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Sample records for quadriceps femoris influences

  1. Intramuscular Ganglion of the Quadriceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeung Jin; Chae, Soo Uk; Kim, Jong Yun; Jo, Hyang Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are common lesions that are most often found around the joints of the hands and feet. Ganglia around the distal femur usually occur within the synovial membrane or tendon sheath, but rarely within muscles. Several cases of intramuscular ganglions in the hand and wrist have been reported, but a ganglion cyst in the quadriceps muscle has rarely been addressed in studies. In this report, we present a 17-year-old patient with a painful movable mass in the intramuscular area of the quadriceps femoris that was diagnosed by ultrasound and treated by excision and biopsy. PMID:23508475

  2. Size of quadriceps femoris may contribute to thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Wei; He, Ying; Yao, Yu; Qiu, Li; Tian, Hao-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) frequently occurs on male individuals at their third and forth decades. The major site of involvement is the proximal muscles of lower limbs. Increasing evidence has shown that the occurrence of TPP is determined by multiple factors. We hypothesized that apart from hormonal fluctuations, skeletal muscle itself may explain for the age and sex variance as well. Our study was established to explore whether the size of lower limb skeletal muscles were related to TPP. We conducted a clinical experiment including 43 patients diagnosed with TPP (Group 1) and 39 pure hyperthyroidism individuals (Group 2). Current age, body mass index (BMI), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), average girth of bilateral upper arm and thigh, physical activity level (PAL) were measured. We also adopted B mode ultrasound to quantify the muscle thickness (MT) of the major muscle involved in the disease, the quadriceps femoris (QF, including rectus femoris, RF; vastus intermedius, VI; vastus medialis, VM and vastus lateralis, VL). Patients were matched in TSH, FT4 and FT3. PAL was also statistically identical between groups. Age, BMI, thigh girth, the average of bilateral MT of QF were statistically different. After adjusting for age, BMI and girth, Group 1 still presented with larger MT of QF than Group 2, regardless of their current thyroid hormone level. There indeed exists an independent relationship between muscle thickness and TPP. PMID:26519100

  3. Firing rate analysis using decompostion-enhanced spike triggered averaging in the quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Conwit, R A; Tracy, B; Cowl, A; McHugh, M; Stashuk, D; Brown, W F; Metter, E J

    1998-10-01

    Electromyographic signals detected from the quadriceps femoris during various constant force contractions were decomposed to identify individual motor unit discharges and mean firing rates (FRs). Subject and group mean FRs were calculated for each force level. Mean FR values and FR variability increased with force. Individual, subject, and group mean FRs showed slight increases until 30% of maximum voluntary contraction and larger increases thereafter. Findings are discussed in relation to motor unit recruitment, frequency modulation, and fatigue. PMID:9736067

  4. Measurement of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J M; Roberts, N; Whitehouse, G H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method for measurement of the cross sectional area and volume of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with stereology, and to compare the results of measurements obtained by the MRI method with those obtained by the conventional method of static B-mode ultrasound in order to evaluate whether MRI is a reliable alternative to ultrasound. METHODS: A preliminary MRI study was undertaken on a single female volunteer in order to optimise the scanning technique and sampling design for estimating the muscle volume using the Cavalieri method. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the method comparison study. Each volunteer underwent static B-mode ultrasonography, immediately followed by MRI. The cross sectional area of the quadriceps femoris was estimated at the junction of the proximal one third and distal two thirds of the thigh, and seven systematic sections of the thigh were obtained in order to estimate muscle volume by both modalities. RESULTS: Seven sections through the muscle are required to achieve a coefficient of error of 4-5%. There was no significant difference in the cross sectional area estimates or volume estimates when ultrasound and MRI were compared. CONCLUSION: Muscle cross sectional area and volume can be measured without bias by MRI in conjunction with stereological methods and the method is a reliable alternative to static B-mode ultrasound for this purpose. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9132215

  5. Histochemical study on the atrophy of the quadriceps femoris muscle caused by knee joint injuries of rats.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y

    1989-03-01

    Atrophy developing in the quadriceps femoris muscle following knee injury is one of the serious problems not only in the field of orthopedics but also of rehabilitation. However the pathogenesis of this atrophy has not yet been elucidated. The author therefore produced a complex ligament injury model using the knee joints of rats in order to study the pathogenesis of this atrophy. After severing the anterior cruciate ligament, the medial collateral ligament and tibial insertion of the medial meniscus of rats, these animals were sacrificed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. After removing the vastus lateralis muscle, vastus medialis muscle, and rectus femoris muscle, specimens of these muscles were stained for ATPase. The transection area of the muscle fibers was measured and the fiber type composition was determined. At 4 weeks the vastus medialis muscle and at 12 weeks the vastus lateralis muscle showed marked atrophy. The rectus femoris muscle exhibited the least atrophy throughout the entire observation period. In examining the atrophy of the quadriceps femoris muscle by muscle fiber type, the degree of atrophy was found to differ among the venters and even the same venter showed a different reaction depending on the elapsed time after sustaining the injury. Neither changes in the fiber type composition not neurogenic findings could be observed. PMID:2526800

  6. Force-generating capacities and fatigability of the quadriceps femoris in relation to different exercise modes.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Boris; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we examined whether different exercise modes provoke functional differences in maximal and explosive force-generating capacities and fatigability of the quadriceps femoris (QF). Additionally, the interaction of different functional capacities was studied in competitive athletes. Ten competitive tennis players and 10 endurance athletes participated in the study. Pre-exercise force-generating capacities were determined during maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions (MVC). Fatigability of the QF was studied using sustained isometric contractions with target loads of 20% and 40% of pre-exercise MVC. Postexercise MVCs were conducted 20 seconds, 1 minute, and 3 minutes post task failure. Muscle activation of the QF during the fatiguing exercises and postexercise MVCs was estimated using surface electromyography. Higher explosive force-generating capacities, but no differences in absolute moments, were detected in tennis players compared with endurance athletes. Fatigability of the QF during both fatiguing tasks was approximately the same in both athletic populations. This was indicated by minor group differences in endurance time, postexercise MVC production, and electromyography (EMG)-estimated muscle activation during fatigue. Variability in endurance time was not significantly associated with pre-exercise force-generating capacities in these competitive athletes. In both athletic populations, recovery of MVC was significantly slower after the fatiguing contraction with 20% of MVC compared with that with 40% of MVC. These results may enhance understanding of plasticity of the neuromuscular system and yield interesting information for the optimization of athletic training programs. Explosive strength training might enhance endurance athletes' explosiveness without decreasing muscle fatigue resistance. The exercise profile of competitive tennis is suggested to act as a sufficient trigger to reach high neuromuscular fatigue resistance but may be

  7. Analysis of three different equations for predicting quadriceps femoris muscle strength in patients with COPD *

    PubMed Central

    Nellessen, Aline Gonçalves; Donária, Leila; Hernandes, Nidia Aparecida; Pitta, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare equations for predicting peak quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle force; to determine the agreement among the equations in identifying QF muscle weakness in COPD patients; and to assess the differences in characteristics among the groups of patients classified as having or not having QF muscle weakness by each equation. Methods: Fifty-six COPD patients underwent assessment of peak QF muscle force by dynamometry (maximal voluntary isometric contraction of knee extension). Predicted values were calculated with three equations: an age-height-weight-gender equation (Eq-AHWG); an age-weight-gender equation (Eq-AWG); and an age-fat-free mass-gender equation (Eq-AFFMG). Results: Comparison of the percentage of predicted values obtained with the three equations showed that the Eq-AHWG gave higher values than did the Eq-AWG and Eq-AFFMG, with no difference between the last two. The Eq-AHWG showed moderate agreement with the Eq-AWG and Eq-AFFMG, whereas the last two also showed moderate, albeit lower, agreement with each other. In the sample as a whole, QF muscle weakness (< 80% of predicted) was identified by the Eq-AHWG, Eq-AWG, and Eq-AFFMG in 59%, 68%, and 70% of the patients, respectively (p > 0.05). Age, fat-free mass, and body mass index are characteristics that differentiate between patients with and without QF muscle weakness. Conclusions: The three equations were statistically equivalent in classifying COPD patients as having or not having QF muscle weakness. However, the Eq-AHWG gave higher peak force values than did the Eq-AWG and the Eq-AFFMG, as well as showing greater agreement with the other equations. PMID:26398750

  8. How can we strengthen the quadriceps femoris in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Callaghan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose: the aim of this article was to review the clinical approach of quadriceps strengthening programmes. Methods: a literature search was carried out from 1980 up to September 2011. Eligible studies were those that: (1) evaluated the patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (not healthy or asymptomatic subjects) (2) examined the effect of kinetic chain exercises (3) examined the effect of weight-bearing exercises (4) compared the effect of the combined exercises programme in the treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Results and conclusion: patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome may tolerate a closed kinetic chain exercises programme better than open kinetic chain. Weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing quadriceps exercises can significantly improve subjective and clinical outcomes in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Combining treatments as an initial approach to treating patellofemoral pain but developing individualized more functional, global treatments are essential. PMID:23738270

  9. Development of a mathematical model for predicting electrically elicited quadriceps femoris muscle forces during isovelocity knee joint motion

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Ramu; Wexler, Anthony S; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2008-01-01

    Background Direct electrical activation of skeletal muscles of patients with upper motor neuron lesions can restore functional movements, such as standing or walking. Because responses to electrical stimulation are highly nonlinear and time varying, accurate control of muscles to produce functional movements is very difficult. Accurate and predictive mathematical models can facilitate the design of stimulation patterns and control strategies that will produce the desired force and motion. In the present study, we build upon our previous isometric model to capture the effects of constant angular velocity on the forces produced during electrically elicited concentric contractions of healthy human quadriceps femoris muscle. Modelling the isovelocity condition is important because it will enable us to understand how our model behaves under the relatively simple condition of constant velocity and will enable us to better understand the interactions of muscle length, limb velocity, and stimulation pattern on the force produced by the muscle. Methods An additional term was introduced into our previous isometric model to predict the force responses during constant velocity limb motion. Ten healthy subjects were recruited for the study. Using a KinCom dynamometer, isometric and isovelocity force data were collected from the human quadriceps femoris muscle in response to a wide range of stimulation frequencies and patterns. % error, linear regression trend lines, and paired t-tests were used to test how well the model predicted the experimental forces. In addition, sensitivity analysis was performed using Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test to obtain a measure of the sensitivity of our model's output to changes in model parameters. Results Percentage RMS errors between modelled and experimental forces determined for each subject at each stimulation pattern and velocity showed that the errors were in general less than 20%. The coefficients of determination between the measured

  10. Does sensorimotor cortex activity change with quadriceps femoris torque output? A human electroencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Fry, A; Vogt, T; Folland, J P

    2014-09-01

    Encoding muscular force output during voluntary contractions is widely perceived to result, at least in part, from modulations in neuronal activity within the sensorimotor cortex. However the underlying electrophysiological phenomena associated with increased force output remains unclear. This study directly assessed sensorimotor cortex activity using electroencephalography (EEG) in humans performing isometric knee-extensions at a range of discrete torque levels. Fifteen healthy males (age 24 (s=5) years) completed one familiarization and one experimental trial. Participants performed a cyclic series of 60 isometric knee-extension contractions with the right leg, including 15 contractions of a 5-s duration at each of four discrete torque levels: 15%, 30%, 45% and 60% of maximal voluntary torque (MVT). Isometric knee-extension torque, quadriceps electromyography and EEG were recorded at rest and throughout all the contractions. EEG (0.5-50 Hz) was collected using a 32-channel active-electrode cap. A voxel-based low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) analysis calculated cortical activation within the sensorimotor cortex (one of 27 MNI coordinates) for the entire 0.5-50-Hz range (cortical current density (CCD)), as well as for each constituent frequency band in this range (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma). Gamma band (30-50 Hz) cortical activity increased with contraction torque (analysis of variance [ANOVA], P=0.03). Conversely, activity within the other frequency bands was not modulated by torque (P≥0.09), nor was overall CCD (P=0.11). Peripheral neuromuscular activation (quadriceps electromyography (EMG) amplitude) demonstrated distinct increases between each torque level (P<0.01). In conclusion, sensorimotor cortical activity within the gamma band demonstrated an overall increase with contraction torque, whereas both CCD and each of the other constituent frequency bands were not modulated by increments in torque magnitude during isometric

  11. Effects of electrical stimulation or voluntary contraction for strengthening the quadriceps femoris muscles in an aged male population.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, E; Emrey, T; Shirley, S; Craik, R L

    1994-07-01

    Since musculoskeletal impairment increases with age, it is important to determine if exercise changes age-related muscle weakness. This study compared the training effects of electrical stimulation and voluntary isometric contraction, the traditional exercise, on the quadriceps femoris in males 65 years and older. Eighteen informed, nondisabled males, 72 +/- 4 years of age, participated in 12 training sessions over 4 weeks. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque was measured with a Cybex II dynamometer prior to and following training. An interclass correlation coefficient (3,1) of 0.982 demonstrated repeated reliable torque measurement. The electrical stimulation group trained at an average of 36% of pretest MVIC; the traditional exercise group trained at an average of 42% MVIC. Average (F = 14.06, p = 0.004) and peak (F = 14.32, p = 0.004) torque values were increased with both modes of training. Both methods of training using a low training load were effective in increasing torque in this older male sample. Electrical stimulation has the same potential as traditional exercise to provide improved strength for aged males. Future research should examine electrical stimulation in older persons with compromised ability to exercise using traditional methods. PMID:8081406

  12. Tenderness, sensory, and color attributes of two muscles from the M. quadriceps femoris when fabricated using a modified hot-boning technique.

    PubMed

    Jenschke, B E; Swedberg, B J; Calkins, C R

    2008-10-01

    The M. quadriceps femoris from USDA Choice (n = 12) and USDA Select (n = 12) carcasses were fabricated traditionally (COLD) or innovatively (HOT), in which the seams it shares with the top round and bottom round were separated prerigor to evaluate positional and locational effects on Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), sensory attributes, and objective color. At slaughter, paired USDA Choice and USDA Select carcasses were alternately assigned either the HOT or COLD treatment. At 48 h postslaughter, subprimals were removed, vacuum-packaged, and aged for an additional 5 d. After aging, the M. quadriceps femoris was cut into 2.54-cm-thick steaks and allowed to bloom 1 h. For the M. rectus femoris (REC) and M. vastus lateralis (VAL), L* values significantly (P < 0.050) decreased when moving from the proximal to distal position within the muscle. Similarly, a* and b* values decreased in the VAL when moving from the proximal to the distal aspect. After color measurement, steaks were vacuum-packaged and frozen (-26 degrees C) until shear and sensory data were collected. Significant position (proximal to distal) and location effects (cranial to caudal) were noted for both muscles. However, treatment did not affect WBSF of the VAL. Although intramuscular variation existed, WBSF and sensory panel tenderness ratings were acceptable for the REC. Although WBSF values were greater and tenderness ratings were less than the REC, the VAL were not extremely tough and therefore could be used in enhancement applications. PMID:18539844

  13. [Amino acid composition of the rat quadriceps femoris muscle after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, T F; Miroshnikova, E B; Poliakov, V V; Murugova, T P

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid composition of the quadriceps muscle of rats flown onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-936 and exposed to the ground-based synchronous control experiment was studied. The weightless rats showed changes in the amino acid concentration in the quadriceps muscle. The centrifuged flight and synchronous rats displayed an accumulation of free amino acids in the above muscle. PMID:7070040

  14. Influence of knee alignment on quadriceps cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Akitoshi; Mukai, Naoki; Miyakawa, Shunpei; Mesaki, Noboru; Maeda, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Gallagher, Philip M; Schrager, Matt; Fry, Andrew C

    2009-10-16

    Previous studies of methods for stimulating the individual muscles composing the quadriceps femoris have not considered the structural features of a subject's knee joint. In this study, we compared the ratios of the individual muscles composing the quadriceps between subjects with different knee alignments using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A total of 18 healthy males were examined: 6 normal knees (age, 23.0+/-0.6 yr; femorotibial angle (FTA), 176.8+/-0.4 degrees), 6 genu varum (age, 21.8+/-2.9 yr; FTA, 181.7+/-2.6 degrees) and 6 genu valgum (age, 21.0+/-1.6 yr; FTA, 172.3+/-1.5 degrees). The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of quadriceps muscles were obtained by MR imaging of the entire left thigh. The CSAs of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were obtained by MR imaging of the entire left thigh in a supine position. The VM/VL ratio was also obtained by dividing the CSA of the VM by that of the VL and compared among the three groups of subjects with different knee alignments. The genu varum group showed a significantly higher %CSA of VM in the CSA of the quadriceps (VM/Quad) (49.0+/-2.6%) than values for the other two groups. The genu valgum group showed significantly higher values of RF/Quad (15.2+/-2.1%) and VL/Quad (40.6+/-4.0%) than the other groups. The VM/VL ratio was significantly higher in the genu varum than in values for the other two groups. This difference in CSA, in respect to knee alignment, may be considered when devising muscle training programs. PMID:19698946

  15. Kinesiology Taping does not Modify Electromyographic Activity or Muscle Flexibility of Quadriceps Femoris Muscle: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study in Healthy Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Dymarek, Robert; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Rajfur, Katarzyna; Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Smykla, Agnieszka; Taradaj, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background Kinesiology taping (KT) is a popular method of supporting professional athletes during sports activities, traumatic injury prevention, and physiotherapeutic procedures after a wide range of musculoskeletal injuries. The effectiveness of KT in muscle strength and motor units recruitment is still uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of KT on surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity and muscle flexibility of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and vastus medialis (VM) muscles in healthy volleyball players. Material/Methods Twenty-two healthy volleyball players (8 men and 14 women) were included in the study and randomly assigned to 2 comparative groups: “kinesiology taping” (KT; n=12; age: 22.30±1.88 years; BMI: 22.19±4.00 kg/m2) in which KT application over the RF muscle was used, and “placebo taping” (PT; n=10; age: 21.50±2.07 years; BMI: 22.74±2.67 kg/m2) in which adhesive nonelastic tape over the same muscle was used. All subjects were analyzed for resting sEMG activity of the VL and VM muscles, resting and functional sEMG activity of RF muscle, and muscle flexibility of RF muscle. Results No significant differences in muscle flexibility of the RF muscle and sEMG activity of the RF, VL, and VM muscles were registered before and after interventions in both groups, and between the KT and PT groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The results show that application of the KT to the RF muscle is not useful to improve sEMG activity. PMID:26232122

  16. Comparative study of linear and curvilinear ultrasound probes to assess quadriceps rectus femoris muscle mass in healthy subjects and in patients with chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, S; Suh, E; Thompson, A; Connolly, B; Ramsay, M; Harding, R; Puthucheary, Z; Moxham, J; Hart, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area (RFCSA) are clinically useful measurements in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and critically ill patients. Technical considerations as to the type of probe used, which affects image resolution, have limited widespread clinical application. We hypothesised that measurement of RFCSA would be similar with linear and curvilinear probes. Methods Four studies were performed to compare the use of the curvilinear probe in measuring RFCSA. Study 1 investigated agreement of RFCSA measurements using linear and curvilinear probes in healthy subjects, and in patients with chronic respiratory disease. Study 2 investigated the intra-rater and inter-rater agreement using the curvilinear probe. Study 3 investigated the agreement of RFCSA measured from whole and spliced images using the linear probe. Study 4 investigated the applicability of ultrasound in measuring RFCSA during the acute and recovery phases of an exacerbation of COPD. Results Study 1 showed demonstrated no difference in the measurement of RFCSA using the curvilinear and linear probes (308±104 mm2 vs 320±117 mm2, p=0.80; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)>0.97). Study 2 demonstrated high intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of RFCSA measurement with ICC>0.95 for both. Study 3 showed that the spliced image from the linear probe was similar to the whole image RFCSA (308±103.5 vs 263±147 mm2, p=0.34; ICC>0.98). Study 4 confirmed the clinical acceptability of using the curvilinear probe during an exacerbation of COPD. There were relationships observed between admission RFCSA and body mass index (r=+0.65, p=0.018), and between RFCSA at admission and physical activity levels at 4 weeks post-hospital discharge (r=+0.75, p=0.006). Conclusions These studies have demonstrated that clinicians can employ whole and spliced images from the linear probe or use images from the curvilinear probe, to measure RFCSA. This will extend

  17. Influence of Local Cooling on Proprioceptive Acuity in the Quadriceps Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Estephan, Lorein; Legendre, Martine; Sulpher, Stéphanie

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To test the influence of cooling on proprioceptive acuity as reflected in the ability to discriminate weights. Design and Setting: Participants were trained to perform a weight-discrimination task. Their ability to correctly report small increments in weight was compared before and after local cooling (a 20-minute application of a crushed-ice pack) of the quadriceps muscle group. Data were collected at a university research laboratory. Subjects: Twenty young, physically active adults (undergraduate students; 14 men, 6 women; mean age, 22.1 ± 2.6 years). Measurements: We calculated overall performance in the weight-discrimination task (percentage of discrimination correct) for each participant to estimate the differential threshold (ie, minimal increment in weight that yields a probability of 75% correct responses). Results: Before local cooling, participants discriminated increments in the order of 4% to 10% from the standard weight (mean threshold, 0.17 ± 0.06 kg). After local cooling, the discriminative performance remained, on average, very similar to that seen before cooling (mean threshold, 0.17 ± 0.08 kg; paired t test: t = 0.24, P = .81). Only a small group of participants (n = 5) showed evidence of a decreased ability to discriminate weight after cooling. Conclusions: The perception of force signals required for weight discrimination does not appear to be affected by local cooling of the quadriceps muscle group. This finding provides additional evidence for the relative safety of cold applications and their effect on proprioceptive perceptual abilities. PMID:12937450

  18. Influence of angular velocity on vastus lateralis and rectus femoris oxygenation dynamics during knee extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Denis, Romain; Wilkinson, Jennifer; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes in angular velocity would alter vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) oxygenation status during maximal isokinetic knee extension exercises. Eleven recreationally active male participants randomly performed ten maximal knee extensions at 30, 60, 120 and 240° s(-1). Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and total haemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) were acquired from the VL and RF muscles by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath-by-breath pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2p)) was recorded throughout the tests. Peak torque and VO(2p) significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). Interestingly, RF and VL TOI significantly increased as a function of velocity (P<0·05), whereas [tHb] significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). A greater number of muscle fibre recruited at slow velocity, where the torque and VO(2p) were the highest, might explain the lower VL and RF TOI observed herein. Furthermore, the increase in local blood flow (suggested by [tHb] changes) during isokinetic knee extension exercises performed at slow angular velocity might have been induced by a higher intramuscular pressure during the contraction phases as well as a greater microcirculatory vasodilatation during relaxation phases. Implementing slow-velocity isokinetic exercises in rehabilitation or other training programmes could delay the short-term anoxia generated by such exercises and result in muscle metabolism enhancement. PMID:21771253

  19. Influence of extended aging on beef quality characteristics and sensory perception of steaks from the biceps femoris and semimembranosus.

    PubMed

    Colle, M J; Richard, R P; Killinger, K M; Bohlscheid, J C; Gray, A R; Loucks, W I; Day, R N; Cochran, A S; Nasados, J A; Doumit, M E

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to determine the influence of post-fabrication aging (2, 14, 21, 42, and 63days) on beef quality characteristics and consumer sensory perception of biceps femoris (BF) and semimembranosus (SM) steaks. Lipid oxidation and aerobic plate counts increased (P<0.05) with longer aging periods and retail display times. An aging period by day of retail display interaction (P<0.05) was observed for a* and b* values of the BF and SM. Warner-Bratzler shear force values decreased (P<0.05) with longer aging for the SM, while no difference was observed for the BF. Consumer panel results revealed that longer aging periods increased (P<0.05) acceptability of the SM, tenderness of both muscles, and tended to increase (P=0.07) juiciness of the SM. Our results show that extended aging reduces retail color stability yet has positive effects on consumer perception of tenderness of both muscles and overall acceptability of the SM. PMID:27155799

  20. Musculotendon variability influences tissue strains experienced by the biceps femoris long head muscle during high-speed running

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    The hamstring muscles frequently suffer injury during high-speed running, though the factors that make an individual more susceptible to injury remain poorly understood. The goals of this study were to measure the musculotendon dimensions of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) muscle, the hamstring muscle injured most often, and to use computational models to assess the influence of variability in the BFlh’s dimensions on internal tissue strains during high-speed running. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired over the thigh in 12 collegiate athletes, and musculotendon dimensions were measured in the proximal free tendon/aponeurosis, muscle and distal free tendon/aponeurosis. Finite element meshes were generated based on the average, standard deviation and range of BFlh dimensions. Simulation boundary conditions were defined to match muscle activation and musculotendon length change in the BFlh during high-speed running. Muscle and connective tissue dimensions were found to vary between subjects, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 17 ± 6% across all dimensions. For all simulations peak local strain was highest along the proximal myotendinous junction, which is where injury typically occurs. Model variations showed that peak local tissue strain increased as the proximal aponeurosis width narrowed and the muscle width widened. The aponeurosis width and muscle width variation models showed that the relative dimensions of these structures influence internal muscle tissue strains. The results of this study indicate that a musculotendon unit’s architecture influences its strain injury susceptibility during high-speed running. PMID:25189094

  1. Myositis Ossificans of Rectus Femoris: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, I Muni; Vishal, Amar; Kiran, K Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Myositis ossificans (MO), heterotopic ossification, occurs in muscles and soft tissue. This lesion contains actively proliferating fibroblasts and osteoblasts. It commonly affects vigorous young men and more so among athletes. It occurs as a result of trauma, either acute or chronic and can also arise near joints in neurological disorders. By time of presentation, ossification is extensive and the benign nature of the lesion is usually evident on radiological studies. Most common muscles involved in MO are the flexor muscles of the arm, the hamstrings and quadriceps femoris. Case Report: We present a case of MO with isolated involvement of rectus femoris in mid-thigh and sparing of other three muscles of quadriceps femoris, with no improvement following physiotherapy and medical management requiring surgical excision for better prognosis with no recurrence. Conclusion: MO, a benign lesion, is known to affect the flexors of the arm, the hamstrings, and quadriceps femoris; it must be noted that even individual muscle can also be affected as shown in the above case presentation without involving whole group of muscles. Surgical excision is indicated if non-operative measures are not successful. PMID:27299083

  2. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-repetition maximum, respectively. [Results] Three weeks of training did not alter the one-repetition maximum, and muscle fibers were injured while measuring the one-repetition maximum and reloading. The decrease in cross-sectional area in the rectus femoris muscle induced by unloading for 2 weeks was significantly recovered after training at 70% of the one-repetition maximum. The levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 mRNA expression were significantly lower in muscles trained at 70% of the one-repetition maximum than in untrained muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training can promote atrophic muscle recovery, which provides a scientific basis for therapeutic exercise methods for treatment of atrophic muscle in physical therapy. PMID:26696716

  3. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-repetition maximum, respectively. [Results] Three weeks of training did not alter the one-repetition maximum, and muscle fibers were injured while measuring the one-repetition maximum and reloading. The decrease in cross-sectional area in the rectus femoris muscle induced by unloading for 2 weeks was significantly recovered after training at 70% of the one-repetition maximum. The levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 mRNA expression were significantly lower in muscles trained at 70% of the one-repetition maximum than in untrained muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training can promote atrophic muscle recovery, which provides a scientific basis for therapeutic exercise methods for treatment of atrophic muscle in physical therapy. PMID:26696716

  4. Isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps peak torque ratio: the influence of sport modality, gender, and angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marilia Dos Santos; De Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Koffes, Fabiana De Carvalho; Mascarin, Naryana Cristina; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia; Da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H/Q) peak torque ratios evaluated at different angular velocities between men and women who participate in judo, handball or soccer. A total of 166 athletes, including 58 judokas (26 females and 32 males), 39 handball players (22 females and 17 males), and 69 soccer players (17 females and 52 males), were evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer. The H/Q isokinetic peak torque ratios were calculated at angular velocities of 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ and 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by gender, female soccer players produced lower H/Q peak torque ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than males involved in the same sport. However, when H/Q peak torque ratio was assessed at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹, there were no significant differences between the sexes. In the analysis by sport, there were no differences among females at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹. In contrast, male soccer players had significantly higher H/Q peak torque ratios than judokas (66 ± 12% vs. 57 ± 14%, respectively). Female handball players produced significantly lower peak torque ratios at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ than judokas or soccer players, whereas males presented no ratio differences among sports At 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by velocity, women's muscular ratios assessed at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ were significantly lower than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ for all sports; among men, only judokas presented lower ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. The present results suggest that sport modality and angular velocity influence the isokinetic strength profiles of men and women. PMID:22364375

  5. Physical characteristics as predictors of quadriceps muscle isometric strength: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hamzat, T K

    2001-09-01

    This one-group experimental study was carried out to investigate the relationship between isometric strength of quadriceps femoris muscle group and physical characteristics of subjects namely: age; weight; and height. Prediction equations were also derived for quadriceps isometric strength from these physical characteristics. Fifty volunteer, right-legged healthy normal male subjects participated in the study. They were aged between 19 and 27 years. The subjects had no previous history of neuromuscular and skeletal injuries to the lower limbs. Their ages, height and weight were measured in years, centimeters and kilograms, respectively. Quadriceps isometric strength was measured using an adapted cable tensiometer (ACT) and recorded in kilogramforce (kgf). Pearson's product correlation co-efficient (r) was used to study the relationship between quadriceps strength and each of age, height and weight. Linear and multiple regression analyses were also carried out. The result showed a high and positive Pearson's moment correlation coefficient (r) between quadriceps isometric strength and each of weight and height. A positive but low correlation (r) was also found between age and quadriceps isometric strength. Prediction equations were also derived from the linear and regression analyses. The study concluded that there was linear relationship between the physical characteristics and quadriceps isometric strength. It was recommended that the prediction equation be employed to estimate quadriceps strength while setting muscle strengthening goals in the clinics during medical rehabilitation for patients within the age range used in this study. PMID:14510124

  6. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  7. Contribution of Hamstring Fatigue to Quadriceps Inhibition Following Lumbar Extension Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Fritz, Julie M.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1) and moderate (set 2) fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls. Key Points A neuromuscular relationship between the lumbar paraspinals and quadriceps while performing lumbar extension exercise may be influenced by hamstring muscle fatigue. QI following lumbar extension exercise in persons with a history of LBP group may involve significant contribution from the hamstring muscle group. More hamstring muscle contribution may be a necessary adaptation in the history of LBP group due to weaker and more fatigable lumbar extensors. PMID:24198683

  8. Distal Insertions of the Biceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Eric A.; Anz, Adam W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of the biceps femoris from the fibula and proximal tibia is encountered in clinical practice. While the anatomy of the primary posterolateral corner structures has been qualitatively and quantitatively described, a quantitative analysis regarding the insertions of the biceps femoris on the fibula and proximal tibia is lacking. Purpose: To quantitatively assess the insertions of the biceps femoris, fibular collateral ligament (FCL), and anterolateral ligament (ALL) on the fibula and proximal tibia as well as establish relationships among these structures and to pertinent surgical anatomy. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissections were performed on 12 nonpaired, fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens identifying the biceps femoris, FCL, and ALL, and their insertions on the proximal tibia and fibula. The footprint areas, orientations, and distances from relevant osseous landmarks were measured using a 3-dimensional coordinate measurement device. Results: Dissection produced 6 easily identifiable and reproducible anatomic footprints. Tibial footprints included the insertion of the ALL and an insertion of the biceps femoris (TBF). Fibular footprints included the insertion of the FCL, a distal insertion of the biceps femoris (DBF), a medial footprint of the biceps femoris (MBF), and a proximal footprint of the biceps femoris (PBF). The mean area of these footprints (95% CI) was as follows: ALL, 53.0 mm2 (38.4-67.6); TBF, 93.9 mm2 (72.0-115.8); FCL, 86.8 mm2 (72.3-101.2); DBF, 119 mm2 (91.1-146.9); MBF, 46.8 mm2 (29.0-64.5); and PBF, 215 mm2 (192.4-237.5). The mean distance (95% CI) from the Gerdy tubercle to the center of the ALL footprint was 24.3 mm (21.6-27.0) and to the center of the TBF was 22.5 mm (21.0-24.0). The center of the DBF was 8.68 mm (7.0-10.3) from the anterior border of the fibula, the center of the FCL was 14.6 mm (12.5-16.7) from the anterior border of the fibula and 20.7 mm (19.0-22.4) from the tip of the fibular

  9. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus®. [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23–29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47–62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35–12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  10. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii.

    PubMed

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus(®). [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23-29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47-62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35-12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  11. Early Quadriceps Strength Loss After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L; Petterson, Stephanie C; Stevens, Jennifer E; Vandenborne, Krista; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Background: While total knee arthroplasty reduces pain and provides a functional range of motion of the knee, quadriceps weakness and reduced functional capacity typically are still present one year after surgery. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the role of failure of voluntary muscle activation and muscle atrophy in the early loss of quadriceps strength after surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis were tested an average of ten days before and twenty-seven days after primary total knee arthroplasty. Quadriceps strength and voluntary muscle activation were measured with use of a burst-superimposition technique in which a supramaximal burst of electrical stimulation is superimposed on a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Maximal quadriceps cross-sectional area was assessed with use of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Postoperatively, quadriceps strength was decreased by 62%, voluntary activation was decreased by 17%, and maximal cross-sectional area was decreased by 10% in comparison with the preoperative values; these differences were significant (p < 0.01). Collectively, failure of voluntary muscle activation and atrophy explained 85% of the loss of quadriceps strength (p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that failure of voluntary activation contributed nearly twice as much as atrophy did to the loss of quadriceps strength. The severity of knee pain with muscle contraction did not change significantly compared with the preoperative level (p = 0.31). Changes in knee pain during strength-testing did not account for a significant amount of the change in voluntary activation (p = 0.14). Conclusions: Patients who are managed with total knee arthroplasty have profound impairment of quadriceps strength one month after surgery. This impairment is predominantly due to failure of voluntary muscle activation, and it is also influenced, to a lesser degree, by muscle atrophy. Knee pain with

  12. A Novel Noninvasive Method for Measuring Fatigability of the Quadriceps Muscle in Noncooperating Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Jesper B.; Rose, Martin H.; Møller, Kirsten; Perner, Anders; Jensen, Bente R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Critical illness is associated with muscle weakness leading to long-term functional limitations. Objectives. To assess the reliability of a novel method for evaluating fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects. Methods. On two occasions, separated by seven days, nonvoluntary isometric contractions (twitch and tetanic) of the quadriceps femoris muscle evoked by transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation were recorded in twelve healthy adults. For tetanic contractions, the Fatigue Index (ratio of peak torque values) and the slope of the regression line of peak torque values were primary outcome measures. For twitch contractions, maximum peak torque and rise time were calculated. Relative (intraclass correlation, ICC3.1) and absolute (standard error of measurement, SEM) reliability were assessed and minimum detectable change was calculated using a 95% confidence interval (MDC95%). Results. The Fatigue Index (ICC3.1, 0.84; MDC95%, 0.12) and the slope of the regression line (ICC3.1, 0.99; MDC95%, 0.03) showed substantial relative and absolute reliability during the first 15 and 30 contractions, respectively. Conclusion. This method for assessing fatigability of the quadriceps muscle produces reliable results in healthy subjects and may provide valuable data on quantitative changes in muscle working capacity and treatment effects in patients who are incapable of producing voluntary muscle contractions. PMID:26266252

  13. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin. PMID:22561379

  14. Differences in activation patterns between eccentric and concentric quadriceps contractions.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Malachy P; Tyler, Timothy F; Greenberg, Scott C; Gleim, Gilbert W

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies analysing electromyograms (EMGs) from indwelling electrodes have indicated that fast-twitch motor units are selectively recruited for low-intensity eccentric contractions. The aim of this study was to compare the frequency content of surface EMGs from quadriceps muscles during eccentric and concentric contractions at various contraction intensities. Electromyograms were recorded from the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles of 10 men during isokinetic (1.05 rad x s(-1)) eccentric and concentric knee extension contractions at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for each contraction mode. Additionally, isometric contractions (70 degrees) were performed at each intensity. The mean frequency and root mean square (RMS) of the surface EMG were computed. Mean frequency was higher for eccentric than concentric contractions at 25% (P < 0.01), 50% (P < 0.01) and 75% (P < 0.05) but not at 100% MVC. It increased with increasing contraction intensity for isometric (P < 0.001) and concentric (P < 0.01) contractions but not for eccentric contractions (P = 0.27). The EMG amplitude (RMS) increased with increasing contraction intensity similarly in each contraction mode (P < 0.0001). Higher mean frequencies for eccentric than concentric contractions at submaximal contraction intensities is consistent with more fast-twitch motor units being active during eccentric contractions. PMID:11811575

  15. Imaging of rectus femoris proximal tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Poussange, Nicolas; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Graveleau, Nicolas; Meyer, Philippe; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Feldis, Matthieu

    2016-07-01

    The rectus femoris is the most commonly injured muscle of the anterior thigh among athletes, especially soccer players. Although the injury pattern of the muscle belly is well documented, less is known about the anatomy and specific lesions of the proximal tendons. For each head, three distinctive patterns may be encountered according to the location of the injury, which can be at the enthesis, within the tendon, or at the musculotendinous junction. In children, injuries correspond most commonly to avulsion of the anteroinferior iliac spine from the direct head and can lead to subspine impingement. Calcific tendinitis and traumatic tears may be encountered in adults. Recent studies have shown that traumatic injuries of the indirect head may be underdiagnosed and that injuries of both heads may have a surgical issue. Finally, in the case of tears, functional outcome and treatment may vary if the rupture involves one or both tendons and if the tear is partial or complete. Thus, it is mandatory for the radiologist to know the different ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of these lesions in order to provide accurate diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this article is to recall the anatomy of the two heads of rectus femoris, describe a reliable method of assessment with ultrasound and MRI and know the main injury patterns, through our own experience and literature review. PMID:26956398

  16. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  17. Effects of preoperative neuromuscular electrical stimulation on quadriceps strength and functional recovery in total knee arthroplasty. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Supervised preoperative muscle strengthening programmes (prehabilitation) can improve recovery after total joint arthroplasty but are considered resource intensive. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to improve quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength and clinical function in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) however it has not been previously investigated as a prehabilitation modality. Methods This pilot study assessed the compliance of a home-based, NMES prehabilitation programme in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We evaluated its effect on preoperative and postoperative isometric quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength, QFM cross-sectional area (CSA) and clinical function (subjective and objective). Seventeen subjects were recruited with 14 completing the study (NMES group n = 9; Control group n = 5). Results Overall compliance with the programme was excellent (99%). Preoperative QFM strength increased by 28% (p > 0.05) with associated gains in walk, stair-climb and chair-rise times (p < 0.05). Early postoperative strength loss (approximately 50%) was similar in both groups. Only the NMES group demonstrated significant strength (53.3%, p = 0.011) and functional recovery (p < 0.05) from 6 to 12 weeks post-TKA. QFM CSA decreased by 4% in the NMES group compared to a reduction of 12% in the control group (P > 0.05) at 12 weeks postoperatively compared to baseline. There were only limited associations found between objective and subjective functional outcome instruments. Conclusions This pilot study has shown that preoperative NMES may improve recovery of quadriceps muscle strength and expedite a return to normal activities in patients undergoing TKA for OA. Recommendations for appropriate outcome instruments in future studies of prehabilitation in TKA have been provided. PMID:20540807

  18. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh ‘muscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  19. Effects of Exposure to Normobaric Hyperoxia on the Recovery of Local Muscle Fatigue in the Quadriceps Femoris of Young People

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Yuka; Yanagihashi, Ryuya; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Abe, Koji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Acute development of local muscle fatigue and recovery often become large issues on sports fields. This study aimed to identify the effects of normobaric hyperoxia on the recovery of local muscle fatigue. [Subjects] Eleven healthy males participated in this study, and they all completed two protocols in a random order. [Methods] Subjects performed single-leg isometric knee extension at 70% of their maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for as long as possible. Each participant was subsequently treated with one of two recovery conditions: 20.9% O2 or 30.0% O2 for 30 minutes. Afterwards, they performed an identical isometric task to measure the extent of their recovery. The following parameters were used to assess the degrees of muscle fatigue: MVIC, endurance time, surface electromyography (sEMG) power spectra, and changes in hemoglobin concentration using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). [Results] The treatment of 30.0% O2 induced a significant recovery rate in MVIC compared to the 20.9% O2. Additionally, the data revealed a significantly higher concentration of total hemoglobin after the 30.0% O2 treatment than after the 20.9% O2 treatment. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that recovery from acute muscle fatigue can be better facilitated under 30.0% normobaric hyperoxia than a normoxic condition. Therefore, for cases requiring quicker full recovery, treatment under 30.0% O2 environment for 30 minutes is recommended. PMID:24707107

  20. Gender-based analysis of hamstring and quadriceps muscle activation during jump landings and cutting.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Petushek, Erich J; Garceau, Luke R; Hsu, Brittni E; Lutsch, Brittney N; Feldmann, Christina R

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated gender differences in the magnitude and timing of hamstring and quadriceps activation during activities that are believed to cause anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Twelve men (age = 21.0 +/- 1.2 years; body mass = 81.61 +/- 13.3 kg; and jump height = 57.61 +/- 10.15 cm) and 12 women (age = 19.91 +/- 0.9 years; body mass = 64.36 +/- 6.14 kg; and jump height = 43.28 +/- 7.5) performed 3 repetitions each of the drop jump (jump) normalized to the subject's vertical jump height, and a sprint and cut at a 45-degree angle (cut). Electromyography (EMG) was used to quantify rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), lateral hamstring (LH), and medial hamstrings (MH) activation, timing, activation ratios, and timing ratios before and after foot contact for the jump and cut and normalized to each subject's hamstring and quadriceps maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Data were analyzed using an analysis of variance with results demonstrating that during the postcontact phase of the cut, men demonstrated greater LH and MH activation than women. In the precontact phase of the jump, men showed earlier activation of the VL and VM, than women. Women produced longer RF and VM muscle bursts during the postcontact phase of the cut. Additionally, men showed a trend toward higher hamstring to quadriceps activation ratio than women for the postcontact phase of the cut. This study provides evidence that men are LH dominant during the postcontact phase of the cut compared with women, whereas women sustain RF activation longer than men during this phase. Men activate quadriceps muscles earlier than women in the precontact phase of the jump. Training interventions may offer the potential for increasing the rate and magnitude of hamstring muscle activation. These outcomes should be evaluated using EMG during movements that are similar to those that cause ACL injuries to determine if gender differences in muscle activation can be

  1. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  2. Foraging activity rhythms of Dinoponera quadriceps (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in its natural environment.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jeniffer; Azevedo, Dina L O; Santana, Melquisedec A D; Lopes, Talita R P; Araújo, Arrilton

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the foraging activity of the queenless ant Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempf) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in its natural environment by testing the hypotheses that foraging activity presents both daily and seasonal rhythmic variations, and that these rhythms are related to environmental variables. Four colonies of D. quadriceps were observed in an area of secondary Atlantic forest in northeastern Brazil. Data collection was performed over 72 h every three months during an annual cycle. Both daily and seasonal foraging activity rhythms of D. quadriceps colonies were related to environmental factors, but colony differences also explained part of foraging variations. Foraging activity of D. quadriceps colonies was predominantly diurnal independently of season. In the early dry season, the colonies had two activity peaks, one in the morning and another in the afternoon, with a decrease in foraging at midday; however, during the rest of the year, foraging activity was distributed more evenly throughout the daylight hours. The daily rhythm of foraging activity was likely determined by an endogenous circadian rhythm year-round, but in the dry season, temperature and relative humidity also influenced daily foraging activity, with a negative effect of temperature and a positive effect of relative humidity. On a seasonal scale, foraging activity peaked in the early dry season and suddenly declined at the end of this season, increasing again at the late rainy season. The seasonal rhythm of foraging was negatively related to relative humidity and positively related to prey availability. PMID:25525097

  3. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Volitional Quadriceps Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher E.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Quadriceps-activation deficits have been reported after meniscectomy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in conjunction with maximal contractions affects quadriceps activation in patients after meniscectomy. Objective: To determine the effect of single-pulsed TMS on quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) in patients after meniscectomy. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants who had partial meniscectomy and who had a CAR less than 85% were assigned randomly to the TMS group (7 men, 4 women; age  =  38.1 ± 16.2 years, height  =  176.8 ± 11.5 cm, mass  =  91.8 ± 27.5 kg, postoperative time  =  36.7 ± 34.9 weeks) or the control group (7 men, 2 women; age  =  38.2 ± 17.5 years, height  =  176.5 ± 7.9 cm, mass  =  86.2 ± 15.3 kg, postoperative time  =  36.6 ± 37.4 weeks). Intervention(s): Participants in the experimental group received TMS over the motor cortex that was contralateral to the involved leg and performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions with the involved leg. The control group performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions without the TMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): Quadriceps activation was assessed using the CAR, which was measured in 70° of knee flexion at baseline and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes posttest. The CAR was expressed as a percentage of full activation. Results: Differences in CAR were detected over time (F4,72  =  3.025, P  = .02). No interaction (F4,72  =  1.457, P  =  .22) or between-groups differences (F1,18  =  0.096, P  =  .76) were found for CAR. Moderate CAR effect sizes were found at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  −0.33, 1.37) and 60 (Cohen d  =  0.50, 95% CI  =  −0.37, 1.33) minutes in the TMS group compared with CAR at baseline. Strong effect sizes were found for CAR at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.82, 95% CI

  4. A clinically relevant BTX-A injection protocol leads to persistent weakness, contractile material loss, and an altered mRNA expression phenotype in rabbit quadriceps muscles.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Rafael; Vaz, Marco A; Sawatsky, Andrew; Hart, David A; Herzog, Walter

    2015-07-16

    Botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) injections have become a common treatment modality for patients suffering from muscle spasticity. Despite its benefits, BTX-A treatments have been associated with adverse effects on target muscles. Currently, application of BTX-A is largely based on clinical experience, and research quantifying muscle structure following BTX-A treatment has not been performed systematically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate strength, muscle mass, and contractile material six months following a single or repeated (2 and 3) BTX-A injections into the quadriceps femoris of New Zealand white rabbits. Twenty three skeletally mature rabbits were divided into four groups: experimental group rabbits received 1, 2, or 3 injections at intervals of 3 months (1-BTX-A, 2-BTX-A, 3-BTX-A, respectively) while control group rabbits received volume-matched saline injections. Knee extensor strength, quadriceps muscle mass, and quadriceps contractile material of the experimental group rabbits were expressed as a percentage change relative to the control group rabbits. One-way ANOVA was used to determine group differences in outcome measures (α=0.05). Muscle strength and contractile material were significantly reduced in experimental compared to control group rabbits but did not differ between experimental groups. Muscle mass was the same in experimental BTX-A and control group rabbits. We concluded from these results that muscle strength and contractile material do not fully recover within six months of BTX-A treatment. PMID:26087882

  5. Acute Calcific Tendinitis of the Rectus Femoris: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    IKobayashi, Hideo; Kaneko, Haruka; Homma, Yasuhiro; Baba, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periarticular calcific tendinitis is a common cause of Orthopedic outpatient referral. Calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris, however, is very rare and not well known. Due to its rarity, correct diagnosis and prompt treatment are not fully understood. Case Report: Two females (38 and 40 years old) of acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris with the good clinical course without any operative treatment were presented. The pain was managed with oral non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and/or local steroid injection. Interval radiographic assessment showed complete resorption of the calcification. Conclusion: Establishing the correct diagnosis and initiating prompt treatment are shown to be important in achieving resolution of symptoms and in avoiding unnecessary investigations. PMID:27299063

  6. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture After Statin Use

    PubMed Central

    Nesselroade, Ryan D.; Nickels, Leslie Connor

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors. The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. PMID:21079697

  7. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome. PMID:11916903

  8. Quadriceps function relates to muscle size following ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuenze, Christopher M; Blemker, Silvia S; Hart, Joseph M

    2016-09-01

    It remains unclear what role reduced volume and cross-section area (CSA) of individual quadriceps muscles may play in persistent quadriceps weakness and more global dysfunction following ACL reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this investigation was to establish the relationship between cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscle group and measures of knee related and quadriceps function following ACLR. Thirty participants with a history of primary, unilateral ACLR experiencing persistent quadriceps activation failure participated in this cohort study. Clinical factors including International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, normalized knee extension MVIC torque (Nm/kg) and quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR, %) were assessed in addition to CSA. Quadriceps CSA was measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; Siemens Avanto 1.5T). Quadriceps CSA (cm(2) ) and quadriceps volume (cm(3) ) as well as individual muscle estimates were identified within a 10 cm mid-thigh capture area. Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (r) established relationships between CSA and all other variables. Stepwise linear regression established which CSA factors were able to successfully predict clinical factors. Knee extension MVIC torque was strongly correlated with Vastus Intermedius (VI; r =  0.857, p < 0.001) CSA as well as partial VI (r = 0.849, p < 0.001) and quadriceps (r = 0.830, p < 0.001) volume. Partial VI (r = 0.365, p = 0.047) volume was weakly correlated with IKDC score. Knee extension MVIC torque was strongly predicted using VI CSA alone (R(2)  = 0.725) or in combination with Vastus Medialis CSA (VM; R(2)  = 0.756). Statement of Clinical Significance: Atrophy of the VI and VM muscles negatively impacts knee extension strength following ACLR. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1656-1662, 2016. PMID:26763833

  9. A cadaver knee simulator to evaluate the biomechanics of rectus femoris transfer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael C; Brown, Nicholas A T; Bachus, Kent N; Macwilliams, Bruce A

    2009-07-01

    A cadaver knee simulator has been developed to model surgical transfer of the rectus femoris. The simulator allows knee specimens six degrees of freedom and is capable of modeling both the swing and stance phases of human gait. Experiments were conducted using a mechanical hinge analog of the knee to verify that time, flexion angle, and knee extension force measurements recorded when using the simulator were not influenced by its design or operation. A ballistic double pendulum model was used to model the swing phase of gait, and the contributions of hip and ankle torques and hamstrings cocontraction were included when modeling the stance phase of gait. When modeling swing, range of motion and time to peak knee flexion in swing for the hinge knee were similar to those of in vivo test subjects. Measurements of hinge knee extension force when modeling stance under various biomechanical conditions matched those predicted using an analytical model. Future studies using cadaver knee specimens will apply techniques described in this paper to further our understanding of changes in knee biomechanics caused by rectus femoris transfer surgery. PMID:19403312

  10. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  11. Diagnosis and management of quadriceps strains and contusions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the quadriceps muscle group occur frequently in sports and athletic activities. Muscle strains and contusions constitute the majority of these injuries. The clinical presentation and assessment of quadriceps strains and contusions are reviewed along with discussion of appropriate imaging used in diagnosis. Treatment protocols for acute injuries are reviewed including rehabilitation techniques frequently utilized during recovery. Special consideration is given to discussing the criteria for return to sports for athletes after injury. Myositis ossificans is a potentially disabling complication from quadriceps contusions and risk factors, prevention, and treatment are reviewed. PMID:21063497

  12. In vivo patellar tracking induced by individual quadriceps components in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang; Wilson, Nicole A; Makhsous, Mohsen; Press, Joel M; Koh, Jason L; Nuber, Gordon W; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-19

    Patellofemoral pain is a common knee disorder with a multi-factorial etiology related to abnormal patellar tracking. Our hypothesis was that the pattern of three-dimensional rotation and translation of the patella induced by selective activation of individual quadriceps components would differ between subjects with patellofemoral pain and healthy subjects. Nine female subjects with patellofemoral pain and seven healthy female subjects underwent electrical stimulation to selectively activate individual quadriceps components (vastus medialis obliquus, VMO; vastus medialis lateralis, VML; vastus lateralis, VL) with the knee at 0 degrees and 20 degrees flexion, while three-dimensional patellar tracking was recorded. Normalized direction of rotation and direction of translation characterized the relative amplitudes of each component of patellar movement. VMO activation in patellofemoral pain caused greater medial patellar rotation (distal patellar pole rotates medially in frontal plane) at both knee positions (p<0.01), and both VMO and VML activation caused increased anterior patellar translation (p<0.001) in patellofemoral pain compared to healthy subjects at 20 degrees knee flexion. VL activation caused more lateral patellar translation (p<0.001) in patellofemoral pain compared to healthy subjects. In healthy subjects the 3-D mechanical action of the VMO is actively modulated with knee flexion angle while such modulation was not observed in PFP subjects. This could be due to anatomical differences in the VMO insertion on the patella and medial quadriceps weakness. Quantitative evaluation of the influence of individual quadriceps components on patellar tracking will aid understanding of the knee extensor mechanism and provide insight into the etiology of patellofemoral pain. PMID:19878947

  13. In vivo patellar tracking induced by individual quadriceps components in individuals with patellofemoral pain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fang; Wilson, Nicole A.; Makhsous, Mohsen; Press, Joel M.; Koh, Jason L.; Nuber, Gordon W.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain is a common knee disorders with a multi-factorial etiology related to abnormal patellar tracking. Our hypothesis was that the pattern of 3-dimensional rotation and translation of the patella induced by selective activation of individual quadriceps components would differ between subjects with patellofemoral pain and healthy subjects. Nine female subjects with patellofemoral pain and seven healthy female subjects underwent electrical stimulation to selectively activate individual quadriceps components (vastus medialis obliquus, VMO; vastus medialis lateralis, VML; vastus lateralis, VL) with the knee at 0° and 20° flexion, while three-dimensional patellar tracking was recorded. Normalized direction of rotation and direction of translation characterized the relative amplitudes of each component of patellar movement. VMO activation in patellofemoral pain caused greater medial patellar rotation (distal patellar pole rotates medially in frontal plane) at both knee positions (p<0.01), and both VMO and VML activation caused increased anterior patellar translation (p<0.001) in patellofemoral pain compared to healthy subjects at 20° knee flexion. VL activation caused more lateral patellar translation (p<0.001) in patellofemoral pain compared to healthy subjects. In healthy subjects the 3-D mechanical action of the VMO is actively modulated with knee flexion angle while such modulation was not observed in PFP subjects. This could be due to anatomical differences in the VMO insertion on the patella and medial quadriceps weakness. Quantitative evaluation of the influence of individual quadriceps components on patellar tracking will aid understanding of the knee extensor mechanism and provide insight into the etiology of patellofemoral pain. PMID:19878947

  14. Lack of Correlation between Dynamic Balance and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio in Patients with Chronic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Lee, Seok-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps (HQ) ratio, as well as the relationships of these parameters with dynamic balance, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Materials and Methods We compared 25 patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral ACL tears and 25 age-matched healthy volunteers. The maximal torque of the quadriceps and hamstring and dynamic balance were measured. Results Although the isokinetic maximal peak torques were about 50% lower in the quadriceps (57%, p<0.001) and hamstring (56%, p=0.001) muscles in the chronic ACL tear group than in the control group, their HQ ratios were similar (56%±17% vs. 58%±6%, p=0.591). HQ ratio was significantly correlated with anterior-posterior stability index (r=-0.511, p=0.021) and overall stability index (r=-0.476, p=0.034) in control group, but these correlations were not observed in chronic ACL tear group. Conclusions Thigh muscle strength was about 50% lower in the chronic ACL tear group than in the control group, but the HQ ratio was similar. The dynamic balance of the knee was not influenced by thigh muscle strength but was influenced by HQ ratio in healthy young individuals. However, HQ ratio was not correlated with dynamic knee balance in chronic ACL tear patients. PMID:26060609

  15. Strength Training to Contraction Failure Increases Voluntary Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Shortly After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Elin Karin; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Andersen, Lars Louis; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to investigate voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during one set of knee extensions performed until contraction failure in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. Design This was a cross-sectional study of 24 patients with total knee arthroplasty. One set of knee extensions was performed until contraction failure, using a predetermined 10 repetition maximum loading. In the operated leg, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral and medial vastus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris muscles was recorded during the set. Muscle activity (%EMGmax) and median power frequency of the EMG power spectrum were calculated for each repetition decile (10%–100% contraction failure). Results Muscle activity increased significantly over contractions from a mean of 90.0 and 93.6 %EMGmax (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 99.3 and 105.5 %EMGmax at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.009 and 0.004). Median power frequency decreased significantly over contractions from a mean of 66.8 and 64.2 Hz (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 59.9 and 60.1 Hz at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.0006 and 0.0187). Conclusion In patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty, 10 repetition maximum–loaded knee extensions performed in one set until contraction failure increases voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during the set. Clinical Trials Gov-identifier: NCT01713140 to the abstract to increase trial transparency. PMID:26339729

  16. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:25148303

  17. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:24983846

  18. Changes in Quadriceps Muscle Activity During Sustained Recreational Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich; Seifert, John G.; Wakeling, James M.

    2011-01-01

    During a day of skiing thousands of repeated contractions take place. Previous research on prolonged recreational alpine skiing show that physiological changes occur and hence some level of fatigue is inevitable. In the present paper the effect of prolonged skiing on the recruitment and coordination of the muscle activity was investigated. Six subjects performed 24 standardized runs. Muscle activity during the first two (PREskiing) and the last two (POSTskiing) runs was measured from the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) using EMG and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF on outside leg. A significant pronounced outside leg loading occurred during POSTskiing and the timing of muscle activity peaks occurred more towards turn completion. Specific EMG frequency changes were observed at certain time points throughout the time windows and not over the whole double turn. It is suggested that general muscular fatigue, where additional specific muscle fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers did not occur. The EMG frequency decrease and intensity changes for RF and VL are caused by altered timing (coordination) within the turn towards a most likely more uncontrolled skiing technique. Hence, these data provide evidence to suggest recreational skiers alter their skiing technique before a potential change in muscle fiber recruitment occurs. Key points The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF. General muscular fatigue, where additional specific fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers, did not occur. A modified skiing style towards a less functional and hence more uncontrolled skiing technique seems to be a key

  19. Effect of tourniquet time on postoperative quadriceps function.

    PubMed

    Saunders, K C; Louis, D L; Weingarden, S I; Waylonis, G W

    1979-09-01

    Postoperative weakness of quadriceps function following knee arthrotomy has often been attributed to pain inhibition or lack of motivation. However, the delayed recovery may be the result of a slowly resolving axonal compression syndrome caused by the pneumatic tourniquet. Forty-eight patients who underwent knee arthrotomy were evaluated including postoperative electromyographic testing and clinical follow-up. Thirty of these patients (62.5%) developed postoperative EMG changes. Abnormalities were noted in various muscle groups but most commonly involved the quadriceps alone or quadriceps and gastrocnemius. An effort was made in 20 patients to substantially decrease the duration of tourniquet compression by limiting tourniquet inflation to intracapsular portions of the procedures. Fewer EMG changes and more rapid clinical recovery were noted in patients with decreased tourniquet times, suggesting that it is beneficial to minimize the duration of tourniquet compression. In all patients who returned for serial testing, the EMG abnormalities eventually resolved. PMID:509826

  20. Evaluation of Central and Peripheral Fatigue in the Quadriceps Using Fractal Dimension and Conduction Velocity in Young Females

    PubMed Central

    Beretta-Piccoli, Matteo; D’Antona, Giuseppe; Barbero, Marco; Fisher, Beth; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M.; Clijsen, Ron; Cescon, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, linear and non-linear surface electromyography descriptors for central and peripheral components of fatigue have been developed. In the current study, we tested fractal dimension (FD) and conduction velocity (CV) as myoelectric descriptors of central and peripheral fatigue, respectively. To this aim, we analyzed FD and CV slopes during sustained fatiguing contractions of the quadriceps femoris in healthy humans. Methods A total of 29 recreationally active women (mean age±standard deviation: 24±4 years) and two female elite athletes (one power athlete, age 24 and one endurance athlete, age 30 years) performed two knee extensions: (1) at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 30 s, and (2) at 60% MVC held until exhaustion. Surface EMG signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis using bidimensional arrays. Results Central and peripheral fatigue were described as decreases in FD and CV, respectively. A positive correlation between FD and CV (R=0.51, p<0.01) was found during the sustained 60% MVC, probably as a result of simultaneous motor unit synchronization and a decrease in muscle fiber CV during the fatiguing task. Conclusions Central and peripheral fatigue can be described as changes in FD and CV, at least in young, healthy women. The significant correlation between FD and CV observed at 60% MVC suggests that a mutual interaction between central and peripheral fatigue can arise during submaximal isometric contractions. PMID:25880369

  1. Avulsion fracture of the straight and reflected heads of rectus femoris.

    PubMed

    Deehan, D J; Beattie, T F; Knight, D; Jongschaap, H

    1992-09-01

    We present a rare case of avulsion fracture of the reflected head of rectus femoris. This occurred in a 13-year-old male footballer. Diagnosis was made with pelvic radiology and treatment was bed rest and analgesia. PMID:1449579

  2. Partial Tendon Release for Treatment of a Symptomatic Snapping Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Scott A.; Quach, Tony; McAllister, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Snapping of the biceps femoris tendon over the fibular head is an uncommon condition. Reported causes include an anomalous insertion of the tendon, trauma at the insertion site of the tendon, and an abnormality of the fibular head. This article reports a case of a painful snapping biceps femoris tendon in a patient without an anomalous tendon insertion or an abnormality of the fibular head. Partial release of the superior aspect of the tendon resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:23015904

  3. The Effect of Concentric Isokinetic Strength Training of the Quadriceps Femoris on Electromyography and Muscle Strength in the Trained and Untrained Limb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evetovich, Tammy K.; Housh, Terry J.; Housh, Dona J.; Johnson, Glen O.; Smith, Douglas B.; Ebersole, Kyle T.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effects of unilateral concentric isokinetic leg extension training on peak torque and electromyographic (EMG) responses in trained and untrained limbs. Adult men participated in training and control groups. Overall, unilateral concentric isokinetic strength training induced strength increases in trained as well as untrained limbs.…

  4. Acute effects of static stretching on peak and end-range hamstring-to-quadriceps functional ratios

    PubMed Central

    Sekir, Ufuk; Arabaci, Ramiz; Akova, Bedrettin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate if static stretching influences peak and end-range functional hamstring-to-quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios in elite women athletes. METHODS: Eleven healthy female athletes in an elite competitive level participated to the study. All the participants fulfilled the static stretching or non-stretching (control) intervention protocol in a randomized design on different days. Two static unassisted stretching exercises, one in standing and one in sitting position, were used to stretch both the hamstring and quadriceps muscles during these protocols. The total time for the static stretching was 6 ± 1 min. The isokinetic peak torque measurements for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles in eccentric and concentric modes and the calculations for the functional H/Q strength ratios at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s were made before (pre) and after (post) the control or stretching intervention. The strength measurements and functional strength ratio calculations were based during the entire- and end-range of knee extension. RESULTS: The pre-test scores for quadriceps and hamstring peak torque and end range values were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). Subsequently, although the control group did not exhibit significant changes in quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength (P > 0.05), static stretching decreased eccentric and concentric quadriceps muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P < 0.01). Similarly, static stretching also decreased eccentric and concentric hamstring muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, when the functional H/Q strength ratios were taken into consideration, the pre-intervention values were not significant different between the groups both during the entire and end range of knee extension (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the functional H/Q strength ratios exhibited no significant alterations during the entire and end ranges of knee extension

  5. Tenderization effect of soy sauce on beef M. biceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Yun-Sang; Choi, Ji-Hun; Kim, Hack-Youn; Lee, Mi-Ai; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Lim, Yun-Bin; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2013-08-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the tenderization effect of soy sauce on beef M. biceps femoris (BF). Five marinades were prepared with 4% (w/v) sodium chloride and 25% (w/v) soy sauce solutions (4% salt concentration) and mixed with the ratios of 100:0 (S0, pH 6.52), 75:25 (S25, 5.40) 50:50 (S50, 5.24), 25:75 (S75, 5.05), and 0:100 (S100, 4.85), respectively. The BF samples which were obtained from Hanwoo cows at 48 h postmortem (n=24) were marinated with five marinades for 72 h at 4°C (1:4 w/w), and the effects of soy sauce on tenderness were evaluated. Soy sauce marination resulted in a decrease in the pH value of the BF sample. However, there were no significant differences in the water holding capacity (P<0.05). The S100 treatment showed the significant (P<0.05) increase in collagen solubility and myofibrillar fragmentation index, contributing to decreased shear force compared to S0 (control). Reduction in intensity of few myofibrillar protein bands were observed for S100 treatment compared to control using SDS-PAGE. Scanning electron microscopy revealed breakdown of connective tissue surrounding muscle fibers of the S100 treatment. The tenderization effect of soy sauce may attribute various mechanisms such as increased collagen solubility or proteolysis which depend on soy sauce level in marinade. PMID:23561150

  6. Quadriceps and respiratory muscle fatigue following high-intensity cycling in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, Damien; Wuyam, Bernard; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Tamisier, Renaud; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Exercise intolerance in COPD seems to combine abnormal ventilatory mechanics, impaired O2 transport and skeletal muscle dysfunction. However their relative contribution and their influence on symptoms reported by patients remain to be clarified. In order to clarify the complex interaction between ventilatory and neuromuscular exercise limiting factors and symptoms, we evaluated respiratory muscles and quadriceps contractile fatigue, dynamic hyperinflation and symptoms induced by exhaustive high-intensity cycling in COPD patients. Fifteen gold II-III COPD patients (age = 67 ± 6 yr; BMI = 26.6 ± 4.2 kg.m(-2)) performed constant-load cycling test at 80% of their peak workload until exhaustion (9.3 ± 2.4 min). Before exercise and at exhaustion, potentiated twitch quadriceps strength (Q(tw)), transdiaphragmatic (P(di,tw)) and gastric (P(ga,tw)) pressures were evoked by femoral nerve, cervical and thoracic magnetic stimulation, respectively. Changes in operational lung volumes during exercise were assessed via repetitive inspiratory capacity (IC) measurements. Dyspnoea and leg discomfort were measured on visual analog scale. At exhaustion, Q(tw) (-33 ± 15%, >15% reduction observed in all patients but two) and Pdi,tw (-20 ± 15%, >15% reduction in 6 patients) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) but not Pga,tw (-6 ± 10%, >15% reduction in 3 patients). Percentage reduction in Q(tw) correlated with the percentage reduction in P(di,tw) (r = 0.66; P<0.05). Percentage reductions in P(di,tw) and P(ga,tw) negatively correlated with the reduction in IC at exhaustion (r = -0.56 and r = -0.62, respectively; P<0.05). Neither dyspnea nor leg discomfort correlated with the amount of muscle fatigue. In conclusion, high-intensity exercise induces quadriceps, diaphragm and less frequently abdominal contractile fatigue in this group of COPD patients. In addition, the rise in end-expiratory lung volume and diaphragm flattening associated with dynamic hyperinflation in COPD might limit

  7. Quadriceps and Respiratory Muscle Fatigue Following High-Intensity Cycling in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bachasson, Damien; Wuyam, Bernard; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Tamisier, Renaud; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Exercise intolerance in COPD seems to combine abnormal ventilatory mechanics, impaired O2 transport and skeletal muscle dysfunction. However their relatie contribution and their influence on symptoms reported by patients remain to be clarified. In order to clarify the complex interaction between ventilatory and neuromuscular exercise limiting factors and symptoms, we evaluated respiratory muscles and quadriceps contractile fatigue, dynamic hyperinflation and symptoms induced by exhaustive high-intensity cycling in COPD patients. Fifteen gold II-III COPD patients (age = 67±6 yr; BMI = 26.6±4.2 kg.m-2) performed constant-load cycling test at 80% of their peak workload until exhaustion (9.3±2.4 min). Before exercise and at exhaustion, potentiated twitch quadriceps strength (Qtw), transdiaphragmatic (Pdi,tw) and gastric (Pga,tw) pressures were evoked by femoral nerve, cervical and thoracic magnetic stimulation, respectively. Changes in operational lung volumes during exercise were assessed via repetitive inspiratory capacity (IC) measurements. Dyspnoea and leg discomfort were measured on visual analog scale. At exhaustion, Qtw (-33±15%, >15% reduction observed in all patients but two) and Pdi,tw (-20±15%, >15% reduction in 6 patients) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) but not Pga,tw (-6±10%, >15% reduction in 3 patients). Percentage reduction in Qtw correlated with the percentage reduction in Pdi,tw (r=0.66; P<0.05). Percentage reductions in Pdi,tw and Pga,tw negatively correlated with the reduction in IC at exhaustion (r=-0.56 and r=-0.62, respectively; P<0.05). Neither dyspnea nor leg discomfort correlated with the amount of muscle fatigue. In conclusion, high-intensity exercise induces quadriceps, diaphragm and less frequently abdominal contractile fatigue in this group of COPD patients. In addition, the rise in end-expiratory lung volume and diaphragm flattening associated with dynamic hyperinflation in COPD might limit the development of abdominal and

  8. Shear-Wave Elastography Assessments of Quadriceps Stiffness Changes prior to, during and after Prolonged Exercise: A Longitudinal Study during an Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon.

    PubMed

    Andonian, Pierre; Viallon, Magalie; Le Goff, Caroline; de Bourguignon, Charles; Tourel, Charline; Morel, Jérome; Giardini, Guido; Gergelé, Laurent; Millet, Grégoire P; Croisille, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In sports medicine, there is increasing interest in quantifying the elastic properties of skeletal muscle, especially during extreme muscular stimulation, to improve our understanding of the impact of alterations in skeletal muscle stiffness on resulting pain or injuries, as well as the mechanisms underlying the relationships between these parameters. Our main objective was to determine whether real-time shear-wave elastography (SWE) can monitor changes in quadriceps muscle elasticity during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon, a powerful mechanical stress model. Our study involved 50 volunteers participating in an extreme mountain marathon (distance: 330 km, elevation: +24,000 m). Quantitative SWE velocity and shear modulus measurements were performed in most superficial quadriceps muscle heads at the following 4 time points: before the race, halfway through the race, upon finishing the race and after recovery (+48 h). Blood biomarker levels were also measured. A significant decrease in the quadriceps shear modulus was observed upon finishing the race (3.31±0.61 kPa) (p<0.001) compared to baseline (3.56±0.63 kPa), followed by a partial recovery +48 h after the race (3.45±0.6 kPa) (p = 0.002) across all muscle heads, as well as for each of the following three muscle heads: the rectus femoris (p = 0.003), the vastus medialis (p = 0.033) and the vastus lateralis (p = 0.001). Our study is the first to assess changes in muscle stiffness during prolonged extreme physical endurance exercises based on shear modulus measurements using non-invasive SWE. We concluded that decreases in stiffness, which may have resulted from quadriceps overuse in the setting of supra-physiological stress caused by the extreme distance and unique elevation of the race, may have been responsible for the development of inflammation and muscle swelling. SWE may hence represent a promising tool for monitoring physiologic or pathological variations in muscle stiffness and may be useful for

  9. Quadriceps Muscle Function After Exercise in Men and Women With a History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kuenze, Christopher M.; Hertel, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sex differences in lower extremity neuromuscular function have been reported after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Research evidence supports different levels of fatigability in men and women and between patients with ACLR and healthy controls. The influence of sex on the response to continuous exercise in patients with ACLR is not clear. Objective: To compare quadriceps neuromuscular function after exercise between men and women with ACLR. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-six active volunteers (13 men [50%]: age = 24.1 ± 4.4 years, height = 179.1 ± 9.8 cm, mass = 80.1 ± 9.4 kg, months since surgery = 43.5 ± 37.0; 13 women [50%]: age = 24.2 ± 5.6 years, height = 163.0 ± 5.9 cm, mass = 62.3 ± 8.3 kg, months since surgery = 45.8 ± 42.7) with a history of unilateral primary ACLR at least 6 months earlier. Intervention(s): Thirty minutes of continuous exercise comprising 5 separate 6-minute cycles, including 5 minutes of uphill walking and 1 minute of body-weight squatting and step-ups. Main Outcome Measure(s): Normalized knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, quadriceps superimposed-burst torque, and quadriceps central activation ratio before and after exercise. We performed separate 2 (sex: men, women) × 2 (time: preexercise, postexercise) repeated-measures analyses of variance for the 3 variables. Separate, independent-samples t tests were calculated to compare preexercise with postexercise change in all dependent variables between sexes. Results: A significant group-by-time interaction was present for knee-extension torque (P = .04). The percentage reduction in knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (men = 1.94%, women = −10.32%; P = .02) and quadriceps central activation ratio (men = −1.45%, women = −8.69%; P = .03) experienced by men was less than that observed in women. Conclusions: In the presence of

  10. Functional analysis of the biceps femoris muscle during locomotor behavior in some primates.

    PubMed

    Kumakura, H

    1989-07-01

    In order to investigate a correlation between morphological variations of the biceps femoris muscle and its homologues in four primate species (Japanese macaque, spider monkey, white-handed gibbon, and chimpanzee) and each type of species-specific locomotor behavior, I carried out both morphological and functional analyses of these muscles. The description of the level of insertion reveals interspecific variation is in the level of crural attachment, especially in species with a bicipital biceps femoris muscle. Electromyograms (EMGs) were induced from both the long and short head of the biceps femoris muscle during four kinds of locomotor behavior (horizontal quadrupedal walking, climbing on an inclined pole, vertical climbing, and bipedal walking). In the case of the monoceptual ischiocruralis lateralis muscle of the Japanese macaque, EMGs were induced from both the one-joint femoral part and the two-joint crural part. Though during horizontal quadrupedal locomotion the crural part of the monocipital-type muscle functioned to maintain the knee joint angle, it functioned to gain propulsive force when the kinematic load became larger, as in vertical climbing and bipedal walking. On the other hand, the long heads of the biceps femoris muscles were active in propulsion regardless of the kinematic load. But in bipedal walking, the long head muscle also acted with the short head muscle to maintain the knee joint angle. These functional features of various biceps femoris muscles of primates correlated with their species-specific locomotor behavior. PMID:2504047

  11. Effects of electromyographic biofeedback on quadriceps strength: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lepley, Adam S; Gribble, Phillip A; Pietrosimone, Brian G

    2012-03-01

    Quadriceps strength is a vital component to lower extremity function and is often the focus in resistance training interventions and injury rehabilitation. Electromyographic biofeedback (EMGBF) is frequently used to supplement strength gains; however, the true effect remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of the treatment effect for EMGBF on quadriceps strength compared with that of placebo and traditional exercise interventions in both healthy and pathological populations. Web of Science and ProQuest databases were searched, and bibliographies of relevant articles were crossreferenced. Six articles measuring isometric quadriceps strength in response to EMGBF training were included and methodologically assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Standardized effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from preintervention and postintervention measures for EMGBF, placebo, and exercise-only interventions. Separate comparisons were made between studies assessing different intervention length (<4 and ≥4 weeks) and patient populations (pathological and healthy). Articles included received an average PEDro score of 6.5 ± 0.84. Homogeneous EMGBF effect sizes were found in all 6 studies (d = 0.01-5.56), with 4 studies reporting CI that crossed 0. A heterogeneous collection of effect sizes was found for exercise alone (d = -0.12 to 1.18) and placebo (d = -0.2 to 1.38), with 4 and 1 studies having a CI that crossed 0, respectively. The greatest EMGBF effects were found in pathological populations (d = 0.01-5.56), with the strongest effect found in the subjects with knee osteoarthritis (d = 5.56, CI = 4.26-6.68). As a group, effects were the strongest for EMGBF compared with that of placebo and exercise-only interventions, yet definitive evidence that EMGBF is beneficial for increasing quadriceps strength could not be concluded because of the 4 studies demonstrating a wide CI. PMID

  12. Contributions to enhanced activity in rectus femoris in response to Lokomat-applied resistance.

    PubMed

    Klarner, Taryn; Blouin, J-S; Carpenter, M G; Lam, T

    2013-03-01

    The application of resistance during the swing phase of locomotion is a viable approach to enhance activity in the rectus femoris (RF) in patients with neurological damage. Increased muscle activity is also accompanied by changes in joint angle and stride frequency, consequently influencing joint angular velocity, making it difficult to attribute neuromuscular changes in RF to resistance. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of resistance on RF activity while constraining joint trajectories. Participants walked in three resistance conditions; 0 % (no resistance), 5 and 10 % of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Visual and auditory biofeedback was provided to help participants maintain the same knee joint angle and stride frequency as during baseline walking. Lower limb joint trajectories and RF activity were recorded. Increasing the resistance, while keeping joint trajectories constant with biofeedback, independently enhanced swing phase RF activity. Therefore, the observed effects in RF are related to resistance, independent of any changes in joint angle. Considering resistance also affects stride frequency, a second experiment was conducted to evaluate the independent effects of resistance and stride frequency on RF activity. Participants walked in four combinations of resistance at 0 and 10 %MVC and natural and slow stride frequency conditions. We observed significant increases in RF activity with increased resistance and decreased stride frequency, confirming the independent contribution of resistance on RF activity as well as the independent effect of stride frequency. Resistance and stride frequency may be key parameters in gait rehabilitation strategies where either of these may be manipulated to enhance swing phase flexor muscle activity in order to maximize rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:23183638

  13. The Significance of Rectus Femoris for the Favorable Functional Outcome After Total Femur Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Shimoji, Takashi; Ae, Keisuke; Tanizawa, Taisuke; Gokita, Tabu

    2016-01-01

    Background: In treatment of tumors, we usually reconstruct after resection of the entire femur using only metallic modular endoprostheses among many procedures and defined it as a total femur replacement. We studied the interrelation between the preservation of rectus femoris and the functional outcome after total femur replacement. Methods: We rated the functional outcomes of 21 patients who underwent total femur replacement. We categorized the subjects into 2 groups: group A (rectus femoris preserved) and group B (rectus femoris unpreserved). We examined them based on the Mann-Whitney U test between the 2 groups in average through the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores. Results: The average score of group A was 20 of 25 (11–25; 80%), whereas the average score of group B was 10 of 25 (4–13; 40%). There was significant difference between the groups (P = 0.00168877). Conclusion: We found that the preservation of rectus femoris is imperative for achieving the favorable functional outcome in total femur replacement.

  14. Avulsion fracture of the straight and reflected heads of rectus femoris.

    PubMed Central

    Deehan, D J; Beattie, T F; Knight, D; Jongschaap, H

    1992-01-01

    We present a rare case of avulsion fracture of the reflected head of rectus femoris. This occurred in a 13-year-old male footballer. Diagnosis was made with pelvic radiology and treatment was bed rest and analgesia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1449579

  15. Examining the Association Between Quadriceps Strength and Cognitive Performance in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Sun, Yu-Shan; Yang, Hui-Fang; Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wu, Li-Wei; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Kao, Tung-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Emerging evidences showed impaired muscle strength was prevalent in older adults with mild cognition impairment or dementia. However, little was known about the role of quadriceps strength in the cognition decline among older population. The objective of our study was to investigate the relation between quadriceps strength and cognitive performance. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2002), a total of 1799 participants aged ≥60 years were enrolled in the study. Every subject completed a household interview, digit symbol substitution test (DSST), physical performances, and a questionnaire regarding personal health. Estimation of relationship between quadriceps strength and cognition was using multiple linear regression and quartile-based analysis with an extended-model approach for covariates adjustment. In a model adjusted for demographics, chronic diseases, health behaviors, and levels of folate and vitamin B12, the level of quadriceps strength was significantly associated with the scores of DSST. The β coefficient interpreted as change of DSST scores for each Newton increment in quadriceps strength comparing participants in the highest quartile of quadriceps strength to those in the lowest quartile was 5.003 (95% confidence interval, 2.725-7.281, P < 0.001). The trends of incremental DSST score across increasing quartiles of quadriceps strength were statistically significant (all P for trend <0.001). Higher quadriceps strength was associated with better cognitive performance. PMID:26266380

  16. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  17. Influence of complete spinal cord injury on skeletal muscle within 6 mo of injury.

    PubMed

    Castro, M J; Apple, D F; Staron, R S; Campos, G E; Dudley, G A

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the influence of spinal cord injury (SCI) on affected skeletal muscle. The right vastus lateralis muscle was biopsied in 12 patients as soon as they were clinically stable (average 6 wk after SCI), and 11 and 24 wk after injury. Samples were also taken from nine able-bodied controls at two time points 18 wk apart. Surface electrical stimulation (ES) was applied to the left quadriceps femoris muscle to assess fatigue at these same time intervals. Biopsies were analyzed for fiber type percent and cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type-specific succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activities, and myosin heavy chain percent. Controls showed no change in any variable over time. Patients showed 27-56% atrophy (P = 0.000) of type I, IIa, and IIax+IIx fibers from 6 to 24 wk after injury, resulting in fiber CSA approximately one-third that of controls. Their fiber type specific SDH and GPDH activities increased (P quadriceps femoris muscle showed moderately greater force loss during ES in patients than in controls. It is suggested that the predominant response of mixed human skeletal muscle within 6 mo of SCI is loss of contractile protein. Therapeutic interventions could take advantage of this to increase

  18. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles.

  19. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females.

  20. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. PMID:27473032

  1. Antiparasitic effect of Dinoponera quadriceps giant ant venom.

    PubMed

    Lima, Danya Bandeira; Sousa, Paloma Leão; Torres, Alba Fabíola Costa; Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da França; Mello, Clarissa Perdigão; Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra de; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; Quinet, Yves Patric; de Oliveira, Márcia Rosa; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2016-09-15

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTD) are treated with toxic therapy of limited efficacy. Previously, we studied the antimicrobial effect of Dinoponera quadriceps venom (DqV) against bacteria. To continue the study, we report in this short communication the antimicrobial effect of DqV against Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi. DqV inhibits the promastigote forms of L. amazonensis and all T. cruzi developmental forms, with low toxicity in host cells. DqV causes cell death in T. cruzi through necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms observed by staining the cells with annexin V-FITC (AX) and propidium iodide (PI), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential by flow cytometry analyses and confocal microscopy and morphological alterations, such as loss of membrane integrity and cell shrinkage by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In conclusion, we suggest there is an antimicrobial effect also on parasites. PMID:27530664

  2. A new isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise using EMG-biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Kesemenli, Cumhur C; Sarman, Hakan; Baran, Tuncay; Memisoglu, Kaya; Binbir, Ismail; Savas, Yilmaz; Isik, Cengiz; Boyraz, Ismail; Koc, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    A new isometric contraction quadriceps-strengthening exercise was developed to restore the quadriceps strength lost after knee surgery more rapidly. This study evaluated the results of this new method. Patients were taught to perform the isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise in the unaffected knee in the supine position, and then they performed it in the affected knee. First, patients were taught the classical isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise, and then they were taught our new alternative method: “pull the patella superiorly tightly and hold the leg in the same position for 10 seconds”. Afterward, the quadriceps contraction was evaluated using a non-invasive Myomed 932 EMG-biofeedback device (Enraf-Nonius, The Netherlands) with gel-containing 48 mm electrodes (Türklab, The Turkey) placed on both knees. The isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise performed using our new method had stronger contraction than the classical method (P < 0.01). The new method involving pulling the patella superiorly appears to be a better choice, which can be applied easily, leading to better patient compliance and greater quadriceps force after arthroscopic and other knee surgeries. PMID:25356122

  3. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on quadriceps function in individuals with experimental knee pain.

    PubMed

    Son, S J; Kim, H; Seeley, M K; Feland, J B; Hopkins, J T

    2016-09-01

    Knee joint pain (KJP) is a cardinal symptom in knee pathologies, and quadriceps inhibition is commonly observed among KJP patients. Previously, KJP independently reduced quadriceps strength and activation. However, it remains unknown how disinhibitory transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) will affect inhibited quadriceps motor function. This study aimed at examining changes in quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and central activation ratio (CAR) before and after sensory TENS following experimental knee pain. Thirty healthy participants were assigned to either the TENS or placebo groups. All participants underwent three separate data collection sessions consisting of two saline infusions and one no infusion control in a crossover design. TENS or placebo treatment was administered to each group for 20 min. Quadriceps MVC and CAR were measured at baseline, infusion, treatment, and post-treatment. Perceived knee pain intensity was measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Post-hoc analysis revealed that hypertonic saline infusion significantly reduced the quadriceps MVC and CAR compared with control sessions (P < 0.05). Sensory TENS, however, significantly restored inhibited quadriceps motor function compared with placebo treatment (P < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between changes in MVC and knee pain (r = 0.33, P < 0.001), and CAR and knee pain (r = 0.62, P < 0.001), respectively. PMID:26346597

  4. Free anterolateral thigh flap raised on musculocutaneous perforators of rectus femoris muscle.

    PubMed

    Ehtesham-ul-Haq; Aslam, Ayesha; Hameed, Shahid; Ahmad, Rao Saood; Majid, Abdul; Waqas, Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) has been in wide clinical use for the last two decades, its major disadvantage has been its variable anatomy. We are presenting a case in which no substantial perforators were found to be arising from either the lateral septum of thigh or Vastus Laterlis muscle. In this case, instead of raising another flap, we used the same skin paddle raised on the musculocutaneous perforators of rectus femoris muscle. PMID:21798144

  5. Relationship Between Intensity of Quadriceps Muscle Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Strength Recovery After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Balter, Jaclyn E.; Wolfe, Pamela; Eckhoff, Donald G.; Schwartz, Robert S.; Schenkman, Margaret; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can facilitate the recovery of quadriceps muscle strength after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the optimal intensity (dosage) of NMES and its effect on strength after TKA have yet to be determined. Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the intensity of NMES application was related to the recovery of quadriceps muscle strength early after TKA. A secondary objective was to quantify quadriceps muscle fatigue and activation immediately after NMES to guide decisions about the timing of NMES during rehabilitation sessions. Design This study was an observational experimental investigation. Methods Data were collected from 30 people who were 50 to 85 years of age and who received NMES after TKA. These people participated in a randomized controlled trial in which they received either standard rehabilitation or standard rehabilitation plus NMES to the quadriceps muscle to mitigate strength loss. For the NMES intervention group, NMES was applied 2 times per day at the maximal tolerable intensity for 15 contractions beginning 48 hours after surgery over the first 6 weeks after TKA. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation training intensity and quadriceps muscle strength and activation were assessed before surgery and 3.5 and 6.5 weeks after TKA. Results At 3.5 weeks, there was a significant association between NMES training intensity and a change in quadriceps muscle strength (R2=.68) and activation (R2=.22). At 6.5 weeks, NMES training intensity was related to a change in strength (R2=.25) but not to a change in activation (R2=.00). Furthermore, quadriceps muscle fatigue occurred during NMES sessions at 3.5 and 6.5 weeks, whereas quadriceps muscle activation did not change. Limitations Some participants reached the maximal stimulator output during at least 1 treatment session and might have tolerated more stimulation. Conclusions Higher NMES training intensities were associated with

  6. Quadriceps intramuscular fat fraction rather than muscle size is associated with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; MacLeod, Toran D.; Lin, Wilson; Nardo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare thigh muscle intramuscular fat (intraMF) fractions and area between people with and without knee radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA); and to evaluate the relationships of quadriceps adiposity and area with strength, function and knee MRI lesions. Methods Ninety six subjects (ROA: KL >1; n = 30, control: KL = 0,1; n = 66) underwent 3-Tesla MRI of the thigh muscles using chemical shift-based water/fat MR imaging (fat fractions) and the knee (clinical grading). Subjects were assessed for isometric/isokinetic quadriceps/hamstrings strength, function (KOOS, stair climbing test [SCT], and 6-minute walk test [(6MWT]. Thigh muscle intraMF fractions, muscle area and strength, and function were compared between controls and ROA subjects, adjusting for age. Relationships between measures of muscle fat/area with strength, function, KL and lesion scores were assessed using regression and correlational analyses. Results The ROA group had worse KOOS scores but SCT and 6MWT were not different. The ROA group had greater quadriceps intraMF fraction but not for other muscles. Quadriceps strength was lower in ROA group but the area was not different. Quadriceps intraMF fraction but not area predicted self-reported disability. Aging, worse KL, and cartilage and meniscus lesions were associated with higher quadriceps intraMF fraction. Conclusion Quadriceps intraMF is higher in people with knee OA and is related to symptomatic and structural severity of knee OA, where as the quadriceps area is not. Quadriceps fat fraction from chemical shift-based water/fat MR imaging may have utility as a marker of structural and symptomatic severity of knee OA disease process. PMID:24361743

  7. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  8. Spontaneous, bilateral, quadriceps tendon rupture caused by local exposure to methidathion.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Ziogas, Evangelos; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Koumis, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous, bilateral, quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. Many predisposing conditions have been reported that contribute to quadriceps tendon degeneration. We report a case of a 42-year-old farmer with spontaneous, bilateral, quadriceps tendon rupture and clear medical history. Clinical and laboratory investigations revealed no risk factors for tendon degeneration but the patient reported that he was exposed locally to methidathion 1 week before the rupture. Methidathion is an organophosphate insecticide commonly used in agriculture that is highly toxic via the dermal route. Methidathion induces lipid pre-oxidation and consequently alters quadriceps tendon blood supply and ultrastructure. The injury was treated with early surgical repair and final outcome was excellent 44 months postoperatively. PMID:22114623

  9. Spontaneous, bilateral, quadriceps tendon rupture caused by local exposure to methidathion

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Ziogas, Evangelos; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Koumis, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous, bilateral, quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. Many predisposing conditions have been reported that contribute to quadriceps tendon degeneration. We report a case of a 42-year-old farmer with spontaneous, bilateral, quadriceps tendon rupture and clear medical history. Clinical and laboratory investigations revealed no risk factors for tendon degeneration but the patient reported that he was exposed locally to methidathion 1 week before the rupture. Methidathion is an organophosphate insecticide commonly used in agriculture that is highly toxic via the dermal route. Methidathion induces lipid pre-oxidation and consequently alters quadriceps tendon blood supply and ultrastructure. The injury was treated with early surgical repair and final outcome was excellent 44 months postoperatively. PMID:22114623

  10. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits. PMID:25997949

  11. Combination of Eccentric Exercise and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Function Post-ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to reduce quadriceps activation failure (QAF), and eccentric exercise has been shown lessen muscle atrophy post-ACL reconstruction. Given that these are two critical components of quadriceps strength, intervention combining these therapies may be effective at reinstituting quadriceps function post-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined NMES and eccentric exercise intervention to improve the recovery of quadriceps activation and strength post-reconstruction. Design Parallel longitudinal design. Setting Laboratory. Participants Thirty-six individuals post-injury were placed into four treatment groups (N&E, NMES and eccentrics; E-only, eccentrics only; N-only, NMES-only; STND, standard of care) and ten healthy controls participated. Intervention N&E and N-only received the NMES protocol 2x per week for the first six weeks post-reconstruction. N&E and E-only received the eccentric exercise protocol 2x per week beginning six weeks post-reconstruction. Main outcome measure Quadriceps activation was assessed via the superimposed burst technique and quantified via the central activation ratio. Quadriceps strength was assessed via maximal voluntary isomeric contractions (Nm/kg). Data was gathered on three occasions: pre-operative, 12-weeks-post-surgery and at return-to-play. Results No differences in pre-operative measures existed (P>0.05). E-only recovered quadriceps activation better than N-only or STND (P<0.05). N&E and E-only recovered strength better than N-only or the STND (P<0.05) and had strength values that were similar to healthy individuals at return-to-play (P>0.05). Conclusion Eccentric exercise was capable of restoring levels of quadriceps activation and strength that were similar to those of healthy adults and better than NMES alone. PMID:25819154

  12. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R. PMID:24414293

  13. Corticospinal and Intracortical Excitability of the Quadriceps in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kittelson, Andrew J.; Thomas, Abbey C.; Kluger, Benzi M.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle are characteristic of knee osteoarthritis (OA), contributing to the quadriceps weakness that is also a hallmark of the disease. The mechanisms underlying this central activation deficit (CAD) are unknown, although cortical mechanisms may be involved. Here, we utilize transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal and intracortical excitability in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and in a comparably aged group of healthy older adults, to quantify group differences and to examine associations between TMS measures and pain, quadriceps strength, and CAD. Seventeen patients with knee OA and 20 healthy controls completed testing. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured at the quadriceps by superficial electromyographic (EMG) recordings. Corticospinal excitability was assessed by measuring resting motor threshold (RMT) to TMS stimulation of the quadriceps representation at primary motor cortex, and intracortical excitability was assessed via paired pulse paradigms for short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). No statistically significant differences between patients with knee OA and healthy controls were found for RMT, SICI or ICF measures (p>0.05). For patients with knee OA, there were significant associations observed between pain and RMT, as well as between pain and ICF. No associations were observed between CAD and measures of corticospinal or intracortical excitability. These data suggest against direct involvement of corticospinal or intracortical pathways within primary motor cortex in the mechanisms of CAD. However, pain is implicated in the neural mechanisms of quadriceps motor control in patients with knee OA. PMID:25183161

  14. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  15. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of the Quadriceps in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy: A Randomized Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Halliday, Vanessa; Chauhan, Alpna; Taylor, Victoria; Nelson, Annmarie; Sampson, Cathy; Byrne, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduced exercise capacity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therapeutic exercise can be beneficial and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the quadriceps muscles may represent a practical approach. The primary aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of NMES of the quadriceps to patients with NSCLC used alongside palliative chemotherapy. Secondary aims explored aspects of safety and efficacy of NMES in this setting. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC due to receive first-line palliative chemotherapy were randomized to usual care with or without NMES. They were asked to undertake 30 minute sessions of NMES, ideally daily, but as a minimum, three times weekly. For NMES to be considered acceptable, it was predetermined that ≥80% of patients should achieve this minimum level of adherence. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients to explore factors influencing adherence. Safety was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass, and physical activity level were assessed at baseline and after three cycles of chemotherapy. Results 49 patients (28 male, median (IQR) age 69 (64−75) years) participated. Of 30 randomized to NMES, 18 were eligible for the primary endpoint, of whom 9 (50% [90% CI, 29 to 71]) met the minimum level of adherence. Adherence was enhanced by incorporating sessions into a daily routine and hindered by undesirable effects of chemotherapy. There were no serious adverse events related to NMES, nor significant differences in quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass or physical activity level between groups. Conclusions NMES is not acceptable in this setting, nor was there a suggestion of benefit. The need remains to explore NMES in patients with cancer in other settings. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 42944026 www

  16. Isokinetic Hamstrings:Quadriceps Ratios in Intercollegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Tracey D.; Mahaffey, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To compare the differences in the concentric hamstrings:quadriceps (H:Q) ratio among athletes in different sports at 3 velocities. Design and Setting: We measured the H:Q ratio of both knees using the Biodex Pro Isokinetic Device. Subjects: Eighty-one male and female collegiate athletes. Measurements: We performed analyses for sport, velocity, and side of body for each sex. To compare the means of the concentric H:Q ratios for mean peak torque and mean total work, a 2 × 3 × 4 mixed-factorial analysis of variance was computed for women and a 2 × 2 × 3 mixed-factorial analysis of variance was computed for men. Results: We observed no significant interactions for men and women for the concentric H:Q ratio for mean peak torque. There was a significant mean difference among velocity conditions and a significant difference for men with respect to velocity. No significant differences were found for side of body or sport. Conclusions: The H:Q ratio increased as velocity increased. No differences existed for the H:Q ratio for sport or side of body. PMID:12937479

  17. Free rectus femoris muscle transfer for one-stage reconstruction of established facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Moriguchi, T; Soeda, S; Hamanaka, T; Tanaka, H; Ohta, S

    1994-09-01

    The free vascularized rectus femoris muscle graft with a long motor nerve was used for reconstruction of unilateral established facial paralysis in one stage. The pedicle vessels were anastomosed to the recipient vessels in the ipsilateral face, and the motor nerve of the muscle, which was led through the upper lip, was sutured to the contralateral facial nerve. The advantages of this one-stage reconstruction as compared with surgery involving second-stage reconstruction are that the reconstruction can be completed in one stage and that the period required for muscle refunctioning after surgery is short. The vascular supply of the rectus femoris muscle can emanate mainly from the lateral circumflex femoral artery. In our cadaveric study, five types of variation were found for origination of a nutrient artery of the muscle. The most common type was one in which the artery derived from the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery (39 percent). The motor nerve of the rectus femoris muscle is derived from the femoral nerve under the inguinal ligament and runs downward through the intermuscular space between the sartorius muscle and the iliopsoas muscle before entering the posteromedial part of the upper third of the rectus muscle. The advantages of using the rectus muscle are as follows: (1) safety and simplicity exist with one main large arterial supply for arterial anastomosis; (2) the length of the femoral nerve (more than 20 cm) is adequate for reaching the contralateral facial nerve for suturing; (3) a simultaneous operation by two teams is possible with the patient in the supine position; (4) the force and distance of contraction are appropriate to reanimate the face; (5) the rectus muscle can be separated as a segment with appropriate lengths, size, and power for replacing lost muscles in the face; (6) the tendinous fascia in both ends provides a reliable point for anchoring sutures, which provides firmer attachment; and (7) no loss of donor

  18. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Chrysanthou, Chrysanthos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year) after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length) and 67.9% (width) after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention. Key pointsChanges in fascicle orientation after biceps femoris mild tear were reduced after a 28 day intervention and remained similar one year after injury.Tendon/aponeurosis strain per unit of moment of force decreased during the course of the therapeutic intervention.Future studies could utilize ultrasonography to monitor mechanical responses after various types of hamstring injury and interventions in order to improve criteria for a safe return to sport. PMID:26957929

  19. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player

    PubMed Central

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Chrysanthou, Chrysanthos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year) after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length) and 67.9% (width) after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention. Key points Changes in fascicle orientation after biceps femoris mild tear were reduced after a 28 day intervention and remained similar one year after injury. Tendon/aponeurosis strain per unit of moment of force decreased during the course of the therapeutic intervention. Future studies could utilize ultrasonography to monitor mechanical responses after various types of hamstring injury and interventions in order to improve criteria for a safe return to sport. PMID:26957929

  20. The individual and combined influence of ACE and ACTN3 genotypes on muscle phenotypes before and after strength training.

    PubMed

    Erskine, R M; Williams, A G; Jones, D A; Stewart, C E; Degens, H

    2014-08-01

    Alternative measures of muscle size, strength, and power to those used in previous studies could help resolve the controversy surrounding associations between polymorphisms of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) genes and skeletal muscle phenotypes, and the responses to resistance training (RT). To this end, we measured quadriceps femoris muscle volume (Vm), physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), maximum isometric force (Ft), specific force (Ft per unit PCSA), maximum isoinertial strength (1-RM), and maximum power (Wmax ; n = 40) before and after 9-week knee extension RT in 51 previously untrained young men, who were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms. ACTN3 R-allele carriers had greater Vm, 1-RM, and Wmax than XX homozygotes at baseline (all P < 0.05), but responses to RT were independent of ACTN3 genotype (all P > 0.05). Muscle phenotypes were independent of ACE genotype before (all P > 0.05) and after RT (all P > 0.01). However, people with the "optimal" ACE+ACTN3 genotype combination had greater baseline 1-RM and Wmax compared to those with the "suboptimal" profile (both P < 0.0125). We show for the first time that the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism is associated with human Vm and (independently and in combination with the ACE I/D polymorphism) influences 1-RM and Wmax. PMID:23384112

  1. Relationship of beef longissimus tenderness classes to tenderness of gluteus medius, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of longissimus tenderness classes to tenderness of three other major muscles. Ninety-eight crossbred steers and heifers (14 to 17 mo of age) were humanely slaughtered over 9 wk and the carcasses were chilled 48 h at 0 degrees C. At 48 h postmortem, carcasses were assigned to one of three tenderness classes (tender < or = 26 kg, intermediate = 26 to 42 kg, tough > or = 42 kg) using slice shear force from the MARC Beef Classification System (n = 20, 67, and 11, respectively). The longissimus thoracis, gluteus medius, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris were removed, aged at 2 degrees C, and frozen at -30 degrees C at 14 d postmortem. Two 2.54-cm-thick steaks were obtained from each muscle, thawed to 5 degrees C, cooked with a belt grill at 163 degrees C for 5.5 min, and served warm to an eight-member trained descriptive attribute panel. Panelists evaluated each sample for tenderness, connective tissue amount, juiciness, and beef flavor intensity on 8-point scales. The mean 2-d longissimus slice shear force values were 20.7, 34.4, and 46.3 kg, respectively, for the "tender," "intermediate," and "tough" classes. Tenderness ratings were lowest (P < 0.05) for the "tough" class and highest (P < 0.05) for the "tender" class for all muscles except the gluteus medius, for which the "tender" and "intermediate" classes were not different (P > 0.05; longissimus, 7.7, 7.1, 6.3, and 7.1; semimembranosus, 6.4, 5.8, 5.1, and 5.8; biceps femoris, 5.9, 5.4, 4.8, and 5.4; gluteus medius, 6.8, 6.5, 5.8, and 6.5 for the "tender," "intermediate," "tough," and "unsorted" classes, respectively). The magnitude of the differences in tenderness ratings between the "tender" and "intermediate" classes and between the "intermediate" and "tough" classes was similar for all muscles. The percentages of tenderness ratings greater than 5.0 (slightly tender) for the "tender" and "unsorted" classes, respectively, were as follows: longissimus

  2. Serial Changes of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscle Strength Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to analyze serial changes in thigh muscles, including quadriceps and hamstring muscles, from before to one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). All studies sequentially comparing isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths between the TKA side and the contralateral uninjured limb were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies with 7 cohorts were included in this meta-analysis. The mean differences in the strengths of quadriceps and hamstring muscles between the TKA and uninjured sides were greatest three months after surgery (26.8 N∙m, 12.8 N∙m, P<0.001), but were similar to preoperative level at six months (18.4 N∙m, 7.4 N∙m P<0.001) and were maintained for up to one year (15.9 N∙m, 4.1 N∙m P<0.001). The pooled mean differences in changes in quadriceps and hamstring strengths relative to preoperative levels were 9.2 N∙m and 4.9 N∙m, respectively, three months postoperatively (P = 0.041), but were no longer significant after six months and one year. During the year after TKA, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths were lowest after 3 months, recovering to preoperative level after six months, but not reaching the muscle strength on the contralateral side. Relative to preoperative levels, the difference in muscle strength between the TKA and contralateral knees was only significant at three months. Because decrease of strength of the quadriceps was significantly greater than decrease in hamstring muscle strength at postoperative three months, early rehabilitation after TKA should focus on recovery of quadriceps muscle strength. PMID:26849808

  3. Measurement of quadriceps endurance by fNIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Devrim; Şayli, Ömer; Karahan, Mustafa; Akin, A.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, the changes in muscle deoxygenation trends during a sustained isometric quadriceps (chair squat/half squat) endurance exercise were evaluated among twelve male subjects and the relationship between muscle oxygenation and endurance times was investigated by means of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Neuromuscular activation and predictions of muscle performance decrements during extended fatiguing task was investigated by means of surface electromyography (sEMG). The results of the study showed that in the subjects who maintained exercise longer than five minutes (group 1), mean Hb recovery time (33 [sec.]) was 37.4% less than the others (group 2, 52.7 [sec.]). Also mean HbO II decline amplitude (2.53 [a.u.] in group 1 and 2.07 [a.u.] in group 2) and oxy decline amplitude (8.4 [a.u.] in group 1 and 3.04 [a.u.] in group 2) in the beginning of squat exercise are found to be 22.6% and 176.9% bigger in these group. For the EMG parameters, mean slope of MNF and MDF decline are found to be 57.5% and 42.2% bigger in magnitude in group 2 which indicates higher degree of decrement in mean and median frequencies although their mean squat duration time is less. This indicates higher index of fatigue for this group. It is concluded that training leads to altered oxygenation and oxygen extraction capability in the exercising muscle and investigated fNIRS parameters could be used for endurance evaluation.

  4. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  5. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  6. Quadriceps fatigability after single muscle exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mador, M Jeffery; Deniz, Omer; Aggarwal, Ajay; Kufel, Thomas J

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare quadriceps fatigability in patients with varying severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with age-matched control subjects. Ten healthy control subjects, 8 patients with severe disease (FEV1 less than 35% predicted), and 11 patients with mild to moderate disease were studied. The FEV1 was 1.75 +/- 0.13 L (SE), 50.4 +/- 2.9% of predicted in the mild to moderate group, and 0.87 +/- 0.06 L, 25.9 +/- 1.9% of predicted in the severe group. Quadriceps fatigue was quantified by the reduction in potentiated twitch force after a potentially fatiguing task. All subjects performed three sets of 10 maximum voluntary contractions of the right quadriceps muscle. Quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction force was 58.3 +/- 3.3 kg for the healthy older group, 49.0 +/- 4.2 kg in the mild to moderate group, and 44.3 +/- 4.7 kg in the severe group. The fall in potentiated twitch force after exercise was significantly greater in the patients with severe disease than in the healthy control subjects. In conclusion, the quadriceps in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are more fatigable than those in age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. PMID:12689846

  7. Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture and unilateral ACL tear in a weightlifter, associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Dalton, David M; Galbraith, John G; Masterson, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture is rare. A 29-year-old man, an amateur weight lifter, taking androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS), developed sudden onset bilateral pain and swelling of his anterior thighs when attempting to squat 280 kg (620 lb). Examination revealed gross swelling superior to the patella and palpable gaps in both quadriceps tendons. He underwent successful operative repair. MRI revealed a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee. This was not reconstructed. Only a few case reports of the association between AAS and quadriceps rupture exist in the literature, with none to the best of our knowledge in the past 10 years. ACL rupture coexisting is very rare, with only two reported cases. PMID:27154985

  8. Contribution of Quadriceps Weakness to Fragility Fracture: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hanh M; Nguyen, Nguyen D; Center, Jacqueline R; Eisman, John A; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2016-01-01

    The association between muscle weakness and fracture is not well understood. This study sought to examine the contribution of muscle strength at baseline and change in muscle strength to the observed risk of fragility fracture in older people. The study involved 595 men and 1066 women aged 60+ years (median 69 years) who had been followed for a median of 11 years (range, 4 to 22 years). Quadriceps isometric muscle strength (MS) measured at baseline and biennially was adjusted for height. Femoral neck bone mineral density (FNBMD) was measured by DXA. Low-trauma fracture was ascertained from X-ray reports and interview. The relationship between baseline MS and serial MS and fracture assessed by time-invariant and time-variant Cox's regression models was expressed as hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). During the follow-up period, 282 (26%) women and 89 (15%) men sustained a fragility fracture. From age 60 years, women lost 0.28 kg/m (1.6%) of MS per year, whereas men lost 0.39 kg/m (1.5%) of MS per year. In the time-variant model, using serial MS, each 1 SD (4.7 kg/m) lower MS was associated with a 27% increase in the risk of fracture in women (HR 1.27; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.43); and 46% increase in men (HR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.75). After adjusting for FNBMD, age and prior fracture, history of fall and smoking, HR per SD of lower MS was 1.13 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.28) for women and 1.35 (95% CI, 1.18 to 1.64) for men. These data indicate that muscle weakness is an independent determinant of fracture risk in men, but not in women. This sex difference suggests that apart from mechanical load effect of muscle on bone, there are other muscle-bone interactions that need to be investigated in future studies. The accuracy of fracture risk prediction for men may be improved by incorporating muscle strength. PMID:26174768

  9. Simultaneous Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture following Long-Term Low-Dose Nasal Corticosteroid Application

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Max; Krettek, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a very rare injury, which was previously only described in slightly more than 100 cases in the English literature. Occurrence after minor trauma is predominantly associated with certain medical conditions including chronic diseases and long-term use of certain drugs. We report the case of a 61-year-old healthy patient who sustained a simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture following minor trauma. Medical history was completely clear except of a long-term nasal corticosteroid medication due to allergic rhinitis. PMID:23984143

  10. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:26722436

  11. Quadriceps myopathy: a variant of the limb-girdle dystrophy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M; Heathfield, Kwg

    1983-01-01

    The clinical and pathological features in a patient with quadriceps myopathy are presented. The pattern of progression of the disorder, during a period of 18 years observation, suggests that it represents an unusual and perhaps specific syndrome within the clinical spectrum of the limb-girdle muscular dystophies. Images PMID:6842250

  12. Fatigue effects on quadriceps and hamstrings activation in dancers performing drop landings.

    PubMed

    McEldowney, Kasey M; Hopper, Luke S; Etlin-Stein, Hannah; Redding, Emma

    2013-09-01

    Fatigue may reduce a dancer's ability to maintain the muscle synergies required for stable human movement. Therefore, fatigue presents as a potential risk factor for injury in dancers. Activation patterns of the quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups in athletic populations have been consistently reported to alter in response to fatigue during landing tasks. It is unknown whether dancers demonstrate similar muscle activation patterns, nor if dancers respond to fatiguing protocols, with regard to muscle activation, in the same manner as their athletic counter-parts. The purpose of this study was to assess quadriceps and hamstrings activation levels in a cohort of dancers performing drop landings before and after completion of a dance-specific fatigue protocol, the High Intensity Dance Performance Fitness Test. Quadriceps and hamstrings co-contraction ratios significantly increased between pre- and post-fatigue conditions in a similar fashion to that reported in the literature. Therefore, the neuromuscular activation of the knee extensors and flexors in dancers changed in response to the dance-specific fatiguing protocol. Furthermore, quadriceps and hamstrings co-contraction ratios were substantially greater than previously reported in other athletic populations, due to low hamstrings activation levels. Future investigation of dancer biomechanical adaptations to fatigue would be beneficial to further examine the potential implications for injury risk. PMID:24069945

  13. Comparative study of hamstring and quadriceps strengthening treatments in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Ahmed H; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Ramadan Hafez, Ashraf; Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Meshari Alroumi, Abdulmohesn; Alanezi, Aqeel M

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most common form of joint disease. It is one of the major causes of impaired function that reduces quality of life (QOL) worldwide. The purpose of this study was to compare exercise treatments for hamstring and quadriceps strength in the management of knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Forty patients with OA knee, aged 50-65 years were divided into 2 groups. The first group (57.65±4.78 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and hamstring, and stretching exercises for the hamstring. The second group (58.15±5.11 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for only the quadriceps, and stretching exercise for the hamstring. Outcome measures were the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index questionnaire), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain, the Fifty-Foot Walk Test (FWS), and Handheld dynamometry. [Results] There was a significant difference between the groups. The first group showed a more significant result than the second group. [Conclusion] Strengthening of the hamstrings in addition to strengthening of the quadriceps was shown to be beneficial for improving subjective knee pain, range of motion and decreasing the limitation of functional performance of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25013274

  14. Rapid recovery from spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in an active, healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Gaheer, Rajinder Singh; Hawkins, Amanda

    2010-07-01

    Bilateral spontaneous quadriceps rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and is frequently misdiagnosed. It is rarely seen in healthy, active individuals. This article presents a case of bilateral simultaneous and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a healthy, athletic, active and highly motivated patient with rapid recovery from injury and return to full sport activity within a relatively short period of time. A 65-year-old healthy man felt both knees give way while walking down stairs at home and collapsed, unable to bear weight. He was fit and well, not on any medications and basic laboratory screening was within normal limits. He was an active sportsman, horse rider, swimmer, and long-distance cyclist, and had completed a half marathon 1 month before his injury. He was diagnosed with bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures. An ultrasound of both knees confirmed the diagnosis of full-thickness rupture. Surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons was performed 3 days after the injury. Bilateral locking brace in 10 degrees of flexion was used to immobilize both knees and protect the repair for 6 weeks. The patient remained nonweight bearing for 2 weeks, then gradual weight bearing was commenced, with full weight bearing at 6 weeks. Intensive isometric quadriceps exercises were started on the second postoperative day. Immobilization of both knees was maintained for 6 weeks, after which full active range of motion (ROM) was initiated. At 16 weeks after the injury he had bilateral ROM from 0 degrees to 120 degrees flexion, with no extension lag. He was horse riding, playing golf, swimming, and walking distances up to 2 miles at that time. PMID:20608622

  15. Arthroscopic Labrum Reconstruction in the Hip Using the Indirect Head of Rectus Femoris as a Local Graft: Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Sharfman, Zachary T; Amar, Eyal; Sampson, Thomas; Rath, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the acetabular labrum has been well documented for the health and function of the hip joint. Labral reconstruction has proven effective but often requires the use of a cadaveric allograft or auto graft from the fascia lata or gracilis. The indirect head of the rectus femoris is in close proximity with the anterior superior acetabulum, which is the most common site of labral tears. Using the indirect head of the rectus femoris as a local graft minimizes surgical invasiveness by mitigating the need to harvest the graft from a different location, in case of an autograft, and by minimizing donor site morbidity and damage to local tissues. The graft is harvested and fixed to the acetabular rim through the same arthroscopic portals. Hip labral reconstruction using the reflected head of the rectus femoris tendon is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that restores stability to the hip joint, is applicable in all patients undergoing hip labral reconstruction, and offers decreased tissue morbidity compared with other grafting techniques. PMID:27462534

  16. DOES RECTUS FEMORIS TRANSFER INCREASE KNEE FLEXION DURING STANCE PHASE IN CEREBRAL PALSY?

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Mauro César; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) is related to postoperative increase of knee flexion during the stance phase in cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The inclusion criteria were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III, kinematic criteria for stiff-knee gait at baseline, and individuals who underwent orthopaedic surgery and had gait analyses performed before and after intervention. The patients included were divided into the following two groups: NO-DRFT (133 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery without DRFT, and DRFT (83 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery that included DRFT. The primary outcome was to evaluate in each group if minimum knee flexion in stance phase (FMJFA) changed after treatment. Results: The mean FMJFA increased from 13.19° to 16.74° (p=0.003) and from 10.60° to 14.80° (p=0.001) in Groups NO-DRFT and DRFT, respectively. The post-operative FMJFA was similar between groups NO-DRFT and DRFT (p=0.534). The increase of FMJFA during the second exam (from 13.01° to 22.51°) was higher among the GMFCS III patients in the DRFT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, DRFT did not generate additional increase of knee flexion during stance phase when compared to the control group. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:26997910

  17. Cortical motor representation of the rectus femoris does not differ between the left and right hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sarah; Bryant, Adam L; Pietrosimone, Brian; Bennell, Kim L; Clark, Ross; Pearce, Alan J

    2016-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) involves non-invasive magnetic stimulation of the brain, and can be used to explore the corticomotor excitability and motor representations of skeletal muscles. However there is a lack of motor mapping studies in the lower limb and few conducted in healthy cohorts. The cortical motor representations of muscles can vary between individuals in terms of center position and area despite having a general localized region within the motor cortex. It is important to characterize the normal range for these variables in healthy cohorts to be able to evaluate changes in clinical populations. TMS was used in this cross-sectional study to assess the active motor threshold (AMT) and cortical representation area for rectus femoris in 15 healthy individuals (11M/4F 27.3±5.9years). No differences were found between hemispheres (Left vs. Right P=0.130) for AMT. In terms of y-axis center position no differences were found between hemispheres (Left vs. Right P=0.539), or for the x-axis center position (Left vs. Right P=0.076). Similarly, no differences in calculated area of the motor representation were found (Left vs. Right P=0.699) indicating symmetry between hemispheres. PMID:26999234

  18. Ultrasound Assessment of the Rectus Femoris Cross-Sectional Area: Subject Position Implications.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Peters, Tara; Garkova, Miglena

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic measurement of the rectus femoris (RF) is a novel, proxy measure for muscle strength. The impact of hip flexion/head of bed positioning on RF cross-sectional area (CSA) has not been fully explored. This study describes and compares differences in RF CSA across four degrees of hip flexion. This repeated-measures, comparative study enrolled healthy, pre-menopausal women (n = 20). RF CSA of the dominant leg was measured using the SonoSite M-Turbo ultrasound system with the head of bed at 0°, 20°, 30°, and 60°. One-way repeated measures indicated significant differences in RF CSA, F(3, 17) = 14.18, p < .001, with variation in hip flexion/head of bed elevation and significant RF CSA differences between: (a) 0° and 20°, (b) 0° and 30°, (c) 0° and 60°, and (d) 20° and 60°. Standardizing patient positioning when conducting ultrasonic measurement of RF CSA is vital for researchers who assess muscle mass. PMID:27090872

  19. Surgical management of acute quadriceps tendon rupture (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is uncommon and often overlooked in emergency. Tearing affects weakening tendon by systemic diseases or some medications. The mechanism is generally indirect. Inability to actively extend the knee associated to a supra-patellar defect evoke easily the diagnosis without other investigations. Surgical repair is realized in emergency to completely restore the extension. We report a case of a patient who has sustained of complete quadriceps tendon tear after a long period of tendon weakening by statin therapy, hypertension and diabetes. The repair has consisted on end-to-end Krackow sutures associated with bone suture to the proximal pole of the patella. Surgeons and emergency physicians must think to this form of extensor apparatus rupture, because early diagnosis leads to early treatment and to best outcomes. PMID:26958106

  20. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up. PMID:27274474

  1. Validity of the twitch interpolation technique for the assessment of quadriceps neuromuscular asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Maffiuletti, Nicola Angelo; Barbero, Marco; Cescon, Corrado; Clijsen, Ron; Beretta-Piccoli, Matteo; Schneebeli, Alessandro; Preiss, Stefan; Togninalli, Danilo

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the validity of the twitch interpolation technique for evaluating side-to-side asymmetries in quadriceps neuromuscular function. Fifty-six subjects with a wide range of asymmetries (19 healthy, 24 with unilateral and 13 with bilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction) took part in the study. Supramaximal electrical paired stimuli were delivered to the quadriceps muscle during and immediately after a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensors (twitch interpolation technique). MVC torque, voluntary activation and resting doublet-evoked torque were measured separately for the two sides, and percent side-to-side asymmetries were calculated for each parameter. MVC torque asymmetry was plotted against voluntary activation asymmetry and doublet-evoked torque asymmetry, and a multiple regression analysis was also conducted. Significant positive correlations were observed between MVC torque asymmetry and both voluntary activation asymmetry (r=0.40; p=0.002) and doublet-evoked torque asymmetry (r=0.53; p<0.001), and their relative contribution to MVC torque asymmetry was comparable (r=0.64; p<0.001). These results establish the validity of the twitch interpolation technique for the assessment of neuromuscular asymmetries. This methodology could provide useful insights into the contribution of some neural and muscular mechanisms that underlie quadriceps strength deficits. PMID:26990615

  2. Ultrasound characteristics of the patellar and quadriceps tendons among young elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Visnes, H; Tegnander, A; Bahr, R

    2015-04-01

    Tendons adapt in response to sports-specific loading, but sometimes develop tendinopathy. If the presence of ultrasound changes like hypoechoic areas and neovascularization in asymptomatic tendons precede (and predict) future tendon problems is unknown. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between the development of ultrasound changes in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and symptoms of jumper's knee, as well to examine the medium-term effects of intensive training on tendon thickness among adolescent athletes. Elite junior volleyball athletes were followed with semi-annual ultrasound and clinical examinations (average follow-up: 1.7 years). Of the 141 asymptomatic athletes included, 22 athletes (35 patellar tendons) developed jumper's knee. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a baseline finding of a hypoechoic tendon area (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 9.2) increased the risk of developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Patellar tendon thickness among healthy athletes did not change (Wilk's lambda, P = 0.07) while quadriceps tendon thickness increased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, ultrasound changes at baseline were risk factors for developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Also, among healthy athletes, we observed a 7-11% increase in quadriceps tendon thickness, while there was no increase in patellar tendon thickness. PMID:24612006

  3. Isometric quadriceps strength determines sailing performance and neuromuscular fatigue during an upwind sailing emulation.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Jan G; Callewaert, Margot; Celie, Bert; De Clercq, Dirk; Boone, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the physiological responses to upwind sailing on a laser emulation ergometer and analyses the components of the physical profile that determine the physiological responses related to sailing level. Ten male high-level laser sailors performed an upwind sailing test, incremental cycling test and quadriceps strength test. During the upwind sailing test, heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake, ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and lactate concentration were measured, combined with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electromyography (EMG) registration of the M. Vastus lateralis. Repeated measures ANOVA showed for the cardio-respiratory, metabolic and muscles responses (mean power frequency [MPF], root mean square [RMS], deoxy[Hb+Mb]) during the upwind sailing test an initial significant increase followed by a stabilisation, despite a constant increase in RPE. Stepwise regression analysis showed that better sailing level was for 46.5% predicted by lower MPF decrease. Lower MPF decrease was for 57.8% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. In conclusion, this study indicates that higher sailing level was mainly determined by a lower rate of neuromuscular fatigue during the upwind sailing test (as indicated by MPF decrease). Additionally, the level of neuromuscular fatigue was mainly determined by higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength stressing the importance of resistance training in the planning of training. PMID:26323461

  4. Anatomy of the long head of biceps femoris: An ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Tosovic, D; Muirhead, J C; Brown, J M M; Woodley, S J

    2016-09-01

    Hamstring strains, particularly involving the long head of biceps femoris (BFlh) at the proximal musculotendinous junction (MTJ), are commonly experienced by athletes. With the use of diagnostic ultrasound increasing, an in-depth knowledge of normal ultrasonographic anatomy is fundamental to better understanding hamstring strain. The aim of this study was to describe the architecture of BFlh, using ultrasonography, in young men and cadaver specimens. BFlh morphology was examined in 19 healthy male participants (mean age 21.6 years) using ultrasound. Muscle, tendon and MTJ lengths were recorded and architectural parameters assessed at four standardised points along the muscle. Measurement accuracy was validated by ultrasound and dissection of BFlh in six male cadaver lower limbs (mean age 76 years). Intra-rater reliability of architectural parameters was examined for repeat scans, image analysis and dissection measurements. Distally the BFlh muscle had significantly (P < 0.05) shorter fascicles and larger pennation angles than proximal sites. Agreement between ultrasound and dissection (cadaver study) was excellent for all architectural parameters, except pennation angle (PA), and MTJ length. All other measures demonstrated good-excellent repeatability. BFlh is not uniform in architecture when imaged using ultrasound. It is likely that its distal-most segment is better suited for force production in comparison to the more proximal segments, which show excursive potential, traits which possibly contribute to the high rate of injury at the proximal MTJ. The data presented in this study provide specific knowledge of the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of BFlh, which should be of assistance in analysing BFlh injury via imaging. Clin. Anat. 29:738-745, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27012306

  5. Avulsion of the direct head of rectus femoris following arthroscopic subspine impingement resection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Brian M; Smith, Bjorn; Stapf, Robert; O'Donnell, John M

    2016-04-01

    Arthroscopic resection of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) for subspine impingement has become a relatively common procedure. The AIIS is the origin of the direct head of rectus femoris (dhRF). Previous studies have reported that removal of the contributing portion of the AIIS causing impingement is unlikely to weaken the attachment of the dhRF. The purpose of this article is to report a case of avulsion of the dhRF, following revision hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. A 23-year-old professional footballer underwent revision left hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. 5-mm of bone was resected inferior to the AIIS. Two-weeks post-operatively, he presented with sudden onset, severe left anterior thigh pain following a fall and hyperextension of his left hip. The patient felt a pop over the anterior aspect of his hip. He noticed immediate swelling, severe pain and stiffness. Examination revealed diffuse swelling, 4/5-power on straight-leg-raise, focal tenderness over the AIIS but no palpable gap. MRI confirmed the clinical suspicion of a dhRF avulsion. Given the minimal loss of power and the lack of significant retraction, the patient was treated conservatively. He was instructed to avoid excessive hip extension. He returned to full participation at 3-months. This article highlights a case of avulsion of the dhRF due to a hyperextension injury of the hip following arthroscopic resection of subspinal impingement, a previously unreported complication. Resection of soft and bone from the AIIS may weaken the insertion of the dhRF. Care should be taken during post-operative rehabilitation to avoid trauma and excessive forces on the dhRF tendon, which may lead to rupture. Rehabilitation should be focused on range of motion of the hip. PMID:27026819

  6. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Andrew J T; Kamavuako, Ernest N; Geertsen, Svend S; Farina, Dario; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Interlimb reflexes contribute to the central neural co-ordination between different limbs in both humans and animals. Although commissural interneurons have only been directly identified in animals, spinally-mediated interlimb reflexes have been discovered in a number of human lower limb muscles, indicating their existence in humans. The present study aimed to investigate whether short-latency crossed-spinal reflexes are present in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle following ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations during a sitting task, where participants maintained a slight pre-contraction in the cBF. Following iKnee extension joint rotations, an inhibitory reflex was observed in the surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the cBF, whereas a facilitatory reflex was observed in the cBF following iKnee flexion joint rotations. The onset latency of both cBF reflexes was 44 ms, which is too fast for a transcortical pathway to contribute. The cBF inhibitory and facilitatory reflexes followed the automatic gain control principle, with the size of the response increasing as the level of background pre-contraction in the cBF muscle increased. In addition to the surface EMG, both short-latency inhibitory and facilitatory cBF reflexes were recorded directly at the motor unit level by i.m. EMG, and the same population of cBF motor units that were inhibited following iKnee extension joint rotations were facilitated following iKnee flexion joint rotations. Therefore, parallel interneuronal pathways (probably involving commissural interneurons) from ipsilateral afferents to common motoneurons in the contralateral leg can probably explain the perturbation direction-dependent reversal in the sign of the short-latency cBF reflex. PMID:25970767

  7. Accuracy assessment of CKC high-density surface EMG decomposition in biceps femoris muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marateb, H. R.; McGill, K. C.; Holobar, A.; Lateva, Z. C.; Mansourian, M.; Merletti, R.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of the convolution kernel compensation (CKC) method in decomposing high-density surface EMG (HDsEMG) signals from the pennate biceps femoris long-head muscle. Although the CKC method has already been thoroughly assessed in parallel-fibered muscles, there are several factors that could hinder its performance in pennate muscles. Namely, HDsEMG signals from pennate and parallel-fibered muscles differ considerably in terms of the number of detectable motor units (MUs) and the spatial distribution of the motor-unit action potentials (MUAPs). In this study, monopolar surface EMG signals were recorded from five normal subjects during low-force voluntary isometric contractions using a 92-channel electrode grid with 8 mm inter-electrode distances. Intramuscular EMG (iEMG) signals were recorded concurrently using monopolar needles. The HDsEMG and iEMG signals were independently decomposed into MUAP trains, and the iEMG results were verified using a rigorous a posteriori statistical analysis. HDsEMG decomposition identified from 2 to 30 MUAP trains per contraction. 3 ± 2 of these trains were also reliably detected by iEMG decomposition. The measured CKC decomposition accuracy of these common trains over a selected 10 s interval was 91.5 ± 5.8%. The other trains were not assessed. The significant factors that affected CKC decomposition accuracy were the number of HDsEMG channels that were free of technical artifact and the distinguishability of the MUAPs in the HDsEMG signal (P < 0.05). These results show that the CKC method reliably identifies at least a subset of MUAP trains in HDsEMG signals from low force contractions in pennate muscles.

  8. Avulsion of the direct head of rectus femoris following arthroscopic subspine impingement resection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, Brian M.; Smith, Bjorn; Stapf, Robert; O’Donnell, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic resection of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) for subspine impingement has become a relatively common procedure. The AIIS is the origin of the direct head of rectus femoris (dhRF). Previous studies have reported that removal of the contributing portion of the AIIS causing impingement is unlikely to weaken the attachment of the dhRF. The purpose of this article is to report a case of avulsion of the dhRF, following revision hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. A 23-year-old professional footballer underwent revision left hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. 5-mm of bone was resected inferior to the AIIS. Two-weeks post-operatively, he presented with sudden onset, severe left anterior thigh pain following a fall and hyperextension of his left hip. The patient felt a pop over the anterior aspect of his hip. He noticed immediate swelling, severe pain and stiffness. Examination revealed diffuse swelling, 4/5-power on straight-leg-raise, focal tenderness over the AIIS but no palpable gap. MRI confirmed the clinical suspicion of a dhRF avulsion. Given the minimal loss of power and the lack of significant retraction, the patient was treated conservatively. He was instructed to avoid excessive hip extension. He returned to full participation at 3-months. This article highlights a case of avulsion of the dhRF due to a hyperextension injury of the hip following arthroscopic resection of subspinal impingement, a previously unreported complication. Resection of soft and bone from the AIIS may weaken the insertion of the dhRF. Care should be taken during post-operative rehabilitation to avoid trauma and excessive forces on the dhRF tendon, which may lead to rupture. Rehabilitation should be focused on range of motion of the hip. PMID:27026819

  9. Quadriceps tendinosis and patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players: sonographic findings in correlation with clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Jost, Bernhard; Pirkl, Christof; Aitzetmüller, Gernot; Lajtai, Georg

    2008-08-01

    The purpose was to assess quadriceps and patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players and to correlate ultrasound findings with clinical symptoms. During a grand-slam beach volleyball tournaments all 202 athletes (100 men and 102 women) were invited to participate at this study. Sixty-one athletes (38 male, mean age 29.6, 23 female, mean age 27.1) were included. The dominant leg was right in 51 (84%) and left in ten athletes (16%). Lysholm knee score and pain during the game was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Sonography of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon was performed by a blinded sonographer. Sonographic findings were compared between both legs and correlated to clinical findings using a regression analysis. Quadriceps tendinosis was diagnosed in 13 (21%, dominant leg)/21 (34%, non-dominant leg), patellar tendinosis in 13(21%)/18(30%). Only sonographic findings at the quadriceps tendon were significantly associated with pain: thickness of the quadriceps tendon (mean diameter 6.9 mm/7.1 mm, significant for both legs P = 0.011/P = 0.030), abnormal echo texture (11/16; P = 0.001/P = 0.228), areas with positive power Doppler signals (mean number 0.3/0.4; P = 0.049/0.346), calcifications (mean number: 0.9/1.1; P = 0.021/0.864). A relationship between findings at patellar tendon was not found. Quadriceps tendinosis is as common as patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players. Thickening and structure alteration of the quadriceps tendon is associated with anterior knee pain during beach volleyball. PMID:18386014

  10. Bilateral simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with psoriasis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is not common in the absence of systemic disease. Patients with chronic systemic diseases such as uremia and systemic lupus erythematosus and patients who are being treated with systemic steroids or local steroid injections are more prone to tendon rupture. The tendon can rupture spontaneously or as a result of trauma. We report an unusual case of simultaneous bilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient with psoriasis who was being treated with topical steroid preparations. Case presentation A 57-year-old Caucasian man with a known history of psoriasis, for which he was being treated with topical steroid preparations, presented to our hospital with clinical signs of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture after he fell while walking down stairs. The diagnosis was confirmed by bilateral ultrasound scans of the thighs. The patient underwent surgery to repair both quadriceps tendons. Post-operatively, the patient was immobilized first in bilateral cylinder casts for six weeks, then in knee braces for the next four weeks. His knees were actively mobilized during physiotherapy. Conclusion Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare occurrence in patients with psoriasis who are being treated with topical steroids. PMID:21801390

  11. Preactivation of the quadriceps muscle could limit cranial tibial translation in a cranial cruciate ligament deficient canine stifle.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan M; Lefebvre, Michael; Böhme, Beatrice; Laurent, Cédric; Balligand, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness of the canine stifle. Application of tension in the quadriceps muscle could trigger cranial tibial translation in case of CrCL rupture. We replaced the quadriceps muscle and the gastrocnemius muscle by load cells and turn-buckles. First, eight canine limbs were placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine, which applied 50% of body weight (BW). In a second phase, the CrCL was transected, and the limbs were tested in a similar manner. In a third phase, a quadriceps pretension of 15% BW was applied and limbs were again tested in a similar manner. Cranial tibial translation was significantly decreased in CrCL deficient stifles (p < 0.05) when quadriceps pretension was applied. These findings indicate that quadriceps pretension could play a role in the stability of a CrCL deficient stifle and should then be considered in rehabilitation programs and conservative treatment of CrCL rupture in dogs. PMID:25487559

  12. Knee Extension Strength and Hamstrings-to-Quadriceps Imbalances in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Bogdanis, G C; Kalapotharakos, V I

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio (H:Q) and relative strength of the knee extensors in elite soccer players. Peak torque was measured during isokinetic knee extension/flexion at angular velocities of 60°·s(-1), 180°·s(-1) and 300°·s(-1). 18 professional players were divided into 2 groups, depending on their H:Q at 60°·s(-1). Players in the lower H:Q group (n=7) had significantly smaller H:Q ratios compared with the higher H:Q group (n=11) at all angular velocities (60°·s(-1): 49.2%; 95% CI: 61.3-57.8% vs. 59.5%; 95% CI: 52.2-46.2%, p=0.001). Players in the lower H:Q group had greater knee-extension peak torque compared with the higher H:Q group (60°·s(-1): 313; 95% CI: 335-291 vs. 269; 95% CI: 289-250 N·m, p=0.01). No differences were found in hamstrings' strength between the 2 groups (60°·s(-1): 156; 95% CI: 170-143 vs. 160; 95% CI: 173-148 N·m, p=0.96). Negative correlations between knee extension peak torque and H:Q ratio were observed at all angular velocities (r=-0.65 to -0.67, p<0.01). In conclusion, a low H:Q strength ratio measured during isokinetic strength testing in professional soccer players, is observed mainly in those with strong quadriceps muscles, while players with lower quadriceps strength have H:Q ratios around the recommended values. PMID:26509377

  13. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment. PMID:22791858

  14. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Takeshi; Nakase, Junsuke; Numata, Hitoaki; Takata, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC) disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN), which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury. PMID:26064740

  15. Quality properties and adsorption behavior of freeze-dried beef meat from the Biceps femoris and Semimembranosus muscles.

    PubMed

    Aykın, Elif; Erbaş, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the quality properties and adsorption behavior of freeze-dried beef meat from the Biceps femoris and Semimembranosus muscles. Most quality properties of both muscles were similar apart from total fat content. Freeze-dried meat pieces were kept in ten different equilibrium levels of relative humidity (2.0-97.3%) at 5, 15, 25 and 30°C. The experimental data were evaluated using BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and GAB (Guggenheim, Anderson and deBoer) models. The equilibrium moisture contents of freeze-dried Biceps femoris were lower than those of Semimembranosus at all water activities and temperature. The constants m0 and C of BET and GAB equations were determined to be between 6.27 and 8.07g/100g dry matter and 9.32-13.73, respectively. Constant k was about 0.90 at all temperatures, and the GAB equation exhibited a better fit to the experimental data of both muscles as a result of all %E values being approximately equal to 10%. PMID:27379930

  16. Clinical utility of the Duncan-Ely test for rectus femoris dysfunction during the swing phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Marks, M C; Alexander, J; Sutherland, D H; Chambers, H G

    2003-11-01

    The Ely Test (or Duncan-Ely test) has been accepted as a clinical tool to assess rectus femoris spasticity by passively flexing the knee rapidly while the patient lies prone in a relaxed state. In this retrospective review, patients' dynamic knee range of motion (ROM) during gait and an electromyogram (EMG) were compared with the results of the Ely test. Data for 70 patients (44 males, 26 females; 104 limbs) were included. Mean age of patients was 13 years, SD 9 years, range 4 years 5 months to 54 years. All patients were diagnosed with cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia, n = 42; spastic quadriplegia, n = 15, and hemiplegia, n = 13). All patients were ambulatory (50 independent, 20 with assistive devices). A standard matrix was used to calculate sensitivity and specificity of the Ely test as well as its positive and negative predictive value. For the gait variables examined (decreased dynamic knee ROM, timing of peak knee flexion, and abnormal EMG in swing) the sensitivity of the Ely test ranged from 56 to 59% and the specificity ranged from 64 to 85%. For the same variables the positive predictive value ranged from 91 to 98% and the negative predictive value ranged from 4 to 19%. The Ely test was shown to have a good positive predictive value (i.e. the certainty about the presence of rectus spasticity in patients with a positive Ely test result) for rectus femoris dysfunction during gait. PMID:14580132

  17. Enthesitis of the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle in a professional volleyball player: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, C.; Coscia, D.R.; Ferrozzi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Enthesitis of the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle is a rare pathology which mainly affects professional athletes, and it is caused by overuse and repetitive microtrauma. Athletic jumping and kicking exert a great stress on the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle, and volleyball and football players are therefore most frequently affected. Enthesitis may occur suddenly causing pain and functional impairment possibly associated with partial or complete tendon injuries, or it may be a chronic condition causing non-specific clinical symptoms. We present the case of a professional volleyball player who felt a sudden pain in the left side of the groin area during a training session although she had suffered no accidental injury. The pain was associated with impaired ipsilateral limb function. Tendon rupture was suspected, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. MRI showed a lesion at the myotendinous junction associated with marked inhomogeneity of the direct tendon. Ultrasound (US) examination confirmed the presence of both lesions and allowed a more detailed study of the pathology. This is a typical case of enthesitis which confirms that MRI should be considered the examination of choice in hip pain, particularly when the patient is a professional athlete, thanks to its panoramic visualization. However, also US is an ideal imaging technique for evaluating tendon injuries thanks to its high spatial resolution, and it can therefore be used effectively as a second line of investigation. PMID:23396666

  18. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A.; Aoki, K.; Kito, M.; Okamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Momose, T.; Kato, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to predict the knee extension strength and post-operative function in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Methods A total of 18 patients (14 men, four women) underwent total or partial quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh between 2002 and 2014. The number of resected quadriceps was surveyed, knee extension strength was measured with the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system (affected side/unaffected side) and relationships between these were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) score and the Short Form 8 were used to evaluate post-operative function and examine correlations with extension strength. The cutoff value for extension strength to expect good post-operative function was also calculated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher’s exact test. Results Extension strength decreased when the number of resected quadriceps increased (p < 0.001), and was associated with lower MSTS score, TESS and EQ-5D (p = 0.004, p = 0.005, p = 0.006, respectively). Based on the functional evaluation scales, the cutoff value of extension strength was 56.2%, the equivalent to muscle strength with resection of up to two muscles. Conclusion Good post-operative results can be expected if at least two quadriceps muscles are preserved. Cite this article: A. Tanaka, Y. Yoshimura, K. Aoki, M. Kito, M. Okamoto, S. Suzuki, T. Momose, H. Kato. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:232–238. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000631. PMID:27317788

  19. Early Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Muscle Strength After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Balter, Jaclyn E.; Wolfe, Pamela; Eckhoff, Donald G.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The recovery of quadriceps muscle force and function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is suboptimal, which predisposes patients to disability with increasing age. Objective The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of quadriceps muscle neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), initiated 48 hours after TKA, as an adjunct to standard rehabilitation. Design This was a prospective, longitudinal randomized controlled trial. Methods Sixty-six patients, aged 50 to 85 years and planning a primary unilateral TKA, were randomly assigned to receive either standard rehabilitation (control) or standard rehabilitation plus NMES applied to the quadriceps muscle (initiated 48 hours after surgery). The NMES was applied twice per day at the maximum tolerable intensity for 15 contractions. Data for muscle strength, functional performance, and self-report measures were obtained before surgery and 3.5, 6.5, 13, 26, and 52 weeks after TKA. Results At 3.5 weeks after TKA, significant improvements with NMES were found for quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength, functional performance, and knee extension active range of motion. At 52 weeks, the differences between groups were attenuated, but improvements with NMES were still significant for quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength, functional performance, and some self-report measures. Limitations Treatment volume was not matched for both study arms; NMES was added to the standard of care treatment. Furthermore, testers were not blinded during testing, but used standardized scripts to avoid bias. Finally, some patients reached the maximum stimulator output during at least one treatment session and may have tolerated more stimulation. Conclusions The early addition of NMES effectively attenuated loss of quadriceps muscle strength and improved functional performance following TKA. The effects were most pronounced and clinically meaningful within the first month after surgery, but persisted through 1

  20. Is quadriceps muscle strength a determinant of the physical function of the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Altubasi, Ibrahim Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the relationships of the quadriceps rate of torque development and the time to peak torque with the physical function of the elderly. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects participated in this study. Quadriceps strength was measured using isometric and isokinetic torque tests. Time to peak torque and rate of torque development were calculated from the torque time curve of the isokinetic and isometric torque tests, respectively. Physical activities were measured using 4 physical activity tests. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships among the variables. [Results] The time to peak torque showed significant correlations with all measures of physical activity tests. Rate of torque development showed significant correlation with the timed stair-climbing test. Isometric and isokinetic torques had no significant correlations with any of the physical activity tests. [Conclusion] Time to maximum torque and the rate of torque development might be more important than peak torque in determining the physical function of the elderly. PMID:26644638

  1. [Quadriceps tendon insufficiency and rupture : Treatment options in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Preininger, B; Perka, C

    2016-05-01

    Quadriceps tendon injuries and insufficiencies in total knee arthroplasty are rare, but are followed by a devastating complication that left untreated leads to a complete loss of function of the knee. This review article summarizes the functional anatomy, risk factors, and the prevalence and diagnosis of quadriceps tendon injuries, in addition to the possible management options for partial and complete ruptures. The treatment options are adapted according to the extent of the loss of function (partial, complete) and the duration of the injury (acute vs chronic). Furthermore, the choice of treatment should take into account the quality and availability of primary tissue, the patient's general health, along with their likely functional requirements. Conservative treatment is often justified in partial ruptures with good results. Complete ruptures require surgical intervention and multiple operative techniques are described. Treatment options for acute ruptures include direct primary repair with autogenous or synthetic tissue augmentation. In the case of chronic insufficiency and a lack of soft-tissue surroundings, reconstruction with the aid of a muscle flap or allograft tissue can be considered. All surgical intervention techniques used so far have been fraught with complications and rarely lead to satisfactory results. A new surgical approach to the reconstruction and augmentation of the extensor mechanism consists of the use of a synthetic mesh. The technique is described here in detail. PMID:27125235

  2. Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, Mario; Petrovic, Igor; Novinscak, Tomislav; Jukic, Ivana; Pevec, Damira; Suknaic, Slaven; Kokic, Neven; Batelja, Lovorka; Brcic, Luka; Boban-Blagaic, Alenka; Zoric, Zdenka; Ivanovic, Domagoj; Ajduk, Marko; Sebecic, Bozidar; Patrlj, Leonardo; Sosa, Tomislav; Buljat, Gojko; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    We report complete transection of major muscle and the systemic peptide treatment that induces healing of quadriceps muscle promptly and then maintains the healing with functional restoration. Initially, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL-10, PLD-116, PL 14736 Pliva, Croatia; in trials for inflammatory bowel disease; wound treatment; no toxicity reported; effective alone without carrier) also superiorly accelerates the healing of transected Achilles tendon. Regularly, quadriceps muscle completely transected transversely 1.0 cm proximal to patella presents a definitive defect that cannot be compensated in rat. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg) is given intraperitoneally, once daily; the first application 30 min posttransection, the final 24 h before sacrifice. It consistently improves muscle healing throughout the whole 72-day period. Improved are: (i) biomechanic (load of failure increased); (ii) function (walking recovery and extensor postural thrust/motor function index returned toward normal healthy values); (iii) microscopy/immunochemistry [i.e., mostly muscle fibers connect muscle segments; absent gap; significant desmin positivity for ongoing regeneration of muscle; larger myofibril diameters on both sides, distal and proximal (normal healthy rat-values reached)]; (iv) macroscopic presentation (stumps connected; subsequently, atrophy markedly attenuated; finally, presentation close to normal noninjured muscle, no postsurgery leg contracture). Thus, posttransection healing-consistently improved-may suggest this peptide therapeutic application in muscle disorders. PMID:16609979

  3. A stepwise procedure to test contractility and susceptibility to injury for the rodent quadriceps muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Stephen J.P.; Lovering, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Biological markers can also be used in measuring muscle injury, such as increased creatine kinase levels in the blood, but these are not always correlated with loss in muscle function (i.e. loss of force production). This is even true of histological findings from animals, which provide a “direct measure” of damage, but do not account for loss of function. The most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is contractile force. To date, animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle. Here we describe an in vivo animal model for the quadriceps, with abilities to measure torque, produce a reliable muscle injury, and follow muscle recovery within the same animal over time. We also describe a second model used for direct measurement of force from an isolated quadriceps muscle in situ. PMID:25530979

  4. Quadriceps Contusion

    MedlinePlus

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  5. Physical principles demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle relative to the other hamstring muscles exerts the most force: implications for hamstring muscle strain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, Bronwyn; Verrall, Geoffrey; Reid, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Summary Of the hamstring muscle group the biceps femoris muscle is the most commonly injured muscle in sports requiring interval sprinting. The reason for this observation is unknown. The objective of this study was to calculate the forces of all three hamstring muscles, relative to each other, during a lengthening contraction to assess for any differences that may help explain the biceps femoris predilection for injury during interval sprinting. To calculate the displacement of each individual hamstring muscle previously performed studies on cadaveric anatomical data and hamstring kinematics during sprinting were used. From these displacement calculations for each individual hamstring muscle physical principles were then used to deduce the proportion of force exerted by each individual hamstring muscle during a lengthening muscle contraction. These deductions demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle is required to exert proportionally more force in a lengthening muscle contraction relative to the semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles primarily as a consequence of having to lengthen over a greater distance within the same time frame. It is hypothesized that this property maybe a factor in the known observation of the increased susceptibility of the biceps femoris muscle to injury during repeated sprints where recurrent higher force is required. PMID:25506583

  6. [Isolated rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps femoris muscle in a sport climber: an uncommon injury].

    PubMed

    Geronikolakis, S; Best, R

    2012-06-01

    An isolated rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps femoris muscle without a direct trauma is an extremely rare injury. To date only a few case reports have been described in the literature. For sport climbers such an injury has never been described before. We report about a 41-year-old male sport climber complaining of such an injury after indoor rock-climbing. Unlike the previously described reports, the rupture occured during a phase of maximum static tension, without acceleration or movement of the knee joint. History and clinical characteristics, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging confirm the diagnosis and should always be performed to exclude other injuries. Early operative treatment with anatomic refixation of the ruptured tendon is necessary to restore function, although there are differences in the type of postoperative treatment. PMID:22415714

  7. Amplitude and frequency changes in surface EMG of biceps femoris during five days Bruce Protocol treadmill test.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Fauzani N; Ahmad, Siti A; Noor, Samsul Bahari Mohd; Hassan, Wan Zuha Wan; Yaakob, Azhar; Adam, Yunus; Ali, Sawal H M

    2015-08-01

    Electromyography (EMG) is one of the indirect tools in indexing fatigue. Fatigue can be detected when there are changes on amplitude and frequency. However, various outcomes from literature make researchers conclude that EMG is not a reliable tool to measure fatigue. This paper investigates EMG behavior of biceps femoris in median frequency and mean absolute value during five days of Bruce Protocol treadmill test. Before that, surface EMG signals are filtered using band pass filter cut-off at 20-500Hz and are de-noised using db45 1-decimated wavelet transform. Five participants achieved more than 85% of their maximal heart rate during the running activity. The authors also consider other markers of fatigue such as performance, muscle soreness and lethargy as indicators to adaptation and maladaptation conditions. Result shows that turning points of median frequency and mean absolute value are very significant in indexing fatigue and indicators to adaptation of resistive training. PMID:26737713

  8. Effect of a Periodized Power Training Program on the Functional Performances and Contractile Properties of the Quadriceps in Sprinters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Stanislovaitis, Aleksas; Duchateau, Jacques; Stanislovaitiene, Jurate

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare the effect of a periodized preparation consisting of power endurance training and high-intensity power training on the contractile properties of the quadriceps muscle and functional performances in well trained male sprinters (n = 7). After 4 weeks of high-intensity power training, 60-m sprint running time improved by an…

  9. Comparison of Lower Body Specific Resistance Training on the Hamstring to Quadriceps Strength Ratios in Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorgo, Sandor; Edupuganti, Pradeep; Smith, Darla R.; Ortiz, Melchor

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we compared hamstring (H) and quadriceps (Q) strength changes in men and women, as well as changes in conventional and functional H:Q ratios following an identical 12-week resistance training program. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to assess 14 male and 14 female participants before and after the intervention, and conventional…

  10. Hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque ratios diverge between sexes with increasing isokinetic angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Zazulak, Bohdanna T

    2008-09-01

    Our purpose was to determine if females demonstrate decreased hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque (H/Q) ratios compared to males and if H/Q ratios increase with increased isokinetic velocity in both sexes. Maturation disproportionately increases hamstrings peak torque at high velocity in males, but not females. Therefore, we hypothesised that mature females would demonstrate decreased H/Q ratios compared to males and the difference in H/Q ratio between sexes would increase as isokinetic velocity increased. Studies that analysed the H/Q ratio with gravity corrected isokinetic strength testing reported between 1967 and 2004 were included in our review and analysis. Keywords were hamstrings/quadriceps, isokinetics, peak torque and gravity corrected. Medline and Smart databases were searched combined with cross-checked bibliographic reference lists of the publications to determine studies to be included. Twenty-two studies were included with a total of 1568 subjects (1145 male, 423 female). Males demonstrated a significant correlation between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R=0.634, p<0.0001), and a significant difference in the isokinetic H/Q ratio at the lowest angular velocity (47.8+/-2.2% at 30 degrees /s) compared to the highest velocity (81.4+/-1.1% at 360 degrees /s, p<0.001). In contrast, females did not demonstrate a significant relationship between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R=0.065, p=0.77) or a change in relative hamstrings strength as the speed increased (49.5+/-8.8% at 30 degrees /s; 51.0+/-5.7% at 360 degrees /s, p=0.84). Gender differences in isokinetic H/Q ratios were not observed at slower angular velocities. However, at high knee flexion/extension angular velocities, approaching those that occur during sports activities, significant gender differences were observed in the H/Q ratio. Females, unlike males, do not increase hamstrings to quadriceps torque ratios at velocities that approach those of functional activities. PMID:17875402

  11. Hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque ratios diverge between sexes with increasing isokinetic angular velocity

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Myer, Gregory D.; Zazulak, Bohdanna T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Our purpose was to determine if females demonstrate decreased hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque (H/Q) ratios compared to males and if H/Q ratios increase with increased isokinetic velocity in both sexes. Maturation disproportionately increases hamstrings peak torque at high velocity in males, but not females. Therefore, we hypothesised that mature females would demonstrate decreased H/Q ratios compared to males and the difference in H/Q ratio between sexes would increase as isokinetic velocity increased. Studies that analysed the H/Q ratio with gravity corrected isokinetic strength testing reported between 1967 and 2004 were included in our review and analysis. Keywords were hamstrings/quadriceps, isokinetics, peak torque and gravity corrected. Medline and Smart databases were searched combined with cross-checked bibliographic reference lists of the publications to determine studies to be included. Twenty-two studies were included with a total of 1568 subjects (1145 male, 423 female). Males demonstrated a significant correlation between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R = 0.634, p < 0.0001), and a significant difference in the isokinetic H/Q ratio at the lowest angular velocity (47.8 ± 2.2% at 30°/s) compared to the highest velocity (81.4 ± 1.1% at 360°/s, p < 0.001). In contrast, females did not demonstrate a significant relationship between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R = 0.065, p = 0.77) or a change in relative hamstrings strength as the speed increased (49.5 ± 8.8% at 30°/s; 51.0 ± 5.7% at 360°/s, p = 0.84). Gender differences in isokinetic H/Q ratios were not observed at slower angular velocities. However, at high knee flexion/extension angular velocities, approaching those that occur during sports activities, significant gender differences were observed in the H/Q ratio. Females, unlike males, do not increase hamstrings to quadriceps torque ratios at velocities that approach those of functional activities. PMID:17875402

  12. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  13. Effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) on evoked muscular output in paraplegic quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Rabischong, E; Ohanna, F

    1992-07-01

    In order to assess the effects of FES on muscle output, chronic electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle was applied for half an hour twice a day for 2 months, in 10 thoracic level traumatic paraplegic patients. Results concerning torque (at 6 different muscle lengths) and fatigue were measured using a strain gauge transducer in isometric condition, and compared with the findings in 15 paraplegic patients who had not received electrical stimulation, and with 10 able bodied subjects with normal motor functions. With training, muscle strength was very significantly improved whilst fatigue resistance remained at a low level. The peak torque was not found to be of the same muscle length when comparing paraplegics and control subjects; it seemed to demonstrate that length-tension relationship of the muscular actuator was changing when it was electrically activated. Moreover, the force recorded in paraplegics remained markedly lower than in able bodied people. PMID:1508560

  14. Morel-Lavallee Lesion Initially Diagnosed as Quadriceps Contusion: Ultrasound, MRI, and Importance of Early Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Nicholas A.; Johnson, Jeremiah J.; Anderson, Shane B.

    2015-01-01

    Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLL) are rare, closed degloving injuries caused by trauma that delivers a shearing force to the soft tissue most commonly of the hip. If not treated in the acute and subacute setting these lesions are often complicated by re-accumulation of fluid, infection, or chronic pain. We present a unique case of a recurrent, massive medial knee/thigh MLL in which proper treatment was delayed due to initial diagnosis of a quadriceps contusion. We describe the ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings of this patient and based on a review of recent literature propose that the initial management should have included early drainage/debridement, which likely could have prevented recurrence and significantly shortened the clinical course. PMID:25987925

  15. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wei Yee; Gheorghiu, Daniel; Rao, Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR) in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. PMID:27298913

  16. Minimally Invasive Harvest of a Quadriceps Tendon Graft With or Without a Bone Block

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Christian; Herbort, Mirco; Abermann, Elisabeth; Hoser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon (QT) as a graft source for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently achieved increased attention. Although many knee surgeons have been using the QT as a graft for ACL revision surgery, it has never gained universal acceptance for primary ACL reconstruction. The QT is a very versatile graft that can be harvested in different widths, thicknesses, and lengths. Conventionally, the QT graft is harvested by an open technique, requiring a 6 to 8 cm longitudinal incision, which often leads to unpleasant scars. We describe a new, minimally invasive, standardized approach in which the QT graft can be harvested through a 2- to 3-cm skin incision and a new option of using the graft without a bone block. PMID:25264512

  17. Minimally invasive harvest of a quadriceps tendon graft with or without a bone block.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Herbort, Mirco; Abermann, Elisabeth; Hoser, Christian

    2014-08-01

    The quadriceps tendon (QT) as a graft source for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently achieved increased attention. Although many knee surgeons have been using the QT as a graft for ACL revision surgery, it has never gained universal acceptance for primary ACL reconstruction. The QT is a very versatile graft that can be harvested in different widths, thicknesses, and lengths. Conventionally, the QT graft is harvested by an open technique, requiring a 6 to 8 cm longitudinal incision, which often leads to unpleasant scars. We describe a new, minimally invasive, standardized approach in which the QT graft can be harvested through a 2- to 3-cm skin incision and a new option of using the graft without a bone block. PMID:25264512

  18. An Artificial Tendon to Connect the Quadriceps Muscle to the Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Stringer, Keith; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    No permanent, reliable artificial tendon exists clinically. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device as a versatile connector, fixed at one end to a muscle, and adaptable at the other end to inert implants such as prosthetic bones or to bone anchors. The objective of this study was to evaluate four configurations of the device to replace the extensor mechanism of the knee in goats. Within muscle, the four groups had: (A) needle-drawn uncoated bundles, (B) needle-drawn coated bundles, (C) barbed uncoated bundles, and (D) barbed coated bundles. The quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon were removed from the right hind limb in 24 goats. The four groups (n=6 for each) were randomly assigned to connect the quadriceps muscle to the tibia (with a bone plate). Specimens were collected from each operated leg and contralateral unoperated controls both for mechanical testing and histology at 90 days post-surgery. In strength testing, maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated control) were 1288±123 N (vs. 1387±118 N) for group A, 1323±144 N (vs. 1396±779 N) for group B, 930±125 N (vs. 1337±126 N) for group C, and 968±109 N (vs. 1528±146 N) for group D (mean ± SEM). The strengths of the OrthoCoupler™ legs in the needled device groups were equivalent to unoperated controls (p=0.6), while both barbed device groups had maximum forces significantly lower than their controls (p=0.001). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopaedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction. PMID:21520259

  19. An EMG comparative analysis of quadriceps during isoinertial strength training using nonlinear scaled wavelets.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Nicholas J; Mixco, Anthony R; Bohorquez, Jorge E; Signorile, Joseph F

    2015-04-01

    High-speed resistance training is used to increase power; however, momentum can reduce the effectiveness of high-speed (HS) training when using weight-stack (WS) machines. This study used a non-linear scaled wavelet analysis to assess differences between pneumatic (P) and WS during seven HS or controlled speed (CS) repetitions. Vastus medialis (VM) and lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) EMG data were collected during leg extension exercises performed by five regular weight-trainers (mean age ± SD, 23.2 ± 2.9 years). Data were analyzed using continuous wavelet analysis to assess temporal Intensity distribution across eight frequency bands. Significant differences occurred due to speed for all muscles (p<.0001). P produced higher Intensity than WS for all muscles during HS (p<.0001), and VM and RF during CS (p<.001). The CON phase produced higher Intensity than ECC for the vasti muscles during CS (p<.0003), and VM and RF during HS (p<.0001). Intensity increased across repetitions plateauing earlier for the vasti than RF during CS. Regardless of the machine, Intensity levels peaked between the 25-53 Hz and 46-82 Hz (2nd and 3rd wavelets) bands. The results indicate that when the objective is increasing power through isoinertial training, P machines at HS appear to be the most effective alternative. PMID:25553560

  20. Dynamics of corticospinal changes during and after high-intensity quadriceps exercise.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Mathieu; Temesi, John; Rupp, Thomas; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2014-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that during fatiguing quadriceps exercise, supraspinal fatigue develops late, is associated with both increased corticospinal excitability and inhibition and recovers quickly. Eight subjects performed 20 s contractions [15 s at 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 5 s MVC] separated by a 10 s rest period until task failure. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical femoral nerve stimulation (PNS) were delivered ∼ 2 s apart during 50% MVC, during MVC and after MVC in relaxed muscle. Voluntary activation was assessed by TMS (VATMS) immediately before and after exercise and then three times over a 6 min recovery period. During exercise, MVC and twitch force evoked by PNS in relaxed muscle decreased progressively to 48 ± 8 and 36 ± 16% of control values, respectively (both P < 0.01). Significant changes in voluntary activation assessed by PNS and twitch evoked by TMS during MVC were observed during the last quarter of exercise only (from 96.4 ± 1.7 to 86 ± 13%, P = 0.03 and from 0.76 ± 0.8 to 4.9 ± 4.7% MVC, P = 0.02, from baseline to task failure, respectively). The TMS-induced silent period increased linearly during both MVC (by ∼ 79 ms) and 50% MVC (by ∼ 63 ms; both P < 0.01). Motor-evoked potential amplitude did not change during the protocol at any force levels. Both silent period and VATMS recovered within 2 min postexercise, whereas MVC and twitch force evoked by PNS in relaxed muscle recovered to only 84 ± 9 and 73 ± 17% of control values 6 min after exercise, respectively. In conclusion, high-intensity single-joint quadriceps exercise induces supraspinal fatigue near task failure, with increased intracortical inhibition and, in contrast to previous upper-limb results, unchanged corticospinal excitability. These changes recover rapidly after task failure, emphasizing the need to measure corticospinal adaptations immediately at task failure to avoid underestimation of exercise

  1. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  2. Simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral rupture of the patellar tendon in an otherwise healthy athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, N I; Mbubaegbu, C E

    1996-01-01

    A case of a healthy athlete with simultaneous rupture of quadriceps tendon and rupture of the contralateral patella tendon is reported. Both tendons rupturing in the same patient is rare and this is the first reported case in a previously healthy person. Different mechanisms are implicated in the different ruptures. The rarity is because the simultaneous presence of contributory factors for either injury in the same person is uncommon. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8799608

  3. Effectiveness of injury prevention programs on developing quadriceps and hamstrings strength of young male professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Daneshjoo, Abdolhamid; Rahnama, Nader; Mokhtar, Abdul Halim; Yusof, Ashril

    2013-12-18

    Muscular strength is an important factor which is crucial for performance and injury prevention in most sports. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the FIFA's Medical Assessment and Research Centre 11+ and HarmoKnee injury prevention programs on knee strength of young professional male soccer players. Thirty-six soccer players (age: 18.9 ± 1.4 years) were divided equally into three groups; the 11+, HarmoKnee and control groups. The programs were performed for 24 sessions. Hamstring and quadriceps strength was measured using the Biodex System 3 at 30°, 60° and 90° of knee flexion. The 11+ increased quadriceps strength in the dominant leg by 19.7% and 47.8% at 60°and 90° knee flexion, respectively, and in the non-dominant leg by 16%, 35.3% and 78.1 % at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion, respectively. The HarmoKnee group, however, showed increased quadriceps strength only at 90° i.e., by 85.7% in the dominant leg and 73.8% in the non-dominant leg. As for hamstring strength, only the 11+ group demonstrated an increment by 24.8% and 19.8% at 30° and 60° knee flexion in the dominant leg, and in the non-dominant leg, by 28.7% and 13.7% at 30° and 60° knee flexion, respectively. In conclusion, both warm-up programs improve quadriceps strength. The 11+ demonstrated improvement in hamstring strength while the HarmoKnee program did not indicate any improvement. We suggest adding eccentric hamstring components such as Nordic hamstring exercise to the HarmoKnee program in order to enhance hamstring strength. PMID:24511347

  4. Effects of Kinesio Tape application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Timur; Aslan, Meryem Doğan; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Kinesio Tape (KT) application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke. Twenty-four patients were allocated into KT and control groups. All patients participated in the same conventional rehabilitation program 5 times/wk for 4 wk. In addition, KT was applied to quadriceps muscles bilaterally to the patients in the KT group. Compared with baseline, peak torque levels increased significantly in both groups (all p < 0.05). However, change levels were significantly higher in the KT group than the control group at 60 degrees/second angular velocity (AV) in extension (p = 0.04) and 60 and 180 degrees/second AV in flexion (both p = 0.02) on the paretic side. Moreover, the change levels were more prominent in the KT group at 60 and 180 degrees/second AV in extension (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively) on the nonparetic side. Gait, balance, mobility, and quality of life values improved significantly in both groups (all p < 0.05), yet the change levels between the groups did not reach significance (p > 0.05). KT application to quadriceps muscles in addition to conventional exercises for 4 wk is effective on isokinetic but not functional parameters. PMID:26220179

  5. Kinesio Taping Does Not Alter Quadriceps Isokinetic Strength and Power in Healthy Nonathletic Men: A Prospective Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Paweł; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna; Rutkowski, Radosław; Gruszczyński, Jakub; Lewandowski, Jacek; Straburzyński-Lupa, Marcin; Łochyński, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The effects of Kinesio Taping (KT) on muscular performance remain largely unclear. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of KT on the maximum concentric and eccentric quadriceps isokinetic strength. Study Design. This is a single-blinded, placebo crossover, repeated measures study. Methods. Maximum isokinetic concentric/eccentric extension torque, work, and power were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer without taping (NT) and with KT or placebo taping (PT) in 17 healthy young men. Repeated measures one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analyses. Results. Testing concentric contractions at 60°/s or 180°/s isokinetic speed, no significant differences in peak torque (Nm), total work (J), or mean power (W) were noted among the application modes under different conditions. Testing eccentric contractions at 30°/s or 60°/s isokinetic speed, no significant differences in mentioned parameters were noted, respectively. KT on the quadriceps neither decreased nor increased muscle strength in the participants. Conclusion. KT application onto the skin overlying the quadriceps muscle does not enhance the strength or power of knee extensors in healthy men. PMID:26819953

  6. The changes in springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) Longissimus thoracis et lumborum and Biceps femoris muscles during the rigour period.

    PubMed

    North, M K; Frylinck, L; Hoffman, L C

    2016-02-01

    This study describes the changes taking place during rigour in springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) and Biceps femoris (BF) muscles. Samples from six male and six female springbok were snap-frozen at 2, 3, 5, 8, 12, 18, 24 and 30h post-mortem (PM) and the pH, calpains I, II and calpastatin activities and cathepsins B, BL and H activities were determined. The temperature was also recorded. Significant third-order interactions were found for the pH and temperature, with the female LTL cooling more rapidly and acidifying slower than the other samples. Female muscles were at risk of developing cold-shortening and all the samples cooled more rapidly than recommended for cattle or sheep. Cathepsin BL activity increased PM, likely due to the degradation of the lysosomes. Calpains I, II and calpastatin activity declined during rigour, indicating that the calpains were activated early PM. Gender and muscle had a significant effect on calpain and cathepsin activity. PMID:26497102

  7. Complex left profunda femoris vein to renal vein bypass for the management of progressive chronic iliofemoral occlusion.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Adams, Matthew K; Telich-Tarriba, Jose E; Dresser, Kelly L; Ismail, Nyla; Peden, Eric K

    2013-01-01

    Chronic occlusions of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and iliofemoral veins are long-term sequelae of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) that can lead to postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Patients may present with a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, ranging from mild discomfort and swelling to severe venous hypertension and ulcerations. We report a 68-year-old man who had a history of left lower extremity DVT after a laminectomy and who developed PTS with nonhealing ulcers. The patient underwent a cross-pubic femorofemoral venous bypass that failed to improve his clinical status. After unsuccessful endovascular attempts for recanalization of the iliofemoral segment, a profunda femoris to IVC bypass was performed. The symptoms recurred 2 years later. Venography revealed restenosis at the caval anastomosis that did not resolve by endovascular means. A surgical revision was performed, and given the quality of the IVC, a jump bypass was created to the left renal vein. The swelling improved and the ulcers healed completely. Twenty-eight months after the complex reconstructions, he remains ulcer-free with mild edema controlled with stockings. Venous reconstructions remain a viable option for patients with symptomatic and recalcitrant nonmalignant obstruction of the large veins. PMID:23122979

  8. Neuromuscular efficiency of the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injuries☆

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Schäfer, Gabriel Santo; de Albuquerque, Carlos Eduardo; Vituri, Rogério Fonseca; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze strength and integrated electromyography (IEMG) data in order to determine the neuromuscular efficiency (NME) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, during the preoperative and postoperative periods; and to compare the injured limb at these two times, using the non-operated limb as a control. Methods EMG data and BF and VL strength data were collected during three maximum isometric contractions in knee flexion and extension movements. The assessment protocol was applied before the operation and two months after the operation, and the NME of the BF and VL muscles was obtained. Results There was no difference in the NME of the VL muscle from before to after the operation. On the other hand, the NME of the BF in the non-operated limb was found to have increased, two months after the surgery. Conclusions The NME provides a good estimate of muscle function because it is directly related to muscle strength and capacity for activation. However, the results indicated that two months after the ACL reconstruction procedure, at the time when loading in the open kinetic chain within rehabilitation protocols is usually started, the neuromuscular efficiency of the VL and BF had still not been reestablished. PMID:26229914

  9. The physical and biochemical changes in springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) Longissimus thoracis et lumborum and Biceps femoris muscle during ageing.

    PubMed

    North, M K; Frylinck, L; Hoffman, L C

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimum ageing period for vacuum-packed springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) and Biceps femoris (BF) muscle stored at 5.4 ± 1.0°C. Portions of muscle from seven male and six female springbok were aged 1, 2, 5, 8, 14 or 21 days. The Warner Bratzler shear force declined most during the first five days post-mortem (PM), while purge and cooking losses increased significantly with ageing. Calpains I and II and calpastatin activity declined significantly up to five days PM, suggesting that they may be responsible for tenderization. Cathepsins B, BL and H activity increased significantly during ageing. The BF muscle had significantly higher pH, lower purge loss, higher cooking loss, higher WBSF and higher calpain and calpastatin activity than the LTL. No significant differences between the genders or muscles were found for the collagen content or collagen solubility. Springbok LTL and BF muscles should not be aged for longer than five days. PMID:26225930

  10. Development of estimation system of knee extension strength using image features in ultrasound images of rectus femoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Hara, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The word "Locomotive syndrome" has been proposed to describe the state of requiring care by musculoskeletal disorders and its high-risk condition. Reduction of the knee extension strength is cited as one of the risk factors, and the accurate measurement of the strength is needed for the evaluation. The measurement of knee extension strength using a dynamometer is one of the most direct and quantitative methods. This study aims to develop a system for measuring the knee extension strength using the ultrasound images of the rectus femoris muscles obtained with non-invasive ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. First, we extract the muscle area from the ultrasound images and determine the image features, such as the thickness of the muscle. We combine these features and physical features, such as the patient's height, and build a regression model of the knee extension strength from training data. We have developed a system for estimating the knee extension strength by applying the regression model to the features obtained from test data. Using the test data of 168 cases, correlation coefficient value between the measured values and estimated values was 0.82. This result suggests that this system can estimate knee extension strength with high accuracy.

  11. Immediate Effects of Kinesiology Taping of Quadriceps on Motor Performance after Muscle Fatigued Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ick Keun; Kim, You Lim; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this cross-sectional single-blind study was to investigate the immediate effects of Kinesiology taping of quadriceps on motor performance after muscle fatigued induction. Design. Randomized controlled cross-sectional design. Subjects. Forty-five subjects participated in this study. Participants were divided into three groups: Kinesiology taping group, placebo taping group, and nontaping group. Methods. Subjects performed short-term exercise for muscle fatigued induction, followed by the application of each intervention. Peak torque test, one-leg single hop test, active joint position sense test, and one-leg static balance test were carried out before and after the intervention. Results. Peak torque and single-leg hopping distance were significantly increased when Kinesiology taping was applied (p < 0.05). But there were no significant effects on active joint position sense and single-leg static balance. Conclusions. We proved that Kinesiology taping is effective in restoring muscle power reduced after muscle fatigued induction. Therefore, we suggest that Kinesiology taping is beneficial for fatigued muscles. PMID:26246835

  12. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  13. Minimally Invasive Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Using Quadriceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  14. Human quadriceps strength and fatiguability in patients with post viral fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, O M; White, P D

    1991-01-01

    Quadriceps isometric strength, activation and fatiguability were measured in 11 patients with symptoms of fatigue three months after glandular fever or a glandular fever-like illness. Predicted normal and lower limits of normal muscle strength were calculated from height and age. These measures and the fatigue index were compared with a group of healthy students of similar age. Two of the patients were unable to activate fully their muscles. After allowing for this inhibition the group mean (SD) strength was 104 (22%) of predicted. Although there was no significant difference in the fatigue index between the patients and the control group, there was a trend for the patients to show less fatigue than controls. There was no difference in the muscle results for those patients who were found to have Epstein-Barr virus infections and those who did not. The feelings of weakness and fatigue experienced by the patients could not be explained by either physiological muscle fatigue or lack of effort. PMID:1800667

  15. A low-riding patella in posterior stabilised total knee replacements alters quadriceps' mechanical advantage, resulting in reduced knee flexion moments.

    PubMed

    Ward, T R; Pandit, H; Hollinghurst, D; Zavatsky, A B; Gill, H S; Thomas, N P; Murray, D W

    2012-08-01

    Abnormal in vivo Total Knee Replacement (TKR) kinetics is influenced by a range of factors, particularly by changes to the knee's geometric parameters such as the patellar tendon moment arm (PTMA). In this study, ground reaction force (GRF) measurements were combined with simultaneous fluoroscopic image measurements to investigate the relationship between abnormal TKR kinetics and geometric parameters. Nine Scorpio Cruciate Retaining (CR) TKR (Stryker, Newbury, UK), nine Scorpio Posterior Stabilized (PS) TKR and seven normal subjects performed a step-up activity on a forceplate in view of a fluoroscope. The TKR subjects were part of a larger ongoing randomised controlled trial. The maximum external knee flexion moment was 22.0% lower in the Scorpio PS group compared to the Scorpio CR group. No significant differences in PTMA were found between the groups. The Scorpio PS had a low-riding patella, with a 30.7% reduction in patellar height compared to the Scorpio CR. This was probably due to using a thick tibial insert after PCL release in the PS, and led to an 8° increase in patellar flexion angle which altered the patellar mechanism and reduced quadriceps' mechanical advantage. Consequently, PS subjects stepped-up more cautiously with a reduced knee flexion moment. PMID:22015171

  16. Coordination of two-joint rectus femoris and hamstrings during the swing phase of human walking and running.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Gregor, R J; Ryan, M M

    1998-06-01

    It has been hypothesized previously that because a strong correlation was found between the difference in electromyographic activity (EMG) of rectus femoris (RF) and hamstrings (HA; EMG(RF)-EMG(HA)) and the difference in the resultant moments at the knee and hip (Mk-Mh) during exertion of external forces on the ground by the leg, input from skin receptors of the foot may play an important role in the control of the distribution of the resultant moments between the knee and hip by modulating activation of the two-joint RF and HA. In the present study, we examined the coordination of RF and HA during the swing phase of walking and running at different speeds, where activity of foot mechanoreceptors is not modulated by an external force. Four subjects walked at speeds of 1.8 m/s and 2.7 m/s and ran at speeds of 2.7 m/s and 3.6 m/s on a motor-driven treadmill. Surface EMG of RF, semimembranosus (SM), and long head of biceps femoris (BF) and coordinates of the four leg joints were recorded. An inverse dynamics analysis was used to calculate the resultant moments at the ankle, knee, and hip during the swing phase. EMG signals were rectified and low-pass filtered to obtain linear envelopes and then shifted in time to account for electromechanical delay between EMG and joint moments. During walking and running at all studied speeds, mean EMG envelope values of RF were statistically (P<0.05) higher in the first half of the swing (or at hip flexion/knee extension combinations of joint moments) than in the second half (or at hip extension/knee flexion combinations of joint moments). Mean EMG values of BF and SM were higher (P<0.05) in the second half of the swing than in the first half. EMG and joint moment peaks were substantially higher (P<0.05) in the swing phase of walking at 2.7 m/s than during the swing phase of running at the same speed. Correlation coefficients calculated between the differences (EMG(RF)-EMG(HA)) and (Mk-Mh), taken every 1% of the swing phase, were

  17. NMR based biomarkers to study age-related changes in the human quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Azzabou, Noura; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-10-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is a major health issue. To improve elderly person quality of life, it is important to characterize age-associated structural changes within the skeletal muscle. NMR imaging offers quantitative tools to monitor these changes. We scanned 93 subjects: 33 young adults aged between 19 and 27 years old and 60 older adults between 69 and 80 years old. Their physical activity was assessed using a tri-axial accelerometer and they were classified either as active or sedentary. A standard multi-slice multi-echo (MSME) sequence was run and water T2 maps were extracted using a tri-exponential fit. Fat fraction was quantified using three-point Dixon technique. Each quadriceps muscle was characterized by: water T2 mean value, water T2 heterogeneity and the mean fat fraction. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) showed that water T2 mean values and its heterogeneity indices as well as fat fraction were significantly higher in the elderly group (p<0.05). Only fat fraction was significantly lower in the active group compared to the sedentary one (p<0.05). Linear regression confirmed the significant impact of age on these NMR parameters whereas physical activity impact was not systematic. NMR imaging provided a comprehensive assessment of the aging process impact on skeletal muscle composition. Water T2 increase might be related to changes in fiber typology while increased T2 heterogeneities might correlate with some degree of tissue disorganization, like the development of interstitial fibrosis. Fat fraction and water T2 heterogeneity increase was partly slowed down by physical activity. These changes were not gender dependent. PMID:26122131

  18. Quadriceps muscle weakness and atrophy are associated with a differential epigenetic profile in advanced COPD.

    PubMed

    Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Ausin, Pilar; Roca, Josep; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate muscle mass and function in models of muscle dysfunction and atrophy. We assessed whether quadriceps muscle weakness and atrophy are associated with a differential expression profile of epigenetic events in patients with advanced COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). In vastus lateralis (VL) of sedentary severe COPD patients (n=41), who were further subdivided into those with (n=25) and without (n=16) muscle weakness and healthy controls (n=19), expression of muscle-enriched miRNAs, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs), growth and atrophy signalling markers, total protein and histone acetylation, transcription factors, small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligases and muscle structure were explored. All subjects were clinically evaluated. Compared with controls, in VL of all COPD together and in muscle-weakness patients, expression of miR-1, miR-206 and miR-27a, levels of lysine-acetylated proteins and histones and acetylated histone 3 were increased, whereas expression of HDAC3, HDAC4, sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) were decreased, Akt (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1) expression did not differ, follistatin expression was greater, whereas myostatin expression was lower, serum reponse factor (SRF) expression was increased and fibre size of fast-twitch fibres was significantly reduced. In VL of severe COPD patients with muscle weakness and atrophy, epigenetic events regulate muscle differentiation rather than proliferation and muscle growth and atrophy signalling, probably as feedback mechanisms to prevent those muscles from undergoing further atrophy. Lysine-hyperacetylation of histones may drive enhanced protein catabolism in those muscles. These findings may help design novel therapeutic strategies (enhancers of miRNAs promoting myogenesis and acetylation inhibitors) to selectively target muscle weakness and atrophy in severe COPD. PMID:25628226

  19. Sonography of the quadriceps muscle: Examination technique, normal anatomy, and traumatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pasta, G.; Nanni, G.; Molini, L.; Bianchi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Lesions of the quadriceps muscle (QM) are frequently seen by sonographers, and in most cases they are the result of sports-related trauma. An accurate assessment of the severity of the lesion is essential, particularly when the patient is a professional athlete. In most cases, careful history-taking and a thorough physical examination are sufficient for making the diagnosis and indicating the most suitable imaging studies for each case. Clinical assessment alone, however, may not be sufficient for distinguishing contusions from small, partial tears or for estimating the size of a tear. Therefore, at least in patients who are professional athletes, imaging studies are necessary to plan appropriate therapy that will allow prompt functional recovery. Muscles cannot be visualized with conventional radiography, but it is used routinely in prepubertal patients because it can detect apophyseal detachments, which are the most frequent muscle lesion in this age group. Radiography is also useful when myositis ossificans is suspected. Magnetic resonance imaging, thanks to its excellent tissue contrast, allows simultaneous assessment of muscle, joint, and bone planes. It remains a second-line study due to its high cost and relatively low availability. It is also associated with various contraindications, the most important of which is the presence of a cardiac pacemaker. Ultrasonography has a number of advantages, including widespread availability, absence of contraindications, and low cost. It can also be used for dynamic studies of the muscle during contraction and relaxation, and if doubts arise, scans can easily be obtained of the contralateral muscle for comparison purposes. These qualities make it an excellent tool for follow-up of patients with QM lesions, when follow-up is necessary. This article reviews the anatomy of the QM, the technique used for standard ultrasound examination of this muscle, its normal appearance on ultrasound, and the sonographic characteristics

  20. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette; Døssing, Simon; Crameri, Regina M; Welling, Rasmus J; Langberg, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Kjaer, Michael; Babraj, John A; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J

    2005-09-15

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studied over 72 h after 1 h of one-legged kicking exercise at 67% of maximum workload (W(max)). To label tissue proteins in muscle and tendon primed, constant infusions of [1-(13)C]leucine or [1-(13)C]valine and flooding doses of [(15)N] or [(13)C]proline were given intravenously, with estimation of labelling in target proteins by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Patellar tendon and quadriceps biopsies were taken in exercised and rested legs at 6, 24, 42 or 48 and 72 h after exercise. The fractional synthetic rates of all proteins were elevated at 6 h and rose rapidly to peak at 24 h post exercise (tendon collagen (0.077% h(-1)), muscle collagen (0.054% h(-1)), myofibrillar protein (0.121% h(-1)), and sarcoplasmic protein (0.134% h(-1))). The rates decreased toward basal values by 72 h although rates of tendon collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis remained elevated. There was no tissue damage of muscle visible on histological evaluation. Neither tissue microdialysate nor serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4) or procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide changed from resting values. Thus, there is a rapid increase in collagen synthesis after strenuous exercise in human tendon and muscle. The similar time course of changes of protein synthetic rates in different cell types supports the idea of coordinated musculotendinous adaptation. PMID:16002437

  1. Reduction in mdx mouse muscle degeneration by low-intensity endurance exercise: a proteomic analysis in quadriceps muscle of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Frinchi, Monica; Giallombardo, Marco; Morici, Giuseppe; Liberto, Valentina Di; Alessandro, Riccardo; De Leo, Giacomo; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2015-01-01

    In our recent study was shown a significant recovery of damaged skeletal muscle of mice with X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) following low-intensity endurance exercise, probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle. Consequently, in the present work, we aimed to identify proteins involved in the observed reduction in degenerating fibres. To this end, we used proteomic analysis to evaluate changes in the protein profile of quadriceps dystrophic muscles of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. Four protein spots were found to be significantly changed and were identified as three isoforms of carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SODC). Protein levels of CA3 isoforms were significantly up-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were completely restored to wild–type (WT) mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Protein levels of SODC were down-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were significantly restored to WT mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Western blot data were in agreement with those obtained using proteomic analysis and revealed the presence of one more CA3 isoform that was significantly changed. Based on data found in the present study, it seems that low-intensity endurance exercise may in part contribute to reduce cell degeneration process in mdx muscles, by counteracting oxidative stress. PMID:26182375

  2. Transcriptome Analysis in Venom Gland of the Predatory Giant Ant Dinoponera quadriceps: Insights into the Polypeptide Toxin Arsenal of Hymenopterans

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Leung, Siu Wai; Prieto-da-Silva, Álvaro R. B.; Havt, Alexandre; Quinet, Yves P.; Martins, Alice M. C.; Lee, Simon M. Y.; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Dinoponera quadriceps is a predatory giant ant that inhabits the Neotropical region and subdues its prey (insects) with stings that deliver a toxic cocktail of molecules. Human accidents occasionally occur and cause local pain and systemic symptoms. A comprehensive study of the D. quadriceps venom gland transcriptome is required to advance our knowledge about the toxin repertoire of the giant ant venom and to understand the physiopathological basis of Hymenoptera envenomation. Results We conducted a transcriptome analysis of a cDNA library from the D. quadriceps venom gland with Sanger sequencing in combination with whole-transcriptome shotgun deep sequencing. From the cDNA library, a total of 420 independent clones were analyzed. Although the proportion of dinoponeratoxin isoform precursors was high, the first giant ant venom inhibitor cysteine-knot (ICK) toxin was found. The deep next generation sequencing yielded a total of 2,514,767 raw reads that were assembled into 18,546 contigs. A BLAST search of the assembled contigs against non-redundant and Swiss-Prot databases showed that 6,463 contigs corresponded to BLASTx hits and indicated an interesting diversity of transcripts related to venom gene expression. The majority of these venom-related sequences code for a major polypeptide core, which comprises venom allergens, lethal-like proteins and esterases, and a minor peptide framework composed of inter-specific structurally conserved cysteine-rich toxins. Both the cDNA library and deep sequencing yielded large proportions of contigs that showed no similarities with known sequences. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of the venom gland transcriptome of the New World giant ant D. quadriceps. The glandular venom system was dissected, and the toxin arsenal was revealed; this process brought to light novel sequences that included an ICK-folded toxins, allergen proteins, esterases (phospholipases and carboxylesterases), and lethal

  3. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson’s r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = −1.39° (−5.53, +2.75); t(22) = −0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen’s d = − 0.15 (−0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = −0.005 (−0.013, +0.003); t(22) = −1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen’s d = − 0.27 (−0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  4. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  5. Association of Quadriceps Muscle Fat With Isometric Strength Measurements in Healthy Males Using Chemical Shift Encoding-Based Water-Fat Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Inhuber, Stephanie; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Cordes, Christian; Ruschke, Stefan; Klupp, Elisabeth; Jungmann, Pia M.; Farlock, Rosanna; Eggers, Holger; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance–based assessment of quadriceps muscle fat has been proposed as surrogate marker in sarcopenia, osteoarthritis, and neuromuscular disorders. We presently investigated the association of quadriceps muscle fat with isometric strength measurements in healthy males using chemical shift encoding-based water-fat magnetic resonance imaging. Intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with isometric strength (up to r = −0.83 and −0.87, respectively). Reproducibility of intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction was 1.5% and 5.7%, respectively. PMID:26953765

  6. Biceps femoris and semitendinosus—teammates or competitors? New insights into hamstring injury mechanisms in male football players: a muscle functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Schuermans, Joke; Van Tiggelen, Damien; Danneels, Lieven; Witvrouw, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background The hamstring injury mechanism was assessed by investigating the exercise-related metabolic activity characteristics of the hamstring muscles using a muscle functional MRI (mfMRI) protocol. Methods 27 healthy male football players and 27 football players with a history of hamstring injuries (recovered and playing fully) underwent standardised mfMR Imaging. The mfMRI protocol consisted of a resting scan, a strenuous bilateral eccentric hamstring exercise and a postexercise scan. The exercise-related T2 increase or the signal intensity shift between both scans was used to detect differences in metabolic activation characteristics (1) between the different hamstring muscle bellies and (2) between the injury group and the control group. Results A more symmetrical muscle recruitment pattern corresponding to a less economic hamstring muscle activation was demonstrated in the formerly injured group (p<0.05). The injured group also demonstrated a significantly lower strength endurance capacity during the eccentric hamstring exercise. Conclusions These findings suggest that the vulnerability of the hamstring muscles to football-related injury is related to the complexity and close coherence in the synergistic muscle recruitment of the biceps femoris and the semitendinosus. Discrete differences in neuromuscular coordination and activity distribution, with the biceps femoris partly having to compensate for the lack of endurance capacity of the semitendinosus, probably increase the hamstring injury risk. PMID:25388959

  7. Influence of complete spinal cord injury on skeletal muscle mechanics within the first 6 months of injury.

    PubMed

    Castro, M J; Apple, D F; Rogers, S; Dudley, G A

    2000-01-01

    In this study we examined the influence of complete spinal cord injury (SCI) on the mechanical characteristics of skeletal muscle in vivo within 6 months of the injury. Surface electrical stimulation (ES) was applied to the left m. quadriceps femoris of patients at 6, 11 and 24 weeks after injury. Surface ES was also applied to seven able-bodied controls (AB) at two time points 18 weeks apart. ES consisted of 2 bouts of 20, 1-s isometric contractions with 2 s and 2 min of rest between contractions and bouts, respectively. The time from 20-80% of peak torque (rise time) and the half relaxation time (1/2 RT) were determined for the first and for the last few contractions. Force loss over repeat contractions was greater in SCI than AB (27% vs 95%; P = 0.0001), and did not change over the 18-week period. Rise time did not change over repeat contractions, was not different between groups, and nor did it change over the 18-week period (range: 150-172 ms). 1/2 RT showed several group differences. Overall, 1/2 RT was longer at the beginning of ES in SCI than AB [mean (SE) 133 (15) ms vs 90 (6) ms, P = 0.037]. Slowing of relaxation time with force loss over repeat contractions was found in SCI at 24 weeks after injury [167 (18) ms, P = 0.016], but not at 6 [128 (14) ms] or 11 [145 (12) ms] weeks after injury. AB, in contrast, showed prolonged relaxation times, with force loss at both time points [115 (10) ms and 113 (11) ms; P = 0.0001]. The results indicate that SCI alters the relaxation but not contractile properties of mixed skeletal muscle within the first 24 weeks of injury. Altered calcium handling and contraction-induced fiber injury are suggested to explain the slower relaxation time per se, and the prolonged relaxation with force loss observed after SCI. PMID:10552277

  8. The Effect of NeuroMuscular Electrical Stimulation on Quadriceps Strength and Knee Function in Professional Soccer Players: Return to Sport after ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Taradaj, J.; Halski, T.; Kucharzewski, M.; Walewicz, K.; Smykla, A.; Ozon, M.; Slupska, L.; Dymarek, R.; Ptaszkowski, K.; Rajfur, J.; Pasternok, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of NMES program applied in male soccer players (after ACL reconstruction) on the quadriceps muscle. The 80 participants (NMES = 40, control = 40) received an exercise program, including three sessions weekly. The individuals in NMES group additionally received neuromuscular electrical stimulation procedures on both right and left quadriceps (biphasic symmetric rectangular pulses, frequency of impulses: 2500 Hz, and train of pulses frequency: 50 Hz) three times daily (3 hours of break between treatments), 3 days a week, for one month. The tensometry, muscle circumference, and goniometry pendulum test (follow-up after 1 and 3 months) were applied. The results of this study show that NMES (in presented parameters in experiment) is useful for strengthening the quadriceps muscle in soccer athletes. There is an evidence of the benefit of the NMES in restoring quadriceps muscle mass and strength of soccer players. In our study the neuromuscular electrical stimulation appeared to be safe for biomechanics of knee joint. The pathological changes in knee function were not observed. This trial is registered with Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001168741. PMID:24381943

  9. The effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on quadriceps strength and knee function in professional soccer players: return to sport after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Taradaj, J; Halski, T; Kucharzewski, M; Walewicz, K; Smykla, A; Ozon, M; Slupska, L; Dymarek, R; Ptaszkowski, K; Rajfur, J; Pasternok, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of NMES program applied in male soccer players (after ACL reconstruction) on the quadriceps muscle. The 80 participants (NMES = 40, control = 40) received an exercise program, including three sessions weekly. The individuals in NMES group additionally received neuromuscular electrical stimulation procedures on both right and left quadriceps (biphasic symmetric rectangular pulses, frequency of impulses: 2500 Hz, and train of pulses frequency: 50 Hz) three times daily (3 hours of break between treatments), 3 days a week, for one month. The tensometry, muscle circumference, and goniometry pendulum test (follow-up after 1 and 3 months) were applied. The results of this study show that NMES (in presented parameters in experiment) is useful for strengthening the quadriceps muscle in soccer athletes. There is an evidence of the benefit of the NMES in restoring quadriceps muscle mass and strength of soccer players. In our study the neuromuscular electrical stimulation appeared to be safe for biomechanics of knee joint. The pathological changes in knee function were not observed. This trial is registered with Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001168741. PMID:24381943

  10. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  11. The interface between bone and tendon at an insertion site: a study of the quadriceps tendon insertion

    PubMed Central

    CLARK, JOHN; STECHSCHULTE, DANIEL J.

    1998-01-01

    Traumatic avulsions of ligament or tendon insertions rarely occur at the actual interface with bone, which suggests that this attachment is strong or otherwise protected from injury by the structure of the insertion complex. In this study we describe the terminal extent of quadriceps tendon fibres where they insert into the patellae of adult rabbits, humans, dogs and sheep. Specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). To facilitate tracing of tendon fibres the specimens were decalcified for SEM, and polarised light microscopy (PLM) was used in the LM segment of the study. By SEM it was possible to identify mature bone by the presence of osteocytes and a lamellar organisation. PLM and SEM showed that, unlike tendon fibres elsewhere, those in the calcified fibrocartilage were not crimped. No specific cement line was identified by SEM. Tendon fibres interdigitated among separate bone lamellar systems, (osteons or marrow spaces), but did not merge with the collagen systems of individual lamellae. The interdigitation was more extensive and the margin between tendon and bone was less distinct in the anterior third of the insertion. The segment of calcified tendon which interdigitated with bone stained less intensely blue and was less cellular than the more proximal calcified fibrocartilage zone adjacent to the tidemark. Lamellar collagen fibres of the bony trabeculae in the anterior patella were unusually parallel and longitudinal in orientation, making distinction of interposed tendon fibres difficult on LM and PLM sections. LM, SEM and transmission electron microscopy of rabbit patellae at birth revealed that anterior quadriceps tendon fibres extended over the patella in a fibrous cellular layer. By 2 wk of age, this layer had acquired chondroid features (i.e. cell lacunae and metachromasia) and contained vessels extending from patellar marrow. At 6 wk of age, part of this fibrocartilaginous layer was replaced by mature bone

  12. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Methods Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Results Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ≤0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0

  13. Extended Healing Validation of an Artificial Tendon to Connect the Quadriceps Muscle to the Tibia: 180-day Study

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan J.; Litsky, Alan S.; Mayerson, Joel L.; Stringer, Keith; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Whenever a tendon or its bone insertion is disrupted or removed, existing surgical techniques provide a temporary connection or scaffolding to promote healing, but the interface of living to nonliving materials soon breaks down under the stress of these applications, if it must bear the load more than acutely. Patients are thus disabled whose prostheses, defect size, or mere anatomy limit the availability or outcomes of such treatments. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to join skeletal muscle to prosthetic or natural structures without this interface breakdown. In this study, the goat knee extensor mechanism (quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon) was removed from the right hind limb in 16 goats. The device connected the quadriceps muscle to a stainless steel bone plate on the tibia. Mechanical testing and histology specimens were collected from each operated leg and contra lateral unoperated control legs at 180 days. Maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated) were 1400± 93N (vs. 1179± 61 N), linear stiffnesses were 33± 3 N/mm (vs. 37 ± 4N/mm), and elongations at failure were 92.1 ± 5.3 mm (vs. 68.4 ± 3.8 mm; mean ± SEM). Higher maximum forces (p = 0.02) and elongations at failure (p = 0.008) of legs with the device versus unoperated controls were significant; linear stiffnesses were not (p = 0.3). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopaedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction. PMID:22179930

  14. Downregulation of the serum response factor/miR-1 axis in the quadriceps of patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amy; Riddoch-Contreras, Joanna; Natanek, Samantha A; Donaldson, Anna; Man, William D-C; Moxham, John; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Polkey, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Muscle atrophy confers a poor prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet the molecular pathways responsible are poorly characterised. Muscle-specific microRNAs and serum response factor (SRF) are important regulators of muscle phenotype that contribute to a feedback system to regulate muscle gene expression. The role of these factors in the skeletal muscle dysfunction that accompanies COPD is unknown. Methods 31 patients with COPD and 14 healthy age-matched controls underwent lung and quadriceps function assessments, measurement of daily activity and a percutaneous quadriceps muscle biopsy. The expression of muscle-specific microRNAs, myosin heavy chains and components of the serum response factor signalling pathway were determined by qPCR. Results A reduction in expression of miR-1 (2.5-fold, p=0.01) and the myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) A and B was observed in patients compared with controls (MRTF-A mRNA: twofold, p=0.028; MRTF-B mRNA: fourfold, p=0.011). miR-1 expression was associated with smoking history, lung function, fat-free mass index, 6 min walk distance and percentage of type 1 fibres. miR-133 and miR-206 were negatively correlated with daily physical activity. Insulin-like growth factor 1 mRNA was increased in the patients and miR-1 was negatively correlated with phosphorylation of the kinase Akt. Furthermore, the protein levels of histone deacetylase 4, another miR-1 target, were increased in the patients. Conclusions Downregulation of the activity of the MRTF-SRF axis and the expression of muscle-specific microRNAs, particularly miR-1, may contribute to COPD-associated skeletal muscle dysfunction. PMID:21998125

  15. Arterial Injury to the Profunda Femoris Artery following Internal Fixation of a Neck of Femur Fracture with a Compression Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old woman who developed extensive proximal thigh swelling and persistent anaemia following internal fixation of an extracapsular neck of femur fracture with a dynamic hip screw (DHS). This was revealed to be a pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery on angiography. Her case was further complicated by a concurrent pulmonary embolism (PE). She underwent endovascular coil embolisation of the pseudoaneurysm. An IVC filter was inserted and the patient was fully anticoagulated once it had been ensured that there was no active bleeding. In this case, we review the potential for anatomical variations in the blood supply to this region and discuss treatment options for a complicated patient. We recommend that a pseudoaneurysm should be part of a differential diagnosis for postoperative patients with anaemia refractory to blood transfusion so as not to miss this rare but potentially serious complication. PMID:24455367

  16. Influence of bicycle seat tube angle and hand position on lower extremity kinematics and neuromuscular control: implications for triathlon running performance.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Gleason, Kyle; Thelen, Darryl G

    2011-11-01

    We investigated how varying seat tube angle (STA) and hand position affect muscle kinematics and activation patterns during cycling in order to better understand how triathlon-specific bike geometries might mitigate the biomechanical challenges associated with the bike-to-run transition. Whole body motion and lower extremity muscle activities were recorded from 14 triathletes during a series of cycling and treadmill running trials. A total of nine cycling trials were conducted in three hand positions (aero, drops, hoods) and at three STAs (73°, 76°, 79°). Participants also ran on a treadmill at 80, 90, and 100% of their 10-km triathlon race pace. Compared with cycling, running necessitated significantly longer peak musculotendon lengths from the uniarticular hip flexors, knee extensors, ankle plantar flexors and the biarticular hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius muscles. Running also involved significantly longer periods of active muscle lengthening from the quadriceps and ankle plantar flexors. During cycling, increasing the STA alone had no affect on muscle kinematics but did induce significantly greater rectus femoris activity during the upstroke of the crank cycle. Increasing hip extension by varying the hand position induced an increase in hamstring muscle activity, and moved the operating lengths of the uniarticular hip flexor and extensor muscles slightly closer to those seen during running. These combined changes in muscle kinematics and coordination could potentially contribute to the improved running performances that have been previously observed immediately after cycling on a triathlon-specific bicycle. PMID:21896955

  17. β2-Adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle does not modulate disease severity in the rodent meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tonge, D.P.; Jones, S.W.; Parr, T.; Bardsley, R.; Doherty, M.; Maciewicz, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine whether β2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle can modulate the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rodent meniscectomy (MNX) model. Methods Male Lewis rats were subcutaneously administered with 1.5 mg/kg/day clenbuterol hydrochloride (n = 15) or saline vehicle (n = 20) for 14 days. Following pre-treatment, five animals from each group were sacrificed to assess the immediate effects of clenbuterol. The remaining animals underwent either invasive knee surgery (clenbuterol pre-treated n = 10; saline pre-treated n = 10) or a sham control surgical procedure (saline pre-treated n = 5). During disease initiation and progression, weight bearing was assessed by hindlimb loading. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein isoforms were quantified by silver stained SDS PAGE. OA severity was graded by assessment of toluidine blue stained step coronal sections of the total knee joint. Results Clenbuterol treatment resulted in an increase in total bodyweight, growth rate and in quadriceps skeletal muscle mass. Meniscal surgery resulted in the development of OA-like lesions, changes to weight bearing, and changes in MHC protein expression in the quadriceps. Clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy had no effect on either weight bearing or articular pathology following MNX surgery. Conclusions Our data reveal that clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is unable to mimic the beneficial clinical effects of increased musculature derived through targeted strength training in humans, in a rodent model of MNX-induced OA. In addition we observed fibre-type switching to “slow twitch” in the quadriceps muscle during the induction of OA that warrants further investigation as to its relationship to joint stability. PMID:20060953

  18. Do Three Different Passive Assessments of Quadriceps Spasticity Relate to the Functional Activity of Walking for Children Diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed Central

    White, Hank; Uhl, Tim L.; Augsburger, Sam

    2015-01-01

    A stiff-knee gait pattern is frequently associated with several impairments including quadriceps spasticity in children diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP). The relationship of clinical measures of quadriceps spasticity and the stiff-knee gait pattern in children diagnosed with CP has not been well established. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the ability of clinical measures of quadriceps spasticity (modified Ashworth scale [MAS], Ely tests, and pendulum test) to categorize a stiff-knee gait pattern in children with CP. Children were categorized as having a stiff-knee gait pattern based on kinematic and EMG gait data. Results of a logistic regression model revealed that the only significant measure was A1 of the pendulum test. Discriminant analysis functions were used to predict group membership (stiff-knee, not stiff-knee gait pattern) for each measure. The A1 of the pendulum test demonstrated the highest classification accuracy and the highest sensitivity compared to the other measures. Therefore, a negative pendulum test (indicated by an A1 value of 45 degrees or more) is more useful for ruling out a stiff-knee gait pattern compared to the other clinical measures. PMID:26576411

  19. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  20. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  1. Neuro-sliding mode control with modular models for control of knee-joint angle using quadriceps electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ajoudani, Arash; Erfanian, Abbas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a control methodology which is based on synergistic combination of a single-neuron controller with sliding mode control (SMC) for control of knee-joint position in paraplegic subjects with quadriceps stimulation. The control law will be switched from the sliding mode control to neural control, when the state trajectory of system enters in some boundary layer around the sliding surface. The main drawback of the standard sliding modes is mostly related to the so-called chattering caused by the high-frequency control switching. The value of switching gain depends on the bounds of system uncertainties. The system with large uncertainties needs to use a higher switching gain. This will, however, result in the high-frequency control switching and chattering across the sliding surface. To avoid such a condition, it is necessary to decrease the system uncertainty. To decrease the uncertainty, an accurate model of the system is required. For this purpose, we present a modular approach to modeling the knee-joint dynamics. Extensive experiments on healthy and paraplegic subjects are provided to demonstrate the robustness, stability and tracking accuracy of the neuro-SMC. The experimental results show that the neuro-SMC provides excellent tracking control for different reference trajectories and could generate control signals to compensate the muscle fatigue. PMID:18002483

  2. The influence of passive stretch on muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kevin K

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that chronic stretch might be able to produce skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, stretching might also restrict blood flow, which could in turn influence any stretch-training program. This study evaluated the influence of muscle stretch on muscle oxygen saturation using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A 16 channel NIRS probes were placed on the medial gastrocnemius, quadriceps, and hamstring muscles of young healthy adults. Oxygen saturation during maximal tolerated stretch was measured and normalized with cuff-induced ischemia and reperfusion. Oxygen saturation decreased in the gastrocnemius and quadriceps in a position dependent fashion, but did not change in the hamstring muscles. Passive stretching may also have a significant hypoxic component in some muscles but not others. PMID:20204809

  3. RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT WITH THE CENTRAL THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE TENDON: ANALYSIS OF 10-YEAR RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Marcus Valladares; Junior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Terra, Dalton Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assess clinical results using two different protocols, 10 years after ACL reconstruction surgery with the central third of quadriceps muscle tendon (QT). Method: Between November /1997 and April/1998, 25 patients were submitted to 25 ACL reconstructions with QT by transtibial technique. The bone portion of the graft was fixated on femoral tunnel with interference screw and the tendinous portion of tibial tunnel with screw with washer. Two patients injured the new when playing soccer. Six patients were not available for follow-up (24%). Seventeen patients were evaluated, 15 men and two women, with mean age at surgery time of 28.53 ± 6.64 years. All patients were examined at six months, one year, and ten years after surgery. Clinical evaluation was made by the Lysholm scale, and the knee evaluation, with the Hospital for Special Surgery scale. Results: The patients had their injuries operated after 9.87 ± 14.42 months of the accident. According to Lysholm scale, the results at the end of the first year were 98.71 ± 2.47 and, after 10 years, 97.35 ± 3.12. Using the Hospital for Special Surgery scale, the mean score was 95.07 ± 5.23 in one year, and 94.87 ± 4.16 in 10 years. All patients returned to their professional activities with the same previous status. Fifteen (88.24%) patients were able to return to their sports activities, one by modifying the practice, while another one switched to another sport. No patient complained of pain on the donor area in the medium and long term. The sports return rate was excellent, and no changes were found on the femoropatellar joint. PMID:27022511

  4. Molecular profiles of Quadriceps muscle in myostatin-null mice reveal PI3K and apoptotic pathways as myostatin targets

    PubMed Central

    Chelh, Ilham; Meunier, Bruno; Picard, Brigitte; Reecy, Mark James; Chevalier, Catherine; Hocquette, Jean-François; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the TGF-β superfamily, has been identified as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Inactivating mutations in the MSTN gene are responsible for the development of a hypermuscular phenotype. In this study, we performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to detect altered expression/abundance of genes and proteins. These differentially expressed genes and proteins may represent new molecular targets of MSTN and could be involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. Results Transcriptomic analysis of the Quadriceps muscles of 5-week-old MSTN-null mice (n = 4) and their controls (n = 4) was carried out using microarray (human and murine oligonucleotide sequences) of 6,473 genes expressed in muscle. Proteomic profiles were analysed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Comparison of the transcriptomic profiles revealed 192 up- and 245 down- regulated genes. Genes involved in the PI3K pathway, insulin/IGF pathway, carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis regulation were up-regulated. Genes belonging to canonical Wnt, calcium signalling pathways and cytokine-receptor cytokine interaction were down-regulated. Comparison of the protein profiles revealed 20 up- and 18 down-regulated proteins spots. Knockout of the MSTN gene was associated with up-regulation of proteins involved in glycolytic shift of the muscles and down-regulation of proteins involved in oxidative energy metabolism. In addition, an increased abundance of survival/anti-apoptotic factors were observed. Conclusion All together, these results showed a differential expression of genes and proteins related to the muscle energy metabolism and cell survival/anti-apoptotic pathway (e.g. DJ-1, PINK1, 14-3-3ε protein, TCTP/GSK-3β). They revealed the PI3K and apoptotic pathways as MSTN targets and are in favour of a role of MSTN as a modulator of cell survival in vivo. PMID:19397818

  5. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  6. Effects of live weight at slaughter on fatty acid composition of Longissimus dorsi and Biceps femoris muscles of indigenous Lori goat.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Ali; Fallah, Rozbeh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine fatty acid (FA) composition of Longissimus dorsi (LD) and Biceps femoris (BF) muscles of an Iranian indigenous goat (Lori goat) at two live weights at slaughter (LWS). Twenty male Lori goats (5 to 8 months) raised in nomadic system were slaughtered either at LWS less than 20 kg (light) or LWS more than 30 kg (heavy). Carcass dressing and FA composition of intramuscular fat of LD and BF muscles as well as cholesterol content of LD muscle were determined. Heavy goats had higher dressing percentage than light ones (42.7vs.39.3%, P < 0.01). The predominant n-6 FA were C18:2, and C20:4 while C22:5, C20:5, C18:3, C20:3, and C22:6 were the n-3 FA detected. Polyunsaturated and saturated FA contributed 22% and 36% of the total FA in both muscles, respectively. Palmitic acid (C16:0) of LD was higher in heavy compared to the light goats (P < 0.05). BF muscle had higher α-linolenic acid (18:3 n-3) as percentage than LD muscle (P < 0.05). The ratio of n-6/n-3 FA and polyunsaturated/saturated FA were 3.8 and 0.6, respectively. Cholesterol content of LD muscle of light and heavy goats were 71.2 ± 16 and 59.5 ± 14 mg per 100 g fresh meat respectively. In conclusion, desirable PUFA/SFA (0.6) and n-3/n-6 ratio (3.8) found in indigenous Lori goat propose healthy source of lean meat for the consumers. PMID:26431711

  7. Age-Related Changes in Strength, Joint Laxity, and Walking Patterns: Are They Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Katherine S; Schmitt, Laura C; Lewek, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Aging is associated with musculoskeletal changes and altered walking patterns. These changes are common in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and may precipitate the development of OA. We examined age-related changes in musculoskeletal structures and walking patterns to better understand the relationship between aging and knee OA. Methods Forty-four individuals without OA (15 younger, 15 middle-aged, 14 older adults) and 15 individuals with medial knee OA participated. Knee laxity, quadriceps femoris muscle strength (force-generating capacity), and gait were assessed. Results Medial laxity was greater in the OA group, but there were no differences between the middle-aged and older control groups. Quadriceps femoris strength was less in the older control group and in the OA group. During the stance phase of walking, the OA group demonstrated less knee flexion and greater knee adduction, but there were no differences in knee motion among the control groups. During walking, the older control group exhibited greater quadriceps femoris muscle activity and the OA group used greater muscle co-contraction. Discussion and Conclusion Although weaker, the older control group did not use truncated motion or higher co-contraction. The maintenance of movement patterns that were similar to the subjects in the young control group may have helped to prevent development of knee OA. Further investigation is warranted regarding age-related musculoskeletal changes and their influence on the development of knee OA. PMID:17785376

  8. Handgrip strength, quadriceps muscle power, and optimal shortening velocity roles in maintaining functional abilities in older adults living in a long-term care home: a 1-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Kozicka, Izabela; Kostka, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relative role of handgrip strength (HGS), quadriceps muscle power (Pmax), and optimal shortening velocity (υopt) in maintaining functional abilities (FAs) in older adults living in a long-term care home over a 1-year follow-up. Subjects and methods Forty-one inactive older institutionalized adults aged 69.8±9.0 years participated in this study. HGS, Pmax, υopt, cognitive function using the Mini-Mental State Examination, depressive symptoms using the Geriatric Depression Scale, nutritional status using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and physical activity (PA) using the Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire were assessed at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. FAs were assessed with activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental ADL, and Timed Up & Go test. Results Both at baseline and at follow-up, FAs were related to age, HGS, Pmax/kg, υopt, MNA, and PA. These associations were generally similar in both sexes. As revealed in multiple regression analysis, υopt was the strongest predictor of FA, followed by Pmax/kg, PA, and MNA. FA deteriorated after 1 year as measured by ADL and Timed Up & Go test. Pmax and υopt, but not HGS, also decreased significantly after 1 year. Nevertheless, 1-year changes in FAs were not related to changes in HGS, Pmax, υopt, or PA. Conclusion The 1-year period of physical inactivity among older institutionalized adults was found to have a negative effect on their FAs, Pmax, and υopt. The present study demonstrates that Pmax and, especially, υopt correlated with FAs of older adults more than HGS, both at baseline and at follow-up. Despite this, 1-year natural fluctuations of PA, Pmax, and υopt are not significant enough to influence FAs in inactive institutionalized older adults. PMID:27307720

  9. The Effect of Warm-Up and Cool-Down Exercise on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in the Quadriceps Muscle: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Olav; Sjøhaug, Mona; van Beekvelt, Mireille; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of warm-up and cool-down exercise on delayed onset of muscle soreness at the distal and central parts of rectus femoris following leg resistance exercise. Thirty-six volunteers (21 women, 15 men) were randomly assigned to the warm-up (20 min ergometer cycling prior to the resistance exercise), cool-down (20 min cycling after the resistance exercise), or control group performing resistance exercise only. The resistance exercise consisted of front lunges (10×5 repetitions/sets) with external loading of 40% (women) and 50% (men) of body mass. Primary outcomes were pressure pain threshold along rectus femoris and maximal isometric knee extension force. Data were recorded before the resistance exercise and on the two consecutive days. Pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced for the control group on both day 2 and 3 (p≤0.003) but not for the warm-up group (p≥0.21). For the cool-down group, pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced on day 2 (p≤0.005) and was also lower compared to the warm-up group (p=0.025). Force was significantly reduced on day 2 and 3 for all groups (p<0.001). This study indicates that aerobic warm-up exercise performed prior to resistance exercise may prevent muscle soreness at the central but not distal muscle regions, but it does not prevent loss of muscle force. PMID:23486850

  10. The acute inflammatory response induced in mice by the venom of the giant ant Dinoponera quadriceps involves macrophage and interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Paloma L; Quinet, Yves P; Cavalcante Brizeno, Luiz André; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Torres, Alba Fabíola C; Martins, Alice Maria C; Assreuy, Ana Maria S

    2016-07-01

    Dinoponera quadriceps (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae) is a primitive and endemic ant of Northeastern Brazil, that uses its sting and associated venom gland to capture preys and for defense. Venom of Dinoponera is of potential clinical importance, since it causes intense local pain, accompanied by erythema and edema, when injected by the sting. With other hymenopteran venoms, inflammatory effects are also reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory activity of D. quadriceps venom (DqV) in mice. Acrylamide electrophoresis of DqV revealed five main protein bands varying between 15 and 100 kDa, confirming the proteinous nature of DqV. DqV subplantar injection elicited edema at 5 μg/kg (3 fold), 50 μg/kg (4 fold) or 500 μg/kg (7 fold) from zero to 360 min compared to saline. DqV (50 μg/kg) increased vascular permeability (4 fold) in the first hour after induction. The paw tissue histology showed moderate inflammatory focus caused by DqV (50 μg/kg) in the first hour of paw edema, but severe tissue changes (edema, inflammatory infiltrate and focal areas of hemorrhage) in the third hour. Intraperitoneal injection of DqV (50 μg/kg) stimulated neutrophil (7 fold) and mononuclear (1.4 fold) migration vs saline. DqV edematogenic effect was inhibited by dexamethasone (92%), thalidomide (82%), cyproheptadine (62%), AA861 (58%), celecoxib (34%) or l-NAME (34%), but the neutrophil migration was only by dexamethasone (57%). DqV-elicited neutrophil migration at 50 μg/kg was potentiated 1.7 fold by the animals pre-treatment with 3% thioglycolate. DqV injection increased the levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in peritoneal cavities. DqV (50, 100 and 200 μg/mL) increased phospholipase activity (A425nm) from 10 min to 40 min. Raw 267 macrophages incubated with DqV (from 3.12 to 50 mg/mL) showed no significant decrease in cell viability or LDH measurements and at 35 μg/mL induced increase in IL-1β (from 3 to 6 h). This study

  11. The Influence of Prior Hamstring Injury on Lengthening Muscle Tissue Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Reeder, Scott B.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2010-01-01

    Hamstring strain injuries often occur near the proximal musculotendon junction (MTJ) of the biceps femoris. Post-injury remodeling can involve scar tissue formation, which may alter contraction mechanics and influence re-injury risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the affect of prior hamstring strain injury on muscle tissue displacements and strains during active lengthening contractions. Eleven healthy and eight subjects with prior biceps femoris injuries were tested. All previously injured subjects had since returned to sport and exhibited evidence of residual scarring along the proximal aponeurosis. Subjects performed cyclic knee flexion-extension on an MRI-compatible device using elastic and inertial loads, which induced active shortening and lengthening contractions, respectively. CINE phase-contrast imaging was used to measure tissue velocities within the biceps femoris during these tasks. Numerical integration of the velocity information was used to estimate two-dimensional tissue displacement and strain fields during muscle lengthening. The largest tissue motion was observed along the distal MTJ, with the active lengthening muscle exhibiting significantly greater and more homogeneous tissue displacements. First principal strains magnitudes were largest along the proximal MTJ for both loading conditions. The previously injured subjects exhibited less tissue motion and significantly greater strains near the proximal MTJ. We conclude that localized regions of high tissue strains during active lengthening contractions may predispose the proximal biceps femoris to injury. Furthermore, post-injury remodeling may alter the in-series stiffness seen by muscle tissue and contribute to the relatively larger localized tissue strains near the proximal MTJ, as was observed in this study. PMID:20472238

  12. Exposure to microgravity for 30 days onboard Bion M1 caused muscle atrophy and decreased regeneration in the mouse femoral Quadriceps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora; Radugina, Elena A.; Almeida, Eduardo; Blaber, Elizabeth; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Markitantova, Yulia

    Mechanical unloading of muscle during spaceflight in microgravity is known to cause muscular atrophy, changes in muscle fiber type composition, gene expression, and reductions in regenerative muscle growth. Although limited data exists for long-term effects of microgravity in human muscle, these processes have mostly been studied in rodents for short periods of time, up to two weeks of spaceflight. Here we report on how 30-day, long-term, mechanical unloading in microgravity affects mouse muscle of the femoral Quadriceps group. To conduct these studies we used muscle tissue from 6 mice from the NASA Biospecimen Sharing Program conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, during the Russian Bion M1 biosatellite mission in 2013. Muscle morphology observed in histological sections shows signs of extensive atrophy and regenerative hypoplasia. Specifically, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of myonuclei and low density of myofibrils, their separation and fragmentation. Despite obvious atrophy, muscle regeneration nevertheless appears to have continued after 30 days in microgravity as evidenced by thin and short newly formed muscle fibers. Many of them however showed evidence of apoptosis and degradation of synthesized fibrils, suggesting long-term unloading in microgravity affects late stages of myofiber differentiation. Ground asynchronous and vivarium control animals showed normal, well-developed tissue structure with sufficient blood and nerve supply and evidence of regenerative formation of new muscle fibers free of apoptotic nuclei. Myofiber nuclei stress responses in spaceflight animals was detected by positive nuclear immunolocalization of c-jun and c-myc proteins. Regenerative activity of satellite cells in muscle was localized with pax-7, MyoD and MCad immunostaining, and did not appear altered in microgravity. In summary, long-term spaceflight in microgravity causes significant atrophy

  13. A comparison of techniques for fixation of the quadriceps muscle-tendon complex for in vitro biomechanical testing of the knee joint in sheep.

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Philip; Goudakos, Ioannis; Rosenstiel, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Taylor, William R; Duda, Georg N; Heller, Markus O

    2009-01-01

    Whilst in vitro testing can contribute to a better understanding of the biomechanical interactions at the knee joint, the application of physiological-like muscle forces in vitro remains challenging. One main difficulty seems to be the adequate fixation of the muscle-tendon complex to the mechanical apparatus that provides the forces in vitro. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of different muscle-tendon fixation mechanisms, including a new technique developed to optimise the interface grip of the soft tissues, to reliably transmit physiological in vivo loads through the muscle-tendon complex to the attached bone. The fixations of three quadriceps components in 16 right knees of skeletally mature female merino sheep were loaded to failure using four different fixation techniques (aluminium clamp, freeze clamp, suture technique and a new extension hull technique). Each technique was tested 12 times: 4 times on each individual quadriceps component. A factorial analysis for repeated measurements was undertaken to examine differences between the different fixation techniques. The extension hull technique and the aluminium clamp performed similarly, exceeding the computationally determined physiological forces in all but one trial and achieved higher failure loads than the suture technique. Although the freeze clamp reached the highest mean load to failure, it also failed more often than the extension hull technique. This comparison of the fixation techniques suggests that the new extension hull technique is a suitable fixation method for applying physiological-like muscle loading in an in vitro set-up. It cannot only be handled in a very simple manner, but also possesses a compact, lightweight construction, providing the possibility for the application of more complex loading conditions that include, e.g. the action of multiple muscles of the knee flexor and extensor group concurrently. PMID:18539516

  14. Influence of Hip-Flexion Angle on Hamstrings Isokinetic Activity in Sprinters

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Kenny; Gojanovic, Boris; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2012-01-01

    Context Hamstrings strains are common and debilitating injuries in many sports. Most hamstrings exercises are performed at an inadequately low hip-flexion angle because this angle surpasses 70° at the end of the sprinting leg's swing phase, when most injuries occur. Objective To evaluate the influence of various hip-flexion angles on peak torques of knee flexors in isometric, concentric, and eccentric contractions and on the hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients and Other Participants Ten national-level sprinters (5 men, 5 women; age = 21.2 ± 3.6 years, height = 175 ± 6 cm, mass = 63.8 ± 9.9 kg). Intervention(s) For each hip position (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion), participants used the right leg to perform (1) 5 seconds of maximal isometric hamstrings contraction at 45° of knee flexion, (2) 5 maximal concentric knee flexion-extensions at 60° per second, (3) 5 maximal eccentric knee flexion-extensions at 60° per second, and (4) 5 maximal eccentric knee flexion-extensions at 150° per second. Main Outcome Measure(s) Hamstrings and quadriceps peak torque, hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio, lateral and medial hamstrings root mean square. Results We found no difference in quadriceps peak torque for any condition across all hip-flexion angles, whereas hamstrings peak torque was lower at 0° of hip flexion than at any other angle (P < .001) and greater at 90° of hip flexion than at 30° and 60° (P < .05), especially in eccentric conditions. As hip flexion increased, the hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio increased. No difference in lateral or medial hamstrings root mean square was found for any condition across all hip-flexion angles (P > .05). Conclusions Hip-flexion angle influenced hamstrings peak torque in all muscular contraction types; as hip flexion increased, hamstrings peak torque increased. Researchers should investigate further whether an eccentric resistance training program at

  15. Effects of fibre type and structure of longissimus lumborum (Ll), biceps femoris (Bf) and semimembranosus (Sm) deer muscles salting with different Nacl addition on proteolysis index and texture of dry-cured meats.

    PubMed

    Żochowska-Kujawska, J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the effect of fibre type and structure as well as NaCl level on the proteolysis index and texture parameters observed in dry-cured meats produced from individual deer muscles. The biceps femoris, semimembranosus and longissimus lumborum muscles were cut from deer main elements, shaped into blocks by trimming off the edges, cured by adding 4, 6 and 8% of salt (w/w) and dried in a ripening chamber for 29days. The results indicated that deer dry-cured muscles with higher percentage of red fibres (type I) showed higher texture parameters, proteolysis index as well as lower moisture losses than muscles with higher amount of white fibres (type IIB). Dry-cured deer muscles with lower NaCl content showed higher values of proteolysis index and lower hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, and chewiness, as well as lower changes in structure elements. PMID:27442183

  16. The effects of squatting with visual feedback on the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Pil-Neo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of performing squat exercises with visual feedback on the activation of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle (Q-angle). [Subjects] This study used a motion analysis program (Dartfish, Switzerland) to select 20 young adults with an increased Q-angle, who were then divided into a squat group that received visual feedback (VSG, n=10) and a squat group that received no visual feedback (SG, n=10). [Methods] The intensity of exercises was increased every two weeks over a six-week exercise period in both groups. A visual marker was attached to the patella of the subjects in the VSG, and they then performed squat exercises with a maximum of 90° of knee flexion within a route marked on a mirror. The SG performed squat exercises with a maximum 90° of knee flexion without attaching a visual feedback device. [Results] Analysis of the muscle activation due to 90° squat exercises indicated that both groups had statistically significant increases in activation of the VL. The VSG exhibited statistically significant increases in activation of the VMO. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that squat exercises with visual feedback are effective in activation of the VMO and VL muscles. The findings are meaningful in terms of preventing the occurrence of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26157251

  17. Effect of ingested sodium bicarbonate on muscle force, fatigue, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Verbitsky, O; Mizrahi, J; Levin, M; Isakov, E

    1997-08-01

    The influence of acute ingestion of NaHCO3 on fatigue and recovery of teh quadriceps femoris muscle after exercise was studied in six healthy male subjects. A bicycle ergometer was used for exercising under three loading conditions: test A, load corresponding to maximal oxygen consumption; test B, load in test A + 17%; test C, load in test B but performed 1 h after acute ingestion of NaHCO3. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) was applied to provoke isometric contraction of the quadriceps femoris. The resulting knee torque was monitored during fatigue (2-min chronic FES) and recovery (10-s FES every 10 min, for 40 min). Quadriceps torques were higher in the presence of NaHCO3 (P < 0.05): with NaHCO3 the peak, residual, and recovery (after 40 min) normalized torques were, respectively, 0.68 +/- 0.05 (SD), 0.58 +/- 0.05, and 0.73 +/- 0.05; without NaHCO3 the values were 0.45 +/- 0.04, 0.30 +/- 0.06, and 0.63 +/- 0.06. The increased torques obtained after acute ingestion of NaHCO3 indicate the possible existence of improved nonoxidative glycolysis in isometric contraction, resulting in reduced fatigue and enhanced recovery. PMID:9296948

  18. Isolated quadriceps training increases maximal exercise capacity in chronic heart failure: The role of skeletal muscle convective and diffusive oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Fabio; Reese, Van; Shabetai, Ralph; Wagner, Peter D.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the benefits of small muscle mass exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Background How central cardiorespiratory and/or peripheral skeletal muscle factors are altered with small muscle mass training in CHF is unknown. Methods We studied muscle structure and oxygen (O2) transport and metabolism at maximal cycle (whole body) and knee-extensor exercise (KE) (small muscle mass) in 6 healthy controls and 6 patients with CHF who then performed 8 weeks of KE training (both legs, separately) and repeated these assessments. Results Pre-training cycling and KE peak leg O2 uptake (VO2peak) were ~17% and ~15% lower, respectively, in the patients compared to controls. Structurally, KE training increased quadriceps muscle capillarity and mitochondrial density by ~21 and ~25%, respectively. Functionally, despite not altering maximal cardiac output, KE training increased maximal O2 delivery (~54%), arterial-venous O2 (a–v O2) difference (~10%), and muscle O2 diffusive conductance (DMO2) (~39%) (assessed during KE), thereby increasing single leg VO2peak by ~53%, to a level exceeding that of the untrained controls. Post-training, during maximal cycling, O2 delivery (~40%), a–v O2 difference (~15%), and DMO2 (~52%) all increased, yielding an increase in VO2peak of ~40%, matching the controls. Conclusions In the face of continued central limitations, clear improvements in muscle structure, peripheral convective and diffusive O2 transport, and subsequently O2 utilization support the efficacy of local skeletal muscle training as a powerful approach to combat exercise intolerance in CHF. PMID:21920265

  19. Running economy is impaired following a single bout of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Palmer, C D; Sleivert, G G

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a low-volume high-intensity resistance training session influenced running economy during a subsequent aerobic treadmill run. Nine well trained distance runners (mean +/- SD; VO2max, 66.6 +/- 10.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); weight, 65.8 +/- 10.2 kg; height, 173.4 +/- 7.8 cm; age 20 +/- 1.1 years) with resistance training experience performed treadmill running at two different speeds (0.56 m x sec(-1) and 0.20 m x sec(-1) below speed corresponding to lactate equilibrium) either rested or 1, 8 or 24 hours after a 50-minute whole body resistance training session. Running economy was assessed using open circuit spirometry while heart rate was recorded telemetrically. The contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris were also determined following each resistance training session and prior to each treadmill run using percutaneous electrical stimulation. Submaximal oxygen consumption was significantly increased one hour (2.6 +/- 2.3%, p= 0.007), and eight hours (1.6 +/- 2.5%, p= 0.032), but not 24 hours after resistance training. No significant differences were found in exercising heart rate, ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, ratings of perceived exertion, or running mechanics. Peak twitch torque, time to peak torque, and half relaxation time of the quadriceps femoris were significantly reduced immediately following resistance training while peak twitch torque was also lower one hour following resistance training. Running economy following a resistance training session is impaired for up to 8 hours. This change was not paralleled by a concomitant change in exercising heart rate. The mechanism responsible for increased oxygen consumption following resistance training may be related to impairment of the force generating capacity of skeletal muscle, as there was a significant decrement in the contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris following resistance training. PMID:11905938

  20. POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH AUTOGRAFT OF THE DOUBLE SEMITENDINOSUS MUSCLES AND MIDDLE THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS TENDON WITH DOUBLE FEMORAL AND SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNELS: CLINICAL RESULTS IN TWO YEARS FOLLOW UP

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Avakian, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical aspects that may offer good anatomic and functional results in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using an autologous graft of the quadriceps tendon and double semitendinosus through a double femoral tunnel. Methods: Fourteen patients with isolated PCL lesions, instability and pain were operated on by arthroscopy and evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scales. Posterior knee laxity was examined with a KT1000 arthrometer. Results: The mean postoperative posterior side-to-side difference was between 0-2 mm in 57.1% of patients and between 3 and 5 mm in 35.7% of cases. The average Lysholm score was 93 points in the final follow-up. In the IKDC evaluation, 3 patients were graded A, 10 were graded B, and 1 patient was graded C. Conclusions: Double bundle arthroscopic PCL reconstruction based on the anatomical positioning of the tunnels, with double semitendinosus tendon and single quadriceps, provides a clinically evident reduction in symptoms and restores satisfactory stability, although no statistically significant difference was found due to the small sample. PMID:27027083

  1. Influence of length-restricted strength training on athlete's power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Boris; Kleinöder, Heinz; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether different length-restricted strength training regimens affect voluntary explosive concentric power-load curves of the quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstring (HAM) muscles. Thirty-two athletes were divided into 3 different training groups (G1-G3): G1 performed isometric training at knee joint angles corresponding to long muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length for QF and HAM; G2 conducted concentric-eccentric contraction cycles that were restricted to a knee joint range of motion corresponding to predominantly long MTU length for QF and HAM; and G3 combined the protocols of G1 and G2. Knee joint angle-dependent power-load curves during maximal voluntary explosive concentric knee extensions and flexions were measured for loads corresponding to 40, 60, and 80% of individual 1 repetition maximum at 5 different occasions: 2 times before, after 5 and 8 weeks of training, and 4 weeks post training. Power values of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position (percent maximum). Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for power production of QF and HAM remained unaltered throughout the course of the study for all testing loads and training groups. Therefore, different strength training regimens with a common restriction to long MTU lengths failed to induce length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors. The approach to develop strength training programs that induce systematic shifts in length-dependent power production of QF and HAM is of direct practical relevance for athletic activities such as cycling, ice skating, and skiing. However, restricting the muscle excursion range during loading seems to be an inappropriate trigger to cause length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves. PMID:20145573

  2. The Spatial Distribution of Absolute Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation During Ramp-Incremental Exercise Is Not Influenced by Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bowen, T Scott; Koga, Shunsaku; Amano, Tatsuro; Kondo, Narihiko; Rossiter, Harry B

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TRS-NIRS) allows absolute quantitation of deoxygenated haemoglobin and myoglobin concentration ([HHb]) in skeletal muscle. We recently showed that the spatial distribution of peak [HHb] within the quadriceps during moderate-intensity cycling is reduced with progressive hypoxia and this is associated with impaired aerobic energy provision. We therefore aimed to determine whether reduced spatial distribution of skeletal muscle [HHb] was associated with impaired aerobic energy transfer during exhaustive ramp-incremental exercise in hypoxia. Seven healthy men performed ramp-incremental cycle exercise (20 W/min) to exhaustion at 3 fractional inspired O2 concentrations (FIO2): 0.21, 0.16, 0.12. Pulmonary O2 uptake ([Formula: see text]) was measured using a flow meter and gas analyser system. Lactate threshold (LT) was estimated non-invasively. Absolute muscle deoxygenation was quantified by multichannel TRS-NIRS from the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis (proximal and distal regions). [Formula: see text] and LT were progressively reduced (p<0.05) with hypoxia. There was a significant effect (p<0.05) of FIO2 on [HHb] at baseline, LT, and peak. However the spatial variance of [HHb] was not different between FIO2 conditions. Peak total Hb ([Hbtot]) was significantly reduced between FIO2 conditions (p<0.001). There was no association between reductions in the spatial distribution of skeletal muscle [HHb] and indices of aerobic energy transfer during ramp-incremental exercise in hypoxia. While regional [HHb] quantified by TRS-NIRS at exhaustion was greater in hypoxia, the spatial distribution of [HHb] was unaffected. Interestingly, peak [Hbtot] was reduced at the tolerable limit in hypoxia implying a vasodilatory reserve may exist in conditions with reduced FIO2. PMID:26782190

  3. A simple means of increasing muscle size after spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dudley, G A; Castro, M J; Rogers, S; Apple, D F

    1999-09-01

    This study tested that hypothesis that skeletal muscle within a year of spinal cord injury (SCI) would respond to intermittent high force loading by showing an increase in size. Three males about 46 weeks post clinically complete SCI underwent surface electrical stimulation of their left or right m. quadriceps femoris 2 days per week for 8 weeks to evoke 4 sets of ten isometric or dynamic actions each session. Conditioning increased average cross-sectional area of m. quadriceps femoris, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, by 20+/-1% (p = 0.0103). This reversed 48 weeks of atrophy such that m. quadriceps femoris 54 weeks after SCI was the same size as when the patients were first studied 6 weeks after injury. The results suggest that skeletal muscle is remarkably responsive to intermittent, high force loading after almost one year of little if any contractile activity. PMID:10483812

  4. Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle – A Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Löfgren, Monika; Bjersing, Jan; Kosek, Eva; Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0–100) and fatigue Borg’s Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6–20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P < .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P < .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P < .001). The levels of IL-1β did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P < .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (P’s < .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1β, IL-6, IL

  5. Strength After Bouts of Eccentric or Concentric Actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Catherine L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the influence of an initial bout of eccentric or concentric actions and a subsequent bout of eccentric actions on muscular strength. Twenty-four healthy males, 24-45 yr old, were placed in three groups that performed eccentric actions in bouts 1 and 2 (ECC/ECC, N = 8), concentric actions in bout 1, and eccentric actions in bout 2 (CON/ECC, N = 8) or served as controls (N = 8). Bouts involved unilateral actions with the left and right quadriceps femoris. Ten sets of 10 repetitions with an initial resistance equal to 85% of the eccentric or concentric one repetition maximum (1 RM) were performed for each bout. Three minutes of rest were given between sets and 3 wk between bouts. Two weeks before bout 1 and 1, 4, 7, and 10 d after bouts 1 and 2, eccentric and concentric 1 RM were measured for the right quadriceps femoris and a speed-torque relation established for the left quadriceps femoris. Eccentric and concentric 1 RM decreased (P less than 0.05) 32% 1 d after bout 1 for group ECC/ECC. The speed-torque relation was down-shifted (P less than 0.05) 38%. Eccentric 1 RM and eccentric and isometric torque returned to normal 6 d later. Concentric 1 RM and torque at 3.14 rad-s(exp -1) had not recovered on day 10 (-7% for both, P less than 0.05). Decreases in strength after bout 2 for group ECC/ECC only occurred on day 1 (-9% for concentric 1 RM and 16% downshift of the speed- torque relation). Group CONIECC showed the opposite responses; marked decreases in strength after bout 2 but not bout 1. The results indicate that the initial decrease in strength after performance of a novel bout of eccentric exercise is comparable for eccentric, concentric and isometric muscle actions. Recovery of strength, however, appears to occur more rapidly for eccentric and isometric actions. They suggest that performance of a prior bout of eccentric but not concentric actions, as done in this study, can essentially eradicate decreases in strength after a subsequent bout

  6. Transient quadriceps paresis following cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, George A

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old man presented with bilateral thigh muscle paralysis several hours after intranasal cocaine use. His blood results showed a creatine kinase (CK) level of 3447 u/L and a normal renal function. He made a marked recovery in just 2 h following the intravenous normal saline 0.9%, and was able to walk. He was discharged home the next day. PMID:24395880

  7. A Predictive Mathematical Model of Muscle Forces for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Samuel C. K.; Ding, Jun; Prosser, Laura A.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if our previously developed muscle model could be used to predict forces of the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles of children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twenty-two children with CP (12 males, 10 females; mean age 10y, SD 2y, range 7-13y; Gross Motor Function…

  8. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  9. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ≥25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (p<0.05), mean vastus lateralis activation during squatting and lunging (p<0.05), and knee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women. PMID:25258248

  10. Influence of transcutaneous electrical stimulation on heterotopic ossification: an experimental study in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues, resulting in joint mobility deficit and pain. Different treatment modalities have been tried to prevent HO development, but there is no consensus on a therapeutic approach. Since electrical stimulation is a widely used resource in physiotherapy practice to stimulate joint mobility, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, its usefulness for HO treatment was investigated. We aimed to identify the influence of electrical stimulation on induced HO in Wistar rats. Thirty-six male rats (350-390 g) were used, and all animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction, to quantify the serum alkaline phosphatase. HO induction was performed by bone marrow implantation in both quadriceps of the animals, which were then divided into 3 groups: control (CG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (TG), and functional electrical stimulation (FES) group (FG) with 12 rats each. All animals were anesthetized and electrically stimulated twice per week, for 35 days from induction day. After this period, another blood sample was collected and quadriceps muscles were bilaterally removed for histological and calcium analysis and the rats were killed. Calcium levels in muscles showed significantly lower results when comparing TG and FG (P<0.001) and between TG and CG (P<0.001). Qualitative histological analyses confirmed 100% HO in FG and CG, while in TG the HO was detected in 54.5% of the animals. The effects of the muscle contractions caused by FES increased HO, while anti-inflammatory effects of TENS reduced HO. PMID:26292223

  11. Influence of transcutaneous electrical stimulation on heterotopic ossification: an experimental study in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zotz, T G G; Paula, J B de

    2015-11-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues, resulting in joint mobility deficit and pain. Different treatment modalities have been tried to prevent HO development, but there is no consensus on a therapeutic approach. Since electrical stimulation is a widely used resource in physiotherapy practice to stimulate joint mobility, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, its usefulness for HO treatment was investigated. We aimed to identify the influence of electrical stimulation on induced HO in Wistar rats. Thirty-six male rats (350-390 g) were used, and all animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction, to quantify the serum alkaline phosphatase. HO induction was performed by bone marrow implantation in both quadriceps of the animals, which were then divided into 3 groups: control (CG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (TG), and functional electrical stimulation (FES) group (FG) with 12 rats each. All animals were anesthetized and electrically stimulated twice per week, for 35 days from induction day. After this period, another blood sample was collected and quadriceps muscles were bilaterally removed for histological and calcium analysis and the rats were killed. Calcium levels in muscles showed significantly lower results when comparing TG and FG (P<0.001) and between TG and CG (P<0.001). Qualitative histological analyses confirmed 100% HO in FG and CG, while in TG the HO was detected in 54.5% of the animals. The effects of the muscle contractions caused by FES increased HO, while anti-inflammatory effects of TENS reduced HO. PMID:26292223

  12. The differential effects of gender, anthropometry, and prior hormonal state on frontal plane knee joint stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Cammarata, Martha L.; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gender differences in passive frontal plane knee stiffness may contribute to the increased anterior cruciate ligament injury rate in females. Gender-based stiffness differences have been attributed to anthropometric variations, but little data exist describing this relationship. Furthermore, sex hormone levels appear to influence joint stiffness, but the differential effects of instantaneous and prior hormonal concentrations remain unknown. This study sought to explore the effect of gender, prior hormonal status, and anthropometry on passive frontal plane knee joint stiffness. Methods Twelve males and 31 females participated. Females were grouped by hormonal contraceptive use (non users [n=11], monophasic contraceptive users [n=11], and triphasic contraceptive users [n=9]) and tested at the same point in the menstrual cycle. Subjects’ right knee was passively stretched ±7° in the frontal plane at 3°/s. Stiffness was estimated at three loading levels and normalized by body size to minimize anthropometric biases. A 4 (group) × 3 (load) repeated measures analysis of variance was performed for both raw and normalized stiffness. Linear regression analyses were preformed between stiffness estimates and knee diameter and quadriceps femoris angle. Findings Males displayed significantly greater (P<0.05) frontal plane stiffness than females. When normalized, males displayed significantly greater stiffness in valgus (P<0.05), but not varus (P>0.05) than females. No significant effect (P>0.05) of prior hormonal state was found; however, when normalized, varus stiffness was significantly less for triphasic contraceptive users than the other female groups (P<0.05). Quadriceps femoris angle was negatively correlated and knee diameter was positively correlated to knee stiffness. Interpretation Consistent with earlier in vitro findings, our data may indicate that ligament material properties are gender specific. A deficit in passive knee joint stiffness may place a

  13. Post-mortem oxidative stability of three yak (Bos grunniens) muscles as influenced by animal age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wenting; Luo, Xiaolin; Xia, Baixue; Guan, Jiuqiang; Nie, Yuanyang; Li, Lu; Duan, Jingyue; Suman, Surendranath P; Sun, Qun

    2015-07-01

    The influence of animal age and muscle source on the oxidative stability of yak steaks was examined. Longissimus thoracis (LT) muscles from yaks of different age groups (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 years), and three muscle sources of LT, Psoas major (PM), and Biceps femoris (BF) from yaks of 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 years, were evaluated for metmyoglobin content, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and antioxidant capacity. Oxidative stability was influenced (P<0.05) by muscle source and animal age. LT steaks from 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 year old yaks exhibited lower (P<0.05) metmyoglobin content than their PM and BF counterparts. Furthermore, LT steaks from 3.5 year old yaks demonstrated lower (P<0.05) metmyoglobin content and greater (P<0.05) activities of antioxidant enzymes than LT steaks from other age groups. These results indicated the necessity to develop muscle- and age-specific processing strategies to improve color and oxidative stability of yak meat. PMID:25839885

  14. Influences of the position of the head on posture while lifting.

    PubMed

    Ishida, H; Watanabe, S; Eguchi, A; Kobara, K

    2008-01-01

    In clinical training of some lower back pain patients, teaching them to control their lumbar lordosis during lifting may be difficult. Therefore, another effective method for lifting technique is required. In standing, head cannot move without some compensating postural adjustment. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of head position on lifting posture. Fourteen healthy male volunteers (22.6 +/- 4.4 years old) lifted a case while maintaining two different head positions; a downward position and an upright position. In the upright position, activities of the latissimus dorsi and vastus lateralis significantly increased, and these of the biceps femoris significantly decreased during the initial 100 msec phase of lifting. There were no differences in the activities of the upper trapezius, lumbar extensor muscles (L3, L5), and obliquus abdominis under the two conditions. There were also no differences in the lumbar angle when the case was lifted. The flexion angles of the hip, knee, and ankle significantly increased, and the lumbar spine moved closer to the case. Lifting posture was influenced by the head position. Advantages included being able to shift loads on the body from the lower back to the legs, to move the lumbar spine closer to the case, and to relatively increase the moment of lumbar extension. The weight of the head as it moved upward and back, and the weight of the rear part of the body as it moved downward and forward helped to maintain balance. PMID:18551836

  15. A newly discovered muscle: The tensor of the vastus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Grob, K; Ackland, T; Kuster, M S; Manestar, M; Filgueira, L

    2016-03-01

    The quadriceps femoris is traditionally described as a muscle group composed of the rectus femoris and the three vasti. However, clinical experience and investigations of anatomical specimens are not consistent with the textbook description. We have found a second tensor-like muscle between the vastus lateralis (VL) and the vastus intermedius (VI), hereafter named the tensor VI (TVI). The aim of this study was to clarify whether this intervening muscle was a variation of the VL or the VI, or a separate head of the extensor apparatus. Twenty-six cadaveric lower limbs were investigated. The architecture of the quadriceps femoris was examined with special attention to innervation and vascularization patterns. All muscle components were traced from origin to insertion and their affiliations were determined. A TVI was found in all dissections. It was supplied by independent muscular and vascular branches of the femoral nerve and lateral circumflex femoral artery. Further distally, the TVI combined with an aponeurosis merging separately into the quadriceps tendon and inserting on the medial aspect of the patella. Four morphological types of TVI were distinguished: Independent-type (11/26), VI-type (6/26), VL-type (5/26), and Common-type (4/26). This study demonstrated that the quadriceps femoris is architecturally different from previous descriptions: there is an additional muscle belly between the VI and VL, which cannot be clearly assigned to the former or the latter. Distal exposure shows that this muscle belly becomes its own aponeurosis, which continues distally as part of the quadriceps tendon. PMID:26732825

  16. Influence on muscle oxygenation to EMG parameters at different skeletal muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Song, Gaoqing

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of muscle oxygenation on EMG parameters during isometric and incremental exercises and to observe the relationship between EMG parameters and muscle oxygenation. Twelve rowers took part in the tests. Near infrared spectrometer was utilized for measurements of muscle oxygenation on lateral quadriceps. sEMG measurement is performed for EMG parameters during isometric and incremental exercises. Results indicated that Oxy-Hb decrease significantly correlated with IEMG, E/T ratio and frequency of impulse signal during 1/3 MVC and 2/3 MVC isometric exercise, and it is also correlated with IEMG, E/T ratio and frequency of impulse signal. Increase of IEMG occurred at the time after Oxy-Hb decrease during incremental exercise and highly correlated with BLa. It is concluded that no matter how heavy the intensity is, Oxy-Hb dissociation may play an important role in affecting EMG parameters of muscle fatigue during isometric exercise. 2) EMG parameters may be influenced by Oxy-Hb dissociation and blood lactate concentration during dynamic exercise.

  17. Influence on muscle oxygenation to EMG parameters at different skeletal muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Song, Gaoqing

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of muscle oxygenation on EMG parameters during isometric and incremental exercises and to observe the relationship between EMG parameters and muscle oxygenation. Twelve rowers took part in the tests. Near infrared spectrometer was utilized for measurements of muscle oxygenation on lateral quadriceps. sEMG measurement is performed for EMG parameters during isometric and incremental exercises. Results indicated that Oxy-Hb decrease significantly correlated with IEMG, E/T ratio and frequency of impulse signal during 1/3 MVC and 2/3 MVC isometric exercise, and it is also correlated with IEMG, E/T ratio and frequency of impulse signal. Increase of IEMG occurred at the time after Oxy-Hb decrease during incremental exercise and highly correlated with BLa. It is concluded that no matter how heavy the intensity is, Oxy-Hb dissociation may play an important role in affecting EMG parameters of muscle fatigue during isometric exercise. 2) EMG parameters may be influenced by Oxy-Hb dissociation and blood lactate concentration during dynamic exercise.

  18. The Influence of an Unstable Surface on Trunk and Lower Extremity Muscle Activities during Variable Bridging Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-hyun; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an unstable surface on trunk and lower extremity muscle activities during various types of bridging exercises. [Subjects] Thirty healthy female adults voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] All subjects were asked to perform 3 different bridging exercises (bridging exercise, single leg lift bridging exercise, single leg cross bridging exercise) with and without an unstable surface. The trunk and lower extremity muscle activities were measured by using surface electromyography during bridging exercise. [Results] During the bridging exercise (BE), single leg lift bridging exercise (LBE), and single leg cross bridging exercise (CBE), the muscle activities of the external oblique muscle (EO), erector spinae (ES), and biceps femoris (BF) were significantly higher on an unstable surface than on a stable surface. The muscle activities of the EO on both sides, contralateral BF, and ipsilateral ES were significantly higher during LBE than during BE and CBE. [Conclusion] Use of an unstable surface increases muscle activity of the trunk and lower extremities, and single leg lift bridging exercise increases the muscle activity of the EO on both sides, ipsilateral ES, and contralateral BF. PMID:24764625

  19. Sporadic inclusion body myositis: HLA-DRB1 allele interactions influence disease risk and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, Frank L; Needham, Merrilee; Scott, Adrian; James, Ian; Zilko, Paul; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Witt, Campbell S; Allcock, Richard; Laing, Nigel; Garlepp, Michael; Christiansen, Frank T

    2009-11-01

    Susceptibility to sIBM is strongly associated with the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype (HLA-A1, B8, DRB1*03) but little is known about the effects of allelic interactions at the DRB1 locus or disease-modifying effects of HLA alleles. HLA-A, B and DRB1 genotyping was performed in 80 Australian sIBM cases and the frequencies of different alleles and allele combinations were compared with those in a group of 190 healthy controls. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also investigated. Amongst carriers of the HLA-DRB1*03 allele, DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes were over-represented in the sIBM group (p<0.003) while. DRB1*03/*04 heterozygotes were under-represented (p<0.008). The mean age-at-onset (AAO) was 6.5 years earlier in DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes who also had more severe quadriceps muscle weakness than the rest of the cohort. The findings indicate that interactions between the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and other alleles at the DRB1 locus can influence disease susceptibility and the clinical phenotype in sIBM. PMID:19720533

  20. [Monomelic segmental amyotrophy: a Spanish case involving the leg].

    PubMed

    Moreno Martinez, J M; Garcia de la Rocha, M L; Martin Araguz, A

    1990-01-01

    A 65-year old male presented with selective amyotrophy of the right lower limb which, after a progressive course of some months, had stabilized 12 years previously. Physical examination showed amyotrophy involving the gastrocnemius and the quadriceps extensor femoris without sensory impairment. EMG suggested motor neuron disease. This case meets Hirayama and Serratrice's criteria for benign chronic monomelic amyotrophy. We support the hypothesis of a casual vascular factor, as proposed by Hirayama. PMID:2204988

  1. Mathematical modeling of the human knee joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ricafort, Juliet

    1996-05-01

    A model was developed to determine the forces exerted by several flexor and extensor muscles of the human knee under static conditions. The following muscles were studied: the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and the set of quadricep muscles. The tibia and fibula were each modeled as rigid bodies; muscles were modeled by their functional lines of action in space. Assumptions based on previous data were used to resolve the indeterminacy.

  2. Effects of wearing gumboots and leather lace-up boots on lower limb muscle activity when walking on simulated underground coal mine surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Jessica A; Riddiford-Harland, Diane L; Steele, Julie R

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of wearing two standard underground coal mining work boots (a gumboot and a leather lace-up boot) on lower limb muscle activity when participants walked across simulated underground coal mining surfaces. Quadriceps (rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis) and hamstring (biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscle activity were recorded as twenty male participants walked at a self-selected pace around a circuit while wearing each boot type. The circuit consisted of level, inclined and declined surfaces composed of rocky gravel and hard dirt. Walking in a leather lace-up boot, compared to a gumboot, resulted in increased vastus lateralis and increased biceps femoris muscle activity when walking on sloped surfaces. Increased muscle activity appears to be acting as a slip and/or trip prevention strategy in response to challenging surfaces and changing boot features. PMID:25766420

  3. Effects of Prior Hamstring Strain Injury on Strength, Flexibility, and Running Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Thelen, Darryl G.; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown evidence of residual scar tissue at the musculotendon junction following an acute hamstring strain injury, which could influence re-injury risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether bilateral differences in strength, neuromuscular patterns, and musculotendon kinematics during sprinting are present in individuals with a history of unilateral hamstring injury, and whether such differences are linked to the presence of scar tissue. Methods Eighteen subjects with a previous hamstring injury (>5 months prior) participated in a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging exam, isokinetic strength testing, and a biomechanical assessment of treadmill sprinting. Bilateral comparisons were made for peak knee flexion torque, angle of peak torque, and hamstrings:quadriceps strength ratio during strength testing, and muscle activations and peak hamstring stretch during sprinting. MR images were used to measure the volumes of the proximal tendon/aponeurois of the biceps femoris, with asymmetries considered indicative of residual scar tissue. Findings A significantly enlarged proximal biceps femoris tendon volume was measured on the side of prior injury. However, no significant differences between the previously injured and uninjured limbs were found in strength measures, peak hamstring stretch, or muscle activation patterns. Further, the degree of asymmetry in tendon volume was not correlated to any of the functional measures. Interpretation The results of this study indicate that injury-induced changes in morphology do not seem discernable from strength measures, running kinematics, or muscle activity patterns. Further research is warranted to ascertain whether residual scarring alters localized musculotendon tissue mechanics in a way that may contribute to the high rates of muscle re-injury that are observed clinically. PMID:20621753

  4. Influence of Gender and Muscle Architecture Asymmetry on Jump and Sprint Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; LaMonica, Michael B.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle architecture is a determinant for sprinting speed and jumping power, which may be related to anaerobic sports performance. In the present investigation, the relationships between peak (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) vertical jump power, 30m maximal sprinting speed (30M), and muscle architecture were examined in 28 college-aged, recreationally-active men (n = 14; 24.3 ± 2.2y; 89.1 ± 9.3kg; 1.80 ± 0.07 m) and women (n = 14; 21.5 ± 1.7y; 65.2 ± 12.4kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m). Ultrasound measures of muscle thickness (MT), pennation angle (PNG), cross-sectional area (CSA), and echo intensity (ECHO) were collected from the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) of both legs; fascicle length (FL) was estimated from MT and PNG. Men possessed lower ECHO, greater muscle size (MT & CSA), were faster, and were more powerful (PVJP & MVJP) than women. Stepwise regression indicated that muscle size and quality influenced speed and power in men. In women, vastus lateralis asymmetry negatively affected PVJP (MT: r = –0.73; FL: r = –0.60) and MVJP (MT: r = –0.76; FL: r = –0.64), while asymmetrical ECHO (VL) and FL (RF) positively influenced MVJP (r = 0.55) and 30M (r = 0.57), respectively. Thigh muscle architecture appears to influence jumping power and sprinting speed, though the effect may vary by gender in recreationally-active adults. Appropriate assessment of these ultrasound variables in men and women prior to training may provide a more specific exercise prescription. Key points The manner in which thigh muscle architecture affects jumping power and sprinting speed varies by gender. In men, performance is influenced by the magnitude of muscle size and architecture. In women, asymmetrical muscle size and architectural asymmetry significantly influence performance. To develop effective and precise exercise prescription for the improvement of jumping power and/or sprinting speed, muscle architecture assessment prior to the onset of a training program is advised. PMID

  5. Interlimb communication to the knee flexors during walking in humans

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Andrew J T; Geertsen, Svend S; Andersen, Jacob B; Sinkjær, Thomas; Nielsen, Jens B; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    A strong coordination between the two legs is important for maintaining a symmetric gait pattern and adapting to changes in the external environment. In humans as well as animals, receptors arising from the quadriceps muscle group influence the activation of ipsilateral muscles. Moreover, strong contralateral spinal connections arising from quadriceps and hamstring afferents have been shown in animal models. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess if such connections also exist in humans and to elucidate on the possible pathways. Contralateral reflex responses were investigated in the right leg following unexpected unilateral knee joint rotations during locomotion in either the flexion or extension direction. Strong reflex responses in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle with a mean onset latency of 76 ± 6 ms were evoked only from ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations in the late stance phase. To investigate the contribution of a transcortical pathway to this response, transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation were applied. Motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but not transcranial electrical stimulation, were facilitated when elicited at the time of the cBF response to a greater extent than the algebraic sum of the cBF reflex and motor evoked potentials elicited separately, indicating that a transcortical pathway probably contributes to this interlimb reflex. The cBF reflex response may therefore be integrated with other sensory input, allowing for responses that are more flexible. We hypothesize that the cBF reflex response may be a preparation of the contralateral leg for early load bearing, slowing the forward progression of the body to maintain dynamic equilibrium during walking. PMID:23918771

  6. Quadriceps oxygenation changes during walking and running on a treadmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresima, Valentina; Pizzi, Assunta; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Ferrari, Adriano; de Angelis, Marco; Ferrari, Marco

    1995-04-01

    Vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation was investigated on volunteers as well as muscular dystrophy patients during a walking test, and on volunteers during a free running by a continuous wave near infrared instrument. The data were analyzed using an oxygenation index independent on pathlength changes. Walking did not significantly affect the oxygenation of volunteers and patients. A relative deoxygenation was found only during free running indicating an unbalance between oxygen supply and tissue oxygen extraction. Preliminary measurements of exercising muscle oxygen saturation were performed by a 110 MHz frequency-domain, multisource instrument.

  7. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Versus Volitional Isometric Strength Training in Children With Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Stackhouse, Scott K.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.; Stackhouse, Carrie A.; McCarthy, James J.; Prosser, Laura A.; Lee, Samuel C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, no reports have investigated neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to increase muscle force production of children with cerebral palsy (CP) using high-force contractions and low repetitions. Objective The aims of this study were to determine if isometric NMES or volitional training in children with CP could increase muscle strength and walking speed and to examine the mechanisms that may contribute to increased force production. Methods Eleven children with spastic diplegia were assigned to an NMES training group or to a volitional training group. Participants in the NMES group had electrodes implanted percutaneously to activate the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles. The volitional group trained with maximal effort contractions. Both groups performed a 12-week isometric strength-training program. Maximum voluntary isometric contract ion (MVIC) force, voluntary muscle activation, quadriceps and triceps surae cross-sectional area (CSA), and walking speed were measured pre- and post-strength training. Results The NMES-trained group had greater increases in normalized force production for both die quadriceps femoris and triceps surae. Similarly only the NMES group showed an increase in walking speed after training. Changes in voluntary muscle activation explained approximately 67% and 37% of the changes seen in the MVIC of the NMES and volitional groups, respectively. Quadriceps femoris maximum CSA increased significantly for the NMES group only. Conclusions This study was the first to quantitatively show strength gains with the use of NMES in children with CP. These results support the need for future experimental studies that will examine the clinical effectiveness of NMES strength training. PMID:17369515

  8. Age and sex influence the balance between maximal cardiac output and peripheral vascular reserve.

    PubMed

    Ridout, Samuel J; Parker, Beth A; Smithmyer, Sandra L; Gonzales, Joaquin U; Beck, Kenneth C; Proctor, David N

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the influence of age and sex on the relationship between central and peripheral vasodilatory capacity. Healthy men (19 younger, 12 older) and women (17 younger, 17 older) performed treadmill and knee extensor exercise to fatigue on separate days while maximal cardiac output (Q, acetylene uptake) and peak femoral blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) were measured, respectively. Maximal Q was reduced with age similarly in men (Y: 23.6 +/- 2.7 vs. O: 17.4 +/- 3.5 l/min; P < 0.05) and women (Y: 17.7 +/- 1.9 vs. O: 12.3 +/- 1.6 l/min; P < 0.05). Peak FBF was similar between younger (Y) and older (O) men (Y: 2.1 +/- 0.5 vs. O: 2.2 +/- 0.7 l/min) but was lower in older women compared with younger women (Y: 1.9 +/- 0.4 vs. O: 1.4 +/- 0.4 l/min; P < 0.05). Maximal Q was positively correlated with peak FBF in men (Y: r = 0.55, O: r = 0.74; P < 0.05) but not in women (Y: r = 0.34, O: r = 0.10). Normalization of cardiac output to appendicular muscle mass and peak FBF to quadriceps mass reduced the correlation between these variables in younger men (r = 0.30), but the significant association remained in older men (r = 0.68; P < 0.05), with no change in women. These data suggest that 1) aerobic capacity is associated with peripheral vascular reserve in men but not women, and 2) aging is accompanied by a more pronounced sex difference in this relationship. PMID:19959767

  9. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Simon M.; Krenn, Matthias; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Toth, Andrea; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals) biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we recommend conducting

  10. Sex-specific influence of aging on exercising leg blood flow.

    PubMed

    Parker, Beth A; Smithmyer, Sandra L; Pelberg, Justin A; Mishkin, Aaron D; Proctor, David N

    2008-03-01

    Our previous work suggests that healthy human aging is associated with sex-specific differences in leg vascular responses during large muscle mass exercise (2-legged cycling) (Proctor DN, Parker BA. Microcirculation 13: 315-327, 2006). The present study determined whether age x sex interactions in exercising leg hemodynamics persist during small muscle mass exercise that is not limited by cardiac output. Thirty-one young (20-30 yr; 15 men/16 women) and 31 older (60-79 yr; 13 men/18 women) healthy, normally active adults performed graded single-leg knee extensions to maximal exertion. Femoral artery blood velocity and diameter (Doppler ultrasound), heart rate (ECG), and beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure (mean arterial pressure, radial artery tonometry) were measured during each 3-min work rate (4.8 and 8 W/stage for women and men, respectively). The results (means +/- SE) were as follows. Despite reduced resting leg blood flow and vascular conductance, older men exhibited relatively preserved exercising leg hemodynamic responses. Older women, by contrast, exhibited attenuated hyperemic (young: 52 +/- 3 ml.min(-1).W(-1); vs. older: 40 +/- 4 ml.min(-1).W(-1); P = 0.02) and vasodilatory responses (young: 0.56 +/- 0.06 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1).W(-1) vs. older: 0.37 +/- 0.04 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1) W(-1); P < 0.01) to exercise compared with young women. Relative (percentage of maximal) work rate comparisons of all groups combined also revealed attenuated vasodilator responses in older women (P < 0.01 for age x sex x work rate interaction). These sex-specific age differences were not abolished by consideration of hemoglobin, quadriceps muscle, muscle recruitment, and mechanical influences on muscle perfusion. Collectively, these findings suggest that local factors contribute to the sex-specific effects of aging on exercising leg hemodynamics in healthy adults. PMID:18162481