates the input files to be used by the optimization program. These files contain all the hydrologic information and management objectives needed to solve the management problem. Used in conjunction with a mathematical programming code, the computer program identifies the pumping or recharge strategy that achieves a user 's management objective while maintaining groundwater hydraulic conditions within desired limits. The objective may be linear or quadratic, and may involve the minimization of pumping and recharge rates or of variable pumping costs. The problem may contain constraints on groundwater heads, gradients, and velocities for a complex, transient hydrologic system. Linear superposition of solutions to the transient, two-dimensional groundwater flow equation is used by the computer program in conjunction with the response matrix optimization method. A unit stress is applied at each decision well and transient responses at all control locations are computed using a modified version of the U.S. Geological Survey two dimensional aquifer simulation model. The program also computes discounted cost coefficients for the objective function and accounts for transient aquifer conditions. (Author 's abstract)

  2. A new numerical approach to solve Thomas-Fermi model of an atom using bio-inspired heuristics integrated with sequential quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Raja, Muhammad Asif Zahoor; Zameer, Aneela; Khan, Aziz Ullah; Wazwaz, Abdul Majid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel bio-inspired computing approach is developed to analyze the dynamics of nonlinear singular Thomas-Fermi equation (TFE) arising in potential and charge density models of an atom by exploiting the strength of finite difference scheme (FDS) for discretization and optimization through genetic algorithms (GAs) hybrid with sequential quadratic programming. The FDS procedures are used to transform the TFE differential equations into a system of nonlinear equations. A fitness function is constructed based on the residual error of constituent equations in the mean square sense and is formulated as the minimization problem. Optimization of parameters for the system is carried out with GAs, used as a tool for viable global search integrated with SQP algorithm for rapid refinement of the results. The design scheme is applied to solve TFE for five different scenarios by taking various step sizes and different input intervals. Comparison of the proposed results with the state of the art numerical and analytical solutions reveals that the worth of our scheme in terms of accuracy and convergence. The reliability and effectiveness of the proposed scheme are validated through consistently getting optimal values of statistical performance indices calculated for a sufficiently large number of independent runs to establish its significance. PMID:27610319

  3. Algorithmic enhancements and experience with a large scale SQP code for general nonlinear programming problems

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, P.; Tolle, J.; Kearsley, A.

    1994-12-31

    We have developed a large scale sequential quadratic programming (SQP) code based on an interior-point method for solving general (convex or nonconvex) quadratic programs (QP). We often halt this QP solver prematurely by employing a trust-region strategy. This procedure typically reduces the overall cost of the code. In this talk we briefly review the algorithm and some of its theoretical justification and then discuss recent enhancements including automatic procedures for both increasing and decreasing the parameter in the merit function, a regularization procedure for dealing with linearly dependent active constraint gradients, and a method for modifying the linearized equality constraints. Some numerical results on a significant set of {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} problems will be presented.

  4. A Limited-Memory BFGS Algorithm Based on a Trust-Region Quadratic Model for Large-Scale Nonlinear Equations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Yuan, Gonglin; Wei, Zengxin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a trust-region algorithm is proposed for large-scale nonlinear equations, where the limited-memory BFGS (L-M-BFGS) update matrix is used in the trust-region subproblem to improve the effectiveness of the algorithm for large-scale problems. The global convergence of the presented method is established under suitable conditions. The numerical results of the test problems show that the method is competitive with the norm method. PMID:25950725

  5. Seven Wonders of the Ancient and Modern Quadratic World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2001-01-01

    Presents four methods for solving a quadratic equation using graphing calculator technology: (1) graphing with the CALC feature; (2) quadratic formula program; (3) table; and (4) solver. Includes a worksheet for a lab activity on factoring quadratic equations. (KHR)

  6. Simulation of superconducting tapes and coils with convex quadratic programming method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Lei; Liu, Xufeng

    2015-08-01

    Second-generation (2G) high-temperature superconducting coated conductors are playing an increasingly important role in power applications due to their large current density under high magnetic fields. In this paper, we conclude and explore the ability and possible potential of J formulation from the mathematical modeling point of view. An equivalent matrix form of J formulation has been presented and a relation between electromagnetic quantities and Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions in optimization theory has been discovered. The use of the latest formulae to calculate inductance in a coil system and the primal-dual interior-point method algorithm is a trial to make the process of modeling stylized and build a bridge to commercial optimization solvers. Two different dependences of the critical current density on the magnetic field have been used in order to make a comparison with those published papers.

  7. Optimal caching algorithm based on dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changjie; Xiang, Zhe; Zhong, Yuzhuo; Long, Jidong

    2001-07-01

    With the dramatic growth of multimedia streams, the efficient distribution of stored videos has become a major concern. There are two basic caching strategies: the whole caching strategy and the caching strategy based on layered encoded video, the latter can satisfy the requirement of the highly heterogeneous access to the Internet. Conventional caching strategies assign each object a cache gain by calculating popularity or density popularity, and determine which videos and which layers should be cached. In this paper, we first investigate the delivery model of stored video based on proxy, and propose two novel caching algorithms, DPLayer (for layered encoded caching scheme) and DPWhole (for whole caching scheme) for multimedia proxy caching. The two algorithms are based on the resource allocation model of dynamic programming to select the optimal subset of objects to be cached in proxy. Simulation proved that our algorithms achieve better performance than other existing schemes. We also analyze the computational complexity and space complexity of the algorithms, and introduce a regulative parameter to compress the states space of the dynamic programming problem and reduce the complexity of algorithms.

  8. Optimization of Lens Adjustment in Semiconductor Lithography Equipment Using Quadratically Constrained and Second-Order Cone Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinano, Yuji; Yoshihara, Toshiyuki; Miyashiro, Ryuhei; Fukagawa, Youzou

    The present paper considers optimization of lens adjustment in semiconductor lithography equipment. For improving productivity, the laser irradiation power of recent semiconductor lithography equipment has been boosted, which causes significant aberration due to heating during exposure. The aberration of the equipment must be measured or estimated in order to adjust the positions and orientations of the lenses. Since this adjustment is performed sequentially during exposure, the optimization problem to obtain optimal lens adjustment should be solved within a time as short as 100 ms. Although the problem of calculating the optimal lens adjustment can be naturally formulated as a convex minimization problem, in such a formulation the objective function is convex but includes several nondifferentiable points. Hence, optimization methods based on derivatives cannot be applied. Other approaches using derivative-free optimization or meta-heuristic methods cannot guarantee that the obtained solutions are truly optimal. Therefore, we formulate the optimization problem as quadratically constrained and second-order cone programming problems, which can be handled by solvers using an interior point method. Using the proposed formulations, computational experiments demonstrate that the optimal lens adjustment is obtained in a practical computational time, which is much less than 100 ms.

  9. Factorising a Quadratic Expression with Geometric Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for factorising a quadratic expression to facilitate instruction and learning. It appeals to elementary geometry which may provide better insights to some students or teachers. There have been many methods for factorising a quadratic expression described in school text books. However, students often seem to struggle with…

  10. Models, algorithms and programs for phylogeny reconciliation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Jean-Philippe; Ranwez, Vincent; Daubin, Vincent; Berry, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Gene sequences contain a gold mine of phylogenetic information. But unfortunately for taxonomists this information does not only tell the story of the species from which it was collected. Genes have their own complex histories which record speciation events, of course, but also many other events. Among them, gene duplications, transfers and losses are especially important to identify. These events are crucial to account for when reconstructing the history of species, and they play a fundamental role in the evolution of genomes, the diversification of organisms and the emergence of new cellular functions. We review reconciliations between gene and species trees, which are rigorous approaches for identifying duplications, transfers and losses that mark the evolution of a gene family. Existing reconciliation models and algorithms are reviewed and difficulties in modeling gene transfers are discussed. We also compare different reconciliation programs along with their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:21949266

  11. Effect of contrast magnitude and resolution metric on noise-resolution tradeoffs in x-ray CT imaging: a comparison of non-quadratic penalized alternating minimization and filtered backprojection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Joshua D.; Politte, David G.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of contrast magnitude and spatial resolution metric choices on the noise-resolution tradeoff of a non-quadratic penalized statistical iterative algorithm, Alternating Minimization (AM), in x-ray transmission CT. Methods: Monoenergetic Poisson-counting CT data were simulated for a water phantom containing circular inserts of varying contrast (7% to 238%). The data was reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and two non-quadratic penalty parameterizations of AM. A range of smoothing strengths is reconstructed for each algorithm to quantify the noise-resolution tradeoff curve. Modulation transfer functions (MTFs) were estimated from the circular contrast-insert edges and then integrated up to a cutoff frequency as a single-parameter measure of local spatial resolution. Two cutoff frequencies and two resolution comparison values are investigated for their effect on reported tradeoff advantage. Results: The noise-resolution tradeoff curve was always more favorable for AM than FBP. For strongly edge-preserving penalty functions, this advantage was found to be dependent upon the contrast for which resolution is quantified for comparison. The magnitude of the reported dose reduction potential of the AM algorithm was shown to be dependent on the resolution metric choices, though the general contrast-dependence was always evident. Conclusions: The penalized AM algorithm shows the potential to reconstruct images of comparable quality using a fraction of the dose required by FBP. The contrast-dependence on the tradeoff advantage implies that statistical algorithms using non-quadratic penalty functions should be assessed using contrasts relevant to the intended clinical task.

  12. Self-Replicating Quadratics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2012-01-01

    We show that there are exactly four quadratic polynomials, Q(x) = x [superscript 2] + ax + b, such that (x[superscript 2] + ax + b) (x[superscript 2] - ax + b) = (x[superscript 4] + ax[superscript 2] + b). For n = 1, 2, ..., these quadratic polynomials can be written as the product of N = 2[superscript n] quadratic polynomials in x[superscript…

  13. Solving Integer Programming Problems by Using Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Bahriye; Karaboga, Dervis

    This paper presents a study that applies the Artificial Bee Colony algorithm to integer programming problems and compares its performance with those of Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm variants and Branch and Bound technique presented to the literature. In order to cope with integer programming problems, in neighbour solution production unit, solutions are truncated to the nearest integer values. The experimental results show that Artificial Bee Colony algorithm can handle integer programming problems efficiently and Artificial Bee Colony algorithm can be considered to be very robust by the statistics calculated such as mean, median, standard deviation.

  14. Algorithm and program for information processing with the filin apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurin, L. S.; Morkrov, V. S.; Moskalenko, Y. I.; Tsoy, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The reduction of spectral radiation data from space sources is described. The algorithm and program for identifying segments of information obtained from the Film telescope-spectrometer on the Salyut-4 are presented. The information segments represent suspected X-ray sources. The proposed algorithm is an algorithm of the lowest level. Following evaluation, information free of uninformative segments is subject to further processing with algorithms of a higher level. The language used is FORTRAN 4.

  15. Evaluation of dynamic programming among the existing stereo matching algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huat, Teo Chee; Manap, Nurulfajar bin Abd

    2015-05-01

    There are various types of existing stereo matching algorithms on image processing which applied on stereo vision images to get better results of disparity depth map. One of them is the dynamic programming method. On this research is to perform an evaluation on the performance between the dynamic programming with other existing method as comparison. The algorithm used on the dynamic programming is the global optimization which provides better process on stereo images like its accuracy and its computational efficiency compared to other existing stereo matching algorithms. The dynamic programming algorithm used on this research is the current method as its disparity estimates at a particular pixel and all the other pixels unlike the old methods which with scanline based of dynamic programming. There will be details on every existing methods presented on this paper with the comparison between the dynamic programming and the existing methods. This can propose the dynamic programming method to be used on many applications in image processing.

  16. Synthesizing Dynamic Programming Algorithms from Linear Temporal Logic Formulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore; Havelund, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The problem of testing a linear temporal logic (LTL) formula on a finite execution trace of events, generated by an executing program, occurs naturally in runtime analysis of software. We present an algorithm which takes an LTL formula and generates an efficient dynamic programming algorithm. The generated algorithm tests whether the LTL formula is satisfied by a finite trace of events given as input. The generated algorithm runs in linear time, its constant depending on the size of the LTL formula. The memory needed is constant, also depending on the size of the formula.

  17. On a programming language for graph algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinboldt, W. C.; Basili, V. R.; Mesztenyi, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    An algorithmic language, GRAAL, is presented for describing and implementing graph algorithms of the type primarily arising in applications. The language is based on a set algebraic model of graph theory which defines the graph structure in terms of morphisms between certain set algebraic structures over the node set and arc set. GRAAL is modular in the sense that the user specifies which of these mappings are available with any graph. This allows flexibility in the selection of the storage representation for different graph structures. In line with its set theoretic foundation, the language introduces sets as a basic data type and provides for the efficient execution of all set and graph operators. At present, GRAAL is defined as an extension of ALGOL 60 (revised) and its formal description is given as a supplement to the syntactic and semantic definition of ALGOL. Several typical graph algorithms are written in GRAAL to illustrate various features of the language and to show its applicability.

  18. A dynamic programming algorithm for RNA structure prediction including pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Rivas, E; Eddy, S R

    1999-02-01

    We describe a dynamic programming algorithm for predicting optimal RNA secondary structure, including pseudoknots. The algorithm has a worst case complexity of O(N6) in time and O(N4) in storage. The description of the algorithm is complex, which led us to adopt a useful graphical representation (Feynman diagrams) borrowed from quantum field theory. We present an implementation of the algorithm that generates the optimal minimum energy structure for a single RNA sequence, using standard RNA folding thermodynamic parameters augmented by a few parameters describing the thermodynamic stability of pseudoknots. We demonstrate the properties of the algorithm by using it to predict structures for several small pseudoknotted and non-pseudoknotted RNAs. Although the time and memory demands of the algorithm are steep, we believe this is the first algorithm to be able to fold optimal (minimum energy) pseudoknotted RNAs with the accepted RNA thermodynamic model. PMID:9925784

  19. RSA cipher algorithm improvements and VC programming realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xianmin

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses the RSA algorithm basic mathematical principle, on the basis to propose a faster design improvement. Programming with Visual C proved that the operation speed of improved RSA algorithm is greatly faster than the speed without improvement. However, the security of anti-crack ability has not been adversely affected.

  20. A scalable parallel algorithm for multiple objective linear programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiecek, Malgorzata M.; Zhang, Hong

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an ADBASE-based parallel algorithm for solving multiple objective linear programs (MOLP's). Job balance, speedup and scalability are of primary interest in evaluating efficiency of the new algorithm. Implementation results on Intel iPSC/2 and Paragon multiprocessors show that the algorithm significantly speeds up the process of solving MOLP's, which is understood as generating all or some efficient extreme points and unbounded efficient edges. The algorithm gives specially good results for large and very large problems. Motivation and justification for solving such large MOLP's are also included.

  1. A Simple SQP Algorithm for Constrained Finite Minimax Problems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A simple sequential quadratic programming method is proposed to solve the constrained minimax problem. At each iteration, through introducing an auxiliary variable, the descent direction is given by solving only one quadratic programming. By solving a corresponding quadratic programming, a high-order revised direction is obtained, which can avoid the Maratos effect. Furthermore, under some mild conditions, the global and superlinear convergence of the algorithm is achieved. Finally, some numerical results reported show that the algorithm in this paper is successful. PMID:24683318

  2. Quadratic boundedness of uncertain nonlinear dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockman, Mark Lawrence

    Physical systems are often perturbed by unknown external disturbances or contain important system parameters which are difficult to model exactly. However, engineers are expected to design systems which perform well even in the presence of uncertainties. For example, an airplane designer can never know the precise direction or magnitude of wind gusts, or the exact mass distribution inside the aircraft, but passengers expect to arrive on time after a smooth ride. This thesis will first present the concept of quadratic boundedness of an uncertain nonlinear dynamic system, and then develop analysis techniques and control design methods for systems containing unknown disturbances and parameters. For a class of nonlinear systems, conditions for quadratic boundedness are given, and the relationship between quadratic boundedness and quadratic stability is explored. An important consequence of quadratic boundedness is the ability to calculate an upper bound on the system gain of an uncertain nonlinear system. For nominally linear systems, necessary and sufficient conditions for quadratic boundedness are given. The innovative use of linear matrix inequalities in an iterative algorithm provides a means to analyze the quadratic boundedness properties of systems containing parameter uncertainties. The analysis results establish a framework for the development of design methods which integrate performance specifications into the control design process for all the types of systems considered. Numerous examples illustrate the major results of the thesis.

  3. Self-replicating quadratics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2012-06-01

    We show that there are exactly four quadratic polynomials, Q(x) = x 2 + ax + b, such that For n = 1, 2, … , these quadratic polynomials can be written as the product of N = 2 n quadratic polynomials in x 1/N , namely, ? , where w N is the Nth root of 1.

  4. Radar simulation program upgrade and algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Radar Simulation Program is a comprehensive calculation of the expected output of an airborne coherent pulse Doppler radar system viewing a low level microburst along or near the approach path. Inputs to the program include the radar system parameters and data files that contain the characteristics of the microbursts to be simulated, the ground clutter map, and the discrete target data base which provides a simulation of the moving ground clutter. For each range bin, the simulation calculates the received signal amplitude level by integrating the product of the antenna gain pattern and the scattering source amplitude and phase of a spherical shell volume segment defined by the pulse width, radar range, and ground plane intersection. A series of in-phase and quadrature pulses are generated and stored for further processing if desired. In addition, various signal processing techniques are used to derive the simulated velocity and hazard measurements, and store them for use in plotting and display programs.

  5. Optimisation in radiotherapy. II: Programmed and inversion optimisation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M

    1997-12-01

    This is the second article in a three part examination of optimisation in radiotherapy. The previous article established the bases of optimisation in radiotherapy, and the formulation of the optimisation problem. This paper outlines several algorithms that have been used in radiotherapy, for searching for the best irradiation strategy within the full set of possible strategies. Two principle classes of algorithm are considered--those associated with mathematical programming which employ specific search techniques, linear programming-type searches or artificial intelligence--and those which seek to perform a numerical inversion of the optimisation problem, finishing with deterministic iterative inversion. PMID:9503694

  6. Algorithmic Trading with Developmental and Linear Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Garnett; Banzhaf, Wolfgang

    A developmental co-evolutionary genetic programming approach (PAM DGP) and a standard linear genetic programming (LGP) stock trading systemare applied to a number of stocks across market sectors. Both GP techniques were found to be robust to market fluctuations and reactive to opportunities associated with stock price rise and fall, with PAMDGP generating notably greater profit in some stock trend scenarios. Both algorithms were very accurate at buying to achieve profit and selling to protect assets, while exhibiting bothmoderate trading activity and the ability to maximize or minimize investment as appropriate. The content of the trading rules produced by both algorithms are also examined in relation to stock price trend scenarios.

  7. The Mystical "Quadratic Formula."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Uses projectile motion to explain the two roots found when using the quadratic formula. An example is provided for finding the time of flight for a projectile which has a negative root implying a negative time of flight. This negative time of flight also has a useful physical meaning. (MVL)

  8. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  9. The Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program: An Algorithm for Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abejuela, Harmony Raylen; Osser, David N

    2016-01-01

    This revision of previous algorithms for the pharmacotherapy of generalized anxiety disorder was developed by the Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program. Algorithms from 1999 and 2010 and associated references were reevaluated. Newer studies and reviews published from 2008-14 were obtained from PubMed and analyzed with a focus on their potential to justify changes in the recommendations. Exceptions to the main algorithm for special patient populations, such as women of childbearing potential, pregnant women, the elderly, and those with common medical and psychiatric comorbidities, were considered. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are still the basic first-line medication. Early alternatives include duloxetine, buspirone, hydroxyzine, pregabalin, or bupropion, in that order. If response is inadequate, then the second recommendation is to try a different SSRI. Additional alternatives now include benzodiazepines, venlafaxine, kava, and agomelatine. If the response to the second SSRI is unsatisfactory, then the recommendation is to try a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). Other alternatives to SSRIs and SNRIs for treatment-resistant or treatment-intolerant patients include tricyclic antidepressants, second-generation antipsychotics, and valproate. This revision of the GAD algorithm responds to issues raised by new treatments under development (such as pregabalin) and organizes the evidence systematically for practical clinical application. PMID:27384395

  10. Maximization of Sums of Quotients of Quadratic Forms and Some Generalizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Monotonically convergent algorithms are described for maximizing sums of quotients of quadratic forms. Six (constrained) functions are investigated. The general formulation of the functions and the algorithms allow for application of the algorithms in various situations in multivariate analysis. (SLD)

  11. Comparison of optimization algorithms in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Rachel

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is used to better conform the radiation dose to the target, which includes avoiding healthy tissue. Planning programs employ optimization methods to search for the best fluence of each photon beam, and therefore to create the best treatment plan. The Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), a program written in MATLAB, was used to examine some commonly-used algorithms for one 5-beam plan. Algorithms include the genetic algorithm, quadratic programming, pattern search, constrained nonlinear optimization, simulated annealing, the optimization method used in Varian EclipseTM, and some hybrids of these. Quadratic programing, simulated annealing, and a quadratic/simulated annealing hybrid were also separately compared using different prescription doses. The results of each dose-volume histogram as well as the visual dose color wash were used to compare the plans. CERR's built-in quadratic programming provided the best overall plan, but avoidance of the organ-at-risk was rivaled by other programs. Hybrids of quadratic programming with some of these algorithms seems to suggest the possibility of better planning programs, as shown by the improved quadratic/simulated annealing plan when compared to the simulated annealing algorithm alone. Further experimentation will be done to improve cost functions and computational time.

  12. EVOLVING RETRIEVAL ALGORITHMS WITH A GENETIC PROGRAMMING SCHEME

    SciTech Connect

    J. THEILER; ET AL

    1999-06-01

    The retrieval of scene properties (surface temperature, material type, vegetation health, etc.) from remotely sensed data is the ultimate goal of many earth observing satellites. The algorithms that have been developed for these retrievals are informed by physical models of how the raw data were generated. This includes models of radiation as emitted and/or rejected by the scene, propagated through the atmosphere, collected by the optics, detected by the sensor, and digitized by the electronics. To some extent, the retrieval is the inverse of this ''forward'' modeling problem. But in contrast to this forward modeling, the practical task of making inferences about the original scene usually requires some ad hoc assumptions, good physical intuition, and a healthy dose of trial and error. The standard MTI data processing pipeline will employ algorithms developed with this traditional approach. But we will discuss some preliminary research on the use of a genetic programming scheme to ''evolve'' retrieval algorithms. Such a scheme cannot compete with the physical intuition of a remote sensing scientist, but it may be able to automate some of the trial and error. In this scenario, a training set is used, which consists of multispectral image data and the associated ''ground truth;'' that is, a registered map of the desired retrieval quantity. The genetic programming scheme attempts to combine a core set of image processing primitives to produce an IDL (Interactive Data Language) program which estimates this retrieval quantity from the raw data.

  13. Evolving retrieval algorithms with a genetic programming scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James P.; Harvey, Neal R.; Brumby, Steven P.; Szymanski, John J.; Alferink, Steve; Perkins, Simon J.; Porter, Reid B.; Bloch, Jeffrey J.

    1999-10-01

    The retrieval of scene properties (surface temperature, material type, vegetation health, etc.) from remotely sensed data is the ultimate goal of many earth observing satellites. The algorithms that have been developed for these retrievals are informed by physical models of how the raw data were generated. This includes models of radiation as emitted and/or reflected by the scene, propagated through the atmosphere, collected by the optics, detected by the sensor, and digitized by the electronics. To some extent, the retrieval is the inverse of this 'forward' modeling problem. But in contrast to this forward modeling, the practical task of making inferences about the original scene usually requires some ad hoc assumptions, good physical intuition, and a healthy dose of trial and error. The standard MTI data processing pipeline will employ algorithms developed with this traditional approach. But we will discuss some preliminary research on the use of a genetic programming scheme to 'evolve' retrieval algorithms. Such a scheme cannot compete with the physical intuition of a remote sensing scientist, but it may be able to automate some of the trial and error. In this scenario, a training set is used, which consists of multispectral image data and the associated 'ground truth;' that is, a registered map of the desired retrieval quantity. The genetic programming scheme attempts to combine a core set of image processing primitives to produce an IDL (Interactive Data Language) program which estimates this retrieval quantity from the raw data.

  14. The psychopharmacology algorithm project at the Harvard South Shore Program: an algorithm for acute mania.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Othman; Osser, David N

    2014-01-01

    This new algorithm for the pharmacotherapy of acute mania was developed by the Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program. The authors conducted a literature search in PubMed and reviewed key studies, other algorithms and guidelines, and their references. Treatments were prioritized considering three main considerations: (1) effectiveness in treating the current episode, (2) preventing potential relapses to depression, and (3) minimizing side effects over the short and long term. The algorithm presupposes that clinicians have made an accurate diagnosis, decided how to manage contributing medical causes (including substance misuse), discontinued antidepressants, and considered the patient's childbearing potential. We propose different algorithms for mixed and nonmixed mania. Patients with mixed mania may be treated first with a second-generation antipsychotic, of which the first choice is quetiapine because of its greater efficacy for depressive symptoms and episodes in bipolar disorder. Valproate and then either lithium or carbamazepine may be added. For nonmixed mania, lithium is the first-line recommendation. A second-generation antipsychotic can be added. Again, quetiapine is favored, but if quetiapine is unacceptable, risperidone is the next choice. Olanzapine is not considered a first-line treatment due to its long-term side effects, but it could be second-line. If the patient, whether mixed or nonmixed, is still refractory to the above medications, then depending on what has already been tried, consider carbamazepine, haloperidol, olanzapine, risperidone, and valproate first tier; aripiprazole, asenapine, and ziprasidone second tier; and clozapine third tier (because of its weaker evidence base and greater side effects). Electroconvulsive therapy may be considered at any point in the algorithm if the patient has a history of positive response or is intolerant of medications. PMID:25188733

  15. Performance of a community detection algorithm based on semidefinite programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The problem of detecting communities in a graph is maybe one the most studied inference problems, given its simplicity and widespread diffusion among several disciplines. A very common benchmark for this problem is the stochastic block model or planted partition problem, where a phase transition takes place in the detection of the planted partition by changing the signal-to-noise ratio. Optimal algorithms for the detection exist which are based on spectral methods, but we show these are extremely sensible to slight modification in the generative model. Recently Javanmard, Montanari and Ricci-Tersenghi [1] have used statistical physics arguments, and numerical simulations to show that finding communities in the stochastic block model via semidefinite programming is quasi optimal. Further, the resulting semidefinite relaxation can be solved efficiently, and is very robust with respect to changes in the generative model. In this paper we study in detail several practical aspects of this new algorithm based on semidefinite programming for the detection of the planted partition. The algorithm turns out to be very fast, allowing the solution of problems with O(105) variables in few second on a laptop computer.

  16. Solitons in quadratic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, M.; Di Menza, L.; Saut, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of solitonic structures arising in quadratic media. First, we recall the derivation of systems governing the interaction process for waves propagating in such media and we check the local and global well-posedness of the corresponding Cauchy problem. Then, we look for stationary states in the context of normal or anomalous dispersion regimes, that lead us to either elliptic or non-elliptic systems and we address the problem of orbital stability. Finally, some numerical experiments are carried out in order to compute localized states for several regimes and to study dynamic stability as well as long-time asymptotics.

  17. Dynamic Programming and Graph Algorithms in Computer Vision*

    PubMed Central

    Felzenszwalb, Pedro F.; Zabih, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Optimization is a powerful paradigm for expressing and solving problems in a wide range of areas, and has been successfully applied to many vision problems. Discrete optimization techniques are especially interesting, since by carefully exploiting problem structure they often provide non-trivial guarantees concerning solution quality. In this paper we briefly review dynamic programming and graph algorithms, and discuss representative examples of how these discrete optimization techniques have been applied to some classical vision problems. We focus on the low-level vision problem of stereo; the mid-level problem of interactive object segmentation; and the high-level problem of model-based recognition. PMID:20660950

  18. Empirical study of self-configuring genetic programming algorithm performance and behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenkin, E.; Semenkina, M.

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of the self-configuring genetic programming algorithm with a modified uniform crossover operator that implements a selective pressure on the recombination stage, is studied over symbolic programming problems. The operator's probabilistic rates interplay is studied and the role of operator variants on algorithm performance is investigated. Algorithm modifications based on the results of investigations are suggested. The performance improvement of the algorithm is demonstrated by the comparative analysis of suggested algorithms on the benchmark and real world problems.

  19. Evaluation of the applicability of nonlinear programming algorithms to a typical commercial process flow-sheeting simulator (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient methodology for using commercial flowsheeting programs with advanced mathematical programming algorithms was developed for the optimization of operating plants. The methodology was demonstrated and validated using ChemShare Corporation's DESIGN/2000 simulation of the Freeport Chemical Company's plant for sulfuric acid manufacture and three nonlinear programming techniques: successive linear programming, successive quadratic programming, and the generalized reduced-gradient method. The application of this methodology begins with the development of a feasible base-case simulation. Partial derivatives of the economic model and constraint equations are computed using fully converged simulations. This information is used to formulate an optimization problem that can be solved with the NLP algorithms giving improved values of the economic model. A line search is constructed through the point found from the nonlinear programming algorithm to find the best feasible point to repeat the procedure. The procedure is repeated using the ChemShare simulation program and the NLP code until convergence criteria are met. This method was applied to three flowsheeting problems; a plant-scale-contact sulfuric acid process model, a packed-bed-reactor design model, and an adiabatic-flash problem.

  20. Fourier analysis of quadratic phase interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Maciel, Jesús; Mora-González, Miguel; Casillas-Rodríguez, Francisco J.; Peña-Lecona, Francisco G.

    2015-06-01

    A phase demodulation method from a single interferogram with a quadratic phase term is developed. The fringe pattern being analysed may contain circular, elliptic or astigmatic fringes. The Fourier transform of such interferograms is seen to be also a sine or a cosine of a second order polynomial in both the real and imaginary parts. In this work we take a discrete Fourier transform of the fringe patterns and then we take separate inverse discrete transforms of the real and imaginary parts of the frequency spectrum. This results in two new interferograms corresponding to the sine and cosine of the quadratic term of the phase modulated by the sine and cosine of the linear term. The linear term of these interferograms may be recovered with similar procedures of fringe analysis from open fringe interferograms. Once the linear term is retrieved the quadratic phase of the interferogram being analysed can also be calculated. The present approach is also being investigated for interferograms with nearly circularly symmetry given that the phase contains some tilt. The described procedure of Fourier analysis from quadratic phase interferograms of nearly symmetric interferograms could be used instead of complex and time consuming algorithms for phase recovery from fringe patterns with closed fringes. Finally, the method is tested in simulated and real data.

  1. Direct Orthogonal Distance to Quadratic Surfaces in 3D.

    PubMed

    Lott, Gus K

    2014-09-01

    Discovering the orthogonal distance to a quadratic surface is a classic geometric task in vision, modeling, and robotics. I describe a simple, efficient, and stable direct solution for the orthogonal distance (foot-point) to an arbitrary quadratic surface from a general finite 3D point. The problem is expressed as the intersection of three quadratic surfaces, two of which are derived from the requirement of orthogonality of two non-coincident planes with the tangent plane to the quadric. A sixth order single-variable polynomial is directly generated in one coordinate of the surface point. The method detects intersection points at infinity and operates smoothly across all real quadratic surface classes. The method also geometrically detects continuums of orthogonal points (i.e., from the exact center of a sphere). I discuss algorithm performance, compare it to a state-of-the-art estimator, demonstrate the algorithm on synthetic data, and describe extension to arbitrary dimension. PMID:26352239

  2. Global and Local Optimization Algorithms for Optimal Signal Set Design

    PubMed Central

    Kearsley, Anthony J.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of choosing an optimal signal set for non-Gaussian detection was reduced to a smooth inequality constrained mini-max nonlinear programming problem by Gockenbach and Kearsley. Here we consider the application of several optimization algorithms, both global and local, to this problem. The most promising results are obtained when special-purpose sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms are embedded into stochastic global algorithms.

  3. Quadratic spatial soliton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav

    Quadratic spatial soliton interactions were investigated in this Dissertation. The first part deals with characterizing the principal features of multi-soliton generation and soliton self-reflection. The second deals with two beam processes leading to soliton interactions and collisions. These subjects were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experiments were performed by using potassium niobate (KNBO 3) and periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystals. These particular crystals were desirable for these experiments because of their large nonlinear coefficients and, more importantly, because the experiments could be performed under non-critical-phase-matching (NCPM) conditions. The single soliton generation measurements, performed on KNBO3 by launching the fundamental component only, showed a broad angular acceptance bandwidth which was important for the soliton collisions performed later. Furthermore, at high input intensities multi-soliton generation was observed for the first time. The influence on the multi-soliton patterns generated of the input intensity and beam symmetry was investigated. The combined experimental and theoretical efforts indicated that spatial and temporal noise on the input laser beam induced multi-soliton patterns. Another research direction pursued was intensity dependent soliton routing by using of a specially engineered quadratically nonlinear interface within a periodically poled KTP sample. This was the first time demonstration of the self-reflection phenomenon in a system with a quadratic nonlinearity. The feature investigated is believed to have a great potential for soliton routing and manipulation by engineered structures. A detailed investigation was conducted on two soliton interaction and collision processes. Birth of an additional soliton resulting from a two soliton collision was observed and characterized for the special case of a non-planar geometry. A small amount of spiraling, up to 30

  4. Finite pure integer programming algorithms employing only hyperspherically deduced cuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed that may be based exclusively on hyperspherically deduced cuts. The algorithms only apply, therefore, to problems structured so that these cuts are valid. The algorithms are shown to be finite.

  5. Quadratic soliton self-reflection at a quadratically nonlinear interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav; Kim, Hongki; Stegeman, George; Carrasco, Silvia; Torner, Lluis; Katz, Mordechai

    2003-11-01

    The reflection of bulk quadratic solutions incident onto a quadratically nonlinear interface in periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate was observed. The interface consisted of the boundary between two quasi-phase-matched regions displaced from each other by a half-period. At high intensities and small angles of incidence the soliton is reflected.

  6. Recognition of Graphs with Convex Quadratic Stability Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Maria F.; Cardoso, Domingos M.

    2009-09-01

    A stable set of a graph is a set of mutually non-adjacent vertices. The determination of a maximum size stable set, which is called maximum stable set, and the determination of its size, which is called stability number, are central combinatorial optimization problems. However, given a nonnegative integer k, to determine if a graph G has a stable set of size k is NP-complete. In this paper we deal with graphs for which the stability number can be determined by solving a convex quadratic programming problem. Such graphs were introduced in [13] and are called graphs with convex-QP stability number. A few algorithmic techniques for the recognition of this type of graphs in particular families are presented.

  7. Efficient Nonlinear Programming Algorithms for Chemical Process Control and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegler, Lorenz T.

    Optimization is applied in numerous areas of chemical engineering including the development of process models from experimental data, design of process flowsheets and equipment, planning and scheduling of chemical process operations, and the analysis of chemical processes under uncertainty and adverse conditions. These off-line tasks require the solution of nonlinear programs (NLPs) with detailed, large-scale process models. Recently, these tasks have been complemented by time-critical, on-line optimization problems with differential-algebraic equation (DAE) process models that describe process behavior over a wide range of operating conditions, and must be solved sufficiently quickly. This paper describes recent advances in this area especially with dynamic models. We outline large-scale NLP formulations and algorithms as well as NLP sensitivity for on-line applications, and illustrate these advances on a commercial-scale low density polyethylene (LDPE) process.

  8. Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help…

  9. Award DE-FG02-04ER52655 Final Technical Report: Interior Point Algorithms for Optimization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, Dianne P.; Tits, Andre

    2014-04-03

    Over the period of this award we developed an algorithmic framework for constraint reduction in linear programming (LP) and convex quadratic programming (QP), proved convergence of our algorithms, and applied them to a variety of applications, including entropy-based moment closure in gas dynamics.

  10. Optimal Approximation of Quadratic Interval Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshelev, Misha; Taillibert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Measurements are never absolutely accurate, as a result, after each measurement, we do not get the exact value of the measured quantity; at best, we get an interval of its possible values, For dynamically changing quantities x, the additional problem is that we cannot measure them continuously; we can only measure them at certain discrete moments of time t(sub 1), t(sub 2), ... If we know that the value x(t(sub j)) at a moment t(sub j) of the last measurement was in the interval [x-(t(sub j)), x + (t(sub j))], and if we know the upper bound D on the rate with which x changes, then, for any given moment of time t, we can conclude that x(t) belongs to the interval [x-(t(sub j)) - D (t - t(sub j)), x + (t(sub j)) + D (t - t(sub j))]. This interval changes linearly with time, an is, therefore, called a linear interval function. When we process these intervals, we get an expression that is quadratic and higher order w.r.t. time t, Such "quadratic" intervals are difficult to process and therefore, it is necessary to approximate them by linear ones. In this paper, we describe an algorithm that gives the optimal approximation of quadratic interval functions by linear ones.

  11. A Program Complexity Metric Based on Variable Usage for Algorithmic Thinking Education of Novice Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuwa, Minori; Kayama, Mizue; Kunimune, Hisayoshi; Hashimoto, Masami; Asano, David K.

    2015-01-01

    We have explored educational methods for algorithmic thinking for novices and implemented a block programming editor and a simple learning management system. In this paper, we propose a program/algorithm complexity metric specified for novice learners. This metric is based on the variable usage in arithmetic and relational formulas in learner's…

  12. SSME structural computer program development: BOPACE theoretical manual, addendum. [algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An algorithm developed and incorporated into BOPACE for improving the convergence and accuracy of the inelastic stress-strain calculations is discussed. The implementation of separation of strains in the residual-force iterative procedure is defined. The elastic-plastic quantities used in the strain-space algorithm are defined and compared with previous quantities.

  13. A Functional Programming Approach to AI Search Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panovics, Janos

    2012-01-01

    The theory and practice of search algorithms related to state-space represented problems form the major part of the introductory course of Artificial Intelligence at most of the universities and colleges offering a degree in the area of computer science. Students usually meet these algorithms only in some imperative or object-oriented language…

  14. Block clustering based on difference of convex functions (DC) programming and DC algorithms.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoai Minh; Le Thi, Hoai An; Dinh, Tao Pham; Huynh, Van Ngai

    2013-10-01

    We investigate difference of convex functions (DC) programming and the DC algorithm (DCA) to solve the block clustering problem in the continuous framework, which traditionally requires solving a hard combinatorial optimization problem. DC reformulation techniques and exact penalty in DC programming are developed to build an appropriate equivalent DC program of the block clustering problem. They lead to an elegant and explicit DCA scheme for the resulting DC program. Computational experiments show the robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm and its superiority over standard algorithms such as two-mode K-means, two-mode fuzzy clustering, and block classification EM. PMID:23777526

  15. Motion Cueing Algorithm Development: New Motion Cueing Program Implementation and Tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, Jacob A. (Technical Monitor); Telban, Robert J.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the purpose of driving the NASA Langley Research Center Visual Motion Simulator (VMS). This program includes two new motion cueing algorithms, the optimal algorithm and the nonlinear algorithm. A general description of the program is given along with a description and flowcharts for each cueing algorithm, and also descriptions and flowcharts for subroutines used with the algorithms. Common block variable listings and a program listing are also provided. The new cueing algorithms have a nonlinear gain algorithm implemented that scales each aircraft degree-of-freedom input with a third-order polynomial. A description of the nonlinear gain algorithm is given along with past tuning experience and procedures for tuning the gain coefficient sets for each degree-of-freedom to produce the desired piloted performance. This algorithm tuning will be needed when the nonlinear motion cueing algorithm is implemented on a new motion system in the Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. Algorithms and programming tools for image processing on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Topics addressed include: data mapping and rotational algorithms for the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP); Parallel Pascal language; documentation for the Parallel Pascal Development system; and a description of the Parallel Pascal language used on the MPP.

  17. Students' understanding of quadratic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help students achieve an understanding of quadratic equations with improved interrelation of ideas and more flexible application of solution methods. Semi-structured interviews with eight beginning undergraduate students explored which of the mental constructions conjectured in the genetic decomposition students could do, and which they had difficulty doing. Two of the mental constructions that form part of the genetic decomposition are highlighted and corresponding further data were obtained from the written work of 121 undergraduate science and engineering students taking a multivariable calculus course. The results suggest the importance of explicitly considering these two highlighted mental constructions.

  18. Computer program for fast Karhunen Loeve transform algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The fast KL transform algorithm was applied for data compression of a set of four ERTS multispectral images and its performance was compared with other techniques previously studied on the same image data. The performance criteria used here are mean square error and signal to noise ratio. The results obtained show a superior performance of the fast KL transform coding algorithm on the data set used with respect to the above stated perfomance criteria. A summary of the results is given in Chapter I and details of comparisons and discussion on conclusions are given in Chapter IV.

  19. Some basic data structures and algorithms for chemical generic programming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Qiao, Xuebin; Xu, Xiaojie

    2004-01-01

    Here, we report a template library used for molecular operation, the Molecular Handling Template Library (MHTL). The library includes some generic data structures and generic algorithms, and the two parts are associated with each other by two concepts: Properties and Molecule. The concept Properties describes the interface to access objects' properties, and the concept Molecule describes the minimum requirement for a molecular class. Data structures include seven models of Properties, each using a different method to access properties, and two models of molecular classes. Algorithms include molecular file manipulation subroutines, SMARTS language interpreter and matcher functions, and molecular OpenGL rendering functions. PMID:15446814

  20. Linear state feedback, quadratic weights, and closed loop eigenstructures. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are given on the relationships between closed loop eigenstructures, state feedback gain matrices of the linear state feedback problem, and quadratic weights of the linear quadratic regulator. Equations are derived for the angles of general multivariable root loci and linear quadratic optimal root loci, including angles of departure and approach. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used for the first time to compute angles of approach. Equations are also derived to find the sensitivity of closed loop eigenvalues and the directional derivatives of closed loop eigenvectors (with respect to a scalar multiplying the feedback gain matrix or the quadratic control weight). An equivalence class of quadratic weights that produce the same asymptotic eigenstructure is defined, sufficient conditions to be in it are given, a canonical element is defined, and an algorithm to find it is given. The behavior of the optimal root locus in the nonasymptotic region is shown to be different for quadratic weights with the same asymptotic properties.

  1. Solving the Quadratic Capacitated Facilities Location Problem by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Leon C.; Smith, Wayland P.

    Several computer programs were developed to solve various versions of the quadratic capacitated facilities location problem. Matrices, which represent various business costs, are defined for the factors of sites, facilities, customers, commodities, and production units. The objective of the program is to find an optimization matrix for the lowest…

  2. Universal algorithms and programs for calculating the motion parameters in the two-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhshiyan, B. T.; Sukhanov, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    The algorithms and FORTRAN programs for computing positions and velocities, orbital elements and first and second partial derivatives in the two-body problem are presented. The algorithms are applicable for any value of eccentricity and are convenient for computing various navigation parameters.

  3. Minimum time acceleration of aircraft turbofan engines by using an algorithm based on nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum time accelerations of aircraft turbofan engines are presented. The calculation of these accelerations was made by using a piecewise linear engine model, and an algorithm based on nonlinear programming. Use of this model and algorithm allows such trajectories to be readily calculated on a digital computer with a minimal expenditure of computer time.

  4. Testing Algorithmic Skills in Traditional and Non-Traditional Programming Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernoch, Mária; Biró, Piroska; Máth, János; Abari, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    The Testing Algorithmic and Application Skills (TAaAS) project was launched in the 2011/2012 academic year to test first year students of Informatics, focusing on their algorithmic skills in traditional and non-traditional programming environments, and on the transference of their knowledge of Informatics from secondary to tertiary education. The…

  5. CALIBRATION, OPTIMIZATION, AND SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ALGORITHMS APPLICATION PROGRAMMING INTERFACE (COSU-API)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for Uncertainty Analysis, Sensitivity Analysis, and Parameter Estimation (UA/SA/PE API) tool development, here fore referred to as the Calibration, Optimization, and Sensitivity and Uncertainty Algorithms API (COSU-API), was initially d...

  6. A program and data base for evaluating SMMR algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A program (PARAM) is described which enables a user to compare the values of meteorological parameters derived from data obtained by the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) instrument on NIMBUS 7 with surface observations made over the ocean. The input to this program is a data base, also described, which contains the surface observations and coincident SMMR data. The evaluation of meteorological parameters using SMMR data is done by a user supplied subroutine. Instruments are given for executing the program and writing the subroutine.

  7. Radar Rainfall Estimation using a Quadratic Z-R equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Will; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to test a method that enables the input of event based drop size distributions to alter a quadratic reflectivity (Z) to rainfall (R) equation that is limited by fixed upper and lower points. Results will be compared to the Marshall-Palmer Z-R relation outputs and validated by a network of gauges and a single polarisation weather radar located close to Essen, Germany. The time window over which the drop size distribution measurements will be collected is varied to note any effect on the generated quadratic Z-R relation. The new quadratic algorithm shows some distinct improvement over the Marshall-Palmer relationship through multiple events. The inclusion of a minimum number of Z-R points helped to decrease the associated error by defaulting back to the Marshall-Palmer equation if the limit was not reached. More research will be done to discover why the quadratic performs poorly in some events as there appears to be little correlation between number of drops or mean rainfall amount and the associated error. In some cases it seems the spatial distribution of the disdrometers has a significant effect as a large percentage of the rain bands pass to the north of two of the three disdrometers, frequently in a slightly north-easterly direction. However during widespread precipitation events the new algorithm works very well with reductions compared to the Marshall-Palmer relation.

  8. Orthogonality preserving infinite dimensional quadratic stochastic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Akın, Hasan; Mukhamedov, Farrukh

    2015-09-18

    In the present paper, we consider a notion of orthogonal preserving nonlinear operators. We introduce π-Volterra quadratic operators finite and infinite dimensional settings. It is proved that any orthogonal preserving quadratic operator on finite dimensional simplex is π-Volterra quadratic operator. In infinite dimensional setting, we describe all π-Volterra operators in terms orthogonal preserving operators.

  9. DE and NLP Based QPLS Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaodong; Huang, Dexian; Wang, Xiong; Liu, Bo

    As a novel evolutionary computing technique, Differential Evolution (DE) has been considered to be an effective optimization method for complex optimization problems, and achieved many successful applications in engineering. In this paper, a new algorithm of Quadratic Partial Least Squares (QPLS) based on Nonlinear Programming (NLP) is presented. And DE is used to solve the NLP so as to calculate the optimal input weights and the parameters of inner relationship. The simulation results based on the soft measurement of diesel oil solidifying point on a real crude distillation unit demonstrate that the superiority of the proposed algorithm to linear PLS and QPLS which is based on Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) in terms of fitting accuracy and computational costs.

  10. Implementing embedded artificial intelligence rules within algorithmic programming languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feyock, Stefan

    1988-01-01

    Most integrations of artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities with non-AI (usually FORTRAN-based) application programs require the latter to execute separately to run as a subprogram or, at best, as a coroutine, of the AI system. In many cases, this organization is unacceptable; instead, the requirement is for an AI facility that runs in embedded mode; i.e., is called as subprogram by the application program. The design and implementation of a Prolog-based AI capability that can be invoked in embedded mode are described. The significance of this system is twofold: Provision of Prolog-based symbol-manipulation and deduction facilities makes a powerful symbolic reasoning mechanism available to applications programs written in non-AI languages. The power of the deductive and non-procedural descriptive capabilities of Prolog, which allow the user to describe the problem to be solved, rather than the solution, is to a large extent vitiated by the absence of the standard control structures provided by other languages. Embedding invocations of Prolog rule bases in programs written in non-AI languages makes it possible to put Prolog calls inside DO loops and similar control constructs. The resulting merger of non-AI and AI languages thus results in a symbiotic system in which the advantages of both programming systems are retained, and their deficiencies largely remedied.

  11. Algorithm for constructing the programmed motion of a bounding vehicle for the flight phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapshin, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    The construction of the programmed motion of a multileg bounding vehicle in the flight was studied. An algorithm is given for solving the boundary value problem for constructing this programmed motion. If the motion is shown to be symmetrical, a simplified use of the algorithm can be applied. A method is proposed for nonimpact of the legs during lift-off of the vehicle, and for softness at touchdown. Tables are utilized to construct this programmed motion over a broad set of standard motion conditions.

  12. Realization of texture synthesis algorithm based on mixed programming via COM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rizhao; Pu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Dan; Chen, Hong

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the respective characteristics of VS2005 and MATLAB and their performances and introduces several methods of mixed programming. Then, the paper discusses the advantages and great applications of texture synthesis from sample (TSFS) and Image Quilting algorithm which is a typical algorithm of TSFS. Further, the paper realizes the Image Quilting algorithm by using mixed programming between VS2005 and MATLAB2007a via COM. We can perceive that mixed programming via COM that is used in developing texture synthesis program can not only speeds up its efficiency and reliability, but also strengthen the convenience of operation and visualization. Finally, the paper summarizes the relationship between texture synthesis parameters and synthesis effects from the experiment.

  13. Realization of texture synthesis algorithm based on mixed programming via COM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rizhao; Pu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Dan; Chen, Hong

    2011-12-01

    This paper analyzes the respective characteristics of VS2005 and MATLAB and their performances and introduces several methods of mixed programming. Then, the paper discusses the advantages and great applications of texture synthesis from sample (TSFS) and Image Quilting algorithm which is a typical algorithm of TSFS. Further, the paper realizes the Image Quilting algorithm by using mixed programming between VS2005 and MATLAB2007a via COM. We can perceive that mixed programming via COM that is used in developing texture synthesis program can not only speeds up its efficiency and reliability, but also strengthen the convenience of operation and visualization. Finally, the paper summarizes the relationship between texture synthesis parameters and synthesis effects from the experiment.

  14. Approach to programming multiprocessing algorithms on the Denelcor HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, E.L.; Overbeek, R.A.

    1983-12-01

    In the process of learning how to write code for the Denelcor HEP, we have developed an approach that others may well find useful. We believe that the basic synchronization primitives of the HEP (i.e., asynchronous variables), along with the prototypical patterns for their use given in the HEP FORTRAN 77 User's Guide, form too low-level a conceptual basis for the formulation of multiprocessing algorithms. We advocate the use of monitors, which can be easily implemented using the HEP primitives. Attempts to solve substantial problems without introducing higher-level constructs such as monitors can produce code that is unreliable, unintelligible, and restricted to the specific dialect of FORTRAN currently supported on the HEP. Our experience leads us to believe that solutions which are both clear and efficient can be formulated using monitors.

  15. A class of stochastic optimization problems with one quadratic & several linear objective functions and extended portfolio selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiuping; Li, Jun

    2002-09-01

    In this paper a class of stochastic multiple-objective programming problems with one quadratic, several linear objective functions and linear constraints has been introduced. The former model is transformed into a deterministic multiple-objective nonlinear programming model by means of the introduction of random variables' expectation. The reference direction approach is used to deal with linear objectives and results in a linear parametric optimization formula with a single linear objective function. This objective function is combined with the quadratic function using the weighted sums. The quadratic problem is transformed into a linear (parametric) complementary problem, the basic formula for the proposed approach. The sufficient and necessary conditions for (properly, weakly) efficient solutions and some construction characteristics of (weakly) efficient solution sets are obtained. An interactive algorithm is proposed based on reference direction and weighted sums. Varying the parameter vector on the right-hand side of the model, the DM can freely search the efficient frontier with the model. An extended portfolio selection model is formed when liquidity is considered as another objective to be optimized besides expectation and risk. The interactive approach is illustrated with a practical example.

  16. A Sequential Linear Quadratic Approach for Constrained Nonlinear Optimal Control with Adaptive Time Discretization and Application to Higher Elevation Mars Landing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Amit

    A sequential quadratic programming method is proposed for solving nonlinear optimal control problems subject to general path constraints including mixed state-control and state only constraints. The proposed algorithm further develops on the approach proposed in [1] with objective to eliminate the use of a high number of time intervals for arriving at an optimal solution. This is done by introducing an adaptive time discretization to allow formation of a desirable control profile without utilizing a lot of intervals. The use of fewer time intervals reduces the computation time considerably. This algorithm is further used in this thesis to solve a trajectory planning problem for higher elevation Mars landing.

  17. Algorithm for obtaining angular fluxes in a cell for the LUCKY and LUCKY{sub C} multiprocessor programs

    SciTech Connect

    Moryakov, A. V.

    2012-12-15

    Basic formulas for solving the transport equation in a cell are presented. The algorithm has been implemented in the LUCKY and LUCKY{sub C} programs. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are described.

  18. Obtaining lower bounds from the progressive hedging algorithm for stochastic mixed-integer programs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gade, Dinakar; Hackebeil, Gabriel; Ryan, Sarah M.; Watson, Jean -Paul; Wets, Roger J.-B.; Woodruff, David L.

    2016-04-02

    We present a method for computing lower bounds in the progressive hedging algorithm (PHA) for two-stage and multi-stage stochastic mixed-integer programs. Computing lower bounds in the PHA allows one to assess the quality of the solutions generated by the algorithm contemporaneously. The lower bounds can be computed in any iteration of the algorithm by using dual prices that are calculated during execution of the standard PHA. In conclusion, we report computational results on stochastic unit commitment and stochastic server location problem instances, and explore the relationship between key PHA parameters and the quality of the resulting lower bounds.

  19. Coherent states for quadratic Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernández C, David J.; Velázquez, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    The coherent states for a set of quadratic Hamiltonians in the trap regime are constructed. A matrix technique which allows us to directly identify the creation and annihilation operators will be presented. Then, the coherent states as simultaneous eigenstates of the annihilation operators will be derived, and will be compared with those attained through the displacement operator method. The corresponding wavefunction will be found, and a general procedure for obtaining several mean values involving the canonical operators in these states will be described. The results will be illustrated through the asymmetric Penning trap.

  20. Programming environment for parallel vision algorithms. Annual report, February 1986-February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.

    1987-02-01

    During the second year of the award period, the Computer Science Department of the University of Rochester continued work in: 1) systems support algorithms, 2) the Butterfly programming environment, and 3) vision applications. This research produced several internal and external reports as well as much exportable code. The University of Rochester also employed DARPA Parallel Architecture Benchmark problems to test different algorithms using four different Butterfly programming environments. These tests produced several interesting results and demonstrated that the Butterfly architecture is a flexible general-purpose architecture that can be effectively programmed by non-experts, using tools developed at BBN and Rochester. The University of Rochester is continuing to study the issues and concerns surrounding the effective implementation of parallel algorithms.

  1. An Atmospheric Guidance Algorithm Testbed for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Orbiter and Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Queen, Eric M.; Powell, Richard W.; Braun, Robert D.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Aguirre, John T.; Sachi, Laura A.; Lyons, Daniel T.

    1998-01-01

    An Atmospheric Flight Team was formed by the Mars Surveyor Program '01 mission office to develop aerocapture and precision landing testbed simulations and candidate guidance algorithms. Three- and six-degree-of-freedom Mars atmospheric flight simulations have been developed for testing, evaluation, and analysis of candidate guidance algorithms for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Orbiter and Lander. These simulations are built around the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. Subroutines were supplied by Atmospheric Flight Team members for modeling the Mars atmosphere, spacecraft control system, aeroshell aerodynamic characteristics, and other Mars 2001 mission specific models. This paper describes these models and their perturbations applied during Monte Carlo analyses to develop, test, and characterize candidate guidance algorithms.

  2. Concurrent extensions to the FORTRAN language for parallel programming of computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Cindy Lou

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center to define multi-tasking software requirements for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computer architectures. The focus was on specifying solutions for algorithms in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The program objectives were to allow researchers to produce usable parallel application software as soon as possible after acquiring MIMD computer equipment, to provide researchers with an easy-to-learn and easy-to-use parallel software language which could be implemented on several different MIMD machines, and to enable researchers to list preferred design specifications for future MIMD computer architectures. Analysis of CFD algorithms indicated that extensions of an existing programming language, adaptable to new computer architectures, provided the best solution to meeting program objectives. The CoFORTRAN Language was written in response to these objectives and to provide researchers a means to experiment with parallel software solutions to CFD algorithms on machines with parallel architectures.

  3. Quadratic invariants for discrete clusters of weakly interacting waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Katie L.; Bustamante, Miguel D.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-06-01

    We consider discrete clusters of quasi-resonant triads arising from a Hamiltonian three-wave equation. A cluster consists of N modes forming a total of M connected triads. We investigate the problem of constructing a functionally independent set of quadratic constants of motion. We show that this problem is equivalent to an underlying basic linear problem, consisting of finding the null space of a rectangular M × N matrix {A} with entries 1, -1 and 0. In particular, we prove that the number of independent quadratic invariants is equal to J ≡ N - M* ⩾ N - M, where M* is the number of linearly independent rows in {A}. Thus, the problem of finding all independent quadratic invariants is reduced to a linear algebra problem in the Hamiltonian case. We establish that the properties of the quadratic invariants (e.g., locality) are related to the topological properties of the clusters (e.g., types of linkage). To do so, we formulate an algorithm for decomposing large clusters into smaller ones and show how various invariants are related to certain parts of a cluster, including the basic structures leading to M* < M. We illustrate our findings by presenting examples from the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima wave model, and by showing a classification of small (up to three-triad) clusters.

  4. A parallel dynamic programming algorithm for multi-reservoir system optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Wei, Jiahua; Li, Tiejian; Wang, Guangqian; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper develops a parallel dynamic programming algorithm to optimize the joint operation of a multi-reservoir system. First, a multi-dimensional dynamic programming (DP) model is formulated for a multi-reservoir system. Second, the DP algorithm is parallelized using a peer-to-peer parallel paradigm. The parallelization is based on the distributed memory architecture and the message passing interface (MPI) protocol. We consider both the distributed computing and distributed computer memory in the parallelization. The parallel paradigm aims at reducing the computation time as well as alleviating the computer memory requirement associated with running a multi-dimensional DP model. Next, we test the parallel DP algorithm on the classic, benchmark four-reservoir problem on a high-performance computing (HPC) system with up to 350 cores. Results indicate that the parallel DP algorithm exhibits good performance in parallel efficiency; the parallel DP algorithm is scalable and will not be restricted by the number of cores. Finally, the parallel DP algorithm is applied to a real-world, five-reservoir system in China. The results demonstrate the parallel efficiency and practical utility of the proposed methodology.

  5. Algorithms and programming tools for image processing on the MPP:3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Anthony P.

    1987-01-01

    This is the third and final report on the work done for NASA Grant 5-403 on Algorithms and Programming Tools for Image Processing on the MPP:3. All the work done for this grant is summarized in the introduction. Work done since August 1986 is reported in detail. Research for this grant falls under the following headings: (1) fundamental algorithms for the MPP; (2) programming utilities for the MPP; (3) the Parallel Pascal Development System; and (4) performance analysis. In this report, the results of two efforts are reported: region growing, and performance analysis of important characteristic algorithms. In each case, timing results from MPP implementations are included. A paper is included in which parallel algorithms for region growing on the MPP is discussed. These algorithms permit different sized regions to be merged in parallel. Details on the implementation and peformance of several important MPP algorithms are given. These include a number of standard permutations, the FFT, convolution, arbitrary data mappings, image warping, and pyramid operations, all of which have been implemented on the MPP. The permutation and image warping functions have been included in the standard development system library.

  6. Algorithm Building and Learning Programming Languages Using a New Educational Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anshul K.; Singhal, Manik; Gupta, Manu Sheel

    2011-08-01

    This research paper presents a new concept of using a single tool to associate syntax of various programming languages, algorithms and basic coding techniques. A simple framework has been programmed in Python that helps students learn skills to develop algorithms, and implement them in various programming languages. The tool provides an innovative and a unified graphical user interface for development of multimedia objects, educational games and applications. It also aids collaborative learning amongst students and teachers through an integrated mechanism based on Remote Procedure Calls. The paper also elucidates an innovative method for code generation to enable students to learn the basics of programming languages using drag-n-drop methods for image objects.

  7. Error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted optimal control problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Ding

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we establish error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted infinite-horizon optimal control problems of discrete-time deterministic nonlinear systems. We consider approximation errors in the update equations of both value function and control policy. We utilize a new assumption instead of the contraction assumption in discounted optimal control problems. We establish the error bounds for approximate value iteration based on a new error condition. Furthermore, we also establish the error bounds for approximate policy iteration and approximate optimistic policy iteration algorithms. It is shown that the iterative approximate value function can converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal value function under some conditions. To implement the developed algorithms, critic and action neural networks are used to approximate the value function and control policy, respectively. Finally, a simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed algorithms. PMID:25751878

  8. A dynamic programming-based particle swarm optimization algorithm for an inventory management problem under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiuping; Zeng, Ziqiang; Han, Bernard; Lei, Xiao

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a dynamic programming-based particle swarm optimization (DP-based PSO) algorithm for solving an inventory management problem for large-scale construction projects under a fuzzy random environment. By taking into account the purchasing behaviour and strategy under rules of international bidding, a multi-objective fuzzy random dynamic programming model is constructed. To deal with the uncertainties, a hybrid crisp approach is used to transform fuzzy random parameters into fuzzy variables that are subsequently defuzzified by using an expected value operator with optimistic-pessimistic index. The iterative nature of the authors' model motivates them to develop a DP-based PSO algorithm. More specifically, their approach treats the state variables as hidden parameters. This in turn eliminates many redundant feasibility checks during initialization and particle updates at each iteration. Results and sensitivity analysis are presented to highlight the performance of the authors' optimization method, which is very effective as compared to the standard PSO algorithm.

  9. Geometrical and Graphical Solutions of Quadratic Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsby, E. John, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are several geometrical and graphical methods of solving quadratic equations. Discussed are Greek origins, Carlyle's method, von Staudt's method, fixed graph methods and imaginary solutions. (CW)

  10. Single-photon quadratic optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present exact analytical solutions to study the coherent interaction between a single photon and the mechanical motion of a membrane in quadratic optomechanics. We consider single-photon emission and scattering when the photon is initially inside the cavity and in the fields outside the cavity, respectively. Using our solutions, we calculate the single-photon emission and scattering spectra, and find relations between the spectral features and the system's inherent parameters, such as: the optomechanical coupling strength, the mechanical frequency, and the cavity-field decay rate. In particular, we clarify the conditions for the phonon sidebands to be visible. We also study the photon-phonon entanglement for the long-time emission and scattering states. The linear entropy is employed to characterize this entanglement by treating it as a bipartite one between a single mode of phonons and a single photon. PMID:25200128

  11. An Optimal Algorithm towards Successive Location Privacy in Sensor Networks with Dynamic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baokang; Wang, Dan; Shao, Zili; Cao, Jiannong; Chan, Keith C. C.; Su, Jinshu

    In wireless sensor networks, preserving location privacy under successive inference attacks is extremely critical. Although this problem is NP-complete in general cases, we propose a dynamic programming based algorithm and prove it is optimal in special cases where the correlation only exists between p immediate adjacent observations.

  12. A Survey of Successful Evaluations of Program Visualization and Algorithm Animation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquiza-Fuentes, Jaime; Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews successful educational experiences in using program and algorithm visualizations (PAVs). First, we survey a total of 18 PAV systems that were subject to 33 evaluations. We found that half of the systems have only been tested for usability, and those were shallow inspections. The rest were evaluated with respect to their…

  13. Enhancements on the Convex Programming Based Powered Descent Guidance Algorithm for Mars Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars; Scharf, Daniel P.; Wolf, Aron

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present enhancements on the powered descent guidance algorithm developed for Mars pinpoint landing. The guidance algorithm solves the powered descent minimum fuel trajectory optimization problem via a direct numerical method. Our main contribution is to formulate the trajectory optimization problem, which has nonconvex control constraints, as a finite dimensional convex optimization problem, specifically as a finite dimensional second order cone programming (SOCP) problem. SOCP is a subclass of convex programming, and there are efficient SOCP solvers with deterministic convergence properties. Hence, the resulting guidance algorithm can potentially be implemented onboard a spacecraft for real-time applications. Particularly, this paper discusses the algorithmic improvements obtained by: (i) Using an efficient approach to choose the optimal time-of-flight; (ii) Using a computationally inexpensive way to detect the feasibility/ infeasibility of the problem due to the thrust-to-weight constraint; (iii) Incorporating the rotation rate of the planet into the problem formulation; (iv) Developing additional constraints on the position and velocity to guarantee no-subsurface flight between the time samples of the temporal discretization; (v) Developing a fuel-limited targeting algorithm; (vi) Initial result on developing an onboard table lookup method to obtain almost fuel optimal solutions in real-time.

  14. STAR adaptation of QR algorithm. [program for solving over-determined systems of linear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The QR algorithm used on a serial computer and executed on the Control Data Corporation 6000 Computer was adapted to execute efficiently on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. How the scalar program was adapted for the STAR-100 and why these adaptations yielded an efficient STAR program is described. Program listings of the old scalar version and the vectorized SL/1 version are presented in the appendices. Execution times for the two versions applied to the same system of linear equations, are compared.

  15. Algorithms and programming tools for image processing on the MPP, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Anthony P.

    1986-01-01

    A number of algorithms were developed for image warping and pyramid image filtering. Techniques were investigated for the parallel processing of a large number of independent irregular shaped regions on the MPP. In addition some utilities for dealing with very long vectors and for sorting were developed. Documentation pages for the algorithms which are available for distribution are given. The performance of the MPP for a number of basic data manipulations was determined. From these results it is possible to predict the efficiency of the MPP for a number of algorithms and applications. The Parallel Pascal development system, which is a portable programming environment for the MPP, was improved and better documentation including a tutorial was written. This environment allows programs for the MPP to be developed on any conventional computer system; it consists of a set of system programs and a library of general purpose Parallel Pascal functions. The algorithms were tested on the MPP and a presentation on the development system was made to the MPP users group. The UNIX version of the Parallel Pascal System was distributed to a number of new sites.

  16. Binary Quadratic Forms: A Historical View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khosravani, Azar N.; Beintema, Mark B.

    2006-01-01

    We present an expository account of the development of the theory of binary quadratic forms. Beginning with the formulation and proof of the Two-Square Theorem, we show how the study of forms of the type x[squared] + ny[squared] led to the discovery of the Quadratic Reciprocity Law, and how this theorem, along with the concept of reduction relates…

  17. An Unexpected Influence on a Quadratic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Using technology to explore the coefficients of a quadratic equation can lead to an unexpected result. This article describes an investigation that involves sliders and dynamically linked representations. It guides students to notice the effect that the parameter "a" has on the graphical representation of a quadratic function in the form…

  18. Correlation signatures of wet soils and snows. [algorithm development and computer programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Interpretation, analysis, and development of algorithms have provided the necessary computational programming tools for soil data processing, data handling and analysis. Algorithms that have been developed thus far, are adequate and have been proven successful for several preliminary and fundamental applications such as software interfacing capabilities, probability distributions, grey level print plotting, contour plotting, isometric data displays, joint probability distributions, boundary mapping, channel registration and ground scene classification. A description of an Earth Resources Flight Data Processor, (ERFDP), which handles and processes earth resources data under a users control is provided.

  19. Applying new optimization algorithms to more predictive control

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    The connections between optimization and control theory have been explored by many researchers and optimization algorithms have been applied with success to optimal control. The rapid pace of developments in model predictive control has given rise to a host of new problems to which optimization has yet to be applied. Concurrently, developments in optimization, and especially in interior-point methods, have produced a new set of algorithms that may be especially helpful in this context. In this paper, we reexamine the relatively simple problem of control of linear processes subject to quadratic objectives and general linear constraints. We show how new algorithms for quadratic programming can be applied efficiently to this problem. The approach extends to several more general problems in straightforward ways.

  20. L -functions and class numbers of imaginary quadratic fields and of quadratic extensions of an imaginary quadratic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louboutin, Stephane

    1992-07-01

    Starting from the analytic class number formula involving its L-function, we first give an expression for the class number of an imaginary quadratic field which, in the case of large discriminants, provides us with a much more powerful numerical technique than that of counting the number of reduced definite positive binary quadratic forms, as has been used by Buell in order to compute his class number tables. Then, using class field theory, we will construct a periodic character &chi , defined on the ring of integers of a field K that is a quadratic extension of a principal imaginary quadratic field k, such that the zeta function of K is the product of the zeta function of k and of the L-function L(s,χ) . We will then determine an integral representation of this L-function that enables us to calculate the class number of K numerically, as soon as its regulator is known. It will also provide us with an upper bound for these class numbers, showing that Hua's bound for the class numbers of imaginary and real quadratic fields is not the best that one could expect. We give statistical results concerning the class numbers of the first 50000 quadratic extensions of {Q}(i) with prime relative discriminant (and with K/Q a non-Galois quartic extension). Our analytic calculation improves the algebraic calculation used by Lakein in the same way as the analytic calculation of the class numbers of real quadratic fields made by Williams and Broere improved the algebraic calculation consisting in counting the number of cycles of reduced ideals. Finally, we give upper bounds for class numbers of K that is a quadratic extension of an imaginary quadratic field k which is no longer assumed to be of class number one.

  1. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Optimal Design of Tidal Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, B.

    2013-03-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm is proposed and demonstrated on a test case to determine the optimum operating schedule of a barrage tidal power plant to maximize the energy generation over a tidal cycle. Since consecutive sets of high and low tides can be predicted accurately for any tidal power plant site, this algorithm can be used to calculate the annual energy generation for different technical configurations of the plant. Thus an optimal choice of a tidal power plant design can be made from amongst different design configurations yielding the least cost of energy generation. Since this algorithm determines the optimal time of operation of sluice gate opening and turbine gates opening to maximize energy generation over a tidal cycle, it can also be used to obtain the annual schedule of operation of a tidal power plant and the minute-to-minute energy generation, for dissemination amongst power distribution utilities.

  2. Programming environment for parallel-vision algorithms. Annual report, February 1985-February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Brown

    1986-08-01

    During the first year of the award period, three main lines of work were pursued: systems support algorithms, Butterfly programming environment, and vision applications. Today's multiprocessor computer architectures are not efficiently programmed or even conceptualized with standard computer languages, and their operating systems and debugging tools are also challengingly different. The University of Rochester is doing work in the area of tools for controlling large-grain parallelism, as one finds in a distributed multiprocessor application like the Autonomous Land Vehicle, or in tightly coupled processors like the Hypercube or the Butterfly Parallel Processor.

  3. OpenACC programs of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    We present sample OpenACC programs of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm. OpenACC is a directive-based programming model for accelerators without requiring modification to the underlying CPU code itself. In this paper, we deal with the classical spin models as with the sample CUDA programs (Komura and Okabe, 2014), that is, two-dimensional (2D) Ising model, three-dimensional (3D) Ising model, 2D Potts model, 3D Potts model, 2D XY model and 3D XY model. We explain the details of sample OpenACC programs and compare the performance of the present OpenACC implementations with that of the CUDA implementations for the 2D and 3D Ising models and the 2D and 3D XY models.

  4. Algorithms and Programs for Strong Gravitational Lensing In Kerr Space-time Including Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, Eddie; Maddumage, Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars are important astrophysical objects to understand. Recently, microlensing observations have constrained the size of the quasar X-ray emission region to be of the order of 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. For distances within a few gravitational radii, light paths are strongly bent by the strong gravity field of the central black hole. If the central black hole has nonzero angular momentum (spin), then a photon’s polarization plane will be rotated by the gravitational Faraday effect. The observed X-ray flux and polarization will then be influenced significantly by the strong gravity field near the source. Consequently, linear gravitational lensing theory is inadequate for such extreme circumstances. We present simple algorithms computing the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. Our algorithms are realized in a program “KERTAP” in two versions: MATLAB and Python. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles. Our algorithms can be easily realized in other programming languages such as FORTRAN, C, and C++. The MATLAB version of KERTAP is parallelized using the MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox and the Distributed Computing Server. The Python code was sped up using Cython and supports full implementation of MPI using the “mpi4py” package. As an example, we investigate the inclination angle dependence of the observed polarization and the strong lensing magnification of AGN X-ray emission. We conclude that it is possible to perform complex numerical-relativity related computations using interpreted languages such as MATLAB and Python.

  5. Quadratic Stochastic Operators with Countable State Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we provide the classes of Poisson and Geometric quadratic stochastic operators with countable state space, study the dynamics of these operators and discuss their application to economics.

  6. Schur Stability Regions for Complex Quadratic Polynomials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Sui Sun; Huang, Shao Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Given a quadratic polynomial with complex coefficients, necessary and sufficient conditions are found in terms of the coefficients such that all its roots have absolute values less than 1. (Contains 3 figures.)

  7. Quantum integrability of quadratic Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, C.; Valent, G.

    2005-05-01

    Quantum integrability of classical integrable systems given by quadratic Killing tensors on curved configuration spaces is investigated. It is proven that, using a 'minimal' quantization scheme, quantum integrability is ensured for a large class of classic examples.

  8. Weight of quadratic forms and graph states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Alessandro; Severini, Simone

    2009-11-01

    We prove a connection between Schmidt rank and weight of quadratic forms. This provides a new tool for the classification of graph states based on entanglement. Our main tool arises from a reformulation of previously known results concerning the weight of quadratic forms in terms of graph states properties. As a byproduct, we obtain a straightforward characterization of the weight of functions associated with pivot-minor of bipartite graphs.

  9. Design and Evaluation of a Dynamic Programming Flight Routing Algorithm Using the Convective Weather Avoidance Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Hok K.; Grabbe, Shon; Mukherjee, Avijit

    2010-01-01

    The optimization of traffic flows in congested airspace with varying convective weather is a challenging problem. One approach is to generate shortest routes between origins and destinations while meeting airspace capacity constraint in the presence of uncertainties, such as weather and airspace demand. This study focuses on development of an optimal flight path search algorithm that optimizes national airspace system throughput and efficiency in the presence of uncertainties. The algorithm is based on dynamic programming and utilizes the predicted probability that an aircraft will deviate around convective weather. It is shown that the running time of the algorithm increases linearly with the total number of links between all stages. The optimal routes minimize a combination of fuel cost and expected cost of route deviation due to convective weather. They are considered as alternatives to the set of coded departure routes which are predefined by FAA to reroute pre-departure flights around weather or air traffic constraints. A formula, which calculates predicted probability of deviation from a given flight path, is also derived. The predicted probability of deviation is calculated for all path candidates. Routes with the best probability are selected as optimal. The predicted probability of deviation serves as a computable measure of reliability in pre-departure rerouting. The algorithm can also be extended to automatically adjust its design parameters to satisfy the desired level of reliability.

  10. Program for the analysis of time series. [by means of fast Fourier transform algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. J.; Brown, C. G.; Hardin, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A digital computer program for the Fourier analysis of discrete time data is described. The program was designed to handle multiple channels of digitized data on general purpose computer systems. It is written, primarily, in a version of FORTRAN 2 currently in use on CDC 6000 series computers. Some small portions are written in CDC COMPASS, an assembler level code. However, functional descriptions of these portions are provided so that the program may be adapted for use on any facility possessing a FORTRAN compiler and random-access capability. Properly formatted digital data are windowed and analyzed by means of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to generate the following functions: (1) auto and/or cross power spectra, (2) autocorrelations and/or cross correlations, (3) Fourier coefficients, (4) coherence functions, (5) transfer functions, and (6) histograms.

  11. Programming environment for parallel-vision algorithms. Final technical report, February 1988-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.

    1990-04-11

    This contract developed and disseminated papers, ideas, algorithms, analysis, software, applications, and implementations for parallel programming environments for computer vision and for vision applications. The work has been widely reported and highly influential. The most significant work centered on the Butterfly Parallel Processor, the MaxVideo pipelined parallel image processor, and the development of the real-time computer vision laboratory. For the Butterfly, the Psyche multi-model operating system was developed and the CONSUL autoparallelizing compiler was designed. Much basic and influential performance monitoring and debugging work was completed, resulting in working systems and novel algorithms. There was also significant research in systems and applications using other parallel architectures in the laboratory, such as the MaxVideo parallel pipelined image processor. The contract developed a heterogeneous parallel architecture involving pipelined and MIMD parallelism and integrated it with a robot head.

  12. Combining classifiers generated by multi-gene genetic programming for protein fold recognition using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bardsiri, Mahshid Khatibi; Eftekhari, Mahdi; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this study the problem of protein fold recognition, that is a classification task, is solved via a hybrid of evolutionary algorithms namely multi-gene Genetic Programming (GP) and Genetic Algorithm (GA). Our proposed method consists of two main stages and is performed on three datasets taken from the literature. Each dataset contains different feature groups and classes. In the first step, multi-gene GP is used for producing binary classifiers based on various feature groups for each class. Then, different classifiers obtained for each class are combined via weighted voting so that the weights are determined through GA. At the end of the first step, there is a separate binary classifier for each class. In the second stage, the obtained binary classifiers are combined via GA weighting in order to generate the overall classifier. The final obtained classifier is superior to the previous works found in the literature in terms of classification accuracy. PMID:25786796

  13. Modified Cholesky factorizations in interior-point algorithms for linear programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    1999-01-01

    We investigate a modified Cholesky algorithm typical of those used in most interior-point codes for linear programming. Cholesky-based interior-point codes are popular for three reasons: their implementation requires only minimal changes to standard sparse Cholesky algorithms (allowing us to take full advantage of software written by specialists in that area); they tend to be more efficient than competing approaches that use alternative factorizations; and they perform robustly on most practical problems, yielding good interior-point steps even when the coefficient matrix of the main linear system to be solved for the step components is ill conditioned. We investigate this surprisingly robust performance by using analytical tools from matrix perturbation theory and error analysis, illustrating our results with computational experiments. Finally, we point out the potential limitations of this approach.

  14. Rays of Small Integer Solutions of Homogeneous Ternary Quadratic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sudhakara

    1991-02-01

    We have dealt with the general ternary quadratic equation: ax2 + by^ {2} + cz2 + dxy + exz + fyz = 0 with integer coefficients. After giving a matrix-reduction formula for a quadratic equation in any number of variables, of which the reduction of the above ternary equation is an easy consequence, we have devoted our attention to the reduced equation: ax^ {2} + by2 + cz^{2 } = 0. We have devised an algorithm for reducing Dirichlet's possibly larger solutions to this prescribed range of Holzer's. Then we have generalized Holzer's theorem to the case of the ternary equation: ax^{2 } + by2 + cz2 + dxy + exz + fyz = 0, giving in this context a new range called the CM-range, of which the Holzer's range is a particular case when d = e = f = 0. We have described an algorithm for getting a solution of the general ternary within this CM-range. After that we have devised an algorithm for getting all the solutions of the Legendre's equation ax 2 + by2 + cz^ {2} = 0 within the Holzer's range--and have shown that if we regard this Legendre's equation as a double cone, these solutions within the Holzer's range lie along some definite rays, here called the CM-rays, which are completely determined by the prime factors of the coefficients a, b and c. After giving an algorithm for detecting these CM-rays of the reduced equation: ax^2 + by^2 + cz^2 = 0, we have shown how one can produce some similar rays of solutions of the above general ternary quadratic equation: ax2 + by2 + cz2 + dxy + exz + fyz = 0. Note that apart from the method of exhausting all the possibilities, so far there has been no precisely stated algorithm to find the minimum solutions of the above ternary equations. Towards the end, observing in the context of our main result an inequality involving two functions, namely C and PCM from doubz_sp{*} {3} to doubz_+, and simultaneously presenting some tables of these positive CM-rays or PCM-rays lying in the positive octant, we have concluded this work with a number of

  15. Quadratic Finite Element Method for 1D Deterministic Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tolar, Jr., D R; Ferguson, J M

    2004-01-06

    In the discrete ordinates, or SN, numerical solution of the transport equation, both the spatial ({und r}) and angular ({und {Omega}}) dependences on the angular flux {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}are modeled discretely. While significant effort has been devoted toward improving the spatial discretization of the angular flux, we focus on improving the angular discretization of {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}. Specifically, we employ a Petrov-Galerkin quadratic finite element approximation for the differencing of the angular variable ({mu}) in developing the one-dimensional (1D) spherical geometry S{sub N} equations. We develop an algorithm that shows faster convergence with angular resolution than conventional S{sub N} algorithms.

  16. Modification of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program Algorithm for Resuscitation of Conjoined Twins.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nicole K; Fuerch, Janene H; Halamek, Louis P

    2016-03-01

    There are no national or international guidelines for the resuscitation of conjoined twins. We have described how the U.S. Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm can be modified for delivery room resuscitation of omphaloischiopagus conjoined twins. In planning for the delivery and resuscitation of these patients, we considered the challenges of providing cardiopulmonary support to preterm conjoined twins in face-to-face orientation and with shared circulation via a fused liver and single umbilical cord. We also demonstrate how in situ simulation can be used to prepare a large, multidisciplinary team of health care professionals to deliver safe, efficient, and effective care to such patients. PMID:26461924

  17. The Factorability of Quadratics: Motivation for More Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Nandakumar, N. R.

    2005-01-01

    Typically, secondary and college algebra students attempt to utilize either completing the square or the quadratic formula as techniques to solve a quadratic equation only after frustration with factoring has arisen. While both completing the square and the quadratic formula are techniques which can determine solutions for all quadratic equations,…

  18. A Semi-Infinite Programming based algorithm for determining T-optimum designs for model discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Belmiro P.M.; Wong, Weng Kee; Atkinson, Anthony C.

    2016-01-01

    T-optimum designs for model discrimination are notoriously difficult to find because of the computational difficulty involved in solving an optimization problem that involves two layers of optimization. Only a handful of analytical T-optimal designs are available for the simplest problems; the rest in the literature are found using specialized numerical procedures for a specific problem. We propose a potentially more systematic and general way for finding T-optimal designs using a Semi-Infinite Programming (SIP) approach. The strategy requires that we first reformulate the original minimax or maximin optimization problem into an equivalent semi-infinite program and solve it using an exchange-based method where lower and upper bounds produced by solving the outer and the inner programs, are iterated to convergence. A global Nonlinear Programming (NLP) solver is used to handle the subproblems, thus finding the optimal design and the least favorable parametric configuration that minimizes the residual sum of squares from the alternative or test models. We also use a nonlinear program to check the global optimality of the SIP-generated design and automate the construction of globally optimal designs. The algorithm is successfully used to produce results that coincide with several T-optimal designs reported in the literature for various types of model discrimination problems with normally distributed errors. However, our method is more general, merely requiring that the parameters of the model be estimated by a numerical optimization. PMID:27330230

  19. Penalty Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Dim Targets Detection in Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayu; Xue, Anke; Guo, Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    In order to detect and track multiple maneuvering dim targets in sensor systems, an improved dynamic programming track-before-detect algorithm (DP-TBD) called penalty DP-TBD (PDP-TBD) is proposed. The performances of tracking techniques are used as a feedback to the detection part. The feedback is constructed by a penalty term in the merit function, and the penalty term is a function of the possible target state estimation, which can be obtained by the tracking methods. With this feedback, the algorithm combines traditional tracking techniques with DP-TBD and it can be applied to simultaneously detect and track maneuvering dim targets. Meanwhile, a reasonable constraint that a sensor measurement can originate from one target or clutter is proposed to minimize track separation. Thus, the algorithm can be used in the multi-target situation with unknown target numbers. The efficiency and advantages of PDP-TBD compared with two existing methods are demonstrated by several simulations. PMID:22666074

  20. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  1. An algorithm and program for data processing from a Compton scattering imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, V. N.; Zaytseva, K. V.

    2005-07-01

    The VolumeScope, a prototype 3D X-ray scanner based on Compton backscatter detection, was designed for examination of a human body electron density distribution. An algorithm and computer program for 3D image reconstruction from the VolumeScope measured data are presented. The reconstruction includes corrections for photon attenuation and multiple scatter in surrounding tissues and postprocessing digital filtering. Properties of multiple scattered photons inside the object of examination were studied by Monte Carlo technique and a geometrical efficiency of the multiple scatter detection was calculated on the base of the collimator design. The contribution of multiple scattered photons in semi-infinite water medium was from 15 to 23% of maximum detector response. The VolumeScope program is described to perform data processing and display the electron density distribution of the object as 2D grayscale images and 3D surfaces of internal structures.

  2. Limit cycles near hyperbolas in quadratic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artés, Joan C.; Dumortier, Freddy; Llibre, Jaume

    In this paper we introduce the notion of infinity strip and strip of hyperbolas as organizing centers of limit cycles in polynomial differential systems on the plane. We study a strip of hyperbolas occurring in some quadratic systems. We deal with the cyclicity of the degenerate graphics DI2a from the programme, set up in [F. Dumortier, R. Roussarie, C. Rousseau, Hilbert's 16th problem for quadratic vector fields, J. Differential Equations 110 (1994) 86-133], to solve the finiteness part of Hilbert's 16th problem for quadratic systems. Techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory are combined with the use of the Bautin ideal. We also rely on the theory of Darboux integrability.

  3. Quadratic forms of projective spaces over rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, V. M.; Starikova, O. A.

    2006-06-01

    In the passage from fields to rings of coefficients quadratic forms with invertible matrices lose their decisive role. It turns out that if all quadratic forms over a ring are diagonalizable, then in effect this is always a local principal ideal ring R with 2\\in R^*. The problem of the construction of a `normal' diagonal form of a quadratic form over a ring R faces obstacles in the case of indices \\vert R^*:R^{*2}\\vert greater than 1. In the case of index 2 this problem has a solution given in Theorem 2.1 for 1+R^{*2}\\subseteq R^{*2} (an extension of the law of inertia for real quadratic forms) and in Theorem 2.2 for 1+R^2 containing an invertible non-square. Under the same conditions on a ring R with nilpotent maximal ideal the number of classes of projectively congruent quadratic forms of the projective space associated with a free R-module of rank n is explicitly calculated (Proposition 3.2). Up to projectivities, the list of forms is presented for the projective plane over R and also (Theorem 3.3) over the local ring F\\lbrack\\lbrack x,y\\rbrack\\rbrack/\\langle x^{2},xy,y^{2}\\rangle with non-principal maximal ideal, where F=2F is a field with an invertible non-square in 1+F^{2} and \\vert F^{*}:F^{*2}\\vert=2. In the latter case the number of classes of non-diagonalizable quadratic forms of rank 0 depends on one's choice of the field F and is not even always finite; all the other forms make up 21 classes.

  4. Haar wavelet operational matrix method for solving constrained nonlinear quadratic optimal control problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaidan, Waleeda; Hussin, Amran

    2015-10-01

    Most direct methods solve finite time horizon optimal control problems with nonlinear programming solver. In this paper, we propose a numerical method for solving nonlinear optimal control problem with state and control inequality constraints. This method used quasilinearization technique and Haar wavelet operational matrix to convert the nonlinear optimal control problem into a quadratic programming problem. The linear inequality constraints for trajectories variables are converted to quadratic programming constraint by using Haar wavelet collocation method. The proposed method has been applied to solve Optimal Control of Multi-Item Inventory Model. The accuracy of the states, controls and cost can be improved by increasing the Haar wavelet resolution.

  5. Quintessence with quadratic coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Chan, Nyein; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Lazkoz, Ruth; Maartens, Roy

    2010-04-15

    We introduce a new form of coupling between dark energy and dark matter that is quadratic in their energy densities. Then we investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is in the form of exponential quintessence. The three types of quadratic coupling all admit late-time accelerating critical points, but these are not scaling solutions. We also show that two types of coupling allow for a suitable matter era at early times and acceleration at late times, while the third type of coupling does not admit a suitable matter era.

  6. Heredity in one-dimensional quadratic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romera, M.; Pastor, G.; Alvarez, G.; Montoya, F.

    1998-12-01

    In an iterative process, as is the case of a one-dimensional quadratic map, heredity has never been mentioned. In this paper we show that the pattern of a superstable orbit of a one-dimensional quadratic map can be expressed as the sum of the gene of the chaotic band where the pattern is to be found, and the ancestral path that joins all its ancestors. The ancestral path holds all the needed genetic information to calculate the descendants of the pattern. The ancestral path and successive descendant generations of the pattern constitute the family tree of the pattern, which is important to study and understand the orbit's ordering.

  7. Quadratic-Like Dynamics of Cubic Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokh, Alexander; Oversteegen, Lex; Ptacek, Ross; Timorin, Vladlen

    2016-02-01

    A small perturbation of a quadratic polynomial f with a non-repelling fixed point gives a polynomial g with an attracting fixed point and a Jordan curve Julia set, on which g acts like angle doubling. However, there are cubic polynomials with a non-repelling fixed point, for which no perturbation results into a polynomial with Jordan curve Julia set. Motivated by the study of the closure of the Cubic Principal Hyperbolic Domain, we describe such polynomials in terms of their quadratic-like restrictions.

  8. Guises and disguises of quadratic divergences

    SciTech Connect

    Cherchiglia, A.L.; Vieira, A.R.; Hiller, Brigitte; Baêta Scarpelli, A.P.; Sampaio, Marcos

    2014-12-15

    In this contribution, we present a new perspective on the control of quadratic divergences in quantum field theory, in general, and in the Higgs naturalness problem, in particular. Our discussion is essentially based on an approach where UV divergences are parameterized, after being reduced to basic divergent integrals (BDI) in one internal momentum, as functions of a cutoff and a renormalization group scale λ. We illustrate our proposal with well-known examples, such as the gluon vacuum self energy of QCD and the Higgs decay in two photons within this approach. We also discuss frameworks in effective low-energy QCD models, where quadratic divergences are indeed fundamental.

  9. On orthogonality preserving quadratic stochastic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Taha, Muhammad Hafizuddin Mohd

    2015-05-15

    A quadratic stochastic operator (in short QSO) is usually used to present the time evolution of differing species in biology. Some quadratic stochastic operators have been studied by Lotka and Volterra. In the present paper, we first give a simple characterization of Volterra QSO in terms of absolutely continuity of discrete measures. Further, we introduce a notion of orthogonal preserving QSO, and describe such kind of operators defined on two dimensional simplex. It turns out that orthogonal preserving QSOs are permutations of Volterra QSO. The associativity of genetic algebras generated by orthogonal preserving QSO is studied too.

  10. Algorithms and theory for the design and programming of industrial control systems materialized with PLC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya Villena, Rafael

    According to its title, the general objective of the Thesis consists in developing a clear, simple and systematic methodology for programming type PLC devices. With this aim in mind, we will use the following elements: Codification of all variables types. This section is very important since it allows us working with little information. The necessary rules are given to codify all type of phrases produced in industrial processes. An algorithm that describes process evolution and that has been called process D.F. This is one of the most important contributions, since it will allow us, together with information codification, representing the process evolution in a graphic way and with any design theory used. Theory selection. Evidently, the use of some kind of design method is necessary to obtain logic equations. For this particular case, we will use binodal theory, an ideal theory for wired technologies, since it can obtain highly reduced schemas for relatively simple automatisms, which means a minimum number of components used. User program outline algorithm (D.F.P.). This is another necessary contribution and perhaps the most important one, since logic equations resulting from binodal theory are compatible with process evolution if wired technology is used, whether it is electric, electronic, pneumatic, etc. On the other hand, PLC devices performance characteristics force the program instructions order to validate or not the automatism, as we have proven in different articles and lectures at congresses both national and international. Therefore, we will codify any information concerning the automating process, graphically represent its temporal evolution and, applying binodal theory and D.F.P (previously adapted), succeed in making logic equations compatible with the process to be automated and the device in which they will be implemented (PLC in our case)

  11. Linear state feedback, quadratic weights, and closed loop eigenstructures. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Equations are derived for the angles of general multivariable root loci and linear quadratic optimal root loci, including angles of departure and approach. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles of approach. Equations are also derived to find the sensitivity of closed loop eigenvalue and the directional derivatives of closed loop eigenvectors. An equivalence class of quadratic weights that produce the same asymptotic eigenstructure is defined, a canonical element is defined, and an algorithm to find it is given. The behavior of the optimal root locus in the nonasymptotic region is shown to be different for quadratic weights with the same asymptotic properties. An algorithm is presented that can be used to select a feedback gain matrix for the linear state feedback problem which produces a specified asymptotic eigenstructure. Another algorithm is given to compute the asymptotic eigenstructure properties inherent in a given set of quadratic weights. Finally, it is shown that optimal root loci for nongeneric problems can be approximated by generic ones in the nonasymptotic region.

  12. Integration of the Quadratic Function and Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsuma, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    We will first recall useful formulas in integration that simplify the calculation of certain definite integrals with the quadratic function. A main formula relies only on the coefficients of the function. We will then explore a geometric proof of one of these formulas. Finally, we will extend the formulas to more general cases. (Contains 3…

  13. Curious Consequences of a Miscopied Quadratic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poet, Jeffrey L.; Vestal, Donald L., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The starting point of this article is a search for pairs of quadratic polynomials x[superscript 2] + bx plus or minus c with the property that they both factor over the integers. The search leads quickly to some number theory in the form of primitive Pythagorean triples, and this paper develops the connection between these two topics.

  14. Quadratic minima and modular forms II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, Barry

    We give upper bounds on the size of the gap between a non-zero constant term and the next non-zero Fourier coefficient of an entire level two modular form. We give upper bounds for the minimum positive integer represented by a level two even positive-definite quadratic form. These bounds extend partial results in part I.

  15. Directional passability and quadratic steering logic for pyramid-type single gimbal control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Katsuhiko; Jikuya, Ichiro

    2014-09-01

    Singularity analysis and the steering logic of pyramid-type single gimbal control moment gyros are studied. First, a new concept of directional passability in a specified direction is introduced to investigate the structure of an elliptic singular surface. The differences between passability and directional passability are discussed in detail and are visualized for 0H, 2H, and 4H singular surfaces. Second, quadratic steering logic (QSL), a new steering logic for passing the singular surface, is investigated. The algorithm is based on the quadratic constrained quadratic optimization problem and is reduced to the Newton method by using Gröbner bases. The proposed steering logic is demonstrated through numerical simulations for both constant torque maneuvering examples and attitude control examples.

  16. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robust optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.

  17. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robustmore » optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.« less

  18. Advances in methods and algorithms in a modern quantum chemistry program package.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yihan; Molnar, Laszlo Fusti; Jung, Yousung; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Brown, Shawn T; Gilbert, Andrew T B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Levchenko, Sergey V; O'Neill, Darragh P; DiStasio, Robert A; Lochan, Rohini C; Wang, Tao; Beran, Gregory J O; Besley, Nicholas A; Herbert, John M; Lin, Ching Yeh; Van Voorhis, Troy; Chien, Siu Hung; Sodt, Alex; Steele, Ryan P; Rassolov, Vitaly A; Maslen, Paul E; Korambath, Prakashan P; Adamson, Ross D; Austin, Brian; Baker, Jon; Byrd, Edward F C; Dachsel, Holger; Doerksen, Robert J; Dreuw, Andreas; Dunietz, Barry D; Dutoi, Anthony D; Furlani, Thomas R; Gwaltney, Steven R; Heyden, Andreas; Hirata, So; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Kedziora, Gary; Khalliulin, Rustam Z; Klunzinger, Phil; Lee, Aaron M; Lee, Michael S; Liang, Wanzhen; Lotan, Itay; Nair, Nikhil; Peters, Baron; Proynov, Emil I; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Rhee, Young Min; Ritchie, Jim; Rosta, Edina; Sherrill, C David; Simmonett, Andrew C; Subotnik, Joseph E; Woodcock, H Lee; Zhang, Weimin; Bell, Alexis T; Chakraborty, Arup K; Chipman, Daniel M; Keil, Frerich J; Warshel, Arieh; Hehre, Warren J; Schaefer, Henry F; Kong, Jing; Krylov, Anna I; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2006-07-21

    Advances in theory and algorithms for electronic structure calculations must be incorporated into program packages to enable them to become routinely used by the broader chemical community. This work reviews advances made over the past five years or so that constitute the major improvements contained in a new release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry package, together with illustrative timings and applications. Specific developments discussed include fast methods for density functional theory calculations, linear scaling evaluation of energies, NMR chemical shifts and electric properties, fast auxiliary basis function methods for correlated energies and gradients, equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for ground and excited states, geminal wavefunctions, embedding methods and techniques for exploring potential energy surfaces. PMID:16902710

  19. Comparing Evolutionary Programs and Evolutionary Pattern Search Algorithms: A Drug Docking Application

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.

    1999-02-10

    Evolutionary programs (EPs) and evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAS) are two general classes of evolutionary methods for optimizing on continuous domains. The relative performance of these methods has been evaluated on standard global optimization test functions, and these results suggest that EPSAs more robustly converge to near-optimal solutions than EPs. In this paper we evaluate the relative performance of EPSAs and EPs on a real-world application: flexible ligand binding in the Autodock docking software. We compare the performance of these methods on a suite of docking test problems. Our results confirm that EPSAs and EPs have comparable performance, and they suggest that EPSAs may be more robust on larger, more complex problems.

  20. A Fixed-Point Iteration Method with Quadratic Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Kevin P.; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The fixed-point iteration algorithm is turned into a quadratically convergent scheme for a system of nonlinear equations. Most of the usual methods for obtaining the roots of a system of nonlinear equations rely on expanding the equation system about the roots in a Taylor series, and neglecting the higher order terms. Rearrangement of the resulting truncated system then results in the usual Newton-Raphson and Halley type approximations. In this paper the introduction of unit root functions avoids the direct expansion of the nonlinear system about the root, and relies, instead, on approximations which enable the unit root functions to considerably widen the radius of convergence of the iteration method. Methods for obtaining higher order rates of convergence and larger radii of convergence are discussed.

  1. Development of ocean color algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a concentrations and inherent optical properties using gene expression programming (GEP).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hua

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes new inversion algorithms for the estimation of Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla) and the ocean's inherent optical properties (IOPs) from the measurement of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). With in situ data from the NASA bio-optical marine algorithm data set (NOMAD), inversion algorithms were developed by the novel gene expression programming (GEP) approach, which creates, manipulates and selects the most appropriate tree-structured functions based on evolutionary computing. The limitations and validity of the proposed algorithms are evaluated by simulated Rrs spectra with respect to NOMAD, and a closure test for IOPs obtained at a single reference wavelength. The application of GEP-derived algorithms is validated against in situ, synthetic and satellite match-up data sets compiled by NASA and the International Ocean Color Coordinate Group (IOCCG). The new algorithms are able to provide Chla and IOPs retrievals to those derived by other state-of-the-art regression approaches and obtained with the semi- and quasi-analytical algorithms, respectively. In practice, there are no significant differences between GEP, support vector regression, and multilayer perceptron model in terms of the overall performance. The GEP-derived algorithms are successfully applied in processing the images taken by the Sea Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), generate Chla and IOPs maps which show better details of developing algal blooms, and give more information on the distribution of water constituents between different water bodies. PMID:25836776

  2. Quantum algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Daniel S.

    This thesis describes several new quantum algorithms. These include a polynomial time algorithm that uses a quantum fast Fourier transform to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian operator, and that can be applied in cases (commonly found in ab initio physics and chemistry problems) for which all known classical algorithms require exponential time. Fast algorithms for simulating many body Fermi systems are also provided in both first and second quantized descriptions. An efficient quantum algorithm for anti-symmetrization is given as well as a detailed discussion of a simulation of the Hubbard model. In addition, quantum algorithms that calculate numerical integrals and various characteristics of stochastic processes are described. Two techniques are given, both of which obtain an exponential speed increase in comparison to the fastest known classical deterministic algorithms and a quadratic speed increase in comparison to classical Monte Carlo (probabilistic) methods. I derive a simpler and slightly faster version of Grover's mean algorithm, show how to apply quantum counting to the problem, develop some variations of these algorithms, and show how both (apparently distinct) approaches can be understood from the same unified framework. Finally, the relationship between physics and computation is explored in some more depth, and it is shown that computational complexity theory depends very sensitively on physical laws. In particular, it is shown that nonlinear quantum mechanics allows for the polynomial time solution of NP-complete and #P oracle problems. Using the Weinberg model as a simple example, the explicit construction of the necessary gates is derived from the underlying physics. Nonlinear quantum algorithms are also presented using Polchinski type nonlinearities which do not allow for superluminal communication. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  3. Characterization of a Quadratic Function in Rn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Conway

    2010-01-01

    It is proved that a scalar-valued function "f"(x) defined in "n"-dimensional space must be quadratic, if the intersection of tangent planes at x[subscript 1] and x[subscript 2] always contains the midpoint of the line joining x[subscript 1] and x[subscript 2]. This is the converse of a result of Stenlund proved in this JOURNAL in 2001.

  4. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  5. Extended Decentralized Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2000-01-01

    A straightforward extension of a solution to the decentralized linear-Quadratic-Gaussian problem is proposed that allows its use for commonly encountered classes of problems that are currently solved with the extended Kalman filter. This extension allows the system to be partitioned in such a way as to exclude the nonlinearities from the essential algebraic relationships that allow the estimation and control to be optimally decentralized.

  6. Graphical Solution of the Monic Quadratic Equation with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many geometrical approaches to the solution of the quadratic equation with real coefficients. In this article it is shown that the monic quadratic equation with complex coefficients can also be solved graphically, by the intersection of two hyperbolas; one hyperbola being derived from the real part of the quadratic equation and one from…

  7. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF QUADRATS FOR MEASURING VASCULAR PLANT DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quadrats are widely used for measuring characteristics of vascular plant communities. It is well recognized that quadrat size affects measurements of frequency and cover. The ability of quadrats of varying sizes to adequately measure diversity has not been established. An exha...

  8. Dark state in a nonlinear optomechanical system with quadratic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yue-Xin; Zhou, Xiang-Fa; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Sheng

    We consider a hybrid system consisting of a cavity optomechanical device with nonlinear quadratic radiation pressure coupled to an atomic ensemble. By considering the collective excitation, we show that this system supports nontrivial, nonlinear dark states. The coupling strength can be tuned via the lasers that ensure the population transfer adiabatically between the mechanical modes and the collective atomic excitations in a controlled way. In addition, we show how to detect the dark-state resonance by calculating the single-photon spectrum of the output fields and the transmission of the probe beam based on two-phonon optomechanically induced transparency. Possible application and extension of the dark states are also discussed. Supported by the National Fundamental Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921200 and No. 2011CBA00200), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB01030200), and NSFC (Grants No. 61275122 and 11474266).

  9. F100 Multivariable Control Synthesis Program. Computer Implementation of the F100 Multivariable Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    As turbofan engines become more complex, the development of controls necessitate the use of multivariable control techniques. A control developed for the F100-PW-100(3) turbofan engine by using linear quadratic regulator theory and other modern multivariable control synthesis techniques is described. The assembly language implementation of this control on an SEL 810B minicomputer is described. This implementation was then evaluated by using a real-time hybrid simulation of the engine. The control software was modified to run with a real engine. These modifications, in the form of sensor and actuator failure checks and control executive sequencing, are discussed. Finally recommendations for control software implementations are presented.

  10. Performance of a benchmark implementation of the Van Slyke and Wets algorithm for stochastic programs on the Alliant FX/8

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyawansa, K.A.

    1991-04-01

    A benchmark parallel implementation of the Van Slyke and Wets algorithm for stochastic linear programs, and the results of a carefully designed numerical experiment on the Sequent/Balance using the implementation are presented. An important use of this implementation is as a benchmark to assess the performance of approximation algorithms for stochastic linear programs. These approximation algorithms are best suited for implementation on parallel vector processes like the Alliant FX/8. Therefore, the performance of the benchmark implementation on the Alliant FX/8 is of interest. In this paper, we present results observed when a portion of the numerical experiment is performed on the Alliant FX/8. These results indicate that the implementation makes satisfactory use of the concurrency capabilities of the Alliant FX/8. They also indicate that the vectorization capabilities of the Alliant FX/8 are not satisfactorily utilized by the implementation. 9 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. A Comparison of the Misconceptions about the Time-Efficiency of Algorithms by Various Profiles of Computer-Programming Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdener, Nesrin

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on how students in vocational high schools and universities interpret the algorithms in structural computer programming that concerns time-efficiency. The targeted research group consisted of 242 students from two vocational high schools and two departments of the Faculty of Education in Istanbul. This study used qualitative and…

  12. Research on trust-region algorithms for nonlinear programming. Final technical report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.E. Jr.; Tapia, R.A.

    1995-12-19

    Goal of the research was to develop and test effective, robust algorithms for general nonlinear programming (NLP) problems, particularly large or otherwise expensive NLP problems. We discuss the research conducted over the 3-year period Jan. 1990-Dec. 1992. We also describe current and future directions of our research.

  13. Finite element simulation of articular contact mechanics with quadratic tetrahedral elements.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Rawlins, David S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-21

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics. PMID:26900037

  14. A Fuzzy Goal Programming Procedure for Solving Multiobjective Load Flow Problems via Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Papun; Chakraborti, Debjani

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes how the genetic algorithms (GAs) can be efficiently used to fuzzy goal programming (FGP) formulation of optimal power flow problems having multiple objectives. In the proposed approach, the different constraints, various relationships of optimal power flow calculations are fuzzily described. In the model formulation of the problem, the membership functions of the defined fuzzy goals are characterized first for measuring the degree of achievement of the aspiration levels of the goals specified in the decision making context. Then, the achievement function for minimizing the regret for under-deviations from the highest membership value (unity) of the defined membership goals to the extent possible on the basis of priorities is constructed for optimal power flow problems. In the solution process, the GA method is employed to the FGP formulation of the problem for achievement of the highest membership value (unity) of the defined membership functions to the extent possible in the decision making environment. In the GA based solution search process, the conventional Roulette wheel selection scheme, arithmetic crossover and random mutation are taken into consideration to reach a satisfactory decision. The developed method has been tested on IEEE 6-generator 30-bus System. Numerical results show that this method is promising for handling uncertain constraints in practical power systems.

  15. Incorporating chemical modification constraints into a dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Disney, Matthew D.; Childs, Jessica L.; Schroeder, Susan J.; Zuker, Michael; Turner, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure has been revised to accommodate folding constraints determined by chemical modification and to include free energy increments for coaxial stacking of helices when they are either adjacent or separated by a single mismatch. Furthermore, free energy parameters are revised to account for recent experimental results for terminal mismatches and hairpin, bulge, internal, and multibranch loops. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, in vivo modification was performed on 5S rRNA in both Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate, dimethyl sulfate, and kethoxal. The percentage of known base pairs in the predicted structure increased from 26.3% to 86.8% for the E. coli sequence by using modification constraints. For C. albicans, the accuracy remained 87.5% both with and without modification data. On average, for these sequences and a set of 14 sequences with known secondary structure and chemical modification data taken from the literature, accuracy improves from 67% to 76%. This enhancement primarily reflects improvement for three sequences that are predicted with <40% accuracy on the basis of energetics alone. For these sequences, inclusion of chemical modification constraints improves the average accuracy from 28% to 78%. For the 11 sequences with <6% pseudoknotted base pairs, structures predicted with constraints from chemical modification contain on average 84% of known canonical base pairs. PMID:15123812

  16. Policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a new discrete-time policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method for solving the infinite horizon optimal control problem of nonlinear systems. The idea is to use an iterative ADP technique to obtain the iterative control law, which optimizes the iterative performance index function. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the convergence and stability properties of policy iteration method for discrete-time nonlinear systems for the first time. It shows that the iterative performance index function is nonincreasingly convergent to the optimal solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. It is also proven that any of the iterative control laws can stabilize the nonlinear systems. Neural networks are used to approximate the performance index function and compute the optimal control law, respectively, for facilitating the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithm, where the convergence of the weight matrices is analyzed. Finally, the numerical results and analysis are presented to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:24807455

  17. Fuzzy bilevel programming with multiple non-cooperative followers: model, algorithm and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hua; Huang, Hu; Ralescu, Dan A.; Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    In centralized decision problems, it is not complicated for decision-makers to make modelling technique selections under uncertainty. When a decentralized decision problem is considered, however, choosing appropriate models is no longer easy due to the difficulty in estimating the other decision-makers' inconclusive decision criteria. These decision criteria may vary with different decision-makers because of their special risk tolerances and management requirements. Considering the general differences among the decision-makers in decentralized systems, we propose a general framework of fuzzy bilevel programming including hybrid models (integrated with different modelling methods in different levels). Specially, we discuss two of these models which may have wide applications in many fields. Furthermore, we apply the proposed two models to formulate a pricing decision problem in a decentralized supply chain with fuzzy coefficients. In order to solve these models, a hybrid intelligent algorithm integrating fuzzy simulation, neural network and particle swarm optimization based on penalty function approach is designed. Some suggestions on the applications of these models are also presented.

  18. Final Report for Award #DE-SC3956 Separating Algorithm and Implementation via programming Model Injection (SAIMI)

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, Michelle

    2015-08-15

    Programming parallel machines is fraught with difficulties: the obfuscation of algorithms due to implementation details such as communication and synchronization, the need for transparency between language constructs and performance, the difficulty of performing program analysis to enable automatic parallelization techniques, and the existence of important "dusty deck" codes. The SAIMI project developed abstractions that enable the orthogonal specification of algorithms and implementation details within the context of existing DOE applications. The main idea is to enable the injection of small programming models such as expressions involving transcendental functions, polyhedral iteration spaces with sparse constraints, and task graphs into full programs through the use of pragmas. These smaller, more restricted programming models enable orthogonal specification of many implementation details such as how to map the computation on to parallel processors, how to schedule the computation, and how to allocation storage for the computation. At the same time, these small programming models enable the expression of the most computationally intense and communication heavy portions in many scientific simulations. The ability to orthogonally manipulate the implementation for such computations will significantly ease performance programming efforts and expose transformation possibilities and parameter to automated approaches such as autotuning. At Colorado State University, the SAIMI project was supported through DOE grant DE-SC3956 from April 2010 through August 2015. The SAIMI project has contributed a number of important results to programming abstractions that enable the orthogonal specification of implementation details in scientific codes. This final report summarizes the research that was funded by the SAIMI project.

  19. Quadratic spline collocation and parareal deferred correction method for parabolic PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Rongjian

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we consider a linear parabolic PDE, and use optimal quadratic spline collocation (QSC) methods for the space discretization, proceed the parareal technique on the time domain. Meanwhile, deferred correction technique is used to improve the accuracy during the iterations. The error estimation is presented and the stability is analyzed. Numerical experiments, which is carried out on a parallel computer with 40 CPUs, are attached to exhibit the effectiveness of the hybrid algorithm.

  20. Insulin algorithms in the self-management of insulin-dependent diabetes: the interactive 'Apple Juice' program.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G

    1996-01-01

    The 'Apple Juice' program is an interactive diabetes self-management program which runs on a lap-top Macintosh Powerbook 100 computer. The dose-by-dose insulin advisory program was initially designed for children with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus. It utilizes several different insulin algorithms, measurement formulae, and compensation factors for meals, activity, medication and the dawn phenomenon. It was developed to assist the individual with diabetes and/or care providers, in determining specific insulin dosage recommendations throughout a 24 h period. Information technology functions include, but are not limited to automated record keeping, data recall, event reminders, data trend/pattern analyses and education. This paper highlights issues, observations and recommendations surrounding the use of the current version of the software, along with a detailed description of the insulin algorithms and measurement formulae applied successfully with the author's daughter over a six year period. PMID:9179836

  1. The updated algorithm of the Energy Consumption Program (ECP): A computer model simulating heating and cooling energy loads in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.; Strain, D. M.; Chai, V. W.; Higgins, S.

    1979-01-01

    The energy Comsumption Computer Program was developed to simulate building heating and cooling loads and compute thermal and electric energy consumption and cost. This article reports on the new additional algorithms and modifications made in an effort to widen the areas of application. The program structure was rewritten accordingly to refine and advance the building model and to further reduce the processing time and cost. The program is noted for its very low cost and ease of use compared to other available codes. The accuracy of computations is not sacrificed however, since the results are expected to lie within + or - 10% of actual energy meter readings.

  2. A quadratic analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.; Staples, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter with a square root transfer function has been developed for use with a pair of CCD imaging detectors in the White Light Coronagraph/X-ray XUV Telescope experiment to be flown as part of the Internal Solar Polar Mission. It is shown that in background-noise-limited instrumentation systems a quadratic analog-to-digital converter will allow a maximum dynamic range with a fixed number of data bits. Low power dissipation, moderately fast conversion time, and reliability are achieved in the proposed design using standard components and avoiding nonlinear elements.

  3. Holographic entropy increases in quadratic curvature gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Wall, Aron C.

    2015-09-01

    Standard methods for calculating the black hole entropy beyond general relativity are ambiguous when the horizon is nonstationary. We fix these ambiguities in all quadratic curvature gravity theories, by demanding that the entropy be increasing at every time, for linear perturbations to a stationary black hole. Our result matches with the entropy formula found previously in holographic entanglement entropy calculations. We explicitly calculate the entropy increase for Vaidya-like solutions in Ricci-tensor gravity to show that (unlike the Wald entropy) the holographic entropy obeys a second law.

  4. Binary classification SVM-based algorithms with interval-valued training data using triangular and Epanechnikov kernels.

    PubMed

    Utkin, Lev V; Chekh, Anatoly I; Zhuk, Yulia A

    2016-08-01

    Classification algorithms based on different forms of support vector machines (SVMs) for dealing with interval-valued training data are proposed in the paper. L2-norm and L∞-norm SVMs are used for constructing the algorithms. The main idea allowing us to represent the complex optimization problems as a set of simple linear or quadratic programming problems is to approximate the Gaussian kernel by the well-known triangular and Epanechnikov kernels. The minimax strategy is used to choose an optimal probability distribution from the set and to construct optimal separating functions. Numerical experiments illustrate the algorithms. PMID:27179616

  5. A parallel algorithm for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors for a general complex matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shroff, Gautam

    1989-01-01

    A new parallel Jacobi-like algorithm is developed for computing the eigenvalues of a general complex matrix. Most parallel methods for this parallel typically display only linear convergence. Sequential norm-reducing algorithms also exit and they display quadratic convergence in most cases. The new algorithm is a parallel form of the norm-reducing algorithm due to Eberlein. It is proven that the asymptotic convergence rate of this algorithm is quadratic. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate the quadratic convergence of the algorithm and certain situations where the convergence is slow are also identified. The algorithm promises to be very competitive on a variety of parallel architectures.

  6. Using Dynamic Programming and Genetic Algorithms to Reduce Erosion Risks From Forest Roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, M.; Eschenbach, E.; Teasley, R.; Diaz, C.; Wartella, J.; Simi, J.

    2002-12-01

    Many anadromous fisheries streams in the Pacific Northwest have been damaged by various land use activities, including timber harvest and road construction. Unpaved forest roads can cause erosion and downstream sedimentation damage in anadromous fish-bearing streams. Although road decommissioning and road upgrading activities have been conducted on many of these roads, these activities have usually been implemented and evaluated on a site-specific basis without the benefit of a watershed perspective. Land managers still struggle with designing the most effective road treatment plan to minimize erosion while keeping costs reasonable across a large land base. Trade-offs between costs of different levels of treatment and the net effect on reducing sediment risks to streams need to be quantified. For example, which problems should be treated first, and by what treatment method? Is it better to fix one large problem or 100 small problems? If sediment reduction to anadromous fish-bearing streams is the desired outcome of road treatment activities, a more rigorous evaluation of risks and optimization of treatments is needed. Two approaches, Dynamic Programming (DP) and Genetic Algorithms (GA), were successfully used to determine the most effective treatment levels for roads and stream crossings in a pilot study basin with approximately 200 road segments and stream crossings and in an actual watershed with approximately 600 road segments and crossings. The optimization models determine the treatment levels for roads and crossings that maximize the total sediment saved within a watershed while maintaining the total treatment cost within the specified budget. The optimization models import GIS data on roads and crossings and export the optimal treatment level for each road and crossing to the GIS watershed model.

  7. RNAiFOLD: a constraint programming algorithm for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Synthetic biology is a rapidly emerging discipline with long-term ramifications that range from single-molecule detection within cells to the creation of synthetic genomes and novel life forms. Truly phenomenal results have been obtained by pioneering groups--for instance, the combinatorial synthesis of genetic networks, genome synthesis using BioBricks, and hybridization chain reaction (HCR), in which stable DNA monomers assemble only upon exposure to a target DNA fragment, biomolecular self-assembly pathways, etc. Such work strongly suggests that nanotechnology and synthetic biology together seem poised to constitute the most transformative development of the 21st century. In this paper, we present a Constraint Programming (CP) approach to solve the RNA inverse folding problem. Given a target RNA secondary structure, we determine an RNA sequence which folds into the target structure; i.e. whose minimum free energy structure is the target structure. Our approach represents a step forward in RNA design--we produce the first complete RNA inverse folding approach which allows for the specification of a wide range of design constraints. We also introduce a Large Neighborhood Search approach which allows us to tackle larger instances at the cost of losing completeness, while retaining the advantages of meeting design constraints (motif, GC-content, etc.). Results demonstrate that our software, RNAiFold, performs as well or better than all state-of-the-art approaches; nevertheless, our approach is unique in terms of completeness, flexibility, and the support of various design constraints. The algorithms presented in this paper are publicly available via the interactive webserver http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold; additionally, the source code can be downloaded from that site. PMID:23600819

  8. Prompt critical control of the ACRR using a linear quadratic regulator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the application of ``Modern Control'' design techniques to the problem of nuclear reactor control. The control algorithm consists of generating a nominal trajectory within the control authority of the reactor rod drives, and then following this trajectory with a gain scheduled linear quadratic regulator (LQR). A controller based on this algorithm has generated power pulses up to 100 mW on Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Prompt critical control at 1.02 net reactivity and at start-up rates over 350 decades per minute (DPM) has also been demonstrated using this controller.

  9. BWM*: A Novel, Provable, Ensemble-based Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Sparse Approximations of Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jonathan D; Jain, Swati; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Donald, Bruce R

    2016-06-01

    Sparse energy functions that ignore long range interactions between residue pairs are frequently used by protein design algorithms to reduce computational cost. Current dynamic programming algorithms that fully exploit the optimal substructure produced by these energy functions only compute the GMEC. This disproportionately favors the sequence of a single, static conformation and overlooks better binding sequences with multiple low-energy conformations. Provable, ensemble-based algorithms such as A* avoid this problem, but A* cannot guarantee better performance than exhaustive enumeration. We propose a novel, provable, dynamic programming algorithm called Branch-Width Minimization* (BWM*) to enumerate a gap-free ensemble of conformations in order of increasing energy. Given a branch-decomposition of branch-width w for an n-residue protein design with at most q discrete side-chain conformations per residue, BWM* returns the sparse GMEC in O([Formula: see text]) time and enumerates each additional conformation in merely O([Formula: see text]) time. We define a new measure, Total Effective Search Space (TESS), which can be computed efficiently a priori before BWM* or A* is run. We ran BWM* on 67 protein design problems and found that TESS discriminated between BWM*-efficient and A*-efficient cases with 100% accuracy. As predicted by TESS and validated experimentally, BWM* outperforms A* in 73% of the cases and computes the full ensemble or a close approximation faster than A*, enumerating each additional conformation in milliseconds. Unlike A*, the performance of BWM* can be predicted in polynomial time before running the algorithm, which gives protein designers the power to choose the most efficient algorithm for their particular design problem. PMID:26744898

  10. Galactic chemical evolution and nucleocosmochronology - Analytic quadratic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Quadratic models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy for a star formation rate proportional to the square of the gas mass are studied. The search for analytic solutions to the gas mass and star mass for time-dependent rates of gaseous infall onto the disk is examined. The quadratic models are compared to models having linear star formation rates. The mass, metallicity, number of stars, and U-235/U-238 isotopic ratio for the models which are subjected to the same infall rate, the same initial disk mass, and the same final gas fraction are compared. The results of the comparison indicate that: (1) the average dwarf age is greater in the quadratic model, (2) the metallicity grows initially faster in the quadratic model, (3) the quadratic model has a smaller percentage of low-Z dwarfs, and (4) the U-235/U-238 isotopic ratio indicates a younger quadratic model.

  11. Status report: Data management program algorithm evaluation activity at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An algorithm evaluation activity was initiated to study the problems associated with image processing by assessing the independent and interdependent effects of registration, compression, and classification techniques on LANDSAT data for several discipline applications. The objective of the activity was to make recommendations on selected applicable image processing algorithms in terms of accuracy, cost, and timeliness or to propose alternative ways of processing the data. As a means of accomplishing this objective, an Image Coding Panel was established. The conduct of the algorithm evaluation is described.

  12. Quadratic relations in continuous and discrete Painlevé equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, A.; Grammaticos, B.; Tamizhmani, T.

    2000-04-01

    The quadratic relations between the solutions of a Painlevé equation and that of a different one, or the same one with a different set of parameters, are investigated in the continuous and discrete cases. We show that the quadratic relations existing for the continuous PII , PIII , PV and PVI have analogues as well as consequences in the discrete case. Moreover, the discrete Painlevé equations have quadratic relations of their own without any reference to the continuous case.

  13. Programming Non-Trivial Algorithms in the Measurement Based Quantum Computation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Alsing, Paul; Fanto, Michael; Lott, Capt. Gordon; Tison, Christoper C.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a quantum circuit model algorithm as measurement based quantum computing (MBQC) algorithm1, 2 via a large cluster state. As means of illustration we draw upon our numerical modeling experience to describe a large graph state capable of searching a logical 8 element list (a non-trivial version of Grover's algorithm3 with feedforward). We develop several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of cluster states and graph state equations which can be generalized into any circuit model operations. Such a resulting cluster state will be able to carry out the desired operation with appropriate measurements and feed forward error correction. We also discuss the physical implementation and the analysis of the principal 3-qubit entangling gate (Toffoli) required for a non-trivial feedforward realization of an 8-element Grover search algorithm.

  14. AESOP- INTERACTIVE DESIGN OF LINEAR QUADRATIC REGULATORS AND KALMAN FILTERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.

    1994-01-01

    AESOP was developed to solve a number of problems associated with the design of controls and state estimators for linear time-invariant systems. The systems considered are modeled in state-variable form by a set of linear differential and algebraic equations with constant coefficients. Two key problems solved by AESOP are the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) design problem and the steady-state Kalman filter design problem. AESOP is designed to be used in an interactive manner. The user can solve design problems and analyze the solutions in a single interactive session. Both numerical and graphical information are available to the user during the session. The AESOP program is structured around a list of predefined functions. Each function performs a single computation associated with control, estimation, or system response determination. AESOP contains over sixty functions and permits the easy inclusion of user defined functions. The user accesses these functions either by inputting a list of desired functions in the order they are to be performed, or by specifying a single function to be performed. The latter case is used when the choice of function and function order depends on the results of previous functions. The available AESOP functions are divided into several general areas including: 1) program control, 2) matrix input and revision, 3) matrix formation, 4) open-loop system analysis, 5) frequency response, 6) transient response, 7) transient function zeros, 8) LQR and Kalman filter design, 9) eigenvalues and eigenvectors, 10) covariances, and 11) user-defined functions. The most important functions are those that design linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters. The user interacts with AESOP when using these functions by inputting design weighting parameters and by viewing displays of designed system response. Support functions obtain system transient and frequency responses, transfer functions, and covariance matrices. AESOP can also provide the user

  15. An interactive approach based on a discrete differential evolution algorithm for a class of integer bilevel programming problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Zhang, Li; Jiao, Yong-Chang

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an interactive approach based on a discrete differential evolution algorithm to solve a class of integer bilevel programming problems, in which integer decision variables are controlled by an upper-level decision maker and real-value or continuous decision variables are controlled by a lower-level decision maker. Using the Karush--Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions in the lower-level programming, the original discrete bilevel formulation can be converted into a discrete single-level nonlinear programming problem with the complementarity constraints, and then the smoothing technique is applied to deal with the complementarity constraints. Finally, a discrete single-level nonlinear programming problem is obtained, and solved by an interactive approach. In each iteration, for each given upper-level discrete variable, a system of nonlinear equations including the lower-level variables and Lagrange multipliers is solved first, and then a discrete nonlinear programming problem only with inequality constraints is handled by using a discrete differential evolution algorithm. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Modeling the MagnetoencephaloGram (MEG) Of Epileptic Patients Using Genetic Programming and Minimizing the Derived Models Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Efstratios; Likothanassis, Spiridon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, a variation of traditional Genetic Programming(GP) is used to model the MagnetoencephaloGram(MEG) of Epileptic Patients. This variation is Linear Genetic Programming(LGP). LGP is a particular subset of GP wherein computer programs in population are represented as a sequence of instructions from imperative programming language or machine language. The derived models from this method were simplified using genetic algorithms. The proposed method was used to model the MEG signal of epileptic patients using 6 different datasets. Each dataset uses different number of previous values of MEG to predict the next value. The models were tested in datasets different from the ones which were used to produce them and the results were very promising.

  17. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  18. Compact stars with quadratic equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngubelanga, Sifiso A.; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Ray, Subharthi

    2015-05-01

    We provide new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system of equations for matter configurations with anisotropy and charge. The spacetime is static and spherically symmetric. A quadratic equation of state is utilised for the matter distribution. By specifying a particular form for one of the gravitational potentials and the electric field intensity we obtain new exact solutions in isotropic coordinates. In our general class of models, an earlier model with a linear equation of state is regained. For particular choices of parameters we regain the masses of the stars PSR J1614-2230, 4U 1608-52, PSR J1903+0327, EXO 1745-248 and SAX J1808.4-3658. A comprehensive physical analysis for the star PSR J1903+0327 reveals that our model is reasonable.

  19. Listing all sorting reversals in quadratic time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We describe an average-case O(n2) algorithm to list all reversals on a signed permutation π that, when applied to π, produce a permutation that is closer to the identity. This algorithm is optimal in the sense that, the time it takes to write the list is Ω(n2) in the worst case. PMID:21504604

  20. Algorithmic Bricks: A Tangible Robot Programming Tool for Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, D.-Y.; Kim, H.-S.; Shim, J.-K.; Lee, W.-G.

    2012-01-01

    Tangible programming tools enable children to easily learn the programming process, previously considered to be difficult for them. While various tangible programming tools have been developed, there is still a lack of available tools to help students experience the general programming process. This study therefore developed a tool called…

  1. An adaptive ant colony system algorithm for continuous-space optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-jun; Wu, Tie-jun

    2003-01-01

    Ant colony algorithms comprise a novel category of evolutionary computation methods for optimization problems, especially for sequencing-type combinatorial optimization problems. An adaptive ant colony algorithm is proposed in this paper to tackle continuous-space optimization problems, using a new objective-function-based heuristic pheromone assignment approach for pheromone update to filtrate solution candidates. Global optimal solutions can be reached more rapidly by self-adjusting the path searching behaviors of the ants according to objective values. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with a basic ant colony algorithm and a Square Quadratic Programming approach in solving two benchmark problems with multiple extremes. The results indicated that the efficiency and reliability of the proposed algorithm were greatly improved. PMID:12656341

  2. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Algorithm-Based Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program Can Improve Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unai, Shinya; Tanaka, Daizo; Ruggiero, Nicholas; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in our institution resulted in near total mortality prior to the establishment of an algorithm-based program in July 2010. We hypothesized that an algorithm-based ECMO program improves the outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated with cardiogenic shock. Between March 2003 and July 2013, 29 patients underwent emergent catheterization for acute myocardial infarction due to left main or proximal left anterior descending artery occlusion complicated with cardiogenic shock (defined as systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg despite multiple inotropes, with or without intra-aortic balloon pump, lactic acidosis). Of 29 patients, 15 patients were treated before July 2010 (Group 1, old program), and 14 patients were treated after July 2010 (Group 2, new program). There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics, including age, sex, coronary risk factors, and left ventricular ejection fraction between the two groups. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to ECMO was performed in two cases (13%) in Group 1 and four cases (29%) in Group 2. ECMO support was performed in one case (6.7%) in Group 1 and six cases (43%) in Group 2. The 30-day survival of Group 1 versus Group 2 was 40 versus 79% (P = 0.03), and 1-year survival rate was 20 versus 56% (P = 0.01). The survival rate for patients who underwent ECMO was 0% in Group 1 versus 83% in Group 2 (P = 0.09). In Group 2, the mean duration on ECMO was 9.8 ± 5.9 days. Of the six patients who required ECMO in Group 2, 100% were successfully weaned off ECMO or were bridged to ventricular assist device implantation. Initiation of an algorithm-based ECMO program improved the outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock. PMID:26148217

  3. A superlinear interior points algorithm for engineering design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, J.; Asquier, J.

    1990-01-01

    We present a quasi-Newton interior points algorithm for nonlinear constrained optimization. It is based on a general approach consisting of the iterative solution in the primal and dual spaces of the equalities in Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions. This is done in such a way to have primal and dual feasibility at each iteration, which ensures satisfaction of those optimality conditions at the limit points. This approach is very strong and efficient, since at each iteration it only requires the solution of two linear systems with the same matrix, instead of quadratic programming subproblems. It is also particularly appropriate for engineering design optimization inasmuch at each iteration a feasible design is obtained. The present algorithm uses a quasi-Newton approximation of the second derivative of the Lagrangian function in order to have superlinear asymptotic convergence. We discuss theoretical aspects of the algorithm and its computer implementation.

  4. The algebraic decoding of the (41, 21, 9) quadratic residue code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Truong, T. K.; Chen, Xuemin; Yin, Xiaowei

    1992-01-01

    A new algebraic approach for decoding the quadratic residue (QR) codes, in particular the (41, 21, 9) QR code is presented. The key ideas behind this decoding technique are a systematic application of the Sylvester resultant method to the Newton identities associated with the code syndromes to find the error-locator polynomial, and next a method for determining error locations by solving certain quadratic, cubic and quartic equations over GF(2 exp m) in a new way which uses Zech's logarithms for the arithmetic. The algorithms developed here are suitable for implementation in a programmable microprocessor or special-purpose VLSI chip. It is expected that the algebraic methods developed here can apply generally to other codes such as the BCH and Reed-Solomon codes.

  5. Learning control for minimizing a quadratic cost during repetitions of a task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longman, Richard W.; Chang, Chi-Kuang

    1990-01-01

    In many applications, control systems are asked to perform the same task repeatedly. Learning control laws have been developed over the last few years that allow the controller to improve its performance each repetition, and to converge to zero error in tracking a desired trajectory. This paper generates a new type of learning control law that learns to minimize a quadratic cost function for tracking. Besides being of interest in its own right, this objective alleviates the need to specify a desired trajectory that can actually be performed by the system. The approach used here is to adapt appropriate methods from numerical optimization theory in order to produce learning control algorithms that adjust the system command from repetition to repetition in order to converge to the quadratic cost optimal trajectory.

  6. Reconstruction of quadratic curves in 3D using two or more perspective views: simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Sukavanam, N.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2006-01-01

    The shapes of many natural and man-made objects have planar and curvilinear surfaces. The images of such curves usually do not have sufficient distinctive features to apply conventional feature-based reconstruction algorithms. In this paper, we describe a method of reconstruction of a quadratic curve in 3-D space as an intersection of two cones containing the respective projected curve images. The correspondence between this pair of projections of the curve is assumed to be established in this work. Using least-square curve fitting, the parameters of a curve in 2-D space are found. From this we are reconstructing the 3-D quadratic curve. Relevant mathematical formulations and analytical solutions for obtaining the equation of reconstructed curve are given. The result of the described reconstruction methodology are studied by simulation studies. This reconstruction methodology is applicable to LBW decision in cricket, path of the missile, Robotic Vision, path lanning etc.

  7. Elastic Model Transitions Using Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2012-01-01

    A technique is presented for initializing multiple discrete finite element model (FEM) mode sets for certain types of flight dynamics formulations that rely on superposition of orthogonal modes for modeling the elastic response. Such approaches are commonly used for modeling launch vehicle dynamics, and challenges arise due to the rapidly time-varying nature of the rigid-body and elastic characteristics. By way of an energy argument, a quadratic inequality constrained least squares (LSQI) algorithm is employed to e ect a smooth transition from one set of FEM eigenvectors to another with no requirement that the models be of similar dimension or that the eigenvectors be correlated in any particular way. The physically unrealistic and controversial method of eigenvector interpolation is completely avoided, and the discrete solution approximates that of the continuously varying system. The real-time computational burden is shown to be negligible due to convenient features of the solution method. Simulation results are presented, and applications to staging and other discontinuous mass changes are discussed

  8. Genetic algorithms and MCML program for recovery of optical properties of homogeneous turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Morales Cruzado, Beatriz; y Montiel, Sergio Vázquez; Atencio, José Alberto Delgado

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present and validate a new method for optical properties recovery of turbid media with slab geometry. This method is an iterative method that compares diffuse reflectance and transmittance, measured using integrating spheres, with those obtained using the known algorithm MCML. The search procedure is based in the evolution of a population due to selection of the best individual, i.e., using a genetic algorithm. This new method includes several corrections such as non-linear effects in integrating spheres measurements and loss of light due to the finite size of the sample. As a potential application and proof-of-principle experiment of this new method, we use this new algorithm in the recovery of optical properties of blood samples at different degrees of coagulation. PMID:23504404

  9. Analysis of Students' Error in Learning of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaria, Effandi; Ibrahim; Maat, Siti Mistima

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the students' error in learning quadratic equation. The samples were 30 form three students from a secondary school in Jambi, Indonesia. Diagnostic test was used as the instrument of this study that included three components: factorization, completing the square and quadratic formula. Diagnostic interview…

  10. Tangent Lines without Derivatives for Quadratic and Cubic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, William J.

    2009-01-01

    In the quadratic equation, y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c, the equation y = bx + c is identified as the equation of the line tangent to the parabola at its y-intercept. This is extended to give a convenient method of graphing tangent lines at any point on the graph of a quadratic or a cubic equation. (Contains 5 figures.)

  11. Effects of Classroom Instruction on Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaiyavutjamai, Pongchawee; Clements, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-one students in six Grade 9 classes in two government secondary schools located near Chiang Mai, Thailand, attempted to solve the same 18 quadratic equations before and after participating in 11 lessons on quadratic equations. Data from the students' written responses to the equations, together with data in the form of…

  12. Geometric quadratic stochastic operator on countable infinite set

    SciTech Connect

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Hamzah, Nur Zatul Akmar

    2015-02-03

    In this paper we construct the family of Geometric quadratic stochastic operators defined on the countable sample space of nonnegative integers and investigate their trajectory behavior. Such operators can be reinterpreted in terms of of evolutionary operator of free population. We show that Geometric quadratic stochastic operators are regular transformations.

  13. Visualising the Roots of Quadratic Equations with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural extension of the root visualisation techniques first presented by Bardell (2012) for quadratic equations with real coefficients. Consideration is now given to the familiar quadratic equation "y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c" in which the coefficients "a," "b," "c" are generally…

  14. Quadratic elongation: A quantitative measure of distortion in coordination polyhedra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Kelly F.; Gibbs, G.V.; Ribbe, P.H.

    1971-01-01

    Quadratic elongation and the variance of bond angles are linearly correlated for distorted octahedral and tetrahedral coordination complexes, both of which show variations in bond length and bond angle. The quadratic elonga tion is dimensionless, giving a quantitative measure of polyhedral distortion which is independent of the effective size of the polyhedron.

  15. Quadratic divergences and quantum gravitational contributions to gauge coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, David J.

    2011-10-01

    The calculation of quadratic divergences in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a possible cosmological constant is considered. We describe a method of calculation, using the background-field method, that is sensitive to quadratic divergences, is respectful of gauge invariance, and is independent of gauge conditions. A standard renormalization group analysis is applied to the result where it is shown that the quadratic divergences do lead to asymptotic freedom as found in the original paper of Robinson and Wilczek. The role and nature of these quadratic divergences is critically evaluated in light of recent criticism. Within the context of the background-field method, it is shown that it is possible to define the charge in a physically motivated way in which the quadratic divergences do not play a role. This latter view is studied in more depth in a toy model described in an appendix.

  16. Quadratic algebras for three-dimensional superintegrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daskaloyannis, C. Tanoudis, Y.

    2010-02-15

    The three-dimensional superintegrable systems with quadratic integrals of motion have five functionally independent integrals, one among them is the Hamiltonian. Kalnins, Kress, and Miller have proved that in the case of nondegenerate potentials with quadratic integrals of motion there is a sixth quadratic integral, which is linearly independent of the other integrals. The existence of this sixth integral implies that the integrals of motion form a ternary parafermionic-like quadratic Poisson algebra with five generators. In this contribution we investigate the structure of this algebra. We show that in all the nondegenerate cases there is at least one subalgebra of three integrals having a Poisson quadratic algebra structure, which is similar to the two-dimensional case.

  17. Effect of Algorithms' Multiple Representations in the Context of Programming Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siozou, Stefania; Tselios, Nikolaos; Komis, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the effect of different representations while teaching basic algorithmic concepts to novice programmers. Design/methodology/approach: A learning activity was designed and mediated with two conceptually different learning environments, each one used by a different group. The first group used the…

  18. An Extension of CART's Pruning Algorithm. Program Statistics Research Technical Report No. 91-11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sung-Ho

    Among the computer-based methods used for the construction of trees such as AID, THAID, CART, and FACT, the only one that uses an algorithm that first grows a tree and then prunes the tree is CART. The pruning component of CART is analogous in spirit to the backward elimination approach in regression analysis. This idea provides a tool in…

  19. Comparing, optimizing, and benchmarking quantum-control algorithms in a unifying programming framework

    SciTech Connect

    Machnes, S.; Sander, U.; Glaser, S. J.; Schulte-Herbrueggen, T.; Fouquieres, P. de; Gruslys, A.; Schirmer, S.

    2011-08-15

    For paving the way to novel applications in quantum simulation, computation, and technology, increasingly large quantum systems have to be steered with high precision. It is a typical task amenable to numerical optimal control to turn the time course of pulses, i.e., piecewise constant control amplitudes, iteratively into an optimized shape. Here, we present a comparative study of optimal-control algorithms for a wide range of finite-dimensional applications. We focus on the most commonly used algorithms: GRAPE methods which update all controls concurrently, and Krotov-type methods which do so sequentially. Guidelines for their use are given and open research questions are pointed out. Moreover, we introduce a unifying algorithmic framework, DYNAMO (dynamic optimization platform), designed to provide the quantum-technology community with a convenient matlab-based tool set for optimal control. In addition, it gives researchers in optimal-control techniques a framework for benchmarking and comparing newly proposed algorithms with the state of the art. It allows a mix-and-match approach with various types of gradients, update and step-size methods as well as subspace choices. Open-source code including examples is made available at http://qlib.info.

  20. A new algorithm to handle finite nuclear mass effects in electronic calculations: the ISOTOPE program.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina P; Mohallem, José R

    2004-11-15

    We report the development of a simple algorithm to modify quantum chemistry codes based on the LCAO procedure, to account for the isotope problem in electronic structure calculations. No extra computations are required compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer calculations. An upgrade of the Gamess package called ISOTOPE is presented, and its applicability is demonstrated in some examples. PMID:15362130

  1. A method of evolving novel feature extraction algorithms for detecting buried objects in FLIR imagery using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paino, A.; Keller, J.; Popescu, M.; Stone, K.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present an approach that uses Genetic Programming (GP) to evolve novel feature extraction algorithms for greyscale images. Our motivation is to create an automated method of building new feature extraction algorithms for images that are competitive with commonly used human-engineered features, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP) and Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG). The evolved feature extraction algorithms are functions defined over the image space, and each produces a real-valued feature vector of variable length. Each evolved feature extractor breaks up the given image into a set of cells centered on every pixel, performs evolved operations on each cell, and then combines the results of those operations for every cell using an evolved operator. Using this method, the algorithm is flexible enough to reproduce both LBP and HOG features. The dataset we use to train and test our approach consists of a large number of pre-segmented image "chips" taken from a Forward Looking Infrared Imagery (FLIR) camera mounted on the hood of a moving vehicle. The goal is to classify each image chip as either containing or not containing a buried object. To this end, we define the fitness of a candidate solution as the cross-fold validation accuracy of the features generated by said candidate solution when used in conjunction with a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. In order to validate our approach, we compare the classification accuracy of an SVM trained using our evolved features with the accuracy of an SVM trained using mainstream feature extraction algorithms, including LBP and HOG.

  2. Adiabatic Quantum Programming: Minor Embedding With Hard Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Klymko, Christine F; Sullivan, Blair D; Humble, Travis S

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into the hardware or logical fabric. An essential programming step is the embedding of problem-specific information into the logical fabric to define the quantum computational transformation. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. Our methods are shown to be extensible in fabric growth, linear in time, and quadratic in logical footprint. In addition, we provide methods for accommodating hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem. These hard fault-tolerant embedding algorithms are expected to prove useful for benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing quantum logical hardware. We illustrate this versatility through numerical studies of embeddabilty versus hard fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells.

  3. Polychromatic solitons in a quadratic medium.

    PubMed

    Towers, I N; Malomed, B A

    2002-10-01

    We introduce the simplest model to describe parametric interactions in a quadratically nonlinear optical medium with the fundamental harmonic containing two components with (slightly) different carrier frequencies [which is a direct analog of wavelength-division multiplexed models, well known in media with cubic nonlinearity]. The model takes a closed form with three different second-harmonic components, and it is formulated in the spatial domain. We demonstrate that the model supports both polychromatic solitons (PCSs), with all the components present in them, and two types of mutually orthogonal simple solitons, both types being stable in a broad parametric region. An essential peculiarity of PCS is that its power is much smaller than that of a simple (usual) soliton (taken at the same values of control parameters), which may be an advantage for experimental generation of PCSs. Collisions between the orthogonal simple solitons are simulated in detail, leading to the conclusion that the collisions are strongly inelastic, converting the simple solitons into polychromatic ones, and generating one or two additional PCSs. A collision velocity at which the inelastic effects are strongest is identified, and it is demonstrated that the collision may be used as a basis to design a simple all-optical XOR logic gate. PMID:12443362

  4. A Quadratic Closure for Compressible Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Futterman, J A

    2008-09-16

    We have investigated a one-point closure model for compressible turbulence based on third- and higher order cumulant discard for systems undergoing rapid deformation, such as might occur downstream of a shock or other discontinuity. In so doing, we find the lowest order contributions of turbulence to the mean flow, which lead to criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) as originally applied by Herring closes the turbulence hierarchy of moment equations by discarding third order and higher cumulants. This is similar to the fourth-order cumulant discard hypothesis of Millionshchikov, except that the Millionshchikov hypothesis was taken to apply to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence generally, whereas RDT is applied only to fluids undergoing a distortion that is 'rapid' in the sense that the interaction of the mean flow with the turbulence overwhelms the interaction of the turbulence with itself. It is also similar to Gaussian closure, in which both second and fourth-order cumulants are retained. Motivated by RDT, we develop a quadratic one-point closure for rapidly distorting compressible turbulence, without regard to homogeneity or isotropy, and make contact with two equation turbulence models, especially the K-{var_epsilon} and K-L models, and with linear instability growth. In the end, we arrive at criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Finite Volume simulations.

  5. LIFT: a nested decomposition algorithm for solving lower block triangular linear programs. Report AMD-859. [In PL/I for IBM 370

    SciTech Connect

    Ament, D; Ho, J; Loute, E; Remmelswaal, M

    1980-06-01

    Nested decomposition of linear programs is the result of a multilevel, hierarchical application of the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition principle. The general structure is called lower block-triangular, and permits direct accounting of long-term effects of investment, service life, etc. LIFT, an algorithm for solving lower block triangular linear programs, is based on state-of-the-art modular LP software. The algorithmic and software aspects of LIFT are outlined, and computational results are presented. 5 figures, 6 tables. (RWR)

  6. Prediction of protein secondary structure based on residue pair types and conformational states using dynamic programming algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Parto, Sahar; Arab, Shahriar; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2005-06-20

    We have used a statistical approach for protein secondary structure prediction based on information theory and simultaneously taking into consideration pairwise residue types and conformational states. Since the prediction of residue secondary structure by one residue window sliding make ambiguity in state prediction, we used a dynamic programming algorithm to find the path with maximum score. A score system for residue pairs in particular conformations is derived for adjacent neighbors up to ten residue apart in sequence. The three state overall per-residue accuracy, Q3, of this method in a jackknife test with dataset created from PDBSELECT is more than 70%. PMID:15936021

  7. Analysis of the Multi Strategy Goal Programming for Micro-Grid Based on Dynamic ant Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, J. P.; Niu, D. X.

    Micro-grid is one of the key technologies of the future energy supplies. Take economic planning. reliability, and environmental protection of micro grid as a basis for the analysis of multi-strategy objective programming problems for micro grid which contains wind power, solar power, and battery and micro gas turbine. Establish the mathematical model of each power generation characteristics and energy dissipation. and change micro grid planning multi-objective function under different operating strategies to a single objective model based on AHP method. Example analysis shows that in combination with dynamic ant mixed genetic algorithm can get the optimal power output of this model.

  8. Research on an augmented Lagrangian penalty function algorithm for nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frair, L.

    1978-01-01

    The augmented Lagrangian (ALAG) Penalty Function Algorithm for optimizing nonlinear mathematical models is discussed. The mathematical models of interest are deterministic in nature and finite dimensional optimization is assumed. A detailed review of penalty function techniques in general and the ALAG technique in particular is presented. Numerical experiments are conducted utilizing a number of nonlinear optimization problems to identify an efficient ALAG Penalty Function Technique for computer implementation.

  9. Scheduling language and algorithm development study. Volume 2, phase 2: Introduction to plans programming. [user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, D. R.; Ishikawa, M. K.; Paulson, R. E.; Ramsey, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    A user guide for the Programming Language for Allocation and Network Scheduling (PLANS) is presented. Information is included for the construction of PLANS programs. The basic philosophy of PLANS is discussed, and access and update reference techniques are described along with the use of tree structures.

  10. A quantum Algorithm for the Moebius Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter

    We give an efficient quantum algorithm for the Moebius function from the natural numbers to -1,0,1. The cost of the algorithm is asymptotically quadratic in log n and does not require the computation of the prime factorization of n as an intermediate step.

  11. A multiobjective interval programming model for wind-hydrothermal power system dispatching using 2-step optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kun; Jihong, Qu

    2014-01-01

    Wind-hydrothermal power system dispatching has received intensive attention in recent years because it can help develop various reasonable plans to schedule the power generation efficiency. But future data such as wind power output and power load would not be accurately predicted and the nonlinear nature involved in the complex multiobjective scheduling model; therefore, to achieve accurate solution to such complex problem is a very difficult task. This paper presents an interval programming model with 2-step optimization algorithm to solve multiobjective dispatching. Initially, we represented the future data into interval numbers and simplified the object function to a linear programming problem to search the feasible and preliminary solutions to construct the Pareto set. Then the simulated annealing method was used to search the optimal solution of initial model. Thorough experimental results suggest that the proposed method performed reasonably well in terms of both operating efficiency and precision. PMID:24895663

  12. A Multiobjective Interval Programming Model for Wind-Hydrothermal Power System Dispatching Using 2-Step Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Jihong, Qu

    2014-01-01

    Wind-hydrothermal power system dispatching has received intensive attention in recent years because it can help develop various reasonable plans to schedule the power generation efficiency. But future data such as wind power output and power load would not be accurately predicted and the nonlinear nature involved in the complex multiobjective scheduling model; therefore, to achieve accurate solution to such complex problem is a very difficult task. This paper presents an interval programming model with 2-step optimization algorithm to solve multiobjective dispatching. Initially, we represented the future data into interval numbers and simplified the object function to a linear programming problem to search the feasible and preliminary solutions to construct the Pareto set. Then the simulated annealing method was used to search the optimal solution of initial model. Thorough experimental results suggest that the proposed method performed reasonably well in terms of both operating efficiency and precision. PMID:24895663

  13. Optimal channels for channelized quadratic estimators.

    PubMed

    Kupinski, Meredith K; Clarkson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for estimation tasks that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. Maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimates are challenging to compute from high-dimensional likelihoods. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of channelized quadratic estimators (CQEs), since estimating likelihood moments from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. The channelized likelihood is then used to form ML estimates of the parameter(s). In this work we choose an imaging example in which the second-order statistics of the image data depend upon the parameter of interest: the correlation length. Correlation lengths are used to approximate background textures in many imaging applications, and in these cases an estimate of the correlation length is useful for pre-whitening. In a simulation study we compare the estimation performance, as measured by the root-mean-squared error (RMSE), of correlation length estimates from CQE and power spectral density (PSD) distribution fitting. To abide by the assumptions of the PSD method we simulate an ergodic, isotropic, stationary, and zero-mean random process. These assumptions are not part of the CQE formalism. The CQE method assumes a Gaussian channelized likelihood that can be a valid for non-Gaussian image data, since the channel outputs are formed from weighted sums of the image elements. We have shown that, for three or more channels, the RMSE of CQE estimates of correlation length is lower than conventional PSD estimates. We also show that computing CQE by using a standard nonlinear optimization method produces channels that yield RMSE within 2% of the analytic optimum. CQE estimates of anisotropic correlation length estimation are reported to demonstrate this technique on a two-parameter estimation problem. PMID:27409452

  14. An analysis of spectral envelope-reduction via quadratic assignment problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Alan; Pothen, Alex

    1994-01-01

    A new spectral algorithm for reordering a sparse symmetric matrix to reduce its envelope size was described. The ordering is computed by associating a Laplacian matrix with the given matrix and then sorting the components of a specified eigenvector of the Laplacian. In this paper, we provide an analysis of the spectral envelope reduction algorithm. We described related 1- and 2-sum problems; the former is related to the envelope size, while the latter is related to an upper bound on the work involved in an envelope Cholesky factorization scheme. We formulate the latter two problems as quadratic assignment problems, and then study the 2-sum problem in more detail. We obtain lower bounds on the 2-sum by considering a projected quadratic assignment problem, and then show that finding a permutation matrix closest to an orthogonal matrix attaining one of the lower bounds justifies the spectral envelope reduction algorithm. The lower bound on the 2-sum is seen to be tight for reasonably 'uniform' finite element meshes. We also obtain asymptotically tight lower bounds for the envelope size for certain classes of meshes.

  15. ORACLS - A linear-quadratic-Gaussian computer-aided design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    ORACLS, an acronym denoting Optimal Regular Algorithms for the Control of Linear Systems, is a collection of FORTRAN coded subroutines dedicated to the formulation and solution of the Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) design problem modeled in both continuous and discrete form. The ORACLS system is under continuous development at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, and is widely used by universities and industry within the U.S.A. The current (operational) ORACLS version as well as new software under development is described.

  16. Thermal algorithms analysis. [programming tasks supporting the development of a thermal model of the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, T.

    1981-01-01

    The programming and analysis methods to support the development of a thermal model of the Earth's surface from detailed analysis of day/night registered data sets from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission satellite are briefly described.

  17. A decentralized linear quadratic control design method for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A decentralized suboptimal linear quadratic control design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized control design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the design of reduced-order controllers for flexible structures. The procedure starts with a definition of the continuum structure to be controlled. An evaluation model of finite dimension is obtained by the finite element method. Then, the finite element model is decomposed into several substructures by using a natural decomposition called substructuring decomposition. Each substructure, at this point, still has too large a dimension and must be reduced to a size that is Riccati-solvable. Model reduction of each substructure can be performed by using any existing model reduction method, e.g., modal truncation, balanced reduction, Krylov model reduction, or mixed-mode method. Then, based on the reduced substructure model, a subcontroller is designed by an LQ optimal control method for each substructure independently. After all subcontrollers are designed, a controller synthesis method called substructural controller synthesis is employed to synthesize all subcontrollers into a global controller. The assembling scheme used is the same as that employed for the structure matrices. Finally, a controller reduction scheme, called the equivalent impulse response energy controller (EIREC) reduction algorithm, is used to reduce the global controller to a reasonable size for implementation. The EIREC reduced controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has the property of matching low-frequency moments and low-frequency power moments. An advantage of the substructural controller synthesis method is that it relieves the computational burden associated with dimensionality. Besides that, the SCS design scheme is also a highly adaptable controller synthesis method for structures with varying configuration, or varying mass

  18. On a 'Mysterious' Case of a Quadratic Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakovich, Sergei

    2006-07-01

    We show that one of the five cases of a quadratic Hamiltonian, which were recently selected by Sokolov and Wolf who used the Kovalevskaya-Lyapunov test, fails to pass the Painlevé test for integrability.

  19. Quadratic function approaching method for magnetotelluric soundingdata inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Liangjun, Yan; Wenbao, Hu; Zhang, Keni

    2004-04-05

    The quadratic function approaching method (QFAM) is introduced for magnetotelluric sounding (MT) data inversion. The method takes the advantage of that quadratic function has single extreme value, which avoids leading to an inversion solution for local minimum and ensures the solution for global minimization of an objective function. The method does not need calculation of sensitivity matrix and not require a strict initial earth model. Examples for synthetic data and field measurement data indicate that the proposed inversion method is effective.

  20. AdS waves as exact solutions to quadratic gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Guellue, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram; Guerses, Metin

    2011-04-15

    We give an exact solution of the quadratic gravity in D dimensions. The solution is a plane-fronted wave metric with a cosmological constant. This metric solves not only the full quadratic gravity field equations but also the linearized ones which include the linearized equations of the recently found critical gravity. A subset of the solutions change the asymptotic structure of the anti-de Sitter space due to their logarithmic behavior.

  1. Evaluation of a Particle Swarm Algorithm For Biomechanical Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Jaco F.; Koh, Byung; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; George, Alan D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization is frequently employed in biomechanics research to solve system identification problems, predict human movement, or estimate muscle or other internal forces that cannot be measured directly. Unfortunately, biomechanical optimization problems often possess multiple local minima, making it difficult to find the best solution. Furthermore, convergence in gradient-based algorithms can be affected by scaling to account for design variables with different length scales or units. In this study we evaluate a recently-developed version of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to address these problems. The algorithm’s global search capabilities were investigated using a suite of difficult analytical test problems, while its scale-independent nature was proven mathematically and verified using a biomechanical test problem. For comparison, all test problems were also solved with three off-the-shelf optimization algorithms—a global genetic algorithm (GA) and multistart gradient-based sequential quadratic programming (SQP) and quasi-Newton (BFGS) algorithms. For the analytical test problems, only the PSO algorithm was successful on the majority of the problems. When compared to previously published results for the same problems, PSO was more robust than a global simulated annealing algorithm but less robust than a different, more complex genetic algorithm. For the biomechanical test problem, only the PSO algorithm was insensitive to design variable scaling, with the GA algorithm being mildly sensitive and the SQP and BFGS algorithms being highly sensitive. The proposed PSO algorithm provides a new off-the-shelf global optimization option for difficult biomechanical problems, especially those utilizing design variables with different length scales or units. PMID:16060353

  2. Photonic EPR State from Quadratic Waveguide Array with Alternating Positive and Negative Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yang; Ping, Xu; Liang-Liang, Lu; Shi-Ning, Zhu

    2016-02-01

    We propose the generation of photonic EPR state from quadratic waveguide array. Both the propagation constant and the nonlinearity in the array are designed to possess a periodical modulation along the propagation direction. This ensures that the photon pairs can be generated efficiently through the quasi-phase-matching spontaneous parametric down conversion by holding the spatial EPR entanglement in the fashion of correlated position and anticorrelated momentum. The Schmidt number which denotes the degree of EPR entanglement is calculated and it can approach a high value when the number of illuminated waveguide channels and the length of the waveguide array are properly chosen. These results suggest the quadratic waveguide array as a compact platform for engineering photonic quantum states in a high-dimensional Hilbert space. Supported by the State Key Program for Basic Research in China under Grant No. 2012CB921802, the National Natural Science Foundations of China under Grant Nos. 91321312, 11321063 and 11422438

  3. Genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling: Applications in materials science and chemistry and advances in scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Kumara Narasimha

    2007-03-01

    Effective and efficient rnultiscale modeling is essential to advance both the science and synthesis in a, wide array of fields such as physics, chemistry, materials science; biology, biotechnology and pharmacology. This study investigates the efficacy and potential of rising genetic algorithms for rnultiscale materials modeling and addresses some of the challenges involved in designing competent algorithms that solve hard problems quickly, reliably and accurately. In particular, this thesis demonstrates the use of genetic algorithms (GAs) and genetic programming (GP) in multiscale modeling with the help of two non-trivial case studies in materials science and chemistry. The first case study explores the utility of genetic programming (GP) in multi-timescaling alloy kinetics simulations. In essence, GP is used to bridge molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods to span orders-of-magnitude in simulation time. Specifically, GP is used to regress symbolically an inline barrier function from a limited set of molecular dynamics simulations to enable kinetic Monte Carlo that simulate seconds of real time. Results on a non-trivial example of vacancy-assisted migration on a surface of a face-centered cubic (fcc) Copper-Cobalt (CuxCo 1-x) alloy show that GP predicts all barriers with 0.1% error from calculations for less than 3% of active configurations, independent of type of potentials used to obtain the learning set of barriers via molecular dynamics. The resulting method enables 2--9 orders-of-magnitude increase in real-time dynamics simulations taking 4--7 orders-of-magnitude less CPU time. The second case study presents the application of multiobjective genetic algorithms (MOGAs) in multiscaling quantum chemistry simulations. Specifically, MOGAs are used to bridge high-level quantum chemistry and semiempirical methods to provide accurate representation of complex molecular excited-state and ground-state behavior. Results on ethylene and benzene---two common

  4. Solving mixed integer nonlinear programming problems using spiral dynamics optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Adhe; Sidarto, Kuntjoro Adji

    2016-02-01

    Many engineering and practical problem can be modeled by mixed integer nonlinear programming. This paper proposes to solve the problem with modified spiral dynamics inspired optimization method of Tamura and Yasuda. Four test cases have been examined, including problem in engineering and sport. This method succeeds in obtaining the optimal result in all test cases.

  5. A user oriented microcomputer facility for designing linear quadratic Gaussian feedback compensators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, P. K.; Wahid, J.; Johnson, T. L.; Ward, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a laboratory design facility for digital microprocessor implementation of Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian feedback compensators. Outputs from user interactive programs for solving infinite time horizon LQ regulator and Kalman filter problems are conditioned for implementation on a laboratory microcomputer system. The software consists of two parts: (1) an off-line high-level program for solving the LQ Ricatti equations and generating associated feedback and filter gains, and (2) a cross compiler/macro assembler which generates object code for the target microprocessor system. Application to the control of a two dimensional inverted pendulum and expanding the design/prototyping system to other target machine architectures are discussed.

  6. Algorithms and Algorithmic Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veselov, V. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    This paper is intended as an introduction to a number of problems connected with the description of algorithms and algorithmic languages, particularly the syntaxes and semantics of algorithmic languages. The terms "letter, word, alphabet" are defined and described. The concept of the algorithm is defined and the relation between the algorithm and…

  7. Implementation of the EM Algorithm in the Estimation of Item Parameters: The BILOG Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Bock, R. Darrell

    This paper reviews the basic elements of the EM approach to estimating item parameters and illustrates its use with one simulated and one real data set. In order to illustrate the use of the BILOG computer program, runs for 1-, 2-, and 3-parameter models are presented for the two sets of data. First is a set of responses from 1,000 persons to five…

  8. A new algorithm to reduce noise in microscopy images implemented with a simple program in python.

    PubMed

    Papini, Alessio

    2012-03-01

    All microscopical images contain noise, increasing when (e.g., transmission electron microscope or light microscope) approaching the resolution limit. Many methods are available to reduce noise. One of the most commonly used is image averaging. We propose here to use the mode of pixel values. Simple Python programs process a given number of images, recorded consecutively from the same subject. The programs calculate the mode of the pixel values in a given position (a, b). The result is a new image containing in (a, b) the mode of the values. Therefore, the final pixel value corresponds to that read in at least two of the pixels in position (a, b). The application of the program on a set of images obtained by applying salt and pepper noise and GIMP hurl noise with 10-90% standard deviation showed that the mode performs better than averaging with three-eight images. The data suggest that the mode would be more efficient (in the sense of a lower number of recorded images to process to reduce noise below a given limit) for lower number of total noisy pixels and high standard deviation (as impulse noise and salt and pepper noise), while averaging would be more efficient when the number of varying pixels is high, and the standard deviation is low, as in many cases of Gaussian noise affected images. The two methods may be used serially. PMID:21898664

  9. Implementation and testing of a real-time 3-component phase picking program for Earthworm using the CECM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B. I.; Friberg, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismic networks typically deploy three component (3C) sensors, but still fail to utilize all of the information available in the seismograms when performing automated phase picking for real-time event location. In most cases a variation on a short term over long term average threshold detector is used for picking and then an association program is used to assign phase types to the picks. However, the 3C waveforms from an earthquake contain an abundance of information related to the P and S phases in both their polarization and energy partitioning. An approach that has been overlooked and has demonstrated encouraging results is the Component Energy Comparison Method (CECM) by Nagano et al. as published in Geophysics 1989. CECM is well suited to being used in real-time because the calculation is not computationally intensive. Furthermore, the CECM method has fewer tuning variables (3) than traditional pickers in Earthworm such as the Rex Allen algorithm (N=18) or even the Anthony Lomax Filter Picker module (N=5). In addition to computing the CECM detector we study the detector sensitivity by rotating the signal into principle components as well as estimating the P phase onset from a curvature function describing the CECM as opposed to the CECM itself. We present our results implementing this algorithm in a real-time module for Earthworm and show the improved phase picks as compared to the traditional single component pickers using Earthworm.

  10. Knowledge-based function optimization using fuzzy cultural algorithms with evolutionary programming.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, R G; Zhu, S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the advantages of a fuzzy representation in problem solving and search is investigated using the framework of Cultural algorithms (CAs). Since all natural languages contain a fuzzy component, the natural question is "Does this fuzzy representation facilitate the problem-solving process, within these systems". In order to investigate this question we use the CA framework of Reynolds (1996), CAs are a computational model of cultural evolution derived from and used to express basic anthropological models of culture and its development. A mathematical model of a full fuzzy CA is developed there. In it, the problem solving knowledge is represented using a fuzzy framework. Several theoretical results concerning its properties are presented. The model is then applied to the solution of a set of 12 difficult, benchmark problems in nonlinear real-valued function optimization. The performance of the full fuzzy model is compared with 8 other fuzzy and crisp architectures. The results suggest that a fuzzy approach can produce a statistically significant improvement in search efficiency over nonfuzzy versions for the entire set of functions, the then investigate the class of performance functions for which the full fuzzy system exhibits the greatest improvements over nonfuzzy systems. In general, these are functions which require some preliminary investigation in order to embark on an effective search. PMID:18244764

  11. An analytic method to account for drag in the Vinti satellite theory. [computer program using quadrature algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. S.; Mistretta, G. D.; Bonavito, N. L.

    1975-01-01

    A quadrature algorithm is presented which employs analytical expressions for the variations of satellite orbital elements caused by air drag. The Hamiltonian is formally preserved and the Jacobi constants of the motion are advanced with time through the variational equations. The atmospheric density profile is written as a fitted exponential function of the eccentric anomaly, which adheres to tabulated data at all altitudes and simultaneously reduces the variational equations to definite integrals with closed form evaluations, whose limits are in terms of the eccentric anomaly. Results are given for two intense air drag satellites and indicate that the satellite ephemerides produced by this method in conjunction with the Vinti program are of very high accuracy.

  12. Adiabatic quantum programming: minor embedding with hard faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymko, Christine; Sullivan, Blair D.; Humble, Travis S.

    2013-11-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into an underlying hardware or logical fabric. An essential step is embedding problem-specific information into the quantum logical fabric. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. These methods extend with fabric growth while scaling linearly in time and quadratically in footprint. We also provide methods for handling hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem and illustrate their versatility through numerical studies of embeddability versus fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells. The studies show that these algorithms are more resilient to faulty fabrics than naive embedding approaches, a feature which should prove useful in benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing faulty hardware.

  13. A transient, quadratic nodal method for triangular-Z geometry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLorey, T.F.

    1993-06-01

    Many systematically-derived nodal methods have been developed for Cartesian geometry due to the extensive interest in Light Water Reactors. These methods typically model the transverse-integrated flux as either an analytic or low order polynomial function of position within the node. Recently, quadratic nodal methods have been developed for R-Z and hexagonal geometry. A static and transient quadratic nodal method is developed for triangular-Z geometry. This development is particularly challenging because the quadratic expansion in each node must be performed between the node faces and the triangular points. As a consequence, in the 2-D plane, the flux and current at the points of the triangles must be treated. Quadratic nodal equations are solved using a non-linear iteration scheme, which utilizes the corrected, mesh-centered finite difference equations, and forces these equations to match the quadratic equations by computing discontinuity factors during the solution. Transient nodal equations are solved using the improved quasi-static method, which has been shown to be a very efficient solution method for transient problems. Several static problems are used to compare the quadratic nodal method to the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) method. The quadratic method is shown to give more accurate node-averaged fluxes. However, it appears that the method has difficulty predicting node leakages near reactor boundaries and severe material interfaces. The consequence is that the eigenvalue may be poorly predicted for certain reactor configurations. The transient methods are tested using a simple analytic test problem, a heterogeneous heavy water reactor benchmark problem, and three thermal hydraulic test problems. Results indicate that the transient methods have been implemented correctly.

  14. Approximating the linear quadratic optimal control law for hereditary systems with delays in the control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental control synthesis issue of establishing a priori convergence rates of approximation schemes for feedback controllers for a class of distributed parameter systems is addressed within the context of hereditary systems. Specifically, a factorization approach is presented for deriving approximations to the optimal feedback gains for the linear regulator-quadratic cost problem associated with time-varying functional differential equations with control delays. The approach is based on a discretization of the state penalty which leads to a simple structure for the feedback control law. General properties of the Volterra factors of Hilbert-Schmidt operators are then used to obtain convergence results for the controls, trajectories and feedback kernels. Two algorithms are derived from the basic approximation scheme, including a fast algorithm, in the time-invariant case. A numerical example is also considered.

  15. Study on MAX-MIN Ant System with Random Selection in Quadratic Assignment Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iimura, Ichiro; Yoshida, Kenji; Ishibashi, Ken; Nakayama, Shigeru

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO), which is a type of swarm intelligence inspired by ants' foraging behavior, has been studied extensively and its effectiveness has been shown by many researchers. The previous studies have reported that MAX-MIN Ant System (MMAS) is one of effective ACO algorithms. The MMAS maintains the balance of intensification and diversification concerning pheromone by limiting the quantity of pheromone to the range of minimum and maximum values. In this paper, we propose MAX-MIN Ant System with Random Selection (MMASRS) for improving the search performance even further. The MMASRS is a new ACO algorithm that is MMAS into which random selection was newly introduced. The random selection is one of the edgechoosing methods by agents (ants). In our experimental evaluation using ten quadratic assignment problems, we have proved that the proposed MMASRS with the random selection is superior to the conventional MMAS without the random selection in the viewpoint of the search performance.

  16. The double-assignment method for the exponential chaotic tabu search in quadratic assignment problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazuaki; Horio, Yoshihiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    The quadratic assignment problem (QAP) is one of the NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems. An exponential chaotic tabu search using a 2-opt algorithm driven by chaotic neuro-dynamics has been proposed as one heuristic method for solving QAPs. In this paper we first propose a new local search, the double-assignment method, suitable for the exponential chaotic tabu search, which adopts features of the Lin-Kernighan algorithm. We then introduce chaotic neuro-dynamics into the double-assignment method to propose a novel exponential chaotic tabu search. We further improve the proposed exponential chaotic tabu search with the double-assignment method by enhancing the effect of chaotic neuro-dynamics.

  17. The oxygen status algorithm: a computer program for calculating and displaying pH and blood gas data.

    PubMed

    Siggaard-Andersen, O; Siggaard-Andersen, M

    1990-01-01

    compatible computer running under DOS version 2.11 or later. A VGA color monitor is preferred, but the program also supports EGA, CGA, and Hercules monitors. The program will be freely available at the cost of a discette and mailing expenses by courtesy of Radiometer Medical A/S, Emdrupvej 72, DK-2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark (valid through 1991). A simplified algorithm for a programmable pocket calculator avoiding iterative calculations is given as an Appendix. PMID:2128561

  18. Support Vector Machine algorithm for regression and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chenggang; Zavaljevski, Nela

    2001-08-01

    The software is an implementation of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm that was invented and developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his co-workers at AT&T Bell Laboratories. The specific implementation reported here is an Active Set method for solving a quadratic optimization problem that forms the major part of any SVM program. The implementation is tuned to specific constraints generated in the SVM learning. Thus, it is more efficient than general-purpose quadratic optimization programs. A decomposition method has been implemented in the software that enables processing large data sets. The size of the learning data is virtually unlimited by the capacity of the computer physical memory. The software is flexible and extensible. Two upper bounds are implemented to regulate the SVM learning for classification, which allow users to adjust the false positive and false negative rates. The software can be used either as a standalone, general-purpose SVM regression or classification program, or be embedded into a larger software system.

  19. Support Vector Machine algorithm for regression and classification

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-08-01

    The software is an implementation of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm that was invented and developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his co-workers at AT&T Bell Laboratories. The specific implementation reported here is an Active Set method for solving a quadratic optimization problem that forms the major part of any SVM program. The implementation is tuned to specific constraints generated in the SVM learning. Thus, it is more efficient than general-purpose quadratic optimization programs. Amore » decomposition method has been implemented in the software that enables processing large data sets. The size of the learning data is virtually unlimited by the capacity of the computer physical memory. The software is flexible and extensible. Two upper bounds are implemented to regulate the SVM learning for classification, which allow users to adjust the false positive and false negative rates. The software can be used either as a standalone, general-purpose SVM regression or classification program, or be embedded into a larger software system.« less

  20. Design of a multiple kernel learning algorithm for LS-SVM by convex programming.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ling; Xia, Zhonghang; Liang, Xijun; Gao, Chuanhou

    2011-06-01

    As a kernel based method, the performance of least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) depends on the selection of the kernel as well as the regularization parameter (Duan, Keerthi, & Poo, 2003). Cross-validation is efficient in selecting a single kernel and the regularization parameter; however, it suffers from heavy computational cost and is not flexible to deal with multiple kernels. In this paper, we address the issue of multiple kernel learning for LS-SVM by formulating it as semidefinite programming (SDP). Furthermore, we show that the regularization parameter can be optimized in a unified framework with the kernel, which leads to an automatic process for model selection. Extensive experimental validations are performed and analyzed. PMID:21441012

  1. Improved CUDA programs for GPU computing of Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm: 2D and 3D Ising, Potts, and XY models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Yukihiro; Okabe, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    We present new versions of sample CUDA programs for the GPU computing of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm. In this update, we add the method of GPU-based cluster-labeling algorithm without the use of conventional iteration (Komura, 2015) to those programs. For high-precision calculations, we also add a random-number generator in the cuRAND library. Moreover, we fix several bugs and remove the extra usage of shared memory in the kernel functions.

  2. Solving Bilevel Programming Problems Using a Neural Network Approach and Its Application to Power System Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakob, Shamshul Bahar; Watada, Junzo

    In this paper, a hybrid neural network approach to solve mixed integer quadratic bilevel programming problems is proposed. Bilevel programming problems arise when one optimization problem, the upper problem, is constrained by another optimization, the lower problem. The mixed integer quadratic bilevel programming problem is transformed into a double-layered neural network. The combination of a genetic algorithm (GA) and a meta-controlled Boltzmann machine (BM) enables us to formulate a hybrid neural network approach to solving bilevel programming problems. The GA is used to generate the feasible partial solutions of the upper level and to provide the parameters for the lower level. The meta-controlled BM is employed to cope with the lower level problem. The lower level solution is transmitted to the upper level. This procedure enables us to obtain the whole upper level solution. The iterative processes can converge on the complete solution of this problem to generate an optimal one. The proposed method leads the mixed integer quadratic bilevel programming problem to a global optimal solution. Finally, a numerical example is used to illustrate the application of the method in a power system environment, which shows that the algorithm is feasible and advantageous.

  3. Stable sequential Kuhn-Tucker theorem in iterative form or a regularized Uzawa algorithm in a regular nonlinear programming problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    A parametric nonlinear programming problem in a metric space with an operator equality constraint in a Hilbert space is studied assuming that its lower semicontinuous value function at a chosen individual parameter value has certain subdifferentiability properties in the sense of nonlinear (nonsmooth) analysis. Such subdifferentiability can be understood as the existence of a proximal subgradient or a Fréchet subdifferential. In other words, an individual problem has a corresponding generalized Kuhn-Tucker vector. Under this assumption, a stable sequential Kuhn-Tucker theorem in nondifferential iterative form is proved and discussed in terms of minimizing sequences on the basis of the dual regularization method. This theorem provides necessary and sufficient conditions for the stable construction of a minimizing approximate solution in the sense of Warga in the considered problem, whose initial data can be approximately specified. A substantial difference of the proved theorem from its classical same-named analogue is that the former takes into account the possible instability of the problem in the case of perturbed initial data and, as a consequence, allows for the inherited instability of classical optimality conditions. This theorem can be treated as a regularized generalization of the classical Uzawa algorithm to nonlinear programming problems. Finally, the theorem is applied to the "simplest" nonlinear optimal control problem, namely, to a time-optimal control problem.

  4. On Volterra quadratic stochastic operators with continual state space

    SciTech Connect

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Hamzah, Nur Zatul Akmar

    2015-05-15

    Let (X,F) be a measurable space, and S(X,F) be the set of all probability measures on (X,F) where X is a state space and F is σ - algebraon X. We consider a nonlinear transformation (quadratic stochastic operator) defined by (Vλ)(A) = ∫{sub X}∫{sub X}P(x,y,A)dλ(x)dλ(y), where P(x, y, A) is regarded as a function of two variables x and y with fixed A ∈ F . A quadratic stochastic operator V is called a regular, if for any initial measure the strong limit lim{sub n→∞} V{sup n }(λ) is exists. In this paper, we construct a family of quadratic stochastic operators defined on the segment X = [0,1] with Borel σ - algebra F on X , prove their regularity and show that the limit measure is a Dirac measure.

  5. Quadratic expressions by means of `summing all the matchsticks'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faaiz Gierdien, M.

    2012-09-01

    This note presents demonstrations of quadratic expressions that come about when particular problems are posed with respect to matchsticks that form regular triangles, squares, pentagons and so on. Usually when such 'matchstick' problems are used as ways to foster algebraic thinking, the expressions for the number of matchstick quantities are linear and not quadratic. It will be shown that a pedagogy of 'summing all the matchsticks' is central to the emergence of quadratic expressions. This pedagogy involves generational and transformational activities which are considered as some of the main activities of algebra. Key elements to these activities are processes such as recognizing and extending patterns, and specializing and generalizing particular functional relationships. Implications of these processes in terms of algebraic thinking are considered.

  6. On Volterra quadratic stochastic operators with continual state space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Hamzah, Nur Zatul Akmar

    2015-05-01

    Let (X,F) be a measurable space, and S(X,F) be the set of all probability measures on (X,F) where X is a state space and F is σ - algebraon X. We consider a nonlinear transformation (quadratic stochastic operator) defined by (V λ )(A ) = ∫X ∫X P (x ,y ,A )d λ (x )d λ (y ), where P(x, y, A) is regarded as a function of two variables x and y with fixed A ∈ F . A quadratic stochastic operator V is called a regular, if for any initial measure the strong limit lim n →∞ Vn(λ ) is exists. In this paper, we construct a family of quadratic stochastic operators defined on the segment X = [0,1] with Borel σ - algebra F on X , prove their regularity and show that the limit measure is a Dirac measure.

  7. Symmetric quadratic Hamiltonians with pseudo-Hermitian matrix representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Francisco M.

    2016-06-01

    We prove that any symmetric Hamiltonian that is a quadratic function of the coordinates and momenta has a pseudo-Hermitian adjoint or regular matrix representation. The eigenvalues of the latter matrix are the natural frequencies of the Hamiltonian operator. When all the eigenvalues of the matrix are real, then the spectrum of the symmetric Hamiltonian is real and the operator is Hermitian. As illustrative examples we choose the quadratic Hamiltonians that model a pair of coupled resonators with balanced gain and loss, the electromagnetic self-force on an oscillating charged particle and an active LRC circuit.

  8. A Note on the Linearly and Quadratically Weighted Kappa Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingke

    2016-09-01

    The linearly and quadratically weighted kappa coefficients are popular statistics in measuring inter-rater agreement on an ordinal scale. It has been recently demonstrated that the linearly weighted kappa is a weighted average of the kappa coefficients of the embedded 2 by 2 agreement matrices, while the quadratically weighted kappa is insensitive to the agreement matrices that are row or column reflection symmetric. A rank-one matrix decomposition approach to the weighting schemes is presented in this note such that these phenomena can be demonstrated in a concise manner. PMID:27246436

  9. Analysis of integral controls in linear quadratic regulator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of linear optimal control to the design of systems with integral control action on specified outputs is considered. Using integral terms in a quadratic performance index, an asymptotic analysis is used to determine the effect of variable quadratic weights on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the closed loop system. It is shown that for small integral terms the placement of integrator poles and gain calculation can be effectively decoupled from placement of the primary system eigenvalues. This technique is applied to the design of integral controls for a STOL aircraft outer loop guidance system.

  10. Performance of a benchmark parallel implementation of the Van Slyke and Wets algorithm for two-stage stochastic programs on the Sequent/Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyawansa, K.A.; Hudson, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a benchmark parallel version of the Van Slyke and Wets algorithm for two-stage stochastic programs and an implementation of that algorithm on the Sequent/Balance. We also report results of a numerical experiment using random test problems and our implementation. These performance results, to the best of our knowledge, are the first available for the Van Slyke and Wets algorithm on a parallel processor. They indicate that the benchmark implementation parallelizes well, and that even with the use of parallel processing, problems with random variables having large numbers of realizations can take prohibitively large amounts of computation for solution. Thus, they demonstrate the need for exploiting both parallelization and approximation for the solution of stochastic programs. 15 refs., 18 tabs.

  11. A preliminary numerical evaluation of a parallel algorithm for approximating the values and subgradients of the recourse function in a stochastic program with complete recourse

    SciTech Connect

    Lessor, K.S.

    1988-08-26

    The parallel algorithm of Ariyawansa, Sorensen, and Wets for approximating the values and subgradients of the recourse function in a stochastic program with complete recourse is implemented and timing results are reported for limited experimental trials. 14 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Finding Optimal Gains In Linear-Quadratic Control Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical method based on Volterra factorization leads to new approximations for optimal control gains in finite-time linear-quadratic control problem of system having infinite number of dimensions. Circumvents need to analyze and solve Riccati equations and provides more transparent connection between dynamics of system and optimal gain.

  13. Analysis of Quadratic Diophantine Equations with Fibonacci Number Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyendekkers, J. V.; Shannon, A. G.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis is made of the role of Fibonacci numbers in some quadratic Diophantine equations. A general solution is obtained for finding factors in sums of Fibonacci numbers. Interpretation of the results is facilitated by the use of a modular ring which also permits extension of the analysis.

  14. Tuning a fuzzy controller using quadratic response surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Response surface methodology, an alternative method to traditional tuning of a fuzzy controller, is described. An example based on a simulated inverted pendulum 'plant' shows that with (only) 15 trial runs, the controller can be calibrated using a quadratic form to approximate the response surface.

  15. A Version of Quadratic Regression with Interpretable Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudeck, Robert; du Toit, Stephen H. C.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests an alternative form of the quadratic model that has the same expectation function of the original model but has the useful feature that its parameters are interpretable. Provides examples of a simple regression problem and a nonlinear mixed-effects model. (SLD)

  16. Confidence set interference with a prior quadratic bound. [in geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1989-01-01

    Neyman's (1937) theory of confidence sets is developed as a replacement for Bayesian interference (BI) and stochastic inversion (SI) when the prior information is a hard quadratic bound. It is recommended that BI and SI be replaced by confidence set interference (CSI) only in certain circumstances. The geomagnetic problem is used to illustrate the general theory of CSI.

  17. Quadratic Expressions by Means of "Summing All the Matchsticks"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierdien, M. Faaiz

    2012-01-01

    This note presents demonstrations of quadratic expressions that come about when particular problems are posed with respect to matchsticks that form regular triangles, squares, pentagons and so on. Usually when such "matchstick" problems are used as ways to foster algebraic thinking, the expressions for the number of matchstick quantities are…

  18. Visualising the Complex Roots of Quadratic Equations with Real Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of the general quadratic equation y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c (real a, b, c) are known to occur in the following sets: (i) real and distinct; (ii) real and coincident; and (iii) a complex conjugate pair. Case (iii), which provides the focus for this investigation, can only occur when the values of the real coefficients a, b, and c are…

  19. Selfsimilarity in a Class of Quadratic-Quasiperiodic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Masanobu; Odagaki, Takashi

    1993-04-01

    We prove that quasiperiodic chains associated with a class of quadratic irrational numbers have an inflation symmetry and can be generated from a regular chain by a hyperinflation. We devise the explicit method to find the hyperinflation symmetry and discuss the properties of such a class of quasiperiodic sequences.

  20. Unravelling Student Challenges with Quadratics: A Cognitive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna

    2007-01-01

    The author's secondary school mathematics students have often reported to her that quadratic relations are one of the most conceptually challenging aspects of the high school curriculum. From her own classroom experiences there seemed to be several aspects to the students' challenges. Many students, even in their early secondary education, have…

  1. A Unified Approach to Teaching Quadratic and Cubic Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, A. J. B.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a simple method for teaching the algebraic solution of cubic equations via completion of the cube. Shows that this method is readily accepted by students already familiar with completion of the square as a method for quadratic equations. (Author/KHR)

  2. Linking genetic algorithms with stochastic dynamic programming to the long-term operation of a multireservoir system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Cheng; Yuan, Lun-Chin; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a genetic algorithm-based stochastic dynamic programming (GA-based SDP) to cope with the dimensionality problem of a multiple-reservoir system. The joint long-term operation of a parallel reservoir system in the Feitsui and Shihmen reservoirs in northern Taiwan demonstrates the successful application of the proposed GA-based SDP model. Within the case study system it is believed that GA is a useful technique in supporting optimization. Though the employment of GA-based SDP may be time consuming as it proceeds through generation by generation, the model can overcome the "dimensionality curse" in searching solutions. Simulation results show Feitsui's surplus water can be utilized efficiently to fill Shihmen's deficit water without affecting Feitsui's main purpose as Taipei city's water supply. The optimal joint operation suggests that Feitsui, on average, can provide 650,000 m3/day and 920,000 m3/day to Shihmen during the wet season and dry season, respectively.

  3. Quadratic blind linear unmixing: A graphical user interface for tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Navarro, O; Campos-Delgado, D U; Arce-Santana, E R; Jo, Javier A

    2016-02-01

    Spectral unmixing is the process of breaking down data from a sample into its basic components and their abundances. Previous work has been focused on blind unmixing of multi-spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (m-FLIM) datasets under a linear mixture model and quadratic approximations. This method provides a fast linear decomposition and can work without a limitation in the maximum number of components or end-members. Hence this work presents an interactive software which implements our blind end-member and abundance extraction (BEAE) and quadratic blind linear unmixing (QBLU) algorithms in Matlab. The options and capabilities of our proposed software are described in detail. When the number of components is known, our software can estimate the constitutive end-members and their abundances. When no prior knowledge is available, the software can provide a completely blind solution to estimate the number of components, the end-members and their abundances. The characterization of three case studies validates the performance of the new software: ex-vivo human coronary arteries, human breast cancer cell samples, and in-vivo hamster oral mucosa. The software is freely available in a hosted webpage by one of the developing institutions, and allows the user a quick, easy-to-use and efficient tool for multi/hyper-spectral data decomposition. PMID:26589467

  4. Placement of cells: Theory and solution of a quadratic 0/1 optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismantel, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The placement problem by design of electronic chips is studied in the framework of very large scale integration. Methods for modeling placement are presented, such as min-cut heuristics, simulated annealing, and a continuous quadratic optimization method based on relaxation. The 'sea of cells' concept was chosen and a quadratic 0/1 optimization problem was described with a graph theory formulation. Variations of the problem and existence of polynomial, epsilon approximative algorithms were discussed. The problem was solved with heuristic decomposition method, with 16 locations for each cell and with 9 locations for each cell. A dynamic decomposition process was also described and a linear Lagrange relaxation solution was proposed. The clustering problem was introduced to reduce magnitude order of placement problem. The r-clustering polytope was presented from a polyhedral point of view. Several classes of facets were described by inequalities, which combine nodes and branches in the following cases: roof dual and disjuncted stars, roof dual and a tree, roof dual and a star, and roof dual and a branch.

  5. Quadratic Blind Linear Unmixing: A Graphical User Interface for Tissue Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Navarro, O.; Campos-Delgado, D.U.; Arce-Santana, E. R.; Jo, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral unmixing is the process of breaking down data from a sample into its basic components and their abundances. Previous work has been focused on blind unmixing of multi-spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (m-FLIM) datasets under a linear mixture model and quadratic approximations. This method provides a fast linear decomposition and can work without a limitation in the maximum number of components or end-members. Hence this work presents an interactive software which implements our blind end-member and abundance extraction (BEAE) and quadratic blind linear unmixing (QBLU) algorithms in Matlab. The options and capabilities of our proposed software are described in detail. When the number of components is known, our software can estimate the constitutive end-members and their abundances. When no prior knowledge is available, the software can provide a completely blind solution to estimate the number of components, the end-members and their abundances. The characterization of three case studies validates the performance of the new software: ex-vivo human coronary arteries, human breast cancer cell samples, and in-vivo hamster oral mucosa. The software is freely available in a hosted webpage by one of the developing institutions, and allows the user a quick, easy-to-use and efficient tool for multi/hyper-spectral data decomposition. PMID:26589467

  6. On the cost of approximating and recognizing a noise perturbed straight line or a quadratic curve segment in the plane. [central processing units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. B.; Yalabik, N.

    1975-01-01

    Approximation of noisy data in the plane by straight lines or elliptic or single-branch hyperbolic curve segments arises in pattern recognition, data compaction, and other problems. The efficient search for and approximation of data by such curves were examined. Recursive least-squares linear curve-fitting was used, and ellipses and hyperbolas are parameterized as quadratic functions in x and y. The error minimized by the algorithm is interpreted, and central processing unit (CPU) times for estimating parameters for fitting straight lines and quadratic curves were determined and compared. CPU time for data search was also determined for the case of straight line fitting. Quadratic curve fitting is shown to require about six times as much CPU time as does straight line fitting, and curves relating CPU time and fitting error were determined for straight line fitting. Results are derived on early sequential determination of whether or not the underlying curve is a straight line.

  7. A user oriented microcomputer facility for designing linear quadratic Gaussian feedback compensators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, P. K.; Wahid, J.; Johnson, T. L.; Ward, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A laboratory design facility for digital microprocessor implementation of linear-quadratic-Gaussian feedback compensators is described. Outputs from user interactive programs for solving infinite time horizon LQ regulator and Kalman filter problems were conditioned for implementation on the laboratory microcomputer system. The software consisted of two parts: an offline high-level program for solving the LQ Ricatti equations and generating associated feedback and filter gains and a cross compiler/macro assembler which generates object code for the target microprocessor system. A PDP 11/70 with a UNIX operating system was used for all high level program and data management, and the target microprocessor system is an Intel MDS (8080-based processor). Application to the control of a two dimensional inverted pendulum is presented and issues in expanding the design/prototyping system to other target machine architectures are discussed.

  8. On the convergence of inexact Uzawa algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Welfert, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    The author considers the solution of symmetric indefinite systems which can be cast in matrix block form, where diagonal blocks A and C are symmetric positive definite and semi-definite, respectively. Systems of this type arise frequently in quadratic minimization problems, as well as mixed finite element discretizations of fluid flow equation. The author uses the Uzawa algorithm to precondition the matrix equations.

  9. A new algorithm for L2 optimal model reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, J. T.; Milman, M. H.; Mingori, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the quadratically optimal model reduction problem for single-input, single-output systems is considered. The reduced order model is determined by minimizing the integral of the magnitude-squared of the transfer function error. It is shown that the numerator coefficients of the optimal approximant satisfy a weighted least squares problem and, on this basis, a two-step iterative algorithm is developed combining a least squares solver with a gradient minimizer. Convergence of the proposed algorithm to stationary values of the quadratic cost function is proved. The formulation is extended to handle the frequency-weighted optimal model reduction problem. Three examples demonstrate the optimization algorithm.

  10. Internal combustion engine control for series hybrid electric vehicles by parallel and distributed genetic programming/multiobjective genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin, D.; Stewart, P.; Stewart, J.

    2011-02-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining a stable rectified DC output from the three-phase AC generator in a series-hybrid vehicle powertrain. The series-hybrid prime power source generally comprises an internal combustion (IC) engine driving a three-phase permanent magnet generator whose output is rectified to DC. A recent development has been to control the engine/generator combination by an electronically actuated throttle. This system can be represented as a nonlinear system with significant time delay. Previously, voltage control of the generator output has been achieved by model predictive methods such as the Smith Predictor. These methods rely on the incorporation of an accurate system model and time delay into the control algorithm, with a consequent increase in computational complexity in the real-time controller, and as a necessity relies to some extent on the accuracy of the models. Two complementary performance objectives exist for the control system. Firstly, to maintain the IC engine at its optimal operating point, and secondly, to supply a stable DC supply to the traction drive inverters. Achievement of these goals minimises the transient energy storage requirements at the DC link, with a consequent reduction in both weight and cost. These objectives imply constant velocity operation of the IC engine under external load disturbances and changes in both operating conditions and vehicle speed set-points. In order to achieve these objectives, and reduce the complexity of implementation, in this article a controller is designed by the use of Genetic Programming methods in the Simulink modelling environment, with the aim of obtaining a relatively simple controller for the time-delay system which does not rely on the implementation of real time system models or time delay approximations in the controller. A methodology is presented to utilise the miriad of existing control blocks in the Simulink libraries to automatically evolve optimal control

  11. FIBER OPTIC POINT QUADRAT SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED ACCURACY IN VEGETATION SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automated, fiber optic point quadrat system for vegetation sampling is described. Because the effective point diameter of the system never exceeds 25um it minimizes the substantial errors which can arise with conventional point quadrats. Automatic contact detection eliminates ...

  12. Fast and accurate computation of two-dimensional non-separable quadratic-phase integrals.

    PubMed

    Koç, Aykut; Ozaktas, Haldun M; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2010-06-01

    We report a fast and accurate algorithm for numerical computation of two-dimensional non-separable linear canonical transforms (2D-NS-LCTs). Also known as quadratic-phase integrals, this class of integral transforms represents a broad class of optical systems including Fresnel propagation in free space, propagation in graded-index media, passage through thin lenses, and arbitrary concatenations of any number of these, including anamorphic/astigmatic/non-orthogonal cases. The general two-dimensional non-separable case poses several challenges which do not exist in the one-dimensional case and the separable two-dimensional case. The algorithm takes approximately N log N time, where N is the two-dimensional space-bandwidth product of the signal. Our method properly tracks and controls the space-bandwidth products in two dimensions, in order to achieve information theoretically sufficient, but not wastefully redundant, sampling required for the reconstruction of the underlying continuous functions at any stage of the algorithm. Additionally, we provide an alternative definition of general 2D-NS-LCTs that shows its kernel explicitly in terms of its ten parameters, and relate these parameters bidirectionally to conventional ABCD matrix parameters. PMID:20508697

  13. Quadratic nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nakao; Naumkin, Pavel I.

    2012-10-01

    We study the initial value problem for the quadratic nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation vtt + v - vxx = λv2, t ∈ R, x ∈ R, with initial conditions v(0, x) = v0(x), vt(0, x) = v1(x), x ∈ R, where v0 and v1 are real-valued functions, λ ∈ R. Using the method of normal forms of Shatah ["Normal forms and quadratic nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations," Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 38, 685-696 (1985)], we obtain a sharp asymptotic behavior of small solutions without the condition of a compact support on the initial data, which was assumed in the previous work of J.-M. Delort ["Existence globale et comportement asymptotique pour l'équation de Klein-Gordon quasi-linéaire á données petites en dimension 1," Ann. Sci. Ec. Normale Super. 34(4), 1-61 (2001)].

  14. Generalized Kaluza-Klein monopole, quadratic algebras and ladder operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquette, Ian

    2011-06-01

    We present a generalized Kaluza-Klein monopole system. We solve this quantum superintegrable system on a Euclidean Taub Nut manifold using the separation of variables of the corresponding Schrödinger equation in spherical and parabolic coordinates. We present the integrals of motion of this system, the quadratic algebra generated by these integrals, the realization in terms of a deformed oscillator algebra using the Daskaloyannis construction and the energy spectrum. The structure constants and the Casimir operator are functions not only of the Hamiltonian but also of other two integrals commuting with all generators of the quadratic algebra and forming an Abelian subalgebra. We present another algebraic derivation of the energy spectrum of this system using the factorization method and ladder operators.

  15. Exploring {{W}}_{∞ } in the quadratic basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Tomáš

    2015-09-01

    We study the operator product expansions in the chiral algebra {W}_{∞ } , first using the associativity conditions in the basis of primary generating fields and then using a different basis coming from the free field representation in which the OPE takes a simpler quadratic form. The results in the quadratic basis can be compactly written using certain bilocal combinations of the generating fields and we conjecture a closed-form expression for the complete OPE in this basis. Next we show that the commutation relations as well as correlation functions can be easily computed using properties of these bilocal fields. In the last part we verify the consistency with results derived previously by studying minimal models of {W}_{∞ } and comparing them to known reductions of {W}_{∞ } to {W}_N . The results we obtain illustrate nicely the role of triality symmetry in the representation theory of {W}_{∞ }.

  16. Quantum integrals of motion for variable quadratic Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero-Soto, Ricardo; Suazo, Erwin; Suslov, Sergei K.

    2010-09-15

    We construct integrals of motion for several models of the quantum damped oscillators in a framework of a general approach to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation with variable quadratic Hamiltonians. An extension of the Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant is given. The time-evolution of the expectation values of the energy-related positive operators is determined for the oscillators under consideration. A proof of uniqueness of the corresponding Cauchy initial value problem is discussed as an application.

  17. Discrete quadratic solitons with competing second-harmonic components

    SciTech Connect

    Setzpfandt, Frank; Pertsch, Thomas; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    2011-11-15

    We describe families of discrete solitons in quadratic waveguide arrays supported by competing cascaded nonlinear interactions between one fundamental and two second-harmonic modes. We characterize the existence, stability, and excitation dynamics of these solitons and show that their features may resemble those of solitons in saturable media. Our results also demonstrate that a power threshold may appear for soliton formation, leading to a suppression of beam self-focusing which explains recent experimental observations.

  18. Construction of Lagrangian Local Symmetries for General Quadratic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriglazov, A. A.

    We propose a procedure which allows one to construct local symmetry generators of general quadratic Lagrangian theory. Manifest recurrence relations for generators in terms of the so-called structure matrices of the Dirac formalism are obtained. The procedure fulfill in terms of initial variables of the theory, and does not imply either separation of constraints on first and second class subsets or any other choice of basis for constraints.

  19. Design of Linear Quadratic Regulators and Kalman Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L.

    1986-01-01

    AESOP solves problems associated with design of controls and state estimators for linear time-invariant systems. Systems considered are modeled in state-variable form by set of linear differential and algebraic equations with constant coefficients. Two key problems solved by AESOP are linear quadratic regulator (LQR) design problem and steady-state Kalman filter design problem. AESOP is interactive. User solves design problems and analyzes solutions in single interactive session. Both numerical and graphical information available to user during the session.

  20. Observers for Systems with Nonlinearities Satisfying an Incremental Quadratic Inequality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Ahmet Behcet; Corless, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We consider the problem of state estimation for nonlinear time-varying systems whose nonlinearities satisfy an incremental quadratic inequality. These observer results unifies earlier results in the literature; and extend it to some additional classes of nonlinearities. Observers are presented which guarantee that the state estimation error exponentially converges to zero. Observer design involves solving linear matrix inequalities for the observer gain matrices. Results are illustrated by application to a simple model of an underwater.

  1. NASA team algorithm for sea ice concentration retrieval from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager - Comparison with Landsat satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, Axel

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the validation of the the NASA team algorithm for the determination of sea ice concentrations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I). A total of 28 cloud-free Landsat scenes were selected to permit validation of the passive microwave ice concentration algorithm for a range of ice concentrations and ice types. The sensitivity of the NASA team algorithm to the selection of locally and seasonally adjusted algorithm parameters is discussed. Mean absolute differences between SSM/I and Landsat ice concentrations are within 1 percent during fall using local and global tie points (standard deviations of the difference are +/-3.1 and +/-6.2 percent, respectively). In areas with greater amounts of nilas and young ice, the NASA team algorithm was found to underestimate ice concentrations by as much as 9 percent. It is inferred that the standard deviation between SSM/I and Landsat ice concentrations decreases from +/-7 to +/-5 percent with local tie points compared to the global ones for spring and fall.

  2. Managing Algorithmic Skeleton Nesting Requirements in Realistic Image Processing Applications: The Case of the SKiPPER-II Parallel Programming Environment's Operating Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudarcher, Rémi; Duculty, Florent; Serot, Jocelyn; Jurie, Frédéric; Derutin, Jean-Pierre; Dhome, Michel

    2005-12-01

    SKiPPER is a SKeleton-based Parallel Programming EnviRonment being developed since 1996 and running at LASMEA Laboratory, the Blaise-Pascal University, France. The main goal of the project was to demonstrate the applicability of skeleton-based parallel programming techniques to the fast prototyping of reactive vision applications. This paper deals with the special features embedded in the latest version of the project: algorithmic skeleton nesting capabilities and a fully dynamic operating model. Throughout the case study of a complete and realistic image processing application, in which we have pointed out the requirement for skeleton nesting, we are presenting the operating model of this feature. The work described here is one of the few reported experiments showing the application of skeleton nesting facilities for the parallelisation of a realistic application, especially in the area of image processing. The image processing application we have chosen is a 3D face-tracking algorithm from appearance.

  3. Quadratic mutual information for dimensionality reduction and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David M.; Principe, José C.

    2010-04-01

    A research area based on the application of information theory to machine learning has attracted considerable interest in the last few years. This research area has been coined information-theoretic learning within the community. In this paper we apply elements of information-theoretic learning to the problem of automatic target recognition (ATR). A number of researchers have previously shown the benefits of designing classifiers based on maximizing the mutual information between the class data and the class labels. Following prior research in information-theoretic learning, in the current results we show that quadratic mutual information, derived using a special case of the more general Renyi's entropy, can be used for classifier design. In this implementation, a simple subspace projection classifier is formulated to find the optimal projection weights such that the quadratic mutual information between the class data and the class labels is maximized. This subspace projection accomplishes a dimensionality reduction of the raw data set wherein information about the class membership is retained while irrelevant information is discarded. A subspace projection based on this criterion preserves as much class discriminability as possible within the subspace. For this paper, laser radar images are used to demonstrate the results. Classification performance against this data set is compared for a gradient descent MLP classifier and a quadratic mutual information MLP classifier.

  4. Measurement of quadratic electrogyration effect in castor oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebski, Marek; Ledzion, Rafał; Górski, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a detailed analysis of electrogyration measurement in liquids with the usage of an optical polarimetric technique. Theoretical analysis of the optical response to an applied electric field is illustrated by experimental data for castor oil which exhibits natural optical activity, quadratic electro-optic effect and quadratic electrogyration effect. Moreover, the experimental data show that interaction of the oil with a pair of flat electrodes induces a significant dichroism and natural linear birefringence. The combination of these effects occurring at the same time complicates the procedure of measurements. It has been found that a single measurement is insufficient to separate the contribution of the electrogyration effect, but it is possible on the basis of several measurements performed with various orientations of the polarizer and the analyser. The obtained average values of the quadratic electrogyration coefficient β13 in castor oil at room temperature are from - 0.92 ×10-22 to - 1.44 ×10-22m2V-2 depending on the origin of the oil. Although this study is focused on measurements in castor oil, the presented analysis is much more general.

  5. Algorithm For Optimal Control Of Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Garba, John A..; Utku, Senol

    1989-01-01

    Cost of computation appears competitive with other methods. Problem to compute optimal control of forced response of structure with n degrees of freedom identified in terms of smaller number, r, of vibrational modes. Article begins with Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of mechanics and use of quadratic cost functional. Complexity reduced by alternative approach in which quadratic cost functional expressed in terms of control variables only. Leads to iterative solution of second-order time-integral matrix Volterra equation of second kind containing optimal control vector. Cost of algorithm, measured in terms of number of computations required, is of order of, or less than, cost of prior algoritms applied to similar problems.

  6. Interactive application of quadratic expansion of chi-square statistic to nonlinear curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Everhart, Joel L.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains a detailed theoretical description of an all-purpose, interactive curve-fitting routine that is based on P. R. Bevington's description of the quadratic expansion of the Chi-Square statistic. The method is implemented in the associated interactive, graphics-based computer program. Taylor's expansion of Chi-Square is first introduced, and justifications for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations is derived, then solved by matrix algebra. A brief description of the code is presented along with a limited number of changes that are required to customize the program of a particular task. To evaluate the performance of the method and the goodness of nonlinear curve fitting, two typical engineering problems are examined and the graphical and tabular output of each is discussed. A complete listing of the entire package is included as an appendix.

  7. ACCEPT: a three-dimensional finite element program for large deformation elastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized tubes (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutula, D.N.; Wiancko, B.E.

    1980-03-01

    ACCEPT is a three-dimensional finite element computer program for analysis of large-deformation elastic-plastic-creep response of Zircaloy tubes subjected to temperature, surface pressures, and axial force. A twenty-mode, tri-quadratic, isoparametric element is used along with a Zircaloy materials model. A linear time-incremental procedure with residual force correction is used to solve for the time-dependent response. The program features an algorithm which automatically chooses the time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution. A contact-separation capability allows modeling of interaction of reactor fuel rod cladding with fuel pellets or external supports.

  8. On collinear scaling algorithms that extend quasi-Newton methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyawansa, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    Quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained minimization are based on local affine scalings of the domain, and local quadratic approximations to the objective function that interpolate the gradient. Quasi-Newton algorithms have finite termination on quadratic functions, and are invariant under affine scalings. In 1980, Davidon presented a new class of algorithms for unconstrained minimization based on local collinear scalings of the domain, and local conic approximations to the objective function that interpolate both the gradient and function value. We refer to these algorithms as Davidon`s collinear scaling algorithms. Collinear scalings and conic functions generalize affine scalings and quadratic functions respectively, and therefore collinear scaling algorithms extend quasi-Newton algorithms. Davidon`s collinear scaling algorithms have finite termination on conic functions, and are invariant under collinear scalings. In this talk, we present a new derivation of Davidon`s collinear scaling algorithms. It indicates that collinear scaling algorithms extending quasi-Newton methods studied to date are different from those of Davidon. It also explains why it has not been possible to demonstrate that these other collinear scaling algorithms have finite termination on conic functions, and are invariant under collinear scalings.

  9. MOEPGA: A novel method to detect protein complexes in yeast protein-protein interaction networks based on MultiObjective Evolutionary Programming Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cao, Buwen; Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Shulin; Song, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The identification of protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has greatly advanced our understanding of biological organisms. Existing computational methods to detect protein complexes are usually based on specific network topological properties of PPI networks. However, due to the inherent complexity of the network structures, the identification of protein complexes may not be fully addressed by using single network topological property. In this study, we propose a novel MultiObjective Evolutionary Programming Genetic Algorithm (MOEPGA) which integrates multiple network topological features to detect biologically meaningful protein complexes. Our approach first systematically analyzes the multiobjective problem in terms of identifying protein complexes from PPI networks, and then constructs the objective function of the iterative algorithm based on three common topological properties of protein complexes from the benchmark dataset, finally we describe our algorithm, which mainly consists of three steps, population initialization, subgraph mutation and subgraph selection operation. To show the utility of our method, we compared MOEPGA with several state-of-the-art algorithms on two yeast PPI datasets. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method can not only find more protein complexes but also achieve higher accuracy in terms of fscore. Moreover, our approach can cover a certain number of proteins in the input PPI network in terms of the normalized clustering score. Taken together, our method can serve as a powerful framework to detect protein complexes in yeast PPI networks, thereby facilitating the identification of the underlying biological functions. PMID:26298638

  10. Mass Conservation and Positivity Preservation with Ensemble-type Kalman Filter Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janjic, Tijana; McLaughlin, Dennis B.; Cohn, Stephen E.; Verlaan, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining conservative physical laws numerically has long been recognized as being important in the development of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In the broader context of data assimilation, concerted efforts to maintain conservation laws numerically and to understand the significance of doing so have begun only recently. In order to enforce physically based conservation laws of total mass and positivity in the ensemble Kalman filter, we incorporate constraints to ensure that the filter ensemble members and the ensemble mean conserve mass and remain nonnegative through measurement updates. We show that the analysis steps of ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) algorithm and ensemble Kalman filter algorithm (EnKF) can conserve the mass integral, but do not preserve positivity. Further, if localization is applied or if negative values are simply set to zero, then the total mass is not conserved either. In order to ensure mass conservation, a projection matrix that corrects for localization effects is constructed. In order to maintain both mass conservation and positivity preservation through the analysis step, we construct a data assimilation algorithms based on quadratic programming and ensemble Kalman filtering. Mass and positivity are both preserved by formulating the filter update as a set of quadratic programming problems that incorporate constraints. Some simple numerical experiments indicate that this approach can have a significant positive impact on the posterior ensemble distribution, giving results that are more physically plausible both for individual ensemble members and for the ensemble mean. The results show clear improvements in both analyses and forecasts, particularly in the presence of localized features. Behavior of the algorithm is also tested in presence of model error.

  11. Mass Conservation and Positivity Preservation with Ensemble-type Kalman Filter Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Tijana; McLaughlin, Dennis B.; Cohn, Stephen E.; Verlaan, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Maintaining conservative physical laws numerically has long been recognized as being important in the development of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In the broader context of data assimilation, concerted efforts to maintain conservation laws numerically and to understand the significance of doing so have begun only recently. In order to enforce physically based conservation laws of total mass and positivity in the ensemble Kalman filter, we incorporate constraints to ensure that the filter ensemble members and the ensemble mean conserve mass and remain nonnegative through measurement updates. We show that the analysis steps of ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) algorithm and ensemble Kalman filter algorithm (EnKF) can conserve the mass integral, but do not preserve positivity. Further, if localization is applied or if negative values are simply set to zero, then the total mass is not conserved either. In order to ensure mass conservation, a projection matrix that corrects for localization effects is constructed. In order to maintain both mass conservation and positivity preservation through the analysis step, we construct a data assimilation algorithm based on quadratic programming and ensemble Kalman filtering. Mass and positivity are both preserved by formulating the filter update as a set of quadratic programming problems that incorporate constraints. Some simple numerical experiments indicate that this approach can have a significant positive impact on the posterior ensemble distribution, giving results that are more physically plausible both for individual ensemble members and for the ensemble mean. The results show clear improvements in both analyses and forecasts, particularly in the presence of localized features. Behavior of the algorithm is also tested in presence of model error.

  12. ORACLS: A system for linear-quadratic-Gaussian control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    A modern control theory design package (ORACLS) for constructing controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear time-invariant differential or difference equations is described. Numerical linear-algebra procedures are used to implement the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) methodology of modern control theory. Algorithms are included for computing eigensystems of real matrices, the relative stability of a matrix, factored forms for nonnegative definite matrices, the solutions and least squares approximations to the solutions of certain linear matrix algebraic equations, the controllability properties of a linear time-invariant system, and the steady state covariance matrix of an open-loop stable system forced by white noise. Subroutines are provided for solving both the continuous and discrete optimal linear regulator problems with noise free measurements and the sampled-data optimal linear regulator problem. For measurement noise, duality theory and the optimal regulator algorithms are used to solve the continuous and discrete Kalman-Bucy filter problems. Subroutines are also included which give control laws causing the output of a system to track the output of a prescribed model.

  13. Method for optimizing channelized quadratic observers for binary classification of large-dimensional image datasets

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, M. K.; Clarkson, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for channelized quadratic observers (CQO) that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. The method for calculating channels is applicable in general and optimal for Gaussian distributed image data. Gradient-based algorithms for determining the channels are presented for five different information-based figures of merit (FOMs). Analytic solutions for the optimum channels for each of the five FOMs are derived for the case of equal mean data for both classes. The optimum channels for three of the FOMs under the equal mean condition are shown to be the same. This result is critical since some of the FOMs are much easier to compute. Implementing the CQO requires a set of channels and the first- and second-order statistics of channelized image data from both classes. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of CQO since estimating image statistics from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. In a simulation study we compare the performance of ideal and Hotelling observers to CQO. The optimal CQO channels are calculated using both eigenanalysis and a new gradient-based algorithm for maximizing Jeffrey's divergence (J). Optimal channel selection without eigenanalysis makes the J-CQO on large-dimensional image data feasible. PMID:26366764

  14. Meta-Heuristic Combining Prior Online and Offline Information for the Quadratic Assignment Problem.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Qingfu; Yao, Xin

    2014-03-01

    The construction of promising solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems (COPs) in meta-heuristics is usually based on three types of information, namely a priori information, a posteriori information learned from visited solutions during the search procedure, and online information collected in the solution construction process. Prior information reflects our domain knowledge about the COPs. Extensive domain knowledge can surely make the search effective, yet it is not always available. Posterior information could guide the meta-heuristics to globally explore promising search areas, but it lacks local guidance capability. On the contrary, online information can capture local structures, and its application can help exploit the search space. In this paper, we studied the effects of using this information on metaheuristic's algorithmic performances for the COPs. The study was illustrated by a set of heuristic algorithms developed for the quadratic assignment problem. We first proposed an improved scheme to extract online local information, then developed a unified framework under which all types of information can be combined readily. Finally, we studied the benefits of the three types of information to meta-heuristics. Conclusions were drawn from the comprehensive study, which can be used as principles to guide the design of effective meta-heuristic in the future. PMID:23757559

  15. Analysis of electroperforated materials using the quadrat counts method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, E.; Garzón, C.; Martínez-Cisneros, C.; Alonso, J.; García-García, J.

    2011-06-01

    The electroperforation distribution in thin porous materials is investigated using the quadrat counts method (QCM), a classical statistical technique aimed to evaluate the deviation from complete spatial randomness (CSR). Perforations are created by means of electrical discharges generated by needle-like tungsten electrodes. The objective of perforating a thin porous material is to enhance its air permeability, a critical issue in many industrial applications involving paper, plastics, textiles, etc. Using image analysis techniques and specialized statistical software it is shown that the perforation locations follow, beyond a certain length scale, a homogeneous 2D Poisson distribution.

  16. Reaction Wheel Control Design Using Linear Quadratic Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nubli Muhamad, Nur; Susanto, Erwin; Syihabuddin, Budi; Prasetya Dwi Wibawa, Ig.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the design of active attitude control system of a nanosatellite in a single axis. In this paper, we consider dc motor based reaction wheel as an actuator, because of its pointing accuracy. However, the power consumption of the dc motor is often relatively large and needed to be optimized. Linear quadratic controller is supposed to have an ability to minimize power consumption and able to enhance the system performance. To show the advantage of this method, simulation result of attitude response, state trajectory, and trajectory of DC motor voltage are presented.

  17. Rigorous performance bounds for quadratic and nested dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuhou; Uhrig, Goetz S.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-12-15

    We present rigorous performance bounds for the quadratic dynamical decoupling pulse sequence which protects a qubit from general decoherence, and for its nested generalization to an arbitrary number of qubits. Our bounds apply under the assumptions of instantaneous pulses and of bounded perturbing environment and qubit-environment Hamiltonians such as those realized by baths of nuclear spins in quantum dots. We prove that if the total sequence time is fixed then the trace-norm distance between the unperturbed and protected system states can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the number of applied pulses.

  18. Frontogenesis driven by horizontally quadratic distributions of density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the quadratic density distribution in a channel, which has been established by Simpson and Linden to be the simplest case of the horizontally nonlinear distribution of fluid density required for the production of frontogenesis. The porous-media and Boussinesq flow models are examined, and their evolution equations are reduced to one-dimensional systems. While both the porous-media and the inviscid/nondiffusive Boussinesq systems exhibit classic frontogenesis behavior, the viscous Boussinesq system exhibits a more complex behavior: boundary-layer effects force frontogenesis away from the lower boundary, and at late times the steepest density gradients are close to mid-channel.

  19. Cyclicity of a fake saddle inside the quadratic vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Maesschalck, P.; Rebollo-Perdomo, S.; Torregrosa, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns the study of small-amplitude limit cycles that appear in the phase portrait near an unfolded fake saddle singularity. This degenerate singularity is also known as an impassable grain. The canonical form of the unperturbed vector field is like a degenerate flow box. Near the singularity, the phase portrait consists of parallel fibers, all but one of which have no singular points, and at the singular fiber, there is one node. We demonstrate different techniques in order to show that the cyclicity is bigger than or equal to two when the canonical form is quadratic.

  20. Quadratic integrand double-hybrid made spin-component-scaled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémond, Éric; Savarese, Marika; Sancho-García, Juan C.; Pérez-Jiménez, Ángel J.; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    We propose two analytical expressions aiming to rationalize the spin-component-scaled (SCS) and spin-opposite-scaled (SOS) schemes for double-hybrid exchange-correlation density-functionals. Their performances are extensively tested within the framework of the nonempirical quadratic integrand double-hybrid (QIDH) model on energetic properties included into the very large GMTKN30 benchmark database, and on structural properties of semirigid medium-sized organic compounds. The SOS variant is revealed as a less computationally demanding alternative to reach the accuracy of the original QIDH model without losing any theoretical background.

  1. On a quadratic transformation due to Kummer and its generalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhawat, Nidhi; Rathie, Arjun K.; Prakash, Om

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to obtain explicit expressions of (1-x ) -a2F1[a ,b 2 b +j ; -2/x 1 -x ] for j = 0, ±1,…, ±9. For j = 0, we have a well-known quadratic transformations formula of Kummer. The results are obtained by using the known hypergeometric identities available in the literature. Several known results obtained earlier by Kim, et al. follow special cases of our main findings. The results derived in this paper are simple, interesting and potentially useful in the applicable sciences.

  2. Quadratic Interaction Functional for General Systems of Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Stefano; Modena, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    For the Glimm scheme approximation to the solution of the system of conservation laws in one space dimension with initial data u 0 with small total variation, we prove a quadratic (w.r.t. Tot. Var. ( u 0)) interaction estimate, which has been used in the literature for stability and convergence results. No assumptions on the structure of the flux f are made (apart from smoothness), and this estimate is the natural extension of the Glimm type interaction estimate for genuinely nonlinear systems. More precisely, we obtain the following results: a new analysis of the interaction estimates of simple waves;

  3. Multivariable quadratic synthesis of an advanced turbofan engine controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehoff, R. L.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A digital controller for an advanced turbofan engine utilizing multivariate feedback is described. The theoretical background of locally linearized control synthesis is reviewed briefly. The application of linear quadratic regulator techniques to the practical control problem is presented. The design procedure has been applied to the F100 turbofan engine, and details of the structure of this system are explained. Selected results from simulations of the engine and controller are utilized to illustrate the operation of the system. It is shown that the general multivariable design procedure will produce practical and implementable controllers for modern, high-performance turbine engines.

  4. Generic Optimization Program User Manual Version 3.0.0

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    2009-05-11

    GenOpt is an optimization program for the minimization of a cost function that is evaluated by an external simulation program. It has been developed for optimization problems where the cost function is computationally expensive and its derivatives are not available or may not even exist. GenOpt can be coupled to any simulation program that reads its input from text files and writes its output to text files. The independent variables can be continuous variables (possibly with lower and upper bounds), discrete variables, or both, continuous and discrete variables. Constraints on dependent variables can be implemented using penalty or barrier functions. GenOpt uses parallel computing to evaluate the simulations. GenOpt has a library with local and global multi-dimensional and one-dimensional optimization algorithms, and algorithms for doing parametric runs. An algorithm interface allows adding new minimization algorithms without knowing the details of the program structure. GenOpt is written in Java so that it is platform independent. The platform independence and the general interface make GenOpt applicable to a wide range of optimization problems. GenOpt has not been designed for linear programming problems, quadratic programming problems, and problems where the gradient of the cost function is available. For such problems, as well as for other problems, special tailored software exists that is more efficient.

  5. A Generalized National Planning Approach for Admission Capacity in Higher Education: A Nonlinear Integer Goal Programming Model with a Novel Differential Evolution Algorithm.

    PubMed

    El-Qulity, Said Ali; Mohamed, Ali Wagdy

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonlinear integer goal programming model (NIGPM) for solving the general problem of admission capacity planning in a country as a whole. The work aims to satisfy most of the required key objectives of a country related to the enrollment problem for higher education. The system general outlines are developed along with the solution methodology for application to the time horizon in a given plan. The up-to-date data for Saudi Arabia is used as a case study and a novel evolutionary algorithm based on modified differential evolution (DE) algorithm is used to solve the complexity of the NIGPM generated for different goal priorities. The experimental results presented in this paper show their effectiveness in solving the admission capacity for higher education in terms of final solution quality and robustness. PMID:26819583

  6. A Generalized National Planning Approach for Admission Capacity in Higher Education: A Nonlinear Integer Goal Programming Model with a Novel Differential Evolution Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    El-Qulity, Said Ali; Mohamed, Ali Wagdy

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonlinear integer goal programming model (NIGPM) for solving the general problem of admission capacity planning in a country as a whole. The work aims to satisfy most of the required key objectives of a country related to the enrollment problem for higher education. The system general outlines are developed along with the solution methodology for application to the time horizon in a given plan. The up-to-date data for Saudi Arabia is used as a case study and a novel evolutionary algorithm based on modified differential evolution (DE) algorithm is used to solve the complexity of the NIGPM generated for different goal priorities. The experimental results presented in this paper show their effectiveness in solving the admission capacity for higher education in terms of final solution quality and robustness. PMID:26819583

  7. Verifying a Computer Algorithm Mathematically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Alton T.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an example of mathematics from an algorithmic point of view, with emphasis on the design and verification of this algorithm. The program involves finding roots for algebraic equations using the half-interval search algorithm. The program listing is included. (JN)

  8. Singular linear-quadratic control problem for systems with linear delay

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.

    2013-12-18

    A singular linear-quadratic optimization problem on the trajectories of non-autonomous linear differential equations with linear delay is considered. The peculiarity of this problem is the fact that this problem has no solution in the class of integrable controls. To ensure the existence of solutions is required to expand the class of controls including controls with impulse components. Dynamical systems with linear delay are used to describe the motion of pantograph from the current collector with electric traction, biology, etc. It should be noted that for practical problems fact singularity criterion of quality is quite commonly occurring, and therefore the study of these problems is surely important. For the problem under discussion optimal programming control contained impulse components at the initial and final moments of time is constructed under certain assumptions on the functional and the right side of the control system.

  9. Quadratic Reciprocity and the Group Orders of Particle States

    SciTech Connect

    DAI,YANG; BORISOV,ALEXEY B.; LONGWORTH,JAMES W.; BOYER,KEITH; RHODES,CHARLES K.

    2001-06-01

    The construction of inverse states in a finite field F{sub P{sub P{alpha}}} enables the organization of the mass scale by associating particle states with residue class designations. With the assumption of perfect flatness ({Omega}total = 1.0), this approach leads to the derivation of a cosmic seesaw congruence which unifies the concepts of space and mass. The law of quadratic reciprocity profoundly constrains the subgroup structure of the multiplicative group of units F{sub P{sub {alpha}}}* defined by the field. Four specific outcomes of this organization are (1) a reduction in the computational complexity of the mass state distribution by a factor of {approximately}10{sup 30}, (2) the extension of the genetic divisor concept to the classification of subgroup orders, (3) the derivation of a simple numerical test for any prospective mass number based on the order of the integer, and (4) the identification of direct biological analogies to taxonomy and regulatory networks characteristic of cellular metabolism, tumor suppression, immunology, and evolution. It is generally concluded that the organizing principle legislated by the alliance of quadratic reciprocity with the cosmic seesaw creates a universal optimized structure that functions in the regulation of a broad range of complex phenomena.

  10. An Instability Index Theory for Quadratic Pencils and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronski, Jared; Johnson, Mathew A.; Kapitula, Todd

    2014-04-01

    Primarily motivated by the stability analysis of nonlinear waves in second-order in time Hamiltonian systems, in this paper we develop an instability index theory for quadratic operator pencils acting on a Hilbert space. In an extension of the known theory for linear pencils, explicit connections are made between the number of eigenvalues of a given quadratic operator pencil with positive real parts to spectral information about the individual operators comprising the coefficients of the spectral parameter in the pencil. As an application, we apply the general theory developed here to yield spectral and nonlinear stability/instability results for abstract second-order in time wave equations. More specifically, we consider the problem of the existence and stability of spatially periodic waves for the "good" Boussinesq equation. In the analysis our instability index theory provides an explicit, and somewhat surprising, connection between the stability of a given periodic traveling wave solution of the "good" Boussinesq equation and the stability of the same periodic profile, but with different wavespeed, in the nonlinear dynamics of a related generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation.

  11. QUADRATIC SERENDIPITY FINITE ELEMENTS ON POLYGONS USING GENERALIZED BARYCENTRIC COORDINATES.

    PubMed

    Rand, Alexander; Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a finite element construction for use on the class of convex, planar polygons and show it obtains a quadratic error convergence estimate. On a convex n-gon, our construction produces 2n basis functions, associated in a Lagrange-like fashion to each vertex and each edge midpoint, by transforming and combining a set of n(n + 1)/2 basis functions known to obtain quadratic convergence. The technique broadens the scope of the so-called 'serendipity' elements, previously studied only for quadrilateral and regular hexahedral meshes, by employing the theory of generalized barycentric coordinates. Uniform a priori error estimates are established over the class of convex quadrilaterals with bounded aspect ratio as well as over the class of convex planar polygons satisfying additional shape regularity conditions to exclude large interior angles and short edges. Numerical evidence is provided on a trapezoidal quadrilateral mesh, previously not amenable to serendipity constructions, and applications to adaptive meshing are discussed. PMID:25301974

  12. Confidence set inference with a prior quadratic bound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1989-01-01

    In the uniqueness part of a geophysical inverse problem, the observer wants to predict all likely values of P unknown numerical properties z=(z sub 1,...,z sub p) of the earth from measurement of D other numerical properties y (sup 0) = (y (sub 1) (sup 0), ..., y (sub D (sup 0)), using full or partial knowledge of the statistical distribution of the random errors in y (sup 0). The data space Y containing y(sup 0) is D-dimensional, so when the model space X is infinite-dimensional the linear uniqueness problem usually is insoluble without prior information about the correct earth model x. If that information is a quadratic bound on x, Bayesian inference (BI) and stochastic inversion (SI) inject spurious structure into x, implied by neither the data nor the quadratic bound. Confidence set inference (CSI) provides an alternative inversion technique free of this objection. Confidence set inference is illustrated in the problem of estimating the geomagnetic field B at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) from components of B measured on or above the earth's surface.

  13. Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Regulator Developed for a Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.

    2002-01-01

    Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control is a modern state-space technique for designing optimal dynamic regulators. It enables us to trade off regulation performance and control effort, and to take into account process and measurement noise. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed an LQG control for a fault-tolerant magnetic bearing suspension rig to optimize system performance and to reduce the sensor and processing noise. The LQG regulator consists of an optimal state-feedback gain and a Kalman state estimator. The first design step is to seek a state-feedback law that minimizes the cost function of regulation performance, which is measured by a quadratic performance criterion with user-specified weighting matrices, and to define the tradeoff between regulation performance and control effort. The next design step is to derive a state estimator using a Kalman filter because the optimal state feedback cannot be implemented without full state measurement. Since the Kalman filter is an optimal estimator when dealing with Gaussian white noise, it minimizes the asymptotic covariance of the estimation error.

  14. QUADRATIC SERENDIPITY FINITE ELEMENTS ON POLYGONS USING GENERALIZED BARYCENTRIC COORDINATES

    PubMed Central

    RAND, ALEXANDER; GILLETTE, ANDREW; BAJAJ, CHANDRAJIT

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a finite element construction for use on the class of convex, planar polygons and show it obtains a quadratic error convergence estimate. On a convex n-gon, our construction produces 2n basis functions, associated in a Lagrange-like fashion to each vertex and each edge midpoint, by transforming and combining a set of n(n + 1)/2 basis functions known to obtain quadratic convergence. The technique broadens the scope of the so-called ‘serendipity’ elements, previously studied only for quadrilateral and regular hexahedral meshes, by employing the theory of generalized barycentric coordinates. Uniform a priori error estimates are established over the class of convex quadrilaterals with bounded aspect ratio as well as over the class of convex planar polygons satisfying additional shape regularity conditions to exclude large interior angles and short edges. Numerical evidence is provided on a trapezoidal quadrilateral mesh, previously not amenable to serendipity constructions, and applications to adaptive meshing are discussed. PMID:25301974

  15. Hidden and Nonstandard Bifurcation Diagram of an Alternate Quadratic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, G.; Romera, M.; Danca, M.-F.; Martin, A.; Orue, A. B.; Montoya, F.; Encinas, L. Hernández

    Alternate quadratic systems A : xn+1 = 1 - axn2,if n is even 1 - a∗xn2,if n is odd andB : xn+1 = 1 - a∗xn2,if n is even 1 - axn2, if n is odd, where a and a∗ are different parameters, seem to be interval maps in a range of the parameter values. However, after a careful graphical analysis of their bifurcation diagrams we conclude that this is true only for system B, but not for system A. In system A we find a hidden and nonstandard bifurcation diagram (“hidden” because it is not visible at normal resolution and “nonstandard” because the bifurcation diagram is empty for some ranges of the parameter values). The different behavior of the underlying critical polynomial in the range of parameter values in both alternate quadratic systems explains why the hidden and nonstandard bifurcation diagram is present in system A and not in system B. The analysis of the Lyapunov exponent also shows both the existence and the different behavior of the hidden bifurcation diagram of system A.

  16. ORACLS - A modern control theory design package. [Optimal Regulator Algorithms for Control of Linear Systems computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program (ORACLS) for implementing the optimal regulator theory approach to the design of controllers for linear time-invariant systems is described. The user-oriented program employs the latest numerical techniques and is applicable to both the digital and continuous control problems.

  17. Measuring Students' Acceptance and Confidence in Algorithms and Programming: The Impact of Engagement with CS on Greek Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doukakis, Spyros; Giannakos, Michail N.; Koilias, Christos; Vlamos, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a questionnaire focused on investigating students' confidence and behavioral intention in the area of programming, particularly that of structures, problem solving, and programming commands (Conditional--Loop). Responses from 116 1st year students regarding informatics were used. The results indicate that the…

  18. Primal-dual interior point methods over quadratic, semidefinite and p-cones

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, I.

    1994-12-31

    It has been observed that some interior point algorithms for linear programming can be extended, in a sense step by step, to optimization problems over more general domains, such as the cone of positive semidefinite matrices and the so-called {open_quotes}ice cream{close_quotes} cone. Most of the algorithms that have been extended, however are mostly primal or dual algorithms. It turns out that analogous extensions of primal-dual methods are more challenging. We discuss such extensions and complexity issues related to such generalizations.

  19. Performance Trend of Different Algorithms for Structural Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Guptill, James D.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear programming algorithms play an important role in structural design optimization. Fortunately, several algorithms with computer codes are available. At NASA Lewis Research Center, a project was initiated to assess performance of different optimizers through the development of a computer code CometBoards. This paper summarizes the conclusions of that research. CometBoards was employed to solve sets of small, medium and large structural problems, using different optimizers on a Cray-YMP8E/8128 computer. The reliability and efficiency of the optimizers were determined from the performance of these problems. For small problems, the performance of most of the optimizers could be considered adequate. For large problems however, three optimizers (two sequential quadratic programming routines, DNCONG of IMSL and SQP of IDESIGN, along with the sequential unconstrained minimizations technique SUMT) outperformed others. At optimum, most optimizers captured an identical number of active displacement and frequency constraints but the number of active stress constraints differed among the optimizers. This discrepancy can be attributed to singularity conditions in the optimization and the alleviation of this discrepancy can improve the efficiency of optimizers.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Different Optimization Algorithms for Structural Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Guptill, James D.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    Non-linear programming algorithms play an important role in structural design optimization. Fortunately, several algorithms with computer codes are available. At NASA Lewis Research Centre, a project was initiated to assess the performance of eight different optimizers through the development of a computer code CometBoards. This paper summarizes the conclusions of that research. CometBoards was employed to solve sets of small, medium and large structural problems, using the eight different optimizers on a Cray-YMP8E/8128 computer. The reliability and efficiency of the optimizers were determined from the performance of these problems. For small problems, the performance of most of the optimizers could be considered adequate. For large problems, however, three optimizers (two sequential quadratic programming routines, DNCONG of IMSL and SQP of IDESIGN, along with Sequential Unconstrained Minimizations Technique SUMT) outperformed others. At optimum, most optimizers captured an identical number of active displacement and frequency constraints but the number of active stress constraints differed among the optimizers. This discrepancy can be attributed to singularity conditions in the optimization and the alleviation of this discrepancy can improve the efficiency of optimizers.

  1. On the connection of the quadratic Lienard equation with an equation for the elliptic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Nikolay A.; Sinelshchikov, Dmitry I.

    2015-07-01

    The quadratic Lienard equation is widely used in many applications. A connection between this equation and a linear second-order differential equation has been discussed. Here we show that the whole family of quadratic Lienard equations can be transformed into an equation for the elliptic functions. We demonstrate that this connection can be useful for finding explicit forms of general solutions of the quadratic Lienard equation. We provide several examples of application of our approach.

  2. PIFCGT: A PIF autopilot design program for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the PIFCGT computer program. In FORTRAN, PIFCGT is a computer design aid for determing Proportional-Integral-Filter (PIF) control laws for aircraft autopilots implemented with a Command Generator Tracker (CGT). The program uses Linear-Quadratic-Regulator synthesis algorithms to determine feedback gains, and includes software to solve the feedforward matrix equation which is useful in determining the command generator tracker feedforward gains. The program accepts aerodynamic stability derivatives and computes the corresponding aerodynamic linear model. The nine autopilot modes that can be designed include four maneuver modes (ROLL SEL, PITCH SEL, HDG SEL, ALT SEL), four final approach models (APR GS, APR LOCI, APR LOCR, APR LOCP), and a BETA HOLD mode. The program has been compiled and executed on a CDC computer.

  3. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  4. Cosmology for quadratic gravity in generalized Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Koivisto, Tomi S.

    2016-04-01

    A class of vector-tensor theories arises naturally in the framework of quadratic gravity in spacetimes with linear vector distortion. Requiring the absence of ghosts for the vector field imposes an interesting condition on the allowed connections with vector distortion: the resulting one-parameter family of connections generalises the usual Weyl geometry with polar torsion. The cosmology of this class of theories is studied, focusing on isotropic solutions wherein the vector field is dominated by the temporal component. De Sitter attractors are found and inhomogeneous perturbations around such backgrounds are analysed. In particular, further constraints on the models are imposed by excluding pathologies in the scalar, vector and tensor fluctuations. Various exact background solutions are presented, describing a constant and an evolving dark energy, a bounce and a self-tuning de Sitter phase. However, the latter two scenarios are not viable under a closer scrutiny.

  5. Absence of the Gribov ambiguity in a quadratic gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raval, Haresh

    2016-05-01

    The Gribov ambiguity exists in various gauges. Algebraic gauges are likely to be ambiguity free. However, algebraic gauges are not Lorentz invariant, which is their fundamental flaw. In addition, they are not generally compatible with the boundary conditions on the gauge fields, which are needed to compactify the space i.e., the ambiguity continues to exist on a compact manifold. Here we discuss a quadratic gauge fixing, which is Lorentz invariant. We consider an example of a spherically symmetric gauge field configuration in which we prove that this Lorentz invariant gauge removes the ambiguity on a compact manifold S^3, when a proper boundary condition on the gauge configuration is taken into account. Thus, we provide one example where the ambiguity is absent on a compact manifold in the algebraic gauge. We also show that the BRST invariance is preserved in this gauge.

  6. Wind turbine power tracking using an improved multimodel quadratic approach.

    PubMed

    Khezami, Nadhira; Benhadj Braiek, Naceur; Guillaud, Xavier

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, an improved multimodel optimal quadratic control structure for variable speed, pitch regulated wind turbines (operating at high wind speeds) is proposed in order to integrate high levels of wind power to actively provide a primary reserve for frequency control. On the basis of the nonlinear model of the studied plant, and taking into account the wind speed fluctuations, and the electrical power variation, a multimodel linear description is derived for the wind turbine, and is used for the synthesis of an optimal control law involving a state feedback, an integral action and an output reference model. This new control structure allows a rapid transition of the wind turbine generated power between different desired set values. This electrical power tracking is ensured with a high-performance behavior for all other state variables: turbine and generator rotational speeds and mechanical shaft torque; and smooth and adequate evolution of the control variables. PMID:20434153

  7. Developed Adomian method for quadratic Kaluza-Klein relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha

    2010-01-01

    We develop and modify the Adomian decomposition method (ADecM) to work for a new type of nonlinear matrix differential equations (MDE's) which arise in general relativity (GR) and possibly in other applications. The approach consists in modifying both the ADecM linear operator with highest order derivative and ADecM polynomials. We specialize in the case of a 4 × 4 nonlinear MDE along with a scalar one describing stationary cylindrically symmetric metrics in quadratic five-dimensional GR, derive some of their properties using ADecM and construct the most general unique power series solutions. However, because of the constraint imposed on the MDE by the scalar one, the series solutions terminate in closed forms exhausting all possible solutions.

  8. Quadratic Forms for the Fermionic Unitary Gas Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finco, Domenico; Teta, Alessandro

    2012-04-01

    We consider a quantum system in dimension three composed by a group of N identical fermions, with mass 1/2, interacting via zero-range interaction with a group of M identical fermions of a different type, with mass m/2. Exploiting a renormalization procedure, we construct the corresponding quadratic form and define the so-called Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan extension Hα, which is the natural candidate as a possible Hamiltonian of the system. It is shown that if the form is unbounded from below then Hα is not a self-adjoint and bounded from below operator, and this in particular suggests that the so-called Thomas effect could occur. In the special case N = 2, M = 1 we prove that this is in fact the case when a suitable condition on the parameter m is satisfied.

  9. Motion corrected intracranial MRA using PROPELLER with RF quadratic encoding.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Nicholas R; Pipe, James G

    2009-06-01

    A new motion corrected Time-of-Flight MRA technique named Variable Pitch PROPELLER is presented. This technique employs the PROPELLER acquisition and reconstruction scheme for in-plane bulk motion correction. A non- Fourier through-plane encoding mechanism called quadratic encoding boosts SNR, relative to conventional 2D MRA, in lieu of traditional 3D encoding. Partial Fourier encoding is applied in the slice direction for a further reduction in scan time. This work details the construction and optimization of this technique. VPPROP MRAs are compared with a clinical MOTSA protocol. Initial results show promising robustness to bulk motion effects. The comparisons with MOTSA provide insight as to the additions required to create a comparable scan. PMID:19353668

  10. Robust linear quadratic designs with respect to parameter uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Joel; Athans, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The authors derive a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) which is robust to parametric uncertainty by using the overbounding method of I. R. Petersen and C. V. Hollot (1986). The resulting controller is determined from the solution of a single modified Riccati equation. It is shown that, when applied to a structural system, the controller gains add robustness by minimizing the potential energy of uncertain stiffness elements, and minimizing the rate of dissipation of energy through uncertain damping elements. A worst-case disturbance in the direction of the uncertainty is also considered. It is proved that performance robustness has been increased with the robust LQR when compared to a mismatched LQR design where the controller is designed on the nominal system, but applied to the actual uncertain system.

  11. Exact Solution of Quadratic Fermionic Hamiltonians for Arbitrary Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Alase, Abhijeet; Cobanera, Emilio; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenza

    2016-08-12

    We present a procedure for exactly diagonalizing finite-range quadratic fermionic Hamiltonians with arbitrary boundary conditions in one of D dimensions, and periodic in the remaining D-1. The key is a Hamiltonian-dependent separation of the bulk from the boundary. By combining information from the two, we identify a matrix function that fully characterizes the solutions, and may be used to construct an efficiently computable indicator of bulk-boundary correspondence. As an illustration, we show how our approach correctly describes the zero-energy Majorana modes of a time-reversal-invariant s-wave two-band superconductor in a Josephson ring configuration, and predicts that a fractional 4π-periodic Josephson effect can only be observed in phases hosting an odd number of Majorana pairs per boundary. PMID:27563986

  12. Schwarz and multilevel methods for quadratic spline collocation

    SciTech Connect

    Christara, C.C.; Smith, B.

    1994-12-31

    Smooth spline collocation methods offer an alternative to Galerkin finite element methods, as well as to Hermite spline collocation methods, for the solution of linear elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). Recently, optimal order of convergence spline collocation methods have been developed for certain degree splines. Convergence proofs for smooth spline collocation methods are generally more difficult than for Galerkin finite elements or Hermite spline collocation, and they require stronger assumptions and more restrictions. However, numerical tests indicate that spline collocation methods are applicable to a wider class of problems, than the analysis requires, and are very competitive to finite element methods, with respect to efficiency. The authors will discuss Schwarz and multilevel methods for the solution of elliptic PDEs using quadratic spline collocation, and compare these with domain decomposition methods using substructuring. Numerical tests on a variety of parallel machines will also be presented. In addition, preliminary convergence analysis using Schwarz and/or maximum principle techniques will be presented.

  13. Exact Solution of Quadratic Fermionic Hamiltonians for Arbitrary Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alase, Abhijeet; Cobanera, Emilio; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenza

    2016-08-01

    We present a procedure for exactly diagonalizing finite-range quadratic fermionic Hamiltonians with arbitrary boundary conditions in one of D dimensions, and periodic in the remaining D -1 . The key is a Hamiltonian-dependent separation of the bulk from the boundary. By combining information from the two, we identify a matrix function that fully characterizes the solutions, and may be used to construct an efficiently computable indicator of bulk-boundary correspondence. As an illustration, we show how our approach correctly describes the zero-energy Majorana modes of a time-reversal-invariant s -wave two-band superconductor in a Josephson ring configuration, and predicts that a fractional 4 π -periodic Josephson effect can only be observed in phases hosting an odd number of Majorana pairs per boundary.

  14. Rarity-Weighted Richness: A Simple and Reliable Alternative to Integer Programming and Heuristic Algorithms for Minimum Set and Maximum Coverage Problems in Conservation Planning

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Fabio; Beier, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that prioritizing sites in order of rarity-weighted richness (RWR) is a simple, reliable way to identify sites that represent all species in the fewest number of sites (minimum set problem) or to identify sites that represent the largest number of species within a given number of sites (maximum coverage problem). We compared the number of species represented in sites prioritized by RWR to numbers of species represented in sites prioritized by the Zonation software package for 11 datasets in which the size of individual planning units (sites) ranged from <1 ha to 2,500 km2. On average, RWR solutions were more efficient than Zonation solutions. Integer programming remains the only guaranteed way find an optimal solution, and heuristic algorithms remain superior for conservation prioritizations that consider compactness and multiple near-optimal solutions in addition to species representation. But because RWR can be implemented easily and quickly in R or a spreadsheet, it is an attractive alternative to integer programming or heuristic algorithms in some conservation prioritization contexts. PMID:25780930

  15. A mathematical model, algorithm, and package of programs for simulation and prompt estimation of the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, V.I.; Yatsko, S.N.

    1995-12-01

    A mathematical model and a package of programs are presented for simulating the atmospheric turbulent diffusion of contaminating impurities from land based and other sources. Test calculations and investigations of the effect of various factors are carried out.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters in Linear-Quadratic Radiobiologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Jack F.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiobiologic modeling is increasingly used to estimate the effects of altered treatment plans, especially for dose escalation. The present article shows how much the linear-quadratic (LQ) (calculated biologically equivalent dose [BED] varies when individual parameters of the LQ formula are varied by {+-}20% and by 1%. Methods: Equivalent total doses (EQD2 = normalized total doses (NTD) in 2-Gy fractions for tumor control, acute mucosal reactions, and late complications were calculated using the linear- quadratic formula with overall time: BED = nd (1 + d/ [{alpha}/{beta}]) - log{sub e}2 (T - Tk) / {alpha}Tp, where BED is BED = total dose x relative effectiveness (RE = nd (1 + d/ [{alpha}/{beta}]). Each of the five biologic parameters in turn was altered by {+-}10%, and the altered EQD2s tabulated; the difference was finally divided by 20. EQD2 or NTD is obtained by dividing BED by the RE for 2-Gy fractions, using the appropriate {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Results: Variations in tumor and acute mucosal EQD ranged from 0.1% to 0.45% per 1% change in each parameter for conventional schedules, the largest variation being caused by overall time. Variations in 'late' EQD were 0.4% to 0.6% per 1% change in the only biologic parameter, the {alpha}/{beta} ratio. For stereotactic body radiotherapy schedules, variations were larger, up to 0.6 to 0.9 for tumor and 1.6% to 1.9% for late, per 1% change in parameter. Conclusions: Robustness occurs similar to that of equivalent uniform dose (EUD), for the same reasons. Total dose, dose per fraction, and dose-rate cause their major effects, as well known.

  17. Confidence set inference with a prior quadratic bound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    In the uniqueness part of a geophysical inverse problem, the observer wants to predict all likely values of P unknown numerical properties z = (z sub 1,...,z sub p) of the earth from measurement of D other numerical properties y(0)=(y sub 1(0),...,y sub D(0)) knowledge of the statistical distribution of the random errors in y(0). The data space Y containing y(0) is D-dimensional, so when the model space X is infinite-dimensional the linear uniqueness problem usually is insoluble without prior information about the correct earth model x. If that information is a quadratic bound on x (e.g., energy or dissipation rate), Bayesian inference (BI) and stochastic inversion (SI) inject spurious structure into x, implied by neither the data nor the quadratic bound. Confidence set inference (CSI) provides an alternative inversion technique free of this objection. CSI is illustrated in the problem of estimating the geomagnetic field B at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) from components of B measured on or above the earth's surface. Neither the heat flow nor the energy bound is strong enough to permit estimation of B(r) at single points on the CMB, but the heat flow bound permits estimation of uniform averages of B(r) over discs on the CMB, and both bounds permit weighted disc-averages with continous weighting kernels. Both bounds also permit estimation of low-degree Gauss coefficients at the CMB. The heat flow bound resolves them up to degree 8 if the crustal field at satellite altitudes must be treated as a systematic error, but can resolve to degree 11 under the most favorable statistical treatment of the crust. These two limits produce circles of confusion on the CMB with diameters of 25 deg and 19 deg respectively.

  18. Spectroscopy of one-dimensionally inhomogeneous media with quadratic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Golubkov, A A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2011-11-30

    We present a brief review of the results of fifty years of development efforts in spectroscopy of one-dimensionally inhomogeneous media with quadratic nonlinearity. The recent original results obtained by the authors show the fundamental possibility of determining, from experimental data, the coordinate dependences of complex quadratic susceptibility tensor components of a onedimensionally inhomogeneous (along the z axis) medium with an arbitrary frequency dispersion, if the linear dielectric properties of the medium also vary along the z axis and are described by a diagonal tensor of the linear dielectric constant. It is assumed that the medium in question has the form of a plane-parallel plate, whose surfaces are perpendicular to the direction of the inhomogeneity. Using the example of several components of the tensors X{sup (2)}(z, {omega}{sub 1} {+-} {omega}{sub 2}; {omega}{sub 1}, {+-} {omega}{sub 2}), we describe two methods for finding their spatial profiles, which differ in the interaction geometry of plane monochromatic fundamental waves with frequencies {omega}{sub 1} and {omega}{sub 2}. The both methods are based on assessing the intensity of the waves propagating from the plate at the sum or difference frequency and require measurements over a range of angles of incidence of the fundamental waves. Such measurements include two series of additional estimates of the intensities of the waves generated under special conditions by using the test and additional reference plates, which eliminates the need for complicated phase measurements of the complex amplitudes of the waves at the sum (difference) frequency.

  19. Conservation of Mass and Preservation of Positivity with Ensemble-Type Kalman Filter Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janjic, Tijana; Mclaughlin, Dennis; Cohn, Stephen E.; Verlaan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the incorporation of constraints to enforce physically based conservation laws in the ensemble Kalman filter. In particular, constraints are used to ensure that the ensemble members and the ensemble mean conserve mass and remain nonnegative through measurement updates. In certain situations filtering algorithms such as the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) yield updated ensembles that conserve mass but are negative, even though the actual states must be nonnegative. In such situations if negative values are set to zero, or a log transform is introduced, the total mass will not be conserved. In this study, mass and positivity are both preserved by formulating the filter update as a set of quadratic programming problems that incorporate non-negativity constraints. Simple numerical experiments indicate that this approach can have a significant positive impact on the posterior ensemble distribution, giving results that are more physically plausible both for individual ensemble members and for the ensemble mean. In two examples, an update that includes a non-negativity constraint is able to properly describe the transport of a sharp feature (e.g., a triangle or cone). A number of implementation questions still need to be addressed, particularly the need to develop a computationally efficient quadratic programming update for large ensemble.

  20. Modeling a magnetostrictive transducer using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, L. A. L.; Deep, G. S.; Lima, A. M. N.; Neff, H.

    2001-05-01

    This work reports on the applicability of the genetic algorithm (GA) to the problem of parameter determination of magnetostrictive transducers. A combination of the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model with a quadratic moment rotation model is simulated using known parameters of a sensor. The simulated sensor data are then used as input data for the GA parameter calculation method. Taking the previously known parameters, the accuracy of the GA parameter calculation method can be evaluated.

  1. CUDA programs for the GPU computing of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm: 2D and 3D Ising, Potts, and XY models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Yukihiro; Okabe, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    We present sample CUDA programs for the GPU computing of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm. We deal with the classical spin models; the Ising model, the q-state Potts model, and the classical XY model. As for the lattice, both the 2D (square) lattice and the 3D (simple cubic) lattice are treated. We already reported the idea of the GPU implementation for 2D models (Komura and Okabe, 2012). We here explain the details of sample programs, and discuss the performance of the present GPU implementation for the 3D Ising and XY models. We also show the calculated results of the moment ratio for these models, and discuss phase transitions. Catalogue identifier: AERM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5632 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14688 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, CUDA. Computer: System with an NVIDIA CUDA enabled GPU. Operating system: System with an NVIDIA CUDA enabled GPU. Classification: 23. External routines: NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit 3.0 or newer Nature of problem: Monte Carlo simulation of classical spin systems. Ising, q-state Potts model, and the classical XY model are treated for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattices. Solution method: GPU-based Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip Monte Carlo method. The CUDA implementation for the cluster-labeling is based on the work by Hawick et al. [1] and that by Kalentev et al. [2]. Restrictions: The system size is limited depending on the memory of a GPU. Running time: For the parameters used in the sample programs, it takes about a minute for each program. Of course, it depends on the system size, the number of Monte Carlo steps, etc. References: [1] K

  2. Solutions of the Schrödinger equation with inversely quadratic Hellmann plus inversely quadratic potential using Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, B. I.

    2014-11-12

    By using the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method, the Schrödinger equation has been solved for the interaction of inversely quadratic Hellmann (IQHP) and inversely quadratic potential (IQP) for any angular momentum quantum number, l. The energy eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenfunctions have been obtained in terms of Laguerre polynomials. Special cases of the sum of these potentials have been considered and their energy eigenvalues also obtained.

  3. Neighboring optimal guidance theory and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Developments of the linear quadratic optimal control problem are discussed. The theory is applicable to the development of neighboring optimal feedback guidance gains, and is useful as a tool for synthesizing feedback control laws. A computer program which requires only the pertinent matrices of the linear quadratic problem is described.

  4. Spacecraft Formation Flying Maneuvers Using Linear Quadratic Regulation With No Radial Axis Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Yedavalli, R. K.; Sparks, Andrew G.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Regarding multiple spacecraft formation flying, the observation has been made that control thrust need only be applied coplanar to the local horizon to achieve complete controllability of a two-satellite (leader-follower) formation. A formulation of orbital dynamics using the state of one satellite relative to another is used. Without the need for thrust along the radial (zenith-nadir) axis of the relative reference frame, propulsion system simplifications and weight reduction may be accomplished. This work focuses on the validation of this control system on its own merits, and in comparison to a related system which does provide thrust along the radial axis of the relative frame. Maneuver simulations are performed using commercial ODE solvers to propagate the Keplerian dynamics of a controlled satellite relative to an uncontrolled leader. These short maneuver simulations demonstrate the capacity of the controller to perform changes from one formation geometry to another. Control algorithm performance is evaluated based on measures such as the fuel required to complete a maneuver and the maximum acceleration required by the controller. Based on this evaluation, the exclusion of the radial axis of control still allows enough control authority to use Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) techniques to design a gain matrix of adequate performance over finite maneuvers. Additional simulations are conducted including perturbations and using no radial control inputs. A major conclusion presented is that control inputs along the three axes have significantly different relationships to the governing orbital dynamics that may be exploited using LQR.

  5. Multiple target detection in video using quadratic multi-frame correlation filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kerekes, Ryan A; Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya

    2008-01-01

    Most integrated target detection and tracking systems employ state-space models to keep track of an explicit number o findividual targets. Recently, a non-state-space framework was developed for enhancing target detection in video by applying probabilistic motion models to the soft information in correlation outputs before thresholding. This framework has been referred to as multi-frame correlation ltering (MFCF), and because it avoids the use of state-space models and the formation of explicit tracks, the framework is well-suited for handling scenes with unknown numbers of targets at unknown positions. In this paper, we propose to use quadratic correlation lters(QCFs)in the MFCF framework for robust target detection. We test our detection algorithm on real and synthe sized single-target and multi-target video sequences. Simulation results show that MFCF can signi cantly reduce (to zero in the best case) the false alarm rates of QCFs at detection rates above 95%in the presence of large amounts of uncorrelated noise. We also show that MFCF is more adept at rejecting those false peaks due to uncorrelated noise rather than those due to clutter and compression noise; consequently, we show that lters used in the framework should be made to favor clutter rejection over noise tolerance.

  6. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  7. Detection of Replication Origin Sites in Herpesvirus Genomes by Clustering and Scoring of Palindromes with Quadratic Entropy Measures.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Ahsan Z; Bhattacharya, C

    2014-01-01

    Replication in herpesvirus genomes is a major concern of public health as they multiply rapidly during the lytic phase of infection that cause maximum damage to the host cells. Earlier research has established that sites of replication origin are dominated by high concentration of rare palindrome sequences of DNA. Computational methods are devised based on scoring to determine the concentration of palindromes. In this paper, we propose both extraction and localization of rare palindromes in an automated manner. Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT-II), a widely recognized image compression algorithm is utilized here to extract palindromic sequences based on their reverse complimentary symmetry property of existence. We formulate a novel approach to localize the rare palindrome clusters by devising a Minimum Quadratic Entropy (MQE) measure based on the Renyi's Quadratic Entropy (RQE) function. Experimental results over a large number of herpesvirus genomes show that the RQE based scoring of rare palindromes have higher order of sensitivity, and lesser false alarm in detecting concentration of rare palindromes and thereby sites of replication origin. PMID:26357048

  8. Computing the Partial Fraction Decomposition of Rational Functions with Irreducible Quadratic Factors in the Denominators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2012-01-01

    In this note, a new method for computing the partial fraction decomposition of rational functions with irreducible quadratic factors in the denominators is presented. This method involves polynomial divisions and substitutions only, without having to solve for the complex roots of the irreducible quadratic polynomial or to solve a system of linear…

  9. PPN Metric and PPN torsion in the quadratic poincaré gauge theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, M. S.; Ponomariov, V. N.; Zhytnikov, V. V.

    1990-05-01

    The post-newtonian approximation of the quadratic Poincaré gauge theory of gravity is studied. As a result of this investigation the modified PPN metric and PPN torsion is obtained. Post-newtonian equations of motion for different test bodies are analyzed and some restrictions on the parameters of the quadratic lagrangian are found.

  10. The cyclicity of period annulus of a quadratic reversible Lotka-Volterra system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengzhi; Llibre, Jaume

    2009-12-01

    We prove that by perturbing the periodic annulus of the quadratic polynomial reversible Lotka-Volterra differential system \\dot x=y+\\case{3}{2}(x^2-y^2) , \\dot y=-x(1-y) , inside the class of all quadratic polynomial differential systems we can obtain at most two limit cycles.

  11. Fast Quantum Algorithms for Numerical Integrals and Stochastic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Williams, C.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss quantum algorithms that calculate numerical integrals and descriptive statistics of stochastic processes. With either of two distinct approaches, one obtains an exponential speed increase in comparison to the fastest known classical deterministic algotithms and a quadratic speed increase incomparison to classical Monte Carlo methods.

  12. Novel algorithm and MATLAB-based program for automated power law analysis of single particle, time-dependent mean-square displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, Moti; Weihs, Daphne

    2012-08-01

    In many physical and biophysical studies, single-particle tracking is utilized to reveal interactions, diffusion coefficients, active modes of driving motion, dynamic local structure, micromechanics, and microrheology. The basic analysis applied to those data is to determine the time-dependent mean-square displacement (MSD) of particle trajectories and perform time- and ensemble-averaging of similar motions. The motion of particles typically exhibits time-dependent power-law scaling, and only trajectories with qualitatively and quantitatively comparable MSD should be ensembled. Ensemble averaging trajectories that arise from different mechanisms, e.g., actively driven and diffusive, is incorrect and can result inaccurate correlations between structure, mechanics, and activity. We have developed an algorithm to automatically and accurately determine power-law scaling of experimentally measured single-particle MSD. Trajectories can then categorized and grouped according to user defined cutoffs of time, amplitudes, scaling exponent values, or combinations. Power-law fits are then provided for each trajectory alongside categorized groups of trajectories, histograms of power laws, and the ensemble-averaged MSD of each group. The codes are designed to be easily incorporated into existing user codes. We expect that this algorithm and program will be invaluable to anyone performing single-particle tracking, be it in physical or biophysical systems. Catalogue identifier: AEMD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 25 892 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 572 780 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB (MathWorks Inc.) version 7.11 (2010b) or higher, program

  13. Digital program for solving the linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, B.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described which solves the linear stochastic optimal control and estimation (LSOCE) problem by using a time-domain formulation. The LSOCE problem is defined as that of designing controls for a linear time-invariant system which is disturbed by white noise in such a way as to minimize a performance index which is quadratic in state and control variables. The LSOCE problem and solution are outlined; brief descriptions are given of the solution algorithms, and complete descriptions of each subroutine, including usage information and digital listings, are provided. A test case is included, as well as information on the IBM 7090-7094 DCS time and storage requirements.

  14. PIPS-SBB: A Parallel Distributed-Memory Branch-and-Bound Algorithm for Stochastic Mixed-Integer Programs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Munguia, Lluis-Miquel; Oxberry, Geoffrey; Rajan, Deepak

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic mixed-integer programs (SMIPs) deal with optimization under uncertainty at many levels of the decision-making process. When solved as extensive formulation mixed- integer programs, problem instances can exceed available memory on a single workstation. In order to overcome this limitation, we present PIPS-SBB: a distributed-memory parallel stochastic MIP solver that takes advantage of parallelism at multiple levels of the optimization process. We also show promising results on the SIPLIB benchmark by combining methods known for accelerating Branch and Bound (B&B) methods with new ideas that leverage the structure of SMIPs. Finally, we expect the performance of PIPS-SBB to improve furthermore » as more functionality is added in the future.« less

  15. Algorithm for Constructing Contour Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Silva, F.

    1984-01-01

    General computer algorithm developed for construction of contour plots. algorithm accepts as input data values at set of points irregularly distributed over plane. Algorithm based on interpolation scheme: points in plane connected by straight-line segments to form set of triangles. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  16. Stability and monotone convergence of generalised policy iteration for discrete-time linear quadratic regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tae Yoon; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we analyse the convergence and stability properties of generalised policy iteration (GPI) applied to discrete-time linear quadratic regulation problems. GPI is one kind of the generalised adaptive dynamic programming methods used for solving optimal control problems, and is composed of policy evaluation and policy improvement steps. To analyse the convergence and stability of GPI, the dynamic programming (DP) operator is defined. Then, GPI and its equivalent formulas are presented based on the notation of DP operator. The convergence of the approximate value function to the exact one in policy evaluation is proven based on the equivalent formulas. Furthermore, the positive semi-definiteness, stability, and the monotone convergence (PI-mode and VI-mode convergence) of GPI are presented under certain conditions on the initial value function. The online least square method is also presented for the implementation of GPI. Finally, some numerical simulations are carried out to verify the effectiveness of GPI as well as to further investigate the convergence and stability properties.

  17. On Dijkstra's Algorithm for Deadlock Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youming; Greca, Ardian; Harris, James

    We study a classical problem in operating systems concerning deadlock detection for systems with reusable resources. The elegant Dijkstra's algorithm utilizes simple data structures, but it has the cost of quadratic dependence on the number of the processes. Our goal is to reduce the cost in an optimal way without losing the simplicity of the data structures. More specifically, we present a graph-free and almost optimal algorithm with the cost of linear dependence on the number of the processes, when the number of resources is fixed and when the units of requests for resources are bounded by constants.

  18. Quadratic Measurement and Conditional State Preparation in an Optomechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brawley, George; Vanner, Michael; Bowen, Warwick; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja

    2014-03-01

    An important requirement in the study of quantum systems is the ability to measure non-linear observables at the level of quantum fluctuations. Such measurements enable the conditional preparation of highly non-classical states. Nonlinear measurement, although achieved in a variety of quantum systems including microwave cavity modes and optical fields, remains an outstanding problem in both electromechanical and optomechanical systems. To the best of our knowledge, previous experimental efforts to achieve nonlinear measurement of mechanical motion have not yielded strong coupling, nor the observation of quadratic mechanical motion. Here using a new technique reliant on the intrinsic nonlinearity of the optomechanical interaction, we experimentally observe for the first time a position squared (x2) measurement of the room-temperature Brownian motion of a nanomechanical oscillator. We utilize this measurement to conditionally prepare non-Gaussian bimodal states, which are the high temperature classical analogue of quantum macroscopic superposition states, or cat states. In the future with the aid of cryogenics and state-of-the-art optical cavities, our approach will provide a viable method of generating quantum superposition states of mechanical oscillators. This research was funded by the ARC Center of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems.

  19. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  20. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E.-G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states. PMID:26640114

  1. Hydroxyl functionalized thermosensitive microgels with quadratic crosslinking density distribution.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Begum; Tuncel, Murvet; Senel, Serap; Patir, S; Tuncel, Ali

    2007-09-01

    N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) based uniform thermosensitive microgels were synthesized by dispersion polymerization by using relatively hydrophilic crosslinking agents with hydroxyl functionality. Glycerol dimethacrylate (GDMA), pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) and pentaerythritol propoxylate triacrylate (PEPTA) were used as crosslinking agents with different hydrophilicities. A protocol was first proposed to determine the crosslinking density distribution in the thermosensitive microgel particles by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The microgels were fluorescently labeled by using hydroxyl group of the crosslinking agent. The CLSM observations performed with the microgels synthesized by three different crosslinking agents showed that the crosslinking density exhibited a quadratic decrease with the increasing radial distance in the spherical microgel particles. This structure led to the formation of more loose gel structure on the particle surface with respect to the center. Then the use of hydrophilic crosslinking agents in the dispersion polymerization of NIPA made possible the synthesis of thermosensitive microgels carrying long, flexible and chemically derivatizable (i.e., hydroxyl functionalized) fringes on the surface by a single-stage dispersion polymerization. The microgels with all crosslinking agents exhibited volume phase transition with the increasing temperature. The microgel obtained by the most hydrophilic crosslinking agent, GDMA exhibited higher hydrodynamic diameters in the fully swollen form at low temperatures than those obtained by PETA and PEPTA. Higher hydrodynamic size decrease from fully swollen form to the fully shrunken form was also observed with the same microgel. PMID:17532327

  2. Phase Transitions in the Quadratic Contact Process on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Chris; Durrett, Rick

    2013-03-01

    The quadratic contact process (QCP) is a natural extension of the well studied linear contact process where a single infected (1) individual can infect a susceptible (0) neighbor and infected individuals are allowed to recover (1 --> 0). In the QCP, a combination of two 1's is required to effect a 0 --> 1 change. We extend the study of the QCP, which so far has been limited to lattices, to complex networks as a model for the change in a population via sexual reproduction and death. We define two versions of the QCP - vertex centered (VQCP) and edge centered (EQCP) with birth events 1 - 0 - 1 --> 1 - 1 - 1 and 1 - 1 - 0 --> 1 - 1 - 1 respectively, where ` -' represents an edge. We investigate the effects of network topology by considering the QCP on regular, Erdős-Rényi and power law random graphs. We perform mean field calculations as well as simulations to find the steady state fraction of occupied vertices as a function of the birth rate. We find that on the homogeneous graphs (regular and Erdős-Rényi) there is a discontinuous phase transition with a region of bistability, whereas on the heavy tailed power law graph, the transition is continuous. The critical birth rate is found to be positive in the former but zero in the latter.

  3. Gap solitons in a nonlinear quadratic negative-index cavity.

    PubMed

    Scalora, Michael; de Ceglia, Domenico; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Mattiucci, Nadia; Akozbek, Neset; Centini, Marco; Bloemer, Mark J

    2007-06-01

    We predict the existence of gap solitons in a nonlinear, quadratic Fabry-Pérot negative index cavity. A peculiarity of a single negative index layer is that if magnetic and electric plasma frequencies are different it forms a photonic band structure similar to that of a multilayer stack composed of ordinary, positive index materials. This similarity also results in comparable field localization and enhancement properties that under appropriate conditions may be used to either dynamically shift the band edge, or for efficient energy conversion. We thus report that an intense, fundamental pump pulse is able to shift the band edge of a negative index cavity, and make it possible for a weak second harmonic pulse initially tuned inside the gap to be transmitted, giving rise to a gap soliton. The process is due to cascading, a well-known phenomenon that occurs far from phase matching conditions that limits energy conversion rates, it resembles a nonlinear third-order process, and causes pulse compression due to self-phase modulation. The symmetry of the equations of motion under the action of either an electric or a magnetic nonlinearity suggests that both nonlinear polarization and magnetization, or a combination of both, can lead to solitonlike pulses. More specifically, the antisymmetric localization properties of the electric and magnetic fields cause a nonlinear polarization to generate a dark soliton, while a nonlinear magnetization spawns a bright soliton. PMID:17677375

  4. Impact of a global quadratic potential on galactic rotation curves.

    PubMed

    Mannheim, Philip D; O'Brien, James G

    2011-03-25

    We present a conformal gravity fit to the 20 largest of a sample of 110 spiral galaxies. We identify the presence of a universal quadratic potential V(κ)(r)=-κc²r²/2 with κ=9.54×10⁻⁵⁴ cm⁻² induced by cosmic inhomogeneities. When V(κ)(r) is taken in conjunction with both a universal linear potential V(γ₀)(r)=γ₀c²r/2 with γ₀=3.06×10⁻³⁰ cm⁻¹ generated by the homogeneous cosmic background and the contribution generated by the local luminous matter in galaxies, the theory then accounts for the rotation curve systematics observed in the entire 110 galaxies, without the need for any dark matter whatsoever. Our study suggests that using dark matter may be nothing more than an attempt to describe global effects in purely local galactic terms. With V(κ)(r) being negative, galaxies can only support bound orbits up to distances of order γ₀/κ=100kpc, with global physics imposing a limit on the size of galaxies. PMID:21517292

  5. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E.-G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Strong spin-orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin-orbit and strong electron-electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  6. GR angular momentum in the quadratic spinor Lagrangian formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siao-Jing

    2016-08-01

    We inquire into the question of whether the quadratic spinor Lagrangian (QSL) formulation can describe the angular momentum for a general-relativistic system. The QSL Hamiltonian has previously been shown to be able to yield an energy-momentum quasilocalization which brings a proof of the positive gravitational energy when the spinor satisfies the conformal Witten equation. After inspection, we find that, under the constraint that the spinor on the asymptotic boundary is a constant, the QSL Hamiltonian is successful in giving an angular momentum quasilocalization. We also make certain the spinor in the Hamiltonian plays the role of a gauge field, a warrant of our permission to impose constraints on the spinor. Then, by some adjustment of the QSL Hamiltonian, we gain a covariant center-of-mass moment quasilocalization only under the condition that the displacement on the asymptotic boundary is a Killing boost vector. We expect the spinor expression will bring a proof of some connection between the gravitational energy and angular momentum.

  7. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; et al

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour ismore » predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.« less

  8. Linear versus quadratic portfolio optimization model with transaction cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Norhidayah Bt Ab; Kamil, Karmila Hanim; Elias, Siti Masitah

    2014-06-01

    Optimization model is introduced to become one of the decision making tools in investment. Hence, it is always a big challenge for investors to select the best model that could fulfill their goal in investment with respect to risk and return. In this paper we aims to discuss and compare the portfolio allocation and performance generated by quadratic and linear portfolio optimization models namely of Markowitz and Maximin model respectively. The application of these models has been proven to be significant and popular among others. However transaction cost has been debated as one of the important aspects that should be considered for portfolio reallocation as portfolio return could be significantly reduced when transaction cost is taken into consideration. Therefore, recognizing the importance to consider transaction cost value when calculating portfolio' return, we formulate this paper by using data from Shariah compliant securities listed in Bursa Malaysia. It is expected that, results from this paper will effectively justify the advantage of one model to another and shed some lights in quest to find the best decision making tools in investment for individual investors.

  9. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  10. Inverse problem of quadratic time-dependent Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang-Jie; Meng, Yan; Chang, Hong; Duan, Hui-Zeng; Di, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Using an algebraic approach, it is possible to obtain the temporal evolution wave function for a Gaussian wave-packet obeying the quadratic time-dependent Hamiltonian (QTDH). However, in general, most of the practical cases are not exactly solvable, for we need general solutions of the Riccatti equations which are not generally known. We therefore bypass directly solving for the temporal evolution wave function, and study its inverse problem. We start with a particular evolution of the wave-packet, and get the required Hamiltonian by using the inverse method. The inverse approach opens up a new way to find new exact solutions to the QTDH. Some typical examples are studied in detail. For a specific time-dependent periodic harmonic oscillator, the Berry phase is obtained exactly. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11347171), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province of China (Grant No. A2012108003), and the Key Project of Educational Commission of Hebei Province of China (Grant No. ZD2014052).

  11. Linear quadratic optimal controller for cable-driven parallel robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolshah, Saeed; Shojaei Barjuei, Erfan

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, various cable-driven parallel robots have been investigated for their advantages, such as low structural weight, high acceleration, and large work-space, over serial and conventional parallel systems. However, the use of cables lowers the stiffness of these robots, which in turn may decrease motion accuracy. A linear quadratic (LQ) optimal controller can provide all the states of a system for the feedback, such as position and velocity. Thus, the application of such an optimal controller in cable-driven parallel robots can result in more efficient and accurate motion compared to the performance of classical controllers such as the proportional- integral-derivative controller. This paper presents an approach to apply the LQ optimal controller on cable-driven parallel robots. To employ the optimal control theory, the static and dynamic modeling of a 3-DOF planar cable-driven parallel robot (Feriba-3) is developed. The synthesis of the LQ optimal control is described, and the significant experimental results are presented and discussed.

  12. Junction conditions in quadratic gravity: thin shells and double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Borja; Senovilla, José M. M.; Vera, Raül

    2016-05-01

    The junction conditions for the most general gravitational theory with a Lagrangian containing terms quadratic in the curvature are derived. We include the cases with a possible concentration of matter on the joining hypersurface—termed as thin shells, domain walls or braneworlds in the literature—as well as the proper matching conditions where only finite jumps of the energy-momentum tensor are allowed. In the latter case we prove that the matching conditions are more demanding than in general relativity. In the former case, we show that generically the shells/domain walls are of a new kind because they possess, in addition to the standard energy-momentum tensor, a double layer energy-momentum contribution which actually induces an external energy flux vector and an external scalar pressure/tension on the shell. We prove that all these contributions are necessary to make the entire energy-momentum tensor divergence-free, and we present the field equations satisfied by these energy-momentum quantities. The consequences of all these results are briefly analyzed.

  13. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M; Chen, R; Ishikawa, J J; Moon, E-G; Yamamoto, T; Ota, Y; Malaeb, W; Kanai, H; Nakashima, Y; Ishida, Y; Yoshida, R; Yamamoto, H; Matsunami, M; Kimura, S; Inami, N; Ono, K; Kumigashira, H; Nakatsuji, S; Balents, L; Shin, S

    2015-01-01

    Strong spin-orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin-orbit and strong electron-electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states. PMID:26640114

  14. Quadratic isothermal amplification for the detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruixue; Zuo, Xiaolei; Wang, Shutao; Quan, Xiyun; Chen, Dongliang; Chen, Zhifei; Jiang, Lei; Fan, Chunhai; Xia, Fan

    2014-03-01

    This protocol describes an isothermal amplification approach for ultrasensitive detection of specific microRNAs (miRNAs). It achieves this level of sensitivity through quadratic amplification of the target oligonucleotide by using a Bst DNA polymerase-induced strand-displacement reaction and a lambda exonuclease-aided recycling reaction. First, the target miRNA binds to a specifically designed molecular beacon, causing it to become a fluorescence emitter. A primer then binds to the activated beacon, and Bst polymerase initiates the synthesis of a double-stranded DNA segment templated on the molecular beacon. This causes the concomitant release of the target miRNA from the beacon--the first round of 'recycling'. Second, the duplex beacon thus produced is a suitable substrate for a nicking enzyme present in solution. After the duplex beacon is nicked, the lambda exonuclease digests the beacon and releases the DNA single strand just synthesized, which is complementary to the molecular beacon, inducing the second round of recycling. The miRNA detection limit of this protocol is 10 fmol at 37 °C and 1 amol at 4 °C. This approach also affords high selectivity when applied to miRNA extracted from MCF-7 and PC3 cell lines and even from breast cancer tissue samples. Upon isolation of miRNA, the detection process can be completed in ∼2 h. PMID:24525753

  15. On the computational cost of approximating and recognizing noise-perturbed straight lines and quadratic arcs in the plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. B.; Yalabik, N.

    1976-01-01

    Recognition of underlying straight lines and quadratic arcs in line drawings, and approximation of very noisy data by such line/curve segments, is addressed as a subproblem of the more general problem of optimum recognition of complicated line/curve drawings. Some specific algorithms are presented with extensions and interpretations for more complicated applications, and a data generation model is developed for the problem. Data are generated as a perturbation of a single underlying straight line or an elliptic or hyperbolic arc. Recursive estimation techniques, minimization of central processing unit time, decision making with controlled error probabilities, and modeling and recognition of pictures consisting of noisy curves are dealt with. Applications envisaged include: picture data compression, contour line representation in maps, intelligent data searches, and ballistic missile decoy tracking.

  16. A Study of Penalty Function Methods for Constraint Handling with Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    COMETBOARDS (Comparative Evaluation Testbed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for Design of Structures) is a design optimization test bed that can evaluate the performance of several different optimization algorithms. A few of these optimization algorithms are the sequence of unconstrained minimization techniques (SUMT), sequential linear programming (SLP) and the sequential quadratic programming techniques (SQP). A genetic algorithm (GA) is a search technique that is based on the principles of natural selection or "survival of the fittest". Instead of using gradient information, the GA uses the objective function directly in the search. The GA searches the solution space by maintaining a population of potential solutions. Then, using evolving operations such as recombination, mutation and selection, the GA creates successive generations of solutions that will evolve and take on the positive characteristics of their parents and thus gradually approach optimal or near-optimal solutions. By using the objective function directly in the search, genetic algorithms can be effectively applied in non-convex, highly nonlinear, complex problems. The genetic algorithm is not guaranteed to find the global optimum, but it is less likely to get trapped at a local optimum than traditional gradient-based search methods when the objective function is not smooth and generally well behaved. The purpose of this research is to assist in the integration of genetic algorithm (GA) into COMETBOARDS. COMETBOARDS cast the design of structures as a constrained nonlinear optimization problem. One method used to solve constrained optimization problem with a GA to convert the constrained optimization problem into an unconstrained optimization problem by developing a penalty function that penalizes infeasible solutions. There have been several suggested penalty function in the literature each with there own strengths and weaknesses. A statistical analysis of some suggested penalty functions

  17. Elastic Model Transitions: a Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, T. Jason; Ottander, John A.

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes both quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) algorithms to determine physical displacements. This approach is applicable to the simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize multiple LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data for discrete segments of the launch vehicle trajectory presents a problem of how to properly transition between models while preserving motion across the transition. In addition, energy may vary between flex models when using a truncated mode set. The LSQI-DSM algorithm can accommodate significant changes in energy between FEM models and carries elastic motion across FEM model transitions. Compared with previous approaches, the LSQI-DSM algorithm shows improvements ranging from a significant reduction to a complete removal of transients across FEM model transitions as well as maintaining elastic motion from the prior state.

  18. New type of Weyl semimetal with quadratic double Weyl fermions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shin-Ming; Xu, Su-Yang; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, BaoKai; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Neupane, Madhab; Sanchez, Daniel; Zheng, Hao; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Bansil, Arun; Neupert, Titus; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-02-01

    Weyl semimetals have attracted worldwide attention due to their wide range of exotic properties predicted in theories. The experimental realization had remained elusive for a long time despite much effort. Very recently, the first Weyl semimetal has been discovered in an inversion-breaking, stoichiometric solid TaAs. So far, the TaAs class remains the only Weyl semimetal available in real materials. To facilitate the transition of Weyl semimetals from the realm of purely theoretical interest to the realm of experimental studies and device applications, it is of crucial importance to identify other robust candidates that are experimentally feasible to be realized. In this paper, we propose such a Weyl semimetal candidate in an inversion-breaking, stoichiometric compound strontium silicide, SrSi2, with many new and novel properties that are distinct from TaAs. We show that SrSi2 is a Weyl semimetal even without spin-orbit coupling and that, after the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling, two Weyl fermions stick together forming an exotic double Weyl fermion with quadratic dispersions and a higher chiral charge of ±2. Moreover, we find that the Weyl nodes with opposite charges are located at different energies due to the absence of mirror symmetry in SrSi2, paving the way for the realization of the chiral magnetic effect. Our systematic results not only identify a much-needed robust Weyl semimetal candidate but also open the door to new topological Weyl physics that is not possible in TaAs. PMID:26787914

  19. Moments for general quadratic densities in n dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2002-03-20

    We present the calculation of the generating functions and the rth-order correlations for densities of the form {rho}(x) {proportional_to} where g(s) is a non-negative function of the quadratic ''action'' s(x)={summation}{sub i,j}H{sub ij}x{sub i}x{sub j}, where x = (x{sub 1},x{sub 2}...,x{sub n}) is a real n-dimensional vector and H is a real, symmetric n x n matrix whose eigenvalues are strictly positive. In particular, we find the connection between the (r+2)th-order and rth-order correlations, which constitutes a generalization of the Gaussian moment theorem, which corresponds to the particular choice g(s)=e{sup -s/2}. We present several examples for specific choices for g(s), including the explicit expression for the generating function for each case and the subspace projection of {rho}(x) in a few cases. We also provide the straightforward generalizations to: (1) the case where g=g(s(x)+a {center_dot} x), where a=(a{sub 1},a{sub 2},...,a{sub n}) is an arbitrary real n-dimensional vector, and (2) the complex case, in which the action is of the form s(z) = {summation}{sub i,j}H{sub ij}z{sup *}{sub i} z{sub j} where z=(z{sub 1},z{sub 2}...z{sub n}) is an n-dimensional complex vector and H is a Hermitian n x n matrix whose eigenvalues are strictly positive.

  20. New type of Weyl semimetal with quadratic double Weyl fermions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shin-Ming; Xu, Su-Yang; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, BaoKai; Alidoust, Nasser; Bian, Guang; Neupane, Madhab; Sanchez, Daniel; Zheng, Hao; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Bansil, Arun; Neupert, Titus; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Weyl semimetals have attracted worldwide attention due to their wide range of exotic properties predicted in theories. The experimental realization had remained elusive for a long time despite much effort. Very recently, the first Weyl semimetal has been discovered in an inversion-breaking, stoichiometric solid TaAs. So far, the TaAs class remains the only Weyl semimetal available in real materials. To facilitate the transition of Weyl semimetals from the realm of purely theoretical interest to the realm of experimental studies and device applications, it is of crucial importance to identify other robust candidates that are experimentally feasible to be realized. In this paper, we propose such a Weyl semimetal candidate in an inversion-breaking, stoichiometric compound strontium silicide, SrSi2, with many new and novel properties that are distinct from TaAs. We show that SrSi2 is a Weyl semimetal even without spin–orbit coupling and that, after the inclusion of spin–orbit coupling, two Weyl fermions stick together forming an exotic double Weyl fermion with quadratic dispersions and a higher chiral charge of ±2. Moreover, we find that the Weyl nodes with opposite charges are located at different energies due to the absence of mirror symmetry in SrSi2, paving the way for the realization of the chiral magnetic effect. Our systematic results not only identify a much-needed robust Weyl semimetal candidate but also open the door to new topological Weyl physics that is not possible in TaAs. PMID:26787914

  1. Gravity waves from non-minimal quadratic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Pallis, Constantinos; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-03-12

    We discuss non-minimal quadratic inflation in supersymmetric (SUSY) and non-SUSY models which entails a linear coupling of the inflaton to gravity. Imposing a lower bound on the parameter c{sub R}, involved in the coupling between the inflaton and the Ricci scalar curvature, inflation can be attained even for subplanckian values of the inflaton while the corresponding effective theory respects the perturbative unitarity up to the Planck scale. Working in the non-SUSY context we also consider radiative corrections to the inflationary potential due to a possible coupling of the inflaton to bosons or fermions. We find ranges of the parameters, depending mildly on the renormalization scale, with adjustable values of the spectral index n{sub s}, tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃(2−4)⋅10{sup −3}, and an inflaton mass close to 3⋅10{sup 13} GeV. In the SUSY framework we employ two gauge singlet chiral superfields, a logarithmic Kähler potential including all the allowed terms up to fourth order in powers of the various fields, and determine uniquely the superpotential by applying a continuous R and a global U(1) symmetry. When the Kähler manifold exhibits a no-scale-type symmetry, the model predicts n{sub s}≃0.963 and r≃0.004. Beyond no-scale SUGRA, n{sub s} and r depend crucially on the coefficient involved in the fourth order term, which mixes the inflaton with the accompanying non-inflaton field in the Kähler potential, and the prefactor encountered in it. Increasing slightly the latter above (−3), an efficient enhancement of the resulting r can be achieved putting it in the observable range. The inflaton mass in the last case is confined in the range (5−9)⋅10{sup 13} GeV.

  2. Post-Newtonian, quasicircular binary inspirals in quadratic modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C.; Yunes, Nicolás; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2012-03-01

    We consider a general class of quantum gravity-inspired, modified gravity theories, where the Einstein-Hilbert action is extended through the addition of all terms quadratic in the curvature tensor coupled to scalar fields with standard kinetic energy. This class of theories includes Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet and Chern-Simons modified gravity as special cases. We analytically derive and solve the coupled field equations in the post-Newtonian approximation, assuming a comparable-mass, spinning black hole binary source in a quasicircular, weak-field/slow-motion orbit. We find that a naive subtraction of divergent piece associated with the point-particle approximation is ill-suited to represent compact objects in these theories. Instead, we model them by appropriate effective sources built so that known strong-field solutions are reproduced in the far-field limit. In doing so, we prove that black holes in Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet and Chern-Simons theory can have hair, while neutron stars have no scalar monopole charge, in diametrical opposition to results in scalar-tensor theories. We then employ techniques similar to the direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations to obtain analytic expressions for the scalar field, metric perturbation, and the associated gravitational wave luminosity measured at infinity. We find that scalar field emission mainly dominates the energy flux budget, sourcing electric-type (even-parity) dipole scalar radiation and magnetic-type (odd-parity) quadrupole scalar radiation, correcting the General Relativistic prediction at relative -1PN and 2PN orders. Such modifications lead to corrections in the emitted gravitational waves that can be mapped to the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework. Such modifications could be strongly constrained with gravitational wave observations.

  3. An integrated portfolio optimisation procedure based on data envelopment analysis, artificial bee colony algorithm and genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Ming

    2014-12-01

    Portfolio optimisation is an important issue in the field of investment/financial decision-making and has received considerable attention from both researchers and practitioners. However, besides portfolio optimisation, a complete investment procedure should also include the selection of profitable investment targets and determine the optimal timing for buying/selling the investment targets. In this study, an integrated procedure using data envelopment analysis (DEA), artificial bee colony (ABC) and genetic programming (GP) is proposed to resolve a portfolio optimisation problem. The proposed procedure is evaluated through a case study on investing in stocks in the semiconductor sub-section of the Taiwan stock market for 4 years. The potential average 6-month return on investment of 9.31% from 1 November 2007 to 31 October 2011 indicates that the proposed procedure can be considered a feasible and effective tool for making outstanding investment plans, and thus making profits in the Taiwan stock market. Moreover, it is a strategy that can help investors to make profits even when the overall stock market suffers a loss.

  4. A parallel variable metric optimization algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straeter, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An algorithm, designed to exploit the parallel computing or vector streaming (pipeline) capabilities of computers is presented. When p is the degree of parallelism, then one cycle of the parallel variable metric algorithm is defined as follows: first, the function and its gradient are computed in parallel at p different values of the independent variable; then the metric is modified by p rank-one corrections; and finally, a single univariant minimization is carried out in the Newton-like direction. Several properties of this algorithm are established. The convergence of the iterates to the solution is proved for a quadratic functional on a real separable Hilbert space. For a finite-dimensional space the convergence is in one cycle when p equals the dimension of the space. Results of numerical experiments indicate that the new algorithm will exploit parallel or pipeline computing capabilities to effect faster convergence than serial techniques.

  5. Parallel algorithms and architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.; Jung, H.; Mehlhorn, K.

    1987-01-01

    Contents of this book are the following: Preparata: Deterministic simulation of idealized parallel computers on more realistic ones; Convex hull of randomly chosen points from a polytope; Dataflow computing; Parallel in sequence; Towards the architecture of an elementary cortical processor; Parallel algorithms and static analysis of parallel programs; Parallel processing of combinatorial search; Communications; An O(nlogn) cost parallel algorithms for the single function coarsest partition problem; Systolic algorithms for computing the visibility polygon and triangulation of a polygonal region; and RELACS - A recursive layout computing system. Parallel linear conflict-free subtree access.

  6. Time-reversible molecular dynamics algorithms with bond constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J.; Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2009-08-01

    Time-reversible molecular dynamics algorithms with bond constraints are derived. The algorithms are stable with and without a thermostat and in double precision as well as in single-precision arithmetic. Time reversibility is achieved by applying a central-difference expression for the velocities in the expression for Gauss' principle of least constraint. The imposed time symmetry results in a quadratic expression for the Lagrange multiplier. For a system of complex molecules with connected constraints the corresponding set of coupled quadratic equations is easily solved by a consecutive iteration scheme. The algorithms were tested on two models. One is a dumbbell model of Toluene, the other system consists of molecules with four connected constraints forming a triangle and a branch point of constraints. The equilibrium particle distributions and the mean-square particle displacements for the dumbbell model were compared to the corresponding functions obtained by GROMACS. The agreement is perfect within statistical error.

  7. Stability of the equilibrium positions of an engine with nonlinear quadratic springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stănescu, Nicolae-Doru; Popa, Dinel

    2014-06-01

    Our paper realizes a study of the equilibrium positions for an engine supported by four identical nonlinear springs of quadratic characteristic. The systems with quadratic characteristic are generally avoided because they lead to mathematical complications. Our goal is to realize such a study for an engine supported on quadratic springs. For the model purposed, we established the equations of motion and we discussed the possibilities for the equilibrium positions. Because of the quadratic characteristic of the springs and of the approximations made for the small rotations, the equations obtained for the equilibrium lead us to a paradox, which consists in the existence of an open neighborhood in which there exists an infinity of positions of indifferent equilibrium, or a curve where the equilibrium positions are situated. Moreover, the study of the stability shows that the stability is assured for the position at which the springs are not compressed. Finally, a numerical example is presented and completely solved.

  8. The Existence of Periodic Orbits and Invariant Tori for Some 3-Dimensional Quadratic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanan; Han, Maoan; Xiao, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    We use the normal form theory, averaging method, and integral manifold theorem to study the existence of limit cycles in Lotka-Volterra systems and the existence of invariant tori in quadratic systems in ℝ3. PMID:24982980

  9. On ideal structure in quadratic DDS in R{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kutnjak, Milan

    2008-11-13

    We consider the dynamics in a special case of two-dimensional quadratic homogeneous discrete dynamical systems. It is well known (c.f. [1, 2]) that homogeneous quadratic maps are in one to one correspondence with two-dimensional commutative (nonassociative) algebras. Algebraic concepts (such as the structure of algebra and existence of special elements like idempotents and nilpotents) help us to study the dynamics of the corresponding discrete homogeneous quadratic maps. It is well-known that such systems can exhibit chaotic behavior [3], In this article we consider the influence of the existence of an algebra ideal on the dynamics of the corresponding discrete homogeneous quadratic system. We also present some examples in the plane.

  10. The existence of periodic orbits and invariant tori for some 3-dimensional quadratic systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanan; Han, Maoan; Xiao, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    We use the normal form theory, averaging method, and integral manifold theorem to study the existence of limit cycles in Lotka-Volterra systems and the existence of invariant tori in quadratic systems in ℝ(3). PMID:24982980

  11. Observers for a class of systems with nonlinearities satisfying an incremental quadratic inequality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Ahmet Behcet; Martin, Corless

    2004-01-01

    We consider the problem of state estimation from nonlinear time-varying system whose nonlinearities satisfy an incremental quadratic inequality. Observers are presented which guarantee that the state estimation error exponentially converges to zero.

  12. Line integral formulation of energy and QUadratic invariants preserving (EQUIP) methods for Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnano, Luigi; Caccia, Gianluca Frasca; Iavernaro, Felice

    2016-06-01

    The family of EQUIP (Energy and QUadratic Invariants Preserving) methods for Hamiltonian systems is here recasted in the framework of Line Integral Methods, in order to provide a more efficient discrete problem.

  13. An algorithm for constrained one-step inversion of spectral CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foygel Barber, Rina; Sidky, Emil Y.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-05-01

    We develop a primal-dual algorithm that allows for one-step inversion of spectral CT transmission photon counts data to a basis map decomposition. The algorithm allows for image constraints to be enforced on the basis maps during the inversion. The derivation of the algorithm makes use of a local upper bounding quadratic approximation to generate descent steps for non-convex spectral CT data discrepancy terms, combined with a new convex-concave optimization algorithm. Convergence of the algorithm is demonstrated on simulated spectral CT data. Simulations with noise and anthropomorphic phantoms show examples of how to employ the constrained one-step algorithm for spectral CT data.

  14. PHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: A study of radiation propagation in a medium with quadratic inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, A. A.

    2001-09-01

    The propagation of Hermitian beams in a medium with a distributed quadratic inhomogeneity is studied and is shown that any solution can be represented as a function of some particular solution. This is accomplished by establishing a one-to-one correspondence between optical fields in a homogeneous medium and in a medium with an arbitrary quadratic inhomogeneity. The stability of optical resonators is studied and the condition for their stability is found. Several solutions are found using the method developed.

  15. Bianchi type-I cosmological model with quadratic equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Adhav, K. S.; Purandare, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Bianchi type-I cosmological model containing perfect fluid with quadratic equation of state has been studied in general theory of relativity. The general solutions of the Einstein's field equations for Bianchi type-I space-time have been obtained under the assumption of quadratic equation of state (EoS) p= αρ 2- ρ, where α is constant and strictly α≠0. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model are discussed.

  16. Solution of the Dirac equation with some superintegrable potentials by the quadratic algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, S.; Chenaghlou, A.

    2014-02-01

    The Dirac equation with scalar and vector potentials of equal magnitude is considered. For the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator superintegrable potential, the superintegrable potentials of E8 (case (3b)), S4 and S2, the Schrödinger-like equations are studied. The quadratic algebras of these quasi-Hamiltonians are derived. By using the realization of the quadratic algebras in a deformed oscillator algebra, the structure function and the energy eigenvalues are obtained.

  17. Local multiplicative Schwarz algorithms for convection-diffusion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan; Sarkis, Marcus

    1995-01-01

    We develop a new class of overlapping Schwarz type algorithms for solving scalar convection-diffusion equations discretized by finite element or finite difference methods. The preconditioners consist of two components, namely, the usual two-level additive Schwarz preconditioner and the sum of some quadratic terms constructed by using products of ordered neighboring subdomain preconditioners. The ordering of the subdomain preconditioners is determined by considering the direction of the flow. We prove that the algorithms are optimal in the sense that the convergence rates are independent of the mesh size, as well as the number of subdomains. We show by numerical examples that the new algorithms are less sensitive to the direction of the flow than either the classical multiplicative Schwarz algorithms, and converge faster than the additive Schwarz algorithms. Thus, the new algorithms are more suitable for fluid flow applications than the classical additive or multiplicative Schwarz algorithms.

  18. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Includes a collection of eight short articles describing model community college programs. Discusses a literacy program, a mobile computer classroom, a support program for at-risk students, a timber-harvesting program, a multimedia presentation on successful women graduates, a career center, a collaboration with NASA, and an Israeli engineering…

  19. AnL1 smoothing spline algorithm with cross validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, Ken W.; Lall, Upmanu

    1993-08-01

    We propose an algorithm for the computation ofL1 (LAD) smoothing splines in the spacesWM(D), with . We assume one is given data of the formyiD(f(ti) +ɛi, iD1,...,N with {itti}iD1N ⊂D, theɛi are errors withE(ɛi)D0, andf is assumed to be inWM. The LAD smoothing spline, for fixed smoothing parameterλ?;0, is defined as the solution,sλ, of the optimization problem (1/N)∑iD1N yi-g(ti +λJM(g), whereJM(g) is the seminorm consisting of the sum of the squaredL2 norms of theMth partial derivatives ofg. Such an LAD smoothing spline,sλ, would be expected to give robust smoothed estimates off in situations where theɛi are from a distribution with heavy tails. The solution to such a problem is a "thin plate spline" of known form. An algorithm for computingsλ is given which is based on considering a sequence of quadratic programming problems whose structure is guided by the optimality conditions for the above convex minimization problem, and which are solved readily, if a good initial point is available. The "data driven" selection of the smoothing parameter is achieved by minimizing aCV(λ) score of the form .The combined LAD-CV smoothing spline algorithm is a continuation scheme in λ↘0 taken on the above SQPs parametrized inλ, with the optimal smoothing parameter taken to be that value ofλ at which theCV(λ) score first begins to increase. The feasibility of constructing the LAD-CV smoothing spline is illustrated by an application to a problem in environment data interpretation.

  20. Quadratically Convergent Method for Simultaneously Approaching the Roots of Polynomial Solutions of a Class of Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchioni, Maria Cristina

    2001-12-01

    This paper investigates the application of the method introduced by L. Pasquini (1989) for simultaneously approaching the zeros of polynomial solutions to a class of second-order linear homogeneous ordinary differential equations with polynomial coefficients to a particular case in which these polynomial solutions have zeros symmetrically arranged with respect to the origin. The method is based on a family of nonlinear equations which is associated with a given class of differential equations. The roots of the nonlinear equations are related to the roots of the polynomial solutions of differential equations considered. Newton's method is applied to find the roots of these nonlinear equations. In (Pasquini, 1994) the nonsingularity of the roots of these nonlinear equations is studied. In this paper, following the lines in (Pasquini, 1994), the nonsingularity of the roots of these nonlinear equations is studied. More favourable results than the ones in (Pasquini, 1994) are proven in the particular case of polynomial solutions with symmetrical zeros. The method is applied to approximate the roots of Hermite-Sobolev type polynomials and Freud polynomials. A lower bound for the smallest positive root of Hermite-Sobolev type polynomials is given via the nonlinear equation. The quadratic convergence of the method is proven. A comparison with a classical method that uses the Jacobi matrices is carried out. We show that the algorithm derived by the proposed method is sometimes preferable to the classical QR type algorithms for computing the eigenvalues of the Jacobi matrices even if these matrices are real and symmetric.

  1. Two linear time, low overhead algorithms for graph layout

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-10

    The software comprises two algorithms designed to perform a 2D layout of a graph structure in time linear with respect to the vertices and edges in the graph, whereas most other layout algorithms have a running time that is quadratic with respect to the number of vertices or greater. Although these layout algorithms run in a fraction of the time as their competitors, they provide competitive results when applied to most real-world graphs. These algorithmsmore » also have a low constant running time and small memory footprint, making them useful for small to large graphs.« less

  2. Rate control algorithm based on frame complexity estimation for MVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Tao; An, Ping; Shen, Liquan; Zhang, Zhaoyang

    2010-07-01

    Rate control has not been well studied for multi-view video coding (MVC). In this paper, we propose an efficient rate control algorithm for MVC by improving the quadratic rate-distortion (R-D) model, which reasonably allocate bit-rate among views based on correlation analysis. The proposed algorithm consists of four levels for rate bits control more accurately, of which the frame layer allocates bits according to frame complexity and temporal activity. Extensive experiments show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently implement bit allocation and rate control according to coding parameters.

  3. A quantum heuristic algorithm for the traveling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Lee, Changhyoup; Yoo, Seokwon; Lim, James; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2012-12-01

    We propose a quantum heuristic algorithm to solve the traveling salesman problem by generalizing the Grover search. Sufficient conditions are derived to greatly enhance the probability of finding the tours with the cheapest costs reaching almost to unity. These conditions are characterized by the statistical properties of tour costs and are shown to be automatically satisfied in the large-number limit of cities. In particular for a continuous distribution of the tours along the cost, we show that the quantum heuristic algorithm exhibits a quadratic speedup compared to its classical heuristic algorithm.

  4. Dose algorithm for EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter for use at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2011-05-01

    An updated algorithm for the EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter has been derived. This algorithm optimizes the binning of dosimeter element ratios and uses a quadratic function to determine the response factors for low response ratios. This results in lower systematic bias across all test categories and eliminates the need for the 'red strap' algorithm that was used for high energy beta/gamma emitting radionuclides. The Radiation Protection Dosimetry Program (RPDP) at Sandia National Laboratories uses the Thermo Fisher EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter, shown in Fig 1.1 to determine shallow dose to the extremities of potentially exposed individuals. This dosimeter consists of two LiF TLD elements or 'chipstrates', one of TLD-700 ({sup 7}Li) and one of TLD-100 (natural Li) separated by a tin filter. Following readout and background subtraction, the ratio of the responses of the two elements is determined defining the penetrability of the incident radiation. While this penetrability approximates the incident energy of the radiation, X-rays and beta particles exist in energy distributions that make determination of dose conversion factors less straightforward in their determination.

  5. Integration of Libration Point Orbit Dynamics into a Universal 3-D Autonomous Formation Flying Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The autonomous formation flying control algorithm developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission is investigated for applicability to libration point orbit formations. In the EO-1 formation-flying algorithm, control is accomplished via linearization about a reference transfer orbit with a state transition matrix (STM) computed from state inputs. The effect of libration point orbit dynamics on this algorithm architecture is explored via computation of STMs using the flight proven code, a monodromy matrix developed from a N-body model of a libration orbit, and a standard STM developed from the gravitational and coriolis effects as measured at the libration point. A comparison of formation flying Delta-Vs calculated from these methods is made to a standard linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method. The universal 3-D approach is optimal in the sense that it can be accommodated as an open-loop or closed-loop control using only state information.

  6. Isolated catalyst sites on amorphous supports: A systematic algorithm for understanding heterogeneities in structure and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Bryan R.; Sanderson, Evan D.; Bean, Daniel; Peters, Baron

    2013-05-01

    Methods for modeling catalytic sites on amorphous supports lag far behind methods for modeling catalytic sites on metal surfaces, zeolites, and other crystalline materials. One typical strategy for amorphous supports uses cluster models with arbitrarily chosen constraints to model the rigid amorphous support, but these constraints arbitrarily influence catalyst site activity. An alternative strategy is to use no constraints, but this results in catalytic sites with unrealistic flexibility. We present a systematic ab initio method to model isolated active sites on insulating amorphous supports using small cluster models. A sequential quadratic programming framework helps us relate chemical properties, such as the activation energy, to active site structure. The algorithm is first illustrated on an empirical valence bond model energy landscape. We then use the algorithm to model an off-pathway kinetic trap in olefin metathesis by isolated Mo sites on amorphous SiO2. The cluster models were terminated with basis set deficient fluorine atoms to mimic the properties of an extended silica framework. We also discuss limitations of the current algorithm formulation and future directions for improvement.

  7. Low-complexity feed-forward carrier phase estimation for M-ary QAM based on phase search acceleration by quadratic approximation.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Meng; Fu, Songnian; Deng, Lei; Tang, Ming; Shum, Perry; Liu, Deming

    2015-07-27

    Blind phase search (BPS) algorithm for M-QAM has excellent tolerance to laser linewidth at the expense of rather high computation complexity (CC). Here, we first theoretically obtain the quadratic relationship between the test angle and corresponding distance matric during the BPS implementation. Afterwards, we propose a carrier phase estimation (CPE) based on a two-stage BPS with quadratic approximation (QA). Instead of searching the phase blindly with fixed step-size for the BPS algorithm, QA can significantly accelerate the speed of phase searching. As a result, a group factor of 2.96/3.05, 4.55/4.67 and 2.27/2.3 (in the form of multipliers/adders) reduction of CC is achieved for 16QAM, 64QAM and 256QAM, respectively, in comparison with the traditional BPS scheme. Meanwhile, a guideline for determining the summing filter block length is put forward during performance optimization. Under the condition of optimum filter block length, our proposed scheme shows similar performance as traditional BPS scheme. At 1 dB required E(S)/N(0) penalty @ BER = 10(-2), our proposed CPE scheme can tolerate a times symbol duration productΔf⋅T(S) of 1.7 × 10(-4), 6 × 10(-5) and 1.5 × 10(-5) for 16/64/256-QAM, respectively. PMID:26367577

  8. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  9. Developing dataflow algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromoto, R.E. ); Bohm, A.P.W. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    Our goal is to study the performance of a collection of numerical algorithms written in Id which is available to users of Motorola's dataflow machine Monsoon. We will study the dataflow performance of these implementations first under the parallel profiling simulator Id World, and second in comparison with actual dataflow execution on the Motorola Monsoon. This approach will allow us to follow the computational and structural details of the parallel algorithms as implemented on dataflow systems. When running our programs on the Id World simulator we will examine the behaviour of algorithms at dataflow graph level, where each instruction takes one timestep and data becomes available at the next. This implies that important machine level phenomena such as the effect that global communication time may have on the computation are not addressed. These phenomena will be addressed when we run our programs on the Monsoon hardware. Potential ramifications for compilation techniques, functional programming style, and program efficiency are significant to this study. In a later stage of our research we will compare the efficiency of Id programs to programs written in other languages. This comparison will be of a rather qualitative nature as there are too many degrees of freedom in a language implementation for a quantitative comparison to be of interest. We begin our study by examining one routine that exhibit different computational characteristics. This routine and its corresponding characteristics is Fast Fourier Transforms; computational parallelism and data dependences between the butterfly shuffles.

  10. Data Structures and Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Niklaus

    1984-01-01

    Built-in data structures are the registers and memory words where binary values are stored; hard-wired algorithms are the fixed rules, embodied in electronic logic circuits, by which stored data are interpreted as instructions to be executed. Various topics related to these two basic elements of every computer program are discussed. (JN)

  11. Towards robust algorithms for current deposition and dynamic load-balancing in a GPU particle in cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Sgattoni, Andrea; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    We present `jasmine', an implementation of a fully relativistic, 3D, electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, capable of running simulations in various laser plasma acceleration regimes on Graphics-Processing-Units (GPUs) HPC clusters. Standard energy/charge preserving FDTD-based algorithms have been implemented using double precision and quadratic (or arbitrary sized) shape functions for the particle weighting. When porting a PIC scheme to the GPU architecture (or, in general, a shared memory environment), the particle-to-grid operations (e.g. the evaluation of the current density) require special care to avoid memory inconsistencies and conflicts. Here we present a robust implementation of this operation that is efficient for any number of particles per cell and particle shape function order. Our algorithm exploits the exposed GPU memory hierarchy and avoids the use of atomic operations, which can hurt performance especially when many particles lay on the same cell. We show the code multi-GPU scalability results and present a dynamic load-balancing algorithm. The code is written using a python-based C++ meta-programming technique which translates in a high level of modularity and allows for easy performance tuning and simple extension of the core algorithms to various simulation schemes.

  12. A fast Stokes inversion technique based on quadratic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Deng, Yuan-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Stokes inversion calculation is a key process in resolving polarization information on radiation from the Sun and obtaining the associated vector magnetic fields. Even in the cases of simple local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and where the Milne-Eddington approximation is valid, the inversion problem may not be easy to solve. The initial values for the iterations are important in handling the case with multiple minima. In this paper, we develop a fast inversion technique without iterations. The time taken for computation is only 1/100 the time that the iterative algorithm takes. In addition, it can provide available initial values even in cases with lower spectral resolutions. This strategy is useful for a filter-type Stokes spectrograph, such as SDO/HMI and the developed two-dimensional real-time spectrograph (2DS).

  13. Biomedical Mathematics, Unit III: Quadratics. Student Text. Revised Version, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This student text presents instructional materials for a unit of mathematics within the Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project (BICP), a two-year interdisciplinary precollege curriculum aimed at preparing high school students for entry into college and vocational programs leading to a career in the health field. Lessons concentrate on…

  14. Optimal reservoir operation policies using novel nested algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Historically, the two most widely practiced methods for optimal reservoir operation have been dynamic programming (DP) and stochastic dynamic programming (SDP). These two methods suffer from the so called "dual curse" which prevents them to be used in reasonably complex water systems. The first one is the "curse of dimensionality" that denotes an exponential growth of the computational complexity with the state - decision space dimension. The second one is the "curse of modelling" that requires an explicit model of each component of the water system to anticipate the effect of each system's transition. We address the problem of optimal reservoir operation concerning multiple objectives that are related to 1) reservoir releases to satisfy several downstream users competing for water with dynamically varying demands, 2) deviations from the target minimum and maximum reservoir water levels and 3) hydropower production that is a combination of the reservoir water level and the reservoir releases. Addressing such a problem with classical methods (DP and SDP) requires a reasonably high level of discretization of the reservoir storage volume, which in combination with the required releases discretization for meeting the demands of downstream users leads to computationally expensive formulations and causes the curse of dimensionality. We present a novel approach, named "nested" that is implemented in DP, SDP and reinforcement learning (RL) and correspondingly three new algorithms are developed named nested DP (nDP), nested SDP (nSDP) and nested RL (nRL). The nested algorithms are composed from two algorithms: 1) DP, SDP or RL and 2) nested optimization algorithm. Depending on the way we formulate the objective function related to deficits in the allocation problem in the nested optimization, two methods are implemented: 1) Simplex for linear allocation problems, and 2) quadratic Knapsack method in the case of nonlinear problems. The novel idea is to include the nested

  15. A Wavelet Bicoherence-Based Quadratic Nonlinearity Feature for Translational Axis Condition Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xiufeng; Lin, Jing; Shi, Shengyu

    2014-01-01

    The translational axis is one of the most important subsystems in modern machine tools, as its degradation may result in the loss of the product qualification and lower the control precision. Condition-based maintenance (CBM) has been considered as one of the advanced maintenance schemes to achieve effective, reliable and cost-effective operation of machine systems, however, current vibration-based maintenance schemes cannot be employed directly in the translational axis system, due to its complex structure and the inefficiency of commonly used condition monitoring features. In this paper, a wavelet bicoherence-based quadratic nonlinearity feature is proposed for translational axis condition monitoring by using the torque signature of the drive servomotor. Firstly, the quadratic nonlinearity of the servomotor torque signature is discussed, and then, a biphase randomization wavelet bicoherence is introduced for its quadratic nonlinear detection. On this basis, a quadratic nonlinearity feature is proposed for condition monitoring of the translational axis. The properties of the proposed quadratic nonlinearity feature are investigated by simulations. Subsequently, this feature is applied to the real-world servomotor torque data collected from the X-axis on a high precision vertical machining centre. All the results show that the performance of the proposed feature is much better than that of original condition monitoring features. PMID:24473281

  16. Classification of the quantum two-dimensional superintegrable systems with quadratic integrals and the Staeckel transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Daskaloyannis, C. Tanoudis, Y.

    2008-05-15

    The two-dimensional quantum superintegrable systems with quadratic integrals of motion on a manifold are classified by using the quadratic associative algebra of the integrals of motion. There are six general fundamental classes of quantum superintegrable systems corresponding to the classical ones. Analytic formulas for the involved integrals are calculated in all the cases. All the known quantum superintegrable systems with quadratic integrals are classified as special cases of these six general classes. The coefficients of the quadratic associative algebra of integrals are calculated and they are compared to the coefficients of the corresponding coefficients of the Poisson quadratic algebra of the classical systems. The quantum coefficients are similar to the classical ones multiplied by a quantum coefficient -{h_bar}{sup 2} plus a quantum deformation of order {h_bar}{sup 4} and {h_bar}{sup 6}. The systems inside the classes are transformed using Staeckel transforms in the quantum case as in the classical case. The general form of the Staeckel transform between superintegrable systems is discussed.

  17. A wavelet bicoherence-based quadratic nonlinearity feature for translational axis condition monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xiufeng; Lin, Jing; Shi, Shengyu

    2014-01-01

    The translational axis is one of the most important subsystems in modern machine tools, as its degradation may result in the loss of the product qualification and lower the control precision. Condition-based maintenance (CBM) has been considered as one of the advanced maintenance schemes to achieve effective, reliable and cost-effective operation of machine systems, however, current vibration-based maintenance schemes cannot be employed directly in the translational axis system, due to its complex structure and the inefficiency of commonly used condition monitoring features. In this paper, a wavelet bicoherence-based quadratic nonlinearity feature is proposed for translational axis condition monitoring by using the torque signature of the drive servomotor. Firstly, the quadratic nonlinearity of the servomotor torque signature is discussed, and then, a biphase randomization wavelet bicoherence is introduced for its quadratic nonlinear detection. On this basis, a quadratic nonlinearity feature is proposed for condition monitoring of the translational axis. The properties of the proposed quadratic nonlinearity feature are investigated by simulations. Subsequently, this feature is applied to the real-world servomotor torque data collected from the X-axis on a high precision vertical machining centre. All the results show that the performance of the proposed feature is much better than that of original condition monitoring features. PMID:24473281

  18. Haplotyping algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.; O`Connell, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Haplotyping is the logical process of inferring gene flow in a pedigree based on phenotyping results at a small number of genetic loci. This paper formalizes the haplotyping problem and suggests four algorithms for haplotype reconstruction. These algorithms range from exhaustive enumeration of all haplotype vectors to combinatorial optimization by simulated annealing. Application of the algorithms to published genetic analyses shows that manual haplotyping is often erroneous. Haplotyping is employed in screening pedigrees for phenotyping errors and in positional cloning of disease genes from conserved haplotypes in population isolates. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A reliable algorithm for optimal control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, powerful design tools for linear time-invariant multivariable control systems have been developed based on direct parameter optimization. In this report, an algorithm for reliable optimal control synthesis using parameter optimization is presented. Specifically, a robust numerical algorithm is developed for the evaluation of the H(sup 2)-like cost functional and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The method is specifically designed to handle defective degenerate systems and is based on the well-known Pade series approximation of the matrix exponential. Numerical test problems in control synthesis for simple mechanical systems and for a flexible structure with densely packed modes illustrate positively the reliability of this method when compared to a method based on diagonalization. Several types of cost functions have been considered: a cost function for robust control consisting of a linear combination of quadratic objectives for deterministic and random disturbances, and one representing an upper bound on the quadratic objective for worst case initial conditions. Finally, a framework for multivariable control synthesis has been developed combining the concept of closed-loop transfer recovery with numerical parameter optimization. The procedure enables designers to synthesize not only observer-based controllers but also controllers of arbitrary order and structure. Numerical design solutions rely heavily on the robust algorithm due to the high order of the synthesis model and the presence of near-overlapping modes. The design approach is successfully applied to the design of a high-bandwidth control system for a rotorcraft.

  20. Two Algorithms for Processing Electronic Nose Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca; Linnell, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Two algorithms for processing the digitized readings of electronic noses, and computer programs to implement the algorithms, have been devised in a continuing effort to increase the utility of electronic noses as means of identifying airborne compounds and measuring their concentrations. One algorithm identifies the two vapors in a two-vapor mixture and estimates the concentration of each vapor (in principle, this algorithm could be extended to more than two vapors). The other algorithm identifies a single vapor and estimates its concentration.

  1. FORTRAN Algorithm for Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Hull, David R.

    1987-01-01

    FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image-processing analysis and enhancement functions developed. Algorithm developed specifically to process images of developmental heat-engine materials obtained with sophisticated nondestructive evaluation instruments. Applications of program include scientific, industrial, and biomedical imaging for studies of flaws in materials, analyses of steel and ores, and pathology.

  2. West Virginia US Department of Energy experimental program to stimulate competitive research. Section 2: Human resource development; Section 3: Carbon-based structural materials research cluster; Section 3: Data parallel algorithms for scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    This report consists of three separate but related reports. They are (1) Human Resource Development, (2) Carbon-based Structural Materials Research Cluster, and (3) Data Parallel Algorithms for Scientific Computing. To meet the objectives of the Human Resource Development plan, the plan includes K--12 enrichment activities, undergraduate research opportunities for students at the state`s two Historically Black Colleges and Universities, graduate research through cluster assistantships and through a traineeship program targeted specifically to minorities, women and the disabled, and faculty development through participation in research clusters. One research cluster is the chemistry and physics of carbon-based materials. The objective of this cluster is to develop a self-sustaining group of researchers in carbon-based materials research within the institutions of higher education in the state of West Virginia. The projects will involve analysis of cokes, graphites and other carbons in order to understand the properties that provide desirable structural characteristics including resistance to oxidation, levels of anisotropy and structural characteristics of the carbons themselves. In the proposed cluster on parallel algorithms, research by four WVU faculty and three state liberal arts college faculty are: (1) modeling of self-organized critical systems by cellular automata; (2) multiprefix algorithms and fat-free embeddings; (3) offline and online partitioning of data computation; and (4) manipulating and rendering three dimensional objects. This cluster furthers the state Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research plan by building on existing strengths at WVU in parallel algorithms.

  3. Resurrecting quadratic inflation in no-scale supergravity in light of BICEP2

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; García, Marcos A.G.; Olive, Keith A.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu

    2014-05-01

    The magnitude of primordial tensor perturbations reported by the BICEP2 experiment is consistent with simple models of chaotic inflation driven by a single scalar field with a power-law potential ∝ φ{sup n} : n ≅ 2, in contrast to the WMAP and Planck results, which favored models resembling the Starobinsky R+R{sup 2} model if running of the scalar spectral index could be neglected. While models of inflation with a quadratic potential may be constructed in simple N = 1 supergravity, these constructions are more challenging in no-scale supergravity. We discuss here how quadratic inflation can be accommodated within supergravity, focusing primarily on the no-scale case. We also argue that the quadratic inflaton may be identified with the supersymmetric partner of a singlet (right-handed) neutrino, whose subsequent decay could have generated the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis.

  4. Clifford group, stabilizer states, and linear and quadratic operations over GF(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Dehaene, Jeroen; Moor, Bart de

    2003-10-01

    We describe stabilizer states and Clifford group operations using linear operations and quadratic forms over binary vector spaces. We show how the n-qubit Clifford group is isomorphic to a group with an operation that is defined in terms of a (2n+1)x(2n+1) binary matrix product and binary quadratic forms. As an application we give two schemes to efficiently decompose Clifford group operations into one- and two-qubit operations. We also show how the coefficients of stabilizer states and Clifford group operations in a standard basis expansion can be described by binary quadratic forms. Our results are useful for quantum error correction, entanglement distillation, and possibly quantum computing.

  5. Propagator for the time-dependent charged oscillator via linear and quadratic invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe Choi, Jeong-Ryeol

    2007-12-15

    The problem of a charged particle in the presence of a variable magnetic field is considered. Using the linear and the quadratic invariants as a tool, the wave functions in Fock state as well as in coherent state are obtained. The corresponding propagators which propagate the wave functions in the space-time are derived. Using numerical computations we have managed to draw some plots for the real, imaginary, and absolute values of the propagators. This has been used to analyze the properties of the propagators associated with both of the linear and the quadratic invariants. It has been shown that there is no essential difference between the behavior of the absolute value of the propagators in both of the linear and the quadratic invariants.

  6. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  7. Basis for a neuronal version of Grover's quantum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Grover's quantum (search) algorithm exploits principles of quantum information theory and computation to surpass the strong Church-Turing limit governing classical computers. The algorithm initializes a search field into superposed N (eigen)states to later execute nonclassical "subroutines" involving unitary phase shifts of measured states and to produce root-rate or quadratic gain in the algorithmic time (O(N (1/2))) needed to find some "target" solution m. Akin to this fast technological search algorithm, single eukaryotic cells, such as differentiated neurons, perform natural quadratic speed-up in the search for appropriate store-operated Ca(2+) response regulation of, among other processes, protein and lipid biosynthesis, cell energetics, stress responses, cell fate and death, synaptic plasticity, and immunoprotection. Such speed-up in cellular decision making results from spatiotemporal dynamics of networked intracellular Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release and the search (or signaling) velocity of Ca(2+) wave propagation. As chemical processes, such as the duration of Ca(2+) mobilization, become rate-limiting over interstore distances, Ca(2+) waves quadratically decrease interstore-travel time from slow saltatory to fast continuous gradients proportional to the square-root of the classical Ca(2+) diffusion coefficient, D (1/2), matching the computing efficiency of Grover's quantum algorithm. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, I elaborate on these traits using a fire-diffuse-fire model of store-operated cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling valid for glutamatergic neurons. Salient model features corresponding to Grover's quantum algorithm are parameterized to meet requirements for the Oracle Hadamard transform and Grover's iteration. A neuronal version of Grover's quantum algorithm figures to benefit signal coincidence detection and integration, bidirectional synaptic plasticity, and other vital cell functions by rapidly selecting, ordering, and/or counting optional

  8. Basis for a neuronal version of Grover's quantum algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kevin B.

    2014-01-01

    Grover's quantum (search) algorithm exploits principles of quantum information theory and computation to surpass the strong Church–Turing limit governing classical computers. The algorithm initializes a search field into superposed N (eigen)states to later execute nonclassical “subroutines” involving unitary phase shifts of measured states and to produce root-rate or quadratic gain in the algorithmic time (O(N1/2)) needed to find some “target” solution m. Akin to this fast technological search algorithm, single eukaryotic cells, such as differentiated neurons, perform natural quadratic speed-up in the search for appropriate store-operated Ca2+ response regulation of, among other processes, protein and lipid biosynthesis, cell energetics, stress responses, cell fate and death, synaptic plasticity, and immunoprotection. Such speed-up in cellular decision making results from spatiotemporal dynamics of networked intracellular Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and the search (or signaling) velocity of Ca2+ wave propagation. As chemical processes, such as the duration of Ca2+ mobilization, become rate-limiting over interstore distances, Ca2+ waves quadratically decrease interstore-travel time from slow saltatory to fast continuous gradients proportional to the square-root of the classical Ca2+ diffusion coefficient, D1/2, matching the computing efficiency of Grover's quantum algorithm. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, I elaborate on these traits using a fire-diffuse-fire model of store-operated cytosolic Ca2+ signaling valid for glutamatergic neurons. Salient model features corresponding to Grover's quantum algorithm are parameterized to meet requirements for the Oracle Hadamard transform and Grover's iteration. A neuronal version of Grover's quantum algorithm figures to benefit signal coincidence detection and integration, bidirectional synaptic plasticity, and other vital cell functions by rapidly selecting, ordering, and/or counting optional response

  9. The non-avian theropod quadrate I: standardized terminology with an overview of the anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Christophe; Araújo, Ricardo; Mateus, Octávio

    2015-01-01

    The quadrate of reptiles and most other tetrapods plays an important morphofunctional role by allowing the articulation of the mandible with the cranium. In Theropoda, the morphology of the quadrate is particularly complex and varies importantly among different clades of non-avian theropods, therefore conferring a strong taxonomic potential. Inconsistencies in the notation and terminology used in discussions of the theropod quadrate anatomy have been noticed, including at least one instance when no less than eight different terms were given to the same structure. A standardized list of terms and notations for each quadrate anatomical entity is proposed here, with the goal of facilitating future descriptions of this important cranial bone. In addition, an overview of the literature on quadrate function and pneumaticity in non-avian theropods is presented, along with a discussion of the inferences that could be made from this research. Specifically, the quadrate of the large majority of non-avian theropods is akinetic but the diagonally oriented intercondylar sulcus of the mandibular articulation allowed both rami of the mandible to move laterally when opening the mouth in many of theropods. Pneumaticity of the quadrate is also present in most averostran clades and the pneumatic chamber-invaded by the quadrate diverticulum of the mandibular arch pneumatic system-was connected to one or several pneumatic foramina on the medial, lateral, posterior, anterior or ventral sides of the quadrate. PMID:26401455

  10. The non-avian theropod quadrate I: standardized terminology with an overview of the anatomy and function

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Ricardo; Mateus, Octávio

    2015-01-01

    The quadrate of reptiles and most other tetrapods plays an important morphofunctional role by allowing the articulation of the mandible with the cranium. In Theropoda, the morphology of the quadrate is particularly complex and varies importantly among different clades of non-avian theropods, therefore conferring a strong taxonomic potential. Inconsistencies in the notation and terminology used in discussions of the theropod quadrate anatomy have been noticed, including at least one instance when no less than eight different terms were given to the same structure. A standardized list of terms and notations for each quadrate anatomical entity is proposed here, with the goal of facilitating future descriptions of this important cranial bone. In addition, an overview of the literature on quadrate function and pneumaticity in non-avian theropods is presented, along with a discussion of the inferences that could be made from this research. Specifically, the quadrate of the large majority of non-avian theropods is akinetic but the diagonally oriented intercondylar sulcus of the mandibular articulation allowed both rami of the mandible to move laterally when opening the mouth in many of theropods. Pneumaticity of the quadrate is also present in most averostran clades and the pneumatic chamber—invaded by the quadrate diverticulum of the mandibular arch pneumatic system—was connected to one or several pneumatic foramina on the medial, lateral, posterior, anterior or ventral sides of the quadrate. PMID:26401455

  11. Nonadiabatic effects in ultracold molecules via anomalous linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts.

    PubMed

    McGuyer, B H; Osborn, C B; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-12-13

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold 88Sr2 molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite f-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model. PMID:24483652

  12. OPTIMAL SHRINKAGE ESTIMATION OF MEAN PARAMETERS IN FAMILY OF DISTRIBUTIONS WITH QUADRATIC VARIANCE

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianchao; Kou, S. C.; Brown, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the simultaneous inference of mean parameters in a family of distributions with quadratic variance function. We first introduce a class of semi-parametric/parametric shrinkage estimators and establish their asymptotic optimality properties. Two specific cases, the location-scale family and the natural exponential family with quadratic variance function, are then studied in detail. We conduct a comprehensive simulation study to compare the performance of the proposed methods with existing shrinkage estimators. We also apply the method to real data and obtain encouraging results. PMID:27041778

  13. Quadratic formula for determining the drop size in pressure-atomized sprays with and without swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-W.; An, Keju

    2016-06-01

    We use a theoretical framework based on the integral form of the conservation equations, along with a heuristic model of the viscous dissipation, to find a closed-form solution to the liquid atomization problem. The energy balance for the spray renders to a quadratic formula for the drop size as a function, primarily of the liquid velocity. The Sauter mean diameter found using the quadratic formula shows good agreements and physical trends, when compared with experimental observations. This approach is shown to be applicable toward specifying initial drop size in computational fluid dynamics of spray flows.

  14. Analytical solution of the Klein Gordon equation for a quadratic exponential-type potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzatpour, Somayyeh; Akbarieh, Amin Rezaei

    2016-07-01

    In this research study, analytical solutions of the Klein Gordon equation by considering the potential as a quadratic exponential will be presented. However, the potential is assumed to be within the framework of an approximation for the centrifugal potential in any state. The Nikiforov-Uvarov method is used to calculate the wave function, as well as corresponding exact energy equation, in bound states. We finally concluded that the quadratic exponential-type potential under which the results were deduced, led to outcomes that were comparable to the results obtained from the well-known potentials in some special cases.

  15. Contractions and deformations of quasiclassical Lie algebras preserving a nondegenerate quadratic Casimir operator

    SciTech Connect

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.

    2008-05-15

    By means of contractions of Lie algebras, we obtain new classes of indecomposable quasiclassical Lie algebras that satisfy the Yang-Baxter equations in its reformulation in terms of triple products. These algebras are shown to arise naturally from noncompact real simple algebras with nonsimple complexification, where we impose that a nondegenerate quadratic Casimir operator is preserved by the limiting process. We further consider the converse problem and obtain sufficient conditions on integrable cocycles of quasiclassical Lie algebras in order to preserve nondegenerate quadratic Casimir operators by the associated linear deformations.

  16. Nonadiabatic Effects in Ultracold Molecules via Anomalous Linear and Quadratic Zeeman Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, B. H.; Osborn, C. B.; McDonald, M.; Reinaudi, G.; Skomorowski, W.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2013-12-01

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite $f$-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art \\textit{ab initio} model.

  17. A study of radiation propagation in a medium with quadratic inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulev, A A

    2001-09-30

    The propagation of Hermitian beams in a medium with a distributed quadratic inhomogeneity is studied and is shown that any solution can be represented as a function of some particular solution. This is accomplished by establishing a one-to-one correspondence between optical fields in a homogeneous medium and in a medium with an arbitrary quadratic inhomogeneity. The stability of optical resonators is studied and the condition for their stability is found. Several solutions are found using the method developed. (physical foundations of quantum electronics)

  18. The Superior Lambert Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    der, G.

    2011-09-01

    Lambert algorithms are used extensively for initial orbit determination, mission planning, space debris correlation, and missile targeting, just to name a few applications. Due to the significance of the Lambert problem in Astrodynamics, Gauss, Battin, Godal, Lancaster, Gooding, Sun and many others (References 1 to 15) have provided numerous formulations leading to various analytic solutions and iterative methods. Most Lambert algorithms and their computer programs can only work within one revolution, break down or converge slowly when the transfer angle is near zero or 180 degrees, and their multi-revolution limitations are either ignored or barely addressed. Despite claims of robustness, many Lambert algorithms fail without notice, and the users seldom have a clue why. The DerAstrodynamics lambert2 algorithm, which is based on the analytic solution formulated by Sun, works for any number of revolutions and converges rapidly at any transfer angle. It provides significant capability enhancements over every other Lambert algorithm in use today. These include improved speed, accuracy, robustness, and multirevolution capabilities as well as implementation simplicity. Additionally, the lambert2 algorithm provides a powerful tool for solving the angles-only problem without artificial singularities (pointed out by Gooding in Reference 16), which involves 3 lines of sight captured by optical sensors, or systems such as the Air Force Space Surveillance System (AFSSS). The analytic solution is derived from the extended Godal’s time equation by Sun, while the iterative method of solution is that of Laguerre, modified for robustness. The Keplerian solution of a Lambert algorithm can be extended to include the non-Keplerian terms of the Vinti algorithm via a simple targeting technique (References 17 to 19). Accurate analytic non-Keplerian trajectories can be predicted for satellites and ballistic missiles, while performing at least 100 times faster in speed than most

  19. Optimal trajectories for flexible-link manipulator slewing using recursive quadratic programming: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Eisler, G.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Procedures for trajectory planning and control of flexible link robots are becoming increasingly important to satisfy performance requirements of hazardous waste removal efforts. It has been shown that utilizing link flexibility in designing open loop joint commands can result in improved performance as opposed to damping vibration throughout a trajectory. The efficient use of link compliance is exploited in this work. Specifically, experimental verification of minimum time, straight line tracking using a two-link planar flexible robot is presented. A numerical optimization process, using an experimentally verified modal model, is used for obtaining minimum time joint torque and angle histories. The optimal joint states are used as commands to the proportional-derivative servo actuated joints. These commands are precompensated for the nonnegligible joint servo actuator dynamics. Using the precompensated joint commands, the optimal joint angles are tracked with such fidelity that the tip tracking error is less than 2.5 cm.

  20. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.