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Sample records for qualitative mammographic features

  1. Characterizing mammographic images by using generic texture features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer, its use is limited in clinical practice because of a lack of automated and standardized measurement methods. The aims of this study were to evaluate a variety of automated texture features in mammograms as risk factors for breast cancer and to compare them with the percentage mammographic density (PMD) by using a case-control study design. Methods A case-control study including 864 cases and 418 controls was analyzed automatically. Four hundred seventy features were explored as possible risk factors for breast cancer. These included statistical features, moment-based features, spectral-energy features, and form-based features. An elaborate variable selection process using logistic regression analyses was performed to identify those features that were associated with case-control status. In addition, PMD was assessed and included in the regression model. Results Of the 470 image-analysis features explored, 46 remained in the final logistic regression model. An area under the curve of 0.79, with an odds ratio per standard deviation change of 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.65), was obtained with validation data. Adding the PMD did not improve the final model. Conclusions Using texture features to predict the risk of breast cancer appears feasible. PMD did not show any additional value in this study. With regard to the features assessed, most of the analysis tools appeared to reflect mammographic density, although some features did not correlate with PMD. It remains to be investigated in larger case-control studies whether these features can contribute to increased prediction accuracy. PMID:22490545

  2. Texture Features from Mammographic Images and Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manduca, Armando; Carston, Michael J.; Heine, John J.; Scott, Christopher G.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Brandt, Kathy R.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Vachon, Celine M.; Cerhan, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Mammographic percent density (PD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but there has been relatively little systematic evaluation of other features in mammographic images that might additionally predict breast cancer risk. We evaluated the association of a large number of image texture features with risk of breast cancer using a clinic-based case-control study of digitized film mammograms, all with screening mammograms prior to breast cancer diagnosis. The sample was split into training (123 cases, 258 controls) and validation (123 cases, 264 controls) datasets. Age and body mass index (BMI)-adjusted Odds Ratios (ORs) per standard deviation change in the feature, 95% confidence intervals, and the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained using logistic regression. A bootstrap approach was used to identify the strongest features in the training dataset, and results for features that validated in the second half of the sample were reported using the full dataset. The mean age at mammography was 64.0 ± 10.2 years, and the mean time from mammography to breast cancer was 3.7 ± 1.0 (range 2.0-5.9 years). PD was associated with breast cancer risk (OR=1.49; 1.25-1.78). The strongest features that validated from each of several classes (Markovian, run-length, Laws, wavelet and Fourier) showed similar ORs as PD and predicted breast cancer at a similar magnitude (AUC=0.58-0.60) as PD (AUC=0.58). All of these features were automatically calculated (unlike PD), and measure texture at a coarse scale. These features were moderately correlated with PD (r = 0.39-0.64), and after adjustment for PD, each of the features attenuated only slightly and retained statistical significance. However, simultaneous inclusion of these features in a model with PD did not significantly improve the ability to predict breast cancer. PMID:19258482

  3. Feature extraction from mammographic images using fast marching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottigli, U.; Golosio, B.

    2002-07-01

    Features extraction from medical images represents a fundamental step for shape recognition and diagnostic support. The present work faces the problem of the detection of large features, such as massive lesions and organ contours, from mammographic images. The regions of interest are often characterized by an average grayness intensity that is different from the surrounding. In most cases, however, the desired features cannot be extracted by simple gray level thresholding, because of image noise and non-uniform density of the surrounding tissue. In this work, edge detection is achieved through the fast marching method (Level Set Methods and Fast Marching Methods, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999), which is based on the theory of interface evolution. Starting from a seed point in the shape of interest, a front is generated which evolves according to an appropriate speed function. Such function is expressed in terms of geometric properties of the evolving interface and of image properties, and should become zero when the front reaches the desired boundary. Some examples of application of such method to mammographic images from the CALMA database (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 460 (2001) 107) are presented here and discussed.

  4. Detection of mammographic masses using sector features with a multiple-circular-path neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Li, Huai; Hasegawa, Akira; Wang, Yue J.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-06-01

    In the clinical course of detecting masses, mammographers usually evaluate the surrounding background of a radiodense when breast cancer is suspected. In this study, we adapted this fundamental concept and computed features of the suspicious region in radial sections. These features were then arranged by circular convolution processes within a neural network, which led to an improvement in detecting mammographic masses.

  5. Mammographic feature type and reader variability by occupation: an ROC study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Hazel J.; Gale, Alastair G.

    2010-02-01

    Previous work has outlined that certain mammographic appearances feature more prominently in reader's false negative responses on a self-assessment scheme. Bi-annually 600 breast-screening film-readers complete at least one round of the Personal Performance in Mammographic Screening (PERFORMS) self-assessment scheme in the UK. The main occupational groups in UK Breast Screening can be categorised thus, Radiologist, Technologists and Symptomatics. Previous work has shown that these groups can vary in their reading 'style' and accuracy on self-assessed cases. These groups could be said to contain individuals each with (arguably) pronounced differences in their real life reading experience, symptomatic readers routinely read a large number of cases with abnormal appearances and Technologists (specially trained to read films) do not have the same medical background as breast-screening Radiologists. We aimed to examine overall (national) and group (occupational) differences in terms of ROC analysis on those mammographic cases with different mammographic appearance (feature type). Several main feature types were identified namely; Well Defined Mass (WDM), Ill Defined Mass (IDM), Spiculate Mass (SPIC), Architectural Distortions (AD), Asymmetry (ASYM) and Calcification (CALC). Results are discussed in light of differences in real-life practice for each of the occupational groups and how this may impact on accuracy over certain mammographic appearances.

  6. Novel multiresolution mammographic density segmentation using pseudo 3D features and adaptive cluster merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erica R. E.; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective ways to overcome the disease. Successful mammographic density segmentation is a key aspect in deriving correct tissue composition, ensuring an accurate mammographic risk assessment. However, mammographic densities have not yet been fully incorporated with non-image based risk prediction models, (e.g. the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick model), because of unreliable segmentation consistency and accuracy. This paper presents a novel multiresolution mammographic density segmentation, a concept of stack representation is proposed, and 3D texture features were extracted by adapting techniques based on classic 2D first-order statistics. An unsupervised clustering technique was employed to achieve mammographic segmentation, in which two improvements were made; 1) consistent segmentation by incorporating an optimal centroids initialisation step, and 2) significantly reduced the number of missegmentation by using an adaptive cluster merging technique. A set of full field digital mammograms was used in the evaluation. Visual assessment indicated substantial improvement on segmented anatomical structures and tissue specific areas, especially in low mammographic density categories. The developed method demonstrated an ability to improve the quality of mammographic segmentation via clustering, and results indicated an improvement of 26% in segmented image with good quality when compared with the standard clustering approach. This in turn can be found useful in early breast cancer detection, risk-stratified screening, and aiding radiologists in the process of decision making prior to surgery and/or treatment.

  7. Assessment of two mammographic density related features in predicting near-term breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Wang, Xingwei; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    In order to establish a personalized breast cancer screening program, it is important to develop risk models that have high discriminatory power in predicting the likelihood of a woman developing an imaging detectable breast cancer in near-term (e.g., <3 years after a negative examination in question). In epidemiology-based breast cancer risk models, mammographic density is considered the second highest breast cancer risk factor (second to woman's age). In this study we explored a new feature, namely bilateral mammographic density asymmetry, and investigated the feasibility of predicting near-term screening outcome. The database consisted of 343 negative examinations, of which 187 depicted cancers that were detected during the subsequent screening examination and 155 that remained negative. We computed the average pixel value of the segmented breast areas depicted on each cranio-caudal view of the initial negative examinations. We then computed the mean and difference mammographic density for paired bilateral images. Using woman's age, subjectively rated density (BIRADS), and computed mammographic density related features we compared classification performance in estimating the likelihood of detecting cancer during the subsequent examination using areas under the ROC curves (AUC). The AUCs were 0.63+/-0.03, 0.54+/-0.04, 0.57+/-0.03, 0.68+/-0.03 when using woman's age, BIRADS rating, computed mean density and difference in computed bilateral mammographic density, respectively. Performance increased to 0.62+/-0.03 and 0.72+/-0.03 when we fused mean and difference in density with woman's age. The results suggest that, in this study, bilateral mammographic tissue density is a significantly stronger (p<0.01) risk indicator than both woman's age and mean breast density.

  8. Decision trees and integrated features for computer aided mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.; Groshong, B.; Allmen, M.; Woods, K.

    1997-02-01

    Breast cancer is a serious problem, which in the United States causes 43,000 deaths a year, eventually striking 1 in 9 women. Early detection is the only effective countermeasure, and mass mammography screening is the only reliable means for early detection. Mass screening has many shortcomings which could be addressed by a computer-aided mammographic screening system. Accordingly, we have applied the pattern recognition methods developed in earlier investigations of speculated lesions in mammograms to the detection of microcalcifications and circumscribed masses, generating new, more rigorous and uniform methods for the detection of both those signs. We have also improved the pattern recognition methods themselves, through the development of a new approach to combinations of multiple classifiers.

  9. Artificial-neural-network-based classification of mammographic microcalcifications using image structure features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.; Chitre, Yateen S.; Moskowitz, Myron

    1993-07-01

    Mammography associated with clinical breast examination and self-breast examination is the only effective and viable method for mass breast screening. It is however, difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant microcalcifications associated with breast cancer. Most of the techniques used in the computerized analysis of mammographic microcalcifications segment the digitized gray-level image into regions representing microcalcifications. We present a second-order gray-level histogram based feature extraction approach to extract microcalcification features. These features, called image structure features, are computed from the second-order gray-level histogram statistics, and do not require segmentation of the original image into binary regions. Several image structure features were computed for 100 cases of `difficult to diagnose' microcalcification cases with known biopsy results. These features were analyzed in a correlation study which provided a set of five best image structure features. A feedforward backpropagation neural network was used to classify mammographic microcalcifications using the image structure features. The network was trained on 10 cases of mammographic microcalcifications and tested on additional 85 `difficult-to-diagnose' microcalcifications cases using the selected image structure features. The trained network yielded good results for classification of `difficult-to- diagnose' microcalcifications into benign and malignant categories.

  10. Analysis of mammographic microcalcifications using gray-level image structure features

    SciTech Connect

    Dhawan, A.P.; Chitre, Y.; Kaiser-Bonasso, C.; Moskowitz, M.

    1996-06-01

    Most of the techniques used in the computerized analysis of mammographic microcalcifications use shape features on the segmented regions of microcalcifications extracted from the digitized mammograms. Since mammographic images usually suffer from poorly defined microcalcification features, the extraction of shape features based on a segmentation process may not accurately represent microcalcifications. In this paper, the authors define a set of image structure features for classification of malignancy. Two categories of correlated gray-level image structure features are defined for classification of difficult-to-diagnose cases. The first category of features includes second-order histogram statistics-based features representing the global texture and the wavelet decomposition-based features representing the local texture of the microcalcification area of interest. The second category of features represents the first-order gray-level histogram-based statistics of the segmented microcalcification regions and the size, number, and distance features of the segmented microcalcification cluster. Various features in each category were correlated with the biopsy examination results of 191 difficult-to-diagnose cases for selection of the best set of features representing the complete gray-level image structure information. The selection of the best features was performed using the multivariate cluster analysis as well as a genetic algorithm (GA)-based search method. The selected features were used for classification using backpropagation neural network and parametric statistical classifiers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the neural network-based classification with linear and k-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifiers.

  11. Association Between Changes in Mammographic Image Features and Risk for Near-Term Breast Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K; Gur, David

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a new computerized model for predicting near-term breast cancer risk based on quantitative assessment of bilateral mammographic image feature variations in a series of negative full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images. The retrospective dataset included series of four sequential FFDM examinations of 335 women. The last examination in each series ("current") and the three most recent "prior" examinations were obtained. All "prior" examinations were interpreted as negative during the original clinical image reading, while in the "current" examinations 159 cancers were detected and pathologically verified and 176 cases remained cancer-free. From each image, we initially computed 158 mammographic density, structural similarity, and texture based image features. The absolute subtraction value between the left and right breasts was selected to represent each feature. We then built three support vector machine (SVM) based risk models, which were trained and tested using a leave-one-case-out based cross-validation method. The actual features used in each SVM model were selected using a nested stepwise regression analysis method. The computed areas under receiver operating characteristic curves monotonically increased from 0.666±0.029 to 0.730±0.027 as the time-lag between the "prior" (3 to 1) and "current" examinations decreases. The maximum adjusted odds ratios were 5.63, 7.43, and 11.1 for the three "prior" (3 to 1) sets of examinations, respectively. This study demonstrated a positive association between the risk scores generated by a bilateral mammographic feature difference based risk model and an increasing trend of the near-term risk for having mammography-detected breast cancer. PMID:26886970

  12. Reduction of false-positive recalls using a computerized mammographic image feature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The high false-positive recall rate is one of the major dilemmas that significantly reduce the efficacy of screening mammography, which harms a large fraction of women and increases healthcare cost. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of helping reduce false-positive recalls by developing a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme based on the analysis of global mammographic texture and density features computed from four-view images. Our database includes full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images acquired from 1052 recalled women (669 positive for cancer and 383 benign). Each case has four images: two craniocaudal (CC) and two mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Our CAD scheme first computed global texture features related to the mammographic density distribution on the segmented breast regions of four images. Second, the computed features were given to two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers that were separately trained and tested in a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on CC and MLO view images, respectively. Finally, two ANN classification scores were combined using a new adaptive scoring fusion method that automatically determined the optimal weights to assign to both views. CAD performance was tested using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The AUC = 0.793  ±  0.026 was obtained for this four-view CAD scheme, which was significantly higher at the 5% significance level than the AUCs achieved when using only CC (p = 0.025) or MLO (p = 0.0004) view images, respectively. This study demonstrates that a quantitative assessment of global mammographic image texture and density features could provide useful and/or supplementary information to classify between malignant and benign cases among the recalled cases, which may eventually help reduce the false-positive recall rate in screening mammography.

  13. Risk of Breast Cancer in Women with False-Positive Results according to Mammographic Features.

    PubMed

    Castells, Xavier; Torá-Rocamora, Isabel; Posso, Margarita; Román, Marta; Vernet-Tomas, Maria; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Domingo, Laia; Vidal, Carmen; Baré, Marisa; Ferrer, Joana; Quintana, María Jesús; Sánchez, Mar; Natal, Carmen; Espinàs, Josep A; Saladié, Francina; Sala, María

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To assess the risk of breast cancer in women with false-positive screening results according to radiologic classification of mammographic features. Materials and Methods Review board approval was obtained, with waiver of informed consent. This retrospective cohort study included 521 200 women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening as part of the Spanish Breast Cancer Screening Program between 1994 and 2010 and who were observed until December 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer and the 95% confidence interval (CI) in women with false-positive mammograms as compared with women with negative mammograms. Separate models were adjusted for screen-detected and interval cancers and for screen-film and digital mammography. Time without a breast cancer diagnosis was plotted by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results When compared with women with negative mammograms, the age-adjusted HR of cancer in women with false-positive results was 1.84 (95% CI: 1.73, 1.95; P < .001). The risk was higher in women who had calcifications, whether they were (HR, 2.73; 95% CI: 2.28, 3.28; P < .001) or were not (HR, 2.24; 95% CI: 2.02, 2.48; P < .001) associated with masses. Women in whom mammographic features showed changes in subsequent false-positive results were those who had the highest risk (HR, 9.13; 95% CI: 8.28, 10.07; P < .001). Conclusion Women with false-positive results had an increased risk of breast cancer, particularly women who had calcifications at mammography. Women who had more than one examination with false-positive findings and in whom the mammographic features changed over time had a highly increased risk of breast cancer. Previous mammographic features might yield useful information for further risk-prediction models and personalized follow-up screening protocols. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26878225

  14. Association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Leader, Joseph K.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We recently investigated a new mammographic image feature based risk factor to predict near-term breast cancer risk after a woman has a negative mammographic screening. We hypothesized that unlike the conventional epidemiology-based long-term (or lifetime) risk factors, the mammographic image feature based risk factor value will increase as the time lag between the negative and positive mammography screening decreases. The purpose of this study is to test this hypothesis. From a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database with 1278 cases, we collected all available sequential FFDM examinations for each case including the "current" and 1 to 3 most recently "prior" examinations. All "prior" examinations were interpreted negative, and "current" ones were either malignant or recalled negative/benign. We computed 92 global mammographic texture and density based features, and included three clinical risk factors (woman's age, family history and subjective breast density BIRADS ratings). On this initial feature set, we applied a fast and accurate Sequential Forward Floating Selection (SFFS) feature selection algorithm to reduce feature dimensionality. The features computed on both mammographic views were individually/ separately trained using two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers. The classification scores of the two ANNs were then merged with a sequential ANN. The results show that the maximum adjusted odds ratios were 5.59, 7.98, and 15.77 for using the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st "prior" FFDM examinations, respectively, which demonstrates a higher association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer in the near-term after a negative screening.

  15. Combining texture features from the MLO and CC views for mammographic CAD x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shalini; Zhang, David; Sampat, Mehul P.; Markey, Mia K.

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate approaches for combining information from the MLO and CC mammographic views for Computer-aided Diagnosis (CADx) algorithms. Feature level and classifier output level combinations were explored. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) with step-wise feature selection from a set of Haralick's texture features was used to develop classifiers for distinguishing between benign and malignant mammographic lesions. The effect of correlation between features from the two views on the performance of classifiers was investigated. The single view models included: (a) an LDA model with stepwise selection based on the MLO view only (MLO-Only) and similarly (b) a CC-Only LDA model. The feature-level combination models included: (a) LDA based on concatenation of feature sets selected independently from the two views (FEAT_CON), (b) LDA based on the concatenated feature sets along with the corresponding value of each feature from the opposite view (FEAT_COR_CON) if the correlation was below a threshold, (c) LDA based on the average of the MLO and CC feature values (FEAT_AVG). The classifier output level combination models investigated included: (a) average of the outputs of the MLO-Only and CC-Only classifiers (OUTPUT_AVG), (b) maximum of the outputs of the MLO-Only and CC-Only classifiers (OUTPUT_MAX), (c) minimum of the outputs of the MLO-Only and CC-Only classifiers (OUTPUT_MIN), (d) a second level LDA classifier on the outputs of the MLO-Only and CC-Only classifiers (OUTPUT_LDA), (e) product of the output values of the two classifiers (OUTPUT_PROD). The performance of the models was assessed and compared using the ROC methodology to determine if combination models performed better than the single-view models.

  16. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  17. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. Methods: An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Results: Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%–5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC

  18. Do screen-detected lobular and ductal carcinoma present with different mammographic features?

    PubMed

    Garnett, S; Wallis, M; Morgan, G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate any difference in the shape and location of infiltrating lobular carcinoma (ILC) with respect to the parenchymal density between the cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic views. Six film-readers independently re-read 59 ILC mammograms and a matched sample of 59 infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) mammograms from one 3-year screening round to quantify lesion characteristics. There is fair to moderate reader agreement for parenchymal pattern, lesion shape and location (kappa = 0.41-0.60). Both ILC (33/60, 55%) and IDC (22/65, 37%) appear as a spiculate mass more often on the CC view than on the MLO view. 41% (25/60) of the ILC spiculate masses become architectural distortions or asymmetric densities on the MLO view. No more ILC lesions (4/60, 7%) are seen in dense breasts than IDC (5/65, 8%), but ILC is mainly associated with (58/60, 97%), and rarely isolated from (2/60, 3%), the main glandular density. The appearance of ILC is significantly different between the MLO and CC views (paired Wilcoxon test: z = -17.059; significance level

  19. Modeling error in assessment of mammographic image features for improved computer-aided mammography training: initial experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2011-03-01

    In this study we investigate the hypothesis that there exist patterns in erroneous assessment of BI-RADS image features among radiology trainees when performing diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. We also investigate whether these error making patterns can be captured by individual user models. To test our hypothesis we propose a user modeling algorithm that uses the previous readings of a trainee to identify whether certain BI-RADS feature values (e.g. "spiculated" value for "margin" feature) are associated with higher than usual likelihood that the feature will be assessed incorrectly. In our experiments we used readings of 3 radiology residents and 7 breast imaging experts for 33 breast masses for the following BI-RADS features: parenchyma density, mass margin, mass shape and mass density. The expert readings were considered as the gold standard. Rule-based individual user models were developed and tested using the leave one-one-out crossvalidation scheme. Our experimental evaluation showed that the individual user models are accurate in identifying cases for which errors are more likely to be made. The user models captured regularities in error making for all 3 residents. This finding supports our hypothesis about existence of individual error making patterns in assessment of mammographic image features using the BI-RADS lexicon. Explicit user models identifying the weaknesses of each resident could be of great use when developing and adapting a personalized training plan to meet the resident's individual needs. Such approach fits well with the framework of adaptive computer-aided educational systems in mammography we have proposed before.

  20. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  1. X-ray absorptiometry of the breast using mammographic exposure factors: application to units featuring automatic beam quality selection.

    PubMed

    Kotre, C J

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have identified the relationship between the visual appearance of high breast density at mammography and an increased risk of breast cancer. Approaches to quantify the amount of glandular tissue within the breast from mammography have so far concentrated on image-based methods. Here, it is proposed that the X-ray parameters automatically selected by the mammography unit can be used to estimate the thickness of glandular tissue overlying the automatic exposure sensor area, provided that the unit can be appropriately calibrated. This is a non-trivial task for modern mammography units that feature automatic beam quality selection, as the number of tube potential and X-ray target/filter combinations used to cover the range of breast sizes and compositions can be large, leading to a potentially unworkable number of curve fits and interpolations. Using appropriate models for the attenuation of the glandular breast in conjunction with a constrained set of physical phantom measurements, it is demonstrated that calibration for X-ray absorptiometry can be achieved despite the large number of possible exposure factor combinations employed by modern mammography units. The main source of error on the estimated glandular tissue thickness using this method is shown to be uncertainty in the measured compressed breast thickness. An additional correction for this source of error is investigated and applied. Initial surveys of glandular thickness for a cohort of women undergoing breast screening are presented. PMID:20505033

  2. Qualitative features of the evolution of some polar satellite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashkov'yak, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Two special cases of the problem of the secular perturbations in the orbital elements of a satellite with a negligible mass produced by the joint influence of the oblateness of the central planet and the attraction by its most massive (or main) satellites and the Sun are considered. These cases are among the integrable ones in the general nonintegrable evolution problem. The first case is realized when the plane of the satellite orbit and the rotation axis of the planet lie in its orbital plane. The second case is realized when the plane of the satellite orbit is orthogonal to the line of intersection between the equatorial and orbital planes of the planet. The corresponding particular solutions correspond to those polar satellite orbits for which the main qualitative features of the evolution of the eccentricity and pericenter argument are described here. Families of integral curves have been constructed in the phase plane of these elements for the satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus.

  3. Distinguishing Features and Similarities Between Descriptive Phenomenological and Qualitative Description Research.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G; Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Knafl, Kathleen; Cohen, Marlene Z

    2016-09-01

    Scholars who research phenomena of concern to the discipline of nursing are challenged with making wise choices about different qualitative research approaches. Ultimately, they want to choose an approach that is best suited to answer their research questions. Such choices are predicated on having made distinctions between qualitative methodology, methods, and analytic frames. In this article, we distinguish two qualitative research approaches widely used for descriptive studies: descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description. Providing a clear basis that highlights the distinguishing features and similarities between descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description research will help students and researchers make more informed choices in deciding upon the most appropriate methodology in qualitative research. We orient the reader to distinguishing features and similarities associated with each approach and the kinds of research questions descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description research address. PMID:27106878

  4. Individualized grid-enabled mammographic training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2009-02-01

    The PERFORMS self-assessment scheme measures individuals skills in identifying key mammographic features on sets of known cases. One aspect of this is that it allows radiologists' skills to be trained, based on their data from this scheme. Consequently, a new strategy is introduced to provide revision training based on mammographic features that the radiologist has had difficulty with in these sets. To do this requires a lot of random cases to provide dynamic, unique, and up-to-date training modules for each individual. We propose GIMI (Generic Infrastructure in Medical Informatics) middleware as the solution to harvest cases from distributed grid servers. The GIMI middleware enables existing and legacy data to support healthcare delivery, research, and training. It is technology-agnostic, data-agnostic, and has a security policy. The trainee examines each case, indicating the location of regions of interest, and completes an evaluation form, to determine mammographic feature labelling, diagnosis, and decisions. For feedback, the trainee can choose to have immediate feedback after examining each case or batch feedback after examining a number of cases. All the trainees' result are recorded in a database which also contains their trainee profile. A full report can be prepared for the trainee after they have completed their training. This project demonstrates the practicality of a grid-based individualised training strategy and the efficacy in generating dynamic training modules within the coverage/outreach of the GIMI middleware. The advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed together with future plans.

  5. Robust Feature Selection from Microarray Data Based on Cooperative Game Theory and Qualitative Mutual Information

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Atiyeh; Moattar, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    High dimensionality of microarray data sets may lead to low efficiency and overfitting. In this paper, a multiphase cooperative game theoretic feature selection approach is proposed for microarray data classification. In the first phase, due to high dimension of microarray data sets, the features are reduced using one of the two filter-based feature selection methods, namely, mutual information and Fisher ratio. In the second phase, Shapley index is used to evaluate the power of each feature. The main innovation of the proposed approach is to employ Qualitative Mutual Information (QMI) for this purpose. The idea of Qualitative Mutual Information causes the selected features to have more stability and this stability helps to deal with the problem of data imbalance and scarcity. In the third phase, a forward selection scheme is applied which uses a scoring function to weight each feature. The performance of the proposed method is compared with other popular feature selection algorithms such as Fisher ratio, minimum redundancy maximum relevance, and previous works on cooperative game based feature selection. The average classification accuracy on eleven microarray data sets shows that the proposed method improves both average accuracy and average stability compared to other approaches. PMID:27127506

  6. Features of a Health-Oriented Education Program during Daily Commutes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramezankhani, Ali; Heydarabadi, Akbar Babaei; Ghaffari, Mohtasham; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Kazemi, Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Today, despite scientific advances, many people spend more time and distance between home and their workplaces because of various economic and population reasons. The aim of this study was to identify features of an appropriate health education program during commutes for factory staff at Ardakan county (Yazd province, Iran). Methods This qualitative study was conducted via the phenomenological method in 2014. The population of this study was members of the staff of Ardakan Steel Company. Nineteen specialists and 11 members of the factory’s staff were invited to participate in the study, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The interviews took 20 to 40 minutes, and their content was analyzed using content analysis. Results Extraction of codes and themes and their placement in this study showed that an educational program during commutes should have nine features to have the desired effectiveness, i.e., the program must be audience-oriented, repeatable, participatory, technology-based, combinational, supportive, and motivational and interesting. Also, the program should have environmental and organizational support, and it must be evaluated for its effectiveness. Conclusion Considering appropriate features of a health education program in educational situations, especially interventions related to daily commutes, is very important because the effectiveness of such health-oriented educational programs must be ensured. PMID:27504166

  7. [Qualitative features of confabulation in a case with basal forebrain amnesia].

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Ohtake, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, M; Fujii, T; Yamadori, A

    2001-12-01

    We investigated qualitative features of confabulation in a case with basal forebrain amnesia. A 66-year-old, right-handed woman with a 8th-grade education, was admitted to the Rehabilitation Department of Tohoku University Hospital, Japan, for evaluation and therapy of amnesia. Her previous medical history included hypertension. Nine months before admission, she went to a hospital because of headache and blurred vision. She was diagnosed as suffering from a suprasellar arachnoid cyst and unruptured aneurysm at the anterior communicating artery. Five months later, resection of the cyst and clipping of the aneurysm was performed. After the operation, she became disoriented and amnesic with marked confabulation. On admission to our hospital 3 months later, she was alert and cooperative. Detailed neuropsychological assessment was performed during the next two months. She remained clinically stable throughout her hospitalization. Neurological examination showed no abnormalities. Brain magnetic resonance images revealed lesions in the bilateral orbito-frontal cortices and basal forebrain. Measurement of blood flow with 123I-IMP single photon emission computed tomography showed hypoperfusion in the bilateral frontotemporal regions. We performed systematic investigations to clarify the qualitative features of her confabulations. Her confabulations included many facts she had experienced before, but they were out of context. Each fact was recalled in isolation or associated with erroneous places, persons or times. Her confabulations were never fantastic or momentary in nature, but were consisted with isolated facts. Experimental investigation revealed that she could recognize individual facts (a person, a place, a task and time) in each episode. However, she could not integrate individual facts into an episode. We propose calling this type of confabulation "mosaic confabulation". PMID:11806121

  8. Factors associated with mammographic decisions of Chinese-Australian women.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Cannas; Cant, Rosemary; Sullivan, Gerard

    2005-12-01

    BreastScreen (a free breast cancer screening service) has been implemented in Australia since 1991. Surveys conducted overseas consistently report that women of Chinese ancestry have low participation rates in breast cancer screening. Although Chinese women's use of breast cancer screening services has been investigated abroad, to date there are few studies of mammographic screening behavior among Chinese-Australian women. The purpose of this study is to explore and investigate the factors associated with mammographic decisions of Chinese-Australian women. Using a qualitative approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Chinese-Australian women. These were augmented by additional data from ethnographic observations. The findings show two facilitators: organizational factors (an invitation letter from BreastScreen and seniors' clubs arrangements) and the influence of 'significant others'. Barriers identified were fear perceptions of mammography, modesty and fear of stigmatization. This study provides a useful framework for designing and implementing mammographic screening services for Chinese-Australian women that may improve their participation rates. PMID:15888474

  9. Autobiographical Planning and the Brain: Activation and Its Modulation by Qualitative Features.

    PubMed

    Spreng, R Nathan; Gerlach, Kathy D; Turner, Gary R; Schacter, Daniel L

    2015-11-01

    To engage in purposeful behavior, it is important to make plans, which organize subsequent actions. Most studies of planning involve "look-ahead" puzzle tasks that are unrelated to personal goals. We developed a task to assess autobiographical planning, which involves the formulation of personal plans in response to real-world goals, and examined autobiographical planning in 63 adults during fMRI scanning. Autobiographical planning was found to engage the default network, including medial-temporal lobe and midline structures, and executive control regions in lateral pFC and parietal cortex and caudate. To examine how specific qualitative features of autobiographical plans modulate neural activity, we performed parametric modulation analyses. Ratings of plan detail, novelty, temporal distance, ease of plan formulation, difficulty in goal completion, and confidence in goal accomplishment were used as covariates in six hierarchical linear regression models. This modeling procedure removed shared variance among the ratings, allowing us to determine the independent relationship between ratings of interest and trial-wise BOLD signal. We found that specific autobiographical planning, describing a detailed, achievable, and actionable planning process for attaining a clearly envisioned future, recruited both default and frontoparietal brain regions. In contrast, abstract autobiographical planning, plans that were constructed from more generalized semantic or affective representations of a less tangible and distant future, involved interactions among default, sensory perceptual, and limbic brain structures. Specific qualities of autobiographical plans are important predictors of default and frontoparietal control network engagement during plan formation and reflect the contribution of mnemonic and executive control processes to autobiographical planning. PMID:26102226

  10. A new detection algorithm for microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Ma, Yide; Li, Yunsong

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach for microcalcification clusters detection is proposed. At the first time, we make a short analysis of mammographic images with microcalcification lesions to confirm these lesions have much greater gray values than normal regions. After summarizing the specific feature of microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening, we make more focus on preprocessing step including eliminating the background, image enhancement and eliminating the pectoral muscle. In detail, Chan-Vese Model is used for eliminating background. Then, we do the application of combining morphology method and edge detection method. After the AND operation and Sobel filter, we use Hough Transform, it can be seen that the result have outperformed for eliminating the pectoral muscle which is approximately the gray of microcalcification. Additionally, the enhancement step is achieved by morphology. We make effort on mammographic image preprocessing to achieve lower computational complexity. As well known, it is difficult to robustly achieve mammograms analysis due to low contrast between normal and lesion tissues, there are also much noise in such images. After a serious preprocessing algorithm, a method based on blob detection is performed to microcalcification clusters according their specific features. The proposed algorithm has employed Laplace operator to improve Difference of Gaussians (DoG) function in terms of low contrast images. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed method performs on a known public database namely MIAS, rather than synthetic images. The comparison experiments and Cohen's kappa coefficients all demonstrate that our proposed approach can potentially obtain better microcalcification clusters detection results in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Are qualitative and quantitative sleep problems associated with delinquency when controlling for psychopathic features and parental supervision?

    PubMed

    Backman, Heidi; Laajasalo, Taina; Saukkonen, Suvi; Salmi, Venla; Kivivuori, Janne; Aronen, Eeva T

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between sleep, including both qualitative and quantitative aspects, and delinquent behaviour while controlling for psychopathic features of adolescents and parental supervision at bedtime. We analysed data from a nationally representative sample of 4855 Finnish adolescents (mean age 15.3 years, 51% females). Sleep problems, hours of sleep and delinquency were evaluated via self-report. Psychopathic features were measured with the Antisocial Process Screening Device - Self-Report. In negative binomial regressions, gender and sleep-related variables acted as predictors for both property and violent crime after controlling for psychopathic features and parental supervision at bedtime. The results suggest that both sleep problems (at least three times per week, at least for a year) and an insufficient amount of sleep (less than 7 h) are associated with property crime and violent behaviour, and the relationship is not explained by gender, degree of parental supervision at bedtime or co-occurring psychopathic features. These results suggest that sleep difficulties and insufficient amount of sleep are associated with delinquent behaviour in adolescents. The significance of addressing sleep-related problems, both qualitative and quantitative, among adolescents is thus highlighted. Implications for a prevention technique of delinquent behaviour are discussed. PMID:25847544

  12. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mammographic x-ray system is a device intended to be used to produce radiographs of the...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mammographic x-ray system is a device intended to be used to produce radiographs of the...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mammographic x-ray system is a device intended to be used to produce radiographs of the...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mammographic x-ray system is a device intended to be used to produce radiographs of the...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mammographic x-ray system is a device intended to be used to produce radiographs of the...

  17. Mammographic density descriptors of novel phantom images: effect of clustered lumpy backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C.; Ryan, Elaine

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Both qualitative and quantitative methods have been used to evaluate MBD. However as it is impossible to measure the actual weight or volume of fibroglandular tissue evident on a mammogram, therefore it is hard to know the true correlation between measured mammographic density and the fibroglandular tissue volume. A phantom system has been developed that represents glandular tissue within an adipose tissue structure. Although a previous study has found strong correlation between the synthesised glandular mass and several image descriptors, it is not known if the correlation is still present when a high level of background noise is introduced. The background noise is required to more realistically simulate clinical image appearance. The aim of this study is to investigate if the correlation between percentage density, integrated density, and standard deviation of mean grey value of the whole phantom and simulated glandular tissue mass is affected by background noise being added to the phantom images. For a set of one hundred phantom mammographic images, clustered lumpy backgrounds were synthesised and superimposed onto phantom images. The correlation between the synthesised glandular mass and the image descriptors were calculated. The results showed the correlation is strong and statistically significant for the above three descriptors with r is 0.7597, 0.8208, and 0.7167 respectively. This indicates these descriptors may be used to assess breast fibroglandular tissue content of the breast using mammographic images.

  18. Use of border information in the classification of mammographic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, C.; Timp, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a new method to characterize the margin of a mammographic mass lesion to improve the classification of benign and malignant masses. Towards this goal, we designed features that measure the degree of sharpness and microlobulation of mass margins. We calculated these features in a border region of the mass defined as a thin band along the mass contour. The importance of these features in the classification of benign and malignant masses was studied in relation to existing features used for mammographic mass detection. Features were divided into three groups, each representing a different mass segment: the interior region of a mass, the border and the outer area. The interior and the outer area of a mass were characterized using contrast and spiculation measures. Classification was done in two steps. First, features representing each of the three mass segments were merged into a neural network classifier resulting in a single regional classification score for each segment. Secondly, a classifier combined the three single scores into a final output to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. We compared the classification performance of each regional classifier and the combined classifier on a data set of 1076 biopsy proved masses (590 malignant and 486 benign) from 481 women included in the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the classifiers. The area under the ROC curve (Az) was 0.69 for the interior mass segment, 0.76 for the border segment and 0.75 for the outer mass segment. The performance of the combined classifier was 0.81 for image-based and 0.83 for case-based evaluation. These results show that the combination of information from different mass segments is an effective approach for computer-aided characterization of mammographic masses. An advantage of this approach is that it allows the assessment of the contribution of regions rather

  19. Mammographic equipment, technique, and quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The most important improvements in mammographic technique were the introduction of single- or double-emulsion high-contrast film-screen combinations for mammography, the use of a specially designed low-kilovoltage Bucky grid to reduce scattered radiation, and the introduction of smaller focal spots to improve imaging geometry. Magnification techniques, especially the spot-film technique, yields clearer delineation of high-contrast microcalcifications. Dedicated mammographic equipment with specially designed x-ray tubes is necessary for modern high-quality mammography. However, in many modern mammographic units, the automatic exposure controller still fails to provide appropriate and constant optical film density over a wide range of tissue thickness and absorption. Extended-cycle processing of single-emulsion mammographic films can yield better image contrast and reduce exposure by up to 30%. Exposure times of less than 1 second are recommended to avoid the unnecessary higher doses caused by longer exposure times and reciprocity law failure. The wide dynamic range in mammography can be reduced by a beam equalization filter, and thus be better adapted to the decreased latitude of modern high-contrast mammographic screen-film systems. Mammographic film reading (detection of subtle microcalcifications) can be facilitated by modern computer evaluation of previously digitized mammograms. Standardization and assurance of image quality have been major challenges in the technical development of mammography. Different technical and anthropomorphic phantoms have been designed to measure and compare practical image quality. Detailed quality control measures have been developed. The benefit of a single or annual screening mammography, calculated in gained life expectancy, by far outweighs the relative risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. 22 references.

  20. Vitamin D and Mammographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, J.; Straub, L.; Wissing, J.; Artmann, A.; Schmidmayr, M.; Kiechle, M.; Seifert-Klauss, V. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleiotropic immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative effects of vitamin D and hopes to stop cancerogenesis have led to an increased interest in possible reduction of breast cancer with higher vitamin D levels. Mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer risk, and its association with serum vitamin D is complex, as recent studies have shown. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1103 participants were recruited in the breast diagnostic unit of the Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU Munich. A standardised questionnaire and blood samples for 25-OH-vitamin D were taken on the day of mammography. Histologic results of biopsies in suspicious mammographies were documented. Results: In the 1090 data-sets analysed, vitamin D-deficiency was common among women under 40. Highest vitamin D values were observed in participants aged 60–69 years, but average values for all age cohorts were below 20 ng/ml of vitamin D. 15.6 % of all participants had very low vitamin D values (< 10 ng/ml), 51.3 % were vitamin D-deficient (10–19 ng/ml) and only 5.7 % were above 30 ng/ml, i.e. showed sufficient vitamin D. Patients with malignant results had vitamin D < 10 ng/ml more often (16.9 %; p = 0.61), and only 3.4 % in this group had sufficient vitamin D supply (> 30 ng/ml). There were no significant differences in vitamin D-levels between density groups according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Conclusion: Vitamin D values were lower than in comparable US women. Up to now, there is no direct clinical evidence for a relationship between the risk for breast cancer and a specific vitamin D value. PMID:27239067

  1. Qualitatively Incorrect Features in the TDDFT Spectrum of Thiophene-Based Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio molecular electronic structure computations of thiophene-based compounds constitute an active field of research prompted by the growing interest in low-cost materials for organic electronic devices. In particular, the modeling of electronically excited states and other time-dependent phenomena has moved toward the description of more realistic albeit challenging systems. We demonstrate that due to its underlying approximations, time-dependent density functional theory predicts results that are qualitatively incorrect for thiophene and thienoacenes, although not for oligothiophene chains. The failure includes spurious state inversion and excitation characters, wrong distribution of oscillator strengths and erroneous potential energy surfaces. We briefly analyze possible origins of this behavior and identify alternative methods that alleviate these problems. PMID:26263085

  2. Incorporation of clinical data into a computerized method for the assessment of mammographic breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2000-06-01

    We previously developed a computerized method to classify mammographic masses as benign or malignant. In this method, mammographic features that are similar to the ones used by radiologists are automatically extracted to characterize a mass lesion. These features are then merged by an artificial neural network (ANN), which yields an estimated likelihood of malignancy for each mass. The performance of the method was evaluated on an independent database consisting of 110 cases (60 benign and 50 malignant cases). The method achieved an Az of 0.91 from round-robin analysis in the task of differentiating between benign and malignant masses using the computer-extracted features only. As the most important clinical risk factor for breast cancer, age achieved a performance level (Az equals 0.79) similar to that (Az equals 0.77 and 0.80) of the computer-extracted spiculation features, which are the most important indicators for malignancy of a mass, in differentiating between the malignant and benign cases. In this study, age is included as an additional input feature to the ANN. The performance of the scheme (Az equals 0.93) is improved when age is included. However, the improvement is not found to be statistically significant. Our results indicated that age may be a strong feature in predicting malignancy of a mass. For this database, however, the inclusion of age may not have a strong impact on the determination of the likelihood for a mammographic mass lesion when the major mammographic characteristics (e.g., spiculation) of a mass are accurately extracted and analyzed along with other features using an artificial neural network.

  3. Qualitative Features Extraction from Sensor Data using Short-time Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amini, Abolfazl M.; Figueroa, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The information gathered from sensors is used to determine the health of a sensor. Once a normal mode of operation is established any deviation from the normal behavior indicates a change. This change may be due to a malfunction of the sensor(s) or the system (or process). The step-up and step-down features, as well as sensor disturbances are assumed to be exponential. An RC network is used to model the main process, which is defined by a step-up (charging), drift, and step-down (discharging). The sensor disturbances and spike are added while the system is in drift. The system runs for a period of at least three time-constants of the main process every time a process feature occurs (e.g. step change). The Short-Time Fourier Transform of the Signal is taken using the Hamming window. Three window widths are used. The DC value is removed from the windowed data prior to taking the FFT. The resulting three dimensional spectral plots provide good time frequency resolution. The results indicate distinct shapes corresponding to each process.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of colonic microendoscopy image features to histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Powless, Amy J.; Lai, Keith; Laryea, Jonathan A.; Mizell, Jason S.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, affecting more than 130,000 Americans every year1. Determining tumor margins prior to surgical resection is essential to providing optimal treatment and reducing recurrence rates. Colorectal cancer recurrence can occur in up to 20% of cases, commonly within three years after curative treatment. Typically, when colorectal cancers are resected, a margin of normal tissue on both sides of the tumor is required. The minimum margin required for colon cancer is 5 cm and for the lower rectum 2 cm. However, usually more normal tissue is taken on both sides of the tumor because the blood supply to the entire segment is removed with the surgery and therefore the entire segment must be removed. Anastomotic recurrences may result from inadequate margins. Pathologists look at the margins to ensure that there is no residual tumor and this is usually documented in the pathology report. We have developed a portable, point-of-care fiber bundle microendoscopy imaging system for detection of abnormalities in colonic epithelial microstructure. The system comprises a laptop, a modified fiber bundle image guide with a 1mm active area diameter and custom LabVIEW interface, and is approved for imaging surgically resected colon tissue at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The microendoscopy probe provides high-resolution images of superficial epithelial histology in real-time to assist surgical guidance and to localize occult regions of dysplasia which may not be visible. Microendoscopy images of freshly resected human colonic epithelium were acquired using the microendoscopy device and subsequently mosaicked using custom post-processing software. Architectural changes in the glands were mapped to histopathology H&E slides taken from the precise location of the microendoscopy images. Qualitatively, glandular distortion and placement of image guide was used to map normal and dysplastic areas of

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic masses using scalable image retrieval.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Menglin; Zhang, Shaoting; Li, Hongsheng; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2015-02-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of masses in mammograms is important to the prevention of breast cancer. Many approaches tackle this problem through content-based image retrieval techniques. However, most of them fall short of scalability in the retrieval stage, and their diagnostic accuracy is, therefore, restricted. To overcome this drawback, we propose a scalable method for retrieval and diagnosis of mammographic masses. Specifically, for a query mammographic region of interest (ROI), scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) features are extracted and searched in a vocabulary tree, which stores all the quantized features of previously diagnosed mammographic ROIs. In addition, to fully exert the discriminative power of SIFT features, contextual information in the vocabulary tree is employed to refine the weights of tree nodes. The retrieved ROIs are then used to determine whether the query ROI contains a mass. The presented method has excellent scalability due to the low spatial-temporal cost of vocabulary tree. Extensive experiments are conducted on a large dataset of 11 553 ROIs extracted from the digital database for screening mammography, which demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of our approach. PMID:25361497

  6. Association of Mammographic Density with Pathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Nasrin; Movahedinia, Samaneh; Movahedinia, Sajjadeh; Shahriari, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and is the first cause of death due to cancer among women. Mammography is the best screening method and mammographic density, which determines the percentage of fibro glandular tissue of breast, is one of the strongest risk factors of breast cancer. Because benign and malignant lesions may present as dense lesions in mammography so it is necessary to take a core biopsy of any suspicious lesions to evaluate pathologic findings. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the association between mammographic density and histopathological findings in Iranian population. Moreover, we assessed the correlation between mammographic density and protein expression profile. We indeed, determined the accuracy and positive predictive value and negative predictive value of mammographic reports in our center. Patients and Method This study is a cross-sectional study carried out among 131 eligible women who had referred to imaging center for mammographic examination and had been advised to take biopsy of breast tissue. All participants of the study had filled out the informed consent. Pathologic review was performed blinded to the density status. Patients were divided into low density breast tissue group (ACR density group 1-2) and high density breast tissue group (ACR 3, 4) and data was compared between these two groups. Statistical analysis performed using SPSS for windows, version 11.5. We used chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression test for analysis and Odds Ratio calculated where indicated. Results In patients with high breast densities, malignant cases (61.2%) were significantly more in comparison to patients with low breast densities (37.3%) (P= 0.007, OR=2.66 95% CI=1.29-5.49). After adjusting for age, density was associated with malignancy in age groups <46 years (P=0.007), and 46-60 years (P=0.024) but not in age group >60yrs (P=0.559). Adjusting for menopausal status, density showed

  7. Power spectral analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2006-03-01

    Mammographic density and parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer. Two groups of women: gene-mutation carriers and low-risk women were included in this study. Power spectral analysis was performed within parenchymal regions of 172 digitized craniocaudal normal mammograms of the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene-mutation carriers and those of women at low-risk of developing breast cancer. The power law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β was evaluated for the mammographic patterns. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of exponent β as a decision variable in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. Power spectral analysis of mammograms demonstrated that mammographic parenchymal patterns have a power-law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β where f is radial spatial frequency, with the average β values of 2.92 and 2.47 for the gene-mutation carriers and for the low-risk women, respectively. A z values of 0.90 and 0.89 were achieved in distinguishing between the gene-mutation carriers and the low-risk women with the individual image β value as the decision variable in the entire database and the age-matched group, respectively.

  8. A prospective study of variability in mammographic density during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Monica; Chatterton, Robert T; Rademaker, Alfred W; Hou, Nanjiang; Jordan, V Craig; Hendrick, R Edward; Khan, Seema A

    2010-06-01

    Mammographic breast density has been proposed as a surrogate endpoint in breast cancer prevention studies, but little is known about its variability over time, particularly in relation to menstrual cycle phase. The purpose of this study was to assess variation in breast density on digital mammograms using quantitative and qualitative density measures. Menstrual cycle phase was determined by salivary estradiol and progesterone assays. 73 healthy subjects with regular menses had 1-3 mammograms with paired saliva collection during a 12-month period. The mean difference in density as a percentage of the mean density was calculated for follicular-luteal (n = 50), luteal-luteal (n = 26) and follicular-follicular (n = 23) pairs in the same woman using the same breast. Two density measures (measurement of dense area and BIRADS) were used. The mean luteal density exceeded the mean follicular density by 7.1-9.2%, but density differences between luteal pairs and follicular pairs did not exceed 5%. The intraclass correlation for measurement of dense area was greater than 85% in all phases of the menstrual cycle, but was below 50% for BIRADS for luteal-follicular and follicular-follicular pairs. Our study provides estimates of the amount of variation in mammographic density during the menstrual cycle, and that inherent in repeated density measurement in premenopausal women, and suggests that menstrual phase of mammographic evaluation should be controlled for in intervention studies where density is being used as a surrogate measure. PMID:19669673

  9. [Clinical and mammographic screening in a district of Milan: organization, social influence and results].

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, A; Cescon, S; Moro, G; Verga, M; Saibene, F; Micheli, A

    1993-12-01

    A reduction in the mortality rate for breast cancer in women over 50 years undergoing mammographic screening has been reported in many studies. Since the first experience in Florence in 1970, mammographic screenings on a population from different areas of Italy began. We report the experience carried out in the 16th District of Milan among women from 50 to 60 years of age. A promotional activity with the use of local media supported the program. The screening was based on two-view conventional mammography and clinical examination. Immediate response was given to the women. The compliance was 60%. Mainly immigrants, with only primary school education, mothers of several children and freelancers seem to be the main features of the women in the non-attenders group. PMID:7957707

  10. A novel phantom system facilitating better descriptors of density within mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C.; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    High mammographic density is a risk factor for breast cancer. As it is impossible to measure actual weight or volume of fibroglandular tissue evident within a mammogram, it is hard to know the correlation between measured mammographic density and the actual fibroglandular tissue volume. The aim of this study is to develop a phantom that represents glandular tissue within an adipose tissue structure so that correlations between image feature descriptors and the synthesised glandular structure can be accurately quantified. In this phantom study, ten different weights of fine steel wool were put into gelatine to simulate breast structure. Image feature descriptors are investigated for both the whole phantom image and the simulated density. Descriptors included actual area and percentage area of density, mean pixel intensity for the whole image and dense area, standard deviation of mean intensity, and integrated pixel density which is the production of area and mean intensity. The results show high level correlation between steel-wool weight and percentage density measured on images (r = 0.8421), and the integrated pixel density of dense area (r = 0.8760). The correlation is significant for mean intensity standard deviation for the whole phantom (r = 0.8043). This phantom study may help identify more accurate descriptors of mammographic density, thus facilitating better assessments of fibroglandular tissue appearances.

  11. Influence of factors on mammographic density in premenopausal Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaping; Liu, Jieqiong; Gu, Ran; Hu, Yue; Liu, Fengtao; Yun, Miaomiao; Xiao, Qiaozhen; Wu, Mei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi

    2016-07-01

    Mammographic density is an independent strong risk factor for breast cancer. However, the influence of factors on mammographic density in premenopausal women remains unclear. In the Southern Professional Women Breast Cancer Screening Project, we assessed the associations between mammographic density and its influential factors using multivariate logistic regression in premenopausal women adjusting for BMI, age, duration of breastfeeding, number of live births, and breast size. A total of 1699 premenopausal women aged 27 to 57 years, who had been screened by mammography, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Overall, 85.2% were categorized as having dense breasts (BI-RADS density 3 and 4) and 14.8% as having fatty breasts (BI-RADS density 1 and 2). In multivariate and logistic regression analysis, only BMI and age were significantly negatively correlated with mammographic density in premenopausal women (P<0.001). No significant associations between mammographic density and number of deliveries, breastfeeding duration, education level, family history of breast cancer, as well as breast size and sleep quality, were identified in the study. Age and BMI are negatively associated with mammographic density in premenopausal Chinese women. Information on the influential factors of mammographic density in premenopausal women might provide meaningful insights into breast cancer prevention. PMID:26075657

  12. Mammographic breast density and serum phytoestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Sarah J; Sprague, Brian L; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Sisney, Gale A; Buist, Diana S M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-08-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55-70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors related to MD and provided a blood sample for analysis of 3 phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol. We examined whether mean percent MD was related to serum level of phytoestrogens, adjusting for age and body mass index. Genistein and daidzein levels correlated with self-reported soy consumption. Mean percent MD did not differ across women with different phytoestrogen levels. For example, women with nondetectable genistein levels had mean density of 11.0% [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.9-12.4], compared to 10.5% (95% CI = 8.0-13.7) and 11.2% (95% CI = 8.7-14.6) for < and ≥ median detectable levels, respectively. In a population with relatively low soy intake, serum phytoestrogens were not associated with mammographic density. Additional studies are needed to determine effects of higher levels, particularly given patterns of increasing phytoestrogen intake. PMID:22860715

  13. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  14. Diagnostic performance on briefly presented mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugglestone, Mark D.; Gale, Alastair G.; Cowley, Helen C.; Wilson, A. R. M.

    1995-04-01

    Previously an outline model of the radiological diagnostic process has been proposed which posits the importance of the initial glance at a medical image in helping to establish an appropriate diagnosis. As part of a long tern study of knowledge elicitation in mammography we examine the amount of information available to breast screening radiologists within the initial 'glance' at a mammogram. These data are compared to those from examining the same images normally. Overall, performance in a brief presentation was poorer than in normal viewing, as expected, but was also worse than found in comparable brief presentation studies using the chest radiograph. These results are discussed with regard to the inferences which can be made about the nature of mammographic knowledge which is utilized in the diagnostic process and how it is organized within the framework of a conceptual model.

  15. Impedance mammograph 3D phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wtorek, J; Stelter, J; Nowakowski, A

    1999-04-20

    The results obtained using the Technical University of Gdansk Electroimpedance Mammograph (TUGEM) of a 3D phantom study are presented. The TUGEM system is briefly described. The hardware contains the measurement head and DSP-based identification modules controlled by a PC computer. A specially developed reconstruction algorithm, Regulated Correction Frequency Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (RCFART), is used to obtain 3D images. To visualize results, the Advance Visualization System (AVS) is used. It allows a powerful image processing on a fast workstation or on a high-performance computer. Results of three types of 3D conductivity perturbations used in the study (aluminum, Plexiglas, and cucumber) are shown. The relative volumes of perturbations less than 2% of the measurement chamber are easily evidenced. PMID:10372188

  16. Influence of Lifestyle Factors on Mammographic Density in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Judith S.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Louise; Trinh, Thang; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Hall, Per; Celebioglu, Fuat

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Apart from hormone replacement therapy (HRT), little is known about lifestyle factors that influence breast density. Methods We examined the effect of smoking, alcohol and physical activity on mammographic density in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women without breast cancer. Lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire and percentage and area measures of mammographic density were measured using computer-assisted software. General linear models were used to assess the association between lifestyle factors and mammographic density and effect modification by body mass index (BMI) and HRT was studied. Results Overall, alcohol intake was positively associated with percent mammographic density (P trend  = 0.07). This association was modified by HRT use (P interaction  = 0.06): increasing alcohol intake was associated with increasing percent density in current HRT users (P trend  = 0.01) but not in non-current users (P trend  = 0.82). A similar interaction between alcohol and HRT was found for the absolute dense area, with a positive association being present in current HRT users only (P interaction  = 0.04). No differences in mammographic density were observed across categories of smoking and physical activity, neither overall nor in stratified analyses by BMI and HRT use. Conclusions Increasing alcohol intake is associated with an increase in mammography density, whereas smoking and physical activity do not seem to influence density. The observed interaction between alcohol and HRT may pose an opportunity for HRT users to lower their mammographic density and breast cancer risk. PMID:24349146

  17. Computerized measurement of mammographic display image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.; Sivarudrappa, Mahesh; Roehrig, Hans

    1999-05-01

    Since the video monitor is widely believed to be the weak link in the imaging chain, it is critical, to include it in the total image quality evaluation. Yet, most physical measurements of mammographic image quality are presently limited to making measurements on the digital matrix, not the displayed image. A method is described to quantitatively measure image quality of mammographic monitors using ACR phantom-based test patterns. The image of the test pattern is digitized using a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, and the resulting image file is analyzed by an existing phantom analysis method (Computer Analysis of Mammography Phantom Images, CAMPI). The new method is called CCD-CAMPI and it yields the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) for an arbitrary target shape (e.g., speck, mass or fiber). In this work we show the feasibility of this idea for speck targets. Also performed were physical image quality characterization of the monitor (so-called Fourier measures) and analysis by another template matching method due to Tapiovaara and Wagner (TW) which is closely related to CAMPI. The methods were applied to a MegaScan monitor. Test patterns containing a complete speck group superposed on a noiseless background were displayed on the monitor and a series of CCD images were acquired. These images were subjected to CCD-CAMPI and TW analyses. It was found that the SNR values for the CCD-CAMPI method tracked those of the TW method, although the latter measurements were considerably less precise. The TW SNR measure was also about 25% larger than the CCD-CAMPI determination. These differences could be understood from the manner in which the two methods evaluate the noise. Overall accuracy of the CAMPI SNR determination was 4.1% for single images when expressed as a coefficient of variance. While the SNR measures are predictable from the Fourier measures the number of images and effort required is prohibitive and it is not suited to Quality Control (QC). Unlike the Fourier

  18. Characterization of difference of Gaussian filters in the detection of mammographic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Catarious, David M. Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    In this article, we present a characterization of the effect of difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters in the detection of mammographic regions. DoG filters have been used previously in mammographic mass computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. As DoG filters are constructed from the subtraction of two bivariate Gaussian distributions, they require the specification of three parameters: the size of the filter template and the standard deviations of the constituent Gaussians. The influence of these three parameters in the detection of mammographic masses has not been characterized. In this work, we aim to determine how the parameters affect (1) the physical descriptors of the detected regions (2) the true and false positive rates, and (3) the classification performance of the individual descriptors. To this end, 30 DoG filters are created from the combination of three template sizes and four values for each of the Gaussians' standard deviations. The filters are used to detect regions in a study database of 181 craniocaudal-view mammograms extracted from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. To describe the physical characteristics of the identified regions, morphological and textural features are extracted from each of the detected regions. Differences in the mean values of the features caused by altering the DoG parameters are examined through statistical and empirical comparisons. The parameters' effects on the true and false positive rate are determined by examining the mean malignant sensitivities and false positives per image (FPpI). Finally, the effect on the classification performance is described by examining the variation in FPpI at the point where 81% of the malignant masses in the study database are detected. Overall, the findings of the study indicate that increasing the standard deviations of the Gaussians used to construct a DoG filter results in a dramatic decrease in the number of regions identified at the expense of missing a small number of

  19. Roles of biologic breast tissue composition and quantitative image analysis of mammographic images in breast tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Christopher I.; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Shepherd, John

    2014-03-01

    Purpose. Investigate whether knowledge of the biologic image composition of mammographic lesions provides imagebased biomarkers above and beyond those obtainable from quantitative image analysis (QIA) of X-ray mammography. Methods. The dataset consisted of 45 in vivo breast lesions imaged with the novel 3-component breast (3CB) imaging technique based on dual-energy mammography (15 malignant, 30 benign diagnoses). The 3CB composition measures of water, lipid, and protein thicknesses were assessed and mathematical descriptors, `3CB features', were obtained for the lesions and their periphery. The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method obtaining `QIA features' describing morphology and texture. We investigated the correlation within the `3CB features', within the `QIA features', and between the two. In addition, the merit of individual features in the distinction between malignant and benign lesions was assessed. Results. Whereas many descriptors within the `3CB features' and `QIA features' were, often by design, highly correlated, correlation between descriptors of the two feature groups was much weaker (maximum absolute correlation coefficient 0.58, p<0.001) indicating that 3CB and QIA-based biomarkers provided potentially complementary information. Single descriptors from 3CB and QIA appeared equally well-suited for the distinction between malignant and benign lesions, with maximum area under the ROC curve 0.71 for a protein feature (3CB) and 0.71 for a texture feature (QIA). Conclusions. In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of breast tissue composition appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between benign and malignant lesions.

  20. A Review on Automatic Mammographic Density and Parenchymal Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R. E.; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. However, the exact cause(s) of breast cancer still remains unknown. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective way to tackle breast cancer. There are more than 70 common genetic susceptibility factors included in the current non-image-based risk prediction models (e.g., the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick models). Image-based risk factors, such as mammographic densities and parenchymal patterns, have been established as biomarkers but have not been fully incorporated in the risk prediction models used for risk stratification in screening and/or measuring responsiveness to preventive approaches. Within computer aided mammography, automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methods have been developed for estimation of breast tissue composition to facilitate mammographic risk assessment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methodologies developed over the past two decades and the evidence for risk assessment/density classification using segmentation. The aim of this review is to analyse how engineering advances have progressed and the impact automatic mammographic tissue segmentation has in a clinical environment, as well as to understand the current research gaps with respect to the incorporation of image-based risk factors in non-image-based risk prediction models. PMID:26171249

  1. Multiresolution neural networks for mammographic mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Clay D.; Sajda, Paul

    1999-01-01

    We have previously presented a hierarchical pyramid/neural network (HPNN) architecture which combines multi-scale image processing techniques with neural networks. This coarse-to- fine HPNN was designed to learn large-scale context information for detecting small objects. We have developed a similar architecture to detect mammographic masses (malignant tumors). Since masses are large, extended objects, the coarse-to-fine HPNN architecture is not suitable for the problem. Instead we constructed a fine-to- coarse HPNN architecture which is designed to learn small- scale detail structure associated with the extended objects. Our initial result applying the fine-to-coarse HPNN to mass detection are encouraging, with detection performance improvements of about 30%. We conclude that the ability of the HPNN architecture to integrate information across scales, from fine to coarse in the case of masses, makes it well suited for detecting objects which may have detail structure occurring at scales other than the natural scale of the object.

  2. Quantitative and qualitative features of heterologous virus-vector-induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Eiji; Ono, Takeshi; Carnero, Elena; Umemoto, Saori; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kanayama, Atsuhiro; Oguma, Takemi; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Tadakuma, Takushi; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Miyahira, Yasushi

    2010-11-01

    We studied some aspects of the quantitative and qualitative features of heterologous recombinant (re) virus-vector-induced, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells against Trypanosoma cruzi. We used three different, highly attenuated re-viruses, i.e., influenza virus, adenovirus and vaccinia virus, which all expressed a single, T. cruzi antigen-derived CD8(+) T-cell epitope. The use of two out of three vectors or the triple virus-vector vaccination regimen not only confirmed that the re-vaccinia virus, which was placed last in order for sequential immunisation, was an effective booster for the CD8(+) T-cell immunity in terms of the number of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, but also demonstrated that (i) the majority of cells exhibit the effector memory (T(EM)) phenotype, (ii) robustly secrete IFN-γ, (iii) express higher intensity of the CD122 molecule and (iv) present protective activity against T. cruzi infection. In contrast, placing the re-influenza virus last in sequential immunisation had a detrimental effect on the quantitative and qualitative features of CD8(+) T cells. The triple virus-vector vaccination was more effective at inducing a stronger CD8(+) T-cell immunity than using two re-viruses. The different quantitative and qualitative features of CD8(+) T cells induced by different immunisation regimens support the notion that the refinement of the best choice of multiple virus-vector combinations is indispensable for the induction of a maximum number of CD8(+) T cells of high quality. PMID:20620143

  3. Mammographic breast density: effect on imaging and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Renee W; Helvie, Mark A

    2010-10-01

    Mammographic breast density has been studied for more than 30 years. Greater breast density not only is related to decreased sensitivity of mammograms because of a masking effect but also is a major independent risk factor for breast cancer. This article defines breast density and reviews literature on quantification of mammographic density that is key to future clinical and research protocols. Important influences on breast density are addressed, including age, menopausal status, exogenous hormones, and genetics of density. Young women with dense breasts benefit from digital mammographic technique. The potential use of supplemental MRI and ultrasound screening techniques in high-risk women and women with dense breasts is explored, as are potential risk reduction strategies. PMID:20971840

  4. Mammographic computer-aided detection systems.

    PubMed

    2003-04-01

    While mammography is regarded as the best means available to screen for breast cancer, reading mammograms is a tedious, error-prone task. Given the repetitiveness of the process and the fact that less than 1% of mammograms in the average screening population contain cancer, it's no wonder that a significant number of breast cancers--about 28%--are missed by radiologists. The fact that human error is such a significant obstacle makes mammography screening an ideal application for computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. CAD systems serve as a "second pair of eyes" to ensure that radiologists don't miss a suspect area on an image. They analyze patterns on a digitized mammographic image, identify regions that may contain an abnormality indicating cancer, and mark these regions. The marks are then inspected and classified by a radiologist. But CAD systems provide no diagnosis of any kind--it's up to the radiologist to analyze the marked area and decide if it shows cancer. In this Evaluation, we describe the challenges posed by screening mammography, the operating principles and overall efficacy of CAD systems, and the characteristics to consider when purchasing a system. We also compare the performance of two commercially available systems, iCAD's MammoReader and R2's ImageChecker. Because the two systems offer comparable sensitivity, our judgments are based on other performance characteristics, including their ease of use, the number of false marks they produce, the degree to which they can integrate with hospital information systems, and their processing speed. PMID:12760158

  5. Mammographic interpretation training: how useful is handheld technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.; Scott, Hazel

    2008-03-01

    In the UK a national self-assessment scheme (PERFORMS) for mammographers is undertaken as part of the National Health Search Breast Screening Programme. Where appropriate, further training is suggested to improve performance. Ideally, such training would be on-demand; that is whenever and wherever an individual decides to undertake it. To use a portable device for such a purpose would be attractive on many levels. However, it is not known whether handheld technology can be used effectively for viewing mammographic images. Previous studies indicate the potential for viewing medical images with fairly low spatial resolution (e.g. CT, MRI) on PDAs. In this study, we set out to investigate factors that might affect the feasibility of using PDAs as a training technology for examining large, high resolution mammographic images. Two studies are reported: 20 mammographers examined a series of mammograms presented on a PDA, specifying the location of any abnormality. Secondly, a group of technologists examined a series of mammograms presented at different sizes and resolutions to mimic presentation on a PDA and their eye movements were recorded. The results indicate the potential for using PDAs to show such large, high resolution images if suitable Human-computer Interaction (HCI) techniques are employed.

  6. Mammographic density measured as changes in tissue structure caused by HRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Nielsen, Mads

    2006-03-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the relation between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. These studies indicate that women with high breast density have a four to six fold risk increase. An investigation of whether or not this relation is causal is important for, e.g., hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which has been shown to actually increase the density. No gold standard for automatic assessment of mammographic density exists. Manual methods such as Wolfe patterns and BI-RADS are helpful for communication of diagnostic sensitivity, but they are both time consuming and crude. They may be sufficient in certain cases and for single measurements, but for serial, temporal analysis it is necessary to be able to detect more subtle changes and, in addition, to be more reproducible. In this work an automated method for measuring the effect of HRT w.r.t. changes in biological density in the breast is presented. This measure is a novel measure, which provides structural information orthogonal to intensity-based methods. Hessian eigenvalues at different scales are used as features and a clustering of these is employed to divide a mammogram into four structurally different areas. Subsequently, based on the relative size of the areas, a density score is determined. In the experiments, two sets of mammograms of 50 patients from a double blind, placebo controlled HRT experiment were used. The change in density for the HRT group, measured with the new method, was significantly higher (p = 0.0002) than the change in the control group.

  7. A novel approach to computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Sari-Sarraf, H.; Gleason, S.S.; Hudson, K.T.; Hubner, K.F.

    1996-08-01

    This is a work-in-progress report of a research endeavor that deals with the design and development of a novel approach to computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of mammographic images. With the initial emphasis being on the analysis of microcalcifications, the proposed approach defines a synergistic paradigm that utilizes new methodologies together with previously developed techniques. The new paradigm is intended to promote a higher degree of accuracy in CAD of mammograms with an increased overall throughput. The process of accomplishing these goals is initiated by the fractal encoding of the input image, which gives rise to the generation of focus-of-attention regions (FARs), that is, regions that contain anomalies. The primary thrust of this work is to demonstrate that by considering FARs, rather than the entire input image, the performances of the ensuing processes (i.e., segmentation, feature extraction, and classification) are enhanced in terms of accuracy and speed. After presenting the proposed approach to CAD of mammographic images, the paper describes the generation of FARs. Furthermore, an experimental study is included that demonstrates the impact of this front-end procedure on the process of microcalcification segmentation. Specifically, the experimentation reveals a dramatic decrease (increase) in the amount of input data (throughput), as well as a reduction in the number of false detections.

  8. Breast MR Imaging for Equivocal Mammographic Findings: Help or Hindrance?

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Chikarmane, Sona A; Sippo, Dorothy A; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2016-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, because of its extremely high sensitivity in detecting invasive breast cancers, is sometimes used as a diagnostic tool to evaluate equivocal mammographic findings. However, breast MR imaging should never substitute for a complete diagnostic evaluation or for biopsy of suspected, localizable suspicious mammographic lesions, whenever possible. The modality's high cost, in addition to only moderate specificity, mandate that radiologists use it sparingly and with discrimination for problematic mammographic findings. It is rare that the reality or significance of a noncalcified mammographic finding remains equivocal or problematic at diagnostic mammography evaluation, which usually includes targeted ultrasonography (US). There are several reasons for this infrequent occurrence: (a) an asymmetry may persist on diagnostic views but be visible only on craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique projections, precluding three-dimensional localization for US or biopsy, or a lesion may persist on some diagnostic spot views but dissipate or efface on others; (b) uncertainty may exist as to whether apparent change is clinically important or owing to technical factors such as compression or positioning differences; or (c) a lesion may be suspected but biopsy options are limited owing to lack of a US correlate and lesion inaccessibility for stereotactic biopsy, or biopsy of a vague or questionably real lesion has been attempted unsuccessfully. This article will discuss the indications for problem-solving MR imaging for equivocal mammographic findings, present cases illustrating appropriate and inappropriate uses of problem-solving MR imaging, and present false-positive and false-negative cases affecting the specificity of breast MR imaging. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27284757

  9. Hyperspectral analysis for qualitative and quantitative features related to acid mine drainage at a remediated open-pit mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G.; Calvin, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    The exposure of pyrite to oxygen and water in mine waste environments is known to generate acidity and the accumulation of secondary iron minerals. Sulfates and secondary iron minerals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) exhibit diverse spectral properties in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The use of hyperspectral imagery for identification of AMD mineralogy and contamination has been well studied. Fewer studies have examined the impacts of hydrologic variations on mapping AMD or the unique spectral signatures of mine waters. Open-pit mine lakes are an additional environmental hazard which have not been widely studied using imaging spectroscopy. A better understanding of AMD variation related to climate fluctuations and the spectral signatures of contaminated surface waters will aid future assessments of environmental contamination. This study examined the ability of multi-season airborne hyperspectral data to identify the geochemical evolution of substances and contaminant patterns at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site. The mine is located 24 miles southeast of Lake Tahoe and contains remnant tailings piles and several AMD collection ponds. The objectives were to 1) distinguish temporal changes in mineralogy at a the remediated open-pit sulfur mine, 2) identify the absorption features of mine affected waters, and 3) quantitatively link water spectra to known dissolved iron concentrations. Images from NASA's AVIRIS instrument were collected in the spring, summer, and fall seasons for two consecutive years at Leviathan (HyspIRI campaign). Images had a spatial resolution of 15 meters at nadir. Ground-based surveys using the ASD FieldSpecPro spectrometer and laboratory spectral and chemical analysis complemented the remote sensing data. Temporal changes in surface mineralogy were difficult to distinguish. However, seasonal changes in pond water quality were identified. Dissolved ferric iron and chlorophyll

  10. A completely automated CAD system for mass detection in a large mammographic database

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Tangaro, S.

    2006-08-15

    Mass localization plays a crucial role in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for the classification of suspicious regions in mammograms. In this article we present a completely automated classification system for the detection of masses in digitized mammographic images. The tool system we discuss consists in three processing levels: (a) Image segmentation for the localization of regions of interest (ROIs). This step relies on an iterative dynamical threshold algorithm able to select iso-intensity closed contours around gray level maxima of the mammogram. (b) ROI characterization by means of textural features computed from the gray tone spatial dependence matrix (GTSDM), containing second-order spatial statistics information on the pixel gray level intensity. As the images under study were recorded in different centers and with different machine settings, eight GTSDM features were selected so as to be invariant under monotonic transformation. In this way, the images do not need to be normalized, as the adopted features depend on the texture only, rather than on the gray tone levels, too. (c) ROI classification by means of a neural network, with supervision provided by the radiologist's diagnosis. The CAD system was evaluated on a large database of 3369 mammographic images [2307 negative, 1062 pathological (or positive), containing at least one confirmed mass, as diagnosed by an expert radiologist]. To assess the performance of the system, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC analysis were employed. The area under the ROC curve was found to be A{sub z}=0.783{+-}0.008 for the ROI-based classification. When evaluating the accuracy of the CAD against the radiologist-drawn boundaries, 4.23 false positives per image are found at 80% of mass sensitivity.

  11. Classification of mammographic microcalcifications using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitre, Yateen S.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Moskowitz, Myron; Sarwal, Alok; Bonasso, Christine; Narayan, Suresh B.

    1995-05-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death among women. Breast cancer can be detected earlier by mammography than any other non-invasive examination. About 30% to 50% of breast cancers demonstrate tiny granulelike deposits of calcium called microcalcifications. It is difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant cases based on an examination of calcification regions, especially in hard-to-diagnose cases. We investigate the potential of using energy and entropy features computed from wavelet packets for their correlation with malignancy. Two types of Daubechies discrete filters were used as prototype wavelets. The energy and entropy features were computed for 128 benign and 63 malignant cases and analyzed using a multivariate cluster analysis and a univariate statistical analysis to reduce the feature set to a `five best set of features.' The efficacy of the reduced feature set to discriminate between the malignant and benign categories was evaluated using different multilayer perceptron architectures. The multilayer perceptron was trained using the backpropagation algorithm for various training and test set sizes. For each case 40 partitions of the data set were used to set up the training and test sets. The performance of the features was evaluated by computing the best area under the relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the average area under the ROC curve. The performance of the features computed from the wavelet packets was compared to a second set of features consisting of the wavelet packet features, image structure features and cluster features. The classification results are encouraging and indicate the potential of using features derived from wavelet packets in discriminating microcalcification regions into benign and malignant categories.

  12. [Suture foreign body reaction as a mammographic pitfall].

    PubMed

    Plagborg, G J; Andersen, H K

    2000-02-14

    A mammographic pitfall is presented. After lumpectomy owing to cancer in the breast a woman developed an immediate allergic reaction presumably caused by the subcutaneous sutures (vicryl). After adjuvant irradiation the breast became swollen and mammography gave suspicion of a recurrent breast cancer. Surgical excision was performed and examination of the biopsy specimen showed a foreign body reaction to the suture material with fibrosis and eosinophilia. PMID:10740437

  13. PRONET services for distance learning in mammographic image processing.

    PubMed

    Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G; Efstratiou, C; Sakellaropoulos, P; Cavouras, D; Kalogeropoulou, C; Varaki, K; Giannakou, L; Dimopoulos, J

    1997-01-01

    The potential of telematics services is investigated with respect to learning needs of medical physicists and biomedical engineers. Telematics services are integrated into a system, the PRONET, which evolves around multimedia computer based courses and distance tutoring support. In addition, information database access and special interest group support are offered. System architecture is based on a component integration approach. The services are delivered in three modes: LAN, ISDN and Internet. Mammographic image processing is selected as an example content area. PMID:10179585

  14. Relationship between breast sound speed and mammographic percent density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Nebojsa; Boyd, Norman; Littrup, Peter; Myc, Lukasz; Faiz, Muhammad; Li, Cuiping; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    Despite some shortcomings, mammography is currently the standard of care for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. However, breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to overcome the drawbacks of mammography. It is known that women with high breast densities have a greater risk of developing breast cancer. Measuring breast density is accomplished through the use of mammographic percent density, defined as the ratio of fibroglandular to total breast area. Using an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype, we created sound speed images of the patient's breast, motivated by the fact that sound speed in a tissue is proportional to the density of the tissue. The purpose of this work is to compare the acoustic performance of the UST system with the measurement of mammographic percent density. A cohort of 251 patients was studied using both imaging modalities and the results suggest that the volume averaged breast sound speed is significantly related to mammographic percent density. The Spearman correlation coefficient was found to be 0.73 for the 175 film mammograms and 0.69 for the 76 digital mammograms obtained. Since sound speed measurements do not require ionizing radiation or physical compression, they have the potential to form the basis of a safe, more accurate surrogate marker of breast density.

  15. The impact of mammographic density and lesion location on detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine; Lee, Warwick; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz; Reed, Warren; Poulos, Ann; Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the impact of breast density and lesion location on detection. A set of 55 mammographic images (23 abnormal images with 26 lesions and 32 normal images) were examined by 22 expert radiologists. The images were classified by an expert radiologist according to the Synoptic Breast Imaging Report of the National Breast Cancer Centre (NBCC) as having low mammographic density (D1<25% glandular and D2> 25-50% glandular) or high density (D3 51-75% glandular and D4> 75-glandular). The observers freely examined the images and located any malignancy using a 5-point confidence. Performance was defined using the following metrics: sensitivity, location sensitivity, specificity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC Az) curves and jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figures of merit. Significant increases in sensitivity (p= 0.0174) and ROC (p=0.0001) values were noted for the higher density compared with lower density images according to NBCC classification. No differences were seen in radiologists' performance between lesions within or outside the fibroglandular region. In conclusion, analysis of our data suggests that radiologists scored higher using traditional metrics in higher mammographic density images without any improvement in lesion localisation. Lesion location whether within or outside the fibroglandular region appeared to have no impact on detection abilities suggesting that if a masking effect is present the impact is minimal. Eye-tracking analyses are ongoing.

  16. Digital mammographic tumor classification using transfer learning from deep convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Benjamin Q; Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-07-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) show potential for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) by learning features directly from the image data instead of using analytically extracted features. However, CNNs are difficult to train from scratch for medical images due to small sample sizes and variations in tumor presentations. Instead, transfer learning can be used to extract tumor information from medical images via CNNs originally pretrained for nonmedical tasks, alleviating the need for large datasets. Our database includes 219 breast lesions (607 full-field digital mammographic images). We compared support vector machine classifiers based on the CNN-extracted image features and our prior computer-extracted tumor features in the task of distinguishing between benign and malignant breast lesions. Five-fold cross validation (by lesion) was conducted with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve as the performance metric. Results show that classifiers based on CNN-extracted features (with transfer learning) perform comparably to those using analytically extracted features [area under the ROC curve [Formula: see text

  17. Mammographic and clinical characteristics of different phenotypes of screen-detected and interval breast cancers in a nationwide screening program.

    PubMed

    Baré, Marisa; Torà, Núria; Salas, Dolores; Sentís, Melchor; Ferrer, Joana; Ibáñez, Josefa; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Sarriugarte, Garbiñe; Barata, Teresa; Domingo, Laia; Castells, Xavier; Sala, Maria

    2015-11-01

    In the context of a population-based screening program, we aimed to evaluate the major mammographic features and clinicopathological characteristics of breast tumors at diagnosis and the associations between them, focusing on tumors with the worst prognosis. We analyzed cancers diagnosed in a cohort of 645,764 women aged 45-69 years participating in seven population-based screening programs in Spain, between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2006 and followed up until June 2009. We included all interval cancers and a sample of screen-detected cancers, whether invasive or in situ. We compared tumor-related information and breast density for different phenotypes (Triple-negative (TN), HER2+, Luminal B and Luminal A) in screen-detected and interval cancers. We used Chi-square or Fisher's exact test to compare major mammographic features of invasive versus in situ tumors, of screen-detected versus interval cancers, and of different types of interval cancers. We included 2582 tumors (1570 screen-detected and 1012 interval cancers). There were significant differences in the distribution of most clinicopathological variables between screen-detected and interval cancers. Invasive TN interval tumors were more common than other phenotypes in breasts with low mammographic density; three-quarters of these tumors presented as masses without associated calcifications. HER2+ tumors were more common in denser breasts and were associated with calcifications and multifocality. Architectural distortion was more common in Luminal A and Luminal B tumors. Certain radiologic findings are associated with pre-invasive lesions; these differ among invasive tumor phenotypes. We corroborate that TN and HER2+ cancers have distinctive appearances also in the context of population-based screening programs. This information can be useful for establishing protocols for diagnostic strategies in screening units. PMID:26531756

  18. Angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Lena R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that combines tomography with conventional digital mammography. In developing DBT dosimetry, a direct application of mammographic dosimetry has appeal. However, DBT introduces rotation of the x-ray tube relative to the dosimeter, thus raising questions about the angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters. To measure this dependence, two ionization chambers, two solid-stated detectors, and one photodiode were rotated relative to an incident Mo/Mo x-ray beam. In this isocentric DBT simulation, the signal of each dosimeter was studied over an angular range of 180° for tube voltages of 26 to 34 kV. One ionization chamber was then modeled numerically to study the response to various monoenergetic beams. The results show that all dosimeters underestimate dose to varying degrees; solid-state detectors show the greatest angular dependence while ionization chambers show the least. Correction factors were computed from the data for isocentric DBT images using projection angles up to +/-25° these factors ranged from 1.0014 to 1.1380. The magnitude of the angular dependence generally decreased with increasing energy, as shown with both the measured and modeled data. As a result, the error arising in measuring DBT dose with a mammographic dosimeter varies significantly; it cannot always be disregarded. The use of correction factors may be possible but is largely impractical, as they are specific to the dosimeter, x-ray beam, and DBT geometry. Instead, an angle-independent dosimeter may be more suitable for DBT.

  19. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system

    PubMed Central

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman’s density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists’ visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer’s equipment affects a woman’s MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; p<0.001), while the VDG (ρ=0.978; p<0.001) and AvBD% (ρ=0.973; p<0.001) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001). PMID:26158085

  20. Training system for digital mammographic diagnoses of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaz, R. L.; Nirschl Crozara, M. G.; Patrocinio, A. C.

    2013-03-01

    As the technology evolves, the analog mammography systems are being replaced by digital systems. The digital system uses video monitors as the display of mammographic images instead of the previously used screen-film and negatoscope for analog images. The change in the way of visualizing mammographic images may require a different approach for training the health care professionals in diagnosing the breast cancer with digital mammography. Thus, this paper presents a computational approach to train the health care professionals providing a smooth transition between analog and digital technology also training to use the advantages of digital image processing tools to diagnose the breast cancer. This computational approach consists of a software where is possible to open, process and diagnose a full mammogram case from a database, which has the digital images of each of the mammographic views. The software communicates with a gold standard digital mammogram cases database. This database contains the digital images in Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) and the respective diagnoses according to BI-RADSTM, these files are read by software and shown to the user as needed. There are also some digital image processing tools that can be used to provide better visualization of each single image. The software was built based on a minimalist and a user-friendly interface concept that might help in the smooth transition. It also has an interface for inputting diagnoses from the professional being trained, providing a result feedback. This system has been already completed, but hasn't been applied to any professional training yet.

  1. Grid-enabled mammographic auditing and training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    Effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing secure grid-enabled healthcare provision. In the UK, a large-scale collaborative research project (GIMI: Generic Infrastructures for Medical Informatics), which is concerned with the development of a secure IT infrastructure to support very widespread medical research across the country, is underway. In the UK, there are some 109 breast screening centers and a growing number of individuals (circa 650) nationally performing approximately 1.5 million screening examinations per year. At the same, there is a serious, and ongoing, national workforce issue in screening which has seen a loss of consultant mammographers and a growth in specially trained technologists and other non-radiologists. Thus there is a need to offer effective and efficient mammographic training so as to maintain high levels of screening skills. Consequently, a grid based system has been proposed which has the benefit of offering very large volumes of training cases that the mammographers can access anytime and anywhere. A database, spread geographically across three university systems, of screening cases is used as a test set of known cases. The GIMI mammography training system first audits these cases to ensure that they are appropriately described and annotated. Subsequently, the cases are utilized for training in a grid-based system which has been developed. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of such a grid based approach.

  2. Classification of mammographic masses: use and influence of a bilateral-filter-based flat-texture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Florian; Elter, Matthias; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Computer-assisted diagnosis (CADx) for the interactive characterization of mammographic masses as benign or malignant has a high potential to help radiologists during the critical process of diagnostic decision making. By default, the characterization of mammographic masses is performed by extracting features from a region of interest (ROI) depicting the mass. To investigate the influence of a so-called bilateral filter based emph{flat texture} (FT) preprocessing step on the classification performance, textural as well as frequency-based features are calculated in the ROI, in the core of the mass and in the mass margin for preprocessed and unprocessed images. Furthermore. the influence of the parameterization of the bilateral filter on the classification performance is investigated. Additionally, as reference Median and Gaussian filters have been used to compute the FT image and the resulting classification performances of the feature extractors are compared to those obtained with the bilateral filters. Classification is done using a k-NN classifier. The classification performance was evaluated using the area Az under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A publicly available mammography database was used as reference image data set. The results show that the proposed FT preprocessing step has a positive influence on the texture-based feature extractors while most of the frequency-based feature extractors perform better on the unprocessed images. For some of the features the original Az could be improved up to 10%. The comparison of the bilateral filter approach with the Median and Gaussian filter approaches showed the superiority of the bilateral filter.

  3. Classification of mammographic lesion based in Completed Local Binary Pattern and using multiresolution representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Y. A. S.; Nascimento, M. Z.; Oliveira, D. L. L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two methods for features extraction of mammograms based in completed local binary pattern (CLBP) and wavelet transform. In first part, CLBP was applied in digitized mammograms. In second part, we applied CLBP in the sub-bands obtained from the wavelet multi-resolution representation of the mammographies. In this study, we evaluated the CLBP in the image in the spatial domain and in the sub-bands obtained with wavelet transform. Then, the statistical technique of variance analysis (ANOVA) was used to reduce the number of features. Finally, the classifier Support Vector Machine (SVM) was applied in the samples. The proposed methods were tested on 720 mammographies which 240 was diagnosed as normal samples, 240 as benign lesion and 240 as malign lesion. The images were obtained randomly of the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). The system effectiveness was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The experiments demonstrate that the textural feature extraction of the multi-resolution representation was more relevant with value of AUC=1.0. In our experiments, CLBP in the spatial domain resulted in value of AUC=0.89. The proposed method demonstrated promising results in the classification of different classes of mammographic lesions.

  4. Associations between soy, diet, reproductive factors, and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Ursin, Giske; Sun, Can-Lan; Koh, Woon-Puay; Khoo, Kei-Siong; Gao, Fei; Wu, Anna H; Yu, Mimi C

    2006-01-01

    Although the evidence is not completely consistent, soy intake has been inversely associated with breast cancer risk, and the strongest results have been observed in certain Asian populations. To address this issue and to examine the association between mammographic density and reproductive factors in this population, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of mammograms and validated food-frequency questionnaires from 380 Chinese women living in Singapore. Percent mammographic density, a biomarker for breast cancer risk, was assessed using a validated computer-assisted method. We used generalized linear models to estimate mean mammographic density by quartiles of soy intake and intake of other dietary factors while adjusting for potential confounders. Percent mammographic density was inversely associated with age, body mass index, parity, breastfeeding, and soy intake. The difference in mammographic density between the highest and lowest quartiles of soy intake was 4-5%; this difference was statistically significant for soy protein and soy isoflavone intake and is similar in magnitude to what has been reported in Western populations when women undergo menopause or commence hormone therapy. We found no evidence that high fiber, fruit, or vegetable intake has protective effects on mammographic density. Our results suggest that the effect of soy intake on percent mammographic density is moderate but possibly of clinical relevance. PMID:17474857

  5. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  6. Improved fracture detection using the mammographic film-screen combination

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, BJJ; Ng, KH

    2005-01-01

    Aim The single emulsion or single screen system is usually reserved for mammography since its use in general radiography is limited. The purpose of this study is to compare the mammographic film-screen combination (MFC) and the standard film-screen combination (SFC) in terms of fracture and soft tissue injuries detection. Patients, methods and materials In this prospective study, 41 patients from Accident and Emergency suspected of having injury in the hands, wrists, ankles and feet regions were radiographed using both MFC and SFC. These were compared in terms of image quality, presence of fractures and soft tissue injuries. The two different film-screen combinations were also compared in terms of detection of bony fragments, film characteristics such as film speed, contrast and spatial resolution, dose and cost. Results The MFC gives statistically better image quality compared to SFC. In 10% of patients, fractures were detected only in the MFC, which also detects tiny bone fragments that may not be resolved by the SFC. The spatial resolution of the MFC is greater than the SFC. The film speed and contrast of the MFC are lower than that of the SFC. The doses of MFC were higher compared to SFC. Conclusions The MFC detects fractures better compared with SFC. However, the entrance skin dose for the mammographic film-screen combination was about 35% to 55% higher than the standard film-screen combination. PMID:21625275

  7. Evaluation of four mammographic density measures on HRT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Pettersen, Paola; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the relation between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. These studies indicate that women with dense breasts have a four to six fold risk increase. There is currently no gold standard for automatic assessment of mammographic density. In previous work two different automated methods for measuring the effect of HRT w.r.t. changes in breast density have been presented. One is a percentage density based on an adaptive global threshold, and the other is an intensity invariant measure, which provides structural information orthogonal to intensity-based methods. In this article we investigate the ability to detect density changes induced by HRT for these measures and compare to a radiologist's BI-RADS rating and interactive threshold percentage density. In the experiments, two sets of mammograms of 80 patients from a double blind, placebo controlled HRT experiment are used. The p-values for the statistical significance of the separation of density means, for the HRT group and the placebo group at end of study, are 0.2, 0.1, 0.02 and 0.02 for the automatic threshold, BI-RADS, the stripyness and the interactive threshold respectively.

  8. Computerized quantitative evaluation of mammographic accreditation phantom images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Shinohara, Norimitsu

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The objective was to develop and investigate an automated scoring scheme of the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic accreditation phantom (RMI 156, Middleton, WI) images. Methods: The developed method consisted of background subtraction, determination of region of interest, classification of fiber and mass objects by Mahalanobis distance, detection of specks by template matching, and rule-based scoring. Fifty-one phantom images were collected from 51 facilities for this study (one facility provided one image). A medical physicist and two radiologic technologists also scored the images. The human and computerized scores were compared. Results: In terms of meeting the ACR's criteria, the accuracies of the developed method for computerized evaluation of fiber, mass, and speck were 90%, 80%, and 98%, respectively. Contingency table analysis revealed significant association between observer and computer scores for microcalcifications (p<5%) but not for masses and fibers. Conclusions: The developed method may achieve a stable assessment of visibility for test objects in mammographic accreditation phantom image in whether the phantom image meets the ACR's criteria in the evaluation test, although there is room left for improvement in the approach for fiber and mass objects.

  9. CADx of mammographic masses and clustered microcalcifications: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Elter, Matthias; Horsch, Alexander

    2009-06-15

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in the western world. While mammography is regarded as the most effective tool for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, the interpretation of mammograms is a difficult and error-prone task. Hence, computer aids have been developed that assist the radiologist in the interpretation of mammograms. Computer-aided detection (CADe) systems address the problem that radiologists often miss signs of cancers that are retrospectively visible in mammograms. Furthermore, computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) systems have been proposed that assist the radiologist in the classification of mammographic lesions as benign or malignant. While a broad variety of approaches to both CADe and CADx systems have been published in the past two decades, an extensive survey of the state of the art is only available for CADe approaches. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the state of the art of CADx approaches is presented in this work. Besides providing a summary, the goals for this article are to identify relations, contradictions, and gaps in literature, and to suggest directions for future research. Because of the vast amount of publications on the topic, this survey is restricted to the two most important types of mammographic lesions: masses and clustered microcalcifications. Furthermore, it focuses on articles published in international journals.

  10. Increases in Serum Estrone Sulfate Level Are Associated with Increased Mammographic Density during Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J.; Guan, Min; Laughlin, Gail A.; Ursin, Giske A.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Ingles, Sue A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Greendale, Gail A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. We determined whether increases in serum estrone sulfate (E1S) levels during menopausal hormone therapy predict increased mammographic density. Methods We measured percent mammographic density and serum E1S levels in 428 participants of the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions study who were randomly assigned to daily conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) 0.625 mg alone, CEE + daily medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) 2.5 mg, CEE + cyclical MPA (10 mg days 1-12 per 28-day cycle), or CEE + cyclical micronized progesterone (10 mg days 1-12). Serum E1S levels were determined by RIA. Information about covariates was determined by annual questionnaire. Using linear regression, we determined the association between change in E1S level from baseline to 12 months and change in percent mammographic density (by semiquantitative interactive threshold method). Results After controlling for baseline mammographic density, age, body mass index, alcohol intake, parity, smoking, ethnicity, physical activity, and age at first pregnancy, mammographic density increased by 1.3% for every 1 ng/mL increase in E1S level (P < 0.0001). The association between change in E1S level and change in mammographic density differed by treatment group (greater effect in CEE + cyclical MPA group versus CEE group; P = 0.05). After controlling for treatment group, change in the ratio of E1S to E1 was also positively associated with change in mammographic density. Conclusions Increases in serum E1S levels during menopausal hormone therapy are associated with increases in mammographic density. The relative contribution of E1S and E1 to stimulation of breast tissue awaits further elucidation. PMID:18628419

  11. Cyclic endogenous estrogen and progesterone vary by mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Anita; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Flote, Vidar G.; Finstad, Sissi Espetvedt; McTiernan, Anne; Ursin, Giske; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ellison, Peter T.; Jasienska, Grazyna; Thune, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and progesterone are key factors in the development of breast cancer, but it remains unclear whether these hormones are associated with mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women. We measured percent mammographic density, nondense area, and absolute mammographic density using computer-assisted breast density readings (Madena) from digitized mammograms taken on a scheduled day of the menstrual cycle (day 7–12) among 202 healthy, premenopausal women (Energy Balance and Breast cancer Aspects Study-I). Daily salivary concentrations of 17β-estradiol and progesterone throughout an entire menstrual cycle and fasting morning serum concentrations of hormones on 3 specific days of the menstrual cycle were assessed. Salivary and serum 17β-estradiol and progesterone were positively associated with percent mammographic density, we observed by 1 SD increase in overall salivary estradiol (β-value equal to 2.07, P=0.044), luteal salivary progesterone (β-value equal to 2.40, P=0.020). Women with above-median percent mammographic density had a 20% higher mean salivary 17β-estradiol level throughout the menstrual cycle. The odds ratio for having above-median percent mammographic density (>28.5%) per 1 SD increase in overall salivary 17β-estradiol was 1.66 (95% confidence interval 1.13–2.45). Women in the top tertile of the overall average daily 17β-estradiol concentrations had an odds ratio of 2.54 (confidence interval 1.05–6.16) of above-median percent mammographic density compared with women in the bottom tertile. Our finding of a relationship between estrogen, progesterone, and percent mammographic density and not with other mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women is biologically plausible, but needs to be replicated in larger studies. PMID:25714648

  12. Erythrocyte Omega-6 and Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Mammographic Breast Density

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Alana G.; Reeves, Katherine W.; Modugno, Francesmary; Wilson, John W.; Evans, Rhobert W.; Vogel, Victor G.; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Simpson, Jennifer; Weissfeld, Joel L.

    2013-01-01

    Diets low in omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high in omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs may protect against breast cancer development. Associations of PUFA intake with mammographic density, an intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, have been inconsistent; however, prior studies have relied on self-reported dietary PUFA intake. We examined the association between circulating erythrocyte n-6 and n-3 PUFAs with mammographic density in 248 postmenopausal women who were not taking exogenous hormones. PUFAs in erythrocytes were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, and mammographic density was assessed quantitatively by planimetry. Spearman’s correlation coefficients and generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationships between PUFA measures and mammographic density. None of the erythrocyte n-6 or n-3 PUFA measures were associated with percent density or dense breast area. PMID:23530640

  13. [Sensitometry of Mammographic Screen-film System Using Bootstrap Aluminum Step-Wedge.].

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinji; Imada, Ryou; Terauchi, Takashi; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Monma, Masahiko; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Mochizuki, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    Recently, a few types of step-wedges for bootstrap sensitometry with a mammographic screen-film system have been proposed. In this study, the bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system was studied for two types of aluminum step-wedges. Characteristic X-ray energy curves were determined using mammographic and general radiographic aluminum step-wedges devised to prevent scattered X-rays generated from one step penetrating into the region of another one, and dependence of the characteristic curves on the wedges was also discussed. No difference was found in the characteristic curves due to the difference in the step-wedges for mammography and general radiography although there was a slight difference in shape at the shoulder portion for the two types of step-wedges. Therefore, it was concluded that aluminum step-wedges for mammography and general radiography could be employed in bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system. PMID:16479054

  14. [Mammographic evaluation of dense breasts: techniques and limits].

    PubMed

    Chérel, P; Hagay, C; Benaim, B; De Maulmont, C; Engerand, S; Langer, A; Talma, V

    2008-09-01

    Breast density is a radiological concept based on the proportion of radiopaque glandular tissue relative to radiolucent fatty tissue. Mammographic evaluation of dense breasts is more difficult, related to technical difficulties, with decreased rates for detection and characterization of breast lesions, resulting in reduced sensitivity with increased number of interval cancers at routine follow-up when compared to radiolucent breasts. We will review the definition of dense breasts and their frequency, especially their relationship with the age of patients. We will discuss the current technical problems and the impact of breast density on the efficacy of conventional mammography. We will discuss the value of digital mammography, the role of computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) systems and tomosynthesis in the evaluation of dense breasts. PMID:18772800

  15. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Huo, Zhimin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Chinander, Michael R.; Lan, Li; Bonta, Ioana R.

    2003-05-01

    Mammographic parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk. Fractal-based texture analyses, including box-counting methods and Minkowski dimension, were performed within parenchymal regions of normal mammograms of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation carriers and within those of women at low risk for developing breast cancer. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized radiographic markers in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. A multifractal phenomenon was observed with the fractal analyses. The high frequency component of fractal dimension from the conventional box-counting technique yielded an Az value of 0.84 in differentiating between two groups, while using the LDA to estimate the fractal dimension yielded an Az value of 0.91 for the high frequency component. An Az value of 0.82 was obtained with fractal dimensions extracted using the Minkowski algorithm.

  16. A spatial shape constrained clustering method for mammographic mass segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jian-Yong; Yang, Xu-Lei; Cao, Ai-Ze

    2015-01-01

    A novel clustering method is proposed for mammographic mass segmentation on extracted regions of interest (ROIs) by using deterministic annealing incorporating circular shape function (DACF). The objective function reported in this study uses both intensity and spatial shape information, and the dominant dissimilarity measure is controlled by two weighting parameters. As a result, pixels having similar intensity information but located in different regions can be differentiated. Experimental results shows that, by using DACF, the mass segmentation results in digitized mammograms are improved with optimal mass boundaries, less number of noisy patches, and computational efficiency. An average probability of segmentation error of 7.18% for well-defined masses (or 8.06% for ill-defined masses) was obtained by using DACF on MiniMIAS database, with 5.86% (or 5.55%) and 6.14% (or 5.27%) improvements as compared to the standard DA and fuzzy c-means methods. PMID:25737739

  17. Supplementary screening sonography in mammographically dense breast: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Sonography is an attractive supplement to mammography in breast cancer screening because it is relatively inexpensive, requires no contrast-medium injection, is well tolerated by patients, and is widely available for equipment as compared with MRI. Sonography has been especially valuable for women with mammographically dense breast because it has consistently been able to detect a substantial number of cancers at an early stage. Despite these findings, breast sonography has known limitations as a screening tool; operator-dependence, the shortage of skilled operators, the inability to detect microcalcifications, and substantially higher false-positive rates than mammography. Further study of screening sonography is still ongoing and is expected to help establish the role of screening sonography. PMID:21076583

  18. Premenopausal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, mammographic density, and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Kimberly A; Rosner, Bernard; Eliassen, A Heather; Hankinson, Susan E; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Willett, Walter; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence for an association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and breast cancer is inconsistent. Data are especially limited for premenopausal women and for associations with mammographic density. To test the hypothesis that plasma concentration of 25(OH)D is associated with mammographic density, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 835 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Studies. We measured 25(OH)D in blood samples and used multivariable linear regression to quantify the association of average percent density by quartile of plasma 25(OH)D. In a nested case-control analysis including 493 breast cancer cases, we evaluated risk of breast cancer associated with vitamin D status within tertiles of mammographic density. Women in the top quartile of plasma 25(OH)D levels had an average percent breast density 5.2 percentage points higher than women in the bottom quartile (95 % confidence interval: 1.8, 8.7; P trend <0.01), after adjusting for predictors of 25(OH)D and established breast cancer risk factors. Plasma 25(OH)D concentration was significantly inversely associated with breast cancer risk among women with high mammographic density (P trend < 0.01) but not among women in lower tertiles of mammographic density (P-interaction < 0.01). These results do not support the hypothesis that vitamin D is inversely associated with percent mammographic density in premenopausal women. There was evidence that the association between premenopausal 25(OH)D and breast cancer risk varies by mammographic density, with an inverse association apparent only among women with high mammographic density. PMID:25543181

  19. Premenopausal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, mammographic density, and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Rosner, Bernard; Eliassen, A. Heather; Hankinson, Susan E.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Willett, Walter; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Epidemiologic evidence for an association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and breast cancer is inconsistent. Data are especially limited for premenopausal women and for associations with mammographic density. Methods To test the hypothesis that plasma concentration of 25(OH)D is associated with mammographic density, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 835 premenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Studies. We measured 25(OH)D in blood samples and used multivariable linear regression to quantify the association of average percent density by quartile of plasma 25(OH)D. In a nested case-control analysis including 493 breast cancer cases, we evaluated risk of breast cancer associated with vitamin D status within tertiles of mammographic density. Results Women in the top quartile of plasma 25(OH)D levels had an average percent breast density 5.2 percentage points higher than women in the bottom quartile (95% confidence interval: 1.8, 8.7; P-trend <0.01), after adjusting for predictors of 25(OH)D and established breast cancer risk factors. Plasma 25(OH)D concentration was significantly inversely associated with breast cancer risk among women with high mammographic density (odds ratio comparing top to bottom tertile of 25(OH)D = 0.50; 95% confidence interval= 0.30, 0.83; P-trend <0.01) but not among women in lower tertiles of mammographic density (P-interaction <0.01). Conclusions These results do not support the hypothesis that vitamin D is inversely associated with percent mammographic density in premenopausal women. There was evidence that the association between premenopausal 25(OH)D and breast cancer risk varies by mammographic density, with an inverse association apparent only among women with high mammographic density. PMID:25543181

  20. Green Tea, Soy, and Mammographic Density in Singapore Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Anna H.; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Khoo, Kei-Siong; Yu, Mimi C.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence from observational studies that breast cancer risk is inversely associated with soy and green tea consumption. We investigated the effects of these two dietary agents on mammographic density, a well-established biomarker for breast cancer risk, in a cross-sectional analysis of mammograms and validated food frequency questionnaires from 3,315 Chinese women in Singapore. Percent mammographic density (PMD) was assessed using a reproducible computer-assisted method. We used generalized linear models to estimate PMD by intake of soy, green tea, and black tea while adjusting for potential confounders. Daily green tea drinkers showed statistically significantly lower PMD (19.5%) than non-tea drinkers (21.7%; P = 0.002) after adjusting for relevant covariates. This difference in PMD between daily green tea drinkers and non-tea drinkers remained statistically significant after adjustment for soy (P = 0.002); the effect was more apparent among lower soy consumers (Q1–Q3; 21.9% versus 19.4%; P = 0.002) than in higher (Q4) consumers (20.9% versus 19.5%; P = 0.32). Black tea intake was unrelated to PMD. Only among postmenopausal women who reported very high soy intake (Q4) compared with those with less soy intake was there any association noted between PMD and soy intake (18.9% versus 20.5%; P = 0.035). Following adjustment for green tea intake, the association between soy and PMD was no longer statistically significant (P = 0.52). Our findings suggest that both regular green tea and high soy intake may have beneficial effects on the breast; the effect of green tea on PMD may be stronger than the effect of soy. PMID:19064551

  1. Metabolic syndrome and mammographic density in Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Megan; Biessy, Carine; Lajous, Martin; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Romieu, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer; however little is known about the association between metabolic syndrome and percent mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 789 premenopausal and 322 postmenopausal women in the Mexican Teacher's Cohort (ESMaestras). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition. We measured percent density on mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the association between density and metabolic syndrome, as well as its components by state (Jalisco, Veracruz) and menopausal status (premenopausal, postmenopausal). Results Among premenopausal women in Jalisco, women with metabolic syndrome had higher percent density compared to those without after adjusting for potential confounders including BMI (difference = 4.76, 95%CI: 1.72, 7.81). Among the metabolic syndrome components, only low high-density lipoprotein levels (<50mg/dl) were associated with significantly higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco (difference=4.62, 95%CI: 1.73, 7.52). Metabolic syndrome was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz (difference=-2.91, 95% CI: -7.19, 1.38), nor among postmenopausal women in either state. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome was associated with higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco, Mexico, but was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz, Mexico or among postmenopausal women in either Jalisco or Veracruz. These findings provide some support for a possible role of metabolic syndrome in mammographic density among premenopausal women; however results were inconsistent across states and require further confirmation in larger studies. PMID:23682074

  2. Urinary Cadmium and Mammographic Density in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Shafer, Martin M.; Atkinson, Charlotte; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Newton, Katherine M.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk, is influenced by genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. Cadmium, a persistent and widespread environmental pollutant, has been associated with risk of breast cancer, and laboratory evidence suggests cadmium is a carcinogen in the breast. We investigated the hypothesis that cadmium exposure is associated with higher MD. Methods In a cross-sectional study of MD and urinary cadmium concentration, percentage MD (MD%) and Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data Systems (BI-RADS ®) density category were determined from screening mammograms of 190 premenopausal women ages 40–45 years. Women completed a health questionnaire, and the cadmium content of spot urine samples was measured with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and corrected for urine creatinine. Urinary cadmium concentrations are thought to reflect exposure to cadmium over a period of 20–30 years. Multivariable linear regression and logistic regression were used to estimate the strength of association between urinary cadmium and mammographic breast density. Results Adjusted mean MD% among women in the upper tertile of creatinine-corrected urine cadmium was 4.6% higher (95% confidence interval (CI): −2.3 to 11.6%) than in women in the lowest cadmium tertile. Each two-fold increase in urine cadmium was associated with higher odds of MD% in the upper tertile (odds ratio(OR): 1.29, 95% CI: 0.82–2.02) or a BI-RADS category rating of “extremely dense” (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.14–2.70). Stronger associations were observed among nulliparous women, and current or former smokers. Conclusions Exposure to cadmium may be associated with increased breast density in premenopausal women. PMID:21327468

  3. Predictive Modeling of Human Perception Subjectivity: Feasibility Study of Mammographic Lesion Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songhua; Tourassi, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    The majority of clinical content-based image retrieval (CBIR) studies disregard human perception subjectivity, aiming to duplicate the consensus expert assessment of the visual similarity on example cases. The purpose of our study is twofold: (i) discern better the extent of human perception subjectivity when assessing the visual similarity of two images with similar semantic content, and (ii) explore the feasibility of personalized predictive modeling of visual similarity. We conducted a human observer study in which five observers of various expertise were shown ninety-nine triplets of mammographic masses with similar BI-RADS descriptors and were asked to select the two masses with the highest visual relevance. Pairwise agreement ranged between poor and fair among the five observers, as assessed by the kappa statistic. The observers' self-consistency rate was remarkably low, based on repeated questions where either the orientation or the presentation order of a mass was changed. Various machine learning algorithms were explored to determine whether they can predict each observer's personalized selection using textural features. Many algorithms performed with accuracy that exceeded each observer's self-consistency rate, as determined using a cross-validation scheme. This accuracy was statistically significantly higher than would be expected by chance alone (two-tailed p-value ranged between 0.001 and 0.01 for all five personalized models). The study confirmed that human perception subjectivity should be taken into account when developing CBIR-based medical applications.

  4. Sampling in Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    LUBORSKY, MARK R.; RUBINSTEIN, ROBERT L.

    2011-01-01

    In gerontology the most recognized and elaborate discourse about sampling is generally thought to be in quantitative research associated with survey research and medical research. But sampling has long been a central concern in the social and humanistic inquiry, albeit in a different guise suited to the different goals. There is a need for more explicit discussion of qualitative sampling issues. This article will outline the guiding principles and rationales, features, and practices of sampling in qualitative research. It then describes common questions about sampling in qualitative research. In conclusion it proposes the concept of qualitative clarity as a set of principles (analogous to statistical power) to guide assessments of qualitative sampling in a particular study or proposal. PMID:22058580

  5. The relative effect of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality by socioeconomic status

    PubMed Central

    Ripping, Theodora M.; van der Waal, Danielle; Verbeek, André L.M.; Broeders, Mireille J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer incidence and mortality are higher in women with a high socioeconomic status (SES). The potential to prevent death from breast cancer is therefore greater in the high SES group. This does, however, require that the effectiveness of screening in the high SES group is equal to or greater than the effectiveness in the low SES group. The aim of this study is to assess the relative effectiveness of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality by SES. In Nijmegen, the Netherlands, women are invited to participate in biennial mammographic screening since 1975. Postal code is collected at each round and is used to calculate the SES of each woman based on the SES indicator of the Netherlands Institute for Social Research. The Dutch average was used to classify the SES score of each woman as either high or low. We designed a case-control study to investigate the effect of mammographic screening in women aged 50 to 75, 40 to 75, and 50 to 69 years, and calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among the women invited to the mammographic screening program in Nijmegen, 10% had a high SES. In women aged 50 to 75 years, the breast cancer death rate was 38% lower in screened women than in unscreened women. The ORs for women with high SES (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.31–2.19) and low SES did not differ significantly (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47–0.78). Mammographic screening reduces breast cancer mortality, but we did not observe a significant difference in the relative effectiveness of screening by SES. If the effectiveness of mammographic screening is indeed not dependent on SES status, the absolute number of breast cancer deaths prevented by mammographic screening will be greater in the high SES than low SES group, because women with a high SES have a greater risk of breast cancer death. PMID:27495038

  6. Mammographic density in relation to daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in overweight, postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; McTiernan, Anne; Aiello, Erin J; Thomas, Wendy K; LaCroix, Kristin; Schramm, Judy; Schwartz, Stephen M; Holt, Victoria L; Lampe, Johanna W

    2004-07-01

    Circulating hormones are associated with mammographic density, an intermediate marker of breast cancer risk. Differences in circulating hormones, including estrone and testosterone, have been observed in premenopausal women based on their capacity to metabolize daidzein, an isoflavone found predominantly in soybeans. Equol and O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) are products of intestinal bacterial metabolism of daidzein. There is interindividual variability in the capacity to produce daidzein metabolites; individuals can be equol producers or non-producers and O-DMA producers or non-producers. We tested the hypothesis that daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes are associated with mammographic density. Participants were recruited from among 92 sedentary, postmenopausal women, ages 50 to 75 years, who participated in a 1-year physical activity intervention. Pre-intervention mammographic density was determined using a computer-assisted, gray-scale thresholding technique. Fifty-five of these women consumed supplemental soy protein (>10 mg daidzein/d) for 3 days and collected a first-void urine sample on the fourth day to determine daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes. Equol and O-DMA concentrations were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Associations between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and percent mammographic density were adjusted for age, maximum adult weight, gravidity, family history of breast cancer, and serum follicle-stimulating hormone and free testosterone concentrations. Mammographic density was 39% lower in equol producers compared with non-producers (P = 0.04). O-DMA producers had mammographic density 69% greater than non-producers (P = 0.05). These results suggest that particular intestinal bacterial profiles are associated with postmenopausal mammographic density, and these associations are not entirely explained by differences in reproductive or anthropometric characteristics or circulating hormones. PMID:15247126

  7. Association of a mammographic parenchymal pattern (MPP) descriptor with breast cancer risk: a case-control study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Zhou, Chuan; Helvie, Mark A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman

    2010-03-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of improving breast cancer risk prediction by computerized mammographic parenchymal pattern (MPP) analysis. A case-control study was conducted to investigate the association of the MPP measures with breast cancer risk. The case group included 168 contralateral CC-view mammograms of breast cancer patients dated at least one year prior to cancer diagnosis, and the control group included 522 CC-view mammograms from one breast of normal subjects. We extracted and compared four types of statistical texture feature spaces that included run length statistics and region size statistics (RLS/RSS) features, spatial gray level dependence (SGLD) features, gray level difference statistics (GLDS) features, and the feature space combining these three types of texture features. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with stepwise feature selection was trained and tested with leave-one-case-out resampling to evaluate whether the breast parenchyma of future cancer patients could be distinguished from those of normal subjects in each feature space. The areas under ROC curves (Az) were 0.71, 0.72, 0.71 and 0.76 for the four feature spaces, respectively. The Az obtained from the combined feature space was significantly (p<0.05) higher than those from the individual feature spaces. Odd ratios (OR) were used to assess the association between breast cancer risk and four categories of MPP measures: <0.1 (C1), 0.1-0.15 (C2), 0.15-0.2 (C3), and >0.2 (C4) while patient age was treated as a confounding factor. The adjusted ORs of breast cancer for C2, C3 and C4 were 3.23, 7.77 and 25.43, respectively. The preliminary result indicated that our proposed computerized MPP measures were strongly associated with breast cancer risk.

  8. Can mammographic assessments lead to consider density as a risk factor for breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Colin, C; Prince, V; Valette, P J

    2013-03-01

    Admitting that mammographic breast density is an important independent risk factor for breast cancer in the general population, has a crucial economical health care impact, since it might lead to increasing screening frequency or reinforcing additional modalities. Thus, the impact of density as a risk factor has to be carefully investigated and might be debated. Some authors suggested that high density would be either a weak factor or confused with a masking effect. Others concluded that most of the studies have methodological biases in basic physics to quantify percentage of breast density, as well as in mammographic acquisition parameters. The purpose of this review is to evaluate mammographic procedures and density assessments in published studies regarding density as a breast cancer risk. No standardization was found in breast density assessments and compared density categories. High density definitions varied widely from 25 to 75% of dense tissues on mammograms. Some studies showed an insufficient follow-up to reveal masking effect related to mammographic false negatives. Evaluating breast density impact needs thorough studies with consensual mammographic procedures, methods of density measurement, breast density classification as well as a standardized definition of high breast density. Digital mammography, more effective in dense breasts, should help to re-evaluate the issue of density as a risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:20133095

  9. Stress Signaling from Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Contributes to Phenotypes of Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared to epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g. activin A, CD36) to prevent breast cancer. PMID:25172842

  10. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M L; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J; Jud, Sebastian M; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Douglas, Julie A; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Ursin, Giske; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela N; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Fasching, Peter A; Pankratz, V Shane; Hopper, John L; Vachon, Celine M

    2015-06-15

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk, but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute nondense area adjusted for study, age, and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1), and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all P < 10(-5)). Of 41 recently discovered breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and nondense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute nondense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiologic pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk. PMID:25862352

  11. Hormone metabolism genes and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Su, Yu-Chen; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Hsu, Chris; Van den Berg, David; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Female steroid hormone levels and exogenous hormone use influence breast cancer risk. We investigated the association between genetic variation in the hormone metabolism and signaling pathway and mammographic density (MD), a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. Methods We genotyped 161 SNPs in 15 hormone metabolism pathway gene regions and evaluated MD in 2,038 Singapore Chinese women. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate SNP-MD association. An overall pathway summary was obtained using the adaptive ranked truncated product test. Results We did not find any of the individually tested SNPs to be associated with MD after a multiple testing correction. There was no evidence of an overall effect on MD of genetic variation in the hormone metabolism pathway. Conclusions In this cross-sectional study, genetic variation in hormone metabolism pathway was not associated with MD in Singapore Chinese women. Impact Consistent with existing data from Caucasian populations, polymorphisms in hormone pathway genes are not likely to be strong predictors of MD in Asian women. PMID:23429186

  12. Role of computer-assisted visual search in mammographic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodine, Calvin F.; Kundel, Harold L.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Weinstein, Susan P.

    2001-06-01

    We used eye-position data to develop Computer-Assisted Visual Search (CAVS) as an aid to mammographic interpretation. CAVS feeds back regions of interest that receive prolonged visual dwell (greater than or equal to 1000 ms) by highlighting them on the mammogram. These regions are then reevaluated for possible missed breast cancers. Six radiology residents and fellows interpreted a test set of 40 mammograms twice, once with CAVS feedback (FB), and once without CAVS FB in a crossover, repeated- measures design. Eye position was monitored. LROC performance (area) was compared with and without CAVS FB. Detection and localization of malignant lesions improved 12% with CAVS FB. This was not significant. The test set contained subtle malignant lesions. 65% (176/272) of true lesions were fixated. Of those fixated, 49% (87/176) received prolonged attention resulting in CAVS FB, and 54% (47/87) of FBs resulted in TPs. Test-set difficulty and the lack of reading experience of the readers may have contributed to the relatively low overall performance, and may have also limited the effectiveness of CAVS FB which could only play a role in localizing potential lesions if the reader fixated and dwelled on them.

  13. Local mammographic density as a predictor of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Mayu; Harkness, Elaine F.; Chen, Xin; Moschidis, Emmanouil; Bydder, Megan; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, Gareth D.; Howell, Anthony; Stavrinos, Paula; Wilson, Mary; Astley, Susan M.

    2015-03-01

    High overall mammographic density is associated with both an increased risk of developing breast cancer and the risk of cancer being masked. We compared local density at cancer sites in diagnostic images with corresponding previous screening mammograms (priors), and matched controls. VolparaTM density maps were obtained for 54 mammograms showing unilateral breast cancer and their priors which had been previously read as normal. These were each matched to 3 controls on age, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy usage, body mass index and year of prior. Local percent density was computed in 15mm square regions at lesion sites and similar locations in the corresponding images. Conditional logistic regression was used to predict case-control status. In diagnostic and prior images, local density was increased at the lesion site compared with the opposite breast (medians 21.58%, 9.18%, p<0.001 diagnostic; 18.82%, 9.45%, p <0.001 prior). Women in the highest tertile of local density in priors were more likely to develop cancer than those in the lowest tertile (OR 42.09, 95% CI 5.37-329.94). Those in the highest tertile of VolparaTM gland volume were also more likely to develop cancer (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.30-6.42). Local density is increased where cancer will develop compared with corresponding regions in the opposite breast and matched controls, and its measurement could enhance computer-aided mammography.

  14. Classification of mammographic masses using generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wei Keat; Er, Meng Joo

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, computer-aided classification of mammographic masses using generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks (GDFNN) is presented. The texture parameters, derived from first-order gradient distribution and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GCMs), were computed from the regions of interest (ROIs). A total of 77 images containing 38 benign cases and 39 malignant cases from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM) were analyzed. A fast approach of automatically generating fuzzy rules from training samples was implemented to classify tumors. The novelty of this work is that it alleviates the problem of the conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that requires a designer to examine all the input-output relationships of a training database in order to obtain the most appropriate structure for the classifier. In this approach, not only the connection weights can be adjusted, but also the structure can be self-adaptive during the learning process. With the classifier automatically generated by the GDFNN learning algorithm, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve, Az, reached 0.9289, which corresponded to a true-positive fraction of 94.9% at a false positive fraction of 73.7%. The corresponding accuracy was 84.4%, the positive predictive value was 78.7% and the negative predictive value was 93.3%.

  15. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Sanabria-Mondragón, Mónica; Hernández-Beltrán, Lourdes; López-Amador, Noé; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (χ2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns. PMID:23346398

  16. Evaluating thin compression paddles for mammographically compatible ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Booi, Rebecca C; Krücker, Jochen F; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; O'Donnell, Matthew; Kapur, Ajay; LeCarpentier, Gerald L; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Fowlkes, J Brian; Carson, Paul L

    2007-03-01

    We are developing a combined digital mammography/3D ultrasound system to improve detection and/or characterization of breast lesions. Ultrasound scanning through a mammographic paddle could significantly reduce signal level, degrade beam focusing and create reverberations. Thus, appropriate paddle choice is essential for accurate sonographic lesion detection and assessment with this system. In this study, we characterized ultrasound image quality through paddles of varying materials (lexan, polyurethane, TPX, mylar) and thicknesses (0.25 to 2.5 mm). Analytical experiments focused on lexan and TPX, which preliminary results demonstrated were most competitive. Spatial and contrast resolution, side-lobe and range lobe levels, contrast and signal strength were compared with no-paddle images. When the beamforming of the system was corrected to account for imaging through the paddle, the TPX 2.5 mm paddle performed the best. Test objects imaged through this paddle demonstrated < or = 15% reduction in spatial resolution, < or = 7.5 dB signal loss, < or = 3 dB contrast loss and range lobe levels > or = 35 dB below signal maximum over 4 cm. TPX paddles <2.5 mm could also be used with this system, depending on imaging goals. In 10 human subjects with cysts, small CNR losses were observed but were determined to be statistically insignificant. Radiologists concluded that 75% of cysts in through-paddle scans were at least as detectable as in their corresponding direct-contact scans. PMID:17280765

  17. Monochromatic Mammographic Imaging Using X-Ray Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiro, Francisca

    2002-06-01

    Monochromatic imaging is typically done with synchrotron sources. These sources are expensive and not practical for clinical settings. However, conventional laboratory sources normally have insufficient intensity. Polycapillary x-ray optics can be used to efficiently produce an intense parallel beam, which can be diffracted from a crystal to create monochromatic radiation. Monochromatic parallel beam imaging produces high subject contrast, high resolution, and low patient dose. Contrast, resolution, and intensity measurements were performed with both high and low angular acceptance crystals. Testing was first done at 8 keV with an intense copper rotating anode source. Preliminary l7.5 kev measurements were then made with a molybdenum source. At 8 keV, contrast enhancement was a factor of five relative to the polychromatic case, in good agreement with theoretical values. At l7.5 kev, monochromatic subject contrast was a factor of two times greater than the conventional polychromatic contrast. The measured angular resolution with a silicon crystal is 0.6 mrad at 8 keV, and 0.2 - 0.3 mrad at 17.5 keV. For a 50-mm thick patient, this angle corresponds to 50 lp/mm with an ideal detector. The use of polychromatic collimating optics allow monochromatic mammographic imaging measurements with a conventional x-ray source in a practical clinical setting.

  18. Does Mammographic Density Distribution Correlate with Location of Breast Cancer Tumors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Clare; Mitchell, James

    2013-03-01

    The risk of breast cancer is higher in women with denser, stiffer breasts. In mammograms, one measure of breast density is mammographic density. Mammograms involve x-rays, and radiodense material is characterized by white areas on a mammogram. The more white areas there are, the higher the mammographic density and the higher the risk of breast cancer. It is also known that most breast tumors occur in the upper half of the breast. Actually, about half of breast tumors occur in the upper outer quadrant of the breast near the armpit. We have analyzed mammograms and find that the mammographic density (white stuff) is higher in the upper half of the breast where there is more tissue. This work is supported by the National Cancer Institute through the Princeton Physical Sciences Oncology Center.

  19. Childhood body mass index and adult mammographic density measures that predict breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hopper, John L; Nguyen, Tuong L; Stone, Jennifer; Aujard, Kelly; Matheson, Melanie C; Abramson, Michael J; Burgess, John A; Walters, E Haydn; Dite, Gillian S; Bui, Minh; Evans, Christopher; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Ward, Gail; Jenkins, Mark A; Giles, Graham G; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Apicella, Carmel

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine if body mass index (BMI) during childhood is associated with the breast cancer risk factor 'adult mammographic density adjusted for age and BMI'. In 1968, the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study studied every Tasmanian school child born in 1961. We obtained measured heights and weights from annual school medical records across ages 7-15 years and imputed missing values. Between 2009 and 2012, we administered to 490 women a questionnaire that asked current height and weight and digitised at least one mammogram per woman. Absolute and percent mammographic densities were measured using the computer-assisted method CUMULUS. We used linear regression and adjusted for age at interview and log current BMI. The mammographic density measures were negatively associated: with log BMI at each age from 7 to 15 years (all p < 0.05); with the average of standardised log BMIs across ages 7-15 years (p < 0.0005); and more strongly with standardised log BMI measures closer to age 15 years (p < 0.03). Childhood BMI measures explained 7 and 10 % of the variance in absolute and percent mammographic densities, respectively, and 25 and 20 % of the association between current BMI and absolute and percent mammographic densities, respectively. Associations were not altered by adjustment for age at menarche. There is a negative association between BMI in late childhood and the adult mammographic density measures that predict breast cancer risk. This could explain, at least in part, why BMI in adolescence is negatively associated with breast cancer risk. PMID:26907766

  20. The Problem of Mammographic Breast Density - The Position of the DEGUM Working Group on Breast Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Schimpfle, M P; Brandenbusch, V C; Degenhardt, F; Duda, V; Madjar, H; Mundinger, A; Rathmann, R; Hahn, M

    2016-04-01

    Mammographic breast density correlates with breast cancer risk and also with the number of false-negative calls. In the USA these facts lead to the "Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act" of 2011. In the case of mammographically dense breasts, the Working Group on Breast Ultrasound in Germany recommends explaining the advantages of adjunct imaging to women, depending on the individual breast cancer risk. Due to the particular structure of German healthcare, quality-assured breast ultrasound would be the first choice. Possible overdiagnosis, costs, potentially increased emotional stress should be addressed. In high familial breast cancer risk, genetic counselling and an intensified early detection program should be performed. PMID:26882482

  1. Online mammographic images database for development and comparison of CAD schemes.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Bruno Roberto Nepomuceno; Schiabel, Homero

    2011-06-01

    Considering the difficulties in finding good-quality images for the development and test of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), this paper presents a public online mammographic images database free for all interested viewers and aimed to help develop and evaluate CAD schemes. The digitalization of the mammographic images is made with suitable contrast and spatial resolution for processing purposes. The broad recuperation system allows the user to search for different images, exams, or patient characteristics. Comparison with other databases currently available has shown that the presented database has a sufficient number of images, is of high quality, and is the only one to include a functional search system. PMID:20480383

  2. The influence of mammographic density on breast tumor characteristics.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Rosenberg, Lena; Humphreys, Keith; Hall, Per

    2012-07-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer. Whether MD influences the tumor phenotype remains to be clarified. Previous studies are highly inconsistent and most lack important covariate information. This is a case-only study within a population-based case-control study. Cases were all postmenopausal women, aged 50-74 years, with incident breast cancer, diagnosed 1993-1995, and with no history of previous cancer (n = 2,720). 1,747 women with mammograms and information on tumor characteristics were included in analyses. MD was assessed using a computer-assisted thresholding technique. We used linear, logistic, and multinomial logistic regression, adjusting for possible confounders, to study density and tumor characteristics. PD was only statistically significantly associated with tumor size in our study (regression coefficient 0.031, p = 0.017). The effect of PD on tumor size was greater when mode of detection was excluded from the model (regression coefficient 0.043, p = 0.001). No other associations between PD and the tumor characteristics studied (lymph node metastasis, ER-status, PR-status, grade, and histopathological classification) were observed. In summary, PD was positively associated with tumor size in postmenopausal women. However, the relationship was at least partially confounded by mode of detection. Although there may be a true biological relationship between MD and more highly proliferative tumors, it also seems that part of this relationship is due to masking delaying diagnosis. In conclusion, PD does not seem to be differentially associated with tumor phenotype, except for tumor size, after taking mode of detection into consideration. PMID:22710708

  3. Time-frequency analysis of functional optical mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Randall L.; Graber, Harry L.; Schmitz, Christoph H.; Tarantini, Frank; Khoury, Georges; Naar, David J.; Panetta, Thomas F.; Lewis, Theophilus; Pei, Yaling

    2003-07-01

    We have introduced working technology that provides for time-series imaging of the hemoglobin signal in large tissue structures. In this study we have explored our ability to detect aberrant time-frequency responses of breast vasculature for subjects with Stage II breast cancer at rest and in response to simple provocations. The hypothesis being explored is that time-series imaging will be sensitive to the known structural and functional malformations of the tumor vasculature. Mammographic studies were conducted using an adjustable hemisheric measuring head containing 21 source and 21 detector locations (441 source-detector pairs). Simultaneous dual-wavelength studies were performed at 760 and 830 nm at a framing rate of ~2.7 Hz. Optical measures were performed on women lying prone with the breast hanging in a pendant position. Two class of measures were performed: (1) 20- minute baseline measure wherein the subject was at rest; (2) provocation studies wherein the subject was asked to perform some simple breathing maneuvers. Collected data were analyzed to identify the time-frequency structure and central tendencies of the detector responses and those of the image time series. Imaging data were generated using the Normalized Difference Method (Pei et al., Appl. Opt. 40, 5755-5769, 2001). Results obtained clearly document three classes of anomalies when compared to the normal contralateral breast. 1) Breast tumors exhibit altered oxygen supply/demand imbalance in response to an oxidative challenge (breath hold). 2) The vasomotor response of the tumor vasculature is mainly depressed and exhibits an altered modulation. 3) The affected area of the breast wherein the altered vasomotor signature is seen extends well beyond the limits of the tumor itself.

  4. Spectral analysis of mammographic images using a multitaper method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Power spectral analysis in radiographic images is conventionally performed using a windowed overlapping averaging periodogram. This study describes an alternative approach using a multitaper technique and compares its performance with that of the standard method. This tool will be valuable in power spectrum estimation of images, whose content deviates significantly from uniform white noise. The performance of the multitaper approach will be evaluated in terms of spectral stability, variance reduction, bias, and frequency precision. The ultimate goal is the development of a useful tool for image quality assurance. Methods: A multitaper approach uses successive data windows of increasing order. This mitigates spectral leakage allowing one to calculate a reduced-variance power spectrum. The multitaper approach will be compared with the conventional power spectrum method in several typical situations, including the noise power spectra (NPS) measurements of simulated projection images of a uniform phantom, NPS measurement of real detector images of a uniform phantom for two clinical digital mammography systems, and the estimation of the anatomic noise in mammographic images (simulated images and clinical mammograms). Results: Examination of spectrum variance versus frequency resolution and bias indicates that the multitaper approach is superior to the conventional single taper methods in the prevention of spectrum leakage and variance reduction. More than four times finer frequency precision can be achieved with equivalent or less variance and bias. Conclusions: Without any shortening of the image data length, the bias is smaller and the frequency resolution is higher with the multitaper method, and the need to compromise in the choice of regions of interest size to balance between the reduction of variance and the loss of frequency resolution is largely eliminated.

  5. Various doses of soy isoflavones do not modify mammographic density in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy isoflavones have functional similarity to human estrogens and may protect against breast cancer as a result of their antiestrogenic activity or increase risk as a result of their estrogen-like properties. We examined the relation between isoflavone supplementation and mammographic density, a str...

  6. Quantitative 3D breast magnetic resonance imaging fibroglandular tissue analysis and correlation with qualitative assessments: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Mema, Eralda; Guo, Xiaotao; Mango, Victoria; Desperito, Elise; Ha, Jason; Wynn, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) has been linked to breast cancer risk based on mammographic density studies. Currently, the qualitative assessment of FGT on mammogram (MG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is prone to intra and inter-observer variability. The purpose of this study is to develop an objective quantitative FGT measurement tool for breast MRI that could provide significant clinical value. Methods An IRB approved study was performed. Sixty breast MRI cases with qualitative assessment of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT were randomly selected for quantitative analysis from routine breast MRIs performed at our institution from 1/2013 to 12/2014. Blinded to the qualitative data, whole breast and FGT contours were delineated on T1-weighted pre contrast sagittal images using an in-house, proprietary segmentation algorithm which combines the region-based active contours and a level set approach. FGT (%) was calculated by: [segmented volume of FGT (mm3)/(segmented volume of whole breast (mm3)] ×100. Statistical correlation analysis was performed between quantified FGT (%) on MRI and qualitative assessments of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT. Results There was a significant positive correlation between quantitative MRI FGT assessment and qualitative MRI FGT (r=0.809, n=60, P<0.001) and mammographic density assessment (r=0.805, n=60, P<0.001). There was a significant correlation between qualitative MRI FGT assessment and mammographic density assessment (r=0.725, n=60, P<0.001). The four qualitative assessment categories of FGT correlated with the calculated mean quantitative FGT (%) of 4.61% (95% CI, 0–12.3%), 8.74% (7.3–10.2%), 18.1% (15.1–21.1%), 37.4% (29.5–45.3%). Conclusions Quantitative measures of FGT (%) were computed with data derived from breast MRI and correlated significantly with conventional qualitative assessments. This quantitative technique may prove to be a valuable tool in clinical use by

  7. Robust estimation of mammographic breast density: a patient-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Harald S.; Erhard, Klaus; Gooßen, Andre; Bulow, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Breast density has become an established risk indicator for developing breast cancer. Current clinical practice reflects this by grading mammograms patient-wise as entirely fat, scattered fibroglandular, heterogeneously dense, or extremely dense based on visual perception. Existing (semi-) automated methods work on a per-image basis and mimic clinical practice by calculating an area fraction of fibroglandular tissue (mammographic percent density). We suggest a method that follows clinical practice more strictly by segmenting the fibroglandular tissue portion directly from the joint data of all four available mammographic views (cranio-caudal and medio-lateral oblique, left and right), and by subsequently calculating a consistently patient-based mammographic percent density estimate. In particular, each mammographic view is first processed separately to determine a region of interest (ROI) for segmentation into fibroglandular and adipose tissue. ROI determination includes breast outline detection via edge-based methods, peripheral tissue suppression via geometric breast height modeling, and - for medio-lateral oblique views only - pectoral muscle outline detection based on optimizing a three-parameter analytic curve with respect to local appearance. Intensity harmonization based on separately acquired calibration data is performed with respect to compression height and tube voltage to facilitate joint segmentation of available mammographic views. A Gaussian mixture model (GMM) on the joint histogram data with a posteriori calibration guided plausibility correction is finally employed for tissue separation. The proposed method was tested on patient data from 82 subjects. Results show excellent correlation (r = 0.86) to radiologist's grading with deviations ranging between -28%, (q = 0.025) and +16%, (q = 0.975).

  8. Improving CAD performance by fusion of the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Xu, Weidong; Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin

    2012-03-01

    Bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry could be an important factor in assessing risk of developing breast cancer and improving the detection of the suspicious lesions. This study aims to assess whether fusion of the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical information into a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme could improve CAD performance in detecting mass-like breast cancers. A testing dataset involving 1352 full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) acquired from 338 cases was used. In this dataset, half (169) cases are positive containing malignant masses and half are negative. Two computerized schemes were first independently applied to process FFDM images of each case. The first single-image based CAD scheme detected suspicious mass regions on each image. The second scheme detected and computed the bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry for each case. A fusion method was then applied to combine the output scores of the two schemes. The CAD performance levels using the original CAD-generated detection scores and the new fusion scores were evaluated and compared using a free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) type data analysis method. By fusion with the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical scores, the case-based CAD sensitivity was increased from 79.2% to 84.6% at a false-positive rate of 0.3 per image. CAD also cued more "difficult" masses with lower CAD-generated detection scores while discarded some "easy" cases. The study indicated that fusion between the scores generated by a single-image based CAD scheme and the computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry scores enabled to increase mass detection sensitivity in particular to detect more subtle masses.

  9. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E.; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J.; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M. L.; Luben, Robert N.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Douglas, Julie A.; Shah, Kaanan P.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Ursin, Giske; Grenaker Alnaes, Grethe I.; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Paroah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Fasching, Peter A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Hopper, John; Vachon, Celine M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute non-dense area adjusted for study, age and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1) and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all p <10−5). Of 41 recently discovered breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and non-dense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute non-dense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiological pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk. PMID:25862352

  10. Relation between clinical and mammographic diagnosis of breast problems and the cancer/biopsy rate

    PubMed Central

    Sterns, Ernest E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the sensitivity of mammographic and clinical assessment of breast problems, independent of one another, on the ratio of cancers found to biopsies performed (cancer/biopsy rate). Design A review of diagnoses from prospectively recorded and independently assessed clinical and mammographic examinations. Setting The breast clinic in a university-affiliated hospital. Patients Patients were considered in two age groups — under 50 years and 50 years and over; 1251 patients underwent breast biopsy between September 1976 and November 1994 after clinical assessment and mammography. Main Outcome Measure The cancer diagnosis rate found on biopsy as a result of clinical and mammographic findings. Results In both age groups, mammography was significantly (p < 0.001) more sensitive than clinical assessment in cancer diagnosis but gave a significantly (p < 0.0001) higher rate of false-positive results. The cancer diagnosis rate was highest when lesions were assessed both clinically and mammographically as malignant but was of diagnostic benefit only to women in the under-50-year age group. The cancer rate was 12% when both assessments indicated a benign process and only 2% in women under age 50 years with clinically benign conditions who did not have mammography. Twenty-one percent of the biopsies were obtained in women with clinically normal breasts because of a mammographic abnormality and 17% of all the cancers found were clinically occult. Conclusions The sensitivity of clinical assessment, particularly in premenopausal women is low and the false-positive mammography rate is high, but the cancer/biopsy rate is sufficiently high to warrant breast biopsy if either diagnostic modality suggests a cancer. When neither modality suggests cancer, the cancer/biopsy rate is 12% in both age groups. PMID:8769923

  11. Dietary phytoestrogen intake and mammographic density -- results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Gabriele; Mack, U; von Fournier, D; Linseisen, J

    2005-09-12

    The influence of dietary phytoestrogens provided by Western diets on mammographic density is not well established. Soy and soy products as source of isoflavones were found to be inversely associated with high mammographic density, a marker for breast cancer risk. Another class of phytoestrogens, the lignans, which are more frequent in Western diets, are rarely investigated. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort in Heidelberg (EPIC-Heidelberg) we explored the feasibility of mammogram collection and measurement of mammographic density in order to investigate the association between dietary phytoestrogen intake and breast density patterns. Wolfe classification was used to summarize mammographic density. Dietary habits were assessed by means of a validated food frequency questionnaire. - Out of the 505 randomly selected women, 317 (63%) returned the questionnaire and 310 (61.4%) women provided informed consent to collect mammograms. Dietary intake of seven women with dense patterns (DY) was compared with 47 women without dense patterns. A high dietary intake of fibre (p-value = 0.008) and secoisolariciresinol (p-value = 0.043) is inversely associated with non-dense breast patterns. This is also observed for a high dietary intake of soy-products (p-value = 0.004) and, in tendency, genistein (p-value = 0.069). After adjustment for energy intake and age the groups of dense and non-dense mammographic patterns were different regarding the intake of carbohydrate (p = 0.032), soy-products (p = 0.020), fibre (p = 0.046), and secoisolariciresinol (p = 0.027). - Our results suggest an inverse association between dietary lignan intake and breast density, similar to the findings for isoflavones. To our knowledge this is the first report on this association, but due to the risk of chance finding, this has to be confirmed in a study with sufficient statistical power. PMID:16183551

  12. Qualitative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James C., Ed.; James, Raymond A., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    "Qualitative evaluation" is the theme of this issue of the California Journal of Teacher Education. Ralph Tyler states that evaluation is essentially descriptive, and using numbers does not solve basic problems. Martha Elin Vernazza examines the issue of objectivity in history and its implications for evaluation. She posits that the decisive…

  13. Quitting drugs: quantitative and qualitative features.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Gene M

    2013-01-01

    According to the idea that addiction is a chronic relapsing disease, remission is at most a temporary state. Either addicts never stop using drugs, or if they do stop, remission is short lived. However, research on remission reveals a more complex picture. In national epidemiological surveys that recruited representative drug users, remission rates varied widely and were markedly different for legal and illegal drugs and for different racial/ethnic groups. For instance, the half-life for cocaine dependence was four years, but for alcohol dependence it was 16 years, and although most dependent cocaine users remitted before age 30, about 5% remained heavy cocaine users well into their forties. Although varied, the remission results were orderly. An exponential growth curve closely approximated the cumulative frequency of remitting for different drugs and different ethnic/racial groups. Thus, each year a constant proportion of those still addicted remitted, independent of the number of years since the onset of dependence. PMID:23330937

  14. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  15. Semi-automated and fully automated mammographic density measurement and breast cancer risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Rafael; Pollán, Marina; Antón, Joaquín; Miranda-García, Josefa; Casals, María; Martínez, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Pérez-Cortés, Juan-Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The task of breast density quantification is becoming increasingly relevant due to its association with breast cancer risk. In this work, a semi-automated and a fully automated tools to assess breast density from full-field digitized mammograms are presented. The first tool is based on a supervised interactive thresholding procedure for segmenting dense from fatty tissue and is used with a twofold goal: for assessing mammographic density (MD) in a more objective and accurate way than via visual-based methods and for labeling the mammograms that are later employed to train the fully automated tool. Although most automated methods rely on supervised approaches based on a global labeling of the mammogram, the proposed method relies on pixel-level labeling, allowing better tissue classification and density measurement on a continuous scale. The fully automated method presented combines a classification scheme based on local features and thresholding operations that improve the performance of the classifier. A dataset of 655 mammograms was used to test the concordance of both approaches in measuring MD. Three expert radiologists measured MD in each of the mammograms using the semi-automated tool (DM-Scan). It was then measured by the fully automated system and the correlation between both methods was computed. The relation between MD and breast cancer was then analyzed using a case-control dataset consisting of 230 mammograms. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to compute reliability among raters and between techniques. The results obtained showed an average ICC=0.922 among raters when using the semi-automated tool, whilst the average correlation between the semi-automated and automated measures was ICC=0.838. In the case-control study, the results obtained showed Odds Ratios (OR) of 1.38 and 1.50 per 10% increase in MD when using the semi-automated and fully automated approaches respectively. It can therefore be concluded that the automated and semi

  16. Mammographic density and its interaction with other breast cancer risk factors in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Wong, C S; Lim, G H; Gao, F; Jakes, R W; Offman, J; Chia, K S; Duffy, S W

    2011-01-01

    Background: Joint effects of mammographic density and other risk factors on breast cancer risk remain unclear. Methods: From The Singapore Breast Screening Project, we selected 491 cases and 982 controls. Mammographic density was measured quantitatively. Data analysis was by conditional logistic regression. Results: Density was a significant risk factor, adjusting for other factors. Density of 76–100% had an odds ratio of 5.54 (95% CI 2.38–12.90) compared with 0–10%. Density had significant interactions with body mass index and oral contraceptive use (P=0.02). Conclusions: Percent density increases breast cancer risk in addition to effects of other risk factors, and modifies the effects of BMI and OCs. PMID:21245860

  17. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  18. Mammographic screening for breast cancer. Overdiagnosis: an insidious adverse effect of screening.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Mammographic mass screening for breast cancer sometimes detects tumours that would grow so slowly that the women concerned would die from other causes before developing noteworthy symptoms. This "overdiagnosis" unnecessarily exposes women to cancer treatments and their adverse effects. To assess the risk of overdiagnosis during mammographic mass screening for breast cancer, we conducted a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The most reliable estimates of overdiagnosis are obtained by deduction, based on data from randomised trials with lengthy post-screening follow-up. A randomised trial in Sweden and two in Canada compared screening versus no screening, and monitored the women for an average of 15 and 17 years after the end of screening. For every 10 000 women who were screened, there were 63 cases of breast cancer overdiagnosis in the Swedish trial and 26 in the Canadian trials, representing about 25% of all cancers diagnosed by screening. This rate of overdiagnosis is probably on the low side, as about 20% of the women in the unscreened control groups had at least one mammogram. Studies of the general female population confirm that mammographic mass screening leads to overdiagnosis, but the results add little to those of randomised trials. In 2015, the most reliable estimate is that at least 25% of breast cancers detected by screening mammography are overdiagnosed. In France, at least 19 breast cancers would be overdiagnosed for every 1000 women screened during a 20-year period, corresponding to a total of about 3800 overdiagnosed cancers for each year of mass screening. Women must be informed of the risk of overdiagnosis and its consequences in terms of unnecessary treatment, along with other factors influencing the harm-benefit balance. See page 190 for our proposals on how to inform women wondering whether or not to undergo mammographic screening. PMID:26240891

  19. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  20. Ethnic Differences in Mammographic Densities: An Asian Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mariapun, Shivaani; Li, Jingmei; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer and is highly variable, but, to date, few studies have examined density in Asian women, particularly those in low and middle-income Asian countries where genetic and lifestyle determinants may be significantly different. Methods A total of 1,240 women who attended an opportunistic mammogram screening programme were eligible for analysis. Mammographic density was estimated using a fully-automated thresholding method and differences across ethnic groups were examined using linear regression in 205 randomly selected Chinese women, 138 Malay and 199 Indian women. Results Percent density was significantly higher in Chinese women (28.5%; 95% CI 27.0%, 30.0%) compared to Malay (24.2%; 95% CI 22.5%, 26.0%) and Indian (24.3%; 95% CI 22.8%, 25.7%) women (p<0.001), after adjustment for age, BMI, menopausal status, parity and age at first full term pregnancy. Correspondingly, adjusted nondense area was significantly lower in Chinese (72.2cm2; 95% CI 67.9cm2, 76.5cm2) women compared to Malay (92.1cm2; 95% CI 86.9cm2, 97.2cm2) and Indian (97.7cm2; 95% CI 93.4cm2, 101.9cm2) women (p<0.001), but dense area did not differ across the three ethnic groups. Conclusions Our study shows that higher percent density and lower nondense area reflect the higher incidence of breast cancer in Chinese compared to Malay and Indian women in Malaysia. Known lifestyle determinants of mammographic density do not fully account for the ethnic variations observed in mammographic density in this Asian cohort. PMID:25659139

  1. [Giant cystosarcoma phylloides: mammographic and sonographic findings in an unusual case].

    PubMed

    Schön, G; Strasser, K; Dünser, M; Buchberger, W; Margreiter, R

    1994-01-01

    Cystosarcoma phylloides (also called phylloides tumour) is a rare fibroepithelial mixed tumour which accounts for 0.3 to 1% of all breast neoplasms. Diagnosis can be strongly suspected after clinical, mammographical and especially sonographical findings. Neither mammography nor sonography and even not aspiration cytology can be reliably used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumours. In the following a patient is presented in whom cystosarcoma phylloides attained, even for this kind of tumour, an unusually large dimension. PMID:8136391

  2. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and population diversity captured across 22 countries.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Valerie A; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Lee, Charmaine Pei Ling; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H; Wanders, Johanna O P; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Won Lee, Jong; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna M; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F

    2016-02-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses. PMID:26724463

  3. Development of a multi-channel time-domain fluorescence mammograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, A.; Steinkellner, O.; Grosenick, D.; Möller, M.; Ziegler, R.; Nielsen, T.; Lauritsen, K.; Macdonald, R.; Rinneberg, H.

    2007-02-01

    We developed an eight-channel scanning time-domain fluorescence mammograph capable of imaging the distribution of a non-specific fluorescent contrast agent in the female breast, besides imaging intrinsic absorption and scattering properties of healthy breast tissue and tumors. The apparatus is based on the PTB multi-channel laser pulse mammograph, originally designed for measurements of absorption and scattering coefficients at four selected wavelengths (λ = 652 nm, 684 nm, 797nm, and 830 nm). It was upgraded for time-resolved detection of fluorescence, excited at 735 nm by a ps diode laser with 10 mW output power and detected at wavelengths λ >= 780 nm. Cooled PMTs with GaAs photocathodes are used to detect laser and fluorescence photons at five positions in transmission and three positions in reflection. Measurements are performed with the breast being slightly compressed between two parallel glass plates. The transmitting and receiving fiber bundles are scanned synchronously over the breast in steps of typically 2.5 mm. At each scan position, distributions of times of flight of laser photons are measured by time-correlated single photon counting at eight detector positions, followed by measurements of distributions of times of arrival of fluorescence photons. The performance of the fluorescence mammograph was investigated by using breast-like phantoms with a fluorescent inhomogeneity with dye enrichment varying between 2:1 and 10:1 over background values.

  4. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  5. Diagnosis of breast cancer in light microscopic and mammographic images textures using relative entropy via kernel estimation.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevcan Aytac; Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Poyraz, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article was to provide early detection of breast cancer by using both mammography and histopathology images of the same patient. When the studies in the literature are examined, it is seen that the mammography and histopathology images of the same patient are not used together for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Mammographic and microscopic images can be limited when using only one of them for the early detection of the breast cancer. Therefore, multi-modality solutions that give more accuracy results than single solutions have been realized in this paper. 3 × 50 microscopic (histopathology) and 3 × 50 mammography image sets have been taken from Firat University Medicine Faculty Pathology and Radiology Laboratories, respectively. Optimum feature space has been obtained by minimum redundancy and maximum relevance via mutual information method applying to the 3 × 50 microscopic and mammography images. Then, probabilistic values of suspicious lesions in the image for selected features have been found by exponential curve fitting. Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measurements have been used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. It has been proved that these measures have been related to each other. Weight values for selected each feature have been found using these measures. These weight values have been used in object function. Afterward, histopathology and mammography images have been classified as normal, malign, and benign utilizing object function. In the result of this classifier, the accuracy of diagnosis of breast cancer has been estimated probabilistically. Furthermore, classifications have been probabilistically visualized on a pie chart. Consequently, the performances of Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measures have been compared with ROC analysis using histopathology and mammography test images. It has been observed that Jensen Shannon measure has higher performance than Hellinger and Triangle measures. Accuracy rates of

  6. Breast imaging using an amorphous silicon-based full-field digital mammographic system: stability of a clinical prototype.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Suryanarayanan, S; D'Orsi, C J; Hendrick, R E

    2000-11-01

    An amorphous silicon-based full-breast imager for digital mammography was evaluated for detector stability over a period of 1 year. This imager uses a structured CsI:TI scintillator coupled to an amorphous silicon layer with a 100-micron pixel pitch and read out by special purpose electronics. The stability of the system was characterized using the following quantifiable metrics: conversion factor (mean number of electrons generated per incident x-ray), presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), detector linearity and sensitivity, detector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom scores. Qualitative metrics such as flat field uniformity, geometric distortion, and Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) test pattern image quality were also used to study the stability of the system. Observations made over this 1-year period indicated that the maximum variation from the average of the measurements were less than 0.5% for conversion factor, 3% for presampling MTF over all spatial frequencies, 5% for signal response, linearity and sensitivity, 12% for SNR over seven locations for all 3 target-filter combinations, and 0% for ACR accreditation phantom scores. ACR mammographic accreditation phantom images indicated the ability to resolve 5 fibers, 4 speck groups, and 5 masses at a mean glandular dose of 1.23 mGy. The SMPTE pattern image quality test for the display monitors used for image viewing indicated ability to discern all contrast steps and ability to distinguish line-pair images at the center and corners of the image. No bleeding effects were observed in the image. Flat field uniformity for all 3 target-filter combinations displayed no artifacts such as gridlines, bad detector rows or columns, horizontal or vertical streaks, or bad pixels. Wire mesh screen images indicated uniform resolution and no geometric distortion. PMID:11110258

  7. Background risk of breast cancer influences the association between alcohol consumption and mammographic density

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T; Christensen, S E; Brand, J S; Cuzick, J; Czene, K; Sjölander, A; Bälter, K; Hall, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alcohol consumption has been suggested to increase risk of breast cancer through a mechanism that also increases mammographic density. Whether the association between alcohol consumption and mammographic density is modified by background breast cancer risk has, however, not been studied. Methods: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 53 060 Swedish women aged 40–74 years. Alcohol consumption was assessed using a web-based self-administered questionnaire. Mammographic density was measured using the fully-automated volumetric Volpara method. The Tyrer–Cuzick prediction model was used to estimate risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years. Linear regression models were used to evaluate the association between alcohol consumption and volumetric mammographic density and the potential influence of Tyrer–Cuzick breast cancer risk. Results: Overall, increasing alcohol consumption was associated with higher absolute dense volume (cm3) and per cent dense volume (%). The association between alcohol consumption and absolute dense volume was most pronounced among women with the highest (⩾5%) Tyrer–Cuzick 10-year risk. Among high-risk women, women consuming 5.0–9.9, 10.0–19.9, 20.0–29.9, and 30.0–40.0 g of alcohol per day had 2.6 cm3 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.2–4.9), 2.9 cm3 (95% CI, −0.6 to 6.3), 4.6 cm3 (95% CI, 1.5–7.7), and 10.8 cm3 (95% CI, 4.8–17.0) higher absolute dense volume, respectively, as compared with women abstaining from alcohol. A trend of increasing alcohol consumption and higher absolute dense volume was seen in women at low (⩽3%) risk, but not in women at moderate (3.0–4.9%) risk. Conclusion: Alcohol consumption may increase breast cancer risk through increasing mammographic density, particularly in women at high background risk of breast cancer. PMID:26035701

  8. Lesions entirely removed during stereotactic biopsy: preoperative localization on the basis of mammographic landmarks and feasibility of freehand technique--initial experience.

    PubMed

    Brenner, R J

    2000-02-01

    Seven patients with mammographic lesions entirely removed at percutaneous core needle biopsy that required wider excision underwent freehand localization of the site of the prior lesion with orthogonal and reproducible mammographic landmarks to guide needle placement. Successful excision was accomplished in all cases, as evidenced by similar histopathologic findings, fibrin bands or collagen, and core needle biopsy tract at microscopy. PMID:10671616

  9. Understanding Participatory Action Research: A Qualitative Research Methodology Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Participatory Action Research (PAR) is a qualitative research methodology option that requires further understanding and consideration. PAR is considered democratic, equitable, liberating, and life-enhancing qualitative inquiry that remains distinct from other qualitative methodologies (Kach & Kralik, 2006). Using PAR, qualitative features of an…

  10. Mammographic mass detection using wavelets as input to neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Niyazi; Gorgel, Pelin; Ucan, Osman N; Sertbas, Ahmet

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of artificial neural networks, in combination with wavelet transforms for the detection of mammogram masses as malign or benign. A total of 45 patients who had breast masses in their mammography were enrolled in the study. The neural network was trained on the wavelet based feature vectors extracted from the mammogram masses for both benign and malign data. Therefore, in this study, Multilayer ANN was trained with the Backpropagation, Conjugate Gradient and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithms and ten-fold cross validation procedure was used. A satisfying sensitivity percentage of 89.2% was achieved with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Since, this algorithm combines the best features of the Gauss-Newton technique and the other steepest-descent algorithms and thus it reaches desired results very fast. PMID:20703600

  11. Genetic variation in Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Van den Berg, David; Hsu, Chris; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) plays a critical role in normal mammary development and morphogenesis. Decreased TGF-β signaling has been associated with increased mammographic density. Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is a strong risk factor and predictor of breast cancer risk. PMD is highly heritable, but few genetic determinants have been identified. We investigated the association between genetic variation in TGFB1 and PMD using a cross-sectional study of 2,038 women who were members of the population-based Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort. We assessed PMD using a computer-assisted method. We used linear regression to examine the association between 9 tagging SNPs of TGFB1 and PMD and their interaction with parity, adjusting for age, BMI, and dialect group. We calculated ‘P-values adjusted for correlated tests’ (PACT) to account for multiple testing. The strongest association was observed for rs2241716. Adjusted PMD was higher by 1.5% per minor allele (PACT =0.04). When stratifying by parity, this association was limited to nulliparous women. For nulliparous women, adjusted PMD was higher by 8.6% per minor allele (PACT=0.003; P for interaction with parity=0.002). Three additional TGFB1 tagging SNPs, which were in linkage disequilibrium with rs2241716, were statistically significantly associated with adjusted PMD (PACT<0.05) for nulliparous women. However, none of these three SNPs showed statistically significant association after adjusting for rs2241716. Our data support that TGFB1 genetic variation may be an important genetic determinant of mammographic density measure that predicts breast cancer risk, particularly in nulliparous women. PMID:23333936

  12. Varying performance in mammographic interpretation across two countries: Do results indicate reader or population variances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Wong, Jill; Sim, Llewellyn; Hillis, Stephen L.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: To compare the performance of Australian and Singapore breast readers interpreting a single test-set that consisted of mammographic examinations collected from the Australian population. Background: In the teleradiology era, breast readers are interpreting mammographic examinations from different populations. The question arises whether two groups of readers with similar training backgrounds, demonstrate the same level of performance when presented with a population familiar only to one of the groups. Methods: Fifty-three Australian and 15 Singaporean breast radiologists participated in this study. All radiologists were trained in mammogram interpretation and had a median of 9 and 15 years of experience in reading mammograms respectively. Each reader interpreted the same BREAST test-set consisting of sixty de-identified mammographic examinations arising from an Australian population. Performance parameters including JAFROC, ROC, case sensitivity as well as specificity were compared between Australian and Singaporean readers using a Mann Whitney U test. Results: A significant difference (P=0.036) was demonstrated between the JAFROC scores of the Australian and Singaporean breast radiologists. No other significant differences were observed. Conclusion: JAFROC scores for Australian radiologists were higher than those obtained by the Singaporean counterparts. Whilst it is tempting to suggest this is down to reader expertise, this may be a simplistic explanation considering the very similar training and audit backgrounds of the two populations of radiologists. The influence of reading images that are different from those that radiologists normally encounter cannot be ruled out and requires further investigation, particularly in the light of increasing international outsourcing of radiologic reporting.

  13. Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and mammographic density in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ahn, Jiin; Jung, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Chan-Won; Yun, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Min-Jung; Suh, Byung-Seong; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Ryu, Seungho

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance (IR) with mammographic density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. The goal of this study was to evaluate these associations in pre- and postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional study was performed in 73,974 adult women who underwent a comprehensive health screening examination that included a mammogram between 2011 and 2013 (mean age 42.6 years). MetS was defined according to the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. IR was assessed with the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dense breast were estimated using logistic regression models after adjustment for potential confounders. In premenopausal women, MetS and all its components except waist circumference were associated with dense breast. After adjustment for potential confounders, the OR (95% CI) for dense breast in women with MetS compared with those without MetS was 1.22 (1.06-1.39). In postmenopausal women, however, there was positive but non-significant association between MetS and dense breast. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, high blood glucose and IR were positively associated with dense breast. The OR (95% CI) for dense breast between the highest and lowest quartiles of HOMA-IR was 1.29 (1.20-1.39) for premenopausal women and 1.44 (1.05-1.97) for postmenopausal women. In a large sample of Korean women, MetS and IR were associated with mammographic dense breast, demonstrating that IR, a potentially modifiable risk factor, may increase breast cancer risk, possibly through high mammographic density. PMID:26277917

  14. Analysis of mammographic findings and patient history data with genetic algorithms for the prediction of breast cancer biopsy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Erik D.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1998-06-01

    A decision model is presented to increase the specificity of breast biopsy directly optimized on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area index. ROC area has higher clinical significance as a performance measure than the traditional metric mean-squared error (MSE). Excisional biopsy as practiced is highly sensitive to cancer but nonspecific; only one in three biopsies is malignant. Data for this study consists of 500 cases randomly selected from patients who underwent excisional biopsy for definitive diagnosis of breast cancer. For each case, inputs to the model consist of mammographic findings and patient history features. Outputs from the model built may be thresholded to correspond to the decision to biopsy a suspicious breast lesion. While clinically relevant, ROC area is a discontinuous function which cannot be optimized directly so a genetic algorithm approach is used to train a nonlinear artificial neural network. Performance using the genetic algorithm method of training was similar to that of a decision model trained using the traditional approach for this data set. ROC areas were obtained after training using three different approaches: genetic algorithm training optimized on ROC area produced an ROC area of 0.845 +/- 0.039, genetic algorithm training optimized on MSE produced an ROC area of 0.845 +/- 0.039, and traditional training using backpropagation produced an ROC area of 0.848 +/- 0.039. Despite the similar performance measures for models trained on this data, it is possible that with different data sets, training on ROC instead of MSE will produce models with significantly different performance. In this case, the genetic algorithm approach will prove useful.

  15. Publishing Qualitative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary Lee

    1987-01-01

    Article defines qualitative research and describes the form that an article based on qualitative research might take. Encourages readers to submit articles based on qualitative research to the American Educational Research Journal. (RB)

  16. Talking and Thinking about Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Carolyn; Bochner, Arthur; Denzin, Norman; Lincoln, Yvonna; Morse, Janice; Pelias, Ronald; Richardson, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    This script comes from an edited transcript of a session titled "Talking and Thinking About Qualitative Research," which was part of the 2006 International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on May 4-6, 2006. This special session featured scholars informally responding to questions about their…

  17. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  18. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  19. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-03-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale ``flower-like'' structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials - 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber.

  20. A knowledge-based approach to the CADx of mammographic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Matthias; Haßlmeyer, Erik

    2008-03-01

    Today, mammography is recognized as the most effective technique for breast cancer screening. Unfortunately, the low positive predictive value of breast biopsy examinations resulting from mammogram interpretation leads to many unnecessary biopsies performed on benign lesions. In the last years, several computer assisted diagnosis (CADx) systems have been proposed with the goal to assist the radiologist in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions and thus to reduce the high number of unnecessary biopsies. In this paper we present a novel, knowledge-based approach to the computer aided discrimination of mammographic mass lesions that uses computer-extracted attributes of mammographic masses and clinical data as input attributes to a case-based reasoning system. Our approach emphasizes a transparent reasoning process which is important for the acceptance of a CADx system in clinical practice. We evaluate the performance of the proposed system on a large publicly available mammography database using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Our results indicate that the proposed CADx system has the potential to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary breast biopsies in clinical practice.

  1. Mass Detection in Mammographic Images Using Wavelet Processing and Adaptive Threshold Technique.

    PubMed

    Vikhe, P S; Thool, V R

    2016-04-01

    Detection of mass in mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant assignment in the reduction of the mortality rate. However, in some cases, screening of mass is difficult task for radiologist, due to variation in contrast, fuzzy edges and noisy mammograms. Masses and micro-calcifications are the distinctive signs for diagnosis of breast cancer. This paper presents, a method for mass enhancement using piecewise linear operator in combination with wavelet processing from mammographic images. The method includes, artifact suppression and pectoral muscle removal based on morphological operations. Finally, mass segmentation for detection using adaptive threshold technique is carried out to separate the mass from background. The proposed method has been tested on 130 (45 + 85) images with 90.9 and 91 % True Positive Fraction (TPF) at 2.35 and 2.1 average False Positive Per Image(FP/I) from two different databases, namely Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) and Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). The obtained results show that, the proposed technique gives improved diagnosis in the early breast cancer detection. PMID:26811073

  2. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale “flower-like” structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials – 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber. PMID:25801531

  3. Mammography workstation design: effect on mammographer behaviour and the risk of musculoskeletal disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Phillips, S.; Wallis, M. G.; Gale, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    In the UK Breast Screening Programme there is a growing transition from film to digital mammography, and consequently a change in mammography workstation ergonomics. This paper investigates the effect of the change for radiologists including their comfort, likelihood of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSD's), and work practices. Three workstations types were investigated: one with all film mammograms; one with digital mammograms alongside film mammograms from the previous screening round, and one with digital mammograms alongside digitised film mammograms from the previous screening round. Mammographers were video-taped whilst conducting work sessions at each of the workstations. Event based Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) postural analysis showed no overall increase in MSD risk level in the switch from the film to digital workstation. Average number of visual glances at the prior mammograms per case measured by analysis of recorded video footage showed an increase if the prior mammograms were digitised, rather than displayed on a multi-viewer (p<.05). This finding has potential implications for mammographer performance in the transition to digital mammography in the UK.

  4. A multichannel time-domain scanning fluorescence mammograph: performance assessment and first in vivo results.

    PubMed

    Grosenick, Dirk; Hagen, Axel; Steinkellner, Oliver; Poellinger, Alexander; Burock, Susen; Schlag, Peter M; Rinneberg, Herbert; Macdonald, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    We present a scanning time-domain fluorescence mammograph capable to image the distribution of a fluorescent contrast agent within a female breast, slightly compressed between two parallel glass plates, with high sensitivity. Fluorescence of the contrast agent is excited using a near infrared picosecond diode laser module. Four additional picosecond diode lasers with emission wavelengths between 660 and 1066 nm allow to measure the intrinsic optical properties of the breast tissue. By synchronously moving a source fiber and seven detection fiber bundles across the breast, distributions of times of flight of photons are recorded simultaneously for selected source-detector combinations in transmission and reflection geometry either at the fluorescence wavelength or at the selected laser wavelengths. To evaluate the performance of the mammograph, we used breastlike rectangular phantoms comprising fluorescent and absorbing objects using the fluorescent dye Omocyanine as contrast agent excited at 735 nm. We compare two-dimensional imaging of the phantom based on transmission and reflection data. Furthermore, we developed an improved tomosynthesis algorithm which permits three-dimensional reconstruction of fluorescence and absorption properties of lesions with good spatial resolution. For illustration, we present fluorescence mammograms of one patient recorded 30 min after administration of the contrast agent indocyanine green showing the carcinoma at high contrast originating from fluorescence of the extravasated dye, excited at 780 nm. PMID:21361617

  5. A multichannel time-domain scanning fluorescence mammograph: Performance assessment and first in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Hagen, Axel; Steinkellner, Oliver; Poellinger, Alexander; Burock, Susen; Schlag, Peter M.; Rinneberg, Herbert; Macdonald, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    We present a scanning time-domain fluorescence mammograph capable to image the distribution of a fluorescent contrast agent within a female breast, slightly compressed between two parallel glass plates, with high sensitivity. Fluorescence of the contrast agent is excited using a near infrared picosecond diode laser module. Four additional picosecond diode lasers with emission wavelengths between 660 and 1066 nm allow to measure the intrinsic optical properties of the breast tissue. By synchronously moving a source fiber and seven detection fiber bundles across the breast, distributions of times of flight of photons are recorded simultaneously for selected source-detector combinations in transmission and reflection geometry either at the fluorescence wavelength or at the selected laser wavelengths. To evaluate the performance of the mammograph, we used breastlike rectangular phantoms comprising fluorescent and absorbing objects using the fluorescent dye Omocyanine as contrast agent excited at 735 nm. We compare two-dimensional imaging of the phantom based on transmission and reflection data. Furthermore, we developed an improved tomosynthesis algorithm which permits three-dimensional reconstruction of fluorescence and absorption properties of lesions with good spatial resolution. For illustration, we present fluorescence mammograms of one patient recorded 30 min after administration of the contrast agent indocyanine green showing the carcinoma at high contrast originating from fluorescence of the extravasated dye, excited at 780 nm.

  6. Calculated mammographic spectra confirmed with attenuation curves for molybdenum, rhodium, and tungsten targets.

    PubMed

    Blough, M M; Waggener, R G; Payne, W H; Terry, J A

    1998-09-01

    A model for calculating mammographic spectra independent of measured data and fitting parameters is presented. This model is based on first principles. Spectra were calculated using various target and filter combinations such as molybdenum/molybdenum, molybdenum/rhodium, rhodium/rhodium, and tungsten/aluminum. Once the spectra were calculated, attenuation curves were calculated and compared to measured attenuation curves. The attenuation curves were calculated and measured using aluminum alloy 1100 or high purity aluminum filtration. Percent differences were computed between the measured and calculated attenuation curves resulting in an average of 5.21% difference for tungsten/aluminum, 2.26% for molybdenum/molybdenum, 3.35% for rhodium/rhodium, and 3.18% for molybdenum/rhodium. Calculated spectra were also compared to measured spectra from the Food and Drug Administration [Fewell and Shuping, Handbook of Mammographic X-ray Spectra (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1979)] and a comparison will also be presented. PMID:9775364

  7. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  8. Correlative feature analysis on FFDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Yading; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li Hui; Sennett, Charlene

    2008-12-15

    Identifying the corresponding images of a lesion in different views is an essential step in improving the diagnostic ability of both radiologists and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Because of the nonrigidity of the breasts and the 2D projective property of mammograms, this task is not trivial. In this pilot study, we present a computerized framework that differentiates between corresponding images of the same lesion in different views and noncorresponding images, i.e., images of different lesions. A dual-stage segmentation method, which employs an initial radial gradient index (RGI) based segmentation and an active contour model, is applied to extract mass lesions from the surrounding parenchyma. Then various lesion features are automatically extracted from each of the two views of each lesion to quantify the characteristics of density, size, texture and the neighborhood of the lesion, as well as its distance to the nipple. A two-step scheme is employed to estimate the probability that the two lesion images from different mammographic views are of the same physical lesion. In the first step, a correspondence metric for each pairwise feature is estimated by a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN). Then, these pairwise correspondence metrics are combined using another BANN to yield an overall probability of correspondence. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the individual features and the selected feature subset in the task of distinguishing corresponding pairs from noncorresponding pairs. Using a FFDM database with 123 corresponding image pairs and 82 noncorresponding pairs, the distance feature yielded an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.81{+-}0.02 with leave-one-out (by physical lesion) evaluation, and the feature metric subset, which included distance, gradient texture, and ROI-based correlation, yielded an AUC of 0.87{+-}0.02. The improvement by using multiple feature metrics was statistically

  9. Performance analysis of morphological component analysis (MCA) method for mammograms using some statistical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardezi, Syed Jamal Safdar; Faye, Ibrahima; Kamel, Nidal; Eltoukhy, Mohamed Meselhy; Hussain, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Early detection of breast cancer helps reducing the mortality rates. Mammography is very useful tool in breast cancer detection. But it is very difficult to separate different morphological features in mammographic images. In this study, Morphological Component Analysis (MCA) method is used to extract different morphological aspects of mammographic images by effectively preserving the morphological characteristics of regions. MCA decomposes the mammogram into piecewise smooth part and the texture part using the Local Discrete Cosine Transform (LDCT) and Curvelet Transform via wrapping (CURVwrap). In this study, simple comparison in performance has been done using some statistical features for the original image versus the piecewise smooth part obtained from the MCA decomposition. The results show that MCA suppresses the structural noises and blood vessels from the mammogram and enhances the performance for mass detection.

  10. Journal club: molecular breast imaging at reduced radiation dose for supplemental screening in mammographically dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Deborah J; Hruska, Carrie B; Conners, Amy Lynn; Tortorelli, Cindy L; Maxwell, Robert W; Jones, Katie N; Toledano, Alicia Y; O'Connor, Michael K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of supplemental screening molecular breast imaging (MBI) in women with mammographically dense breasts after system modifications to permit radiation dose reduction. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A total of 1651 asymptomatic women with mammographically dense breasts on prior mammography underwent screening mammography and adjunct MBI performed with 300-MBq (99m)Tc-sestamibi and a direct-conversion (cadmium zinc telluride) gamma camera, both interpreted independently. The cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of biopsies performed (PPV3) were determined. RESULTS. In 1585 participants with a complete reference standard, 21 were diagnosed with cancer: two detected by mammography only, 14 by MBI only, three by both modalities, and two by neither. Of 14 participants with cancers detected only by MBI, 11 had invasive disease (median size, 0.9 cm; range, 0.5-4.1 cm). Nine of 11 (82%) were node negative, and two had bilateral cancers. With the addition of MBI to mammography, the overall cancer detection rate (per 1000 screened) increased from 3.2 to 12.0 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 8.8). The invasive cancer detection rate increased from 1.9 to 8.8 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 6.9), a relative increase of 363%, while the change in DCIS detection was not statistically significant (from 1.3 to 3.2, p =0.250). For mammography alone, sensitivity was 24%; specificity, 89%; and PPV3, 25%. For the combination, sensitivity was 91% (p < 0.001); specificity, 83% (p < 0.001); and PPV3, 28% (p = 0.70). The recall rate increased from 11.0% with mammography alone to 17.6% (p < 0.001) for the combination; the biopsy rate increased from 1.3% for mammography alone to 4.2% (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION. When added to screening mammography, MBI performed using a radiopharmaceutical activity acceptable for screening (effective dose 2.4 mSv) yielded a supplemental cancer detection rate

  11. Molecular Breast Imaging at Reduced Radiation Dose for Supplemental Screening in Mammographically Dense Breasts

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy Lynn; Tortorelli, Cindy L.; Maxwell, Robert W.; Jones, Katie N.; Toledano, Alicia Y.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of supplemental screening molecular breast imaging (MBI) in women with mammographically dense breasts after system modifications to permit radiation dose reduction. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 1651 asymptomatic women with mammographically dense breasts on prior mammography underwent screening mammography and adjunct MBI performed with 300-MBq 99mTc-sestamibi and a direct-conversion (cadmium zinc telluride) gamma camera, both interpreted independently. The cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of biopsies performed (PPV3) were determined. RESULTS In 1585 participants with a complete reference standard, 21 were diagnosed with cancer: two detected by mammography only, 14 by MBI only, three by both modalities, and two by neither. Of 14 participants with cancers detected only by MBI, 11 had invasive disease (median size, 0.9 cm; range, 0.5–4.1 cm). Nine of 11 (82%) were node negative, and two had bilateral cancers. With the addition of MBI to mammography, the overall cancer detection rate (per 1000 screened) increased from 3.2 to 12.0 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 8.8). The invasive cancer detection rate increased from 1.9 to 8.8 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 6.9), a relative increase of 363%, while the change in DCIS detection was not statistically significant (from 1.3 to 3.2, p =0.250). For mammography alone, sensitivity was 24%; specificity, 89%; and PPV3, 25%. For the combination, sensitivity was 91% (p < 0.001); specificity, 83% (p < 0.001); and PPV3, 28% (p = 0.70). The recall rate increased from 11.0% with mammography alone to 17.6% (p < 0.001) for the combination; the biopsy rate increased from 1.3% for mammography alone to 4.2% (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION When added to screening mammography, MBI performed using a radiopharmaceutical activity acceptable for screening (effective dose 2.4 mSv) yielded a supplemental cancer detection rate of

  12. System performance of a prototype flat-panel imager operated under mammographic conditions.

    PubMed

    Jee, Kyung-Wook; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2003-07-01

    The results of an empirical and theoretical investigation of the performance of a high-resolution, active matrix flat-panel imager performed under mammographic conditions are reported. The imager is based upon a prototype, indirect detection active matrix array incorporating a discrete photodiode in each pixel and a pixel-to-pixel pitch of 97 microm. The investigation involved three imager configurations corresponding to the use of three different x-ray converters with the array. The converters were a conventional Gd2O2S-based mammographic phosphor screen (Min-R) and two structured CsI:Tl scintillators: one optimized for high spatial resolution (FOS-HR) and the other for high light output (FOS-HL). Detective quantum efficiency for mammographic exposures ranging from approximately 2 to approximately 40 mR at 26 kVp were determined for each imager configuration through measurements of x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise power spectrum (NPS). All configurations were found to provide significant presampling MTF at frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency of the array, approximately 5.2 mm(-1) , consistent with the high spatial resolution of the converters. In addition, the effect of additive electronic noise on the NPS was found to be significantly larger for the configuration with lower system gain (FOS-HR) than for the configurations with higher gain (Min-R, FOS-HL). The maximum DQE values obtained with the CsI:Tl scintillators were considerably greater than those obtained with the Min-R screen due to the significantly lower Swank noise of the scintillators. Moreover, DQE performance was found to degrade with decreasing exposure, although this exposure-dependence was considerably reduced for the higher gain configurations. Theoretical calculations based on the cascaded systems model were found to be in generally good agreement with these empirically determined NPS and DQE values. In this study, we provide an example of how cascaded

  13. Mammographic breast density: impact on breast cancer risk and implications for screening.

    PubMed

    Freer, Phoebe E

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic breast density is rapidly becoming a hot topic in both the medical literature and the lay press. In the United States, recent legislative changes in 19 states now require radiologists to notify patients regarding breast density as well as the possible need for supplemental screening. Federal legislation regarding breast density notification has been introduced, and its passage is likely on the horizon. An understanding of the context, scientific evidence, and controversies surrounding the topic of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer is critical for radiologists. The current state of evidence is presented regarding supplemental screening for women with dense breasts, including the use of digital breast tomosynthesis, whole-breast ultrasonography, and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A review of current practice guidelines and additional sources of information will improve radiologists' understanding of the relevant subject of breast density and enable them to respond appropriately to questions from patients, clinicians, and the media. PMID:25763718

  14. Mammographic Imaging Studies Using the Monte Carlo Image Simulation-Differential Sampling (MCMIS-DS) Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 1-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of certain design changes in the Fisher Senoscan mammography system and in the degree of breast compression on the discernability of microcalcifications in calcification clusters often observed in mammograms with tumor lesions. The most important design change that one can contemplate in a digital mammography system to improve resolution of calcifications is the reduction of pixel dimensions of the digital detector. Breast compression is painful to the patient and is though to be a deterrent to women to get routine mammographic screening. Calcification clusters often serve as markers (indicators ) of breast cancer.

  15. What information should be given to women invited for mammographic screening for breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Duffy, Stephen W; Tabar, Laszlo; Chen, Tony Hh; Yen, Amy Mf; Dean, Peter B; Smith, Robert A

    2006-11-01

    Mammography is the only proven frontline screening method for breast cancer. Following the demonstration of a reduction in breast cancer mortality with mammography, population mammographic screening services have been instituted, and there has been discussion in the medical literature of how to convey the pros and cons of screening to invited women. Much of the discussion has focused on the negative aspects of screening, such as false-positive and negative screens, overdiagnosis and anxiety. Also, some commentators have advocated rather cumbersome amounts of quantitative information. In this article we review the original evidence on the positive and negative aspects of screening, and show that the latter may have been exaggerated in the past. We suggest a few simple and clear points that should be made to the invited women, summarizing the positive and negative aspects without a mass of confusing statistics. PMID:19804001

  16. Mammographic density measurement: a comparison of automated volumetric density measurement to BIRADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Damases, Christine N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare mammographic breast density assessment with automated volumetric software with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by radiologists on two imaging systems. A data set of 120 mammograms was classified by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) Examiners. The mammograms were of 20 women (mean age, 60 years; range, 42-89 years). These women were image twice once with GE system and the following year with Hologic system. These images also had their volumetric density classified by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG). The radiologists were asked to estimate the mammographic density according to BIRADS categories (1- 4). There was a moderate agreement between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (K=0.45; p<0.001). Radiologists estimated percentage density to be lower by an average of 0.37, the radiologist's BIRADS having a mean of 2.13 and the mean VDG higher at 2.50 (t = -11.99; p<0.001). VDG and radiologist's BIRADS showed a positive strong correlation (r=0.84; p<0.001). Radiologist BIRADS and VDG AvBD% also showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.86; p<0.001). There was a large spread of radiologist's BIRADS categories for each of the VDG AvBD% classifications. Using Volpara, the Hologic system showed a higher meanAvBD% (10.02 vs. 9.97). However using BIRADS the Hologic systems showed a lower mean (2.05 vs. 2.21). Automated systems demonstrated higher internal validity. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement and a strong correlation between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density assessment.

  17. RELATIONSHIP OF MAMMOGRAPHIC DENSITY AND GENE EXPRESSION: ANALYSIS OF NORMAL BREAST TISSUE SURROUNDING BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Williams, Tyisha; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Wesolowska, Ewa; Boyd, Norman F.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Troester, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies of breast tissue gene expression have demonstrated that the extratumoral microenvironment has substantial variability across individuals, some of which can be attributed to epidemiologic factors. To evaluate how mammographic density (MD) and breast tissue composition relate to extratumoral microenvironment gene expression, we used data on 121 breast cancer patients from the population-based Polish Women's Breast Cancer Study. Design Breast cancer cases were classified based on a previously reported, biologically-defined extratumoral gene expression signature with two subtypes: an Active subtype, which is associated with high expression of genes related to fibrosis and wound response, and an Inactive subtype, which has high expression of cellular adhesion genes. MD of the contralateral breast was assessed using pre-treatment mammograms and a quantitative, reliable computer-assisted thresholding method. Breast tissue composition was evaluated based on digital image analysis of tissue sections. Results The Inactive extratumoral subtype was associated with significantly higher percentage mammographic density (PD) and dense area (DA) in univariate analysis (PD: p=0.001; DA: p=0.049) and in multivariable analyses adjusted for age and body mass index (PD: p=0.004; DA: p=0.049). Inactive/higher MD tissue was characterized by a significantly higher percentage of stroma and a significantly lower percentage of adipose tissue, with no significant change in epithelial content. Analysis of published gene expression signatures suggested that Inactive/higher MD tissue expressed increased estrogen response and decreased TGF-β signaling. Conclusions By linking novel molecular phenotypes with MD, our results indicate that MD reflects broad transcriptional changes, including changes in both epithelia- and stroma-derived signaling. PMID:23918601

  18. Glycemic index, glycemic load and mammographic breast density: the EPIC Florence longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Ermini, Ilaria; Occhini, Daniela; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Palli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83%) and MBD assessed according to Wolfe's classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfe's categories) with those with low MBD (N1+P1) through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR = 1.73, 95%CI 1.13-2.67, p for trend = 0.048) while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further investigations. PMID

  19. Assessment of change in breast density: reader performance using synthetic mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Sue; Swayamprakasam, Chitra; Berks, Michael; Sergeant, Jamie; Morris, Julie; Wilson, Mary; Barr, Nicky; Boggis, Caroline

    2012-02-01

    A recent study has shown that breast cancer risk can be reduced by taking Tamoxifen, but only if this results in at least a 10% point reduction in mammographic density. When mammographic density is quantified visually, it is impossible to assess reader accuracy using clinical images as the ground truth is unknown. Our aim was to compare three models of assessing density change and to determine reader accuracy in identifying reductions of 10% points or more. We created 100 synthetic, mammogram-like images comprising 50 pairs designed to simulate natural reduction in density within each pair. Model I: individual images were presented to readers and density assessed. Model II: pairs of images were displayed together, with readers assessing density for each image. Model III: pairs of images were displayed together, and readers asked whether there was at least a 10% point reduction in density. Ten expert readers participated. Readers' estimates of percentage density were significantly closer to the truth (6.8%-26.4%) when images were assessed individually rather than in pairs (9.6%-29.8%). Measurement of change was significantly more accurate in Model II than Model I (p<0.005). Detecting density changes of at least 10% points in image pairs, mean accuracy was significantly (p<0.005) lower (58%-88%) when change was calculated from density assessments than in Model III (74%-92%). Our results suggest that where readers need to identify change in density, images should be displayed alongside one another. In our study, less accurate assessors performed better when asked directly about the magnitude of the change.

  20. Influence of monitor characteristics on the signals detection present in the mammographic phantom image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Silvio R.; Medeiros, Regina B.

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the detection of microcalcifications and fibers on phantom images based on monitor readings versus analog image readings. 180 films were obtained with 3 different mammographic equipment under different exposure conditions and digitized using the Lumiscan75 scanner. It was used the ALVIM statistical phantom (4,5cm) and 2 acrylic plates of 1cm (6,5cm) over it. The software named QualIM was developed to manager the images and the database which storages the specialist's readings allowing them digital tools manipulation. The images were displayed on 4 monitors: CRT Philips 19" (2,9Mpixels/8bits), CRT Philips 22" (3,0Mpixels/8bits), LCD Clinton (3,0Mpixels/10bits) and LCD Barco (5,0Mpixels/14bits). The same images group was also displayed on the appropriated view box to mammograms (3200cd/m2) and the readings performance was taken as reference parameter. The software generates on real time Kappa values to microcalcifications and fibers detection, histogram, ROC curve and true/false positive parameters. Barco monitor readings produced superior results when compared with all the others suggesting that there weren't losses in the digitalizing process. Clinton monitor readings were similar the view box results and superior on both Philips monitors when compared the detection of objects on phantom images (6,5cm). The specialist performance results using Philips 22" were only comparable to view box and Clinton for images of 4,5cm. It was possible to verify that the monitors' spatial and contrast resolutions have influenced on the readings performance of specialists, suggesting these characteristics are relevant at lesions detection performance in mammographic exams.

  1. An assessment of reference exposure in analogic and digital mammographic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilly, J. G.; Miguel, C.; Schelin, H. R.; Porto, L. E.; Paschuk, S.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the incident air kerma (Ki,a), half-value layer (HVL), output and voltage accuracy for 28 mammography services were evaluated. All mammographs had high frequency rectification, a focus-film distance greater than 60 cm, automatic exposure control, a Mo-Mo anode-filter combination, and compression system. Twenty-three evaluations were made of analogic imaging systems and 21 of digital imaging systems, two of which were full field digital mammography units. The Ki,a was measured in the beam radiation with a 6 cm3 ionization chamber, calibrated for a mammography range of energy. A standard American College of Radiology mammographic phantom simulated a skull caudal incidence. The average, minimum, and maximum Ki,a values were 10.13 mGy, 3.92 mGy, and 30.41 mGy, respectively. However, when the analogic and digital systems are analyzed separately in two subsets, the values were 8.13 mGy, 3.92 mGy, and 11.78 mGy for the analogic systems and 12.33 mGy, 5.21 mGy, and 30.41 mGy for the digital systems, respectively. The results show that the Ki,a values found in digital systems were higher than those in analogic systems, highlighting the differences between these acquisition systems. All HVL values, measured in the primary beam at 28 kV were found between 0.33 mm Al and 0.43 mm Al. Although the manufacture time of the equipment was approximately 146 months (~12 years) prior, the variation in output was between 0.071 mGy/mAs and 0.164 mGy/mAs for the entire sample.

  2. Qualitative Student Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancey, William J.

    The concept of a qualitative model is used as the focus of this review of qualitative student models in order to compare alternative computational models and to contrast domain requirements. The report is divided into eight sections: (1) Origins and Goals (adaptive instruction, qualitative models of processes, components of an artificial…

  3. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  4. Requiem for Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Five papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982) focused on qualitative analysis curricula and instruction. Topics included benefits of qualitative analysis, use of iodo/bromo-complexes in qualitative analysis schemes, lecture demonstrations, and brief descriptions of three courses. (JN)

  5. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Uytven, Eric; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard

    2008-10-01

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p < 0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  6. Menstrual and reproductive factors in relation to mammographic density: the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Gold, Ellen B.; Greendale, Gail A.; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Modugno, Francesmary; Oestreicher, Nina; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Menstrual and reproductive factors may increase breast cancer risk through a pathway that includes increased mammographic density. We assessed whether known or suspected menstrual and reproductive breast cancer risk factors were cross-sectionally associated with mammographic density, by measuring area of radiographic density and total breast area on mammograms from 801 participants in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multi-ethnic cohort of pre- and early perimenopausal women. From multivariable linear regression, the following menstrual or reproductive factors were independently associated with percent mammographic density (area of dense breast/breast area): older age at menarche (β = 10.3, P < 0.01, for >13 vs. <12 years), premenstrual cravings and bloating (β = −3.36, P = 0.02), younger age at first full-term birth (β = −8.12, P < 0.01 for ≤23 years versus no births), greater number of births (β = −6.80, P < 0.01 for ≥3 births versus no births), and premenopausal status (β = 3.78, P < 0.01 versus early perimenopausal). Only number of births remained associated with percent density after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, study site, body mass index (BMI), and smoking. In addition, stratified analyses revealed that the association with number of births was confined to women within the lowest BMI tertile (β = −12.2, P < 0.01 for ≥3 births versus no births). Our data support a mechanism for parity and breast cancer that involves mammographic density among pre- and early perimenopausal women that may be modified by body size. PMID:18066689

  7. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with <25 % were more likely to be diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density. PMID:26518019

  8. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (p<0.001) with a 95% confidence interval [0.77, 0.94]. Significant texture feature predictors (p<0.05) included contrast, sum variance and difference average. Sensitivity for false-positives was 51% at the 100% cancer detection operating point. Although preliminary, clinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  9. Similarity of Fibroglandular Breast Tissue Content Measured from Magnetic Resonance and Mammographic Images and by a Mathematical Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hyunsu; Brunder, Donald G.; Anderson, Karl E.; Khamapirad, Tuenchit; Lu, Lee-Jane W.

    2014-01-01

    Women with high breast density (BD) have a 4- to 6-fold greater risk for breast cancer than women with low BD. We found that BD can be easily computed from a mathematical algorithm using routine mammographic imaging data or by a curve-fitting algorithm using fat and nonfat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. These BD measures in a strictly defined group of premenopausal women providing both mammographic and breast MRI images were predicted as well by the same set of strong predictor variables as were measures from a published laborious histogram segmentation method and a full field digital mammographic unit in multivariate regression models. We also found that the number of completed pregnancies, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, and progesterone were more strongly associated with amounts of glandular tissue than adipose tissue, while fat body mass, alanine aminotransferase, and insulin like growth factor-II appear to be more associated with the amount of breast adipose tissue. Our results show that methods of breast imaging and modalities for estimating the amount of glandular tissue have no effects on the strength of these predictors of BD. Thus, the more convenient mathematical algorithm and the safer MRI protocols may facilitate prospective measurements of BD. PMID:25132995

  10. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Heit, John A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A.; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A.; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Shah, Kaanan P.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A.; Beck, Andrew H.; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hopper, John L.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Boyd, Norman F.; Vachon, Celine M.; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B, SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23, TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease susceptibility loci. PMID:25342443

  12. A Novel Automated Mammographic Density Measure and Breast 
Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammographic breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor but is not used in the clinical setting, partly because of a lack of standardization and automation. We developed an automated and objective measurement of the grayscale value variation within a mammogram, evaluated its association with breast cancer, and compared its performance with that of percent density (PD). Methods Three clinic-based studies were included: a case–cohort study of 217 breast cancer case subjects and 2094 non-case subjects and two case–control studies comprising 928 case subjects and 1039 control subjects and 246 case subjects and 516 control subjects, respectively. Percent density was estimated from digitized mammograms using the computer-assisted Cumulus thresholding program, and variation was estimated from an automated algorithm. We estimated hazards ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards models for the cohort and logistic regression for case–control studies, with adjustment for age and body mass index. We performed a meta-analysis using random study effects to obtain pooled estimates of the associations between the two mammographic measures and breast cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The variation measure was statistically significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer in all three studies (highest vs lowest quartile: HR = 7.0 [95% CI = 4.6 to 10.4]; OR = 10.7 [95% CI = 7.5 to 15.3]; OR = 2.6 [95% CI = 1.6 to 4.2]; all P trend < .001). In two studies, the risk estimates and AUCs for the variation measure were greater than those for percent density (AUCs for variation = 0.71 and 0.76; AUCs for percent density = 0.65 and 0.65), whereas in the third study, these estimates were similar (AUC for variation = 0.60 and AUC for percent density = 0.61). A meta-analysis of the three studies demonstrated a stronger

  13. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  14. Increased vitamin D and calcium intake associated with reduced mammographic breast density among premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fair, Alecia Malin; Lewis, Toni J; Sanderson, Maureen; Dupont, William D; Fletcher, Sarah; Egan, Kathleen M; Disher, Anthony C

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D has been identified as a weak protective factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (relative risk, ~0.9), whereas high breast density has been identified as a strong risk factor (relative risk, ~4-6). To test the hypothesis that there is an association between vitamin D intake, but not circulating vitamin D levels, and mammographic breast density among women in our study, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 165 screening mammography patients at Nashville General Hospital's Breast Health Center, a public facility serving medically indigent and underserved women. Dietary and total (dietary plus supplements) vitamin D and calcium intakes were estimated by the Harvard African American Food Frequency Questionnaire, and blood samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Average percent breast density for the left and right breasts combined was estimated from digitized films using an interactive thresholding method available through Cumulus software. After statistical adjustment for age, race, and body mass index, the results revealed that there were significant trends of decreasing breast density with increasing vitamin D and calcium intake among premenopausal but not among postmenopausal women. There was no association between serum vitamin D and breast density in premenopausal or postmenopausal women. Confirmation of our findings in larger studies may assist in clarifying the role of vitamin D in breast density. PMID:26321093

  15. Mammographic film-processor temperature, development time, and chemistry: effect on dose, contrast, and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Rothschild, P.A.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Moler, C.

    1989-01-01

    Six different combinations of film-processor temperature (33.3 degrees C, 35 degrees C), development time (22 sec, 44 sec), and chemistry (Du Pont medium contrast developer (MCD) and Kodak rapid process (RP) developer) were each evaluated by separate analyses with Hurter and Driffield curves, test images of plastic step wedges, noise variance analysis, and phantom images; each combination also was evaluated clinically. Du Pont MCD chemistry produced greater contrast than did Kodak RP chemistry. A change in temperature from 33.3 degrees C (92 degrees F) to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) had the least effect on dose and image contrast. Temperatures of 36.7 degrees C (98 degrees F) and 38.3 degrees C (101 degrees F) also were tested with extended processing. The speed increased for 36.7 degrees C but decreased at 38.3 degrees C. Base plus fog increased, but contrast decreased for these higher temperatures. Increasing development time had the greatest effect on decreasing the dose required for equivalent film darkening when imaging BR12 breast equivalent test objects; ion chamber measurements showed a 32% reduction in dose when the development time was increased from 22 to 44 sec. Although noise variance doubled in images processed with the extended development time, diagnostic capability was not compromised. Extending the processing time for mammographic films was an effective method of dose reduction, whereas varying the processing temperature and chemicals had less effect on contrast and dose.

  16. The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shihying; Boone, John M.; Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Packard, Nathan J.

    2008-04-15

    The effect of breast skin thickness on dosimetry in mammography was investigated. Breast computed tomography (CT) acquisition techniques, combined with algorithms designed for determining specific breast metrics, were useful for estimating skin thickness. A radial-geometry edge detection scheme was implemented on coronal reconstructed breast CT (bCT) images to measure the breast skin thickness. Skin thickness of bilateral bCT volume data from 49 women and unilateral bCT volume data from 2 women (10 healthy women and 41 women with BIRADS 4 and 5 diagnoses) was robustly measured with the edge detection scheme. The mean breast skin thickness ({+-}inter-breast standard deviation) was found to be 1.45{+-}0.30 mm. Since most current published normalized glandular dose (D{sub gN}) coefficients are based on the assumption of a 4-mm breast skin thickness, the D{sub gN} values computed with Monte Carlo techniques will increase up to 18% due to the thinner skin layers (e.g., 6-cm 50% glandular breast, 28 kVp Mo-Mo spectrum). The thinner skin dimensions found in this study suggest that the current D{sub gN} values used for mammographic dosimetry lead to a slight underestimate in glandular dose.

  17. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes; Seta, Marismary Horsth De; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Delamarque, Elizabete Vianna; de Azevedo, Ana Cecília Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%), films development (72.7%), film response (72.7%), low contrast fine detail (92.2%), tumor mass visualization (76.5%), absence of image artifacts (94.1%), mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%). On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8%) and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%). Conclusion The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval. PMID:25987749

  18. Inter-observer variability within BI-RADS and RANZCR mammographic density assessment schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damases, Christine N.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; McEntee, Mark F.

    2016-03-01

    This study compares variability associated with two visual mammographic density (MD) assessment methods using two separate samples of radiologists. The image test-set comprised of images obtained from 20 women (age 42-89 years). The images were assessed for their MD by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners and twenty-six radiologists registered with the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). Images were assessed using the same technology and conditions, however the ABR radiologists used the BI-RADS and the RANZCR radiologists used the RANZCR breast density synoptic. Both scales use a 4-point assessment. The images were then grouped as low- and high-density; low including BIRADS 1 and 2 or RANZCR 1 and 2 and high including BI-RADS 3 and 4 or RANZCR 3 and 4. Four-point BI-RADS and RANZCR showed no or negligible correlation (ρ=-0.029 p<0.859). The average inter-observer agreement on the BI-RADS scale had a Kappa of 0.565; [95% CI = 0.519 - 0.610], and ranged between 0.328-0.669 while the inter-observer agreement using the RANZCR scale had a Kappa of 0.360; [95% CI = 0.308 - 0.412] and a range of 0.078-0.499. Our findings show a wider range of inter-observer variability among RANZCR registered radiologists than the ABR examiners.

  19. Mammographic density is the main correlate of tumors detected on ultrasound but not on mammography.

    PubMed

    Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Brehm, Barbara; Heusinger, Katharina; Jud, Sebastian M; Loehberg, Christian R; Hack, Carolin C; Preuss, Caroline; Lux, Michael P; Hartmann, Arndt; Vachon, Celine M; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    Although mammography screening programs do not include ultrasound examinations, some diagnostic units do provide women with both mammography and ultrasonography. This article is concerned with estimating the risk of a breast cancer patient diagnosed in a hospital-based mammography unit having a tumor that is visible on ultrasound but not on mammography. A total of 1,399 women with invasive breast cancer from a hospital-based diagnostic mammography unit were included in this retrospective study. For inclusion, mammograms from the time of the primary diagnosis had to be available for computer-assisted assessment of percentage mammographic density (PMD), as well as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessment of mammography. In addition, ultrasound findings were available for the complete cohort as part of routine diagnostic procedures, regardless of any patient or imaging characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of mammography failure, defined as BIRADS assessment 1 or 2. The probability that the visibility of a tumor might be masked at diagnosis was estimated using a regression model with the identified predictors. Tumors were only visible on ultrasound in 107 cases (7.6%). PMD was the strongest predictor for mammography failure, but age, body mass index and previous breast surgery also influenced the risk, independently of the PMD. Risk probabilities ranged from 1% for a defined low-risk group up to 40% for a high-risk group. These findings might help identify women who should be offered ultrasound examinations in addition to mammography. PMID:27389655

  20. Mammographic findings after breast cancer treatment with local excision and definitive irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dershaw, D.D.; Shank, B.; Reisinger, S.

    1987-08-01

    Following local excision and definitive irradiation of 163 breast cancers in 160 women, alterations in mammographic patterns were observed for up to 7 years. Skin thickening was observed in 96% of mammograms obtained within 1 year of completing therapy and was most pronounced in women treated with iridium implant, chemotherapy, or axillary dissection. In 76% of mammograms, alterations in the parenchymal pattern, including coarsening of stroma and increased breast density, were seen at 1 year. Neither skin nor parenchymal changes progressed after 1 year. Within 3 years of treatment the parenchymal density, which usually regressed, did not change in all patients. At 3 years skin thickness and the parenchymal pattern had returned to normal in less than 50% of the breasts of these women. Scars developed in approximately one-quarter of women. They were present on the initial post-treatment mammogram and remained unchanged on serial studies. Coarse, benign calcifications also developed in the breasts of about one-quarter of women. Microcalcifications developed in 11 breasts; biopsy specimens of six were benign. Benign microcalcifications may be related to therapy.

  1. Hemodynamic signature of breast cancer under fractional mammographic compression using a dynamic diffuse optical tomography system

    PubMed Central

    Carp, Stefan A.; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Wanyo, Christy M.; Fang, Qianqian; Specht, Michelle C.; Schapira, Lidia; Moy, Beverly; Bardia, Aditya; Boas, David A.; Isakoff, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Near infrared dynamic diffuse optical tomography measurements of breast hemodynamics during fractional mammographic compression offer a novel contrast mechanism for detecting breast cancer and monitoring chemotherapy. Tissue viscoelastic relaxation during the compression period leads to a slow reduction in the compression force and reveals biomechanical and metabolic differences between healthy and lesion tissue. We measured both the absolute values and the temporal evolution of hemoglobin concentration during 25-35 N of compression for 22 stage II and III breast cancer patients scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy. 17 patients were included in the group analysis (average tumor size 3.2 cm, range: 1.3-5.7 cm). We observed a statistically significant differential decrease in total and oxy-hemoglobin, as well as in hemoglobin oxygen saturation in tumor areas vs. healthy tissue, as early as 30 seconds into the compression period. The hemodynamic contrast is likely driven by the higher tumor stiffness and different viscoelastic relaxation rate, as well as the higher tumor oxygen metabolism rate. PMID:24409390

  2. Consumption of sweet foods and mammographic breast density: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing consumption of sugar worldwide seems to lead to several health problems, including some types of cancer. While some studies reported a positive association between sweet foods intake and breast cancer risk, little is known about their relation to mammographic density (MD), a strong breast cancer risk factor. This study examined the association of sweet foods and drinks intake with MD among 776 premenopausal and 779 postmenopausal women recruited at mammography. Methods A food-frequency questionnaire was used to assess intake of sweet foods, sugar-sweetened beverages and spoonsful of sugar added. Percent and absolute breast density were estimated using a computer-assisted method. Multivariate generalized linear models were used to evaluate associations. All models were adjusted for potential confounders, including age and body mass index. Results For increasing quartiles of sugar-sweetened beverages intake, adjusted-mean absolute density was respectively 32, 34, 32 and 36 cm2 among all women (Ptrend = 0.040) and 43, 46, 44 and 51 cm2 among premenopausal women (Ptrend = 0.007). For increasing quartiles of sweet foods intake, adjusted-mean percent density was respectively 16, 16, 17 and 19% among postmenopausal women (Ptrend = 0.036). No association was shown between intake of spoonsful of sugar added and MD. Conclusion Our results suggest that an increase in sweet foods or sugar-sweetened beverage intake is associated with higher MD. PMID:24969543

  3. Teaching Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delyser, Dydia

    2008-01-01

    Explicitly qualitative research has never before been so popular in human geography, and this article hopes to encourage more graduate students and faculty members to undertake the teaching of qualitative geography. The article describes one such course for graduate students, highlighting its challenges and rewards, and focusing on exercises…

  4. Qualitative Studies: Historiographical Antecedents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Rilla Dean

    This paper provides an overview of qualitative studies' antecedents among historiographers and of the positivist tide which nearly engulfed them. Humans live by interpretations. The task of social science--the basic task of qualitative studies--is to study these interpretations so that we can better understand the meanings which people use to…

  5. Visualizing Qualitative Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slone, Debra J.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of qualitative data in today's society and the need to easily scrutinize, digest, and share this information calls for effective visualization and analysis tools. Yet, no existing qualitative tools have the analytic power, visual effectiveness, and universality of familiar quantitative instruments like bar charts, scatter-plots, and…

  6. Handbook of Qualitative Research. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.

    This handbook's second edition represents the state of the art for the theory and practice of qualitative inquiry. It features eight new topics, including autoethnography, critical race theory, applied ethnography, queer theory, and "testimonio"every chapter in the handbook has been thoroughly revised and updated. The book contains:"Preface" (1…

  7. Mammographic texture resemblance generalizes as an independent risk factor for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast density has been established as a major risk factor for breast cancer. We have previously demonstrated that mammographic texture resemblance (MTR), recognizing the local texture patterns of the mammogram, is also a risk factor for breast cancer, independent of percent breast density. We examine if these findings generalize to another population. Methods Texture patterns were recorded in digitalized pre-diagnosis (3.7 years) film mammograms of a nested case–control study within the Dutch screening program (S1) comprising of 245 breast cancers and 250 matched controls. The patterns were recognized in the same study using cross-validation to form resemblance scores associated with breast cancer. Texture patterns from S1 were examined in an independent nested case–control study within the Mayo Mammography Health Study cohort (S2) of 226 cases and 442 matched controls: mammograms on average 8.5 years prior to diagnosis, risk factor information and percent mammographic density (PD) estimated using Cumulus were available. MTR scores estimated from S1, S2 and S1 + S2 (the latter two as cross-validations) were evaluated in S2. MTR scores were analyzed as both quartiles and continuously for association with breast cancer using odds ratios (OR) and adjusting for known risk factors including age, body mass index (BMI), and hormone usage. Results The mean ages of S1 and S2 were 58.0 ± 5.7 years and 55.2 ± 10.5 years, respectively. The MTR scores on S1 showed significant capability to discriminate cancers from controls (area under the operator characteristics curve (AUC) = 0.63 ± 0.02, P <0.001), which persisted after adjustment for PD. S2 showed an AUC of 0.63, 0.61, and 0.60 based on PD, MTR scores trained on S2, and MTR scores trained on S1, respectively. When adjusted for PD, MTR scores of S2 trained on S1 showed an association with breast cancer for the highest quartile alone: OR in quartiles of controls as reference; 1

  8. Vision 20/20: Mammographic breast density and its clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong Lau, Susie

    2015-12-15

    Breast density is a strong predictor of the failure of mammography screening to detect breast cancer and is a strong predictor of the risk of developing breast cancer. The many imaging options that are now available for imaging dense breasts show great promise, but there is still the question of determining which women are “dense” and what imaging modality is suitable for individual women. To date, mammographic breast density has been classified according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories from visual assessment, but this is known to be very subjective. Despite many research reports, the authors believe there has been a lack of physics-led and evidence-based arguments about what breast density actually is, how it should be measured, and how it should be used. In this paper, the authors attempt to start correcting this situation by reviewing the history of breast density research and the debates generated by the advocacy movement. The authors review the development of breast density estimation from pattern analysis to area-based analysis, and the current automated volumetric breast density (VBD) analysis. This is followed by a discussion on seeking the ground truth of VBD and mapping volumetric methods to BI-RADS density categories. The authors expect great improvement in VBD measurements that will satisfy the needs of radiologists, epidemiologists, surgeons, and physicists. The authors believe that they are now witnessing a paradigm shift toward personalized breast screening, which is going to see many more cancers being detected early, with the use of automated density measurement tools as an important component.

  9. Relationship of Terminal Duct Lobular Unit Involution of the Breast with Area and Volume Mammographic Densities.

    PubMed

    Gierach, Gretchen L; Patel, Deesha A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Figueroa, Jonine D; Linville, Laura; Papathomas, Daphne; Johnson, Jason M; Chicoine, Rachael E; Herschorn, Sally D; Shepherd, John A; Wang, Jeff; Malkov, Serghei; Vacek, Pamela M; Weaver, Donald L; Fan, Bo; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Palakal, Maya; Xiang, Jackie; Oh, Hannah; Horne, Hisani N; Sprague, Brian L; Hewitt, Stephen M; Brinton, Louise A; Sherman, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Elevated mammographic density (MD) is an established breast cancer risk factor. Reduced involution of terminal duct lobular units (TDLU), the histologic source of most breast cancers, has been associated with higher MD and breast cancer risk. We investigated relationships of TDLU involution with area and volumetric MD, measured throughout the breast and surrounding biopsy targets (perilesional). Three measures inversely related to TDLU involution (TDLU count/mm(2), median TDLU span, median acini count/TDLU) assessed in benign diagnostic biopsies from 348 women, ages 40-65, were related to MD area (quantified with thresholding software) and volume (assessed with a density phantom) by analysis of covariance, stratified by menopausal status and adjusted for confounders. Among premenopausal women, TDLU count was directly associated with percent perilesional MD (P trend = 0.03), but not with absolute dense area/volume. Greater TDLU span was associated with elevated percent dense area/volume (P trend<0.05) and absolute perilesional MD (P = 0.003). Acini count was directly associated with absolute perilesional MD (P = 0.02). Greater TDLU involution (all metrics) was associated with increased nondense area/volume (P trend ≤ 0.04). Among postmenopausal women, TDLU measures were not significantly associated with MD. Among premenopausal women, reduced TDLU involution was associated with higher area and volumetric MD, particularly in perilesional parenchyma. Data indicating that TDLU involution and MD are correlated markers of breast cancer risk suggest that associations of MD with breast cancer may partly reflect amounts of at-risk epithelium. If confirmed, these results could suggest a prevention paradigm based on enhancing TDLU involution and monitoring efficacy by assessing MD reduction. PMID:26645278

  10. Mammographic parasitic calcifications in South West Nigeria: prospective and descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji-Sofoluwe, Adenike Temitayo; Obajimi, Millicent Olubunmi; Oluwasola, Abideen Olayiwola; Soyemi, Temitope O

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lymphatic filariasis caused by nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia Malayi is endemic in the tropics. In Nigeria, 25% of the population is infected. Lymph edema and elephantiasis are the predominant manifestations. Its infrequent manifestation is in the breast. This paper discusses the epidemiology, reviews literature, imaging options and mammographic appearances of these parasitic nematodes. Methods This prospective descriptive study reports on 39 cases of parasitic calcifications seen during mammography in the Radiology Department, University College Hospital between 2006 and 2012 in Ibadan, South West Nigeria. Each mammogram was reported by MO and ATS: assigned a final Bi-RADs category. Parasitic calcifications were further evaluated for distribution, and types of calcification. Results A total of 527 women had mammography done between 2006 and 2012. Thirty-nine women (7.4%) had parasitic breast calcifications. The ages of the women ranged between 38-71 years - mean of 52.36±8.72 SD. Twenty-three (59%) were post-menopausal, 16(41%) were pre-menopausal. The majority (31; 79.5%) were screeners while 8(20.5%) were follow up cases. Approximately half (51.3%) of the women had no complaints. Pain (23.1%) was the commonest presentation in the remaining half. Solitary calcifications were predominant (20) while only 3 cases had 10 calcifications. Left sided calcifications (53.8%) were the majority. Calcifications were subcutaneous in 2/3rds of the women (66.7%) while the Yoruba tribe (84.6%) was principal. Conclusion Parasitic breast calcifications can be misdiagnosed on mammography for suspicious micro-calcification. This publication should alert radiologists in a tropical country like Nigeria to increase diagnostic vigilance thereby preventing unnecessary anxiety and invasive work-up procedures. PMID:24255732

  11. Sibship analysis of associations between SNP haplotypes and a continuous trait with application to mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Stone, J; Gurrin, L C; Hayes, V M; Southey, M C; Hopper, J L; Byrnes, G B

    2010-05-01

    Haplotype-based association studies have been proposed as a powerful comprehensive approach to identify causal genetic variation underlying complex diseases. Data comparisons within families offer the additional advantage of dealing naturally with complex sources of noise, confounding and population stratification. Two problems encountered when investigating associations between haplotypes and a continuous trait using data from sibships are (i) the need to define within-sibship comparisons for sibships of size greater than two and (ii) the difficulty of resolving the joint distribution of haplotype pairs within sibships in the absence of parental genotypes. We therefore propose first a method of orthogonal transformation of both outcomes and exposures that allow the decomposition of between- and within-sibship regression effects when sibship size is greater than two. We conducted a simulation study, which confirmed analysis using all members of a sibship is statistically more powerful than methods based on cross-sectional analysis or using subsets of sib-pairs. Second, we propose a simple permutation approach to avoid errors of inference due to the within-sibship correlation of any errors in haplotype assignment. These methods were applied to investigate the association between mammographic density (MD), a continuously distributed and heritable risk factor for breast cancer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes from the VDR gene using data from a study of 430 twins and sisters. We found evidence of association between MD and a 4-SNP VDR haplotype. In conclusion, our proposed method retains the benefits of the between- and within-pair analysis for pairs of siblings and can be implemented in standard software. PMID:19918759

  12. Body size throughout the life course and mammographic density in Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Megan S.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Lajous, Martin; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Biessy, Carine; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Romieu, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but the biological mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Current adult body mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with percent MD; however, few studies have included Hispanic women or evaluated associations with measures of body fatness earlier in life. ESMaestras was established in 2006, when 28,345 women ages ≥35 responded to a detailed questionnaire that assessed possible disease risk factors, including body fatness in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. In 2007, 2,084 ESMaestras participants underwent a clinical examination, which included measurements of weight, height, and sitting height and a mammogram. We measured percent MD using a computer-assisted method. The current analysis includes 972 premenopausal and 559 postmenopausal women. We used multivariable linear regression to evaluate associations between measures of body size and MD, independent of current BMI. Among pre- and postmenopausal women, we observed no significant associations between body fatness during childhood, adolescence or young adulthood and percent MD. Among postmenopausal women, we observed a modest positive association between body fatness immediately before first pregnancy and between ages 25–35 after adjustment for current BMI, with differences of 4.9 and 3.6 percentage points, respectively, in percent MD between the heaviest and leanest women (p-trend = 0.02). There were no significant associations between height, sitting height, and percent MD among pre- or postmenopausal women in multivariable models adjusting for BMI. In general, we found no clear associations between measures of body size in early life, current sitting height, or current height, and percent MD, after adjusting for current BMI, in this population of Mexican women. Our observation of a positive association between early adult body fatness (i.e., before first pregnancy and ages 25–35) and percent MD among

  13. Vision 20/20: Mammographic breast density and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Lau, Susie

    2015-12-01

    Breast density is a strong predictor of the failure of mammography screening to detect breast cancer and is a strong predictor of the risk of developing breast cancer. The many imaging options that are now available for imaging dense breasts show great promise, but there is still the question of determining which women are "dense" and what imaging modality is suitable for individual women. To date, mammographic breast density has been classified according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories from visual assessment, but this is known to be very subjective. Despite many research reports, the authors believe there has been a lack of physics-led and evidence-based arguments about what breast density actually is, how it should be measured, and how it should be used. In this paper, the authors attempt to start correcting this situation by reviewing the history of breast density research and the debates generated by the advocacy movement. The authors review the development of breast density estimation from pattern analysis to area-based analysis, and the current automated volumetric breast density (VBD) analysis. This is followed by a discussion on seeking the ground truth of VBD and mapping volumetric methods to BI-RADS density categories. The authors expect great improvement in VBD measurements that will satisfy the needs of radiologists, epidemiologists, surgeons, and physicists. The authors believe that they are now witnessing a paradigm shift toward personalized breast screening, which is going to see many more cancers being detected early, with the use of automated density measurement tools as an important component. PMID:26632060

  14. HCG blood test - qualitative

    MedlinePlus

    ... qualitative Images Blood test References Lee P, Pincus MR, McPherson RA. Diagnosis and management of cancer using serologic tumor markers. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory ...

  15. Computers and Qualitative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Jerry; Jost, Muktha

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of computers in qualitative research, including sources of information; collaboration; electronic discussion groups; Web sites; Internet search engines; electronic sources of data; data collection; communicating research results; desktop publishing; hypermedia and multimedia documents; electronic publishing; holistic and…

  16. Variation in Inflammatory Cytokine/Growth-Factor Genes and Mammographic Density in Premenopausal Women Aged 50–55

    PubMed Central

    Ozhand, Ali; Lee, Eunjung; Wu, Anna H.; Ellingjord-Dale, Merete; Akslen, Lars A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Ursin, Giske

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD) has been found to be an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Although data from twin studies suggest that MD has a strong genetic component, the exact genes involved remain to be identified. Alterations in stromal composition and the number of epithelial cells are the most predominant histopathological determinants of mammographic density. Interactions between the breast stroma and epithelium are critically important in the maturation and development of the mammary gland and the cross-talk between these cells are mediated by paracrine growth factors and cytokines. The potential impact of genetic variation in growth factors and cytokines on MD is largely unknown. Methods We investigated the association between 89 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 cytokine/growth-factor genes (FGFR2, IGFBP1, IGFBP3, TGFB1, TNF, VEGF, IL6) and percent MD in 301 premenopausal women (aged 50 to 55 years) participating in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. We evaluated the suggestive associations in 216 premenopausal Singapore Chinese Women of the same age. Results We found statistically significant associations between 9 tagging SNPs in the IL6 gene and MD in Norwegian women; the effect ranged from 3–5% in MD per variant allele (p-values = 0.02 to 0.0002). One SNP in the IL6 (rs10242595) significantly influenced MD in Singapore Chinese women. Conclusion Genetic variations in IL6 may be associated with MD and therefore may be an indicator of breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. PMID:23762340

  17. A review of the cost-effectiveness of Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography in diagnosis of breast cancer in Taiwanese women with indeterminate mammographically dense breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Shan; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chan, Tam; Sun, Shung-Shung; Kao, Albert

    2002-11-01

    In general, biopsy is the preferred management method for women with indeterminate mammographically dense breasts. In this review, we describe a decision analysis model comparing technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (Tc-99m sestamibi) scintimammography and excisional biopsy as breast cancer evaluation strategies for hypothetical cohorts of estimated 16,000-40,000 women with indeterminate mammographic probability of malignancy because of mammographically dense breasts. In cost-effectiveness analysis, quantitative decision tree sensitivity analysis was used to compare the conventional excision biopsy alone strategy (strategy A) with decision strategy for screening with Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography before excision biopsy (strategy B) after an indeterminate mammogram. Strategy B showed a cost saving of US dollars 649,600-1,624,000 in reducing the cost of unnecessary biopsies. The total cost of strategy B showed a cost saving of US dollars 123,075-307,776 compared to strategy A. The analysis data indicate that Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography can save the cost of unnecessary biopsies in Taiwanese women with non-diagnostic mammogram because of mammographically dense breasts. PMID:12356511

  18. Mammographic Density Phenotypes and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Rebecca E.; Ursin, Giske; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; McCormack, Valerie; Baglietto, Laura; Vachon, Celine; Bakker, Marije F.; Giles, Graham G.; Chia, Kee Seng; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Louise; Hall, Per; Hartman, Mikael; Warren, Ruth M. L.; Hislop, Greg; Chiarelli, Anna M.; Hopper, John L.; Krishnan, Kavitha; Li, Jingmei; Li, Qing; Pagano, Ian; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wong, Chia Siong; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Boyd, Norman F.; van Gils, Carla H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibroglandular breast tissue appears dense on mammogram, whereas fat appears nondense. It is unclear whether absolute or percentage dense area more strongly predicts breast cancer risk and whether absolute nondense area is independently associated with risk. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 case–control studies providing results from logistic regressions for associations between one standard deviation (SD) increments in mammographic density phenotypes and breast cancer risk. We used random-effects models to calculate pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All tests were two-sided with P less than .05 considered to be statistically significant. Results Among premenopausal women (n = 1776 case patients; n = 2834 control subjects), summary odds ratios were 1.37 (95% CI = 1.29 to 1.47) for absolute dense area, 0.78 (95% CI = 0.71 to 0.86) for absolute nondense area, and 1.52 (95% CI = 1.39 to 1.66) for percentage dense area when pooling estimates adjusted for age, body mass index, and parity. Corresponding odds ratios among postmenopausal women (n = 6643 case patients; n = 11187 control subjects) were 1.38 (95% CI = 1.31 to 1.44), 0.79 (95% CI = 0.73 to 0.85), and 1.53 (95% CI = 1.44 to 1.64). After additional adjustment for absolute dense area, associations between absolute nondense area and breast cancer became attenuated or null in several studies and summary odds ratios became 0.82 (95% CI = 0.71 to 0.94; P heterogeneity = .02) for premenopausal and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.75 to 0.96; P heterogeneity < .01) for postmenopausal women. Conclusions The results suggest that percentage dense area is a stronger breast cancer risk factor than absolute dense area. Absolute nondense area was inversely associated with breast cancer risk, but it is unclear whether the association is independent of absolute dense area. PMID:24816206

  19. Association between the Adherence to the International Guidelines for Cancer Prevention and Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, Adela; Prieto, Leandro; Ederra, María; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Vidal, Carmen; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Pedraz, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Lope, Virginia; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density (MD) is considered a strong predictor of Breast Cancer (BC). The objective of the present study is to explore the association between MD and the compliance with the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations for cancer prevention. Methods Data of 3584 women attending screening from a population-based multicenter cross-sectional study (DDM-Spain) collected from October 7, 2007 through July 14, 2008, was used to calculate a score that measures the level of compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations: R1)Maintain adequate body weight; R2)Be physically active; 3R)Limit the intake of high density foods; R4)Eat mostly plant foods; R5)Limit the intake of animal foods; R6)Limit alcohol intake; R7)Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; R8)Meet nutritional needs through diet. The association between the score and MD (assessed by a single radiologist using a semi-quantitative scale) was evaluated using ordinal logistic models with random center-specific intercepts adjusted for the main determinants of MD. Stratified analyses by menopausal status and smoking status were also carried out. Results A higher compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with lower MD (OR1-unit increase = 0.93 95%CI:0.86;0.99). The association was stronger in postmenopausal women (OR = 0.91 95%CI:0.84;0.99) and nonsmokers (OR = 0.87;95%CI:0.80;0.96 for nonsmokers, OR = 1.01 95%CI:0.91;1.12 for smokers, P-interaction = 0.042). Among nonsmokers, maintaining adequate body weight (OR = 0.81 95%CI:0.65;1.01), practicing physical activity (OR = 0.68 95%CI:0.48;0.96) and moderating the intake of high-density foods (OR = 0.58 95%CI:0.40;0.86) and alcoholic beverages (OR = 0.76 95%CI:0.55;1.05) were the recommendations showing the strongest associations with MD. Conclusions postmenopausal women and non-smokers with greater compliance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines have lower MD. These results may

  20. Qualitative Assertions as Prescriptive Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolen, Amanda; Talbert, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The primary question regarding prescriptive appropriateness is a difficult one to answer for the qualitative researcher. While there are certainly qualitative researchers who have offered prescriptive protocols to better define and describe the terrain of qualitative research design and there are qualitative researchers who offer research…

  1. Qualitative and quantitative features of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant; Abarzhi, Snezhana; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Lawrie, Andrew; RTI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We consider dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) flow in a large aspect ratio three-dimensional domain with square symmetry in the plane for fluids with contrasting densities. In order to quantify the interface evolution from a small amplitude single-mode initial perturbation to advanced stage of RT mixing, we apply numerical simulations using the MOBILE code, theoretical analyses, including group theory and momentum model, as well as parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence. We find: In RT flow, the fluid motion is intense near the interface and is negligible far from the interface. At late times the growth rates of RT bubbles and spikes may increase without a corresponding increase of length-scales in the direction normal to acceleration. The parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence in RT mixing are shown to scale well with the flow Reynolds number and Froude number.

  2. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-07-16

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T>160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.

  3. Demystifying Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greckhamer, Thomas; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Cilesiz, Sebnem; Hayes, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to demystify, through deconstruction, the concept of "interdisciplinarity" in the context of qualitative research to contribute to a new praxis of knowledge production through reflection on the possibilities and impossibilities of interdisciplinarity. A review and discussion of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity leads the…

  4. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. PMID:27338694

  5. Disciplining Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzin, Norman K.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.; Giardina, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative research exists in a time of global uncertainty. Around the world, governments are attempting to regulate scientific inquiry by defining what counts as "good" science. These regulatory activities raise fundamental, philosophical epistemological, political and pedagogical issues for scholarship and freedom of speech in the academy. This…

  6. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that qualitatively, entropy is simple. Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. (MM)

  7. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  8. Bookstart: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Maggie; Wade, Barrie

    2003-01-01

    A qualitative study of Bookstart, which gave free children's books and support to British inner-city families, collected data from librarians, health visitors, and nursery school staff. Bookstart increased positive attitudes toward and interest in books. Health visitors' support was crucial in helping parents use the books to support children's…

  9. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  10. The Effect of Raloxifene on Mammographic Density and Breast MRI in Premenopausal Women at Increased Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eng-Wong, Jennifer; Orzano-Birgani, Jennifer; Chow, Catherine K.; Venzon, David; Yao, Jianhua; Galbo, Claudia E.; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Prindiville, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. MD and breast MRI volume (MRIV) assess the amount of fibroglandular tissue in the breast. MD and MRIV can be modulated with hormonal interventions, suggesting that these imaging modalities may be useful as surrogate endpoint biomarkers for breast cancer chemoprevention trials. We evaluated the effect of raloxifene on MD and MRIV in premenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer. Materials and Methods Mammograms and MRIs were obtained at baseline and after one and two years of raloxifene 60 mg by mouth daily for 27 premenopausal women. Mammographic percent dense area was calculated using a semi-quantitative thresholding technique. T1 weighted spoiled gradient-echo MRI with fat suppression was used to determine breast MRIV using a semiautomatic method. Mean change in MD and median change in MRIV were assessed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results No significant change in MD was seen after treatment with raloxifene. Mean change after one year was 1% (95% CI -3 to +5) and after two years was 1% (95% CI -2 to +5). MRIV decreased on raloxifene. Median relative change in MRIV after one year was -17% (95% CI % -28 to -9; p=0.0017) and after two years was -16% (95% CI -31 to -4; p=0.0004). Conclusions In high risk premenopausal women MD did not change on raloxifene, while MRIV significantly declined. Our findings suggest that MRIV is a promising surrogate biomarker in premenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer and should be investigated further in breast cancer prevention trials. PMID:18583470

  11. Towards a nanoscale mammographic contrast agent: development of a modular pre-clinical dual optical/x-ray agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Niroui, Farnaz; Levitin, Ronald B.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Rowlands, J. A.; Matsuura, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) can provide improved breast cancer detection and characterization compared to conventional mammography by imaging the effects of tumour angiogenesis. Current small-molecule contrast agents used for CEDM are limited by a short plasma half-life and rapid extravasation into tissue interstitial space. To address these limitations, nanoscale agents that can remain intravascular except at sites of tumour angiogenesis can be used. For CEDM, this agent must be both biocompatible and strongly attenuate mammographic energy x-rays. Nanoscale perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) droplets have good x-ray attenuation and have been used in patients for other applications. However, the macroscopic scale of x-ray imaging (50-100 µm) is inadequate for direct verification that PFOB droplets localize at sites of breast tumour angiogenesis. For efficient pre-clinical optimization for CEDM, we integrated an optical marker into PFOB droplets for microscopic assessment (≪50 µm). To develop PFOB droplets as a new nanoscale mammographic contrast agent, PFOB droplets were labelled with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). The droplets had mean diameters of 160 nm, fluoresced at 635 nm and attenuated x-ray spectra at 30.5 keV mean energy with a relative attenuation of 5.6 ± 0.3 Hounsfield units (HU) mg-1 mL-1 QD-PFOB. With the agent loaded into tissue phantoms, good correlation between x-ray attenuation and optical fluorescence was found (R2 = 0.96), confirming co-localization of the QDs with PFOB for quantitative assessment using x-ray or optical methods. Furthermore, the QDs can be removed from the PFOB agent without affecting its x-ray attenuation or structural properties for expedited translation of optimized PFOB droplet formulations into patients.

  12. A qualitative model for temporal reasoning with incomplete information

    SciTech Connect

    Geffner, H.

    1996-12-31

    We develop a qualitative framework for temporal reasoning with incomplete information that features a modeling language based on rules and a semantics based on infinitesimal probabilities. The framework relates logical and probabilistical models, and accommodates in a natural way features that have been found problematic in other models like non-determinism, action qualifications, parallel actions, and abduction to actions and fluents.

  13. Qualitative Research: Comments and Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    This article comments upon the use of qualitative research in physical education, exercise, and sport science. Topics include unresolved methodological problems, data analysis, and the scope of qualitative research. (IAH)

  14. Combined effects of endogenous sex hormone levels and mammographic density on postmenopausal breast cancer risk: results from the Breakthrough Generations Study

    PubMed Central

    Schoemaker, M J; Folkerd, E J; Jones, M E; Rae, M; Allen, S; Ashworth, A; Dowsett, M; Swerdlow, A J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mammographic density and sex hormone levels are strong risk factors for breast cancer, but it is unclear whether they represent the same aetiological entity or are independent risk factors. Methods: Within the Breakthrough Generations Study cohort, we conducted a case–control study of 265 postmenopausal breast cancer cases and 343 controls with prediagnostic mammograms and blood samples. Plasma was assayed for oestradiol, testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations and mammographic density assessed by Cumulus. Results: Oestradiol and testosterone were negatively and SHBG positively associated with percentage density and absolute dense area, but after adjusting for body mass index the associations remained significant only for SHBG. Breast cancer risk was independently and significantly positively associated with percentage density (P=0.002), oestradiol (P=0.002) and testosterone (P=0.007) levels. Women in the highest tertile of both density and sex hormone level were at greatest risk, with an odds ratio of 7.81 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.89–21.1) for oestradiol and 4.57 (95% CI: 1.75–11.9) for testosterone and high density compared with those who were in the lowest tertiles. The cumulative risk of breast cancer in the highest oestradiol and density tertiles, representing 8% of controls, was estimated as 12.8% at ages 50–69 years and 19.4% at ages 20–79 years, and in the lowest tertiles was 1.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Associations of breast cancer risk with tertiles of mammographic dense area were less strong than for percentage density. Conclusions: Endogenous sex hormone levels and mammographic density are independent risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, which in combination can identify women who might benefit from increased frequency of screening and chemoprophylaxis. PMID:24518596

  15. Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) activity, mammographic density, and oxidative stress: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chi-Chen; Tang, Bing-Kou; Rao, Venketeshwer; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Martin, Lisa; Tritchler, David; Yaffe, Martin; Boyd, Norman F

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Mammographically dense breast tissue is a strong predictor of breast cancer risk, and is influenced by both mitogens and mutagens. One enzyme that is able to affect both the mitogenic and mutagenic characteristics of estrogens is cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), which is principally responsible for the metabolism of 17β-estradiol. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 146 premenopausal and 149 postmenopausal women, we examined the relationships between CYP1A2 activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and mammographic density. In vivo CYP1A2 activity was assessed by measuring caffeine metabolites in urine. Levels of serum and urinary MDA, and MDA–deoxyguanosine adducts in DNA were measured. Mammograms were digitized and measured using a computer-assisted method. Results CYP1A2 activity in postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women, was positively associated with mammographic density, suggesting that increased CYP1A2 activity after the menopause is a risk factor for breast cancer. In premenopausal women, but not in postmenopausal women, CYP1A2 activity was positively associated with serum and urinary MDA levels; there was also some evidence that CYP1A2 activity was more positively associated with percentage breast density when MDA levels were high, and more negatively associated with percentage breast density when MDA levels were low. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence that variation in the activity level of enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism is related to levels of mammographic density and potentially to breast cancer risk. PMID:15217501

  16. Improved location features for linkage of regions across ipsilateral mammograms.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Christine; van Schie, Guido; Lesniak, Jan M; Karssemeijer, Nico; Székely, Gábor

    2013-12-01

    Improved performance has been reported for computer aided detection (CADe) methods using information from multiple mammographic views over single-view CADe approaches. Linkage across the views is based on assuming that location and image features from the same lesion depicted in both views will be similar. In this study we investigate if the location features can be improved and what effect such an improvement has on the linkage of lesions across ipsilateral views. Performance of different methods to define the location features was first assessed with respect to the location of 137 manually annotated and linked masses. Taking the median result from five complementary methods (based on pectoral muscle boundary, breast shape and intensity signature) increased the mean accuracy compared to the current standard (7.1 vs. 6.3 mm). Thereafter the impact of this best method on the automatic linkage of detected regions across views was assessed for a second, independent dataset of 131 mammogram pairs. Linkage was based on the combination of location and single-view image features by a linear discriminate analysis classifier trained to differentiate between links of corresponding true-positive (TP) regions versus links including TP and false-positive (FP) regions. Nested cross-validation results showed that using the improved location features significantly increased the classification performance and the percentage of correctly linked regions. PMID:23731758

  17. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Amendolia, S R; Bisogni, M G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Paternoster, G; Rosso, V; Stefanini, A

    2009-04-01

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics. PMID:19472640

  18. Efficiency of Lu 2SiO 5:Ce (LSO) powder phosphor as X-ray to light converter under mammographic imaging conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Liaparinos, P.; Kalivas, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Toutountzis, A.; Efthimiou, N.; Loudos, G.; Sianoudis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Nomicos, C. D.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the light emission efficiency of Lu 2SiO 5:Ce (LSO) powder scintillator under X-ray mammographic imaging conditions. Powder LSO scintillator has never been used in X-ray imaging. For the purposes of the present study, a 25 mg/cm 2 thick scintillating screen was prepared in our laboratory, by sedimentation of Lu 2SiO 5:Ce powder. Absolute luminescence efficiency measurements were performed within the range of X-ray tube voltages (22-49 kVp) used in mammographic applications. Parameters related to X-ray detection, i.e. the energy absorption efficiency (EAE) and the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) were calculated. A theoretical model, describing radiation and light transfer, was employed to fit experimental data and to estimate values of the intrinsic conversion efficiency and the light attenuation coefficients of the screen. The spectral compatibility of the LSO powder scintillator to mammographic X-ray films and to various electronic optical detectors was determined by performing light emission spectrum measurements and by taking into account the spectral sensitivity of the optical detectors. Results in the voltage range used in mammography showed that Lu 2SiO 5:Ce powder scintillator has approximately 10% higher values of QDE and 4.5% higher values of EAE than Gd 2O 2S:Tb.

  19. Mammographically Occult Asymptomatic Radial Scars/Complex Sclerosing Lesions at Ultrasonography-Guided Core Needle Biopsy: Follow-Up Can Be Recommended.

    PubMed

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung

    2016-10-01

    An increasing number of radial scars are detected by ultrasound (US), but their management is controversial. This study investigated the upgrade rate in mammographically occult radial scars/complex sclerosing lesions without epithelial atypia at US-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy in asymptomatic patients. Nineteen mammographically occult benign radial scars/complex sclerosing lesions (median size, 7 mm; range, 3-23 mm) were included. Patients underwent surgical excision (n = 10) or vacuum-assisted excision, with follow-up US at least 6 mo after benign vacuum-assisted excision results (n = 8), or underwent US follow-up for 2 y after core needle biopsy (n = 1). Any cases with change in diagnosis to high-risk lesions or malignancy at excision were considered upgrades. The upgrade rate was 0.0%. Based on US findings, 15.8% (3/19) were Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3, 68.4% (13/19) were BI-RADS category 4a and 15.8% (3/19) were BI-RADS category 4b. Follow-up with US can be considered for mammographically occult benign radial scar/complex sclerosing lesions diagnosed by US core needle biopsy in asymptomatic patients. PMID:27444865

  20. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Paternoster, G.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics.

  1. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  2. The qualitative similarity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Peter V; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within the purview of two groups of cognitive models: those that emphasize the cognitive development of individuals and those that pertain to disciplinary or knowledge structures. It is argued that the QSH has scientific merit with implications for classroom instruction. Future research should examine the validity of the QSH in other disciplines such as mathematics and science and should include perspectives from social as well as cognitive models. PMID:20415280

  3. Common Perspectives in Qualitative Research.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Marie

    2016-07-01

    The primary purpose of this column is to focus on several common core concepts that are foundational to qualitative research. Discussion of these concepts is at an introductory level and is designed to raise awareness and understanding of several conceptual foundations that undergird qualitative research. Because of the variety of qualitative approaches, not all concepts are relevant to every design and tradition. However, foundational aspects were selected for highlighting. PMID:27314194

  4. Intra-operative specimen analysis using faxitron microradiography for excision of mammographically suspicious, non-palpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Muttalib, M; Tisdall, M; Scawn, R; Shousha, S; Cummins, R S; Sinnett, H D

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances in digital imaging have made Faxitron microradiography an attractive alternative to intra-operative conventional specimen radiography (CSR) for the excision of wire-localized breast lesions. Faxitron specimen analysis time, usefulness of digital image manipulation and re-excision rates were evaluated in comparison to CSR in 299 consecutive wire-localized excisions for mammographically suspicious non-palpable breast lesions (172 procedures with Faxitron, 127 with CSR) in a non-randomized study. The corresponding mean operation times were 34.7 vs. 42.7 min and the respective re-excision rates were 19.8% vs. 31.5% (no significant difference on chi analysis P < 0.1). Faxitron digital image manipulation led to cavity biopsies in 50% (60/121) of the cancer excisions. In 19 of these (16%), histological excision margins were converted from incomplete to complete. The shorter Faxitron mean operating time enables an additional wire-localized operation per theatre list. Digital imaging guides the surgeon for additional cavity biopsies, resulting in re-excision rates as good as CSR. PMID:15325665

  5. Qualitative interviewing as measurement.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2010-04-01

    The attribution of beliefs and other propositional attitudes is best understood as a form of measurement, however counter-intuitive this may seem. Measurement theory does not require that the thing measured should be a magnitude, or that the calibration of the measuring instrument should be numerical. It only requires a homomorphism between the represented domain and the representing domain. On this basis, maps measure parts of the world, usually geographical locations, and 'belief' statements measure other parts of the world, namely people's aptitudes. Having outlined an argument for this view, I deal with an obvious objection to it: that self-attribution of belief cannot be an exercise in measurement, because we are all aware, from introspection, that our beliefs have an intrinsically semantic form. Subsequently, I turn to the philosophical and methodological ramifications of the measurement theoretic view. I argue, first, that it undermines at least one version of constructivism and, second, that it provides an effective alternative to the residually Cartesian philosophy that underpins much qualitative research. Like other anti-Cartesian strategies, belief-attribution-as-measurement implies that the objective world is far more knowable than the subjective one, and that reality is ontologically prior to meaning. I regard this result as both plausible and welcome. PMID:20415963

  6. Using Numbers in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of numerical/quantitative data in qualitative research studies and reports has been controversial. Prominent qualitative researchers such as Howard Becker and Martyn Hammersley have supported the inclusion of what Becker called "quasi-statistics": simple counts of things to make statements such as "some," "usually," and "most" more…

  7. Qualitative Science in Experimental Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhart, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the "state of qualitative inquiry" in the sense of how that inquiry is being positioned in the current construction of a US national policy agenda for "scientifically based" education research. In the author's view, qualitative inquiry is being drowned out in the national agenda despite its ability to provide the kinds of…

  8. An unusual breast lesion: the ultrasonographic, mammographic, MRI and nuclear medicine findings of mammary hibernoma.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Londero, V; Machin, P; Travaini, L L; Zuiani, C; Bazzocchi, M; Paganelli, G

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman being treated for an ovarian cancer who was diagnosed at the age of 40. A CT-positron emission tomography (PET) scan performed as follow-up documented abnormal uptake in the right breast. Mammograms were negative for malignancy, while a focal hyperechoic lesion was observed on ultrasonography in the same breast. Thus, she was referred to our institution for breast MRI, which showed a focal area of enhancement with atypical features. Percutaneous biopsy was performed, and a mammary hibernoma was diagnosed. Radiological and pathological correlation was provided. To our knowledge, this is the only report that describes the features of this rare tumour on four different imaging modalities (mammography, ultrasonography, MRI and CT-PET). PMID:20139247

  9. An unusual breast lesion: the ultrasonographic, mammographic, MRI and nuclear medicine findings of mammary hibernoma

    PubMed Central

    Martini, N; Londero, V; Machin, P; Travaini, L L; Zuiani, C; Bazzocchi, M; Paganelli, G

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman being treated for an ovarian cancer who was diagnosed at the age of 40. A CT–positron emission tomography (PET) scan performed as follow-up documented abnormal uptake in the right breast. Mammograms were negative for malignancy, while a focal hyperechoic lesion was observed on ultrasonography in the same breast. Thus, she was referred to our institution for breast MRI, which showed a focal area of enhancement with atypical features. Percutaneous biopsy was performed, and a mammary hibernoma was diagnosed. Radiological and pathological correlation was provided. To our knowledge, this is the only report that describes the features of this rare tumour on four different imaging modalities (mammography, ultrasonography, MRI and CT–PET). PMID:20139247

  10. Bilateral image subtraction features for multivariate automated classification of breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celaya-Padilla, Jose M.; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Martínez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2014-03-01

    Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the most widely available method for early detection. However, mammogram interpretation is based on human radiologist, whose radiological skills, experience and workload makes radiological interpretation inconsistent. In an attempt to make mammographic interpretation more consistent, computer aided diagnosis (CADx) systems has been introduced. This paper presents an CADx system aimed to automatically triage normal mammograms form suspicious mammograms. The CADx system co-reregister the left and breast images, then extracts image features from the co-registered mammographic bilateral sets. Finally, an optimal logistic multivariate model is generated by means of an evolutionary search engine. In this study, 440 subjects form the DDSM public data sets were used: 44 normal mammograms, 201 malignant mass mammograms, and 195 mammograms with malignant calci cations. The results showed a cross validation accuracy of 0.88 and an area under receiver operating characteristic (AUC) of 0.89 for the calci cations vs. normal mammograms. The optimal mass vs. normal mammograms model obtained an accuracy of 0.85 and an AUC of 0.88.