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Sample records for quality hospital care

  1. Uncompensated care and quality assurance among rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Dixon, Chris; Kruszynski, Paul; Coustasse, Alberto

    2010-07-01

    Health care disparities in rural areas remain significant in the U.S. health care industry. Uncompensated care makes health care disparities in rural areas worse, and rural hospitals are unfavorably positioned to compete with urban hospitals in the economic-downturn marketplace. How uncompensated care affects quality care among rural hospitals has been lightly investigated. Given that many rural residents experience difficulty accessing high quality care and given the importance of establishing quality care practice standards in a rural setting, we conducted a systematic literature review to identify some quality-care barriers and opportunities and suggested strategies to strengthen the position of rural hospitals in response to uncompensated care. PMID:20582851

  2. Patients' perceptions of care are associated with quality of hospital care: a survey of 4605 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Stein, Spencer M; Day, Michael; Karia, Raj; Hutzler, Lorraine; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Favorable patient experience and low complication rates have been proposed as essential components of patient-centered medical care. Patients' perception of care is a key performance metric and is used to determine payments to hospitals. It is unclear if there is a correlation between technical quality of care and patient satisfaction. The study authors correlated patient perceptions of care measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores with accepted quality of care indicators. The Hospital Compare database (4605 hospitals) was used to examine complication rates and patient-reported experience for hospitals across the nation in 2011. The majority of the correlations demonstrated an inverse relationship between patient experience and complication rates. This negative correlation suggests that reducing these complications can lead to a better hospital experience. Overall, these results suggest that patient experience is generally correlated with the quality of care provided. PMID:24740016

  3. How has hospital consolidation affected the price and quality of hospital care?

    PubMed

    Vogt, William B; Town, Robert; Williams, Claudia H

    2006-02-01

    During the 1990s, the hospital industry was transformed by mergers and acquisitions. This synthesis looks at why this rapid consolidation occurred and what impact it had on the price and quality for patients, and the cost of care for hospitals. Key findings include: Managed care was not a main driver of consolidation, but fear of managed care may have played a part. Other factors, including technological advances that reduced inpatient demand, and an antitrust environment that was receptive to consolidation contributed to consolidation. Research suggests hospital prices increased by 5 percent or more as a result of consolidation. When two hospitals merge, not only does the surviving hospital raise prices but so do its competitors. Evidence of the impact of consolidation on quality of care is limited and mixed, but the strongest studies show a reduction in quality. Hospital consolidation does modestly reduce the cost to hospitals of providing care. PMID:22051574

  4. Hospital Care for Newborn Babies: Quality Assessment, A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Hossein; Abdollahi Sabet, Somayae; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Context: Neonatal mortality rate is declining globally. The aim of the present study is to identify relevant indicators for assessing newborn care in hospitals by a systematic review. Evidence Acquisition: A search on electronic data base and manual searches of personal files for studies on quality indicators of newborn care were carried out. Searching 9 bibliographic databases, we found 85 articles of which 22 exactly related ones were selected and studied. Hand search yielded 1 record were also searched and 2 records were included. Results: A list of 87 structure, process and outcome indicators was formulated from the articles. Also 26 excess measures were identified in gray literature. After removing duplicates, and categorizing in 3 domains, 18 measures were input, 41 process and 34 outcome measures. Conclusions: These 93 indicators provide a framework for assessing how well the hospitals are providing neonatal care. These measures should be discussed in each context expert panels to address nationally applicable indices of neonatal care and may be adapted for local health settings. PMID:26495100

  5. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

  6. Nursing care quality and adverse events in US hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Robert J; Lake, Eileen T; Aiken, Linda H

    2010-01-01

    Aim To examine the association between nurses' reports of unmet nursing care needs and their reports of patients' receipt of the wrong medication or dose, nosocomial infections and patient falls with injury in hospitals. Background Because nursing activities are often difficult to measure, and data are typically not collected by health care organisations, there are few studies that have addressed the association between nursing activities and patient outcomes. Design Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected in 1999 from 10,184 staff nurses and 168 acute care hospitals in the US. Methods Multivariate linear regression models estimated the effect of unmet nursing care needs on adverse events given the influence of patient factors and the care environment. Results The proportion of necessary nursing care left undone ranged from 26% for preparing patients and families for discharge to as high as 74% for developing or updating nursing care plans. A majority of nurses reported that patients received the wrong medication or dose, acquired nosocomial infections, or had a fall with injury infrequently. However, nurses who reported that these adverse events occurred frequently varied considerably [i.e. medication errors (15%), patient falls with injury (20%), nosocomial infection (31%)]. After adjusting for patient factors and the care environment, there remained a significant association between unmet nursing care needs and each adverse event. Conclusion The findings suggest that attention to optimising patient care delivery could result in a reduction in the occurrence of adverse events in hospitals. Relevance to clinical practice The occurrence of adverse events may be mitigated when nurses complete care activities that require them to spend time with their patients. Hospitals should engage staff nurses in the creation of policies that influence human resources management to enhance their awareness of the care environment and patient care delivery. PMID:20659198

  7. Quality of Care for Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Chan, Leighton; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Huff, Edwin D.; Hart, L. Gary

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the mid-1990s, significant gaps existed in the quality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care between rural and urban hospitals. Since then, overall AMI care quality has improved. This study uses more recent data to determine whether rural-urban AMI quality gaps have persisted. Methods: Using inpatient records data for 34,776…

  8. Quality of Care and Patient Satisfaction in Hospitals With High Concentrations of Black Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brooks-Carthon, J. Margo; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Sloane, Douglas M.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine the influence of nursing– specifically nurse staffing and the nurse work environment– on quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with varying concentrations of Black patients. Design Cross-sectional secondary analysis of 2006–2007 nurse survey data collected across four states (Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and California), the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, and administrative data. Global analysis of variance and linear regression models were used to examine the association between the concentration of Black patients on quality measures (readiness for discharge, patient or family complaints, health care–associated infections) and patient satisfaction, before and after accounting for nursing and hospital characteristics. Results Nurses working in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks reported poorer confidence in patients’ readiness for discharge and more frequent complaints and infections. Patients treated in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks were less satisfied with their care. In the fully adjusted regression models for quality and patient satisfaction outcomes, the effects associated with the concentration of Blacks were explained in part by nursing and structural hospital characteristics. Conclusions This study demonstrates a relationship between nursing, structural hospital characteristics, quality of care, and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of Black patients. Clinical Relevance Consideration of nursing factors, in addition to other important hospital characteristics, is critical to understanding and improving quality of care and patient satisfaction in minority-serving hospitals. PMID:21884376

  9. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  10. Organizational factors associated with quality of care in US teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Lambiase, Louis R; Zhao, Mei

    2010-01-01

    This study is unique because it uses multiple regression and data envelopment analysis (DEA) to evaluate teaching hospital quality. The results support the premise that teaching hospital leadership through the effective allocation of resources can improve the quality of care. This study has managerial implications by demonstrating the positive correlation between HMO market penetration and improved clinical quality outcomes. This would suggest that improved efficiency caused by limited HMO reimbursement and tight utilization controls encourage hospitals to cut waste as well as improve their clinical care processes. Additionally, our research found that teaching hospitals with higher levels of long-term debt also had improved quality. This shows that increased investments in facilities and advanced technology at teaching hospitals can lead to enhanced quality. PMID:22329326

  11. Total quality management in a 300-bed community hospital: the quality improvement process translated to health care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J M

    1992-09-01

    Winter Park Memorial Hospital (Winter Park, Florida) began implementation of a well-strategized plan for total quality management (TQM) in 1987. Having no guidelines for applying TQM to health care but using the industrial quality management techniques of Philip Crosby Associates, Inc, the hospital made the transition and saved thousands of dollars in the process. This article describes the transition, especially the integral part played by the Medical Staff Quality Council in changing the hospital's culture. PMID:1437093

  12. Quality improvement in pre-hospital critical care: increased value through research and publication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital critical care is considered to be a complex intervention with a weak evidence base. In quality improvement literature, the value equation has been used to depict the inevitable relationship between resources expenditure and quality. Increased value of pre-hospital critical care involves moving a system from quality assurance to quality improvement. Agreed quality indicators can be integrated in existing quality improvement and complex intervention methodology. A QI system for pre-hospital critical care includes leadership involvement, multi-disciplinary buy-in, data collection infrastructure and long-term commitment. Further, integrating process control with governance systems allows evidence-based change of practice and publishing of results. PMID:24887186

  13. Quality improvement in pre-hospital critical care: increased value through research and publication.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital critical care is considered to be a complex intervention with a weak evidence base. In quality improvement literature, the value equation has been used to depict the inevitable relationship between resources expenditure and quality. Increased value of pre-hospital critical care involves moving a system from quality assurance to quality improvement. Agreed quality indicators can be integrated in existing quality improvement and complex intervention methodology. A QI system for pre-hospital critical care includes leadership involvement, multi-disciplinary buy-in, data collection infrastructure and long-term commitment. Further, integrating process control with governance systems allows evidence-based change of practice and publishing of results. PMID:24887186

  14. Evaluation of maternal and neonatal hospital care: quality index of completeness

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ana Lúcia Andrade; Mendes, Antonio da Cruz Gouveia; Miranda, Gabriella Morais Duarte; de Sá, Domicio Aurélio; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Lyra, Tereza Maciel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Develop an index to evaluate the maternal and neonatal hospital care of the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This descriptive cross-sectional study of national scope was based on the structure-process-outcome framework proposed by Donabedian and on comprehensive health care. Data from the Hospital Information System and the National Registry of Health Establishments were used. The maternal and neonatal network of Brazilian Unified Health System consisted of 3,400 hospitals that performed at least 12 deliveries in 2009 or whose number of deliveries represented 10.0% or more of the total admissions in 2009. Relevance and reliability were defined as criteria for the selection of variables. Simple and composite indicators and the index of completeness were constructed and evaluated, and the distribution of maternal and neonatal hospital care was assessed in different regions of the country. RESULTS A total of 40 variables were selected, from which 27 single indicators, five composite indicators, and the index of completeness of care were built. Composite indicators were constructed by grouping simple indicators and included the following variables: hospital size, level of complexity, delivery care practice, recommended hospital practice, and epidemiological practice. The index of completeness of care grouped the five variables and classified them in ascending order, thereby yielding five levels of completeness of maternal and neonatal hospital care: very low, low, intermediate, high, and very high. The hospital network was predominantly of small size and low complexity, with inadequate child delivery care and poor development of recommended and epidemiological practices. The index showed that more than 80.0% hospitals had a low index of completeness of care and that most qualified heath care services were concentrated in the more developed regions of the country. CONCLUSIONS The index of completeness proved to be of great value for monitoring the maternal and neonatal hospital care of Brazilian Unified Health System and indicated that the quality of health care was unsatisfactory. However, its application does not replace specific evaluations. PMID:25210827

  15. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high-quality patient care. PMID:25971397

  16. Quality of outpatient hospital care for children under 5 years in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Allison; Edward, Anbrasi; Bonhoure, Philippe; Mustafa, Lais; Hansen, Peter; Burnham, Gilbert; Peters, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the quality of outpatient hospital care for children under 5 years in Afghanistan. Design Case management observations were conducted on 10–12 children under five selected by systematic random sampling in 31 outpatient hospital clinics across the country, followed by interviews with caretakers and providers. Main Outcome Measures Quality of care defined as adherence to the clinical standards described in the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Results Overall quality of outpatient care for children was suboptimal based on patient examination and caretaker counseling (median score: 27.5 on a 100 point scale). Children receiving care from female providers had better care than those seen by male providers (OR: 6.6, 95% CI: 2.0–21.9, P = 0.002), and doctors provided better quality of care than other providers (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.1–6.4, P = 0.02). The poor were more likely to receive better care in hospitals managed by non-governmental organizations than those managed by other mechanisms (OR: 15.2, 95% CI: 1.2–200.1, P = 0.04). Conclusions Efforts to strengthen optimal care provision at peripheral health clinics must be complemented with investments at the referral and tertiary care facilities to ensure care continuity. The findings of improved care by female providers, doctors and NGO's for poor patients, warrant further empirical evidence on care determinants. Optimizing care quality at referral hospitals is one of the prerequisites to ensure service utilization and outcomes for the achievement of the Child health Millennium Development Goals for Afghanistan. PMID:21242157

  17. Can hospitals compete on quality? : Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  18. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  19. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  20. Payments and quality of care in private for-profit and public hospitals in Greece

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Empirical evidence on how ownership type affects the quality and cost of medical care is growing, and debate on these topics is ongoing. Despite the fact that the private sector is a major provider of hospital services in Greece, little comparative information on private versus public sector hospitals is available. The aim of the present study was to describe and compare the operation and performance of private for-profit (PFP) and public hospitals in Greece, focusing on differences in nurse staffing rates, average lengths of stay (ALoS), and Social Health Insurance (SHI) payments for hospital care per patient discharged. Methods Five different datasets were prepared and analyzed, two of which were derived from information provided by the National Statistical Service (NSS) of Greece and the other three from data held by the three largest SHI schemes in the country. All data referred to the 3-year period from 2001 to 2003. Results PFP hospitals in Greece are smaller than public hospitals, with lower patient occupancy, and have lower staffing rates of all types of nurses and highly qualified nurses compared with public hospitals. Calculation of ALoS using NSS data yielded mixed results, whereas calculations of ALoS and SHI payments using SHI data gave results clearly favoring the public hospital sector in terms of cost-efficiency; in all years examined, over all specialties and all SHI schemes included in our study, unweighted ALoS and SHI payments for hospital care per discharge were higher for PFP facilities. Conclusions In a mixed healthcare system, such as that in Greece, significant performance differences were observed between PFP and public hospitals. Close monitoring of healthcare provision by hospital ownership type will be essential to permit evidence-based decisions on the future of the public/private mix in terms of healthcare provision. PMID:21943020

  1. A Perinatal Care Quality and Safety Initiative: Hospital Costs and Potential Savings

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Sommerness, Samantha; Rauk, Phillip; Gams, Rebecca; Hirt, Charles; Davis, Stanley; Miller, Kristi K.; Landers, Daniel V.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing national focus on hospital initiatives to improve obstetric and neonatal outcomes. While costs of providing care may decrease with improved quality, the accompanying reduced adverse outcomes may impact hospital revenues. The purpose of this study was to estimate, from a hospital perspective, the financial impacts of implementing a perinatal quality and safety initiative. Methods In 2008, a Minnesota-based health system (Fairview Health Services) launched the Zero Birth Injury (ZBI) initiative, which uses evidence-based care bundles to guide management of obstetric services. We conducted a pre-post analysis of financial impacts of ZBI, using hospital administrative records to measure costs and revenues associated with changes in maternal and neonatal birth injuries before (2008) and after (2009–11) the initiative. Results After adjusting for relevant covariates, implementation of ZBI was associated with an 11% decrease in the rate of maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes between 2008 and 2011 (AOR=0.89, p=0.076). As a result of the adverse events avoided, the hospital system saved $284,985 in costs but earned $324,333 less revenue, which produced a net financial decrease of $39,348 (or a $305 net financial loss per adverse event avoided) in 2011, compared with 2008. Conclusions Adoption of a perinatal quality and safety initiative that reduced birth injuries had little net financial impact on the hospital. ZBI produced better clinical results at a lower cost, which represents potential savings for payers, but the hospital system offering increased quality reaped no clear financial rewards. These results highlight the important role for shared-savings collaborations (among patients, providers, government and third-party payers, and employers) to incentivize quality improvement. Widespread adoption of perinatal safety initiatives combined with innovative payment models may contribute to better health at reduced cost. PMID:23991507

  2. The hospital standardised mortality ratio: a powerful tool for Dutch hospitals to assess their quality of care?

    PubMed Central

    Pieter, D; van der Veen, A A; Kool, R B; Aylin, P; Bottle, A; Westert, G P; Jones, S

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the study To use the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR), as a tool for Dutch hospitals to analyse their death rates by comparing their risk-adjusted mortality with the national average. Method The method uses routine administrative databases that are available nationally in The Netherlands—the National Medical Registration dataset for the years 2005–2007. Diagnostic groups that led to 80% of hospital deaths were included in the analysis. The method adjusts for a number of case-mix factors per diagnostic group determined through a logistic regression modelling process. Results In The Netherlands, the case-mix factors are primary diagnosis, age, sex, urgency of admission, length of stay, comorbidity (Charlson Index), social deprivation, source of referral and month of admission. The Dutch HSMR model performs well at predicting a patient's risk of death as measured by a c statistic of the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.91. The ratio of the HSMR of the Dutch hospital with the highest value in 2005–2007 is 2.3 times the HSMR of the hospital with the lowest value. Discussion Overall hospital HSMRs and mortality at individual diagnostic group level can be monitored using statistical process control charts to give an early warning of possible problems with quality of care. The use of routine data in a standardised and robust model can be of value as a starting point for improvement of Dutch hospital outcomes. HSMRs have been calculated for several other countries. PMID:20172876

  3. I Brazilian Registry of Heart Failure - Clinical Aspects, Care Quality and Hospitalization Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Denilson Campos; de Souza, João David; Bacal, Fernando; Rohde, Luiz Eduardo Paim; Bernardez-Pereira, Sabrina; Berwanger, Otavio; Almeida, Dirceu Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalization in adults in Brazil. However, most of the available data is limited to unicenter registries. The BREATHE registry is the first to include a large sample of hospitalized patients with decompensated HF from different regions in Brazil. Objective Describe the clinical characteristics, treatment and prognosis of hospitalized patients admitted with acute HF. Methods Observational registry study with longitudinal follow-up. The eligibility criteria included patients older than 18 years with a definitive diagnosis of HF, admitted to public or private hospitals. Assessed outcomes included the causes of decompensation, use of medications, care quality indicators, hemodynamic profile and intrahospital events. Results A total of 1,263 patients (64±16 years, 60% women) were included from 51 centers from different regions in Brazil. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (70.8%), dyslipidemia (36.7%) and diabetes (34%). Around 40% of the patients had normal left ventricular systolic function and most were admitted with a wet-warm clinical-hemodynamic profile. Vasodilators and intravenous inotropes were used in less than 15% of the studied cohort. Care quality indicators based on hospital discharge recommendations were reached in less than 65% of the patients. Intrahospital mortality affected 12.6% of all patients included. Conclusion The BREATHE study demonstrated the high intrahospital mortality of patients admitted with acute HF in Brazil, in addition to the low rate of prescription of drugs based on evidence. PMID:26131698

  4. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  5. University Hospitals: creating the infrastructure for quality and value through accountable care.

    PubMed

    Zenty, Thomas F; Bieber, Eric J; Hammack, Elizabeth R

    2014-01-01

    University Hospitals Health System Inc. (UH), in Cleveland, Ohio, like many hospitals and healthcare systems, sought to anticipate the dramatic changes of healthcare reform, including its increased focus on quality and outcomes. UH evaluated incentives to keep patients out of hospital and to ease mounting pressures on reimbursement and costs. During UH's strategic planning sessions in 2009 and 2010, we identified value--the combination of quality and efficiency--to be a key driver of our future success. Ahead of the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, in early 2010 we chose to proceed with the formation of an accountable care organization (ACO). We believed the ACO was a novel vehicle by which to improve the efficient delivery of our high-quality healthcare to maximize the value of the services we provide. We also believed that the most successful strategy, if it can be achieved, is to build on success. A major success, or a series of smaller successes, will go a long way toward achieving operational buy-in, enhancing respect for strategic initiatives, and convincing physicians of the need for change. Through thoughtful governance, effective plan design, customized data analytics, physician networks and incentives, innovative patient engagement, and supplemental coordination resources, our ACOs have succeeded in improving population health and delivering value. PMID:25671992

  6. Understanding the Role of the Professional Practice Environment on Quality of Care in Magnet® and Non-Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Rosen, Jennifer E.; McHugh, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between Magnet Recognition® and nurse-reported quality of care. BACKGROUND Magnet® hospitals are recognized for nursing excellence and quality patient outcomes; however, few studies have explored contributing factors for these superior outcomes. METHODS This was a secondary analysis of linked nurse survey data, hospital administrative data, and a listing of American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet hospitals. Multivariate regressions were modeled before and after propensity score matching to assess the relationship between Magnet status and quality of care. A mediation model assessed the indirect effect of the professional practice environment on quality of care. RESULTS Nurse-reported quality of care was significantly associated with Magnet Recognition after matching. The professional practice environment mediates the relationship between Magnet status and quality of care. CONCLUSION A prominent feature of Magnet hospitals, a professional practice environment that is supportive of nursing, plays a role in explaining why Magnet hospitals have better nurse-reported quality of care. PMID:24316613

  7. [Quality indicators in the acute coronary syndrome for the analysis of the pre- and in-hospital care process].

    PubMed

    Felices-Abad, F; Latour-Pérez, J; Fuset-Cabanes, M P; Ruano-Marco, M; Cuñat-de la Hoz, J; del Nogal-Sáez, F

    2010-01-01

    We present a map of 27 indicators to measure the care quality given to patients with acute coronary syndrome attended in the pre- and hospital area. This includes technical process indicators (registration of care intervals, performance of electrocardiogram, monitoring and vein access, assessment of prognostic risk, hemorrhage and in-hospital mortality, use of reperfusion techniques and performance of echocardiograph), pharmacological process indicators (platelet receptors inhibition, anticoagulation, thrombolysis, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting inhibitors and lipid lowering drugs) and outcomes indicators (quality scales of the care given and mortality). PMID:20451303

  8. Reducing unnecessary hospital days to improve quality of care through physician accountability: a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over 20% of hospital bed use is inappropriate, implying a waste of resources and the increase of patient iatrogenic risk. Methods This is a cluster, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, carried out in a large University Hospital of Northern Italy, aiming to evaluate the effect of a strategy to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The primary outcome was the percentage of patient-days compatible with discharge. Among secondary objectives, to describe the strategy’s effect in the long-term, as well as on hospital readmissions, considered to be a marker of the quality of hospital care. The 12 medical wards with the longest length of stay participated. Effectiveness was measured at the individual level on 3498 eligible patients during monthly index days. Patients admitted or discharged on index days, or with stay >90 days, were excluded. All ward staff was blinded to the index days, while staff in the control arm and data analysts were blinded to the trial’s objectives and interventions. The strategy comprised the distribution to physicians of the list of their patients whose hospital stay was compatible with discharge according to a validated Delay Tool, and of physician length of stay profiles, followed by audits managed autonomously by the physicians of the ward. Results During the 12 months of data collection, over 50% of patient-days were judged to be compatible with discharge. Delays were mainly due to problems with activities under medical staff control. Multivariate analysis considering clustering showed that the strategy reduced patient-days compatible with discharge by 16% in the intervention vs control group, (OR=0.841; 95% CI, 0.735 to 0.963; P=0.012). Follow-up at 1 year did not yield a statistically significant difference between the percentages of patient-days judged to be compatible with discharge between the two arms (OR=0.818; 95% CI, 0.476 to 1.405; P=0.47). There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission and mortality rates for all eligible patients (N=3498) between the two arms. Conclusions Results indicate that a strategy, involving physician direct accountability, can reduce unnecessary hospital days. Relatively simple interventions, like the one assessed in this study, should be implemented in all hospitals with excessive lengths of stay, since unnecessary prolongation may be harmful to patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01422811. PMID:23305251

  9. Intergroup communication between hospital doctors: implications for quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Hewett, David G; Watson, Bernadette M; Gallois, Cindy; Ward, Michael; Leggett, Barbara A

    2009-12-01

    Hospitals involve a complex socio-technical health system, where communication failures influence the quality of patient care. Research indicates the importance of social identity and intergroup relationships articulated through power, control, status and competition. This study focused on interspecialty communication among doctors for patients requiring the involvement of multiple specialist departments. The paper reports on an interview study in Australia, framed by social identity and communication accommodation theories of doctors' experiences of managing such patients, to explore the impact of communication. Interviews were undertaken with 45 doctors working in a large metropolitan hospital, and were analysed using Leximancer (text mining software) and interpretation of major themes. Findings indicated that intergroup conflict is a central influence on communication. Contested responsibilities emerged from a model of care driven by single-specialty ownership of the patient, with doctors allowed to evade responsibility for patients over whom they had no sense of ownership. Counter-accommodative communication, particularly involving interpersonal control, appeared as important for reinforcing social identity and winning conflicts. Strategies to resolve intergroup conflict must address structural issues generating an intergroup climate and evoke interpersonal salience to moderate their effect. PMID:19846246

  10. Quality-quantity decomposition of income elasticity of U.S. hospital care expenditure using state-level panel data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Okunade, Albert; Lubiani, Gregory G

    2014-11-01

    Economic theory suggests that income growth could lead to changes in consumption quantity and quality as the spending on a commodity changes. Similarly, the volume and quality of healthcare consumption could rise with incomes because of demographic changes, usage of innovative medical technologies, and other factors. Hospital healthcare spending is the largest component of aggregate US healthcare expenditures. The novel contribution of our paper is estimating and decomposing the income elasticity of hospital care expenditures (HOCEXP) into its quantity and quality components. By using a 1999-2008 panel dataset of the 50 US states, results from the seemingly unrelated regressions model estimation reveal the income elasticity of HOCEXP to be 0.427 (std. error=0.044), with about 0.391 (calculated std. error=0.044) arising from care quality improvements and 0.035 (std. error=0.050) emanating from the rise in usage volume. Our novel research findings suggest the following: (i) the quantity part of hospital expenditure is inelastic to income change; (ii) almost the entire income-induced rise in hospital expenditure comes from care quality changes; and (iii) the 0.427 income elasticity of HOCEXP, the largest component of total US healthcare expenditure, makes hospital care a normal commodity and a much stronger technical necessity than aggregate healthcare. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:24038390

  11. Quality of surgical care in hospitals providing internship training in Kenya: a cross sectional survey.

    PubMed Central

    Mwinga, Stephen; Kulohoma, Colette; Mwaniki, Paul; Idowu, Rachel; Masasabi, John; English, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate services in hospitals providing internship training to graduate doctors in Kenya. Methods A survey of 22 internship training hospitals was conducted. Availability of key resources spanning infrastructure, personnel, equipment and drugs was assessed by observation. Outcomes and process of care for pre-specified priority conditions (head injury, chest injury, fractures, burns and acute abdomen) were evaluated by auditing case records. Results Each hospital had at least one consultant surgeon. Scheduled surgical outpatient clinics, major ward rounds and elective (half day) theatre lists were provided once per week in 91%, 55% and 9%, respectively. In all other hospitals, these were conducted twice weekly. Basic drugs were not always available (e.g. gentamicin, morphine and pethidine in 50%, injectable antistaphylococcal penicillins in 5% hospitals). Fewer than half of hospitals had all resources needed to provide oxygen. One hundred and forty-five of 956 cases evaluated underwent operations under general or spinal anaesthesia. We found operation notes for 99% and anaesthetic records for 72%. Pre-operatively measured vital signs were recorded in 80% of cases, and evidence of consent to operation was found in 78%. Blood loss was documented in only one case and sponge and instrument counts in 7%. Conclusions Evaluation of surgical services would be improved by development and dissemination of clear standards of care. This survey suggests that internship hospitals may be poorly equipped and documented care suggests inadequacies in quality and training. Objectif Evaluer les services dans les hôpitaux offrant des stages de formation à des médecins diplômés au Kenya. Méthodes Enquête auprès de 22 hôpitaux offrant des stages de formation. La disponibilité des ressources clés incluant infrastructure, personnel, matériel et médicaments a été évaluée par observation. Les résultats et processus de soins pour des affections prioritaires prédéfinies (blessure à la tête, blessure à la poitrine, fractures, brûlures et maux d'estomac aigus) ont été évalués par l'audit des dossiers des cas. Résultats Chaque hôpital avait au moins un chirurgien consultant. Les cliniques chirurgicales ambulatoires planifiées, les principales tournées dans les chambres d'hospitalisation et des listes d'opérations choisies (demi-journée) ont été fournies une fois par semaine dans 91%, 55% et 9% des cas respectivement. Dans tous les autres hôpitaux, cela a été effectué deux fois par semaine. Les médicaments de base n’étaient pas toujours disponibles (par ex. la gentamicine, la morphine et la péthidine dans 50% des hôpitaux, les pénicillines anti-staphylococciques injectables dans 5%). Moins de la moitié des hôpitaux disposaient de toutes les ressources nécessaires pour fournir de l'oxygène. 145 sur 956 cas évalués ont subi des opérations sous anesthésie générale ou rachidienne. Nous avons retrouvé des notes d'opération pour 99% des cas et des dossiers d'anesthésie pour 72%. Les mesures préopératoires des signes vitaux ont été enregistrées dans 80% des cas et la preuve du consentement pour l'opération a été trouvée dans 78% des cas. La perte de sang a été documentée dans un seul cas et le comptage des éponges et instruments dans 7% des cas. Conclusions L’évaluation des services de chirurgie serait améliorée par le développement et la dissémination de normes de soins claires. Cette étude suggère que les hôpitaux offrant des stages peuvent être mal équipés et les soins enregistrés suggèrent des insuffisances dans la qualité et la formation. Objetivo Evaluar los servicios en hospitales que proveen entrenamiento a m

  12. Variations in the Quality of Care at Large Public Hospitals in Beijing, China: A Condition-Based Outcome Approach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Liu, Yuanli; Shu, Ting; Yang, Wei; Liang, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Background Public hospitals deliver over ninety percent of all outpatient and inpatient services in China. Their quality is graded into three levels (A, B, and C) largely based on structural resources, but empirical evidence on the quality of process and outcome of care is extremely scarce. As expectations for quality care rise with higher living standards and cost of care, such evidence is urgently needed and vital to improve care and to inform future health reforms. Methods We compiled and analyzed a multicenter database of over 4 million inpatient discharge summary records to provide a comprehensive assessment of the level and variations in clinical outcomes of hospitalization at 39 tertiary hospitals in Beijing. We assessed six outcome measures of clinical quality: in-hospital mortality rates (RSMR) for AMI, stroke, pneumonia and CABG, post-procedural complication rate (RS-CR), and failure-to-rescue rate (RS-FTR). The measures were adjusted for pre-admission patient case-mix using indirect standardization method with hierarchical linear mixed models. Results We found good overall quality with large variations by hospital and condition (mean/range, in %): RSMR-AMI: 6.23 (2.37–14.48), RSMR-stroke: 4.18 (3.58–4.44), RSMR-pneumonia: 7.78 (7.20–8.59), RSMR-CABG: 1.93 (1.55–2.23), RS-CR: 11.38 (9.9–12.88), and RS-FTR: 6.41 (5.17–7.58). Hospital grade was not significantly associated with any risk-adjusted outcome measures. Conclusions Going to a higher grade public hospital does not always lead to better patient outcome because hospital grade only contains information about hospital structural resources. A hospital report card with some outcome measures of quality would provide valuable information to patients in choosing providers, and for regulators to identify gaps in health care quality. Reducing the variations in clinical practice and patient outcome should be a focus for policy makers in the next round of health sector reforms in China. PMID:26430748

  13. Perioperative Care and the Importance of Continuous Quality Improvement—A Controlled Intervention Study in Three Tanzanian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mtatifikolo, Ferdinand; Ngoli, Baltazar; Neuner, Bruno; Wernecke, Klaus–Dieter; Spies, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical services are increasingly seen to reduce death and disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, where hospital-based mortality remains alarmingly high. This study explores two implementation approaches to improve the quality of perioperative care in a Tanzanian hospital. Effects were compared to a control group of two other hospitals in the region without intervention. Methods All hospitals conducted quality assessments with a Hospital Performance Assessment Tool. Changes in immediate outcome indicators after one and two years were compared to final outcome indicators such as Anaesthetic Complication Rate and Surgical Case Fatality Rate. Results Immediate outcome indicators for Preoperative Care in the intervention hospital improved (52.5% in 2009; 84.2% in 2011, p<0.001). Postoperative Inpatient Care initially improved to then decline again (63.3% in 2009; 70% in 2010; 58.6% in 2011). In the control group, preoperative care declined from 50.8% (2009) to 32.8% (2011, p <0.001), while postoperative care did not significantly change. Anaesthetic Complication Rate in the intervention hospital declined (1.89% before intervention; 0.96% after intervention, p = 0.006). Surgical Case Fatality Rate in the intervention hospital declined from 5.67% before intervention to 2.93% after intervention (p<0.0010). Surgical Case Fatality Rate in the control group was 4% before intervention and 3.8% after intervention (p = 0.411). Anaesthetic Complication Rate in the control group was not available. Discussion Immediate outcome indicators initially improved, while at the same time final outcome declined (Surgical Case Fatality, Anaesthetic Complication Rate). Compared to the control group, final outcome improved more in the intervention hospital, although the effect was not significant over the whole study period. Documentation of final outcome indicators seemed inconsistent. Immediate outcome indicators seem more helpful to steer the Continuous Quality Improvement program. Conclusion Specific interventions as part of Continuous Quality Improvement might lead to sustainable improvement of the quality of care, if embedded in a multi-faceted approach. PMID:26327392

  14. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  15. Evaluating ventilator weaning best practice: a long-term acute care hospital system-wide quality initiative.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, Linda; Von Rueden, Kathryn; Malila, Fern

    2002-11-01

    Long-term acute care (LTAC) hospitals and units are becoming increasingly important to the management of patients who have serious, complex critical illnesses and require mechanical ventilation for extended periods of time. Kindred Healthcare, Inc., a nation-wide system of LTAC hospitals embarked on a quality initiative to establish a Ventilator Management and Weaning Best Practice. The process steps included: measurement of performance of all hospitals in the system using a risk-adjusted methodology to evaluate clinical outcomes, identification of facilities with superior outcomes; structured evaluation of the characteristics, practices, and protocols of these Best Practice hospitals; and utilization of the information gleaned from these hospitals to establish evidence-based LTAC best practice ventilator management guidelines. Key characteristics of the Best Practice LTAC hospitals were: hospital-wide philosophy that "everybody weans"-that is, all disciplines actively participate and all patients are expected to wean; collaborative multidisciplinary plans of care; a consistent and a 24-hour-a-day approach to ventilator management and weaning; daily communication; mutual respect for the contributions of all disciplines to the weaning process; early, aggressive nutrition support and intervention by rehabilitation services; use of 24-hour in-hospital advance practice nurses, hospitalists, or physician assistants; and intervention by physiatrists. PMID:12473919

  16. Bacteriological Quality of Treated Water and Dialysate in Haemodialysis Unit of A Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Indumathi, V A; Gurudev, K C; Naik, Shalini Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Haemodialysis is one of the treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Dialysis patients are exposed to large volumes of water for production of dialysis fluids. Treated water and dialysate come in direct contact with the patient’s bloodstream. Such patients suffer from abnormalities of the immune system, making them more susceptible to infections. Microbial contamination of the treated water and dialysate can lead to biofilm formation and release of endotoxins in Haemodialysis system. These can give rise to pyrogenic reactions in the short term and ?2 amyloidosis, atherosclerosis, and increased mortality in the long term. Aim To assess the bacteriological quality of treated water and dialysate used in the Haemodialysis unit of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of records of treated water and dialysate samples sent to the Microbiology laboratory for analysis of bacteriological contamination of the water used in haemodialysis treatment from January 2013 to June 2014 was conducted. The acceptable limits for treated water and dialysate were taken as <200 CFU/ml and < 2000 CFU/ml respectively as per Government of India Guidelines for Maintenance Haemodialysis. Results Thirty six samples of treated water and 394 samples of dialysate were analysed for bacteriological contamination. 4 out of 36 (11.1%) samples of treated water and 44 out of 394 dialysate samples (11.2%) showed unacceptable bacteriological growth. Conclusion Regular and continual monitoring of the disinfection protocol of the water distribution system in haemodialysis unit is necessary to get good microbiological quality of treated water and dialysate fluid. PMID:26557519

  17. Is health care a special challenge to quality management? Insights from the Danderyd Hospital case.

    PubMed

    Striem, Jörgen; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats

    2003-01-01

    A 10-year quality journey of a Swedish university hospital is described in this case study based on a variety of data sources. A series of quality initiatives were implemented according to total quality management (TQM) "best practice." Many projects were successful, but still a majority of those did not meet the staff's requirement of practical relevance, and they provoked scepticism toward instruments introduced and resistance to service-related quality definitions. The hospital's incentive structures did not reward an engagement in improvement activities. The findings are interpreted as demonstrating that the programs were viewed upon as part of a "management" rather than "professional" agenda, despite the underlying philosophy of TQM. It is suggested that applying professional practice development approaches to improvement initiatives might help to overcome the barrier thus created. PMID:14603787

  18. Improving hospital-based quality of care by reducing HIV-related stigma: evaluation results from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pulerwitz, Julie; Oanh, Khuat Thi Hai; Akinwolemiwa, Dayo; Ashburn, Kim; Nyblade, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Operations Research conducted at four hospitals in Vietnam sought to reduce HIV-related stigma and discrimination among hospital workers. The quasi-experimental study compared effects of focusing on 'fear-based' stigma (stemming from lack of knowledge) versus both fear-based and social stigma (stemming from moral judgments). Interventions included staff training (ranging from physicians to ward cleaners), hospital policy development, and supplies provision. At baseline (n = 795), reported stigma was substantial (e.g., about half of hospital workers indicated fear of casually touching PLHIV, and felt HIV was a punishment for bad behavior). By endline, stigma measures had improved significantly for both intervention groups (e.g., proportion reporting signs on beds indicating HIV status decreased from 51 to 24 % in Arm 1, and 31 to 7 % in Arm 2), with the combined intervention group showing greater effects. This study highlights successful strategies to reduce stigma, and thus, improve quality of care for PLHIV. PMID:25382350

  19. Improvement in hospital Quality of Care (QoC) after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination: An evaluation study in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Standaert, B; Alwan, A; Strens, D; Raes, M; Postma, M J

    2015-01-01

    During each winter period hospital emergency rooms and pediatric wards are often overwhelmed by high patient influx with infectious diseases leading to chaotic conditions with poor quality of care (QoC) delivery as a consequence. The conditions could be improved if we were able to better control the influx by introducing for instance better prevention strategies against some of the most frequent infectious diseases. New prevention strategies using vaccination against rotavirus infection were introduced in Belgium in November 2006. We developed a measure of hospital QoC suitable for assessing the impact of pediatric rotavirus vaccination. The study is retrospective collecting routine data on bed and staff management in one pediatric hospital in Belgium. The data were divided in pre- and post-vaccination periods during rotavirus-epidemic and non-epidemic periods. The scores were constructed using Explanatory Factor Analysis (EFA). All patients enrolled were admitted to the pediatric ward over the period from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009. The results of the epidemic period indicated that bed-day occupancy, bed-day turnover and unplanned readmissions for acute gastroenteritis were lower in the post-vaccination compared with the pre-vaccination periods. The QoC scores were therefore significantly lower (indicating improved QoC) after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination, compared with pre-vaccination. The data suggests that the reduction in the winter peak of rotavirus-related hospitalizations after the introduction of the vaccine reduces pressure on hospital resources and improves the quality of hospital care. The findings should be further tested in similar settings. PMID:25902371

  20. Serendipity: translational research, high quality care, and the children's hospital. Jay and Margie Grosfeld Lecture.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Jessica J

    2014-01-01

    The word "serendipity" was coined by Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford, in a letter he wrote in January 1754. He defined serendipity as the making of "….discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which [you] were not in quest of….you must observe that no discovery of a thing you are looking for comes under this description." I would like to make the case that a children's hospital can be a superb setting in which to attempt this feat-to generate Serendipity. I would also like to convince you that this attribute is absolutely essential to providing the very best care for children. PMID:24439574

  1. Costs and quality of hospitals in different health care systems: a multi-level approach with propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    Schreyögg, Jonas; Stargardt, Tom; Tiemann, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons of costs and quality between hospitals are often made at the macro level. The goal of this study was to explore methods to compare micro-level data from hospitals in different health care systems. To do so, we developed a multi-level framework in combination with a propensity score matching technique using similarly structured data for patients receiving treatment for acute myocardial infarction in German and US Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Our case study shows important differences in results between multi-level regressions based on matched and unmatched samples. We conclude that propensity score matching techniques are an appropriate way to deal with the usual baseline imbalances across the samples from different countries. Multi-level models are recommendable to consider the clustered structure of the data when patient-level data from different hospitals and health care systems are compared. The results provide an important justification for exploring new ways in performing health system comparisons. PMID:20084662

  2. Do Malawian women critically assess the quality of care? A qualitative study on women’s perceptions of perinatal care at a district hospital in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malawi has a high perinatal mortality rate of 40 deaths per 1,000 births. To promote neonatal health, the Government of Malawi has identified essential health care packages for improving maternal and neonatal health in health care facilities. However, regardless of the availability of health services, women’s perceptions of the care is important as it influences whether the women will or will not use the services. In Malawi 95% of pregnant women receive antenatal care from skilled attendants, but the number is reduced to 71% deliveries being conducted by skilled attendants. The objective of this study was to describe women’s perceptions on perinatal care among the women delivered at a district hospital. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using semi-structured interview guides collecting information on women’s perceptions on perinatal care. A total of 14 in depth interviews were conducted with women delivering at Chiradzulu District Hospital from February to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum. They were also asked about the information they received during provision of care. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Two themes from the study were good care and unsatisfactory care. Subthemes under good care were: respect, confidentiality, privacy and normal delivery. Providers’ attitude, delay in providing care, inadequate care, and unavailability of delivery attendants were subthemes under unsatisfactory care. Conclusions Although the results show that women wanted to be well received at health facilities, respected, treated with kindness, dignity and not shouted at, they were not critical of the care they received. The women did not know the quality of care to expect because they were not well informed. The women were not critical of the care they received because they were not aware of the standard of care. Instead they had low expectations. Health workers have a responsibility to inform women and their families about the care that women should expect. There is also a need for standardization of the antenatal information that is provided. PMID:23158672

  3. Quality care, public perception and quick-fix service management: a Delphi study on stressors of hospital doctors in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Blanaid; Fitzgerald, Deirdre; Doherty, Sally; Walsh, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify and rank the most significant workplace stressors to which consultants and trainees are exposed within the publicly funded health sector in Ireland. Design Following a preliminary semistructured telephone interview, a Delphi technique with 3 rounds of reiterative questionnaires was used to obtain consensus. Conducted in Spring 2014, doctors were purposively selected by their college faculty or specialty training body. Setting Consultants and higher specialist trainees who were engaged at a collegiate level with their faculty or professional training body. All were employed in the Irish publicly funded health sector by the Health Services Executive. Participants 49 doctors: 30 consultants (13 male, 17 female) and 19 trainees (7 male, 12 female). Consultants and trainees were from a wide range of hospital specialties including anaesthetics, radiology and psychiatry. Results Consultants are most concerned with the quality of healthcare management and its impact on service. They are also concerned about the quality of care they provide. They feel undervalued within the negative sociocultural environment that they work. Trainees also feel undervalued with an uncertain future and they also perceive their sociocultural environment as negative. They echo concerns regarding the quality of care they provide. They struggle with the interface between career demands and personal life. Conclusions This Delphi study sought to explore the working life of doctors in Irish hospitals at a time when resources are scarce. It identified both common and distinct concerns regarding sources of stress for 2 groups of doctors. Its identification of key stressors should guide managers and clinicians towards solutions for improving the quality of patient care and the health of care providers. PMID:26700286

  4. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  5. Acute Care Hospitals' Accountability to Provincial Funders

    PubMed Central

    Kromm, Seija K.; Ross Baker, G.; Wodchis, Walter P.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  6. “SHOUT” to improve the quality of care delivered to patients with acute kidney injury at Great Western Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Paul; Gorham, James; Kosti, Angeliki; Seligman, William; Courtney, Alona; Mazan, Karolina; Paterson, Stuart; Ramcharitar, Steve; Chandrasekaran, Badri; Juniper, Mark; Greamspet, Mala; Daniel, Jessica; Chalstrey, Sue; Ahmed, Ijaz; Dasgupta, Tanaji

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects up to 20% of all patients admitted to hospital, and is associated with a higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes, increased healthcare costs, as well as long term risks of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal failure. The aim of this project was to improve the quality of care for patients with AKI admitted to the acute medical unit (AMU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH). We assessed awareness and self reported confidence among physicians in our Trust, in addition to basic aspects of care relevant to AKI on our AMU. A multifaceted quality improvement strategy was developed, which included measures to improve awareness such as a Trust wide AKI awareness day, and reconfiguring the admission proforma on our AMU in order to enhance risk assessment, staging, and early response to AKI. Ancillary measures such as the dissemination of flashcards for lanyards containing core information were also used. Follow up assessments showed that foundation year one (FY1) doctors’ self reported confidence in managing AKI increased from 2.8 to 4.2, as measured on a five point Likert scale (P=0.0003). AKI risk assessment increased from 13% to 57% (P=0.07) following a change in the admission proforma. Documentation of the diagnosis of AKI increased from 66% to 95% (P=0.038) among flagged patients. Documentation of urine dip results increased from 33% to 73% (P=0.01), in addition to a rise in appropriate referral for specialist input, although this was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that using the twin approaches of improving awareness, and small changes to systemic factors such as modification of the admission proforma, can lead to significant enhancements in the quality of care of patients with AKI.

  7. Clinical pathways--an evaluation of its impact on the quality of care in an acute care general hospital in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Cheah, J

    2000-07-01

    A critical or clinical pathway defines the optimal care process, sequencing and timing of interventions by healthcare professionals for a particular diagnosis or procedure. It is a relatively new clinical process improvement tool that has been gaining popularity across hospitals and various healthcare organisations in many parts of the world. It is now slowly gaining momentum and popularity in Asia and Singapore. Clinical pathways are developed through collaborative efforts of clinicians, case managers, nurses, and other allied healthcare professionals with the aim of improving the quality of patient care, while minimising cost to the patient. Clinical pathways have been shown to reduce unnecessary variation in patient care, reduce delays in discharge through more efficient discharge planning, and improve the cost-effectiveness of clinical services. The approach and objectives of clinical pathways are consistent with those of total quality management (TQM) and continuous clinical quality improvement (CQI), and is essentially the application of these principles at the patient's bedside. However, despite the growing popularity of pathways, their impact on clinical outcomes and their clinical effectiveness remains largely untested and unproven through rigorous clinical trials. This paper begins with an overview of the nature of clinical pathways and the analysis of variances from the pathway, their benefits to the healthcare organisation, their application as a tool for CQI activities in direct relation to patient care, and their effectiveness in a variety of healthcare settings. The paper describes an evaluation of the impact of a clinical pathway on the quality of care for patients admitted for uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction (AMI) through an analysis of variances. The author carried out a one year evaluation of a clinical pathway on uncomplicated AMI in Changi General Hospital (CGH) to determine its effectiveness and impact on a defined set of outcomes. A before and after nonrandomized study of two groups of patients admitted to the Hospital for uncomplicated AMI was done. A total of 169 patients were managed on the clinical pathway compared to 100 patients in the control (historical comparison) group. Outcomes were compared between the two groups of patients. Restriction and matching of study subjects in both groups ensured that the patients selected were comparable in terms of severity of illness. The results showed that the patients on the clinical pathway and the comparison group were similar with respect to demographic variables, prevalence of risk factors and comorbidities. There was a statistically significant reduction in the average length of stay after implementation of the clinical pathway. This was achieved without any adverse effect on short term clinical outcomes such as in-hospital mortality, complication rate and morbidity. There were no significant difference in readmission rates at 6 months after discharge. The paper concludes that clinical pathways, implemented in the context of an acute care general hospital, is able to significantly improve care processes through better collaboration among healthcare professionals and improvements in work systems. PMID:11026801

  8. Involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management functions in EU hospitals: implementation and impact on patient-centred care strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wang, Aolin; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Thompson, Andrew; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lombarts, MJMH; Plochg, T; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Bottaro, S; Garel, P; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Lívio, A; Eiras, M; Franca, M; Leite, I; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, CA; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management (QM) functions and to assess associations between levels of involvement and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies. Design A cross-sectional, multilevel study design that surveyed quality managers and department heads and data from an organizational audit. Setting Randomly selected hospitals (n = 74) from seven European countries (The Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Participants Hospital quality managers (n = 74) and heads of clinical departments (n = 262) in charge of four patient pathways (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries) participated in the data collection between May 2011 and February 2012. Main Outcome Measures Four items reflecting essential patient-centred care strategies based on an on-site hospital visit: (1) formal survey seeking views of patients and carers, (2) written policies on patients' rights, (3) patient information literature including guidelines and (4) fact sheets for post-discharge care. The main predictors were patient involvement in QM at the (i) hospital level and (ii) pathway level. Results Current levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions in European hospitals are low at hospital level (mean score 1.6 on a scale of 0 to 5, SD 0.7), but even lower at departmental level (mean 0.6, SD 0.7). We did not detect associations between levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies; however, the smallest hospitals were more likely to have implemented patient-centred care strategies. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence that involving patients and their representatives in QM leads to establishing or implementing strategies and procedures that facilitate patient-centred care; however, lack of evidence should not be interpreted as evidence of no effect. PMID:24615596

  9. Quality Improvement Implementation and Hospital Performance on Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Bryan J; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shortell, Stephen M; Baker, Laurence C; Becker, Mark; Geppert, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between the scope of quality improvement (QI) implementation in hospitals and hospital performance on selected indicators of clinical quality. Data Sources Secondary data from 1997 mailed survey of hospital QI practices, Medicare Inpatient Database, American Hospital Association's Annual Survey of Hospitals, the Bureau of Health Professions' Area Resource File, and two proprietary data sets compiled by Solucient Inc. containing data on managed care penetration and hospital financial performance. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 1,784 community hospitals to assess relationship between QI implementation approach and six hospital-level quality indicators. Data Collection/Abstraction Methods Two-stage instrumental variables estimation in which predicted values (instruments) of four QI scope variables and control (exogenous) variables used to estimate hospital-level quality indicators. Principal Findings Involvement by multiple hospital units in QI effort is associated with worse values on hospital-level quality indicators. Percentage of hospital staff and percentage of senior managers participating in formally organized QI teams are associated with better values on quality indicators. Percentage of physicians participating in QI teams is not associated with better values on the hospital-level quality indicators studied. Conclusions Results supported the proposition that the scope of QI implementation in hospitals is significantly associated with hospital-level quality indicators. However, the direction of the association varied across different measures of QI implementation scope. PMID:16584451

  10. Assessment of quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhute, Sonali A.; Bajait, Chaitali S.; Dakhale, Ganesh N.; Sontakke, Smita D.; Jaiswal, Kavita M.; Kinge, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Health-related quality of life (QOL) is an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Very few studies have been carried out on the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE-31) in India. The present study aimed to determine the level of health-related QOLIE-31 in patients of epilepsy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Respondents were adults aged at least 18-year-old with a diagnosis of epilepsy. QOLIE-31 was used for collecting data on health-related QOL. The unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance was used to compare means of QOL scores between groups. Results: Totally, 60 patients of epilepsy were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation) total score of QOLIE-31 was 64.61. A score of cognitive and medication effect were significantly better in carbamazepine group as compared to valproate group. Conclusions: Patients on monotherapy had a better QOL as compared to patients receiving polytherapy.

  11. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  12. Policies to improve end-of-life decisions in Flemish hospitals: communication, training of health care providers and use of quality assessments

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence and implementation of institutional end-of-life policies has been comprehensively studied in Flanders, Belgium, a country where euthanasia was legalised in 2002. Developing end-of-life policies in hospitals is a first step towards improving the quality of medical decision-making at the end-of-life. Implementation of policies through quality assessments, communication and the training and education of health care providers is equally important in improving actual end-of-life practice. The aim of the present study is to report on the existence and nature of end-of-life policy implementation activities in Flemish acute hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional mail survey was sent to all acute hospitals (67 main campuses) in Flanders (Belgium). The questionnaire asked about hospital characteristics, the prevalence of policies on five types of end-of-life decisions: euthanasia, palliative sedation, alleviation of symptoms with possible life-shortening effect, do-not-resuscitate decision, and withdrawing or withholding of treatment, the internal and external communication of these policies, training and education on aspects of end-of-life care, and quality assessments of end-of-life care on patient and family level. Results The response rate was 55%. Results show that in 2007 written policies on most types of end-of-life decisions were widespread in acute hospitals (euthanasia: 97%, do-not-resuscitate decisions: 98%, palliative sedation: 79%). While standard communication of these policies to health care providers was between 71% and 91%, it was much lower to patients and/or family (between 17% and 50%). More than 60% of institutions trained and educated their caregivers in different aspects on end-of-life care. Assessment of the quality of these different aspects at patient and family level occurred in 25% to 61% of these hospitals. Conclusions Most Flemish acute hospitals have developed a policy on end-of-life practices. However, communication, training and the education of health care providers about these policies is not always provided, and quality assessment tools are used in less than half of the hospitals. PMID:20042090

  13. Influence of Hospital and Nursing Home Quality on Hospital Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kali S.; Rahman, Momotazur; Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the quality of the hospital and of the nursing home (NH) to which a patient was discharged were related to the likelihood of rehospitalization. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of 1,382,477 individual hospitalizations discharged to 15,356 NHs from 3683 hospitals between 2006 and 2008. Methods Data come from Medicare claims and enrollment records, Minimum Data Set, Online Survey Certification and Reporting Dataset, Hospital Compare, and the American Hospital Association Database. Cross-classified random effects models were used to test the association of hospital and NH quality measures and the likelihood of 30-day rehospitalization. Results Patients discharged from higher-quality hospitals (as indicated by higher scores on their accountability process measures and high nurse staffing levels) and patients who received care in higher-quality NHs (as indicated by high nurse staffing levels and lower deficiency scores) were less likely to be rehospitalized within 30 days. Conclusions The passage of the Affordable Care Act changed the accountability of hospitals for patients’ outcomes after discharge. This study highlights the joint accountability of hospitals and NHs for rehospitalization of patients. PMID:25730351

  14. [Palliative care day hospital and nursing coordination].

    PubMed

    Teillet, Fabienne

    2015-11-01

    The palliative care day hospital is still underdeveloped in France, unlike in Anglo-Saxon countries. Its main mission is to help improve the quality of life at home of the patient suffering from a serious and progressive disease. It offers an inter-disciplinary and global approach in which the nurse's role is quite specific. PMID:26567073

  15. 77 FR 45061 - Hospital Outpatient Prospective and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ...non-face-to-face work involved in hospital...subsequent illnesses, improve beneficiary outcomes...could improve the quality of care while...information on hospital quality of care. This...beneficiaries to work with their doctors...to discuss the quality of care hospitals...to hospitals to improve the quality...

  16. Quality of Care

    Cancer.gov

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) defines quality of care as "the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge." In 1999, the IOM issued Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, a report that documented significant gaps in the quality of cancer care in the United States.

  17. Paying for the quantity and quality of hospital care: the foundations and evolution of payment policy in England.

    PubMed

    Graši?, Katja; Mason, Anne R; Street, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Prospective payment arrangements are now the main form of hospital funding in most developed countries. An essential component of such arrangements is the classification system used to differentiate patients according to their expected resource requirements. In this article we describe the evolution and structure of Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs) in England and the way in which costs are calculated for patients allocated to each HRG. We then describe how payments are made, how policy has evolved to incentivise improvements in quality, and how prospective payment is being applied outside hospital settings. PMID:26062538

  18. 76 FR 51475 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...promote high- quality, innovative...CTI also works to streamline...accelerate, and improve coordination...the CTI works to streamline...process, improve the quality of medical...beneficiaries to work with their...discuss the quality of care hospitals...hospitals to improve the...

  19. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...promote high- quality, innovative...CTI also works to streamline...accelerate, and improve coordination...the CTI works to streamline...process, improve the quality of medical...beneficiaries to work with their...discuss the quality of care hospitals...hospitals to improve the...

  20. Learning from MARQuIS: future direction of quality and safety in hospital care in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Groene, O; Klazinga, N; Walshe, K; Cucic, C; Shaw, C D; Suñol, R

    2009-01-01

    This article summarises the significant lessons to be drawn from, and the policy implications of, the findings of the Methods of Assessing Response to Quality Improvement Strategies (MARQuIS) project—a part of the suite of research projects intended to support policy established by the European Commission through its Sixth Framework Programme. The article first reviews the findings of MARQuIS and their implications for healthcare providers (and particularly for hospitals), and then addresses the broader policy implications for member states of the European Union (EU) and for the commission itself. Against the background of the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme, it then outlines a number of future areas for research to inform policy and practice in quality and safety in Europe. The article concludes that at this stage, a unique EU-wide quality improvement system for hospitals does not seem to be feasible or effective. Because of possible future community action in this field, attention should focus on the use of existing research on quality and safety strategies in healthcare, with the aim of combining soft measures to accelerate mutual learning. Concrete measures should be considered only in areas for which there is substantial evidence and effective implementation can be ensured. PMID:19188465

  1. Evaluation of Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Karen Lynn; Rafalson, Lisa; Mariano, Kathleen; Michalek, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated current hospital-based palliative care programs using recommendations from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) as a framework. Seven hospitals located in Buffalo, New York were included based on the existence of a hospital-based palliative care program. Data was collected from August through October of 2013 by means of key informant interviews with nine staff members from these hospitals using a guide comprised of questions based on CAPC's recommendations. A gap analysis was conducted to analyze the current state of each hospital's program based upon CAPC's definition of a quality palliative care program. The findings identify challenges facing both existing/evolving palliative care programs, and establish a foundation for strategies to attain best practices not yet implemented. This study affirms the growing availability of palliative care services among these selected hospitals along with opportunities to improve the scope of services in line with national recommendations. PMID:25294226

  2. Critical Care in Critical Access Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Seright, Teresa J; Winters, Charlene A

    2015-10-01

    What began as a grant-funded demonstration project, as a means of bridging the gap in rural health care, has developed into a critical access hospital system comprising 1328 facilities across 45 states. A critical access hospital is not just a safety net for health care in a rural community. Such hospitals may also provide specialized services such as same-day surgery, infusion therapy, and intensive care. For hospitals located near the required minimum of 35 miles from a tertiary care center, management of critically ill patients may be a matter of stabilization and transfer. Critical access hospitals in more rural areas are often much farther from tertiary care; some of these hospitals are situated within frontier areas of the United States. This article describes the development of critical access hospitals, provision of care and services, challenges to critical care in critical access hospitals, and suggestions to address gaps in research and collaborative care. PMID:26427976

  3. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... fiscal year FPL Federal poverty line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full... Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Proposed Fiscal Year... System and Proposed Fiscal Year 2014 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  4. Hospital board and management practices are strongly related to hospital performance on clinical quality metrics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Thomas C; Jha, Ashish K; Gawande, Atul A; Huckman, Robert S; Bloom, Nicholas; Sadun, Raffaella

    2015-08-01

    National policies to improve health care quality have largely focused on clinical provider outcomes and, more recently, payment reform. Yet the association between hospital leadership and quality, although crucial to driving quality improvement, has not been explored in depth. We collected data from surveys of nationally representative groups of hospitals in the United States and England to examine the relationships among hospital boards, management practices of front-line managers, and the quality of care delivered. First, we found that hospitals with more effective management practices provided higher-quality care. Second, higher-rated hospital boards had superior performance by hospital management staff. Finally, we identified two signatures of high-performing hospital boards and management practice. Hospitals with boards that paid greater attention to clinical quality had management that better monitored quality performance. Similarly, we found that hospitals with boards that used clinical quality metrics more effectively had higher performance by hospital management staff on target setting and operations. These findings help increase understanding of the dynamics among boards, front-line management, and quality of care and could provide new targets for improving care delivery. PMID:26240243

  5. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  6. Continuous quality improvement, total quality management, and reengineering: one hospital's continuous quality improvement journey.

    PubMed

    Klein, D; Motwani, J; Cole, B

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significantly increasing interest in the application of continuous quality improvement (CQI) and total quality management (TQM) in the health care arena. This case analysis is designed to identify and assess the strategies and processes that led to the successful implementation of CQI in the Emergency Care Center at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI. PMID:9735478

  7. Supply chain automation and the effects on clinician satisfaction and patient care quality in the hospital setting

    E-print Network

    Xie, Yue, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    The healthcare industry, more specifically hospitals, has in recent times been experiencing a steady rise in nursing shortages and cost pressures. To offset these problems hospitals have increasingly relied upon supply ...

  8. Conflicting interests in private hospital care.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Mary Ann

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at key changes impacting on private hospital care: the increasing corporate ownership of private hospitals; the Commonwealth Government's support for private health; the significant increase in health fund membership; and the contracting arrangements between health funds and private hospitals. The changes highlight the often conflicting interests of hospitals, doctors, Government, health funds and patients in the provision of private hospital care. These conflicts surfaced in the debate around allegations of 'cherry picking' by private hospitals of more profitable patients. This is also a good illustration of the increasing entanglement of the Government in the fortunes of the private health industry. PMID:12474506

  9. Measuring Child Care Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard

    Child care quality is not a single dimension, but rather a multidimensional characteristic of programs that support the family in its child-rearing role and programs in which children thrive developmentally, socially, cognitively, physically, and emotionally. At the regulatory and accreditation level, approaches to quality focus on group size,…

  10. Hospital value-based purchasing (VBP) program: measurement of quality and enforcement of quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Szablowski, Katarzyna M

    2014-01-01

    VBP program is a novel medicare payment estimatin tool used to encourage clinical care quality improvement as well as improvement of patient experience as a customer of a health care system. The program utilizes well established tools of measuring clinical care quality and patient satisfaction such as the hospital IQR program and HCAHPS survey to estimate Medicare payments and encourage hospitals to continuosly improve the level of care they provide. PMID:24600783

  11. Quality Improvement Strategies and Best Practices in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Moscovice, Ira

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) face many challenges in implementing quality improvement (QI) initiatives, which include limited resources, low volume of patients, small staffs, and inadequate information technology. A primary goal of the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program is to improve the quality of care provided by CAHs. This article…

  12. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  13. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  14. Transitional Care Strategies From Hospital to Home

    PubMed Central

    Ranji, Sumant R.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are challenged with reevaluating their hospital’s transitional care practices, to reduce 30-day readmission rates, prevent adverse events, and ensure a safe transition of patients from hospital to home. Despite the increasing attention to transitional care, there are few published studies that have shown significant reductions in readmission rates, particularly for patients with stroke and other neurologic diagnoses. Successful hospital-initiated transitional care programs include a “bridging” strategy with both predischarge and postdischarge interventions and dedicated transitions provider involved at multiple points in time. Although multicomponent strategies including patient engagement, use of a dedicated transition provider, and facilitation of communication with outpatient providers require time and resources, there is evidence that neurohospitalists can implement a transitional care program with the aim of improving patient safety across the continuum of care. PMID:25553228

  15. Quality of Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Work is underway to make cancer a working model for quality of care research and the translation of this research into practice. This requires addressing how data collection about cancer care can be standardized and made most useful to a variety of audiences including providers, patients and their families, purchasers, payers, researchers, and policymakers. The Applied Research Program has spearheaded several key activities to carry out this initiative.

  16. Keys for successful implementation of total quality management in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Carman, James M; Shortell, Stephen M; Foster, Richard W; Hughes, Edward F X; Boerstler, Heidi; O' Brien, James L; O'Connor, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Editor's Note: This article reports the findings of an analysis of the implementation of continuous quality improvement (CQI) or total quality management (TQM) programs in 10 hospitals. This analysis is the result of a 2-year study designed to identify and assess the ingredients that lead to the successful implementation of CQI programs in acute care hospitals. This article first appeared in Health Care Management Review 21(1), 48-60. Copyright © 1996 Aspen Publishers, Inc. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). PMID:20844354

  17. Dissecting hospital quality. Antecedents of clinical and perceived quality in hospitals.

    PubMed

    García-Lacalle, Javier; Bachiller, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Clinical quality (CQ) and patient satisfaction (PS) are key elements on the agenda of European public healthcare systems. This paper seeks to explore the relationship between CQ and PS, at hospital level, as freedom of hospital choice may lead to a trade-off between them. In addition, the paper studies the influence of some factors--location, size, case-mix, length of stay and occupancy rate (OR)--on hospital clinical and perceived quality. Correlation analyses and the linear mixed-effect methodology are used. The study focuses on the Andalusian Health Service, one of the biggest European public health services, and covers the years from 2002 to 2006. The results indicate that CQ and perceived quality are not related. The 'volume-expertise' effect is not confirmed in our study, but we find a 'complexity-expertise' effect, i.e. attending more complex cases may improve CQ. Shorter hospitalizations and higher ORs might negatively affect CQ. Location, size, case-mix and ORs significantly affect PS. Hospitals with better patient assessments might attract patients without providing a better clinical care. Caution should be taken when evaluating hospital performance and implementing reforms to improve hospital efficiency as quality may be harmed. PMID:21796682

  18. The European quality of care pathways (EQCP) study on the impact of care pathways on interprofessional teamwork in an acute hospital setting: study protocol: for a cluster randomised controlled trial and evaluation of implementation processes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although care pathways are often said to promote teamwork, high-level evidence that supports this statement is lacking. Furthermore, knowledge on conditions and facilitators for successful pathway implementation is scarce. The objective of the European Quality of Care Pathway (EQCP) study is therefore to study the impact of care pathways on interprofessional teamwork and to build up understanding on the implementation process. Methods/design An international post-test-only cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (cRCT), combined with process evaluations, will be performed in Belgium, Ireland, Italy, and Portugal. Teams caring for proximal femur fracture (PFF) patients and patients hospitalized with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will be randomised into an intervention and control group. The intervention group will implement a care pathway for PFF or COPD containing three active components: a formative evaluation of the actual teams’ performance, a set of evidence-based key interventions, and a training in care pathway-development. The control group will provide usual care. A set of team input, process and output indicators will be used as effect measures. The main outcome indicator will be relational coordination. Next to these, process measures during and after pathway development will be used to evaluate the implementation processes. In total, 132 teams have agreed to participate, of which 68 were randomly assigned to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Based on power analysis, a sample of 475 team members per arm is required. To analyze results, multilevel analysis will be performed. Discussion Results from our study will enhance understanding on the active components of care pathways. Through this, preferred implementation strategies can be defined. Trail registration NCT01435538 PMID:22607698

  19. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  20. Hospital-Based Comprehensive Care Programs for Children With Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Eyal; Jovcevska, Vesna; Kuo, Dennis Z.; Mahant, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of hospital-based comprehensive care programs in improving the quality of care for children with special health care needs. Data Sources A systematic review was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts SocioFile, and Web of Science. Study Selection Evaluations of comprehensive care programs for categorical (those with single disease) and noncategorical groups of children with special health care needs were included. Selected articles were reviewed independently by 2 raters. Data Extraction Models of care focused on comprehensive care based at least partially in a hospital setting. The main outcome measures were the proportions of studies demonstrating improvement in the Institute of Medicine’s quality-of-care domains (effectiveness of care, efficiency of care, patient or family centeredness, patient safety, timeliness of care, and equity of care). Data Synthesis Thirty-three unique programs were included, 13 (39%) of which were randomized controlled trials. Improved outcomes most commonly reported were efficiency of care (64% [49 of 76 outcomes]), effectiveness of care (60% [57 of 95 outcomes]), and patient or family centeredness (53% [10 of 19 outcomes). Outcomes less commonly evaluated were patient safety (9% [3 of 33 programs]), timeliness of care (6% [2 of 33 programs]), and equity of care (0%). Randomized controlled trials occurred more frequently in studies evaluating categorical vs noncategorical disease populations (11 of 17 [65%] vs 2 of 16 [17%], P = .008). Conclusions Although positive, the evidence supporting comprehensive hospital-based programs for children with special health care needs is restricted primarily to nonexperimental studies of children with categorical diseases and is limited by inadequate outcome measures. Additional high-quality evidence with appropriate comparative groups and broad outcomes is necessary to justify continued development and growth of programs for broad groups of children with special health care needs. PMID:21646589

  1. Care of Children in Hospital. A Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenbak, Else

    The report, presented from a nursing point of view, looks at the care of children in European hospitals including official policies, regulations, laws and daily nursing care practices. The first chapter provides a rationale for the study with a review of the literature and a presentation of the conceptual framework of the study. The second chapter…

  2. Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective - improving hospital care for migrant children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Results Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient’s family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. Conclusions International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care for PMs at both policy and service levels is an investment in the future that will benefit native and migrant families. PMID:24093461

  3. Tweets about hospital quality: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Antony A; Cano, Daniel Ramirez; Moilanen, Karo; Pulman, Stephen; Darzi, Ara; Millett, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Twitter is increasingly being used by patients to comment on their experience of healthcare. This may provide information for understanding the quality of healthcare providers and improving services. Objective To examine whether tweets sent to hospitals in the English National Health Service contain information about quality of care. To compare sentiment on Twitter about hospitals with established survey measures of patient experience and standardised mortality rates. Design A mixed methods study including a quantitative analysis of all 198?499 tweets sent to English hospitals over a year and a qualitative directed content analysis of 1000 random tweets. Twitter sentiment and conventional quality metrics were compared using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Key results 11% of tweets to hospitals contained information about care quality, with the most frequent topic being patient experience (8%). Comments on effectiveness or safety of care were present, but less common (3%). 77% of tweets about care quality were positive in tone. Other topics mentioned in tweets included messages of support to patients, fundraising activity, self-promotion and dissemination of health information. No associations were observed between Twitter sentiment and conventional quality metrics. Conclusions Only a small proportion of tweets directed at hospitals discuss quality of care and there was no clear relationship between Twitter sentiment and other measures of quality, potentially limiting Twitter as a medium for quality monitoring. However, tweets did contain information useful to target quality improvement activity. Recent enthusiasm by policy makers to use social media as a quality monitoring and improvement tool needs to be carefully considered and subjected to formal evaluation. PMID:24748372

  4. Controlling for quality in the hospital cost function.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Stefos, Theodore

    2011-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the cost and quality of hospital care from the perspective of applied microeconomics. It addresses both theoretical and practical complexities entailed in incorporating hospital quality into the estimation of hospital cost functions. That literature is extended with an empirical analysis that examines the use of 15 Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) as measures of hospital quality. A total operating cost function is estimated on 2,848 observations from five states drawn from the period 2001 to 2007. In general, findings indicate that the PSIs are successful in capturing variation in hospital cost due to adverse patient safety events. Measures that rely on the aggregate number of adverse events summed over PSIs are found to be superior to risk-adjusted rates for individual PSIs. The marginal cost of an adverse event is estimated to be $22,413. The results contribute to a growing business case for inpatient safety in hospital services. PMID:21086051

  5. Deming's quality principles: a health care application.

    PubMed

    Lynn, M L; Osborn, D P

    1991-01-01

    W. Edwards Deming is considered a guru of quality by many international manufacturers. His ideas revolutionized Japan's auto industry in the 1950s, but did not make a substantial impact in the United States until 1980. Increasingly, service organizations, from hotels to public utility companies, are experimenting with his principles. This article explains how a 165-bed community hospital--Brazosport Memorial Hospital in Lake Jackson, Texas--is putting Deming's ideas to work in health care. Deming's philosophy and principles are described as is the hospital's application and implementation of his ideas; preliminary results are encouraging. PMID:10108969

  6. The outcomes of psychiatric inpatients by proportion of experienced psychiatrists and nurse staffing in hospital: New findings on improving the quality of mental health care in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Sung-In; Hahm, Myung-Il; Kim, Seung Ju; Lee, Seo Yoon; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-10-30

    Readmission rates for mental health care are higher in South Korea than other Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. Therefore, it is worthwhile to continue investigating how to reduce readmissions. Taking a novel approach, we determined the relationship between psychiatrist experience and mental health care readmission rates. We used National Health Insurance claim data (N=21,315) from 81 hospitals to analyze readmissions within 30 days of discharge for "mood disorders" or "schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders" during 2010-2013. In this study, multilevel models that included both patient and hospital-level variables were analyzed to examine associations with readmission. Readmissions within 30 days of discharge accounted for 1079 (5.1%) claims. Multilevel analysis demonstrated that the proportion of experienced psychiatrists at a hospital was inversely associated with risk of readmission (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.74-0.84 per 10% increase in experienced psychiatrists). Readmission rates for psychiatric disorders within 30 days of discharge were lower in hospitals with a higher number of nurses (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.94-0.96 per 10 nurses). In conclusion, health policymakers and hospital managers should make an effort to reduce readmissions for psychiatric disorders and other diseases by considering the role that physician experience plays and nurse staffing. PMID:26260566

  7. Limited Use of Price and Quality Advertising Among American Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Chrisanne E A; Richter, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumer-directed policies, including health savings accounts, have been proposed and implemented to involve individuals more directly with the cost of their health care. The hope is this will ultimately encourage providers to compete for patients based on price or quality, resulting in lower health care costs and better health outcomes. Objective To evaluate American hospital websites to learn whether hospitals advertise directly to consumers using price or quality data. Methods Structured review of websites of 10% of American hospitals (N=474) to evaluate whether price or quality information is available to consumers and identify what hospitals advertise about to attract consumers. Results On their websites, 1.3% (6/474) of hospitals advertised about price and 19.0% (90/474) had some price information available; 5.7% (27/474) of hospitals advertised about quality outcomes information and 40.9% (194/474) had some quality outcome data available. Price and quality information that was available was limited and of minimal use to compare hospitals. Hospitals were more likely to advertise about service lines (56.5%, 268/474), access (49.6%, 235/474), awards (34.0%, 161/474), and amenities (30.8%, 146/474). Conclusions Insufficient information currently exists for consumers to choose hospitals on the basis of price or quality, making current consumer-directed policies unlikely to realize improved quality or lower costs. Consumers may be more interested in information not related to cost or clinical factors when choosing a hospital, so consumer-directed strategies may be better served before choosing a provider, such as when choosing a health plan. PMID:23988296

  8. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System...Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate...applications for new technology add-on payments, we...certain long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and LTCH...

  9. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

  10. Establishing a Coalition of Hospital-Affiliated and Community-Based Child Care Services through a Family Home Day Care Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Kathy A.

    The director of the child care and services program of a New England hospital designed and implemented this practicum for the purpose of expanding child care services for children of hospital employees and residents of communities around the hospital. The primary goal was to increase the number of quality child care slots in the area. A second aim…

  11. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute myocardial infarction n = 1,379, hip fracture n = 1,503, deliveries n = 2,088, stroke n = 1,566). Patients admitted for hip fracture and stroke had the lowest scores across the four patient-reported experience measures throughout. Patients admitted after acute myocardial infarction reported highest scores on patient experience and hospital recommendation; women after delivery reported highest scores for patient involvement and health care transition. We found no substantial associations between hospital-wide quality management strategies, patient involvement in quality management, or patient-centered care strategies with any of the patient-reported experience measures. Conclusion This is the largest study so far to assess the complex relationship between quality management strategies and patient experience with care. Our findings suggest absence of and wide variations in the institutionalization of strategies to engage patients in quality management, or implement strategies to improve patient-centeredness of care. Seemingly counterintuitive inverse associations could be capturing a scenario where hospitals with poorer quality management were beginning to improve their patient experience. The former suggests that patient-centered care is not yet sufficiently integrated in quality management, while the latter warrants a nuanced assessment of the motivation and impact of involving patients in the design and assessment of services. PMID:26151864

  12. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ...Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System...Requirements for Specific Providers; Hospital Conditions of Participation...MS-DRG classifications and new technology add-on payments. Eva Fung...corrections regarding the Hospital Readmission Reduction...

  13. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long- Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and...Payment Rates Implementing the Affordable Care Act AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

  14. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements...2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting...

  15. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements...2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting...

  16. 77 FR 65495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ...2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements...2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting...

  17. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year... Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident...

  18. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free public access... Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013... Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps...

  19. Reducing hospital acquired pressure ulcers in intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Cullen Gill, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a definite problem in our health care system and are growing in numbers. Unfortunately, it is usually the most weak and vulnerable of our culture that faces these complications, causing the patient and their families discomfort, anguish, and economic hardship due to their expensive treatment. Data collected by the tissue viability department showed high incidence of hospital acquire pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit in March 2013. An action plan was initiated and implemented by the tissue viability team, senior nursing management, pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) team and respiratory therapists (RT's) within the ICU. Our objective was to reduce hospital acquired pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit using the plan, do, check, act quality improvement process.

  20. Moving Towards the Age-friendly Hospital: A Paradigm Shift for the Hospital-based Care of the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Allen R.; Larente, Nadine; Morais, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Care of the older adult in the acute care hospital is becoming more challenging. Patients 65 years and older account for 35% of hospital discharges and 45% of hospital days. Up to one-third of the hospitalized frail elderly loses independent functioning in one or more activities of daily living as a result of the ‘hostile environment’ that is present in the acute hospitals. A critical deficit of health care workers with expertise and experience in the care of the elderly also jeopardizes successful care delivery in the acute hospital setting. Methods We propose a paradigm shift in the culture and practice of event-driven acute hospital-based care of the elderly which we call the Age-friendly Hospital concept. Guiding principles include: a favourable physical environment; zero tolerance for ageism throughout the organization; an integrated process to develop comprehensive services using the geriatric approach; assistance with appropriateness decision-making and fostering links between the hospital and the community. Our current proposed strategy is to focus on delirium management as a hospital-wide condition that both requires and highlights the Geriatric Medicine specialist as an expert of content, for program development and of evaluation. Conclusion The Age-friendly Hospital concept we propose may lead the way to enable hospitals in the fast-moving health care system to deliver high-quality care without jeopardizing risk-benefit, function, and quality of life balances for the frail elderly. Recruitment and retention of skilled health care professionals would benefit from this positive ‘branding’ of an institution. Convincing hospital management and managing change are significant challenges, especially with competing priorities in a fiscal environment with limited funding. The implementation of a hospital-wide delirium management program is an example of an intervention that embodies many of the principles in the Age-friendly Hospital concept. It is important to change the way hospital care is delivered to older adults in time to meet our needs when we need hospital services ourselves. PMID:23251321

  1. Quality of care and the patient: new criteria for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Omachonu, V K

    1990-01-01

    Quality in health care has two critical components: quality in practice and quality in perception. The first involves meeting your own or some other set of standards; the second, meeting your customers' expectations. Neither of these essentials will, by itself, carry a hospital far. This article examines the extent to which customer perception is important in understanding the concept of quality in health care. PMID:2266007

  2. Helping You Choose Quality Ambulatory Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Critical Access Hospitals Home Care (+ Pharmacy) Hospital Laboratory Nursing Care Center International Accreditation Accreditation Top Spots What Is ... Equity High Reliability Infection Prevention and HAI Portal Pain Management Patient Safety Sentinel Event - Sentinel Event Alert ...

  3. Helping You Choose Quality Hospice Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Critical Access Hospitals Home Care (+ Pharmacy) Hospital Laboratory Nursing Care Center International Accreditation Accreditation Top Spots What Is ... Equity High Reliability Infection Prevention and HAI Portal Pain Management Patient Safety Sentinel Event - Sentinel Event Alert ...

  4. Financial and organizational determinants of hospital diversification into subacute care.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, J R; Burkhardt, J; Alexander, J A; Magnus, S A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the financial, market, and organizational determinants of hospital diversification into subacute inpatient care by acute care hospitals in order to guide hospital managers in undertaking such diversification efforts. STUDY SETTING: All nongovernment, general, acute care, community hospitals that were operating during the years 1985 through 1991 (3,986 hospitals in total). DATA SOURCES: Cross-sectional, time-series data were drawn from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals, the Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) Medicare Cost Reports, a latitude and longitude listing for all community hospital addresses, and the Area Resource File (ARF) published in 1992, which provides county level environmental variables. STUDY DESIGN: The study is longitudinal, enabling the specification of temporal patterns in conversion, causal inferences, and the treatment of right-censoring problems. The unit of analysis is the individual hospital. KEY FINDINGS: Significant differences were found in the average level of subacute care offered by investor-owned versus tax-exempt hospitals. After controlling for selection bias, financial performance, risk, size, occupancy, and other variables, IO hospitals offered 31.3 percent less subacute care than did NFP hospitals. Financial performance and risk are predictors of IO hospitals' diversification into subacute care, but not of NFP hospitals' activities in this market. Resource availability appears to expedite expansion into subacute care for both types of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Investment criteria and strategy differ between investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals. PMID:10201852

  5. 38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section 17.45 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.45 Hospital care for research...

  6. 38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section 17.45 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.45 Hospital care for research...

  7. 38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section 17.45 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.45 Hospital care for research...

  8. 38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section 17.45 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.45 Hospital care for research...

  9. 38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section 17.45 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.45 Hospital care for research...

  10. The Role of Stepdown Beds in Hospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Prin, Meghan

    2014-01-01

    Stepdown beds provide an intermediate level of care for patients with requirements somewhere between that of the general ward and the intensive care unit. Models of care include incorporation of stepdown beds into intensive care units, stand-alone units, or incorporation of beds into standard wards. Stepdown beds may be used to provide a higher level of care for patients deteriorating on a ward (“step-up”), a lower level of care for patients transitioning out of intensive care (“stepdown”) or a lateral transfer of care from a recovery room for postoperative patients. These units are one possible strategy to improve critical care cost-effectiveness and patient flow without compromising quality, but these potential benefits remain primarily theoretical as few patient-level studies provide concrete evidence. This narrative review provides a general overview of the theory of stepdown beds in the care of hospitalized patients and a summary of what is known about their impact on patient flow and outcomes and highlights areas for future research. PMID:25163008

  11. The role of stepdown beds in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Prin, Meghan; Wunsch, Hannah

    2014-12-01

    Stepdown beds provide an intermediate level of care for patients with requirements somewhere between that of the general ward and the intensive care unit. Models of care include incorporation of stepdown beds into intensive care units, stand-alone units, or incorporation of beds into standard wards. Stepdown beds may be used to provide a higher level of care for patients deteriorating on a ward ("step-up"), a lower level of care for patients transitioning out of intensive care ("stepdown") or a lateral transfer of care from a recovery room for postoperative patients. These units are one possible strategy to improve critical care cost-effectiveness and patient flow without compromising quality, but these potential benefits remain primarily theoretical as few patient-level studies provide concrete evidence. This narrative review provides a general overview of the theory of stepdown beds in the care of hospitalized patients and a summary of what is known about their impact on patient flow and outcomes and highlights areas for future research. PMID:25163008

  12. Long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia

    2009-08-01

    Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) are health care facilities that admit complex patients with acute care needs (eg, mechanical ventilator weaning, administration of intravenous antibiotics, and complex wound care) for a mean duration of stay of 25 days. LTACHs are different than nursing homes and were initially created in the 1990s in an effort to decrease Medicare costs by facilitating prompt discharge from intensive care units of patients with difficulty weaning mechanical ventilation; however, current admission diagnoses are quite broad. Patients admitted to these facilities have multiple comorbidities and are at risk for colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms. LTACH patients have been shown to have high rates of hospital-acquired infections, including central vascular catheter-associated bloodstream infection and ventilator-associated pneumonia. In addition, LTACHs have been implicated in various regional outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. This review summarizes the limited amount of scientific literature on LTACHs while highlighting their infection control problems, as well as the role LTACHs play on regional outbreaks. PMID:19548836

  13. Achieving better in-hospital and after-hospital care of patients with acute cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Denaro, Charles P; Bennett, Cameron J; Hickey, Annabel C; Mudge, Alison M; Flores, Judy L; Sanders, Daniela C J; Thiele, Justine M; Wenck, Beres; Bennett, John W; Jones, Mark A

    2004-05-17

    In patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and congestive heart failure (CHF), evidence suggests opportunities for improving in-hospital and after-hospital care, patient self-care, and hospital-community integration. A multidisciplinary quality improvement program was designed and instigated in Brisbane in October 2000 involving 250 clinicians at three teaching hospitals, 1080 general practitioners (GPs) from five Divisions of General Practice, 1594 patients with ACS and 904 patients with CHF. Quality improvement interventions were implemented over 17 months after a 6-month baseline period and included: clinical decision support (clinical practice guidelines, reminders, checklists, clinical pathways); educational interventions (seminars, academic detailing); regular performance feedback; patient self-management strategies; and hospital-community integration (discharge referral summaries; community pharmacist liaison; patient prompts to attend GPs). Using a before-after study design to assess program impact, significantly more program patients compared with historical controls received: ACS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and lipid-lowering agents at discharge, aspirin and beta-blockers at 3 months after discharge, inpatient cardiac counselling, and referral to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. CHF: Assessment for reversible precipitants, use of prophylaxis for deep-venous thrombosis, beta-blockers at discharge, ACE inhibitors at 6 months after discharge, imaging of left ventricular function, and optimal management of blood pressure levels. Risk-adjusted mortality rates at 6 and 12 months decreased, respectively, from 9.8% to 7.4% (P = 0.06) and from 13.4% to 10.1% (P = 0.06) for patients with ACS and from 22.8% to 15.2% (P < 0.001) and from 32.8% to 22.4% (P = 0.005) for patients with CHF. Quality improvement programs that feature multifaceted interventions across the continuum of care can change clinical culture, optimise care and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:15139843

  14. Does a hospital's quality depend on the quality of other hospitals? A spatial econometrics approach

    PubMed Central

    Gravelle, Hugh; Santos, Rita; Siciliani, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether a hospital's quality is affected by the quality provided by other hospitals in the same market. We first sketch a theoretical model with regulated prices and derive conditions on demand and cost functions which determine whether a hospital will increase its quality if its rivals increase their quality. We then apply spatial econometric methods to a sample of English hospitals in 2009–10 and a set of 16 quality measures including mortality rates, readmission, revision and redo rates, and three patient reported indicators, to examine the relationship between the quality of hospitals. We find that a hospital's quality is positively associated with the quality of its rivals for seven out of the sixteen quality measures. There are no statistically significant negative associations. In those cases where there is a significant positive association, an increase in rivals' quality by 10% increases a hospital's quality by 1.7% to 2.9%. The finding suggests that for some quality measures a policy which improves the quality in one hospital will have positive spillover effects on the quality in other hospitals. PMID:25843994

  15. Assessment of quality of care given to diabetic patients at Jimma University Specialized Hospital diabetes follow-up clinic, Jimma, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa is currently enduring the heaviest global burden of diabetes and diabetes care in such resource poor countries is far below standards. This study aims to describe the gaps in the care of Ethiopian diabetic patients at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods 329 diabetic patients were selected as participants in the study, aged 15 years or greater, who have been active in follow-up for their diabetes for more than 1 year at the hospital. They were interviewed for their demographic characters and relevant clinical profiles. Their charts were simultaneously reviewed for characters related to diabetes and related morbidities. Descriptive statistics was used for most variables and Chi-square test, where necessary, was used to test the association among various variables. P-value of < 0.05 was used as statistical significance. Results Blood glucose determination was done for 98.5% of patients at each of the last three visits, but none ever had glycosylated haemoglobin results. The mean fasting blood sugar (FBS) level was 171.7 ± 63.6 mg/dl and 73.1% of patients had mean FBS levels above 130 mg/dl. Over 44% of patients have already been diagnosed to be hypertensive and 64.1% had mean systolic BP of > 130 and/or diastolic > 80 mmHg over the last three visits. Diabetes eye and neurologic evaluations were ever done for 42.9% and 9.4% of patients respectively. About 66% had urine test for albumin, but only 28.2% had renal function testing over the last 5 years. The rates for lipid test, electrocardiography, echocardiography, or ultrasound of the kidneys during the same time were < 5% for each. Diabetic neuropathy (25.0%) and retinopathy (23.1%) were the most common chronic complications documented among those evaluated for complications. Conclusions The overall aspects of diabetes care at the hospital were far below any recommended standards. Hence, urgent action to improve care for patients with diabetes is mandatory. Future studies examining patterns and prevalence of chronic complications using appropriate parameters is strongly recommended to see the true burden of diabetes. PMID:22185229

  16. Health Care User Perspectives on Constructing, Contextualizing, and Co-Producing "Quality of Care".

    PubMed

    Baim-Lance, Abigail; Tietz, Daniel; Schlefer, Madeleine; Agins, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research on health care user "quality of care" perspectives seeks discrete and measurable indicators to advance quality improvement (QI) goals. This lacks sufficiently grounded query about the meaning of "quality of care" for health users, and how context influences their ideas and experiences. We studied this between 2010 and 2011, repeatedly interviewing and shadowing 45 individuals in three of New York's hospital-based outpatient HIV care settings during routine visits. We found participants using common terminology, but across the cohort meaning varied and employed personal narratives. Participants conveyed the impact of historic and current experiences of stigma and discrimination on limiting access to care, and showed its destabilizing effects on quality constructs. Participants also felt they contributed to their health care settings' delivery of quality care. From our findings, we discuss the applicability and implications of "co-production" to conceptualize health care as jointly delivered by typical "givers" and "receivers" of care. PMID:25670664

  17. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2015-12-15

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised 'cardiac arrest centres' as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  18. Total quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Brannan, K M

    1998-05-01

    Quality is at the top of American consumers' demand list, and consequently American manufacturing companies have been forced to assign priority to the development of high-quality products. To improve the quality of what they offer, many manufacturers use the management philosophy known as total quality management (TQM), and now the service sector is following in their footsteps. The health care industry is a good example of a service industry that can benefit greatly from TQM, and it is the purpose of this article to show how a health care provider can implement TQM and evaluate its effects. PMID:10178544

  19. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  20. Hospital mergers and referrals in the United States: patient steering or integrated delivery of care?

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sayaka

    2010-01-01

    Many tertiary care hospitals (acquirers) acquire non-tertiary care hospitals (targets), and some of these mergers lead to a significant increase in referrals from the target to the acquirer. This study examines the hospitals' motives for integration and for increasing referrals using hospital discharge data from the Pittsburgh area. I develop and estimate a model of referral choice based on a reputation mechanism. The results suggest that low- or average-quality acquirers exploit their targets' monopoly power to steer patients to the acquirers. Distinguished acquirers, on the other hand, seem to have motives other than patient steering, including the integrated delivery of care. PMID:21155417

  1. Perspectives on Home Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Rosalie A.; Kane, Robert L.; Illston, Laurel H.; Eustis, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Home care quality assurance (QA) must consider features inherent in home care, including: multiple goals, limited provider control, and unique family roles. Successive panels of stakeholders were asked to rate the importance of selected home care outcomes. Most highly rated outcomes were freedom from exploitation, satisfaction with care, physical safety, affordability, and physical functioning. Panelists preferred outcome indicators to process and structure, and all groups emphasized “enabling” criteria. Themes highlighted included: interpersonal components of care; normalizing life for clientele; balancing quality of life with safety; developing flexible, negotiated care plans; mechanisms for accountability and case management. These themes were formulated differently according to the stakeholders' role. Providers preferred intermediate outcomes, akin to process. PMID:10140158

  2. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011 Rates... Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011 Rates; Provider Agreements and Supplier Approvals; and Hospital... annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital...

  3. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the final rules and interim final rule with comment period entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011 Rates; Provider Agreements and Supplier Approvals; and Hospital Conditions of Participation for......

  4. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  5. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. 17.43 Section 17.43 Pensions... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. Hospital or domiciliary care may...

  6. Pediatric Post-Acute Hospital Care: Striving for Identity and Value.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jane E; Berry, Jay; Dumas, Helene

    2015-10-01

    The landscape of hospital care for children is changing. Hospital clinicians are challenged to provide high-quality care to 2 increasingly complex groups of children: (1) healthy children admitted for high-severity acute illnesses or injury and (2) children admitted with lifelong, and often disabling, chronic conditions. Hospitalizations for both of these groups are becoming more prevalent, lengthy, and costly. In many situations, these children need weeks, or sometimes months, to recover from their illness or injury, with a sustained intensity of daily caregiving needs throughout their recovery period. Pediatric post-acute hospital care is a little-known and underused option in pediatric health care that could substantially help these children stabilize in a less restrictive and less costly environment than acute care hospitals can provide. In this commentary, we (1) propose the need and place for pediatric post-acute care hospitals along the continuum of care, (2) discuss the characteristics of children currently cared for in pediatric post-acute care hospitals, (3) suggest research opportunities and challenges, and (4) present issues related to the cost and value of pediatric post-acute care hospitals. PMID:26427924

  7. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  8. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  9. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  10. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  11. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  12. The relative effectiveness of managed care penetration and the healthcare safety net in reducing avoidable hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Pracht, Etienne E; Orban, Barbara L; Comins, Meg M; Large, John T; Asin-Oostburg, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Avoidable hospitalizations represent a key indicator for access to, and the quality of, primary care. Therefore, understanding their behavior is essential in terms of management of healthcare resources and costs. This analysis examines the affect of 2 healthcare strategies on the rate of avoidable hospitalization, managed care and the healthcare safety net. The avoidable hospitalizations definition developed by Weissman et al. (1992) was used to identify relevant inpatient episodes. A 2-stage simultaneous equations multivariate regression model with instrumental variables was used to estimate the relative influence of HMO penetration and the composition of local hospital markets on the rate of avoidable hospitalizations. Control variables in the model include healthcare supply and demand, demographic, socioeconomic, and health status characteristics. Increased market presence of public hospitals significantly reduced avoidable hospitalizations. HMO penetration did not influence the rate of avoidable hospitalizations. The results suggest that public investments in healthcare facilities and infrastructure are more effective in reducing avoidable hospitalizations. PMID:21733024

  13. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Pilar Isla

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM) and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions. Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed. Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system. Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials. PMID:21423590

  14. ORD Studies of Water Quality in Hospitals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation descibes results from two studies of water quality and pathogen occurrence in water and biofilm samples from two area hospitals. Includes data on the effectiveness of copper/silver ionization as a disinfectant.

  15. Identifying Key Hospital Service Quality Factors in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain

    2015-01-01

    Background The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. Objective As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. Methods We defined social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea’s two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. Results To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and classification performance still has room for improvement, but the extraction results are applicable to more detailed analysis. Further analysis of the extracted information reveals that there are differences in the details of social media–based key quality factors for hospitals according to the regions in Korea, and the patterns of change seem to accurately reflect social events (eg, influenza epidemics). Conclusions These findings could be used to provide timely information to caregivers, hospital officials, and medical officials for health care policies. PMID:25855612

  16. Measuring quality of maternity care.

    PubMed

    Collins, Katherine J; Draycott, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Health-care organisations are required to monitor and measure the quality of their maternity services, but measuring quality is complex, and no universal consensus exists on how best to measure it. Clinical outcomes and process measures that are important to stakeholders should be measured, ideally in standardised sets for benchmarking. Furthermore, a holistic interpretation of quality should also reflect patient experience, ideally integrated with outcome and process measures, into a balanced suite of quality indicators. Dashboards enable reporting of trends in adverse outcomes to stakeholders, staff and patients, and they facilitate targeted quality improvement initiatives. The value of such dashboards is dependent upon high-quality, routinely collected data, subject to robust statistical analysis. Moving forward, we could and should collect a standard, relevant set of quality indicators, from routinely collected data, and present these in a manner that facilitates ongoing quality improvement, both locally and at regional/national levels. PMID:25913563

  17. Quality indicators for paediatric palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Janie; Cyr, Claude

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To apply quality indicators for paediatric palliative care and evaluate performance in one service provision area. METHODS: After institutional review board approval, medical records were abstracted for well-defined and measurable quality indicators for children with chronic complex conditions (CCCs) between January 2006 and December 2011 (n=50) at a university medical centre. RESULTS: Of the 50 children with a CCC (mean age 64 months, 48% female), 39 (78%) died in hospital, 11 (22%) died at home and 13 (26%) were <1 month of age. In the final month of their life, 10 patients (20%) required an unplanned visit to the emergency department and seven (14%) were admitted. Only four patients (8%) were admitted for >14 days in their final month of life. Goals of care were addressed in a timely manner 60% of the time. An invasive procedure was performed in the final month of life in 27 (44%) patients. Bereavement follow-up was offered to 25 (50%) families. A palliative care consultant was involved with 17 (34%) patients. Palliative care was associated with less frequent invasive procedures in the final month of life and more frequent documentation of the preferred place of death. CONCLUSION: Performance on these particular quality indicators was unsatisfactory across a diverse group of children with CCCs, indicating important opportunities for improvement. Methods used to improve the quality of other aspects of paediatric care, including emphasis on efficient work systems, practical tools and interdisciplinary teamwork, should be used for ensuring delivery of high-quality palliative care. PMID:25914573

  18. Hospital Coding Practice, Data Quality, and DRG-Based Reimbursement under the Thai Universal Coverage Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pongpirul, Krit

    2011-01-01

    In the Thai Universal Coverage scheme, hospital providers are paid for their inpatient care using Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) reimbursement. Questionable quality of the submitted DRG codes has been of concern whereas knowledge about hospital coding practice has been lacking. The objectives of this thesis are (1) To explore hospital coding…

  19. Tweeting and Treating: How Hospitals Use Twitter to Improve Care.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Christian; Coustasse, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals that have adopted Twitter primarily use it to share organizational news, provide general health care information, advertise upcoming community events, and foster networking. The purpose of this study was to explore the benefits that Twitter utilization has had in improving quality of care, access to care, patient satisfaction, and community footprint while assessing the barriers to its implementation. The methodology used was a qualitative study with a semistructured interview combined with a literature review, which followed the basic principles of a systematic review. The utilization of Twitter by hospitals suggest that it leads to savings of resources, enhanced employee and patient communication, and expanded patient reach in the community. Savings opportunities are generated by preventing unnecessary office visits, producing billable patient encounters, and eliminating high recruiting costs. Communication is enhanced using Twitter by sharing organizational content, news, and health promotions and can be also a useful tool during crises. The utilization of Twitter in the hospital setting has been more beneficial than detrimental in its ability to generate opportunities for cost savings, recruiting, communication with employees and patients, and community reach. PMID:26217995

  20. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

  1. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

  2. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

  3. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

  4. 38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

  5. Hospital Culture of Transitions in Care: Survey Development.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Mark; Lazar, Danielle; Wolfe, Lindsay; Goldberg, Debora Goetz; Zocchi, Mark; Twesten, Jenny; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding hospital culture is important to effectively manage patient flow. The purpose of this study was to develop a survey instrument that can assess a hospital's culture related to in-hospital transitions in care. Key transition themes were identified using a multidisciplinary team of experts from 3 health care systems. Candidate items were rigorously evaluated using a modified Delphi technique. Findings indicate 8 themes associated with hospital culture-mediating transitions. Forty-four items reflect the themes. PMID:26121054

  6. Accountable Care Organizations: roles and opportunities for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schoenbaum, Stephen C

    2011-08-01

    Federal health reform has established Medicare Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) as a new program, and some states and private payers have been independently developing ACO pilot projects. The objective is to hold provider groups accountable for the quality and cost of care to a population. The financial models for providers generally build off of shared savings between the payers and providers or some type of global payment that includes the possibility of partial or full capitation. For ACOs to achieve the same outcomes with lower costs or, better yet, improved outcomes with the same or lower costs, the delivery system will need to become more oriented toward primary care and care coordination than is currently the case. Providers of clinical services, in order to be more effective, efficient, and coordinated, will need to be supported by a variety of shared services, such as off-hours care, easy access to specialties, and information exchanges. These services can be organized by an ACO as a medical neighborhood or community. Hospitals, because they have a management structure, history of developing programs and services, and accessibility 24/7/365, are logical leaders of this enhancement of health care delivery for populations and other providers. PMID:21881401

  7. Organizing integrated care in a university hospital: application of a conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Runo; Axelsson, Susanna Bihari; Gustafsson, Jeppe; Seemann, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim As a result of New Public Management, a number of industrial models of quality management have been implemented in health care, mainly in hospitals. At the same time, the concept of integrated care has been developed within other parts of the health sector. The aim of the article is to discuss the relevance of integrated care for hospitals. Theory and methods The discussion is based on application of a conceptual framework outlining a number of organizational models of integrated care. These models are illustrated in a case study of a Danish university hospital implementing a new organization for improving the patient flows of the hospital. The study of the reorganization is based mainly on qualitative data from individual and focus group interviews. Results The new organization of the university hospital can be regarded as a matrix structure combining a vertical integration of clinical departments with a horizontal integration of patient flows. This structure has elements of both interprofessional and interorganizational integration. A strong focus on teamwork, meetings and information exchange is combined with elements of case management and co-location. Conclusions It seems that integrated care can be a relevant concept for a hospital. Although the organizational models may challenge established professional boundaries and financial control systems, this concept can be a more promising way to improve the quality of care than the industrial models that have been imported into health care. This application of the concept may also contribute to widen the field of integrated care. PMID:24966806

  8. Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital, an acute-care medical facility

    E-print Network

    Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital, an acute-care medical facility in Downers Grove, Illinois, has evolved during the past 30 years from a midsized community hospital relationships as well as the organizational transformation of "moving from good to great," the hospital has

  9. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation......

  10. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act......

  11. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    We are proposing to revise the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of......

  12. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ...We are proposing to revise the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act......

  13. DUQuE quality management measures: associations between quality management at hospital and pathway levels

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Cordula; Groene, Oliver; Thompson, Caroline A.; Dersarkissian, Maral; Klazinga, Niek S.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Suñol, Rosa; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lombarts, K; Plochg, T; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Garel, P; Hanslik, K; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Franca, M; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; Chow, A; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, C; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The assessment of integral quality management (QM) in a hospital requires measurement and monitoring from different perspectives and at various levels of care delivery. Within the DUQuE project (Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe), seven measures for QM were developed. This study investigates the relationships between the various quality measures. Design It is a multi-level, cross-sectional, mixed-method study. Setting and Participants As part of the DUQuE project, we invited a random sample of 74 hospitals in 7 countries. The quality managers of these hospitals were the main respondents. Furthermore, data of site visits of external surveyors assessing the participating hospitals were used. Main Outcome Measures Three measures of QM at hospitals level focusing on integral systems (QMSI), compliance with the Plan-Do-Study-Act quality improvement cycle (QMCI) and implementation of clinical quality (CQII). Four measures of QM activities at care pathway level focusing on Specialized expertise and responsibility (SER), Evidence-based organization of pathways (EBOP), Patient safety strategies (PSS) and Clinical review (CR). Results Positive significant associations were found between the three hospitals level QM measures. Results of the relationships between levels were mixed and showed most associations between QMCI and department-level QM measures for all four types of departments. QMSI was associated with PSS in all types of departments. Conclusion By using the seven measures of QM, it is possible to get a more comprehensive picture of the maturity of QM in hospitals, with regard to the different levels and across various types of hospital departments. PMID:24615597

  14. Managing variability to improve quality, capacity and cost in the perioperative process at Massachusetts General Hospital

    E-print Network

    Price, Devon J. (Devon Jameson)

    2011-01-01

    The widely held assumption is that to improve access and quality of health care, we need to spend more. In fact, that is not necessarily true. The results of this project, performed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), ...

  15. 38 CFR 17.108 - Copayments for inpatient hospital care and outpatient medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital care and outpatient medical care. 17.108 Section 17.108 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Copayments § 17.108 Copayments for inpatient hospital care and outpatient medical care. (a) General. This section sets forth requirements regarding copayments for...

  16. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    E-print Network

    2015-01-01

    level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from thedesign in which patient-level measure- ments are nested in hospitaland design of processes, quality committees, quality improvement projects and discussion of results of quality improvement projects Questionnaire to hospital

  17. Hospitals on the path to accountable care: highlights from a 2011 national survey of hospital readiness to participate in an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Audet, Anne-Marie J; Kenward, Kevin; Patel, Shreya; Joshi, Maulik S

    2012-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are forming in communities across the country. In ACOs, health care providers take responsibility for a defined patient popu­lation, coordinate their care across settings, and are held jointly accountable for the quality and cost of care. This issue brief reports on results from a survey that assesses hospitals' readiness to participate in ACOs. Results show we are at the beginning of the ACO adop­tion curve. As of September 2011, only 13 percent of hospital respondents reported partici­pating in an ACO or planning to participate within a year, while 75 percent reported not considering participation at all. Survey results indicate that physician-led ACOs are the second most common governance model, far exceeding payer-led models, highlighting an encouraging paradigm shift away from acute care and toward primary care. Findings also point to significant gaps, including the infrastructure needed to take on financial risks and to manage population health. PMID:22928221

  18. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  19. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

  20. Does Winning a Pay-for-Performance Bonus Improve Subsequent Quality Performance? Evidence from the Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Andrew; Sutton, Matthew; Doran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test whether receiving a financial bonus for quality in the Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration (HQID) stimulated subsequent quality improvement. Data Hospital-level data on process-of-care quality from Hospital Compare for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, and pneumonia for 260 hospitals participating in the HQID from 2004 to 2006; receipt of quality bonuses in the first 3 years of HQID from the Premier Inc. website; and hospital characteristics from the 2005 American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Study Design Under the HQID, hospitals received a 1 percent bonus on Medicare payments for scoring between the 80th and 90th percentiles on a composite quality measure, and a 2 percent bonus for scoring at the 90th percentile or above. We used a regression discontinuity design to evaluate whether hospitals with quality scores just above these payment thresholds improved more in the subsequent year than hospitals with quality scores just below the thresholds. In alternative specifications, we examined samples of hospitals scoring within 3, 5, and 10 percentage point “bandwidths” of the thresholds. We used a Generalized Linear Model to estimate whether the relationship between quality and lagged quality was discontinuous at the lagged thresholds required for quality bonuses. Principal Findings There were no statistically significant associations between receipt of a bonus and subsequent quality performance, with the exception of the 2 percent bonus for AMI in 2006 using the 5 percentage point bandwidth (0.8 percentage point increase, p < .01), and the 1 percent bonus for pneumonia in 2005 using all bandwidths (3.7 percentage point increase using the 3 percentage point bandwidth, p < .05). Conclusions We found little evidence that hospitals' receipt of quality bonuses was associated with subsequent improvement in performance. This raises questions about whether winning in pay-for-performance programs, such as Hospital Value-Based Purchasing, will lead to subsequent quality improvement. PMID:23909992

  1. A Survey of Nursing Home Organizational Characteristics Associated with Potentially Avoidable Hospital Transfers and Care Quality in One Large British Columbia Health Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Margaret J.; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Abu-Laban, Riyad B.; McGrail, Kimberlyn M.; Andrusiek, Dug; Globerman, Judith; Berg, Shannon; Cox, Michelle B.; Salomons, Kia; Volker, Jan; Ronald, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Hospitalization of nursing home residents can be futile as well as costly, and now evidence indicates that treating nursing home residents in place produces better outcomes for some conditions. We examined facility organizational characteristics that previous research showed are associated with potentially avoidable hospital transfers and with…

  2. Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

  3. Case management: quality care today.

    PubMed

    Firman, J

    1991-02-01

    The literature demonstrates that the concept of case management offers quality, patient-centered care. Case management promotes the wise utilization of resources and has economic advantages. The benefits of case management are widespread. Everyone concerned with patient care is affected positively, including the patient, family, caregivers, and the facility itself. The benefits far outweigh the potential problems outlined in the literature, and these problems can be eliminated with proper education. The movement toward the use of case management makes good business sense. It will continue. PMID:10108631

  4. [Quality of medication storage on hospital wards].

    PubMed

    Burnat, Pascal; Dupont, Hélène; Koch, Isabelle; Le Garlantezec, Patrick; Oulieu, Sylvie; Dussart, Claude

    2015-03-01

    In order to meet regulations and limit the risks for patients, the quality of medication storage on hospital wards requires practical actions. They concern mainly the management of the emergency medication cabinets, conditions regarding supply and cold storage under controlled temperatures. Failures in the system may result in nurses carrying out risky procedures. PMID:26145140

  5. The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.

    PubMed

    Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

    2014-01-01

    Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients. PMID:24938026

  6. Innovative and Successful Approaches to Improving Care Transitions From Hospital to Home

    PubMed Central

    Labson, Margherita C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Effective transitions to home care have been identified as among the factors leading to reducing hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge and improvements on various other quality measures. Innovative applications of published evidence-based models and best practices designed to improve care transitions have been implemented in various settings across the country in an effort to enhance quality performance. For this article, The Joint Commission collected a series of case examples to examine how evidence-based innovations in care transitions are reducing readmissions and improving other quality outcomes. The organizations providing the case examples were interviewed and asked to provide performance data demonstrating quality improvement, as well as information about their care processes and data-gathering techniques. Their innovative approaches are reducing hospital readmissions; improving patient safety, satisfaction, and engagement; and contributing to other positive outcomes. PMID:25654457

  7. [Quality of coding in acute inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Stausberg, J

    2007-08-01

    Routine data in the electronic patient record are frequently used for secondary purposes. Core elements of the electronic patient record are diagnoses and procedures, coded with the mandatory classifications. Despite the important role of routine data for reimbursement, quality management and health care statistics, there is currently no systematic analysis of coding quality in Germany. Respective concepts and investigations share the difficulty to decide what's right and what's wrong, being at the end of the long process of medical decision making. Therefore, a relevant amount of disagreement has to be accepted. In case of the principal diagnosis, this could be the fact in half of the patients. Plausibility of coding looks much better. After optimization time in hospitals, regular and complete coding can be expected. Whether coding matches reality, as a prerequisite for further use of the data in medicine and health politics, should be investigated in controlled trials in the future. PMID:17676418

  8. A study of evaluation methods for hospital medical care systems.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, M; Eussen, M E

    1992-07-01

    When we seek to evaluate hospital medical care services, we first collect data regarding the existing system in order to gather information and to develop a method of analysis that we can use for evaluation. We took the OPD system as an example, taking into account systematic OPD services based on queuing theory and computer simulation. As a result of the computer simulation model based on experimental conditions, we were able to offer recommendations for modifications of the present system that could improve patient service. The hospital manager can use this information to aid him in the decision making processes concerning the hospital. A study of the methods for the evaluation of hospital medical care services is important. It is necessary to develop a regional medical care information system as well as a hospital medical care information system. PMID:10120546

  9. Primary Care Quality among Different Health Care Structures in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Aitian; Mao, Zongfu; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the primary care quality among different health care structures in Tibet, China. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire survey including Primary Care Assessment Tool-Tibetan version was used to obtain data from a total of 1386 patients aged over 18 years in the sampling sites in two prefectures in Tibet. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between health care structures and primary care quality while controlling for sociodemographic and health care characteristics. Results. The services provided by township health centers were more often used by a poor, less educated, and healthy population. Compared with prefecture (77.42) and county hospitals (82.01), township health centers achieved highest total score of primary care quality (86.64). Factors that were positively and significantly associated with higher total assessment scores included not receiving inpatient service in the past year, less frequent health care visits, good self-rated health status, lower education level, and marital status. Conclusions. This study showed that township health centers patients reported better primary care quality than patients visiting prefecture and county hospitals. Government health reforms should pay more attention to THC capacity building in Tibet, especially in the area of human resource development. PMID:25861619

  10. Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p?<0.?001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

  11. Managing the quality of health care.

    PubMed

    Larson, James S; Muller, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews quality of health care initiatives beginning with the quality assessment/quality assurance movement of the 1970s. Conceptually, modern quality of care management is rooted in the intellectual work of Avedis Donabedian who defined quality of care as a combination of structure, process, and outcome. Donabedian's model is presented and some limitations are pointed out. In the late 1980s and 1990s. the health care industry adopted total quality management (TQM). More recently, the pursuit of health care quality has led to substantial performance measurement initiatives such as ORYX by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and MEDIS by the National Commission of Quality Assurance. The importance of CONQUEST, a freely available performance measurement database developed at the Harvard School of Public Health, is noted and discussed. The article concludes with a list of challenges facing public and private parties interests in health care quality improvement. PMID:15188996

  12. Can Hospital Cultural Competency Reduce Disparities in Patient Experiences with Care?

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N.; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Hall, Allyson; Hays, Ron D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency has been espoused as an organizational strategy to reduce health disparities in care. Objective To examine the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Research Design The first model predicted Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from hospital random effects, plus fixed effects for hospital cultural competency, individual race/ethnicity/language, and case-mix variables. The second model tested if the association between a hospital’s cultural competency and HCAHPS scores differed for minority and non-Hispanic white patients. Subjects The National CAHPS® Benchmarking Database’s (NCBD) HCAHPS Surveys and the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Surveys for California hospitals were merged, resulting in 66 hospitals and 19,583 HCAHPS respondents in 2006. Measures Dependent variables include ten HCAHPS measures: six composites (communication with doctors, communication with nurses, staff responsiveness, pain control, communication about medications, and discharge information), two individual items (cleanliness, and quietness of patient rooms), and two global items (overall hospital rating, and whether patient would recommend hospital). Results Hospitals with greater cultural competency have better HCAHPS scores for doctor communication, hospital rating, and hospital recommendation. Furthermore, HCAHPS scores for minorities were higher at hospitals with greater cultural competency on four other dimensions: nurse communication, staff responsiveness, quiet room, and pain control. Conclusions Greater hospital cultural competency may improve overall patient experiences, but may particularly benefit minorities in their interactions with nurses and hospital staff. Such effort may not only serve longstanding goals of reducing racial/ethnic disparities in inpatient experience, but may also contribute to general quality improvement. PMID:23064277

  13. Parents’ participation in taking care of hospitalized children: A concept analysis with hybrid model

    PubMed Central

    Vasli, Parvaneh; Salsali, Mahvash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although today parents’ participation in taking care of hospitalized children is considered as an indispensable principle, it is still among the concepts with no consensus about. The main objective of this study is to define parents’ participation in taking care of hospitalized children. Materials and Methods: The concept of “parents’ participation in taking care of hospitalized children” was analyzed using a hybrid model in three phases: Literature review (theoretical phase), fieldwork, and combination of literature review and fieldwork (analytical phase). Results: Based on the results of theoretical (literature review), fieldwork, and analytical phases, the best definitions for the concept of “parents’ participation in taking care of hospitalized children” are mutual relationship and gaining parents’ trust toward nurses, giving the required information and education to the parents about care and treatment process, assigning the needed home care to the parents, involving the parents in caregiving process, and finally, defining their participation in decision making (clarifying the parents’ role) in order to improve the quality of care given to the children. Conclusions: The findings of this study showed that the dimensions of parents’ participation can be applied in pediatric wards, and nurses can improve the quality of care through application of the obtained findings. PMID:24834082

  14. Medicare Program; Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-24

    This final rule implements a new Medicare Part A and B payment model under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, in which acute care hospitals in certain selected geographic areas will receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedure will be included in the episode of care. We believe this model will further our goals in improving the efficiency and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries with these common medical procedures. PMID:26606762

  15. Measuring pediatric hospital readmission rates to drive quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mari M; Toomey, Sara L; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Berry, Jay G; Lorch, Scott A; Jha, Ashish K; Bryant, Maria C; Geanacopoulos, Alexandra T; Loren, Samuel S; Pain, Debanjan; Schuster, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The Pediatric Quality Measures Program is developing readmission measures for pediatric use. We sought to describe the importance of readmissions in children and the challenges of developing readmission quality measures. We consider findings and perspectives from research studies and commentaries in the pediatric and adult literature, characterizing arguments for and against using readmission rates as measures of pediatric quality and discussing available evidence and current knowledge gaps. The major topic of debate regarding readmission rates as pediatric quality measures is the relative influence of hospital quality versus other factors within and outside of health systems on readmission risk. The complex causation of readmissions leads to disagreement, particularly when rates are publicly reported or tied to payment, about whether readmissions can be prevented and how to achieve fair comparisons of readmission performance. Despite these controversies, the policy focus on readmissions has motivated widespread efforts by hospitals and outpatient providers to evaluate and reengineer care processes. Many adult studies demonstrate a link between successful initiatives to improve quality and reductions in readmissions. More research is needed on methods to enhance adjustment of readmission rates and on how to prevent pediatric readmissions. PMID:25169456

  16. The Relationship between Social Capital and Quality Management Systems in European Hospitals: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Antje; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; DerSarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Mannion, Russell; Wagner, Cordula; Ommen, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Pfaff, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background Strategic leadership is an important organizational capability and is essential for quality improvement in hospital settings. Furthermore, the quality of leadership depends crucially on a common set of shared values and mutual trust between hospital management board members. According to the concept of social capital, these are essential requirements for successful cooperation and coordination within groups. Objectives We assume that social capital within hospital management boards is an important factor in the development of effective organizational systems for overseeing health care quality. We hypothesized that the degree of social capital within the hospital management board is associated with the effectiveness and maturity of the quality management system in European hospitals. Methods We used a mixed-method approach to data collection and measurement in 188 hospitals in 7 European countries. For this analysis, we used responses from hospital managers. To test our hypothesis, we conducted a multilevel linear regression analysis of the association between social capital and the quality management system score at the hospital level, controlling for hospital ownership, teaching status, number of beds, number of board members, organizational culture, and country clustering. Results The average social capital score within a hospital management board was 3.3 (standard deviation: 0.5; range: 1-4) and the average hospital score for the quality management index was 19.2 (standard deviation: 4.5; range: 0-27). Higher social capital was associated with higher quality management system scores (regression coefficient: 1.41; standard error: 0.64, p=0.029). Conclusion The results suggest that a higher degree of social capital exists in hospitals that exhibit higher maturity in their quality management systems. Although uncontrolled confounding and reverse causation cannot be completely ruled out, our new findings, along with the results of previous research, could have important implications for the work of hospital managers and the design and evaluation of hospital quality management systems. PMID:24392027

  17. Hospital's transition program coordinates care throughout the continuum.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    UnityPoint-St. Luke's Hospital's Transitions Home program has slashed all-cause readmissions to an average of 10% by focusing on making sure patients' needs are met while they are in the hospital and after discharge. An Advanced Medical Team of RN care navigators and social workers works in the outpatient clinic and coordinates care for patients with multiple comorbidities who take multiple medications and are being treated by multiple physicians. The Consistent Care program, overseen by a social worker, links patients who use the emergency department for primary care with a primary care physician. Dedicated care coordinators on each unit have cubicles in the nurses' stations and meet daily with the charge nurse, social worker, and bedside nurse caring for the patient to discuss the goals of care and goals for discharge of each patient on the unit. PMID:25632707

  18. Quality of Informal Care Is Multidimensional

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Juliette; Smith, G. Rush; Williamson, Gail M.; Lance, Charles. E.; Shovali, Tamar E.; Silva, Luciana

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that assessing quality of informal care involves more than merely determining whether care recipient needs for assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) are satisfied on a routine basis. Potentially harmful behavior (PHB), adequate care, and exemplary care (EC) are conceptually distinct dimensions of quality of care. We investigated the extent to which these three dimensions also are empirically distinguishable. Design 237 care recipients completed the quality of care measures, and their caregivers completed psychosocial measures of depressed affect, life events, cognitive status, and perceived pre-illness relationship quality. Results Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that PHB, adequate care, and EC are empirically distinct factors. Although PHB was moderately related to EC, adequate care was not associated with PHB and was only slightly related to EC. Psychosocial variables were not related to adequate care but were differentially associated with PHB and EC, providing further evidence for the distinction between the measures of quality of care used in this study. Conclusions Assessing quality of informal care is a complex endeavor. ADL assistance can be adequate in the presence of PHB and/or the absence of EC. Declines in EC may signal increases in PHB, independent of adequacy of care. These findings produce a brief, portable, and more comprehensive instrument for assessing quality of informal care. PMID:19469607

  19. Creating champions for health care quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Holland, Robert; Meyers, David; Hildebrand, Christopher; Bridges, Alan J; Roach, Mary A; Vogelman, Bennett

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety and quality of care are public concerns that demand personal responsibility at all levels of the health care organization. Senior residents in our graduate medical education program took responsibility for a capstone quality improvement project designed to transform them into champions for health care quality. Residents (n = 26) participated alone or in pairs in a 1-month faculty-mentored rotation at the Veterans Administration Hospital during the 2007-2008 academic year. They completed a Web-based curriculum, identified a quality-of-care issue, applied Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, authored a report, and engaged colleagues in their innovations during a department-wide presentation. Results indicated that residents demonstrated significantly enhanced knowledge and attitudes about patient safety and quality improvement and provided consistently positive faculty and rotation evaluations. In addition, residents generated 20 quality improvement project proposals with a 50% rate of hospital-wide implementation, leading to meaningful changes in the systems that affect patient care. PMID:19966115

  20. Quality improvement in nursing care facilities: extent, impetus, and impact.

    PubMed

    Zinn, J S; Brannon, D; Weech, R

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the extent, motivation, and performance implications of normal quality improvement (QI) programs in Pennsylvania nursing care facilities. Responses to a 20-item survey sent to facility administrators indicate that continuous quality improvement/total quality management (CQI/TQM) adopters are more motivated by quality of care and human resource concerns in implementing QI, more satisfied with the results of QI efforts, and more aware of a competitive environment than are non-adopters. There are few differences between adopters and non-adopters with respect to organizational characteristics or performance on quality of care measures. Comparison with the results of a study of QI implementation in hospitals reveals some differences in motivation, but similarities in satisfaction with results. PMID:9116533

  1. 77 FR 69848 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... 2013 Rates and to the Long Term Care Hospital PPS and FY 2013 Rates'' (77 FR 53257). Therefore, the... 21st through 100th day of extended care services in a skilled nursing facility in a benefit period... the 21st through 100th day of extended care services in a skilled nursing facility in a benefit...

  2. Care for hospitalized patients with unhealthy alcohol use: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for unhealthy alcohol use in the general hospital, as highlighted by new Joint Commission recommendations on SBIRT. However, the evidence supporting this approach is not as robust relative to primary care settings. This review is targeted to hospital-based clinicians and administrators who are responsible for generally ensuring the provision of high quality care to patients presenting with a myriad of conditions, one of which is unhealthy alcohol use. The review summarizes the major issues involved in caring for patients with unhealthy alcohol use in the general hospital setting, including prevalence, detection, assessment of severity, reduction in drinking with brief intervention, common acute management scenarios for heavy drinkers, and discharge planning. The review concludes with consideration of Joint Commission recommendations on SBIRT for unhealthy alcohol use, integration of these recommendations into hospital work flows, and directions for future research. PMID:23738519

  3. Consumer opinion of when to attend for hospital antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Lester, C; Farrow, S

    1988-01-01

    Between May 1985 and June 1986 a case control study of late and early antenatal bookings took place in two South Wales hospitals, one urban and one rural. The study examined respondents' opinions on the importance of early hospital antenatal care and the optimum time for a booking visit. Respondents were asked to state the major influence on their opinions regarding antenatal care. It was found that the majority of both late and early attenders thought that early hospital antenatal care was important, but of these many, particularly late attenders, had no accurate idea of the advisable gestation for first attendance. The most frequently mentioned influence on the respondents' opinions was health service literature provided during antenatal care. Some of these booklets gave no specific advice on when the first hospital visit should take place. PMID:10288141

  4. Quality in health care. Medical or managerial?

    PubMed

    Hansson, J

    2000-01-01

    Explores the notion that the introduction of total quality management (TQM) in the public health-care sector indicates a conceptual break with a tradition in which the authority to define and interpret the meaning of medical practice has been located solely within the medical profession. It also serves to shift the focus of medical practice away from its contextual and interactional character towards numerical representations and codification in monetary terms. Further, it is argued that the realization of management ideals in everyday practice is dependent more on the availability of pre-existing technologies and standard procedures than on the ingenuity of particular organizational and institutional actors. These arguments are illustrated with the reutilization for TQM purposes of "local incident reports" in a Swedish hospital organization. PMID:11200301

  5. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p < .01). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients (age, gender, education level) with regard to patient satisfaction were determined. Several statistically significant differences were found between the sociodemographic characteristics and weighted scores for dimensions of SERVQUAL (p < 0.5). According to results, the SQ gap scores for five dimensions were negative to meet expectations. The negative scores for tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care. PMID:11668854

  6. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... hospitals, PPS- exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are...-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting Issues. Anita Bhatia, (410) 786-7236, Ambulatory Surgical...

  7. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  8. Managing critical care casualties on the Navy's hospital ships.

    PubMed

    Boren, Denise; Forbus, Ronald; Bibeau, Patrice; McKenzie, Robin; McKinsey, Karen

    2003-06-01

    In this article, a history of the hospital ships was recounted. Recent missions were described in terms of the ship and crew's capability based on education and mock training exercises. Patient flow was described and a case scenario was presented to illustrate surgically intensive management of critical care casualties. Finally, thoughts on the future of hospital ships were discussed. PMID:12755184

  9. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient–provider language concordance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients’ discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient–provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. Methods This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0–100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Results Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient–provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients’ discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Conclusion Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients. PMID:25075273

  10. Linking Home Care Interventions and Hospitalization Outcomes for Frail and Non-frail Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Monsen, Karen A.; Westra, Bonnie L.; Oancea, S. Cristina; Yu, Fang; Kerr, Madeleine J.

    2015-01-01

    Structured clinical data generated using standardized terminologies such as the Omaha System are available for evaluating health care quality and patient outcomes. New intervention management grouping approaches are needed to deal with large, complex clinical intervention data sets. We evaluated 56 intervention groups derived using four data management approaches with a data set of 165,700 interventions from 14 home care agencies to determine which approaches and interventions predicted hospitalizations among frail (n=386) and non-frail (n=1,364) elders. Hospitalization predictors differed for frail and non-frail elders. Low frequencies in some intervention groups were positively associated with hospitalization outcomes, suggesting that there may be a mismatch between the level of care that is needed and the level of care that is provided. PMID:21360551

  11. Quality of Care and Quality of Life: Convergence or Divergence?

    PubMed Central

    Alonazi, Wadi B; Thomas, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of quality of care (QoC) on patients’ quality of life (QoL). In a cross-sectional study, two domains of QoC and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref questionnaire were combined to collect data from 1,059 pre-discharge patients in four accredited hospitals (ACCHs) and four non-accredited hospitals (NACCHs) in Saudi Arabia. Health and well-being are often restricted to the characterization of sensory qualities in certain settings such as unrestricted access to healthcare, effective treatment, and social welfare. The patients admitted to tertiary health care facilities are generally able to present themselves with a holistic approach as to how they experience the impact of health policy. The statistical results indicated that patients reported a very limited correlation between QoC and QoL in both settings. The model established a positive, but ultimately weak and insignificant, association between QoC (access and effective treatment) and QoL (r = 0.349, P = 0.000; r = 0.161, P = 0.000, respectively). Even though the two settings are theoretically different in terms of being able to conceptualize, adopt, and implement QoC, the outcomes from both settings demonstrated insignificant relationships with QoL as the results were quite similar. Though modern medicine has substantially improved QoL around the world, this paper proposes that health accreditation has a very limited impact on improving QoL. This paper raises awareness of this topic with multiple healthcare professionals who are interested in correlating QoC and QoL. Hopefully, it will stimulate further research from other professional groups that have new and different perspectives. Addressing a transitional health care system that is in the process of endorsing accreditation, investigating the experience of tertiary cases, and analyzing deviated data may limit the generalization of this study. Global interest in applying public health policy underlines the impact of such process on patients’ outcomes. As QoC accreditation does not automatically produce improved QoL outcomes, the proposed study encourages further investigation of the value of health accreditation on personal and social well-being. PMID:25114568

  12. Patterns of Care/Quality of Care

    Cancer.gov

    POC studies began in 1987 with SEER cases serving as controls for a study that examined the provision of state-of-the-art therapy in Community Clinical Oncology Program hospitals. In 1990, the number of cases included in the POC initiative was increased substantially to obtain more stable estimates of community practice in a population-based sample of cases.

  13. Hippi Care Hospital: Towards Proactive Business Processes in Emergency Room Services. Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kar Way; Shankararaman, Venky

    2014-01-01

    It was 2:35 am on a Saturday morning. Wiki Lim, process specialist from the Process Innovation Centre (PIC) of Hippi Care Hospital (HCH), desperately doodling on her notepad for ideas to improve service delivery at HCH's Emergency Department (ED). HCH has committed to the public that its ED would meet the service quality criterion of serving 90%…

  14. Internet Point of Care Learning at a Community Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinusas, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Internet point of care (PoC) learning is a relatively new method for obtaining continuing medical education credits. Few data are available to describe physician utilization of this CME activity. Methods: We describe the Internet point of care system we developed at a medium-sized community hospital and report on its first year of…

  15. Can patients reliably identify safe, high quality care?

    PubMed Central

    Tevis, Sarah E.; Schmocker, Ryan K.; Kennedy, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is a publicly reported tool that measures patient satisfaction. As both patients and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement rely on survey results as a metric of quality of care, we reviewed the current literature to determine if patient satisfaction correlates with quality, safety, or patient outcomes. We found varying associations between safety culture, process of care measure compliance, and patient outcomes with patient satisfaction on the HCAHPS survey. Some studies found inverse relationships between quality and safety metrics and patient satisfaction. The measure that most reliably correlated with high patient satisfaction was low readmission rate. Future studies using patient specific data are needed to better identify which factors most influence patient satisfaction and to determine if patient satisfaction is a marker of safer and better quality care. Furthermore, the HCAHPS survey should continue to undergo evaluations to assure it generates predictable results. PMID:26413179

  16. Self-care program for inpatients in a mental hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Butler, J. A.; Bullock, L. J.; El-Gaaly, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Summary: A self-care program for selected inpatients in a mental hospital has been developed and has been in operation for more than a year. The 12-bed unit operates without any nursing or other professional staff during the night and weekend. Certain factors, including the mental hospital as an organization, tend to hamper the development of this type of program as well as the progress and growth of other programs in psychiatric hospitals. It is suggested that the much needed progress in the mental hospital would be facilitated by an open-systems approach to its organization. Mental hospitals should consider the introduction of self-care programs for selected patients, mainly in view of their therapeutic potential, but also because of the financial savings such programs offer. PMID:1111874

  17. Determining the quality of IMCI pneumonia care in Malawian children

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Erica; Preidis, Geoffrey A.; Lufesi, Norman; Olson, Dan; Kamthunzi, Portia; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; McCollum, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pneumonia is the leading cause of child mortality worldwide, little is known about the quality of routine pneumonia care in high burden settings like Malawi that utilize World Health Organization’s Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) guidelines. Due to severe human resource constraints, the majority of clinical care in Malawi is delivered by non-physician clinicians called Clinical Officers (COs). Aim To assess the quality of child pneumonia care delivered by Malawian COs in routine care conditions. Methods At an outpatient district-level clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, 10 COs caring for 695 children who presented with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing were compared to IMCI pneumonia diagnostic and treatment guidelines. Results Fewer than 1% of patients received an evaluation by COs that included all 16 elements of the history and physical examination. The respiratory rate was only determined in 16.1% of patients presenting with cough or difficulty breathing. Of the 274 children with IMCI-defined pneumonia, COs correctly diagnosed 30%, and administered correct pneumonia care in less than 25%. COs failed to hospitalize 40.8% of children with severe or very severe pneumonia. Conclusions IMCI pneumonia care quality at this Malawian government clinic is alarmingly low. Along with reassessing current pneumonia training and supervision approaches, novel quality improvement interventions are necessary to improve care. PMID:24091151

  18. IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness 

    E-print Network

    Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

    2010-01-01

    industries. Symptoms of poor IAQ in a building, contaminants causing poor IAQ, features of HVAC systems for a hospital for better IAQ are briefly discussed in this paper. Strategies to improve indoor air quality in hospitals and the current international...

  19. [The revised system of hospitalization for medical care and protection].

    PubMed

    Fukuo, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    The Act to Partially Amend the Act on Mental Health and Welfare for the Mentally Disabled was passed on June 13, 2013. Major amendments regarding hospitalization for medical care and protection include the points listed below. The guardianship system will be abolished. Consent by a guardian will no longer be required in the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection. In the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection, the administrators of the psychiatric hospital are required to obtain the consent of one of the following persons: spouse, person with parental authority, person responsible for support, legal custodian, or curator. If no qualified person is available, consent must be obtained from the mayor, etc. of the municipality. The following three obligations are imposed on psychiatric hospital administrators. (1) Assignment of a person, such as a psychiatric social worker, to provide guidance and counseling to patients hospitalized for medical care and protection regarding their postdischarge living environment. (2) Collaboration with community support entities that consult with and provide information as necessary to the person hospitalized, their spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. (3) Organizational improvements to promote hospital discharge. With regard to requests for discharge, the revised law stipulates that, in addition to the person hospitalized with a mental disorder, others who may file a request for discharge with the psychiatric review board include: the person's spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. If none of the above persons are available, or if none of them are able to express their wishes, the mayor, etc. of the municipality having jurisdiction over the place of residence of the person hospitalized may request a discharge. In order to promote transition to life in the community by persons with mental disorders, efforts will be made to enhance psychiatric care for them, with guidelines to be developed to ensure the provision of medical care to persons with mental disorders. The revised law clarifies that members of psychiatric review boards shall be "persons with expert knowledge and experience pertaining to the health and/or welfare of persons with mental disorders." Provision is made for a review of conditions related to implementation of the revised law approximately three years after it takes effect, with measures to be taken as necessary based on results of the review. The main focus of this presentation will be the revisions to the system of hospitalization for medical care and protection, and the deletion of provisions relating to the system of guardianship. PMID:24864562

  20. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  1. Hospital Admission of Cancer Patients: Avoidable Practice or Necessary Care?

    PubMed Central

    Numico, Gianmauro; Cristofano, Antonella; Mozzicafreddo, Alessandro; Cursio, Olga Elisabetta; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Courthod, Giulia; Trogu, Antonio; Malossi, Alessandra; Cucchi, Mariella; Sirotovà, Zuzana; Alvaro, Maria Rosa; Stella, Anna; Grasso, Fulvia; Spinazzé, Silvia; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer patients are frequently admitted to hospital due to acute conditions or refractory symptoms. This occurs through the emergency departments and requires medical oncologists to take an active role. The use of acute-care hospital increases in the last months of life. Patients and methods We aimed to describe the admissions to a medical oncology inpatient service within a 16-month period with respect to patients and tumor characteristics, and the outcome of the hospital stay. Results 672 admissions of 454 patients were analysed. The majority of admissions were urgent (74.1%), and were due to uncontrolled symptoms (79.6%). Among the chief complaints, dyspnoea occurred in 15.7%, pain in 15.2%, and neurological symptoms in 14.5%. The majority of the hospitalizations resulted in discharge to home (60.6%); in 26.5% the patient died and in 11.0% was transferred to a hospice. Admissions due to symptoms correlated with a longer hospital stay and a higher incidence of in-hospital death. Conclusion We suggest that hospital use is not necessarily a sign of inappropriately aggressive care: inpatient care is probably an unavoidable step in the cancer trajectory. Optimization of inpatient supportive procedures should be a specific task of modern medical oncology. PMID:25812117

  2. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Quality of Care

    Cancer.gov

    The issue of quality of care involves many different components, including what cancer care quality looks like, which patients are more likely to receive poor quality care, and ways to measure healthcare quality.

  3. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Prabhat; Goel, Arun

    2010-01-01

    The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans PMID:21321651

  4. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs. PMID:22575784

  5. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  6. Bridging the gap between hospital and primary care: the pharmacist home visit.

    PubMed

    Ensing, Hendrik T; Koster, Ellen S; Stuijt, Clementine C M; van Dooren, Ad A; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2015-06-01

    Bridging the gap between hospital and primary care is important as transition from one healthcare setting to another increases the risk on drug-related problems and consequent readmissions. To reduce those risks, pharmacist interventions during and after hospitalization have been frequently studied, albeit with variable effects. Therefore, in this manuscript we propose a three phase approach to structurally address post-discharge drug-related problems. First, hospitals need to transfer up-todate medication information to community pharmacists. Second, the key phase of this approach consists of adequate follow-up at the patients' home. Pharmacists need to apply their clinical and communication skills to identify and analyze drug-related problems. Finally, to prevent and solve identified drug related problems a close collaboration within the primary care setting between pharmacists and general practitioners is of utmost importance. It is expected that such an approach results in improved quality of care and improved patient safety. PMID:25759280

  7. FAMILY PRESENCE DURING RESUSCITATION AND PATTERNS OF CARE DURING IN-HOSPITAL CARDIAC ARREST

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Zachary D.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Nichol, Graham; Chan, Paul S.; Curtis, J. Randall; Cooke, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing number of hospitals have begun to implement policies allowing for family presence during resuscitation (FPDR); the safety of these policies and their affect on patterns of care is unknown. Objective To measure the association between FPDR and processes and outcomes of care following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Get With the Guidelines–Resuscitation (GWTG–R) a large, multicenter observational registry capturing in-hospital cardiac arrests. Participants 41,568 adult patients at 252 hospitals in the United States. Measurements The exposure was a hospital-level policy to allow FPDR. Primary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival to discharge. Secondary outcomes included the quality, interventions, and self-reported potential systems errors associated with resuscitation. Results There were no significant differences in ROSC or survival to discharge in hospitals with and without a FPDR policy in unadjusted or adjusted analyses. There was a small, borderline significant decrease in the mean time to defibrillation at hospitals with a FPDR policy compared to hospitals without a FPDR policy during adjusted analysis (p=0.05). Similarly, there was a significant increase in the risk-adjusted median duration of resuscitation among non-survivors in hospitals with FPDR (P=0.04). Other resuscitation quality, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions, and potential self-reported systems-level resuscitation errors did not meaningfully differ between hospitals with and without a FPDR policy. Limitation GWTG–R may not be representative of all hospitals. Furthermore, it does not collect information on whether families were actually present during the arrests recorded. Conclusion Hospitals with a policy allowing families to be present during resuscitation generally have similar outcome and processes of case as hospitals without a FPDR policy suggesting such policies do not negatively impact resuscitation outcomes and processes. Expanding hospital implementation policies allowing FPDR may offer substantial opportunity for enhancing the practice of resuscitation care. Primary Funding Source American Heart Association, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health. PMID:25805646

  8. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...to promote high- quality, innovative care...time, the CTI also works to streamline, accelerate, and improve coordination of these...its goals, the CTI works to streamline and...process, improve the quality of medical...

  9. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ...to promote high- quality, innovative care...time, the CTI also works to streamline, accelerate, and improve coordination of these...its goals, the CTI works to streamline and...process, improve the quality of medical...

  10. Are the CMS Hospital Outpatient Quality Measures Relevant for Rural Hospitals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Prasad, Shailendra; Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Context: Quality measures focused on outpatient settings are of increasing interest to policy makers, but little research has been conducted on hospital outpatient quality measures, especially in rural settings. Purpose: To evaluate the relevance of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) outpatient quality measures for rural hospitals,…

  11. Quality of Cancer Care - Applied Research

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of these efforts, substantially supported by the Applied Research Program, is to enhance the state of the science on the quality of cancer care and inform federal and private-sector decision making on care delivery, coverage, regulation, and standard setting. Work is underway to make cancer a working model for quality of care research and the translation of this research into practice.

  12. Quality of haemophilia care in the Netherlands: new standards for optimal care

    PubMed Central

    Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Fischer, Kathelijn

    2014-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, the first formal haemophilia comprehensive care centre was established in 1964, and Dutch haemophilia doctors have been organised since 1972. Although several steps were taken to centralise haemophilia care and maintain quality of care, treatment was still delivered in many hospitals, and formal criteria for haemophilia treatment centres as well as a national haemophilia registry were lacking. Material and methods In collaboration with patients and other stakeholders, Dutch haemophilia doctors have undertaken a formal process to draft new quality standards for the haemophilia treatment centres. First a project group including doctors, nurses, patients and the institute for harmonisation of quality standards undertook a literature study on quality standards and performed explorative visits to several haemophilia treatment centres in the Netherlands. Afterwards concept standards were defined and validated in two treatment centres. Next, the concept standards were evaluated by haemophilia doctors, patients, health insurance representatives and regulators. Finally, the final version of the standards of care was approved by Central body of Experts on quality standards in clinical care and the Dutch Ministry of Health. Results A team of expert auditors have been trained and, together with an independent auditor, will perform audits in haemophilia centres applying for formal certification. Concomitantly, a national registry for haemophilia and allied disorders is being set up. Discussion It is expected that these processes will lead to further concentration and improved quality of haemophilia care in the Netherlands. PMID:24922288

  13. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  14. Predictors of patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital nursing care.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, June H; Ostrow, C Lynne; Withrow, Mary Lynne; Janney, Michelle A; Hobbs, Gerald R; Burant, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this predictive nonexperimental study was to investigate the influence of registered nurse (RN) job satisfaction, context of care, structure of care, patient-perceived nurse caring, and patient characteristics on patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital nursing care in an academic medical center in north-central West Virginia. Convenience samples of patients (N = 362) and RNs (N = 90) were recruited from two medical units, two surgical units, and three intensive care step-down units. Causal modeling identified patient-perceived nurse caring as the major predictor of patient satisfaction, with nurse/physician (RN/MD) collaboration as the only other direct predictor. Age had an indirect influence on patient satisfaction. Strategies to achieve and maintain patient satisfaction should address the enhancement of patient-perceived nurse caring and RN/MD collaboration. PMID:15264264

  15. Leading quality through the development of a multi-year corporate quality plan: sharing The Ottawa Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Linda; Myles, Joanne; Worthington, James R; Lebrun, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the background and process for developing a multi-year corporate quality plan. The Ottawa Hospital's goal is to be a top 10% performer in quality and patient safety in North America. In order to create long-term measurable and sustainable changes in the quality of patient care, The Ottawa Hospital embarked on the development of a three-year strategic corporate quality plan. This was accomplished by engaging the organization at all levels and defining quality frameworks, aligning with internal and external expectations, prioritizing strategic goals, articulating performance measurements and reporting to stakeholders while maintaining a transparent communication process. The plan was developed through an iterative process that engaged a broad base of health professionals, physicians, support staff, administration and senior management. A literature review of quality frameworks was undertaken, a Quality Plan Working Group was established, 25 key stakeholder interviews were conducted and 48 clinical and support staff consultations were held. The intent was to gather information on current quality initiatives and challenges encountered and to prioritize corporate goals and then create the quality plan. Goals were created and then prioritized through an affinity exercise. Action plans were developed for each goal and included objectives, tasks and activities, performance measures (structure, process and outcome), accountabilities and timelines. This collaborative methodology resulted in the development of a three-year quality plan. Six corporate goals were outlined by the tenets of the quality framework for The Ottawa Hospital: access to care, appropriate care (effective and efficient), safe care and satisfaction with care. Each of the six corporate goals identified objectives and supporting action plans with accountabilities outlining what would be accomplished in years one, two and three. The three-year quality plan was approved by senior management and the board in April 2009. This process has supported The Ottawa Hospital's journey of excellence through the creation of a quality plan that will enable long-term measurable and sustainable changes in the quality of patient care. It also engaged healthcare providers who aim to achieve more measured quality patient care, engaged practitioners through collaboration resulting in both alignment of goals and outcomes and allowed for greater commitment by those responsible for achieving quality goals. PMID:21841391

  16. Improving the quality of eye care with tele-ophthalmology: shared-care glaucoma screening.

    PubMed

    de Mul, Marleen; de Bont, Antoinette A; Reus, Nicolaas J; Lemij, Hans G; Berg, Marc

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a shared-care tele-ophthalmology service initiated by the Rotterdam Eye Hospital and 10 optometrists working in retail optician stores. The optometrists screened their clients with a nerve fibre analyser and the resulting images were then further assessed by trained technicians at the hospital. We analysed data from 1729 patients and measured several indicators of the quality of the work as well as its efficiency and effectiveness. The quality of the images was at least satisfactory in most cases (89%), and the agreement between the optometrists and the hospital about normal or suspect test results was high (81%). Only 27% of the patients were called for additional testing at the hospital department and 11% consulted an ophthalmologist. Eighty new cases of glaucoma were detected. The combination of task redesign and telemedicine accounted for the success of the screening service. Task redesign was needed to transfer screening from the hospital to primary care in a safe and responsible way. Telemedicine was crucial for assuring quality, facilitating information exchange and for coordination. PMID:15603630

  17. Effects of care pathways on the in-hospital treatment of heart failure: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Care pathways have become a popular tool to enhance the quality of care by improving patient outcomes, promoting patient safety, increasing patient satisfaction, and optimizing the use of resources. We performed a disease specific systematic review to determine how care pathways in the hospital treatment of heart failure affect in-hospital mortality, length of in-hospital stay, readmission rate and hospitalisation cost when compared with standard care. Methods Medline, Cinahl, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from 1985 to 2010. Each study was assessed independently by two reviewers. Methodological quality of the included studies was assed using the Jadad methodological approach for randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and the New Castle Ottawa Scale for case–control studies, cohort studies and time interrupted series. Results Seven studies met the study inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review with a total sample of 3,690 patients. The combined overall results showed that care pathways have a significant positive effect on mortality and readmission rate. A shorter length of hospital stay was also observed compared with the standard care group. No significant difference was found in the hospitalisation costs. More positive results were observed in controlled trials compared to randomized controlled trials. Conclusion By combining all possible results, it can be concluded that care pathways for treatment of heart failure decrease mortality rates and length of hospital stay, but no statistically significant difference was observed in the readmission rates and hospitalisation costs. However, one should be cautious with overall conclusions: what works for one organization may not work for another because of the subtle differences in processes and bottlenecks. PMID:23009030

  18. Organization of Hospital Nursing, Provision of Nursing Care, and Patient Experiences With Care in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Bruyneel, Luk; Li, Baoyue; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Dumitrescu, Irina; Smith, Herbert L.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sermeus, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This study integrates previously isolated findings of nursing outcomes research into an explanatory framework in which care left undone and nurse education levels are of key importance. A moderated mediation analysis of survey data from 11,549 patients and 10,733 nurses in 217 hospitals in eight European countries shows that patient care experience is better in hospitals with better nurse staffing and a more favorable work environment in which less clinical care is left undone. Clinical care left undone is a mediator in this relationship. Clinical care is left undone less frequently in hospitals with better nurse staffing and more favorable nurse work environments, and in which nurses work less overtime and are more experienced. Higher proportions of nurses with a bachelor’s degree reduce the effect of worse nurse staffing on more clinical care left undone. PMID:26062612

  19. Organization of Hospital Nursing, Provision of Nursing Care, and Patient Experiences With Care in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bruyneel, Luk; Li, Baoyue; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Dumitrescu, Irina; Smith, Herbert L; Sloane, Douglas M; Aiken, Linda H; Sermeus, Walter

    2015-12-01

    This study integrates previously isolated findings of nursing outcomes research into an explanatory framework in which care left undone and nurse education levels are of key importance. A moderated mediation analysis of survey data from 11,549 patients and 10,733 nurses in 217 hospitals in eight European countries shows that patient care experience is better in hospitals with better nurse staffing and a more favorable work environment in which less clinical care is left undone. Clinical care left undone is a mediator in this relationship. Clinical care is left undone less frequently in hospitals with better nurse staffing and more favorable nurse work environments, and in which nurses work less overtime and are more experienced. Higher proportions of nurses with a bachelor's degree reduce the effect of worse nurse staffing on more clinical care left undone. PMID:26062612

  20. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment... waive the notice and comment and effective date requirements. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc....

  1. Improving quality of tuberculosis care in India.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Hopewell, Phil

    2014-01-01

    In India, the quality of care that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive varies considerably and is often not in accordance with the national and international standards. In this article, we provide an overview of the third (latest) edition of the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC). These standards are supported by the existing World Health Organization guidelines and policy statements pertaining to TB care and have been endorsed by a number of international organizations. We call upon all health care providers in the country to practice TB care that is consistent with these standards, as well as the upcoming Standards for TB Care in India (STCI). PMID:24640340

  2. Why nonprofits? Hospitals and the future of American health care.

    PubMed

    Gray, B H

    1992-01-01

    The future of the nonprofit hospital depends on its relationship to the for-profit and governmental sectors of our economy. A decade ago, the primary challenge came from the growing investor-owned hospital companies. Nonprofit hospitals' responses--both competitive and imitative--led to new challenges from government regarding tax-exempt status. The reasons underlying this challenge include the growing commercialism of health care, the nation's failure to deal directly with the problem of the uninsured, and the lack of a coherent theory of tax exemption. Although hospitals are likely to retain exemptions from federal taxation, challenges to local tax exemptions are likely to continue. Strategies that hospitals pursue for competitive purposes may undercut their legitimacy as tax-exempt institutions, but several groups are working to address the issue. PMID:10118566

  3. Collaborative quality improvement in the cardiac intensive care unit: development of the Paediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4).

    PubMed

    Gaies, Michael; Cooper, David S; Tabbutt, Sarah; Schwartz, Steven M; Ghanayem, Nancy; Chanani, Nikhil K; Costello, John M; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Laussen, Peter C; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Donohue, Janet E; Willis, Gina M; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Ohye, Richard G; Charpie, John R; Pasquali, Sara K; Scheurer, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Despite many advances in recent years for patients with critical paediatric and congenital cardiac disease, significant variation in outcomes remains across hospitals. Collaborative quality improvement has enhanced the quality and value of health care across specialties, partly by determining the reasons for variation and targeting strategies to reduce it. Developing an infrastructure for collaborative quality improvement in paediatric cardiac critical care holds promise for developing benchmarks of quality, to reduce preventable mortality and morbidity, optimise the long-term health of patients with critical congenital cardiovascular disease, and reduce unnecessary resource utilisation in the cardiac intensive care unit environment. The Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4) has been modelled after successful collaborative quality improvement initiatives, and is positioned to provide the data platform necessary to realise these objectives. We describe the development of PC4 including the philosophical, organisational, and infrastructural components that will facilitate collaborative quality improvement in paediatric cardiac critical care. PMID:25167212

  4. Leadership and the quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Firth-Cozens, J; Mowbray, D

    2001-01-01

    The importance of good leadership is becoming increasingly apparent within health care. This paper reviews evidence which shows that it has effects, not only on financial management, but on the quality of care provided. Some theories of leadership are discussed, primarily in terms of how different types of leaders might affect quality in different ways, including the effects that they might have on the stress or wellbeing of their staff which, in turn, is related to the quality of care produced. Finally, the conflicts shown in terms of leadership within the context of health care are discussed, leading to the conclusion that development programmes must be specially tailored to address the complexities of this arena. Key Words: leadership; quality of care; stress; personality PMID:11700372

  5. 42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located in the same building or on the same campus as the long-term care hospital or satellite... payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...

  6. 42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located in the same building or on the same campus as the long-term care hospital or satellite... payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...

  7. 42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located in the same building or on the same campus as the long-term care hospital or satellite... payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...

  8. 42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located in the same building or on the same campus as the long-term care hospital or satellite... payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...

  9. 42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located in the same building or on the same campus as the long-term care hospital or satellite... payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...

  10. The associations between organizational culture, organizational structure and quality management in European hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, C.; Mannion, R.; Hammer, A.; Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; Dersarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To better understand associations between organizational culture (OC), organizational management structure (OS) and quality management in hospitals. Design A multi-method, multi-level, cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants As part of the DUQuE project (Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe), a random sample of 188 hospitals in 7 countries (France, Poland, Turkey, Portugal, Spain, Germany and Czech Republic) participated in a comprehensive questionnaire survey and a one-day on-site surveyor audit. Respondents for this study (n = 158) included professional quality managers and hospital trustees. Main outcome measures Extent of implementation of quality management systems, extent of compliance with existing management procedures and implementation of clinical quality activities. Results Among participating hospitals, 33% had a clan culture as their dominant culture type, 26% an open and developmental culture type, 16% a hierarchical culture type and 25% a rational culture type. The culture type had no statistically significant association with the outcome measures. Some structural characteristics were associated with the development of quality management systems. Conclusion The type of OC was not associated with the development of quality management in hospitals. Other factors (not culture type) are associated with the development of quality management. An OS that uses fewer protocols is associated with a less developed quality management system, whereas an OS which supports innovation in care is associated with a more developed quality management system. PMID:24671119

  11. Mothers’ Satisfaction Rate from Hospital Cares in Hematology- Oncology Ward

    PubMed Central

    Boroumand, H; Moshki, M; Khajavi, A; Hashemizadeh, H

    2015-01-01

    Background Satisfaction evaluation is a good way to assess hospital conditions. In Health Care System, parentscan be also as children's main supporters, thus they may act as patient's viewpoints' representatives.This study aimed to evaluate mother’s satisfaction of hospital care in hematology – oncology ward in Dr Sheikh hospital. Materials and Methods A Cross-sectional descriptive analytic study was conducted using Pediatric Family Satisfaction (PFS) questionnaire and interviewing with 164 mothers duringMarchto February2013. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS -16 software and descriptive statistics. Results The mean age of mothers and children was31.2±5.8, and 7.95 4/66 years.The children were 64 % male and 36 % femael. A large number of mothers (%56 (describedtheir satisfaction about medical care as moderate,(%70.7) reported their satisfaction about nursing care at very high level and(36.5 %) reported satisfaction about welfare services at high level(59%)and describe overall satisfaction at very high level . The totals mean of mothers’ satisfaction ratewas 121.8 ± 10.8. The mean of medical care, nursing care, welfare services was 2.9±34.1,4.6±50 and4.8± 32.9 respectively. Conclusion Overall satisfaction with medical, nursing and welfare staff was acceptable. For more satisfaction, it is widely recommended to improve veinipuncture by nurses, Physicians should inform parents about the tests results, and finally disturbance in ward with noise should be controled.

  12. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  13. Control Costs, Enhance Quality, and Increase Revenue in Three Top General Public Hospitals in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. Methods We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. Findings There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001), from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. Interpretations These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely market-oriented health-care reform could also misguide future healthcare reform. PMID:23977243

  14. Pediatric palliative care: a qualitative study of physicians' perspectives in a tertiary care university hospital.

    PubMed

    St-Laurent-Gagnon, Thérèse; Carnevale, Franco A; Duval, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the concept of palliative care for a group of physicians in a tertiary care pediatric university hospital. Grounded theory methodology was used. Data included 12 semistructured interviews, field notes, research consent forms, research protocols, and articles published by the participants. Physicians involved in both research and clinical care of severely ill children were interviewed. Data analysis identified three principal themes. First, physicians limited their concept of palliative care to the relief of physical symptoms, equating palliative care with comfort care. Second, there was variation regarding the appropriate moment to introduce palliative care for children. Finally, many physicians were not comfortable using the term "palliative care". Although this study was conducted in one Canadian centre, the results raise questions that should be examined in other settings. A vague concept of palliative care may delay the provision of palliative care to children. PMID:18459594

  15. A Conceptual Framework for Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research on defining and measuring health care quality, little attention has been given to different stakeholders’ perspectives of high-quality health care services. The main purpose of this study was to explore the attributes of quality healthcare in the Iranian context. Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with key healthcare stakeholders including clients, providers, managers, policy makers, payers, suppliers and accreditation panel members to identify the healthcare service quality attributes and dimensions. Data analysis was carried out by content analysis, with the constant comparative method. Over 100 attributes of quality healthcare service were elicited and grouped into five categories. The dimensions were: efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, empathy, and environment. Consequently, a comprehensive model of service quality was developed for health care context. The findings of the current study led to a conceptual framework of healthcare quality. This model leads to a better understanding of the different aspects of quality in health care and provides a better basis for defining, measuring and controlling quality of health care services. PMID:23922534

  16. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care. PMID:25122562

  17. Children in Foster Care: Before, during, and after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persi, Joe; Sisson, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that foster children are at greater risk for mental health problems than are children in the general population, very little is known about the smaller group of foster children admitted to psychiatric hospitals. The present study sought to determine whether foster children admitted to inpatient care are a distinct…

  18. The role of hospital managers in quality and patient safety: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Parand, Anam; Dopson, Sue; Renz, Anna; Vincent, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review the empirical literature to identify the activities, time spent and engagement of hospital managers in quality of care. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods A search was carried out on the databases MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, HMIC. The search strategy covered three facets: management, quality of care and the hospital setting comprising medical subject headings and key terms. Reviewers screened 15?447 titles/abstracts and 423 full texts were checked against inclusion criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed on 19 included articles. Results The majority of studies were set in the USA and investigated Board/senior level management. The most common research designs were interviews and surveys on the perceptions of managerial quality and safety practices. Managerial activities comprised strategy, culture and data-centred activities, such as driving improvement culture and promotion of quality, strategy/goal setting and providing feedback. Significant positive associations with quality included compensation attached to quality, using quality improvement measures and having a Board quality committee. However, there is an inconsistency and inadequate employment of these conditions and actions across the sample hospitals. Conclusions There is some evidence that managers’ time spent and work can influence quality and safety clinical outcomes, processes and performance. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies, further weakened by a lack of objective outcome measures and little examination of actual actions undertaken. We present a model to summarise the conditions and activities that affect quality performance. PMID:25192876

  19. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Steps to Choosing a Hospital Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–9 Hospital Quality Quick Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 A ... a Hospital 7 Steps to Choosing a Hospital Checklist STEP 1: Learn about the care you need ...

  20. Healthcare technologies, quality improvement programs and hospital organizational culture in Canadian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare technology and quality improvement programs have been identified as a means to influence healthcare costs and healthcare quality in Canada. This study seeks to identify whether the ability to implement healthcare technology by a hospital was related to usage of quality improvement programs within the hospital and whether the culture within a hospital plays a role in the adoption of quality improvement programs. Methods A cross-sectional study of Canadian hospitals was conducted in 2010. The sample consisted of hospital administrators that were selected by provincial review boards. The questionnaire consisted of 3 sections: 20 healthcare technology items, 16 quality improvement program items and 63 culture items. Results Rasch model analysis revealed that a hierarchy existed among the healthcare technologies based upon the difficulty of implementation. The results also showed a significant relationship existed between the ability to implement healthcare technologies and the number of quality improvement programs adopted. In addition, culture within a hospital served a mediating role in quality improvement programs adoption. Conclusions Healthcare technologies each have different levels of difficulty. As a consequence, hospitals need to understand their current level of capability before selecting a particular technology in order to assess the level of resources needed. Further the usage of quality improvement programs is related to the ability to implement technology and the culture within a hospital. PMID:24119419

  1. Acute Care of Ischemic Stroke Patients in the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Karl M; Thabet, Ahmad M; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Recent advances in acute treatment provide hope that the impact of this disease will be reduced. Rapid assessment for large vessel occlusion is now a key element in acute stroke care given advances in endovascular therapy. Because access to acute therapies is limited, development of systems of care to triage appropriate patients to specialized centers is essential. Acute hospitalization management requires multiple strategies including initiation of secondary prevention measures. In addition to preventing further stroke, physicians can also improve long-term survival by preventing the complications of stroke in the hospital and ensuring longitudinal poststroke care and rehabilitation following discharge. PMID:26595863

  2. Analysis of early accountable care organizations defines patient, structural, cost, and quality-of-care characteristics.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Arnold M; Jha, Ashish K; Orav, E John; Liebman, Daniel L; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Zezza, Mark A; Guterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have attracted interest from many policy makers and clinical leaders because of their potential to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. Federal ACO programs for Medicare beneficiaries are now up and running, but little information is available about the baseline characteristics of early entrants. In this descriptive study we present data on the structural and market characteristics of these early ACOs and compare ACOs' patient populations, costs, and quality with those of their non-ACO counterparts at baseline. We found that ACO patients were more likely than non-ACO patients to be older than age eighty and had higher incomes. ACO patients were less likely than non-ACO patients to be black, covered by Medicaid, or disabled. The cost of care for ACO patients was slightly lower than that for non-ACO patients. Slightly fewer than half of the ACOs had a participating hospital. Hospitals that were in ACOs were more likely than non-ACO hospitals to be large, teaching, and not-for-profit, although there was little difference in their performance on quality metrics. Our findings can be useful in interpreting the early results from the federal ACO programs and in establishing a baseline to assess the programs' development. PMID:24395940

  3. Air quality in Ain Shams University Surgery Hospital.

    PubMed

    El Awady, M Y; El Rahman, A T Abd; Al Bagoury, L S; Mossad, I M

    2014-12-01

    Through air sampling, it was possible to evaluate microbial contamination in environments at high risk of infection, and to check the efficiency of ventilation system and the medical team's hygiene procedures. This study measured the concentration of particulate matter (PM) 2.5 or less microns and microbiological organisms in operating rooms (OR), intensive care units (ICU) and emergency rooms (ER) in Ain Shams University Surgery Hospital, and to assess ventilation characteristics in operating rooms in the hospital. The passive air sampling was done from ICUs, ORs, and ERs in Ain Shams University Surgery Hospital. Also for each operating room, an observational checklist was done to record other factors that may affect air quality in the room. The evaluated air quality indices were: suspended (PM) 2.5 micrometer or less, culture media and microbial identification of bacteria and fungi, and temperature and relative humidity. The results showed that the highest mean found for bacterial (105.70±30.49) and fungi concentration (7.50±5.30) was in ER. The three settings did not differ statistically as regard levels of PM 2.5, temperature, and relative humidity. A positive correlation exits between bacteria and fungi concentration on one hand and relative humidity on the other. Diphteroid, CONS, MRSA, S. aureus, and Anthracoid were the most frequent isolated bacterial types, while Penicillium and Asperigillus fumigatus were the most frequent isolated fungi. In operating rooms, the percent of unmasked persons present and the temperature positively influence the bacterial count, while ventilation condition is negatively influencing fungi count, and the number of persons present in the operating room positively affects the PM level. PMID:25643516

  4. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  5. [The "Zurich Quality Model of Nursing Care", based on the "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM): a new perspective in measuring quality in nursing care].

    PubMed

    Schmid-Büchi, Silvia; Rettke, Horst; Horvath, Eva; Marfurt-Russenberger, Katrin; Schwendimann, René

    2008-10-01

    Ensuring and maintaining a high level of quality in nursing care becomes more and more important as economic pressure is increasing and personnel is being reduced. The nursing executives of four large Swiss hospitals therefore commissioned a group of nursing scientists and nursing experts with the task of developing a trendsetting model to represent, assess, and interpret the quality of nursing care. The "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM) served as a basis for development. More than 60 nurses from acute care hospitals and specialized clinics assessed a first draft of the model in hearings and by means of questionnaires. The model integrated earlier attempts at quality screening regarding structures, processes and results, complementing these three elements with a fourth: the patients, whose characteristics influence the results of nursing care remarkably. Thus, the former one-dimensional, linear viewpoint was resolved into a dynamic representation of all four elements, illustrating a specific concept of nursing care. Through the multi-dimensionality of the model the complexity of the nursing process is better represented. The model's core consists of eight exemplary indicators of quality, each of which is relevant to nursing and for each of which criteria and assessment tools have been formulated. The model is seen as a basis and reference for the quality development and first opportunities for clinical application have been succesfully employed. The project can serve as a paradigm of networking amongst hospitals and cooperation between nursing scientists and experts, and of the critical significance of such collaboration to the advancement of nursing quality. PMID:18850535

  6. Patients' Perspectives of Care and Surgical Outcomes in Michigan: An Analysis Using the CAHPS Hospital Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sheetz, Kyle H.; Waits, Seth A.; Girotti, Micah E.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Englesbe, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between postoperative morbidity and mortality and patients' perspectives of care. Summary Background Data Priorities in healthcare quality research are shifting to place greater emphasis on patient-centered outcomes. Whether patients' perspectives of care correlate with surgical outcomes remains unclear. Methods Using data from the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative clinical registry (2008–2012), we identified 41,833 patients undergoing major elective general or vascular surgery. Our exposure variables were the HCAHPS Total and Base Scores derived from the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Patient Experience of Care Domain. Using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models, we adjusted hospitals' rates of morbidity and mortality for patient comorbidities and case mix. We stratified reporting of outcomes by quintiles of hospitals' Total and Base Scores. Results Risk-adjusted morbidity (13.6% to 28.6%) varied widely across hospitals. There were no significant differences in risk-adjusted morbidity rates between hospitals with the lowest versus highest HCAHPS Total Score (24.5% vs. 20.2%, p=0.312). The HCAHPS Base Score, which quantifies sustained achievement or improvement in patients' perspectives of care, was not associated with a reduction in postoperative morbidity over the study period despite an overall decrease of 2.5% for all centers. We observed a similar relationship between HCAHPS Total and Base Scores and postoperative mortality. Conclusions and Relevance Patients' perspectives of care do not correlate with the incidence of morbidity and mortality following major surgery. Improving patients' perspectives and objective outcomes may require separate initiatives for surgeons in Michigan. PMID:24646549

  7. Depression among hospitalized and non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Tahira; Zadeh, Zainab Fotowwat

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed at determining the differences in the levels of depression between hospitalized and non-hospitalized Gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi. The present study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre and Civil Hospital, Karachi, from July to October 2009. One hundred adult patients diagnosed with Gonadal cancer volunteered for the study. Cases with any other co-morbidity were excluded. Urdu version of Siddiqui Shah Depression Scale (SSDS) was administered. Purposive and snowball sampling methods were used for data collection. The ages of participants in the sample ranged from 20 to 27 years with the mean age of 23.85 years. The participants belonged to the lower and middle classes. Out of the 30 hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 40% were moderately depressed and 60% were severely depressed, whereas out of 70 non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 74.3% were mildly depressed, 24.3% were moderately depressed and only 1.4% were severely depressed, which clearly indicated that the depression level of hospitalized gonadal cancer patients was high as compared to non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients. PMID:25772968

  8. Child Care Subsidy and Program Quality Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, Becky F.; Frey, Andy; Barbee, Anita; Frey, Shannon; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Cox, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Previous research has documented conflicting results on the relationship between program quality and the percentage of children receiving subsidized child care (subsidy density) in early childhood centers. This research examined the relationship between subsidy density and the quality of infant and preschool classrooms in child…

  9. Post-Hospital Medical Respite Care and Hospital Readmission of Homeless Persons

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Stefan G.; Posner, Michael A.; O’Connell, James J.; Swain, Stacy; Mullins, Ashley N.; Michael, Shwartz; Ash, Arlene S.

    2009-01-01

    Medical respite programs offer medical, nursing, and other care as well as accommodation for homeless persons discharged from acute hospital stays. They represent a community-based adaptation of urban health systems to the specific needs of homeless persons. This paper examines whether post-hospital discharge to a homeless medical respite program was associated with a reduced chance of 90-day readmission compared to other disposition options. Adjusting for imbalances in patient characteristics using propensity scores, Respite patients were the only group that was significantly less likely to be readmitted within 90 days compared to those released to Own Care. Respite programs merit attention as a potentially efficacious service for homeless persons leaving the hospital. PMID:19363773

  10. Hospital Quality and Selective Contracting: Evidence from Kidney Transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    Howard, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Most private health insurers offer a limited network of providers to enrollees. Critics have questioned whether selective contracting benefits patients. Plans counter that they take quality into account when choosing providers. Using data on five plans’ networks for kidney transplant hospitals, this study shows that in-network hospitals have better outcomes than out-of-network facilities. Conditional logit estimates using patient level data confirm this result: compared to Medicare patients, privately-insured patients are more likely to register at hospitals with higher survival rates. Restricting choice has the potential to improve patient welfare if plans steer uninformed patients to high quality hospitals and physicians. PMID:19079762

  11. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part IV: Quality and Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-11-01

    The 1999 Institute of Medicine report Ensuring Quality Cancer Care discussed the difference between the actual cancer care received in the United States and the care that the patients should get, as well as some points to consider in delivering optimum care. In 2012, a follow-up review article in the journal Cancer entitled "Ensuring quality cancer care" indicated that there had been some interval progress, but more are needed to be done. The 2013 Institute of Medicine report Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis indicated that there are continuing major problems with cancer care and that they advocated a national system of quality reporting and a major information technology system to capture and help assess the data. PMID:26444648

  12. [Quality of care: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Guillain, H; Raetzo, M A

    1997-03-29

    Quality of care is growing concern among health care professionals and managers. As a multidimensional concept, it cannot be reduced to simple customer satisfaction. Taking into account the views of the three major players in the health care system-patients, providers and payers-quality can be defined as the capacity to satisfy patients' needs according to professional knowledge and within available resources. Efficacy, efficiency, appropriateness, acceptability, legitimacy and equity are dimensions of health care quality. Contrary to popular belief, quality is neither maximum performance, nor satisfaction at all costs, nor punishment or elimination of "bad apples". In ambulatory medicine, quality implies first of all the ability to master the processes occurring during an office visit. However, although history taking and physical examination are the cornerstones of medical practice, they have not been well studied. Improving quality of care in the ambulatory sector will require better knowledge about medical decision-making processes, in particular identification of the most relevant information required for a decision and the optimal way of obtaining it in any specific clinical situation. PMID:9190666

  13. Transitioning care at the end of life: Quality measures and the Affordable Care Act

    E-print Network

    1 Transitioning care at the end of life: Quality measures and the Affordable Care Act "When of life. With these changing goals of care and an intensified spotlight on quality of care, palliative reporting. Lastly, the costs of end-of-life care will be discussed in relation to quality of care

  14. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

  15. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

  16. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

  17. 42 CFR 412.540 - Method of payment for preadmission services under the long-term care hospital prospective payment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...preadmission services under the long-term care hospital prospective payment system...Prospective Payment System for Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.540 Method of payment...preadmission services under the long-term care hospital prospective payment...

  18. Implementation of Departmental Quality Strategies Is Positively Associated with Clinical Practice: Results of a Multicenter Study in 73 Hospitals in 7 European Countries.

    E-print Network

    2015-01-01

    direct, monitor, control, and improve quality of care [12].quality monitoring by hospital board, 3) training of professionals, 4) formal protocols for infection control,quality programs, while continuing to focus on overall hospital responsibilities, such as policies, overall monitor- ing, and infection control.

  19. Family Participation in the Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khosravan, Shahla; Mazlom, Behnam; Abdollahzade, Naiemeh; Jamali, Zeinab; Mansoorian, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies, especially in Iran, have assessed the status of family participation in the care of the hospitalized patients. Objectives: This study was conducted to assess why family members partake in caregiving of their patients in hospitals, the type of care that family provide, and the outcomes of the participation in the opinions of nurses and family members. Patients and Methods: In this comparative-descriptive study, data was collected by a two- version researcher-developed questionnaire, from 253 family members of patients by quota sampling method and 83 nurses by census sampling method from wards which had licensed for entering the families. Each questionnaire has three sections: the care needs of the patients which family participated to provide, the reasons to take part, and the outcomes of this collaborative care. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and also chi-squared test through SPSS software version 11.5. Results: The patients received more unskilled and non- professional nursing care from their family members. Most of the nurses and families believed that family participation is both voluntary and compulsory. The shortage of personnel in different categories of nursing and speeding up the patient-related affairs were the most important outcome of the participation, from the nurses’ viewpoint was speeding up the patient-related affairs and from the side of the family members, it was the patients’ feeling of satisfaction from the presence of one of their relatives beside them. Conclusions: Co understanding, skillfulness and competence of families and nurses in collaboration with each other were not good enough.Few studies, especially in Iran, have assessed the status of family participation in the care of the hospitalized patients. PMID:24719705

  20. Caring for the new uninsured: Hospital charity care for older people without coverage.

    PubMed

    DeLia, Derek

    2006-12-01

    Despite near-universal coverage through Medicare, a number of elderly residents in the United States do not have health insurance coverage. To the author's knowledge, this study is the first to document trends in the use of hospital charity care by uninsured older people. Data from the New Jersey Charity Care Program, which subsidizes hospitals for services provided to low-income uninsured people, were used to analyze trends in charity care utilization by older people from 1999 to 2004. Charity care charges are standardized to uniform Medicaid reimbursement rates and inflation adjusted using the Medical Care Consumer Price Index. From 1999 to 2004, use of charity care by older people grew much faster than it did for younger patients. As a result, older people now account for a greater share of hospital charity care in New Jersey than children. Elderly users of charity care generated higher costs per patient than their younger counterparts. Cost differences were especially salient at the upper end of the distribution, where high-cost elderly patients used significantly more resources than high-cost patients in other age groups. These results highlight an emerging source of strain on the healthcare safety net and point to a growing population of uninsured residents who have costly and complex medical needs. Similar experiences are likely to be found in other states, especially those that have growing populations of elderly immigrants who are likely to lack health insurance. PMID:17198501

  1. Improving the quality of health care: what's taking so long?

    PubMed

    Chassin, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    Nearly fourteen years ago the Institute of Medicine's report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, triggered a national movement to improve patient safety. Despite the substantial and concentrated efforts that followed, quality and safety problems in health care continue to routinely result in harm to patients. Desired progress will not be achieved unless substantial changes are made to the way in which quality improvement is conducted. Alongside important efforts to eliminate preventable complications of care, there must also be an effort to seriously address the widespread overuse of health services. That overuse, which places patients at risk of harm and wastes resources at the same time, has been almost entirely left out of recent quality improvement endeavors. Newer and much more effective strategies and tools are needed to address the complex quality challenges confronting health care. Tools such as Lean, Six Sigma, and change management are proving highly effective in tackling problems as difficult as hand-off communication failures and patient falls. Finally, the organizational culture of most American hospitals and other health care organizations must change. To create a culture of safety, leaders must eliminate intimidating behaviors that suppress the reporting of errors and unsafe conditions. Leaders must also hold everyone accountable for adherence to safe practices. PMID:24101066

  2. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  3. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  4. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  5. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  6. What is the current state of care for older people with dementia in general hospitals? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Jan; Dijk, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises a literature review focusing on the literature directly pertaining to the acute care of older people with dementia in general hospitals from 2007 onwards. Following thematic analysis, one overarching theme emerged: the consequences of being in hospital with seven related subthemes. Significantly, this review highlights that overall there remains mostly negative consequences and outcomes for people with dementia when they go into general hospitals. Although not admitted to hospital directly due to dementia, there are usually negative effects on the dementia condition from hospitalisation. The review suggests this is primarily because there is a tension between prioritisation of acute care for existing co-morbidities and person-centred dementia care. This is complicated by insufficient understanding of what constitutes person-centred care in an acute care context and a lack of the requisite knowledge and skills set in health care practitioners. The review also reveals a worrying lack of evidence for the effectiveness of mental health liaison posts and dementia care specialist posts in nursing. Finally, although specialist posts such as liaison and clinical nurse specialists and specialist units/shared care wards can enhance quality of care and reduce adverse consequences of hospitalisation (they do not significantly) impact on reducing length of stay or the cost of care. PMID:24459188

  7. Effects of Primary Care Team Social Networks on Quality of Care and Costs for Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.; Fleming, Michael F.; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Beasley, John W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. Primary care teams can be best suited to improve quality of care and lower costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the associations between primary care team communication, interaction, and coordination (ie, social networks); quality of care; and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. METHODS Using a sociometric survey, 155 health professionals from 31 teams at 6 primary care clinics identified with whom they interact daily about patient care. Social network analysis calculated variables of density and centralization representing team interaction structures. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between team network density, centralization, and number of patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease for controlled blood pressure and cholesterol, counts of urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital days, and medical care costs in the previous 12 months. RESULTS Teams with dense interactions among all team members were associated with fewer hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50–0.77) and lower medical care costs (?$556; 95% CI, ?$781 to ?$331) for patients with cardiovascular disease. Conversely, teams with interactions revolving around a few central individuals were associated with increased hospital days (RR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09–1.94) and greater costs ($506; 95% CI, $202–$810). Team-shared vision about goals and expectations mediated the relationship between social network structures and patient quality of care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Primary care teams that are more interconnected and less centralized and that have a shared team vision are better positioned to deliver high-quality cardiovascular disease care at a lower cost. PMID:25755035

  8. Accountable care organizations: financial advantages of larger hospital organizations.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Rodrigo; Camargo, Thaisa; Deslich, Stacie; Paul, David P; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are groups of providers who agree to accept the responsibility for elevating the health status of a defined group of patients, with the goal of enabling people to take charge of their health and enroll in shared decision making with providers. The large initial investment required (estimated at $1.8 million) to develop an ACO implies that the participation of large health care organizations, especially hospitals and health systems, is required for success. Findings of this study suggest that ACOs based in a larger hospital organization are more likely to meet Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services criteria for formation because of financial and structural assets of those entities. PMID:24776829

  9. Empathy and quality of care.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Stewart W; Reynolds, William J

    2002-01-01

    Empathy is a complex multi-dimensional concept that has moral cognitive emotive and behavioural components Clinical empathy involves an ability to: (a) understand the patient's situation, perspective, and feelings (and their attached meanings); (b) to communicate that understanding and check its accuracy; and (c) to act on that understanding with the patient in a helpful (therapeutic) way. Research on the effect of empathy on health outcomes in primary care is lacking, but studies in mental health and in nursing suggest it plays a key role. Empathy can be improved and successfully taught at medical school especially if it is embedded in the students actual experiences with patients. A variety of assessment and feedback techniques have also been used in general medicine psychiatry and nursing. Further work is required to determine if clinical empathy needs to be, and can be, improved in the primary care setting. PMID:12389763

  10. Quality of care: how good is good enough?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Israel has made impressive progress in improving performance on key measures of the quality of health care in the community in recent years. These achievements are all the more notable given Israel's modest overall spending on health care and because they have accrued to virtually the entire population of the country. Health care systems in most developed nations around the world find themselves in a similar position today with respect to health care quality. Despite significantly increased improvement efforts over the past decade, routine safety processes, such as hand hygiene and medication administration, fail routinely at rates of 30% to 50%. People with chronic diseases experience preventable episodes of acute illness that require hospitalization due to medication mix-ups and other failures of outpatient management. Patients continue to be harmed by preventable adverse events, such as surgery on the wrong part of the body and fires in operating theaters. Health care around the world is not nearly as safe as other industries, such as commercial aviation, that have mastered highly effective ways to manage serious hazards. Health care organizations will have to undertake three interrelated changes to get substantially closer to the superlative safety records of other industries: leadership commitment to zero major quality failures, widespread implementation of highly effective process improvement methods, and the adoption of all facets of a culture of safety. Each of these changes represents a major challenge to the way today's health care organizations plan and carry out their daily work. The Israeli health system is in an enviable position to implement these changes. Universal health insurance coverage, the enrolment of the entire population in a small number of health plans, and the widespread use of electronic health records provide advantages available to few other countries. Achieving and sustaining levels of safety comparable to, say, commercial aviation will be a long journey for health care--one we should begin promptly. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/1/1/3/ PMID:22913581

  11. Child Care Quality and School Readiness:Child Care Quality and School Readiness: Quality Effects and Variation by

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    significant positivestatistically significant positive relationship between child care quality and school on different aspects of child care experiences (e.g., quantity or type of care) and different child outcomes y g sample sizes, focusing on widely accepted measures of quality and outcomes, and fitting

  12. The Growth of Palliative Care in U.S. Hospitals: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Dumanovsky, Tamara; Augustin, Rachel; Rogers, Maggie; Lettang, Katrina; Meier, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Palliative care is expanding rapidly in the United States. Objective: To examine variation in access to hospital palliative care. Methods: Data were obtained from the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Surveys™ for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013, the National Palliative Care Registry™, the Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare, the American Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS), web searches, and telephone interviews of hospital administrators and program directors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine predictors of hospital palliative care programs. Results: Sixty-seven percent of hospitals with 50 or more total facility beds reported a palliative care program. Institutional characteristics were strongly associated with the presence of a hospital palliative care program. Ninety percent of hospitals with 300 beds or more were found to have palliative care programs as compared to 56% of hospitals with fewer than 300 beds. Tax status was also a significant predictor. Not-for-profit hospitals and public hospitals were, respectively, 4.8 times and 7.1 times more likely to have a palliative care program as compared to for-profit hospitals. Palliative care penetration was highest in the New England (88% of hospitals), Pacific (77% of hospitals), and mid-Atlantic (77% of hospitals) states and lowest in the west south central (43% of hospitals) and east south central (42% of hospitals) states. Conclusions: This study demonstrates continued steady growth in the number of hospital palliative care programs in the United States, with almost universal access to services in large U.S. hospitals and academic medical centers. Nevertheless access to palliative care remains uneven and depends on accidents of geography and hospital ownership. PMID:26417923

  13. European hospital managers' perceptions of patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Angelina; Groene, Oliver

    2015-09-21

    Purpose - The spotlight has recently been placed on managers' responsibility for patient-centred care as a result of Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust failings. In previous research, clinicians reported that managers do not have an adequate structured plan for implementing patient-centred care. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceptions of European hospital management with respect to factors affecting the implementation of a patient-centred approach. Design/methodology/approach - In total, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospital managers (n=10), expert country informants (n=2), patient organisations (n=2) and a user representative (n=1) from around Europe. Participants were purposively and snowball sampled. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. Findings - Most participants felt that current levels of patient-centred care are inadequate, but accounted that there were a number of macro, meso and micro challenges they faced in implementing this approach. These included budget constraints, political and historical factors, the resistance of clinicians and other frontline staff. Organisational culture emerged as a central theme, shaped by these multi-level factors and influencing the way in which patient-centred care was borne out in the hospital. Participants proposed that the needs of patients might be better met through increasing advocacy by patient organisations and greater staff contact with patients. Originality/value - This study is the first of its kind to obtain management views from around Europe. It offers an insight into different models of how patient-centred care is realised by management. It indicates that managers see the value of a patient-centred approach but that they feel restricted by a number of factors at multiple levels. PMID:26394254

  14. Creating a safer workplace to provide quality care.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J C

    2001-04-01

    In recent years, increasing interest has been placed on how health care workers can be trained and equipped to better protect them from possible workplace accidents and injuries while improving the care they deliver. Better workplace safety also means better customer and employee satisfaction, improved workforce retention and recruitment, and cost savings. Workplace safety is constantly evolving and addresses a whole host of issues ranging from needles and sharps injuries to moving patients to human factor analyses. This issue takes a cross-sectional look at how hospitals and health systems are addressing problem areas--and sharing information and best practices--to strengthen their quality of care at the workplace level. PMID:11330227

  15. Patient satisfaction scores and their relationship to hospital website quality measures.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric W; Huerta, Timothy R; Diana, Mark L; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Menachemi, Nir

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals and health systems are using web-based and social media tools to market themselves to consumers with increasingly sophisticated strategies. These efforts are designed to shape the consumers' expectations, influence their purchase decisions, and build a positive reputation in the marketplace. Little is known about how these web-based marketing efforts are taking form and if they have any relationship to consumers' satisfaction with the services they receive. The purpose of this study is to assess if a relationship exists between the quality of hospitals' public websites and their aggregated patient satisfaction ratings. Based on analyses of 1,952 U.S. hospitals, our results show that website quality is significantly and positively related to patients' overall rating of the hospital and their intention to recommend the facility to others. The potential for web-based information sources to influence consumer behavior has important implications for policymakers, third-party payers, health care providers, and consumers. PMID:24308412

  16. [Post-hospital home care after ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Beaussier, Marc; Vons, Corinne

    2014-03-01

    Ambulatory surgery should correspond to mastered acts performed on selected patients. This makes home care unnecessary in the vast majority of the cases. The development of outpatient surgery toward more complex procedures on more vulnerable patients would justify a specific home care in some circumstances. Justification of an overnight hospitalization only because the need for the patient to be reassured on experienced symptoms, supervision of analgesic device, wound incision overseeing or drains removal appears questionable. Home care after ambulatory surgery may be considered as several different modalities. The involvement of general practitioners, home nurses and telemedicine have to be explored for several procedures. Evolutions of surgical and anesthetic practices toward less invasive procedures, as well as improvement in patient's information, are the major challenges for the future of outpatient surgery. PMID:24525305

  17. Quality Indicators for Primary Health Care: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Simou, Effie; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Koutsogeorgou, Eleni; Roumeliotou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Data have indicated that countries with a strong system of Primary Health Care (PHC) are more likely to have efficient health systems and better health outcomes than countries that focus strongly on hospital services. The aim of the article was to systematically review implemented quality projects used for evaluation of quality in PHC services. A systematic literature review was conducted via MEDLINE to identify papers referring to international or national PHC quality assessment projects, published in English from 1990 to 2010. Projects were included if they had been implemented, had a holistic approach, and reported specifications of the quality indicators used. Sixteen publications were considered eligible for further analyses, referring to 10 relevant projects and a total of 556 indicators. Number and content of indicators and their domains varied across projects. Regarding raw data, lack of standardization of collection tools between projects could lead to invalid comparisons. In areas that international projects operate in parallel to national initiatives, there may be problems regarding expenses and burden of data collection, which might create competing interests and low quality of information. Further actions for alignment of quality projects on primary health care are required, for future results to become comparable. PMID:24374361

  18. Effects of music therapy on patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life of hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Susan E; Davis, Beth A; Secic, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The matched-case control study investigated the effect of inpatient music therapy (MT), including the gift of a compact disc, on patient satisfaction and quality of life. Overall rating of the hospital and likelihood to recommend it (n = 210), and SF-12 quality of life scores (n = 160) were compared between groups. Although no significant difference in overall hospital rating was found, MT patients' recommendation scores were higher (p =.02). The MT patients had marginally better quality of life pain scores (p =.06). Integration of MT with inpatient care can improve the likelihood that patients will recommend the hospital and may impact their perception of pain. PMID:24926737

  19. Confidential inquiry into quality of care before admission to intensive care

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, Peter; Pilkington, Sally; Allan, Alison; Taylor, Bruce; Short, Alasdair; Morgan, Giles; Nielsen, Mick; Barrett, David; Smith, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence, nature, causes, and consequences of suboptimal care before admission to intensive care units, and to suggest possible solutions. Design: Prospective confidential inquiry on the basis of structured interviews and questionnaires. Setting: A large district general hospital and a teaching hospital. Subjects: A cohort of 100 consecutive adult emergency admissions, 50 in each centre. Main outcome measures: Opinions of two external assessors on quality of care especially recognition, investigation, monitoring, and management of abnormalities of airway, breathing, and circulation, and oxygen therapy and monitoring. Results: Assessors agreed that 20 patients were well managed (group 1) and 54 patients received suboptimal care (group 2). Assessors disagreed on quality of management of 26 patients (group 3). The casemix and severity of illness, defined by the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) score, were similar between centres and the three groups. In groups 1, 2, and 3 intensive care mortalities were 5 (25%), 26 (48%), and 6 (23%) respectively (P=0.04) (group 1 versus group 2, P=0.07). Hospital mortalities were 7 (35%), 30 (56%), and 8 (31%) (P=0.07) and standardised hospital mortality ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.23 (0.49 to 2.54), 1.4 (0.94 to 2.0), and 1.26 (0.54 to 2.48) respectively. Admission to intensive care was considered late in 37 (69%) patients in group 2. Overall, a minimum of 4.5% and a maximum of 41% of admissions were considered potentially avoidable. Suboptimal care contributed to morbidity or mortality in most instances. The main causes of suboptimal care were failure of organisation, lack of knowledge, failure to appreciate clinical urgency, lack of supervision, and failure to seek advice. Conclusions: The management of airway, breathing, and circulation, and oxygen therapy and monitoring in severely ill patients before admission to intensive care units may frequently be suboptimal. Major consequences may include increased morbidity and mortality and requirement for intensive care. Possible solutions include improved teaching, establishment of medical emergency teams, and widespread debate on the structure and process of acute care. Key messages Suboptimal management of oxygen therapy, airway, breathing, circulation, and monitoring before admission to intensive care occurred in over half of a consecutive cohort of acute adult emergency patients. This may be associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and avoidable admissions to intensive care At least 39% of acute adult emergency patients were admitted to intensive care late in the clinical course of the illness Major causes of suboptimal care included failure of organisation, lack of knowledge, failure to appreciate clinical urgency, lack of supervision, and failure to seek advice A medical emergency team may be useful in responding pre-emptively to the clinical signs of life threatening dysfunction of airway, breathing, and circulation, rather than relying on a cardiac arrest team The structure and process of acute care and their importance require major re-evaluation and debate PMID:9632403

  20. Higher Quality of Care and Patient Safety Associated With Better NICU Work Environments.

    PubMed

    Lake, Eileen T; Hallowell, Sunny G; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Hatfield, Linda A; Del Guidice, Mary; Boxer, Bruce Alan; Ellis, Lauren N; Verica, Lindsey; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) work environment, quality of care, safety, and patient outcomes. A secondary analysis was conducted of responses of 1247 NICU staff nurses in 171 hospitals to a large nurse survey. Better work environments were associated with lower odds of nurses reporting poor quality, safety, and outcomes. Improving the work environment may be a promising strategy to achieve safer settings for at-risk newborns. PMID:26262450

  1. Point-of-Care Blood Glucose Testing for Diabetes Care in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes requires accurate near-patient glucose monitoring systems. In the past decade, point-of-care blood glucose monitoring devices have become the mainstay of near-patient glucose monitoring in hospitals across the world. In this article, we focus on its history, accuracy, clinical use, and cost-effectiveness. Point-of-care devices have evolved from 1.2 kg instruments with no informatics to handheld lightweight portable devices with advanced connectivity features. Their accuracy however remains a subject of debate, and new standards for their approval have now been issued by both the International Organization for Standardization and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. While their cost-effectiveness remains to be proved, their clinical value for managing inpatients with diabetes remains unchallenged. This evidence-based review provides an overall view of its use in the hospital setting. PMID:25355711

  2. Care control and collaborative working in a prison hospital.

    PubMed

    Foster, John; Bell, Linda; Jayasinghe, Neil

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports findings from a qualitative research project, using interviews, focus groups and participant observations, which sought to investigate "good practice" in a nurse-led prison hospital wing for male prisoners. The study raised issues about tensions between "caring" and "control" of prisoners from the perspectives of professionals working or visiting the wing. This paper discusses collaborative working between professionals from different backgrounds, including nurses and healthcare (prison) officers who were based on the wing and others who visited such as probation, medical, Inreach team or Counselling Advice, Referral, Assessment and Through Care team staff (CARAT). The key finding was that there is a balance between therapy and security/risk. In order to maintain this, the two main groups based on the hospital wing--nurses and prison officers--moved between at times cooperating, coordinating and collaborating with each other to maintain this balance. Other themes were care and control, team working, individual and professional responsibilities and communication issues. Enhancing the role of nurses should be encouraged so that therapy remains paramount, and we conclude with some recommendations to encourage collaborative working in prison healthcare settings to ensure that therapy continues to be paramount while security and safety are maintained. PMID:23078591

  3. Total quality management issues in managed care.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of total quality management (TQM) in health care has gone on in parallel with the growth of managed care. What is the interaction between the two? Key issues are the ascendance of cost control over quality in many areas, erosion of employee commitment and loyalty, and a short-run orientation. Associated with this is an emphasis on organizational learning rather than learning by autonomous professionals. Both TQM and managed care acknowledge the dynamic nature of clinical processes and the ability and responsibility of both institutions and clinicians to improve their processes. Both are consistent with efforts to identify and implement best practices. However, these similarities should not mask fundamental differences. Continuous improvement must shift its focus from avoiding unnecessary variation to facilitating rapid organizational learning and institutionalizing mass customization into the delivery of health services. PMID:9327355

  4. Examining Quality Improvement Programs: The Case of Minnesota Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Olson, John R; Belohlav, James A; Cook, Lori S; Hays, Julie M

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is a hierarchy of improvement program adoption by hospitals and outline that hierarchy. Data Sources Primary data were collected in the spring of 2007 via e-survey from 210 individuals representing 109 Minnesota hospitals. Secondary data from 2006 were assembled from the Leapfrog database. Study Design As part of a larger survey, respondents were given a list of improvement programs and asked to identify those programs that are used in their hospital. Data Collection/Data Extraction Rasch Model Analysis was used to assess whether a unidimensional construct exists that defines a hospital's ability to implement performance improvement programs. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of the Rasch ability scores with Leapfrog Safe Practices Scores to validate the research findings. Principal Findings The results of the study show that hospitals have widely varying abilities in implementing improvement programs. In addition, improvement programs present differing levels of difficulty for hospitals trying to implement them. Our findings also indicate that the ability to adopt improvement programs is important to the overall performance of hospitals. Conclusions There is a hierarchy of improvement programs in the health care context. A hospital's ability to successfully adopt improvement programs is a function of its existing capabilities. As a hospital's capability increases, the ability to successfully implement higher level programs also increases. PMID:18761677

  5. "Folk" Understandings of Quality in UK Higher Hospitality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the evolution of "folk" understandings of quality in higher hospitality education and the consequent implications of these understandings for current quality concerns in the field. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a historical survey of the stated topic…

  6. 42 CFR 412.140 - Participation, data submission, and validation requirements under the Hospital Inpatient Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Payments to Hospitals Under the Prospective Payment Systems § 412.140 Participation, data submission, and validation requirements under the Hospital... the approved CMS Quality Improvement Evaluation System (QIES). (b) Withdrawal from the Hospital...

  7. [Quality of abortion care in the Unified Health System of Northeastern Brazil: what do women say?].

    PubMed

    Aquino, Estela M L; Menezes, Greice; Barreto-de-Araújo, Thália Velho; Alves, Maria Teresa; Alves, Sandra Valongueiro; de Almeida, Maria da Conceição Chagas; Schiavo, Eleonora; Lima, Luci Praciano; de Menezes, Carlos Augusto Santos; Marinho, Lilian Fátima Barbosa; Coimbra, Liberata Campos; Campbell, Oona

    2012-07-01

    Abortion is a serious health problem in Brazil and complications can be avoided by adequate and timely care. The article evaluates the quality of care given to women admitted for abortion in hospitals operated by the Unified Health System, in Salvador, Recife and São Luis, the benchmarks being Ministry of Health norms and user satisfaction. The article analyzes 2804 women admitted to hospital for abortion complications in 19 hospitals, between August and December 2010. Four dimensions were defined: reception and guidance; inputs and physical environment; technical quality and continuity of care. There was a closer fit to norms on reception and guidance. Social support and the right to information were not well rated in all three cities. The technical quality of care was rated poor. With respect to inputs and physical environment, cleanliness was the least adequate criterion. Continuity of care was the most critical situation in all three cities, due to the lack of scheduled follow-up appointments, information about care available after hospital discharge, the risk of further pregnancy and family planning. Abortion care falls short of that advocated under Brazilian norms and by international agencies. PMID:22872338

  8. Information Architecture for Quality Management Support in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Álvaro; Freixo, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Quality Management occupies a strategic role in organizations, and the adoption of computer tools within an aligned information architecture facilitates the challenge of making more with less, promoting the development of a competitive edge and sustainability. A formal Information Architecture (IA) lends organizations an enhanced knowledge but, above all, favours management. This simplifies the reinvention of processes, the reformulation of procedures, bridging and the cooperation amongst the multiple actors of an organization. In the present investigation work we planned the IA for the Quality Management System (QMS) of a Hospital, which allowed us to develop and implement the QUALITUS (QUALITUS, name of the computer application developed to support Quality Management in a Hospital Unit) computer application. This solution translated itself in significant gains for the Hospital Unit under study, accelerating the quality management process and reducing the tasks, the number of documents, the information to be filled in and information errors, amongst others. PMID:26306878

  9. Child Care Quality: An Overview for Parents. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Peggy; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Many parents want to know how important the quality of care is to children's social, emotional, and academic development. This digest synthesizes some major recent research on child care quality. First, the digest explains what features contribute to quality of care. The digest also explains the differences between studies of how quality is…

  10. 38 CFR 17.52 - Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities. 17.52 Section 17.52 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.52 Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities. (a) When...

  11. 38 CFR 17.52 - Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities. 17.52 Section 17.52 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.52 Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities. (a) When...

  12. Therapist-centred design of NUI based therapies in a neurological care hospital

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    Therapist-centred design of NUI based therapies in a neurological care hospital Junia Anacleto chronic care hospital that has no ICT based workflow processes we identified three main components where social intranet. Hospital staff liked the game-activity and logging, but expressed concerns about

  13. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients. PMID:22299830

  14. Introduction to the transforming dementia care in hospitals series.

    PubMed

    Evans, Simon; Brooker, Dawn; Thompson, Rachel; Bray, Jennifer; Milosevic, Sarah; Bruce, Mary; Carter, Christine

    2015-07-01

    A short series of articles in Nursing Older People, starting in September, presents case study examples of the positive work achieved by trusts that participated in the RCN's development programme to improve dementia care in acute hospitals. This introductory article reports on the independent evaluation of the programme. The programme included a launch event, development days, site visits, ongoing support by the RCN lead and carer representatives and a conference to showcase service improvements. The evaluation drew on data from a survey, the site visits, trust action plans and a range of self-assessment tools for dementia care. The findings highlight substantial progress towards programme objectives and learning outcomes and suggest that the programme provided the focus, impetus and structure for trusts to make sustainable changes. It also equipped participants with the strategies and confidence to change practice. Recommendations are made for taking the programme forward. PMID:26108943

  15. [The multi-factorial model of satisfaction of medical care by hospital patients suffering from borderline psychic disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsigankov, B D; Maligin, Ya V

    2015-01-01

    The satisfaction of patients with medical care determines their consumer behavior. The factors of satisfaction with medical care vary depending on level of its provision and profile of medical specialty. At that, there are only sporadic studies dedicated to factors of satisfaction with psychiatric care. The study was carried out to examine factors of satisfaction with hospital psychiatric care by patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The sampling consisted of 356 hospital patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The survey in written form was carried out using originally developed questionnaire. The statistical analysis was implemented by compiling equation of multiple regression. It is established that key factors of satisfaction include functioning of medical nurses of department, functioning of attending physician, comfort of wards, proportions and quality of psychiatric care capability of physician to empathic listening. The developed mathematical model explains 81% of variation of satisfaction with treatment. PMID:26012273

  16. An intervention to improve paediatric and newborn care in Kenyan district hospitals: Understanding the context

    PubMed Central

    English, Mike; Ntoburi, Stephen; Wagai, John; Mbindyo, Patrick; Opiyo, Newton; Ayieko, Philip; Opondo, Charles; Migiro, Santau; Wamae, Annah; Irimu, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Background It is increasingly appreciated that the interpretation of health systems research studies is greatly facilitated by detailed descriptions of study context and the process of intervention. We have undertaken an 18-month hospital-based intervention study in Kenya aiming to improve care for admitted children and newborn infants. Here we describe the baseline characteristics of the eight hospitals as environments receiving the intervention, as well as the general and local health system context and its evolution over the 18 months. Methods Hospital characteristics were assessed using previously developed tools assessing the broad structure, process, and outcome of health service provision for children and newborns. Major health system or policy developments over the period of the intervention at a national level were documented prospectively by monitoring government policy announcements, the media, and through informal contacts with policy makers. At the hospital level, a structured, open questionnaire was used in face-to-face meetings with senior hospital staff every six months to identify major local developments that might influence implementation. These data provide an essential background for those seeking to understand the generalisability of reports describing the intervention's effects, and whether the intervention plausibly resulted in these effects. Results Hospitals had only modest capacity, in terms of infrastructure, equipment, supplies, and human resources available to provide high-quality care at baseline. For example, hospitals were lacking between 30 to 56% of items considered necessary for the provision of care to the seriously ill child or newborn. An increase in spending on hospital renovations, attempts to introduce performance contracts for health workers, and post-election violence were recorded as examples of national level factors that might influence implementation success generally. Examples of factors that might influence success locally included frequent and sometimes numerous staff changes, movements of senior departmental or administrative staff, and the presence of local 'donor' partners with alternative priorities. Conclusion The effectiveness of interventions delivered at hospital level over periods realistically required to achieve change may be influenced by a wide variety of factors at national and local levels. We have demonstrated how dynamic such contexts are, and therefore the need to consider context when interpreting an intervention's effectiveness. PMID:19627588

  17. Sociodemographic and Health Characteristics, Rather Than Primary Care Supply, are Major Drivers of Geographic Variation in Preventable Hospitalizations in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, Louisa R.; Douglas, Kirsty A.; Blyth, Fiona M.; Elliott, Robert F.; Leyland, Alastair H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Geographic rates of preventable hospitalization are used internationally as an indicator of accessibility and quality of primary care. Much research has correlated the indicator with the supply of primary care services, yet multiple other factors may influence these admissions. Objective: To quantify the relative contributions of the supply of general practitioners (GPs) and personal sociodemographic and health characteristics, to geographic variation in preventable hospitalization. Methods: Self-reported questionnaire data for 267,091 participants in the 45 and Up Study, Australia, were linked with administrative hospital data to identify preventable hospitalizations. Multilevel Poisson models, with participants clustered in their geographic area of residence, were used to explore factors that explain geographic variation in hospitalization. Results: GP supply, measured as full-time workload equivalents, was not a significant predictor of preventable hospitalization, and explained only a small amount (2.9%) of the geographic variation in hospitalization rates. Conversely, more than one-third (36.9%) of variation was driven by the sociodemographic composition, health, and behaviors of the population. These personal characteristics explained a greater amount of the variation for chronic conditions (37.5%) than acute (15.5%) or vaccine-preventable conditions (2.4%). Conclusions: Personal sociodemographic and health characteristics, rather than GP supply, are major drivers of preventable hospitalization. Their contribution varies according to condition, and if used for performance comparison purposes, geographic rates of preventable hospitalization should be reported according to individual condition or potential pathways for intervention. PMID:25793270

  18. Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18?months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was £50?000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was £65?000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was £16?000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

  19. Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

  20. [Quality improvement initiatives in hospitals: which one to choose].

    PubMed

    Haller, G; Quenon, J L

    2014-05-21

    The number of quality improvement initiatives in hospitals has been steadily increasing in the last decades. Most of these initiatives are inspired by three quality control and improvement models developed in the manufacturing industry: the final inspection, the quality assurance and the total quality management. The purpose of this review is to describe how these methods have been implemented in healthcare organizations and to assess their effectiveness and acceptability by healthcare professionals. This review should help quality managers and healthcare professionals to choose a model that is best adapted to their needs and expected goals. PMID:24941688

  1. Black patients more likely than whites to undergo surgery at low-quality hospitals in segregated regions.

    PubMed

    Dimick, Justin; Ruhter, Joel; Sarrazin, Mary Vaughan; Birkmeyer, John D

    2013-06-01

    Research has shown that black patients more frequently undergo surgery at low-quality hospitals than do white patients. We assessed the extent to which living in racially segregated areas and living in geographic proximity to low-quality hospitals contribute to this disparity. Using national Medicare data for all patients who underwent one of three high-risk surgical procedures in 2005-08, we found that black patients actually tended to live closer to higher-quality hospitals than white patients did but were 25-58 percent more likely than whites to receive surgery at low-quality hospitals. Racial segregation was also a factor, with black patients in the most segregrated areas 41-96 percent more likely than white patients to undergo surgery at low-quality hospitals. To address these disparities, care navigators and public reporting of comparative quality could steer patients and their referring physicians to higher-quality hospitals, while quality improvement efforts could focus on improving outcomes for high-risk surgery at hospitals that disproportionately serve black patients. Unfortunately, existing policies such as pay-for-performance, bundled payments, and nonpayment for adverse events may divert resources and exacerbate these disparities. PMID:23733978

  2. Is having quality as an item on the executive board agenda associated with the implementation of quality management systems in European hospitals: a quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Botje, Daan; Klazinga, N.S.; Suñol, R.; Groene, O.; Pfaff, H.; Mannion, R.; Depaigne-Loth, A.; Arah, O.A.; Dersarkissian, M.; Wagner, C.; Klazinga, N.; Kringos, D.S.; Lombarts, M.J.M.H.; Plochg, T.; Lopez, M.A.; Vallejo, P.; Saillour-Glenisson, F.; Car, M.; Jones, S.; Klaus, E.; Bottaro, S.; Garel, P.; Saluvan, M.; Bruneau, C.; Depaigne-Loth, A.; Hammer, A.; Ommen, O.; Pfaff, H.; Botje, D.; Escoval, A.; Lívio, A.; Eiras, M.; Franca, M.; Leite, I.; Almeman, F.; Kus, H.; Ozturk, K.; Mannion, R.; Wang, A.; Thompson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether there is a relationship between having quality as an item on the board's agenda, perceived external pressure (PEP) and the implementation of quality management in European hospitals. Design A quantitative, mixed method, cross-sectional study in seven European countries in 2011 surveying CEOs and quality managers and data from onsite audits. Participants One hundred and fifty-five CEOs and 155 quality managers. Setting One hundred and fifty-five randomly selected acute care hospitals in seven European countries (Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Main outcome measure(s) Three constructs reflecting quality management based on questionnaire and audit data: (i) Quality Management System Index, (ii) Quality Management Compliance Index and (iii) Clinical Quality Implementation Index. The main predictor was whether quality performance was on the executive board's agenda. Results Discussing quality performance at executive board meetings more often was associated with a higher quality management system score (regression coefficient b = 2.53; SE = 1.16; P = 0.030). We found a trend in the associations of discussing quality performance with quality compliance and clinical quality implementation. PEP did not modify these relationships. Conclusions Having quality as an item on the executive board's agenda allows them to review and discuss quality performance more often in order to improve their hospital's quality management. Generally, and as this study found, having quality on the executive board's agenda matters. PMID:24550260

  3. 78 FR 55671 - Hospital Care and Medical Services for Camp Lejeune Veterans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... hospital care and medical services. As discussed in a separate notice (78 FR 39832, July 2, 2013), we are... 17 Administrative practice and procedure, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO78 Hospital Care and Medical Services for Camp Lejeune Veterans...

  4. [Improvement approaches in the hospital setting: From total quality management to Lean].

    PubMed

    Curatolo, N; Lamouri, S; Huet, J-C; Rieutord, A

    2015-07-01

    Hospitals have to deal strong with economic constraints and increasing requirements in terms of quality and safety of care. To address these constraints, one solution could be the adoption of approaches from the industry sector. Following the decree of April 6, 2011 on the quality management of the medication use process, some of these approaches, such as risk management, are now part of the everyday work of healthcare professionals. However, other approaches, such as business process improvement, are still poorly developed in the hospital setting. In this general review, we discuss the main approaches of business process improvements that have been used in hospitals by focusing specifically on one of the newest and most currently used: Lean. PMID:25558800

  5. Identifying Quality Indicators Used by Patients to Choose Secondary Health Care Providers: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Saman Sara; Kahlon, Gurnaaz Kaur; Naik, Aditi; Jessel, Amar Singh; Nanavati, Niraj; Shah, Akash; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients in health systems across the world can now choose between different health care providers. Patients are increasingly using websites and apps to compare the quality of health care services available in order to make a choice of provider. In keeping with many patient-facing platforms, most services currently providing comparative information on different providers do not take account of end-user requirements or the available evidence base. Objective To investigate what factors were considered most important when choosing nonemergency secondary health care providers in the United Kingdom with the purpose of translating these insights into a ratings platform delivered through a consumer mHealth app. Methods A mixed methods approach was used to identify key indicators incorporating a literature review to identify and categorize existing quality indicators, a questionnaire survey to formulate a ranked list of performance indicators, and focus groups to explore rationales behind the rankings. Findings from qualitative and quantitative methodologies were mapped onto each other under the four categories identified by the literature review. Results Quality indicators were divided into four categories. Hospital access was the least important category. The mean differences between the other three categories hospital statistics, hospital staff, and hospital facilities, were not statistically significant. Staff competence was the most important indicator in the hospital staff category; cleanliness and up-to-date facilities were equally important in hospital facilities; ease of travel to the hospital was found to be most important in hospital access. All quality indicators within the hospital statistics category were equally important. Focus groups elaborated that users find it difficult to judge staff competence despite its importance. Conclusions A mixed methods approach is presented, which supported a patient-centered development and evaluation of a hospital ratings mobile app. Where possible, mHealth developers should use systematic research methods in order to more closely meet the needs of the end user and add credibility to their platform. PMID:26048441

  6. In California, not-for-profit hospitals spent more operating expenses on charity care than for-profit hospitals spent.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos, Erica; Le, Sidney; Hsia, Renee Y

    2015-08-01

    In exchange for sizable tax exemptions, not-for-profit hospitals must engage in activities that meet the Internal Revenue Service's community benefit standard. The provision of charity care-free care to those unable to pay-can help meet that standard. Bad debt, the other form of uncompensated care, cannot be used to meet the standard, although Medicaid shortfalls can. However, the ACA lacks guidelines for providing charity care, and federal law sets no minimum requirements for community benefit activities. Using data from California, we examined whether the levels of charity and uncompensated care provided differed across general acute care hospitals by profit status and other characteristics during 2011-13. The mean proportion of total operating expenses spent on charity care differed significantly between not-for-profit (1.9 percent) and for-profit hospitals (1.4 percent), in contrast to the mean proportion spent on uncompensated care. Both types of spending varied widely across hospitals. Policy makers should consider measures that remove disincentives to meeting the persistent considerable need for charity care-for example, increasing supports to offset rising Medicaid shortfalls resulting from program expansion-and facilitate the tracking of ACA impacts on the distribution of charity care and uncompensated care delivery. PMID:26240242

  7. Rural and Urban Hospitals' Role in Providing Inpatient Care, 2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did rural hospital inpatients differ from urban hospital inpatients ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did patients' first-listed diagnoses differ in rural and ...

  8. [Comprehensive quality management in hospitals--experience and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Schubert, H J

    1999-03-01

    Total quality management concepts, increasingly being introduced into hospitals, offer opportunities for integrative leadership concepts because of their multidimensional character viewed from the aspects of results and from the standpoint of organisational design. Customized for leadership and organisation of hospitals in Germany, questions of introduction strategies as well as recommendations for the integration of total quality understanding into the daily practice of management and employees are discussed. The active support of top and middle management and a combination of radical change in selected problem areas and continual incremental improvements on a broad base have been proven as significant factors for the success in the introductory phase. For a lasting integration of the principles of a comprehensive quality management concept in a hospital, it will be necessary to carry out regularly relevant measurements of success. The results become an important part of agreements with management. PMID:10355063

  9. General medical care and the education of internists in university hospitals. An evaluation of the teaching hospital general medicine group practice program.

    PubMed

    Kosecoff, J; Fink, A; Brook, R H; Davies, A R; Goldberg, G; Linn, L S; Clark, V A; Salisbury, P C

    1985-02-01

    Fifteen general internal medicine group practices in university teaching hospitals were studied to evaluate their primary care services and education. Data were collected over 9 months from physicians, patients, and medical records, and by observation. All institutions had closed their general medical clinics. Many patients being treated in group practices were very sick; 57% had hypertension; 21% were diabetic; and 45% could not work. Most were satisfied with their care. Care for acute problems from a health care provider in the practice was available quickly; regular physicians were harder to see. House staff and faculty spent little time in the practices. Few practices used teams; most used traditional attending and house staff models. Practice physicians could not easily determine when patients were seen in the institution's emergency department or were hospitalized. Quality of care standards were not uniformly met. Finally, the structure of academic centers appeared to inhibit the practices' performance, suggesting a need for further appraisal of relationships between university hospitals and their ambulatory care units. PMID:3966761

  10. Designing a balanced scorecard for a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan: a modified Delphi group exercise.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Fauziah; Jafri, Syed M Wasim; Abbas, Farhat; Shah, Mairaj; Azam, Syed Iqbal; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem; Brommels, Mats; Tomson, Goran

    2010-01-01

    Balanced Scorecards (BSC) are being implemented in high income health settings linking organizational strategies with performance data. At this private university hospital in Pakistan an elaborate information system exists. This study aimed to make best use of available data for better performance management. Applying the modified Delphi technique an expert panel of clinicians and hospital managers reduced a long list of indicators to a manageable size. Indicators from existing documents were evaluated for their importance, scientific soundness, appropriateness to hospital's strategic plan, feasibility and modifiability. Panel members individually rated each indicator on a scale of 1-9 for the above criteria. Median scores were assigned. Of an initial set of 50 indicators, 20 were finally selected to be assigned to the four BSC quadrants. These were financial (n = 4), customer or patient (n = 4), internal business or quality of care (n = 7) and innovation/learning or employee perspectives (n = 5). A need for stringent definitions, international benchmarking and standardized measurement methods was identified. BSC compels individual clinicians and managers to jointly work towards improving performance. This scorecard is now ready to be implemented by this hospital as a performance management tool for monitoring indicators, addressing measurement issues and enabling comparisons with hospitals in other settings. PMID:20191594

  11. Clinical nurse leader impact on microsystem care quality

    E-print Network

    Bender, M; Connelly, CD; Glaser, D; Brown, C

    2012-01-01

    positive, sustained correlation between CNL-mediated processes and quality patient outcomes.positive correlation between CNL-mediated collaborative care processes and improvements in patient satisfaction with care quality provides empirical evidence of outcomes

  12. Can social media be used as a hospital quality improvement tool?

    PubMed

    Lagu, Tara; Goff, Sarah L; Craft, Ben; Calcasola, Stephanie; Benjamin, Evan M; Priya, Aruna; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Many hospitals wish to improve their patients' experience of care. To learn whether social media could be used as a tool to engage patients and to identify opportunities for hospital quality improvement (QI), we solicited patients' narrative feedback on the Baystate Medical Center Facebook page during a 3-week period in 2014. Two investigators used directed qualitative content analysis to code comments and descriptive statistics to assess the frequency of selected codes and themes. We identified common themes, including: (1) comments about staff (17/37 respondents, 45.9%); (2) comments about specific departments (22/37, 59.5%); (3) comments on technical aspects of care, including perceived errors and inattention to pain control (9/37, 24.3%); and (4) comments describing the hospital physical plant, parking, and amenities (9/37, 24.3%). A small number (n?=?3) of patients repeatedly responded, accounting for 30% (45/148) of narratives. Although patient feedback on social media could help to drive hospital QI efforts, any potential benefits must be weighed against the reputational risks, the lack of representativeness among respondents, and the volume of responses needed to identify areas of improvement. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:52-55. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26390277

  13. Communicating quality improvement through a hospital newsletter.

    PubMed

    Tietz, A; Tabor, R

    1995-01-01

    Healthcare organizations across the United States are embracing the tenets of continuous quality improvement. The challenge is to disseminate information about this quality activity throughout the organization. A monthly newsletter serves two vital purposes: to share the improvements and to generate more enthusiasm and participation by staff members. This article gives practical suggestions for promoting a monthly newsletter. Preparation of an informative newsletter requires a significant investment of time and effort. However, the positive results of providing facilitywide communications can make it worth the effort. The current availability of relatively inexpensive desktop publishing computer software programs has made the process much easier. PMID:10143536

  14. Disparities in Health Care Quality among Minority Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3-EF Go to Online Store Disparities in Health Care Quality Among Minority Women Selected Findings From the ... race and ethnicity are combined. Return to Contents Health Care Delivery and Systems Information about health care delivery ...

  15. 38 CFR 17.86 - Provision of hospital care and medical services during certain disasters and emergencies under 38...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Provision of hospital care and medical services during certain disasters and...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Care During Certain Disasters and Emergencies...86 Provision of hospital care and medical services during certain disasters...

  16. Suffering caused by care—Patients’ experiences from hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Mia; Westin, Lars; Svanström, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Suffering and well-being are significant aspects of human existence; in particular, suffering and well-being are important aspects of patients’ experiences following diseases. Increased knowledge about existential dimensions of illness and healthcare experiences may be needed in order to improve care and reduce unnecessary suffering. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to illuminate the phenomenon of suffering experienced in relation to healthcare needs among patients in hospital settings in Sweden. In this study, we used a reflective lifeworld approach. The data were analysed with a focus on meanings. The results describe the essential meaning of the phenomenon of suffering in relation to healthcare needs. The patients were suffering during care-giving when they felt distrusted or mistreated and when their perspective on illness and health was overlooked. Suffering was found to arise due to healthcare actions that neglected a holistic and patient-centred approach to care. Unfortunately, healthcare experiences that cause patients to suffer seem to be something one needs to endure without being critical. The phenomenon can be described as having four constituents: to be mistreated; to struggle for one's healthcare needs and autonomy; to feel powerless; and to feel fragmented and objectified. The study concludes that there are problems associated with patients experiencing suffering at the hands of healthcare providers, even if this suffering may not have been caused deliberately to the patient. Consequently, conscious improvements are needed to lessen the suffering caused by care-giving, as are strategies that promote more patient-centred care and patient participation. PMID:22943888

  17. Health care quality improvement publication trends.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gordon H; MacEachern, Mark P; Perla, Rocco J; Gaines, Jean M; Davis, Matthew M; Shrank, William H

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the extent of academic interest in quality improvement (QI) initiatives in medical practice, annual publication trends for the most well-known QI methodologies being used in health care settings were analyzed. A total of 10 key medical- and business-oriented library databases were examined: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ABI/INFORM, and Business Source Complete. A total of 13 057 articles were identified that discuss at least 1 of 10 well-known QI concepts used in health care contexts, 8645 (66.2%) of which were classified as original research. "Total quality management" was the only methodology to demonstrate a significant decline in publication over time. "Continuous quality improvement" was the most common topic of study across all publication years, whereas articles discussing Lean methodology demonstrated the largest growth in publication volume over the past 2 decades. Health care QI publication volume increased substantially beginning in 1991. PMID:24101680

  18. Optimizing quality of life through palliative care.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Kim, Ann; Fall, Patrick C; Wang, Dajie

    2007-12-01

    Many developments have occurred in prevention and treatment of cancer, but death from this disease is still common. Of the 58 million people who died worldwide in 2005, 7.6 million died of cancer (http://www.who.int/cancer/en/). For dying patients, it is most important to improve quality of life and relieve suffering. Palliative care is the active total care of patients whose medical condition is not responsive to curative treatment. It encompasses all therapeutic modalities designed to enhance quality of life rather than eliminating disease. Each patient's definition of quality of life is unique, and therefore, it is important to treat each as an individual and holistically. Controlling cancer-related symptoms can ameliorate the limited remaining time patients have with family and friends. Palliative chemotherapy, rehabilitation, radiation therapy, surgery, and interventional pain management can help to achieve this objective. In this online update of an article published in a 2005 series on pain management, a case presentation describes the typical course of a patient with cancer who receives palliative care to reduce pain. PMID:18165379

  19. Management of acute coronary syndromes at hospital discharge: do targeted educational interventions improve practice quality?

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gregory M; Thompson, Angus; Pulver, Lisa K; Robertson, Marion B; Brieger, David; Wai, Angela; Tett, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines exist for the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), yet adherence is suboptimal. The Discharge Management of Acute Coronary Syndrome project used a quality improvement approach, with targeted intervention strategies to optimize: prescription of guideline-recommended medications; education regarding lifestyle modifications, including cardiac rehabilitation (CR); and communication between hospital staff, patients, and general practitioners. Hospitals across Australia participated in a quality improvement cycle of audit, feedback, intervention, and reaudit. Interventions involved educational meetings, academic detailing and point-of-care reminders, and feedback of baseline audit results. Outcome measures included prescription of guideline-recommended medications, referral to CR, and documentation and communication of management plan. At baseline, 49 hospitals recruited 1,545 patients, and postintervention, 45 hospitals remained active in the project and recruited 1,589 patients. Three thousand and thirty-four hospital staff attended group education or academic detailing sessions. Postintervention, there was a significant increase in the prescription of all four guideline-recommended medications (69% vs. 57%; p<.0001); short-acting nitrates (68% vs. 56%; p<.0001); and documented referral to CR (68% vs. 57%; p<.0001). There were significant increases in documented discharge medication counselling, smoking cessation counselling, and communication of management plans. Targeted educational interventions used as part of a quality improvement cycle can enhance adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with ACS. PMID:22059443

  20. Exploration of the Practices of Credentialing of Nurse Practitioners in Acute Care Hospital Settings

    E-print Network

    Hronek, Carla M.

    2014-05-31

    Abstract The nursing shortage, physician shortage, advancing age of the population, and concerns about equalizing access to health care have supported the movement of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role into the acute care hospital setting (ACHS...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution ... resistance and improving prescribing practices. Work with other health care facilities to prevent infections, transmission, and resistance. Problem ...

  2. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital...

  3. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital...

  4. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital...

  5. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor ...residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital...

  6. Racial, Income, and Marital Status Disparities in Hospital Readmissions Within a Veterans-Integrated Health Care Network.

    PubMed

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Gao, Kelly; Shulan, Mollie

    2015-12-01

    Hospital readmission is an important indicator of health care quality and currently used in determining hospital reimbursement rates by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Given the important policy implications, a better understanding of factors that influence readmission rates is needed. Racial disparities in readmission have been extensively studied, but income and marital status (a postdischarge care support indicator) disparities have received limited attention. By employing three Poisson regression models controlling for different confounders on 8,718 patients in a veterans-integrated health care network, this study assessed racial, income, and martial disparities in relation to total number of readmissions. In contrast to other studies, no racial and income disparities were found, but unmarried patients experienced significantly more readmissions: 16%, after controlling for the confounders. These findings render unique insight into health care policies aimed to improve race and income disparities, while challenging policy makers to reduce readmissions for those who lack family support. PMID:23811693

  7. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-10-12

    Purpose - Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. Design/methodology/approach - This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Findings - Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. Originality/value - According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments. PMID:26440482

  8. Analysis of the quality of hospital information systems audit trails

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Audit Trails (AT) are fundamental to information security in order to guarantee access traceability but can also be used to improve Health information System’s (HIS) quality namely to assess how they are used or misused. This paper aims at analysing the existence and quality of AT, describing scenarios in hospitals and making some recommendations to improve the quality of information. Methods The responsibles of HIS for eight Portuguese hospitals were contacted in order to arrange an interview about the importance of AT and to collect audit trail data from their HIS. Five institutions agreed to participate in this study; four of them accepted to be interviewed, and four sent AT data. The interviews were performed in 2011 and audit trail data sent in 2011 and 2012. Each AT was evaluated and compared in relation to data quality standards, namely for completeness, comprehensibility, traceability among others. Only one of the AT had enough information for us to apply a consistency evaluation by modelling user behaviour. Results The interviewees in these hospitals only knew a few AT (average of 1 AT per hospital in an estimate of 21 existing HIS), although they all recognize some advantages of analysing AT. Four hospitals sent a total of 7 AT – 2 from Radiology Information System (RIS), 2 from Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), 3 from Patient Records. Three of the AT were understandable and three of the AT were complete. The AT from the patient records are better structured and more complete than the RIS/PACS. Conclusions Existing AT do not have enough quality to guarantee traceability or be used in HIS improvement. Its quality reflects the importance given to them by the CIO of healthcare institutions. Existing standards (e.g. ASTM:E2147, ISO/TS 18308:2004, ISO/IEC 27001:2006) are still not broadly used in Portugal. PMID:23919501

  9. Child Care Quality in Different State Policy Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Elizabeth; Ryan, Rebecca M.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we test associations between the quality of child care and state child care policies. These data, which include observations of child care and interviews with care providers and mothers for 777 children across 14 states, allow for comparisons across a…

  10. Comparison between two mobile pre-hospital care services for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Pre-hospital care (PH) in Brazil is currently in the phase of implementation and expansion, and there are few studies on the impacts of this public health service. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of care and severity of trauma among the population served, using trauma scores, attendance response times, and mortality rates. This work compares two pre-hospital systems: the Mobile Emergency Care Service, or SAMU 192, and the Fire Brigade Group, or CB. Method Descriptive study evaluating all patients transported by both systems in Catanduva, SP, admitted to a single hospital. Results 850 patients were included, most of whom were men (67.5%); the mean age was 38.5 ± 18.5 years. Regarding the use of PH systems, most patients were transported by SAMU (62.1%). The trauma mechanisms involved motorcycle accidents in 32.7% of cases, transferred predominantly by SAMU, followed by falls (25.8%). Regarding the response time, CB showed the lowest rates. In relation to patient outcome, only 15.5% required hospitalization. The average score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14.7 ± 1.3; average RTS was 7.7 ± 0.7; ISS 3.8 ± 5.9; and average TRISS 97.6 ± 9.3. The data analysis showed no statistical differences in mortality between the groups studied (SAMU - 1.5%; CB - 2.5%). The trauma scores showed a higher severity of trauma among the fatal victims. Conclusion Trauma victims are predominantly young and male; the trauma mechanism that accounted for the majority of PH cases was motorcycle accidents; CB responded more quickly than SAMU; and there was no statistical difference between the services of SAMU and CB in terms of severity of the trauma and mortality rates. PMID:23531089

  11. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  12. Testing the Bed-Blocking Hypothesis: Does Nursing and Care Home Supply Reduce Delayed Hospital Discharges?

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, James; Gravelle, Hugh; Siciliani, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Hospital bed-blocking occurs when hospital patients are ready to be discharged to a nursing home, but no place is available, so that hospital care acts as a more costly substitute for long-term care. We investigate the extent to which greater supply of nursing home beds or lower prices can reduce hospital bed-blocking using a new Local Authority (LA) level administrative data from England on hospital delayed discharges in 2009–2013. The results suggest that delayed discharges respond to the availability of care home beds, but the effect is modest: an increase in care home beds by 10% (250 additional beds per LA) would reduce social care delayed discharges by about 6–9%. We also find strong evidence of spillover effects across LAs: more care home beds or fewer patients aged over 65?years in nearby LAs are associated with fewer delayed discharges. © 2015 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25760581

  13. [Closing forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy: a new deal for mental health care?].

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Malavolta, Maurizio; Bianchini, Valeria; Giusti, Laura; Di Michele, Vittorio; Giosuè, Patricia; Ruggeri, Mirella; Biondi, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The date of March 31, 2015, following the Law 81/2014, has marked a historical transition with the final closure of the six forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy. This law identifies a new pathway of care that involves small-scale high therapeutic profile facilities (Residenze per la Esecuzione della Misura di Sicurezza, REMS) instead of the old forensic psychiatric hospitals. The Law promotes a new recovery-oriented rehabilitation approach for the persons with mental disorders who committed a criminal offence, but lack criminal responsibility and deemed as socially dangerous. After a brief description of what happens abroad, this article highlights the positive aspects of the law that, as a whole, has to be considered innovative and unavoidable. The main debated problems are also reviewed, including the lack of changes to the Criminal Code; the improper equation between insanity and mental illness and social dangerousness; the evaluation of "socially dangerousness", based solely on "subjective qualities" of the person, assessed out of his/her context, without paying attention to family and social conditions suitable for discharge; the expensive implementation of the REMS, mainly based on security policies and less on care and rehabilitation, the delay in their construction, and the search for residential alternatives structures; the uncertain boundaries of professional responsibility. Finally, several actions are suggested that can support the implementation of the law: information programs addressed to the general population; training activities for mental health professionals; systematic monitoring and evaluation of the outcomes of the care provided to the forensic psychiatric population; implementation of Agreement Protocols and a better cooperation with the judiciary. Scientific societies dealing with psychosocial rehabilitation need to be involved in such issues relating to the identification of the best care and rehabilitation pathways, which should be implemented following closure of forensic psychiatric hospitals. PMID:26489069

  14. Uncompensated hospital care payment and access for the uninsured: evidence from New Jersey.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, D L; Chen, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We assess the impacts of New Jersey's payment for hospital uncompensated care on access for the uninsured. DATA SOURCES. Uncompensated care charges and other data were obtained from audited reports maintained by the New Jersey State Department of Health. Other data sources include the AHA Annual Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The sample includes 80 of 88 acute care hospitals in the state for 1979 to 1987. STUDY DESIGN. This study used a pre- and postdesign to assess the impacts of the introduction of uncompensated care payment. Both descriptive and multivariate analyses were used. Key variables include hospital ownership and teaching characteristics; the labor force composition; and the level of government funding for public health insurance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The overall level of uncompensated hospital care increased markedly in New Jersey during the period 1979 through 1987. However, this trend can be attributed to variables other than the new payment system, including increased demand for uncompensated care. The program did result in a more even distribution of uncompensated care across hospitals. The financial condition of hospitals providing the largest share of this care also improved, ensuring continued access. CONCLUSIONS. Funding of uncompensated care via hospital payment regulation did not increase its overall provision. However, improved access was achieved as opportunities for the uninsured to receive care were made more widely available. PMID:8163377

  15. Graduate medical education's new focus on resident engagement in quality and safety: will it transform the culture of teaching hospitals?

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; Nash, David B

    2014-10-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently announced its Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) program, which is designed to catalyze and promote the engagement of physician trainees in health care quality and patient safety activities that are essential to the delivery of high-quality patient care in U.S. teaching hospitals. In this Commentary, the authors argue that a strong organizational culture in quality improvement and patient safety is a necessary foundation for resident engagement in these areas. They describe residents' influence via their social networks on the behaviors and attitudes of peers and other health care providers and highlight this as a powerful driver for culture change in teaching hospitals. They also consider some of the potential unintended consequences of the CLER program and offer strategies to avoid them. The authors suggest that the CLER program provides an opportunity for health care and graduate medical education leaders to closely examine organizational quality and safety culture and the degree to which their residents are integrated in these efforts. They highlight the importance of developing collaborative interprofessional strategies to reach common goals to improve patient care. By sharpening the focus on patient safety, supervision, professionalism, patient care transitions, and the overall quality of health care delivery in the clinical learning environment during residents' formative training years, the hope is that the CLER program will inspire a new generation of physicians who possess and value these skills. PMID:25054414

  16. Availability and Quality of Prehospital Care on Pakistani Interurban Roads

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Junaid A.; Waseem, Hunniya; Razzak, Junaid A.; Shiekh, Naeem-ul-lah; Khoso, Ajmal Khan; Salmi, L.-Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Interurban road crashes often result in severe Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs). Prehospital emergency care on interurban roads was rarely evaluated in the low- and middle-income countries. The study highlighted the availability and quality of prehospital care facilities on interurban roads in Pakistan, a low-income country. The study setting was a 592-km-long National highway in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Using the questionnaires adapted from the World Health Organization prehospital care guidelines [Sasser et al., 2005], managers and ambulance staff at the stations along highways were interviewed regarding the process of care, supplies in ambulances, and their experience of trauma care. Ambulance stations were either managed by the police or the Edhi Foundation (EF), a philanthropic organization. All highway stations were managed by the EF; the median distance between highway stations was 38 km (Interquartile Range [IQR]=27–46). We visited 14 stations, ten on the highway section, and four in cities, including two managed by the police. Most highway stations (n=13) received one RTI call per day. Half of stations (n=5) were inside highway towns, usually near primary or secondary-level healthcare facilities. Travel time to the nearest tertiary healthcare facility ranged from 31 to 70 minutes (median=48 minutes; IQR=30–60). Other shortcomings noted for stations were not triaging RTI cases (86%), informing hospitals (64%), or recording response times (57%). All ambulances (n=12) had stretchers, but only 58% had oxygen cylinders. The median schooling of ambulance staff (n=13) was 8 years (IQR=3–10), and the median paramedic training was 3 days (IQR=2–3). Observed shortcomings in prehospital care could be improved by public-private partnerships focusing on paramedic training, making available essential medical supplies, and linking ambulance stations with designated healthcare facilities for appropriate RTI triage. PMID:24406963

  17. Availability and quality of prehospital care on pakistani interurban roads.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Junaid A; Waseem, Hunniya; Razzak, Junaid A; Shiekh, Naeem-Ul-Lah; Khoso, Ajmal Khan; Salmi, L-Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Interurban road crashes often result in severe Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs). Prehospital emergency care on interurban roads was rarely evaluated in the low- and middle-income countries. The study highlighted the availability and quality of prehospital care facilities on interurban roads in Pakistan, a low-income country. The study setting was a 592-km-long National highway in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Using the questionnaires adapted from the World Health Organization prehospital care guidelines [Sasser et al., 2005], managers and ambulance staff at the stations along highways were interviewed regarding the process of care, supplies in ambulances, and their experience of trauma care. Ambulance stations were either managed by the police or the Edhi Foundation (EF), a philanthropic organization. All highway stations were managed by the EF; the median distance between highway stations was 38 km (Interquartile Range [IQR]=27-46). We visited 14 stations, ten on the highway section, and four in cities, including two managed by the police. Most highway stations (n=13) received one RTI call per day. Half of stations (n=5) were inside highway towns, usually near primary or secondary-level healthcare facilities. Travel time to the nearest tertiary healthcare facility ranged from 31 to 70 minutes (median=48 minutes; IQR=30-60). Other shortcomings noted for stations were not triaging RTI cases (86%), informing hospitals (64%), or recording response times (57%). All ambulances (n=12) had stretchers, but only 58% had oxygen cylinders. The median schooling of ambulance staff (n=13) was 8 years (IQR=3-10), and the median paramedic training was 3 days (IQR=2-3). Observed shortcomings in prehospital care could be improved by public-private partnerships focusing on paramedic training, making available essential medical supplies, and linking ambulance stations with designated healthcare facilities for appropriate RTI triage. PMID:24406963

  18. SIADH-related hyponatremia in hospital day care units: clinical experience and management with tolvaptan.

    PubMed

    De Las Peñas, Ramón; Ponce, Santiago; Henao, Fernando; Camps Herrero, Carlos; Carcereny, Enric; Escobar Álvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, César A; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; López López, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (Na ?135 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in clinical practice, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the commonest cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Correcting hyponatremia in these patients can reduce morbidity and mortality, increase the response to anti-cancer agents, and help reduce hospital length of stay and costs. Tolvaptan is an oral medication used to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia patients that needs to be initiated at hospital so patients can have their serum sodium monitored. If tolvaptan could be initiated in hospital day care units (DCUs), performing the same tests, hospitalization could be avoided, quality of life improved, and costs reduced. This is the first publication where a panel of oncologists are sharing their experience and making some recommendations with the use of tolvaptan to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia in DCU after collecting and examining 35 clinical cases with these type of patients. The conclusion from this retrospective observational analysis is that the use of tolvaptan in DCU is safe and effective in the therapeutic management of SIADH-related hyponatremia. PMID:26431960

  19. 42 CFR 412.505 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for long-term care hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...prospective payment system for long-term care hospitals. 412.505 Section 412...Prospective Payment System for Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.505 Conditions for...prospective payment system for long-term care hospitals. (a) Long-term care...

  20. Clinical audit of multidisciplinary care at a medium-sized hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary care is a key enabler in the provision of high quality care for cancer patients. Despite compelling evidence supporting their benefit to patients and for providers, multidisciplinary cancer conferences (MCC) are not universally occurring. Team composition of MCC reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the body. Lack of nursing input can have a negative impact on team decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate multidisciplinary care and adherence to national recommendations at a medium-sized hospital through a clinical audit of cancer conferences and clinical records. Methods A total of 77 multidisciplinary cancer conferences were visited and 496 electronic health records were reviewed. The regularity of meetings and multidisciplinary attendance were evaluated. Each electronic health record was checked to verify documented prospective discussion before any treatment was started. Results Nine multidisciplinary teams meet on a weekly or biweekly basis at the hospital with an average number of ten people and six different specialties represented. Average duration of meetings was 46.8 min. Though most patients (64.5%) were discussed at some point at the relevant cancer conference, only 40% had a documented multidisciplinary team discussion prior to the first treatment. Pathological stage (pTNM) was documented in 53.6% of clinical records. Conclusions Nursing representatives should be included as usual attendees at cancer conferences. Prospective discussion of all cancer cases should be encouraged. Use of checklists and systematic collection of key information, specifically cancer staging, could improve clinical documentation in the electronic clinical record. PMID:24597686

  1. Where Child Care is above Average? Licensing, Legislation, and Indicators of Quality of Care in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceglowski, Deborah A.; Davis, Elizabeth E.

    2004-01-01

    Despite Minnesota's reputation for quality child care, recent changes in legislation and the impact of changing needs have raised concerns about the quality of child care available in the state. This paper presents an overview of Minnesota's current child care system including structural indicators of program quality such as licensing standards,…

  2. Serious Mental Illness and Nursing Home Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Cai, Shubing; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of a nursing home's share of residents with a serious mental illness (SMI) on the quality of care. Data Sources Secondary nursing home level data over the period 2000 through 2008 obtained from the Minimum Data Set, OSCAR, and Medicare claims. Study Design We employ an instrumental variables approach to address the potential endogeneity of the share of SMI residents in nursing homes in a model including nursing home and year fixed effects. Principal Findings An increase in the share of SMI nursing home residents positively affected the hospitalization rate among non-SMI residents and negatively affected staffing skill mix and level. We did not observe a statistically significant effect on inspection-based health deficiencies or the hospitalization rate for SMI residents. Conclusions Across the majority of indicators, a greater SMI share resulted in lower nursing home quality. Given the increased prevalence of nursing home residents with SMI, policy makers and providers will need to adjust practices in the context of this new patient population. Reforms may include more stringent preadmission screening, new regulations, reimbursement changes, and increased reporting and oversight. PMID:23278400

  3. Interactional aspects of care during hospitalization: perspectives of family caregivers of psychiatrically ill in a tertiary care setting in India.

    PubMed

    Dinakaran, P; Mehrotra, Seema; Bharath, Srikala

    2014-12-01

    There are very few studies on user-perspectives about mental health care services that explore perspectives of family caregivers in India. An exploratory study was undertaken to understand the perceived importance of various aspects of interactions with mental health service providers during hospitalization, from the perspectives of family caregivers. In addition, it also aimed at documenting their actual experience of interactional aspects of care during the hospitalization of their relatives. The study was conducted on fifty family caregivers of patients with varied psychiatric diagnoses hospitalized in a tertiary psychiatric care setting in South India. Measures of Interactional aspects of care were developed to assess perceived importance of six different interactional domains of care and the actual experience of care in these domains. Provision of informational inputs and addressing of concerns raised emerged as the domains of care given highest importance. The item pertaining to 'sharing with the caregiver about different alternatives for treatment' received negative ratings in terms of actual experience by maximum number of participants (18%). Significant differences on perceived importance of four domains of interactional aspects of care (dignity, confidentiality and fairness, addressing concerns raised, informational inputs and prompt attention and consistent care) emerged between caregiver subgroups based on educational level of the caregiver, socio-economic status, hospitalization history and broad diagnostic categories. In addition, the care givers of patients with psychoses assigned significantly more positive ratings on actual experience for all the domains of interactional aspects of care. The findings have implications for further research and practice. PMID:25440563

  4. Prospects for comparing European hospitals in terms of quality and safety: lessons from a comparative study in five countries

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Susan; Renz, Anna; Wiig, Siri; Fernandes, Alexandra; Weggelaar, Anne Marie; Calltorp, Johan; Anderson, Janet E.; Robert, Glenn; Vincent, Charles; Fulop, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Being able to compare hospitals in terms of quality and safety between countries is important for a number of reasons. For example, the 2011 European Union directive on patients' rights to cross-border health care places a requirement on all member states to provide patients with comparable information on health-care quality, so that they can make an informed choice. Here, we report on the feasibility of using common process and outcome indicators to compare hospitals for quality and safety in five countries (England, Portugal, The Netherlands, Sweden and Norway). Main Challenges Identified The cross-country comparison identified the following seven challenges with respect to comparing the quality of hospitals across Europe: different indicators are collected in each country; different definitions of the same indicators are used; different mandatory versus voluntary data collection requirements are in place; different types of organizations oversee data collection; different levels of aggregation of data exist (country, region and hospital); different levels of public access to data exist; and finally, hospital accreditation and licensing systems differ in each country. Conclusion Our findings indicate that if patients and policymakers are to compare the quality and safety of hospitals across Europe, then further work is urgently needed to agree the way forward. Until then, patients will not be able to make informed choices about where they receive their health care in different countries, and some governments will remain in the dark about the quality and safety of care available to their citizens as compared to that available in neighbouring countries. PMID:23292003

  5. Using Latent Class Analysis to Identify Sophistication Categories of Electronic Medical Record Systems in U.S. Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Christopher M.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Belden, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Many believe that electronic medical record systems hold promise for improving the quality of health care services. The body of research on this topic is still in the early stages, however, in part because of the challenge of measuring the capabilities of electronic medical record systems. The purpose of this study was to identify classes of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system sophistication in hospitals as well as hospital characteristics associated with the sophistication categories. The data used were from the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the Health Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS). The sample included acute care hospitals in the United States with 50 beds or more. We used latent class analysis to identify the sophistication classes and logistic regression to identify relationships between these classes and hospital characteristics. Our study identifies cumulative categories of EMR sophistication: ancillary-based, ancillary/data aggregation, and ancillary-to-bedside. Rural hospital EMRs are likely to be ancillary-based, while hospitals in a network are likely to have either ancillary-based or ancillary-to-bedside EMRs. Future research should explore the effect of network membership on EMR system development. PMID:24244071

  6. Microbiological assessment of indoor air quality at different hospital sites.

    PubMed

    Cabo Verde, Sandra; Almeida, Susana Marta; Matos, João; Guerreiro, Duarte; Meneses, Marcia; Faria, Tiago; Botelho, Daniel; Santos, Mateus; Viegas, Carla

    2015-09-01

    Poor hospital indoor air quality (IAQ) may lead to hospital-acquired infections, sick hospital syndrome and various occupational hazards. Air-control measures are crucial for reducing dissemination of airborne biological particles in hospitals. The objective of this study was to perform a survey of bioaerosol quality in different sites in a Portuguese Hospital, namely the operating theater (OT), the emergency service (ES) and the surgical ward (SW). Aerobic mesophilic bacterial counts (BCs) and fungal load (FL) were assessed by impaction directly onto tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar supplemented with antibiotic chloramphenicol (0.05%) plates, respectively using a MAS-100 air sampler. The ES revealed the highest airborne microbial concentrations (BC range 240-736 CFU/m(3) CFU/m(3); FL range 27-933 CFU/m(3)), exceeding, at several sampling sites, conformity criteria defined in national legislation [6]. Bacterial concentrations in the SW (BC range 99-495 CFU/m(3)) and the OT (BC range 12-170 CFU/m(3)) were under recommended criteria. While fungal levels were below 1 CFU/m(3) in the OT, in the SW (range 1-32 CFU/m(3)), there existed a site with fungal indoor concentrations higher than those detected outdoors. Airborne Gram-positive cocci were the most frequent phenotype (88%) detected from the measured bacterial population in all indoor environments. Staphylococcus (51%) and Micrococcus (37%) were dominant among the bacterial genera identified in the present study. Concerning indoor fungal characterization, the prevalent genera were Penicillium (41%) and Aspergillus (24%). Regular monitoring is essential for assessing air control efficiency and for detecting irregular introduction of airborne particles via clothing of visitors and medical staff or carriage by personal and medical materials. Furthermore, microbiological survey data should be used to clearly define specific air quality guidelines for controlled environments in hospital settings. PMID:25869221

  7. Patient satisfaction and quality in home health care of elderly islanders.

    PubMed

    Nadarevi?-Stefanec, Vesna; Malatestini?, Dulija; Mataija-Redzovi?, Andrea; Nadarevi?, Tin

    2011-09-01

    Patient satisfaction has been a widely investigated subject in health care research. Quality of care from the patient perspective, especially in home health care, however has been investigated only very recently. Home health care is a system of care provided by skilled practitioners to patients in their homes under the direction of a physician. Multidisciplinary nature of home health care services present challenges to quality measurement that differ from those found in a more traditional hospital settings. The aim of the study was to investigate the satisfaction of elderly patients living on islands with home health care. Participants receiving skilled nursing care in their homes, for any diagnosis, who met selection criteria, were surveyed about their perception of the quality of health care. The research was conducted during the year 2010 among the residents of Kvarnerian islands (Krk, Cres and Mali Losinj) under the authority of Croatian Institute for Health Insurance that approved the protocols employed in the investigation. Most older patients (96.2%) reported high levels of satisfaction with health services delivery. Common leading diagnosis among home health care patient include diseases of circulatory system (28.9% of patients), nutritional and metabolic disease (14.5%), malignant diseases (13.2%), musculoskeletal and connective tissue disease (11.8%), diseases of the nervous system (9.2%), followed by injury and poisoning (7.9%). Provision of home health care was well received by elderly patients. Home health care providers seek to provide high quality, safe care in ways that honour patient autonomy and accommodate the individual characteristics of each patients home and family. The demographics of an aging society will sustain the trend towards home-based care. Therefore, research on effective practices, conducted in home health care settings, is necessary to support excellent and evidence-based care. PMID:22220438

  8. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  9. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  10. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  11. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  12. Effects of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly on Hospital Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meret-Hanke, Louise A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study evaluates the effects of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) on hospital use. PACE's capitated financing creates incentives to reduce the use of costly services. Furthermore, its emphasis on preventative care and regular monitoring by provides a mechanism for reducing unnecessary hospital use…

  13. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  14. Are patients admitted to hospitals from care homes dehydrated? A retrospective analysis of hypernatraemia and in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Anthony; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare risks of hypernatraemia on admission to hospital in persons who were with those who were not identified as care home residents and evaluate the association of hypernatraemia with in-hospital mortality. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A National Health Service Trust in London. Participants A total of 21,610 patients aged over 65 years whose first admission to the Trust was between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Main outcome measures Hypernatraemia on admission (plasma Na?>?145?mmol/L) and in-hospital death. Results Patients admitted from care homes had 10-fold higher prevalence of hypernatraemia than those from their own homes (12.0% versus 1.3%, respectively; odds ratio [OR]: 10.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.43–13.0). Of those with hypernatraemia, nine in 10 cases were associated with nursing home ECOHOST residency (attributable fraction exposure: 90.5%), and the population attributable fraction of hypernatraemia on admission associated with care homes was 36.0%. After correcting for age, gender, mode of admission and dementia, care home residents were significantly more likely to be admitted with hypernatraemia than were own-home residents (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 5.32, 95% CI: 3.85–7.37). Compared with own-home residents, care home residents were also at about a two-fold higher risk of in-hospital mortality compared with non-care home residents (AOR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.59–2.45). Consistent with evidence that hypernatraemia is implicated in higher mortality, the association of nursing homes with in-hospital mortality was attenuated after adjustment for it (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.26–2.06). Conclusions Patients admitted to hospital from care homes are commonly dehydrated on admission and, as a result, appear to experience significantly greater risks of in-hospital mortality. PMID:25592963

  15. Determinants of patient satisfaction with hospital health care in psychiatry: results based on the SATISPSY-22 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Zendjidjian, Xavier Y; Auquier, Pascal; Lançon, Christophe; Loundou, Anderson; Parola, Nathalie; Faugère, Melanie; Boyer, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to identify patient- and care-related factors that are associated with patients’ satisfaction with psychiatric hospital care, using a specific, self-administered questionnaire based exclusively on the patient’s point of view: the Satisfaction with Psychiatry Care Questionnaire-22 (SATISPSY-22). Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the psychiatric departments of two French public university teaching hospitals. The data collected included sociodemographic information, clinical characteristics, care characteristics, and the SATISPSY-22. A multivariate analysis using multiple linear regressions was performed to determine the variables potentially associated with satisfaction levels. Results Two hundred seventy patients were enrolled in our study. Only one moderate association was found between satisfaction and sociodemographic characteristics: the personal experience dimension with age (?=0.15). Clinical improvement was moderately associated with higher global satisfaction (?=?0.15), higher satisfaction with quality of care (?=?0.19), and higher satisfaction with food (?=?0.18). Stronger associations with satisfaction were found for care characteristics, particularly the therapeutic alliance with all of the satisfaction dimensions (?, 0.20–0.43) except food, and for seclusion with global satisfaction (?=?0.33) and personal experience (?=?0.32). Patients with previous hospitalization also had a higher level of satisfaction with quality of care compared with patients who were admitted for the first time (?=?0.15). Conclusion This study has identified a number of potential determinants of satisfaction. The therapeutic relationship and seclusion were the most important features associated with a patient’s satisfaction. These factors might be amenable through intervention, which, in turn, might be expected to improve satisfaction, patients’ management, and health outcomes in psychiatric hospitals. PMID:25368515

  16. A typology for legal risk management in patient care in Australian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Newby, L

    1996-01-01

    The author reviewed the literature on legal risk management in patient care, and carried out research in two acute care hospitals. The hospital research involved auditing policies and procedures, interviewing key people in the hospital, reviewing external legal and policy trends, and examining selected complaints files and legal cases. The results were used to develop a 'typology' of legal risk management to provide guidelines and assistance to hospital management in improving their hospital's strategic response to legal vulnerability. The model sets out four levels of legal risk management programs, and identifies specific components classified as promoting loss prevention, or loss minimisation. PMID:10165291

  17. Service Quality of Delivered Care from the Perception of Women with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Jafar S.; Askari, Samira; Fardiazar, Zahra; Koshavar, Hossein; Gholipour, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 – (Importance × Performance) based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women’s perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. Results: “Confidentiality”, “autonomy”, “choice of care provider” and “communication” achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and “support group”, “prompt attention”, “prevention and early detection”, “continuity of care”, “dignity”, “safety”, “accessibility and “basic amenities” got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008). Conclusion: A notable gap between the participants? expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care. PMID:25650105

  18. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  19. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  20. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  1. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  2. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  3. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  4. Managing risk, clinical error, and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Milne, J Kenneth

    2002-09-01

    Clinical risk presents enormous challenges for the health profession and governments. Despite excellent national and regional programs focused on the management of obstetrical conditions and prevention of newborn injury, an environment of clinical error persists; according to Canadian Medical Protective Association data, each year 6% of Canadian obstetricians face a legal challenge, with most cases also involving nurses and hospitals. Principles and lessons learned from risk management developed in high reliability organizations (HROs), such as air traffic controllers and nuclear power plants, can be applied to risk management in perinatal/obstetrical units. In 2002, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada will launch an obstetrical risk management program called "Managing Obstetrical Risk Efficiently" (MORE), integrating labour and delivery clinical core content with HRO principles and reflective learning and practice modification tools designed to help all obstetrical caregivers build and maintain confidence and competency, improve patient safety and quality of care, and reduce clinical error and adverse events. PMID:12360367

  5. 38 CFR 52.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality of care. 52.120 Section 52.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.120 Quality of care. Each participant must receive, and the...

  6. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality of care. 51.120 Section 51.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each...

  7. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quality of care. 51.120 Section 51.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each resident must receive and the facility management...

  8. Differential Susceptibility to Parenting and Quality Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Research on differential susceptibility to rearing suggests that infants with difficult temperaments are disproportionately affected by parenting and child care quality, but a major U.S. child care study raises questions as to whether quality of care influences social adjustment. One thousand three hundred sixty-four American children from…

  9. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality of care. 483.25 Section 483.25 Public... Care Facilities § 483.25 Quality of care. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the... education regarding the benefits and potential side effects of the immunization; (ii) Each resident...

  10. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality of care. 483.25 Section 483.25 Public... Care Facilities § 483.25 Quality of care. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the... education regarding the benefits and potential side effects of the immunization; (ii) Each resident...

  11. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality of care. 483.25 Section 483.25 Public... Care Facilities § 483.25 Quality of care. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the... education regarding the benefits and potential side effects of the immunization; (ii) Each resident...

  12. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality of care. 483.25 Section 483.25 Public... Care Facilities § 483.25 Quality of care. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the... education regarding the benefits and potential side effects of the immunization; (ii) Each resident...

  13. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality of care. 483.25 Section 483.25 Public... Care Facilities § 483.25 Quality of care. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the... education regarding the benefits and potential side effects of the immunization; (ii) Each resident...

  14. Quality of Health Care PH/ISyE 703

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Quality of Health Care PH/ISyE 703 Spring 2009 Tuesday 4:30 p.m. ­ 7 p.m. Room 758 WARF Building) The final group poster and presentation is an analysis of an attempt to improve the quality of health care academic disciplines (i.e., 1 health care student paired with 1 engineering student). During class

  15. Multi-hospital Community NICU Quality Improvement Improves Survival of ELBW Infants.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jack D; Soltau, Thomas; McCaughn, Danny; Miller, Jason; O'Mara, Patrick; Robbins, Kenny; Temple, David M; Wender, David F

    2015-08-01

    Quality improvement or high reliability in medicine is an evolving science where we seek to integrate evidence-based medicine, structural resources, process management, leadership models, culture, and education. Newborn Associates is a community-based neonatology practice that staffs and manages neonatal intensive care units (NICU's) at Central Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, River Oaks Hospital, St Dominic's Hospital and Woman's Hospital within the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. These hospitals participate in the Vermont-Oxford Neonatal Network (VON), which is a voluntary national network of about 1000 NICU groups that submit data allowing them to benchmark their patient outcome. This network currently holds data on 1.5 million infants. Participation may also include the Newborn Improvement Quality Collaborative (NICQ) which is an intensive quality improvement program where 40-60 of the almost 1000 VON centers participate each year or the iNICQ, which is an internet-based collaborative involving about 150 centers per year. From 2008-2009, our group concentrated efforts on quality improvement which included consolidating resources of three corporately managed hospitals to allow focused care of babies under 800-1000 grams at a single center, expanding participation in the VON NICQ to include all physicians and centers, and establishing a group QI focused committee aimed at sharing practice bundles and adopting quality improvement methodology. The goal of this article is to report the impact of these QI activities on survival of the smallest preterm infants who weigh less than 1500 grams at birth. Two epochs were compared: 2006-2009, and 2010-2013. 551 VLBW (< 1 500 grams) infants from epoch I were compared to 583 VLBW infants from epoch 2. Mortality in this group decreased from 18% to 11.1% (OR 0.62,95% CI 0.44-0.88). Mortality in the 501-750 grams birth weight category decreased from 45.7% to 18% (OR 0.39,95% CI 0.21-0.74). Improved survival was noted in all centers over the time period. These findings suggest that a physician-driven, multidisciplinary, individualized and multifactorial quality improvement effort can positively impact the care of extremely preterm infants in the community NICU setting. PMID:26521537

  16. The Spillover Effects of Medicare Managed Care: Medicare Advantage and Hospital Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Baicker, Katherine; Chernew, Michael; Robbins, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    More than a quarter of Medicare beneficiaries are enrolled in Medicare Advantage, which was created in large part to improve the efficiency of health care delivery by promoting competition among private managed care plans. This paper explores the spillover effects of the Medicare Advantage program on the traditional Medicare program and other patients, taking advantage of changes in Medicare Advantage payment policy to isolate exogenous increases in Medicare Advantage enrollment and trace out the effects of greater managed care penetration on hospital utilization and spending throughout the health care system. We find that when more seniors enroll in Medicare managed care, hospital costs decline for all seniors and for commercially insured younger populations. Greater managed care penetration is not associated with fewer hospitalizations, but is associated with lower costs and shorter stays per hospitalization. These spillovers are substantial – offsetting more than 10% of increased payments to Medicare Advantage plans. PMID:24308880

  17. Cultural diversity between hospital and community nurses: implications for continuity of care

    PubMed Central

    Hellesø, Ragnhild; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Health care systems and nurses need to take into account the increasing number of people who need post-hospital nursing care in their homes. Nurses have taken a pivotal role in discharge planning for frail patients. Despite considerable effort and focus on how to undertake hospital discharge successfully, the problem of ensuring continuity of care remains. Challenges In this paper, we highlight and discuss three challenges that seem to be insufficiently articulated when hospital and community nurses interact during discharge planning. These three challenges are: how local practices circumvent formal structures, how nurses' different perspectives influence their assessment of patients' need for post-hospital care, and how nurses have different understanding of what it means to be ‘ready to be discharged’. Discussion We propose that nurses need to discuss these challenges and their implications for nursing care so as to be ready to face changing demands for health care in future. PMID:20422021

  18. Health care professionals’ pain narratives in hospitalized children’s medical records. Part 1: Pain descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Rashotte, Judy; Coburn, Geraldine; Harrison, Denise; Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Abbott, Laura K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although documentation of children’s pain by health care professionals is frequently undertaken, few studies have explored the nature of the language used to describe pain in the medical records of hospitalized children. OBJECTIVES: To describe health care professionals’ use of written language related to the quality and quantity of pain experienced by hospitalized children. METHODS: Free-text pain narratives documented during a 24 h period were collected from the medical records of 3822 children (0 to 18 years of age) hospitalized on 32 inpatient units in eight Canadian pediatric hospitals. A qualitative descriptive exploration using a content analysis approach was used. RESULTS: Pain narratives were documented a total of 5390 times in 1518 of the 3822 children’s medical records (40%). Overall, word choices represented objective and subjective descriptors. Two major categories were identified, with their respective subcategories of word indicators and associated cues: indicators of pain, including behavioural (eg, vocal, motor, facial and activities cues), affective and physiological cues, and children’s descriptors; and word qualifiers, including intensity, comparator and temporal qualifiers. CONCLUSIONS: The richness and complexity of vocabulary used by clinicians to document children’s pain lend support to the concept that the word ‘pain’ is a label that represents a myriad of different experiences. There is potential to refine pediatric pain assessment measures to be inclusive of other cues used to identify children’s pain. The results enhance the discussion concerning the development of standardized nomenclature. Further research is warranted to determine whether there is congruence in interpretation across time, place and individuals. PMID:24093122

  19. Spectrum of Oral Lesions in A Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashok; Kumar, Parbodh

    2015-01-01

    Aim The present study was undertaken to study the spectrum and pattern of various oral cavity lesions in a tertiary care hospital in Rohilkhand region of Uttar Pradesh, India. Background Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for tumour and tumour like lesions especially in males. It has been observed that benign lesions are more common than malignant ones. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital during the period of two years from June 2012 to May 2014. The study included 133 cases of oral cavity lesions. The parameters included in the study were age, gender, site of the lesion and histopathological diagnosis. Special stains and Immunohistochemical markers were applied as and when required. Data collected were analysed. Results A total of 133 cases were included in the present study. The age ranged from 8 to 80 years. Males were affected more often than females with a Male: Female ratio of 3.3:1. The most common involved site was tongue 39 (29.32%) followed by tonsil in 30 (22.56%), buccal mucosa 27(20.32%), floor of mouth 14 (10.53%), palate 12(9.02%), lower lip 8 (6.02%), upper lip 2(1.50%) and vestibule in 1 (0.75%) cases. Of the 133 cases, 63 cases (47.36%) were malignant, 52 non-neoplastic (39.10%) and 18 cases (13.53%) of benign neoplasias. The various lesions included - Squamous cell carcinoma, Verrucous carcinoma, Carcinoma-in-situ, Leukoplakia, Fibroma, Lipoma, Squamous cell papilloma, Lymphoid hyperplasia, Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, Haemangioma, Schwannoma, Atypical Pleomor -phic adenoma, Pleomorphic adenoma, Epidermal cyst, Retention cyst, Parasitic infestation, Tubercular pathology, Granulation tissue, Chronic Sialadenitis and Chronic non-specific inflammatory pathology. A larger epidemiopathological study in this region needs to be carried out for detailed statistical analysis. Conclusion Benign lesions were the predominant pathology. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest malignant lesion. Histopathological typing of the lesion is mandatory to confirm or rule out malignancy and is essential for the rational management thus avoiding mutilating surgery. PMID:26266127

  20. Sustainable development and quality health care.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    On the occasion of Development Week in Canada, Dr. Remi Sogunro spoke in February, 1994, about the many achievements of quality primary health care and PLAN's strategy to achieve sustainability. In one generation, under-5 mortality has been cut by a third. Deaths from measles has been reduced from 2.5 million to 1 million a year. Skeletal deformities from polio also have been reduced from 1/2 million to less than 140,000. Despite all this, there is much more to be attained. 35,000 children under 5 die from preventable diseases every day in developing countries. The health community is working hard to address these silent emergencies. PLAN International's primary health care program targets the poor and undeserved populations where diseases are prevalent. The main focus of PLAN's programs are mothers and children who are most vulnerable to disease. Key interventions that PLAN gives priority to are childhood and maternal immunization programs, including pre- and post-natal care for mothers. Other interventions under PLAN's comprehensive primary health care program include: control of diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections, growth monitoring, nutrition and control of STDs and HIV/AIDS infection, water and sanitation, family planning information and educational services, and rehabilitation of the handicapped. "Go in search of people, begin with what they know, build on what they have," goes a Chinese proverb. This also summarizes PLAN's guiding principle for achieving sustainable development: the importance of investing in people. PLAN's programs in the field build partnerships and empower communities. PLAN's emphasis on institution-building and capacity-building with local institutions is an important part of organizational strategy to ensure sustained development. PMID:12179549

  1. Distinct enough? A national examination of Catholic hospital affiliation and patient perceptions of care

    PubMed Central

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Melendez-Torres, G.J.; McHugh, Matthew D.; Wall, Barbra Mann

    2014-01-01

    Background Catholic hospitals play a critical role in the provision of health care in the United States; yet, empirical evidence of patient outcomes in these institutions is practically absent in the literature. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether patient perceptions of care are more favorable in Catholic hospitals as compared with non-Catholic hospitals in a national sample of hospitals. Methodology This cross-sectional secondary analysis used linked data from the 2008 American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the 2008 Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, the 2008 Medicare Case Mix Index file, and the 2010 Religious Congregations and Membership Study. The study included over 3,400 hospitals nationwide, including 494 Catholic hospitals. Propensity score matching and ordinary least-squares regression models were used to examine the relationship between Catholic affiliation and various HCAHPS measures. Findings Our findings revealed that patients treated in Catholic hospitals appear to rate their hospital experience similar to patients treated in non-Catholic hospitals. Catholic hospitals maintain a very slight advantage above their non-Catholic peers on five HCAHPS measures related to nurse communication, receipt of discharge information, quietness of the room at night, overall rating, and recommendation of the hospital; yet, these differences were minimal. Practice Implications If the survival of Catholic health care services is contingent upon how its provision of care is distinct, administrators of Catholic hospitals must show differences more clearly. Given the great importance of Catholic hospitals to the health of millions of patients in the United States, this study provides Catholic hospitals with a set of targeted areas on which to focus improvement efforts, especially in light of current pay-for-performance initiatives. PMID:23493045

  2. Child Care in the American South: Poverty, Costs, and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Vikki K.

    2012-01-01

    High-quality child care has been shown to improve the academic success and life adjustments of children living in poverty. During the past decade, many American states have adopted voluntary Quality Rating and Improvement (QRI) systems in an attempt to increase the level of quality in child care. Using data compiled by the National Association of…

  3. Evaluating the Quality of the Child Care in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hujala, Eeva; Fonsen, Elina; Elo, Janniina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of the early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality in Finland. The study is based on the paradigm of inclusionary quality and the assessment is based on the quality evaluation model. The parents and teachers assess the quality to be good. The strength of the quality was the effect…

  4. 38 CFR 17.44 - Hospital care for certain retirees with chronic disability (Executive Orders 10122, 10400 and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.44 Hospital care for certain retirees...diseases shall include chronic arthritis, malignancy, psychiatric disorders, poliomyelitis with residuals,...

  5. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. PMID:25533732

  6. Deepening our Understanding of Quality in Australia (DUQuA): a study protocol for a nationwide, multilevel analysis of relationships between hospital quality management systems and patient factors

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie; Clay-Williams, Robyn; Hogden, Emily; Pye, Victoria; Li, Zhicheng; Groene, Oliver; Suñol, Rosa; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the growing body of research on quality and safety in healthcare, there is little evidence of the association between the way hospitals are organised for quality and patient factors, limiting our understanding of how to effect large-scale change. The ‘Deepening our Understanding of Quality in Australia’ (DUQuA) study aims to measure and examine relationships between (1) organisation and department-level quality management systems (QMS), clinician leadership and culture, and (2) clinical treatment processes, clinical outcomes and patient-reported perceptions of care within Australian hospitals. Methods and analysis The DUQuA project is a national, multilevel, cross-sectional study with data collection at organisation (hospital), department, professional and patient levels. Sample size calculations indicate a minimum of 43 hospitals are required to adequately power the study. To allow for rejection and attrition, 70 hospitals across all Australian jurisdictions that meet the inclusion criteria will be invited to participate. Participants will consist of hospital quality management professionals; clinicians; and patients with stroke, acute myocardial infarction and hip fracture. Organisation and department-level QMS, clinician leadership and culture, patient perceptions of safety, clinical treatment processes, and patient outcomes will be assessed using validated, evidence-based or consensus-based measurement tools. Data analysis will consist of simple correlations, linear and logistic regression and multilevel modelling. Multilevel modelling methods will enable identification of the amount of variation in outcomes attributed to the hospital and department levels, and the factors contributing to this variation. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained. Results will be disseminated to individual hospitals in de-identified national and international benchmarking reports with data-driven recommendations. This ground-breaking national study has the potential to influence decision-making on the implementation of quality and safety systems and processes in Australian and international hospitals. PMID:26644128

  7. [Organization of clinical care of North Fleet hospitals in XVIII century].

    PubMed

    Kostiuk, A V

    2013-02-01

    Clinical care of national navy hospitals was normed from reception of patients till hospital discharge. After admission to the hospital, patient got competent medical care and corresponding attendance. But the situation changed in XVIII century, period of wars. In conditions of war time hospitals were overcrowded with patients and wounded. The number of patients went beyond the bedspace. Deficit of vacant beds was supplied with the help of additional beds; deficit of medical staff was supplied with the help of participation of another medial staff. Huge number of patients with different diseases, including contagious diseases, conduced communication of contagious diseases inside the hospital. Diagnostics and methods of treatment of these diseases were not enough researched. Taking into account results of statistical analysis of data about the number of fatality cases (peace time--4-10%, war time--20%), we can make a conclusion that clinical care of national navy hospitals was satisfying. PMID:23808206

  8. Shifting hospital-hospice boundaries: historical perspectives on the institutional care of the dying.

    PubMed

    Risse, Guenter B; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Social forces have continually framed how hospitals perceive their role in care of the dying. Hospitals were originally conceived as places of hospitality and spiritual care, but by the 18th century illness was an opponent, conquered through science. Medicalization transformed hospitals to places of physical cure and scientific prowess. Death was an institutional liability. Equipped with new technologies, increased public demand, and the establishment of Medicare in 1965, modern hospitals became the most likely place for Americans to die--increasing after the 1940s and spiking in the 1990s. Medicare's 1983 hospice benefit began to reverse this trend. Palliative care has more recently proliferated, suggesting an institutional shift of alignment with traditional functions of care toward those facing death. PMID:22777407

  9. The role of Medicaid in promoting access to high-quality, high-value maternity care.

    PubMed

    Markus, Anne Rossier; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2010-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of health care improvement and reform is ensuring that individuals, particularly those who are vulnerable and low income, have access to care. Just as challenging is the imperative to ensure that the care accessed is of the highest quality possible. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, identified the primary goal of any high-quality heath care system: The ability to furnish the right care, in the right setting, at the right time. This aim must also be the primary goal of Medicaid in regard to providing access to high-quality care for women throughout the reproductive cycle. Nationwide, Medicaid is a large purchaser of maternity care; in 2006, the program paid for 43% of all births and maternity costs represented 29% of all hospital charges to Medicaid. Under current federal law, state Medicaid agencies have to fulfill several obligations related to assessing, ensuring, and improving the quality of care, particularly for enrollees who receive services through managed care arrangements. The main purpose of this article is to analyze and describe the role of Medicaid in facilitating access to care for pregnant women and ensuring high-quality maternity care that is affordable. It first summarizes the federal Medicaid requirements regarding eligibility, coverage of benefits, financing, and service delivery, with a special emphasis on existing quality provisions. Then, it discusses current issues and recommends several Medicaid reforms, particularly in the area of quality assessment and improvement. All reforms, including Medicaid reforms, should seek to support the IOM-identified aims. Much of the emphasis in Medicaid policy development has been focused on access to care and great need for reform remains in the area of quality assurance and improvement, and disparity reduction because the program can play a significant role in this regard as well. More broadly, health care reform may provide an opportunity to revisit key issues around access to and quality of maternity care, including the benefit package, the content of services covered in the package, the frequency with which these services should be furnished, and the development of meaningful measures to capture whether women of childbearing age, including pregnant women, regardless of insurance status, indeed receive efficient, timely, effective, safe, accessible, and woman-centered maternity care. PMID:20123184

  10. Telephone calls to patients after discharge from the hospital: an important part of transitions of care

    PubMed Central

    Record, Janet D.; Niranjan-Azadi, Ashwini; Christmas, Colleen; Hanyok, Laura A.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Hellmann, David B.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Teaching interns patient-centered communication skills, including making structured telephone calls to patients following discharge, may improve transitions of care. Objective To explore associations between a patient-centered care (PCC) curriculum and patients’ perspectives of the quality of transitional care. Methods We implemented a novel PCC curriculum on one of four inpatient general medicine resident teaching teams in which interns make post-discharge telephone calls to patients, contact outpatient providers, perform medication adherence reviews, and engage in patient-centered discharge planning. Between July and November of 2011, we conducted telephone surveys of patients from all four teaching teams within 30 days of discharge. In addition to asking if patients received a call from their hospital physician (intern), we administered the 3-Item Care Transitions Measure (CTM-3), which assesses patients’ perceptions of preparedness for the transition from hospital to home (possible score range 0–100). Results The CTM-3 scores (mean±SD) of PCC team patients and standard team patients were not significantly different (82.4±17.3 vs. 79.6±17.6, p=0.53). However, regardless of team assignment, patients who reported receiving a post-discharge telephone call had significantly higher CTM-3 scores than those who did not (84.7±16.0 vs. 78.2±17.4, p=0.03). Interns exposed to the PCC curriculum called their patients after discharge more often than interns never exposed (OR=2.78, 95% CI [1.25, 6.18], p=0.013). Conclusions The post-discharge telephone call, one element of PCC, was associated with higher CTM-3 scores – which, in turn, have been shown to lessen patients’ risk of emergency department visits within 30 days of discharge. PMID:25933623

  11. 38 CFR 17.55 - Payment for authorized public or private hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...another facility before completion of care, VA shall pay the transferring hospital...the HCFA PRICER for each patient day of care, not to exceed the full DRG rate...receive a payment for each patient day of care not to exceed the amount...

  12. 38 CFR 17.55 - Payment for authorized public or private hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...another facility before completion of care, VA shall pay the transferring hospital...the HCFA PRICER for each patient day of care, not to exceed the full DRG rate...receive a payment for each patient day of care not to exceed the amount...

  13. 38 CFR 17.55 - Payment for authorized public or private hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...another facility before completion of care, VA shall pay the transferring hospital...the HCFA PRICER for each patient day of care, not to exceed the full DRG rate...receive a payment for each patient day of care not to exceed the amount...

  14. 38 CFR 17.55 - Payment for authorized public or private hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...another facility before completion of care, VA shall pay the transferring hospital...the HCFA PRICER for each patient day of care, not to exceed the full DRG rate...receive a payment for each patient day of care not to exceed the amount...

  15. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...keep the hospital or health care facility in operation...interest rate in effect on community and business programs...facility continuing to offer health care services which may...the projected amount of funds anticipated to be spent...would be for smaller health care facilities...

  16. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. Results: The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%), pharmacopoeia availability (92%), equipment calibration (87%) and identifying responsibilities (86%). Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%). The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%), pharmacies, blood bank services (83%) reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%). There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO) and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. Conclusion: There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits) can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA strategies in practice, and the application of these strategies in outpatient DCSS units require further policy attention.

  17. Priority Queuing Models for Hospital Intensive Care Units and Impacts to Severe Case Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Matthew S.; Jopling, Jeffrey K; Buchman, Timothy G; Lee, Eva K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines several different queuing models for intensive care units (ICU) and the effects on wait times, utilization, return rates, mortalities, and number of patients served. Five separate intensive care units at an urban hospital are analyzed and distributions are fitted for arrivals and service durations. A system-based simulation model is built to capture all possible cases of patient flow after ICU admission. These include mortalities and returns before and after hospital exits. Patients are grouped into 9 different classes that are categorized by severity and length of stay (LOS). Each queuing model varies by the policies that are permitted and by the order the patients are admitted. The first set of models does not prioritize patients, but examines the advantages of smoothing the operating schedule for elective surgeries. The second set analyzes the differences between prioritizing admissions by expected LOS or patient severity. The last set permits early ICU discharges and conservative and aggressive bumping policies are contrasted. It was found that prioritizing patients by severity considerably reduced delays for critical cases, but also increased the average waiting time for all patients. Aggressive bumping significantly raised the return and mortality rates, but more conservative methods balance quality and efficiency with lowered wait times without serious consequences. PMID:24551379

  18. Palliative care need and management in the acute hospital setting: a census of one New Zealand Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving palliative care management in acute hospital settings has been identified as a priority internationally. The aim of this study was to establish the proportion of inpatients within one acute hospital in New Zealand who meet prognostic criteria for palliative care need and explore key aspects of their management. Methods A prospective survey of adult hospital inpatients (n = 501) was undertaken. Case notes were examined for evidence that the patient might be in their last year of life according to Gold Standards Framework (GSF) prognostic indicator criteria. For patients who met GSF criteria, clinical and socio-demographic information were recorded. Results Ninety-nine inpatients met GSF criteria, representing 19.8% of the total census population. The patients’ average age was 70 years; 47% had a primary diagnosis of cancer. Two thirds had died within 6 months of their admission. Seventy-eight of the 99 cases demonstrated evidence that a palliative approach to care had been adopted; however documentation of discussion about goals of care was very limited and only one patient had evidence of an advance care plan. Conclusion One fifth of hospital inpatients met criteria for palliative care need, the majority of whom were aged >70 years. Whilst over three quarters were concluded to be receiving care in line with a palliative care approach, very little documented evidence of discussion with patients and families regarding end of life issues was evident. Future research needs to explore how best to support ‘generalist’ palliative care providers in initiating, and appropriately recording, such discussions. PMID:23537092

  19. TITLE: Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock Alexandra Ortego, B.A.1

    E-print Network

    Small, Dylan

    TITLE: Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock Authors: Alexandra Ortego, B.A.1 about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design: Retrospective cohort

  20. A longitudinal, multi-level comparative study of quality and safety in European hospitals: the QUASER study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background although there is a wealth of information available about quality improvement tools and techniques in healthcare there is little understanding about overcoming the challenges of day-to-day implementation in complex organisations like hospitals. The 'Quality and Safety in Europe by Research' (QUASER) study will investigate how hospitals implement, spread and sustain quality improvement, including the difficulties they face and how they overcome them. The overall aim of the study is to explore relationships between the organisational and cultural characteristics of hospitals and how these impact on the quality of health care; the findings will be designed to help policy makers, payers and hospital managers understand the factors and processes that enable hospitals in Europe to achieve-and sustain-high quality services for their patients. Methods/design in-depth multi-level (macro, meso and micro-system) analysis of healthcare quality policies and practices in 5 European countries, including longitudinal case studies in a purposive sample of 10 hospitals. The project design has three major features: • a working definition of quality comprising three components: clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient experience • a conceptualisation of quality as a human, social, technical and organisational accomplishment • an emphasis on translational research that is evidence-based and seeks to provide strategic and practical guidance for hospital practitioners and health care policy makers in the European Union. Throughout the study we will adopt a mixed methods approach, including qualitative (in-depth, narrative-based, ethnographic case studies using interviews, and direct non-participant observation of organisational processes) and quantitative research (secondary analysis of safety and quality data, for example: adverse incident reporting; patient complaints and claims). Discussion the protocol is based on the premise that future research, policy and practice need to address the sociology of improvement in equal measure to the science and technique of improvement, or at least expand the discipline of improvement to include these critical organisational and cultural processes. We define the 'organisational and cultural characteristics associated with better quality of care' in a broad sense that encompasses all the features of a hospital that might be hypothesised to impact upon clinical effectiveness, patient safety and/or patient experience. PMID:22029712

  1. Strategies for Reducing Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Tobias; Campbell, Stephen M.; Geissler, Stefan; Kunz, Cornelia U.; Mahler, Cornelia; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Hospitalizations for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex causality of such hospitalizations from the perspective of primary care physicians. METHODS We conducted semistructured interviews with 12 primary care physicians from 10 primary care clinics in Germany regarding 104 hospitalizations of 81 patients with ACSCs at high risk of rehospitalization. RESULTS Participating physicians rated 43 (41%) of the 104 hospitalizations to be potentially avoidable. During the interviews the cause of hospitalization fell into 5 principal categories: system related (eg, unavailability of ambulatory services), physician related (eg, suboptimal monitoring), medical (eg, medication side effects), patient related (eg, delayed help-seeking), and social (eg, lack of social support). Subcategories frequently associated with physicians’ rating of hospitalizations for ACSCs as potentially avoidable were after-hours absence of the treating physician, failure to use ambulatory services, suboptimal monitoring, patients’ fearfulness, cultural background and insufficient language skills of patients, medication errors, medication nonadherence, and overprotective caregivers. Comorbidities and medical emergencies were frequent causes attributed to ACSC-based hospitalizations that were rated as being unavoidable. CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians rated a significant proportion of hospitalizations for ACSCs to be potentially avoidable. Strategies to avoid these hospitalizations may target after-hours care, optimal use of ambulatory services, intensified monitoring of high-risk patients, and initiatives to improve patients’ willingness and ability to seek timely help, as well as patients’ medication adherence. PMID:23835823

  2. The impact of critical total quality management practices on hospital performance in the ministry of health hospitals in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Alaraki, Mohammad Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) offers a method for solving quality and patient safety problems and bringing significant improvement to hospital performance. However, only few studies have been conducted in this area in developing countries, particularly in Saudi Arabia. This research is carried out in an attempt to address this gap, exploring the impact of applying TQM practices on hospital performance in the Saudi Ministry of Health hospitals. The study has included 4 hospitals in Tabuk Region, namely, King Khaled Hospital, King Fahad Hospital, Maternity and Children Hospital, and Hagel General Hospital. The data collection was done by the researcher when 400 questionnaires were distributed using a convenient sampling technique to access the required data. The response rate was 67.25% of the total questionnaires distributed. The TQM practices used in the study were as follows: leadership, employee management, information analysis, training, customer focus, continuous improvement, process management, and supplier management. The findings of the research show a significant positive correlation between the 8 practices of TQM and hospital performance with a correlation coefficient r value of 0.9 (P = .0001). The study also reveals that Saudi hospitals are facing difficulties in engaging the clinical staff in their quality initiative. Moreover, our findings show that accredited hospitals have significantly applied TQM practices more than unaccredited hospitals. PMID:24368721

  3. 42 CFR 413.114 - Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital... § 413.114 Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital...which provides for payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by rural hospitals and...

  4. 42 CFR 413.114 - Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital... § 413.114 Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital...which provides for payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by rural hospitals and...

  5. 42 CFR 413.114 - Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital... § 413.114 Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital...which provides for payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by rural hospitals and...

  6. 42 CFR 413.114 - Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital... § 413.114 Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital...which provides for payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by rural hospitals and...

  7. 42 CFR 413.114 - Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital... § 413.114 Payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by a swing-bed hospital...which provides for payment for posthospital SNF care furnished by rural hospitals and...

  8. An exploration of the leadership attributes and methods associated with successful lean system deployments in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Steed, Airica

    2012-01-01

    The lean system has been shown to be a viable and sustainable solution for the growing number of cost, quality, and efficiency issues in the health care industry. While there is a growing body of evidence to support the outcomes that can be achieved as a result of the successful application of the lean system in hospital organizations, there is not a complete understanding of the leadership attributes and methods that are necessary to achieve successful widespread mobilization and sustainment. This study was an exploration of leadership and its relevant association with successful lean system deployments in acute care hospitals. This research employed an exploratory qualitative research design encompassing a research questionnaire and telephonic interviews of 25 health care leaders in 8 hospital organizations across the United States. The results from this study identified the need to have a strong combination of personal characteristics, learned behaviors, strategies, tools, and tactics that evolved into a starting adaptable framework for health care leaders to leverage when starting their own transformational change journeys using the lean system. Health care leaders could utilize the outcomes reported in this study as a conduit to enhance the effective deployment, widespread adoption, and sustainment of the lean system in practice. PMID:22207019

  9. The legal duty of physicians and hospitals to provide emergency care

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anne F.

    2002-01-01

    ACCESSIBILITY OF HOSPITAL EMERGENCY SERVICES HAS BEEN an issue of increasing concern and was recently brought into public focus in Ontario by the tragic death of Joshua Fleuelling, whose ambulance was redirected from the nearest hospital. As will be reviewed, the limited case law has identified a legal duty for physicians and hospitals to provide treatment to people in need of emergency care, a duty that should be considered when formulating hospital policies. The impact of this duty of care on the existing standard of medical practice will be considered. PMID:11873926

  10. The association between managed care enrollments and potentially preventable hospitalization among adult Medicaid recipients in Florida

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The intent of adopting managed care plans is to improve access to health care services while containing costs. To date, there have been a number of studies that examine the relationship between managed care and access to health care. However, the results from previous studies have been inconsistent. Specifically, previous studies did not demonstrate a clear benefit of Medicaid managed care. In this study we have examine whether Medicaid managed care is associated with the probabilities of preventable hospitalizations. This study also analyzes the spillover effect of Medicaid managed care into Medicaid patients in traditional FFS plans and the interaction effects of other patient- and county-level variables on preventable hospitalizations. Methods The study included 254,321 Medicaid patients who were admitted to short-term general hospital in the 67 counties in Florida. Using 2008 hospital inpatient discharge data for working-age adult Medicaid enrollees (18-64 years) in Florida, we conduct multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify possible factors associated with preventable hospitalizations. The first model includes patient- and county-level variables. Then, we add interaction terms between Medicaid HMO and other variables such as race, rurality, market-level factors, and resource for primary care. Results The results show that Medicaid HMO patients are more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (OR?=?1.30; CI?=?1.21, 1.40). We also find that market structure (i.e., competition) is significantly associated with preventable hospitalizations. However, our study does not support that there are spillover effects of Medicaid managed care on preventable hospitalizations for other Medicaid recipients. We find that interactions between Medicaid managed care and race, rurality and market structure are significant. Conclusions The results of our study show that the Medicaid managed care program in Florida was associated with an increase in potentially preventable hospitalizations for Medicaid enrollees. The results suggest that lower capitation rate has been associated with a greater likelihood of preventable hospitalizations for Medicaid managed care patients. Our findings also indicate that increased competition in the Medicaid managed care market has no clear benefit in Medicaid managed care patients. PMID:24916077

  11. Assessing Safety Attitudes among Healthcare Providers after a Hospital-Wide High-Risk Patient Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Je, Sang Mo; Kim, Hyun Jong; You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Cho, Junho; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is commonly performed in high-risk, high intensity situations and is therefore a good procedure around which to develop and implement safety culture strategies in the hospital. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a hospital-wide quality improvement program on the management of sudden cardiac arrests by assessing healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Materials and Methods This study was designed as a prospective cohort study at a single academic medical center. The comprehensive hospital-based safety program included steps to identify areas of hazard, partner units with the Resuscitation Committee, and to conduct a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ evaluated 35 questions in seven domains to assess changes in patient safety culture by comparing the results before and after the hospital-wide high risk patient care improvement program. Results The response rates of the pre- and post-SAQ survey were 489 out of 1121 (43.6%) and 575 out of 1270 (45.3%), respectively. SAQ survey responses revealed significant improvement in all seven domains of the questionnaire (p-values of 0.006 and lower). In a subgroup analysis, doctors and nurses showed improvement in five domains. Both doctors and nurses did not show improvement in the "sharing information" domain. Conclusion A hospital-wide quality improvement program for high-risk, high reliability patient care involving CPR care was shown to be associated with a change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Through an immersive and active program on CPR care, change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety was initiated. PMID:24532527

  12. Quality of end-of-life cancer care in Canada: a retrospective four-province study using administrative health care data

    PubMed Central

    Barbera, L.; Seow, H.; Sutradhar, R.; Chu, A.; Burge, F.; Fassbender, K.; McGrail, K.; Lawson, B.; Liu, Y.; Pataky, R.; Potapov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The quality of data comparing care at the end of life (eol) in cancer patients across Canada is poor. This project used identical cohorts and definitions to evaluate quality indicators for eol care in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Nova Scotia. Methods This retrospective cohort study of cancer decedents during fiscal years 2004–2009 used administrative health care data to examine health service quality indicators commonly used and previously identified as important to quality eol care: emergency department use, hospitalizations, intensive care unit admissions, chemotherapy, physician house calls, and home care visits near the eol, as well as death in hospital. Crude and standardized rates were calculated. In each province, two separate multivariable logistic regression models examined factors associated with receiving aggressive or supportive care. Results Overall, among the identified 200,285 cancer patients who died of their disease, 54% died in a hospital, with British Columbia having the lowest standardized rate of such deaths (50.2%). Emergency department use at eol ranged from 30.7% in Nova Scotia to 47.9% in Ontario. Of all patients, 8.7% received aggressive care (similar across all provinces), and 46.3% received supportive care (range: 41.2% in Nova Scotia to 61.8% in British Columbia). Lower neighbourhood income was consistently associated with a decreased likelihood of supportive care receipt. Interpretation We successfully used administrative health care data from four Canadian provinces to create identical cohorts with commonly defined indicators. This work is an important step toward maturing the field of eol care in Canada. Future work in this arena would be facilitated by national-level data-sharing arrangements. PMID:26628867

  13. The future of medical schools and teaching hospitals in the era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Pardes, H

    1997-02-01

    At the 125 U.S. medical schools and their affiliated teaching hospitals, most of the nation's basic and clinical research advances are made, and these translate into topflight medical care and great reductions in health care costs (e.g., $30 billion a year for polio). But these medical schools and teaching hospitals and their capacities to provide critical education and research are threatened by escalating erosion of their infrastructure, the declining academic workforce, the diminishing of quality and access as a result of growing marketplace forces, and shrinking funds. The author provides details about the forces threatening academic medical centers (i.e., medical schools and their affiliated teaching hospitals) and then presents a variety of strategies that individual academic medical centers can carry out to more efficiently use their resources. But sufficient resources ae still needed if centers are to function as they should. What is to save them? The author indicates that centers should not overly depend on managed care, the pharmaceutical industry, or foundations to provide the necessary support, and that centers' internal strategies can go only so far. He proposes that the importance of centers and the dangers they face must be communicated convincingly to the nation's citizens, business leaders, government representatives, and purchasers of health care. The message must be repeated frequently so it will sink in, and must be given in terms that are relevant to individuals and their families. He also advises that certain types of partnerships may be helpful. But most critical is the need to persuade the government to mandate separate revenue streams for research, education, and care for the underserved. As hard as this will be to achieve, there are many allies of academic medicine, from the president to numerous legislators; the author discusses what they have said and done to help. He concludes by urging everyone in academic medicine to do their parts to make a powerful case for the value of academic medical centers to society, and affirms his belief that American society will sustain these centers. PMID:9040243

  14. How consumers evaluate health care quality: Part II.

    PubMed

    Moore, S T; Bopp, K D

    1999-01-01

    This article is the second in a series which examines the way in which consumers assess information regarding the quality of health care services. In the previous article it was demonstrated that, in the view of health care consumers, three major perceptions held by health care consumers, are: (1) substantial differences in quality exist among health care providers, (2) little information is available that allows for the comparison of health care providers on issues related to quality, and (3) when such information is available it is found to be useful and often serves as the basis for decision regarding the choice of health care providers. We further discussed the short coming of marketing strategies based on complex quality indicators and the difficulties of image advertising in an age of institutional mistrust. The reader is reminded that these findings relate to the subjective assessments of consumers, not to objective facts concerning health care delivery. PMID:11066719

  15. Hospital-Level Variation in ICU Admission and Critical Care Procedures for Patients Hospitalized for Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Admon, Andrew J.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Gershengorn, Hayley B.; Wunsch, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variation in the use of ICUs for low-risk conditions contributes to health system inefficiency. We sought to examine the relationship between ICU use for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) and cost, mortality, readmission, and procedure use. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study including 61,249 adults with PE discharged from 263 hospitals in three states between 2007 and 2010. We generated hospital-specific ICU admission rate quartiles and used a series of multilevel models to evaluate relationships between admission rates and risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality, readmission, and costs and between ICU admission rates and several critical care procedures. RESULTS: Hospital quartiles varied in unadjusted ICU admission rates for PE (range, ? 15% to > 31%). Among all patients, there was a small trend toward increased use of arterial catheterization (0.6%-1.1%, P < .01) in hospital quartiles with higher levels of ICU admission. However, use of invasive mechanical ventilation (14.4%-7.9%, P < .01), noninvasive ventilation (6.6%-3.0%, P < .01), central venous catheterization (14.6%-11.3%, P < .02), and thrombolytics (11.0%-4.7%, P < .01) in patients in the ICU declined across hospital quartiles. There was no relationship between ICU admission rate and risk-adjusted hospital mortality, costs, or readmission. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitals vary widely in ICU admission rates for acute PE without a detectable impact on mortality, cost, or readmission. Patients admitted to ICUs in higher-using hospitals received many critical care procedures less often, suggesting that these patients may have had weaker indications for ICU admission. Hospitals with greater ICU admission may be appropriate targets for improving efficiency in ICU admissions. PMID:24992579

  16. The Affordable Care Act: the ethical call for value-based leadership to transform quality.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals in America face a daunting and historical challenge starting in 2013 as leadership navigates their organizations toward a new port of call-the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law in March 2010 and held in abeyance waiting on 2 pivotal points-the Supreme Court's June 2012 ruling upholding the constitutionality of the ACA and the 2012 presidential election of Barack Obama bringing to reality to health care organizations that leadership now must implement the mandates of health care delivery under the ACA. This article addresses the need for value-based leadership to transform the culture of health care organizations in order to be successful in navigating uncharted waters under the unprecedented challenges for change in the delivery of quality health care. PMID:23903938

  17. Assessing Coverage, Equity and Quality Gaps in Maternal and Neonatal Care in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wilunda, Calistus; Putoto, Giovanni; Riva, Donata Dalla; Manenti, Fabio; Atzori, Andrea; Calia, Federico; Assefa, Tigist; Turri, Bruno; Emmanuel, Onapa; Straneo, Manuela; Kisika, Firma; Tarmbulini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Background Gaps in coverage, equity and quality of health services hinder the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other high-burden countries, yet few studies attempt to assess all these dimensions as part of the situation analysis. We present the base-line data of a project aimed at simultaneously addressing coverage, equity and quality issues in maternal and neonatal health care in five districts belonging to three African countries. Methods Data were collected in cross-sectional studies with three types of tools. Coverage was assessed in three hospitals and 19 health centres (HCs) utilising emergency obstetric and newborn care needs assessment tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program. Emergency obstetrics care (EmOC) indicators were calculated. Equity was assessed in three hospitals and 13 HCs by means of proxy wealth indices and women delivering in health facilities were compared with those in the general population to identify inequities. Quality was assessed in three hospitals using the World Health Organization’s maternal and neonatal quality of hospital care assessment tool which evaluates the whole range of aspects of obstetric and neonatal care and produces an average score for each main area of care. Results All the three hospitals qualified as comprehensive EmOC facilities but none of the HCs qualified for basic EmOC. None of the districts met the minimum requisites for EmOC indicators. In two out of three hospitals, there were major quality gaps which were generally greater in neonatal care, management of emergency and complicated cases and monitoring. Higher access to care was coupled by low quality and good quality by very low access. Stark inequities in utilisation of institutional delivery care were present in all districts and across all health facilities, especially at hospital level. Conclusion Our findings confirm the existence of serious issues regarding coverage, equity and quality of health care for mothers and newborns in all study districts. Gaps in one dimension hinder the potential gains in health outcomes deriving from good performances in other dimensions, thus confirm the need for a three-dimensional profiling of health care provision as a basis for data-driven planning. PMID:26000964

  18. Improving Child Care Quality and Supply: The Impact of the Child Care and Development Block Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Helen

    1993-01-01

    Surveys how states are investing new federal money in child care quality and supply. Examines several key areas: child care licensing and monitoring; resource and referral services; child care for infants, school-agers, and children with special needs; child care for low-income families; comprehensive and enriched services; provider training;…

  19. Integrating Health Care for the Most Vulnerable: Bridging the Differences in Organizational Cultures Between US Hospitals and Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Michelle; Murphy, Julia; Bindman, Andrew B

    2015-11-01

    Policymakers have increasingly promoted health services integration to improve quality and efficiency. The US health care safety net, which comprises providers of health care to uninsured, Medicaid, and other vulnerable patients, remains a largely fragmented collection of providers. We interviewed leadership from safety net hospitals and community health centers in 5 US cities (Boston, MA; Denver, CO; Los Angeles, CA; Minneapolis, MN; and San Francisco, CA) throughout 2013 on their experiences with service integration. We identify conflicts in organizational mission, identity, and consumer orientation that have fostered reluctance to enter into collaborative arrangements. We describe how smaller scale initiatives, such as capitated model for targeted populations, health information exchange, and quality improvements led by health plans, can help bridge cultural differences to lay the groundwork for developing integrated care programs. PMID:26509286

  20. Integrating Health Care for the Most Vulnerable: Bridging the Differences in Organizational Cultures Between US Hospitals and Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Julia; Bindman, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers have increasingly promoted health services integration to improve quality and efficiency. The US health care safety net, which comprises providers of health care to uninsured, Medicaid, and other vulnerable patients, remains a largely fragmented collection of providers. We interviewed leadership from safety net hospitals and community health centers in 5 US cities (Boston, MA; Denver, CO; Los Angeles, CA; Minneapolis, MN; and San Francisco, CA) throughout 2013 on their experiences with service integration. We identify conflicts in organizational mission, identity, and consumer orientation that have fostered reluctance to enter into collaborative arrangements. We describe how smaller scale initiatives, such as capitated model for targeted populations, health information exchange, and quality improvements led by health plans, can help bridge cultural differences to lay the groundwork for developing integrated care programs. PMID:26509286

  1. Redesigning roles for patient-centered care. The hospitality representative.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, J; Serpico-Thompson, D

    1992-01-01

    Nurses cannot always meet patients' expectations for nonclinical care. The authors describe the operational redesign of several hotel-related functions to enhance the provision of nonclinical care. This system enhances care delivery to better balance patients' perceptions of the clinical with the non-clinical components of care. PMID:1506909

  2. [Challenges and barriers in the promotion of quality in health care services].

    PubMed

    Brezis, Mayer; Cohen, Matan J; Frankel, Meir; Chinitz, David

    2012-03-01

    The promotion of quality and safety in health care faces many challenges and barriers including lack of cooperation by physicians. Complexity and uncertainty in measuring quality raise methodological difficulties. Lack of sufficient awareness about these limitations, also among those who measure quality, contributes to physicians lack of interest, suspicion and mistrust. Strategic issues associated with quality assessment in the Israeli health care system derive from lack of regulation and evasiveness about the accountability of executives and governing bodies regarding the quality of the services provided to patients in hospitals and clinics. Some of these challenges relate to the intrusion of market forces into the world of medicine without needed adaptations, so that reimbursement is often conveniently linked to the quantity of services and not to their quality. Efficiency, which characterizes competitive markets, is not easily translated in the clinical world where empathy, listening skills, and capability of explaining are critical physician attributes. This clinical world values giving beyond monetary compensation, and cooperation between institutions--rather than competition--all crucial for the continuity of patient's care. The interface between economics and health care calls for creative thinking, with a novel definition for the social value of medical and nursing care according to their quality and not their quantity. PMID:22519258

  3. Implementation of Departmental Quality Strategies Is Positively Associated with Clinical Practice: Results of a Multicenter Study in 73 Hospitals in 7 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the amount of time and resources invested in implementing quality programs in hospitals, few studies have investigated their clinical impact and what strategies could be recommended to enhance its effectiveness. Objective To assess variations in clinical practice and explore associations with hospital- and department-level quality management systems. Design Multicenter, multilevel cross-sectional study. Setting and Participants Seventy-three acute care hospitals with 276 departments managing acute myocardial infarction, deliveries, hip fracture, and stroke in seven countries. Intervention None. Measures Predictor variables included 3 hospital- and 4 department-level quality measures. Six measures were collected through direct observation by an external surveyor and one was assessed through a questionnaire completed by hospital quality managers. Dependent variables included 24 clinical practice indicators based on case note reviews covering the 4 conditions (acute myocardial infarction, deliveries, hip fracture and stroke). A directed acyclic graph was used to encode relationships between predictors, outcomes, and covariates and to guide the choice of covariates to control for confounding. Results and Limitations Data were provided on 9021 clinical records by 276 departments in 73 hospitals. There were substantial variations in compliance with the 24 clinical practice indicators. Weak associations were observed between hospital quality systems and 4 of the 24 indicators, but on analyzing department-level quality systems, strong associations were observed for 8 of the 11 indicators for acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Clinical indicators supported by higher levels of evidence were more frequently associated with quality systems and activities. Conclusions There are significant gaps between recommended standards of care and clinical practice in a large sample of hospitals. Implementation of department-level quality strategies was significantly associated with good clinical practice. Further research should aim to develop clinically relevant quality standards for hospital departments, which appear to be more effective than generic hospital-wide quality systems. PMID:26588842

  4. An evaluation of charity care for tax-exempt hospitals engaging in joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela C

    2006-01-01

    The study examines whether the level of charity care and financial stability contribute to a nonprofit hospital's motivation for partnering with a for-profit hospital through a joint venture. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has heightened its scrutiny of joint ventures within the health care sector. Considering recent calls to investigate the merit of the tax-exempt status of hospitals engaged in joint ventures, this research will assist policy makers in the evaluation of nonprofit hospitals. Constituents will continue to question whether joint ventures contribute to a reduced focus on charitable activities. Results indicate that the propensity to engage in a joint venture significantly increases with increased levels of charity care. Furthermore, nonprofit hospitals with lower profitability are more likely to engage in joint ventures. These results are useful to policy makers when evaluating the level of charity care provided by hospitals seeking alternative strategic alliances. Considering many critics allege hospitals are reducing the provision of charity care to the community, it is imperative for management to be conscious of the impact of joint ventures on the provision of charity care. PMID:21110492

  5. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  6. Deepening our understanding of quality improvement in Europe (DUQuE): overview of a study of hospital quality management in seven countries

    PubMed Central

    Secanell, Mariona; Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Lopez, Maria Andrée; Kutryba, Basia; Pfaff, Holger; Klazinga, Niek; Wagner, Cordula; Kristensen, Solvejg; Bartels, Paul Daniel; Garel, Pascal; Bruneau, Charles; Escoval, Ana; França, Margarida; Mora, Nuria; Suñol, Rosa; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Bottaro, S; Garel, P; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Lívio, A; Eiras, M; Franca, M; Leite, I; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; Chow, A; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, CA; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objective This paper provides an overview of the DUQuE (Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe) project, the first study across multiple countries of the European Union (EU) to assess relationships between quality management and patient outcomes at EU level. The paper describes the conceptual framework and methods applied, highlighting the novel features of this study. Design DUQuE was designed as a multi-level cross-sectional study with data collection at hospital, pathway, professional and patient level in eight countries. Setting and Participants We aimed to collect data for the assessment of hospital-wide constructs from up to 30 randomly selected hospitals in each country, and additional data at pathway and patient level in 12 of these 30. Main outcome measures A comprehensive conceptual framework was developed to account for the multiple levels that influence hospital performance and patient outcomes. We assessed hospital-specific constructs (organizational culture and professional involvement), clinical pathway constructs (the organization of care processes for acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries), patient-specific processes and outcomes (clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient experience) and external constructs that could modify hospital quality (external assessment and perceived external pressure). Results Data was gathered from 188 hospitals in 7 participating countries. The overall participation and response rate were between 75% and 100% for the assessed measures. Conclusions This is the first study assessing relation between quality management and patient outcomes at EU level. The study involved a large number of respondents and achieved high response rates. This work will serve to develop guidance in how to assess quality management and makes recommendations on the best ways to improve quality in healthcare for hospital stakeholders, payers, researchers, and policy makers throughout the EU. PMID:24671120

  7. 77 FR 70786 - Request for Information Regarding Health Care Quality for Exchanges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ...Request for Information Regarding Health Care Quality for Exchanges AGENCY...Strategy for Quality Improvement in Health Care (National Quality Strategy) to...efforts to improve the quality of health care in the United States. The...

  8. Quality improvement research in pediatric hospital medicine and the role of the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network.

    PubMed

    Simon, Tamara D; Starmer, Amy J; Conway, Patrick H; Landrigan, Christopher P; Shah, Samir S; Shen, Mark W; Sectish, Theodore C; Spector, Nancy D; Tieder, Joel S; Srivastava, Rajendu; Willis, Leah E; Wilson, Karen M

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric hospitalists care for many hospitalized children in community and academic settings, and they must partner with administrators, other inpatient care providers, and researchers to assure the reliable delivery of high-quality, safe, evidence-based, and cost-effective care within the complex inpatient setting. Paralleling the growth of the field of pediatric hospital medicine is the realization that innovations are needed to address some of the most common clinical questions. Some of the unique challenges facing pediatric hospitalists include the lack of evidence for treating common conditions, children with chronic complex conditions, compressed time frame for admissions, and the variety of settings in which hospitalists practice. Most pediatric hospitalists are engaged in some kind of quality improvement (QI) work as hospitals provide many opportunities for QI activity and innovation. There are multiple national efforts in the pediatric hospital medicine community to improve quality, including the Children's Hospital Association (CHA) collaboratives and the Value in Pediatrics Network (VIP). Pediatric hospitalists are also challenged by the differences between QI and QI research; understanding that while improving local care is important, to provide consistent quality care to children we must study single-center and multicenter QI efforts by designing, developing, and evaluating interventions in a rigorous manner, and examine how systems variations impact implementation. The Pediatric Research in Inpatient Setting (PRIS) network is a leader in QI research and has several ongoing projects. The Prioritization project and Pediatric Health Information System Plus (PHIS+) have used administrative data to study variations in care, and the IIPE-PRIS Accelerating Safe Sign-outs (I-PASS) study highlights the potential for innovative QI research methods to improve care and clinical training. We address the importance, current state, accomplishments, and challenges of QI and QI research in pediatric hospital medicine; define the role of the PRIS Network in QI research; describe an exemplary QI research project, the I-PASS Study; address challenges for funding, training and mentorship, and publication; and identify future directions for QI research in pediatric hospital medicine. PMID:24268086

  9. Nonprofit hospitals in a competitive environment: behavior in the Arizona indigent care experiment.

    PubMed

    Christianson, J B; Kirkmanliff, B L; Guffey, T A; Beeler, J R

    1987-11-01

    The initial expectations of a group of urban nonprofit hospitals about the implementation of a prepaid, competitively bid program for the provision of indigent medical care were that their participation in the program would be limited to the provision of inpatient care on a subcontracted basis. In reality, as the program evolved, nonprofit hospitals played an increasingly active role which included the provision of care as a primary contractor on a full, risk-sharing basis. This evolution in nonprofit hospital behavior resulted from a change in the overall hospital environment in the community, as well as the somewhat negative experience of the hospitals as subcontractors and a more realistic assessment of the benefits and costs from participating in the program. PMID:10312280

  10. Rising pressure: hospital emergency departments as barometers of the health care system.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Gerland, Anneliese M; Pham, Hoangmai H; Berenson, Robert A

    2005-11-01

    Pressures--ranging from persuading specialists to provide on-call coverage to dealing with growing numbers of patients with serious mental illness--are building in already-crowded hospital emergency departments (EDs) across the country, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2005 site visits to 12 nationally representative communities. As the number of ED visits rises significantly faster than population growth, many hospitals are expanding emergency department capacity. At the same time, hospitals face an ongoing nursing shortage, contributing to tight inpatient capacity that in turn hinders admitting ED patients. In their role as hospitals' "front door" for attracting insured inpatient admissions, emergency departments also increasingly are expected to help hospitals compete for insured patients while still meeting obligations to provide emergency care to all-comers under federal law. Failure to address these growing pressures may compromise access to emergency care for patients and spur already rapidly rising health care costs. PMID:16299951

  11. Prospective cohort study protocol to describe the transfer of patients from intensive care units to hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, Denise L; Bagshaw, Sean M; Dodek, Peter; Forster, Alan J; Fowler, Robert A; Lamontagne, François; Turgeon, Alexis F; Potestio, Melissa; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The transfer of patient care between the intensive care unit (ICU) and the hospital ward is associated with increased risk of medical error and adverse events. This study will describe patient transfer from ICU to hospital ward by documenting (1) patient, family and provider experiences related to ICU transfer, (2) communication between stakeholders involved in ICU transfer, (3) adverse events that follow ICU transfer and (4) opportunities to improve ICU to hospital ward transfer. Methods This is a mixed methods prospective observational study of ICU to hospital ward transfer practices in 10 ICUs across Canada. We will recruit 50 patients at each site (n=500) who are transferred from ICU to hospital ward, and distribute surveys to enrolled patients, family members, and healthcare providers (ICU and ward physicians and nurses) after patient transfer. A random sample of 6 consenting study participants (patients, family members, healthcare providers) from each study site (n=60) will be offered an opportunity to participate in interviews to further describe stakeholders’ experience with ICU to hospital ward transfer. We will abstract information from patient health records to identify clinical data and use of transfer tools, and identify adverse events that are related to the transfer. Ethics and Dissemination Research ethics board approval has been obtained at the coordinating study centre (UofC REB13-0021) and 5 study sites (UofA Pro00050646; UBC-PHC H14-01667; Sunnybrook 336-2014; QCH 14-07; Sherbrooke 14-172). Dissemination of the findings will provide a comprehensive description of transfer from ICU to hospital ward in Canada including the uptake of validated or local transfer tools, a conceptual framework of the experiences and needs of stakeholders in the ICU transfer process, a summary of adverse events experienced by patients after transfer from ICU to hospital ward, and opportunities to guide quality improvement efforts. PMID:26155820

  12. Understanding Afghan healthcare providers: a qualitative study of the culture of care in a Kabul maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, R; van Teijlingen, E; Ryan, K; Holloway, I

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the culture of a Kabul maternity hospital to understand the perspectives of healthcare providers on their roles, experiences, values and motivations and the impact of these determinants on the care of perinatal women and their babies. Design Qualitative ethnographic study. Setting A maternity hospital, Afghanistan. Population Doctors, midwives and care assistants. Methods Six weeks of observation followed by 22 semi-structured interviews and four informal group discussions with staff, two focus group discussions with women and 41 background interviews with Afghan and non-Afghan medical and cultural experts. Main outcome measures The culture of care in an Afghan maternity hospital. Results A large workload, high proportion of complicated cases and poor staff organisation affected the quality of care. Cultural values, social and family pressures influenced the motivation and priorities of healthcare providers. Nepotism and cronyism created inequality in clinical training and support and undermined the authority of management to improve standards of care. Staff without powerful connections were vulnerable in a punitive inequitable environment—fearing humiliation, blame and the loss of employment. Conclusions Suboptimal care put the lives of women and babies at risk and was, in part, the result of conflicting priorities. The underlying motivation of staff appeared to be the socio-economic survival of their own families. The hospital culture closely mirrored the culture and core values of Afghan society. In setting priorities for women's health post-2015 Millennium Development Goals, understanding the context-specific pressures on staff is key to more effective programme interventions and sustainability. PMID:25394518

  13. A comparison between antenatal care quality in public and private sector in rural Hebei, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Dai, Yaohua; Zhang, Yanfeng; Wu, Qiong; Rudan, Diana; Safti?, Vanja; van Velthoven, Michelle H.M.M.T.; Su, Jianqiang; Tan, Zangwen; Scherpbier, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the quality of antenatal care (ANC) in Hebei Province and compare it between the public and private sector and within the public sector. Methods We conducted a Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Household Survey in 2010 using a two-stage sampling procedure and included 1079 mothers. The quality of ANC was assessed on the basis of the number of ANC visits, the time of the first ANC visit, 16 different ANC procedures, owning a maternal health care booklet, and the type of service provider. Results Almost all women (98%) received ANC services at least once, 80% at least four times, and 54% at least five times. About half of the women (46%) visited ANC facility within their first trimester. Neither public nor private sector provided all 16 standardized services, but significantly more women in public sector received ANC procedures. Most women received ANC in county or higher-level hospitals (75%) and very few in township hospitals (8%). Significantly fewer women were weighed and tested for HIV/AIDS in township than in county or higher-level hospitals. Conclusion The quality of ANC in Hebei was poorer than required by China’s national and World Health Organization norms. Although the public sector performed better than the private sector, the utilization and quality of care of ANC services in this sector varied and women generally visited county or higher-level health facilities. PMID:23630142

  14. Bridging the Gap: A Framework and Strategies for Integrating the Quality and Safety Mission of Teaching Hospitals and Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Yang, Julius; Myers, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Integrating the quality and safety mission of teaching hospitals and graduate medical education (GME) is a necessary step to provide the next generation of physicians with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to participate in health system improvement. Although many teaching hospital and health system leaders have made substantial efforts to improve the quality of patient care, few have fully included residents and fellows, who deliver a large portion of that care, in their efforts. Despite expectations related to the engagement of these trainees in health care quality improvement and patient safety outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Clinical Learning Environment Review program, a structure for approaching this integration has not been described.In this article, the authors present a framework that they hope will assist teaching hospitals in integrating residents and fellows into their quality and safety efforts and in fostering a positive clinical learning environment for education and patient care. The authors define the six essential elements of this framework-organizational culture, teaching hospital-GME alignment, infrastructure, curricular resources, faculty development, and interprofessional collaboration. They then describe the organizational characteristics required for each element and offer concrete strategies to achieve integration. This framework is meant to be a starting point for the development of robust national models of infrastructure, alignment, and collaboration between GME and health care quality and safety leaders at teaching hospitals. PMID:26039138

  15. 38 CFR 17.36 - Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01...Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans. 17.36 Section 17.36 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  16. 38 CFR 17.36 - Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01...Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans. 17.36 Section 17.36 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  17. 38 CFR 17.36 - Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01...Enrollment-provision of hospital and outpatient care to veterans. 17.36 Section 17.36 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  18. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  19. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  20. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  1. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but these medical services are available in a school-operated facility or with doctors...arrangement is necessary to provide timely medical services for veterans attending...

  2. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but these medical services are available in a school-operated facility or with doctors...arrangement is necessary to provide timely medical services for veterans attending...

  3. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but these medical services are available in a school-operated facility or with doctors...arrangement is necessary to provide timely medical services for veterans attending...

  4. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but these medical services are available in a school-operated facility or with doctors...arrangement is necessary to provide timely medical services for veterans attending...

  5. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but these medical services are available in a school-operated facility or with doctors...arrangement is necessary to provide timely medical services for veterans attending...

  6. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  7. In sickness and in wealth : hospitals, community benefits, and the Affordable Care Act

    E-print Network

    Mella, Katherine M. (Katherine Manuela)

    2014-01-01

    The new community benefit guidelines for non-profit hospitals enacted by the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) present major opportunities for the public health and planning fields alike. Given that ...

  8. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011...Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services...Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011...Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services...Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011...Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care...

  9. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  10. Is readmission a valid indicator of the quality of inpatient psychiatric care?

    PubMed

    Durbin, Janet; Lin, Elizabeth; Layne, Crystal; Teed, Moira

    2007-04-01

    Early return to hospital is a frequently measured outcome in mental health system performance monitoring yet its validity for evaluating quality of inpatient care is unclear. This study reviewed research conducted in the last decade on predictors of early readmission (within 30 to 90 days of discharge) to assess the association between this indicator and quality of inpatient psychiatric care. Only 13 studies met inclusion criteria. Results indicated that risk is greatest in the 30-day period immediately after discharge. There was modest support that attending to stability of clinical condition and preparing patients for discharge can protect against early readmission. A history of repeated admission increases risk, suggesting that special efforts are required to break the revolving door cycle. The authors identified a need for more standardization in measurement of client status at discharge and related care processes, more intervention studies on discharge practices, and studies of the effect of community care on early readmission. PMID:17437186

  11. Analyzing Determinants of Hospitals' Accountable Care Organizations Participation: A Resource Dependency Theory Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Valerie A; Zhang, Yongkang; Diana, Mark L

    2015-12-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are rapidly being implemented across the United States, but little is known about what environmental and organizational factors are associated with hospital participation in ACOs. Using resource dependency theory, this study examines external environmental characteristics and organizational characteristics that relate to hospital participation in Medicare ACOs. Results indicate hospitals operating in more munificent environments (as measured by income per capita: ? = 0.00002, p < .05) and more competitive environments (as measured by Health Maintenance Organization penetration: ? = 1.86, p < .01) are more likely to participate in ACOs. Organizational characteristics including hospital ownership, health care system membership, electronic health records implementation, hospital type, percentage of Medicaid inpatient discharge, and number of nursing home beds per 1,000 population over 65 are also related to ACO participation. Should the anticipated benefits of ACOs be realized, findings from this study can guide strategies to encourage hospitals that have not gotten involved in ACOs. PMID:26156971

  12. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  13. Using Quality Experts from Manufacturing to Transform Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Rose M.; Walsworth, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) is an initiative convened by the American Board of Medical Specialties. It investigates the efficacy of coaches in helping primary-care practices improve the care of patients with diabetes and asthma. Most IPIP states use coaches who have a health care background, and are trained in quality

  14. Transition from housestaff to nonphysicians as neonatal intensive care providers: cost, impact on revenue, and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Schulman, M; Lucchese, K R; Sullivan, A C

    1995-11-01

    Nonphysician providers (NPP) increasingly fill roles traditionally performed by housestaff. Downsizing of a pediatric residency program prompted phased replacement of housestaff in a 26-bed neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Subsidized education for neonatal nurse-practitioners, recruitment of physician assistants, and NPP leadership took place over 18 months, at which time all housestaff functions were assumed by NPP. Cost to establish the program, impact on hospital revenue under New York's prospective reimbursement system, and quality of care were evaluated. The net startup cost for the NPP program was $441,000 ($722,000 for education, salaries, staff replacement, and recruitment, partially offset by a New York State workforce demonstration project grant). Ongoing costs of the program are $1.2 million/yr (including salaries, off-hours medical backup, recruitment, administrative overhead, and loss of indirect and direct medical education reimbursement, partially offset by recaptured housestaff salaries and ancillary expense reductions). Access to care was maintained. Quality of care was assessed during the last 6 months of housestaff and the first 6 months of full NPP staffing, revealing similar weight-specific survival, and improvement in documentation and compliance with immunization and blood utilization guidelines during the NPP period. NPP are expensive in comparison to housestaff. Revenue is minimally adversely affected, but access to NICU services and quality of care was preserved and in some cases enhanced with NPP. In the context of graduate medical education reform, staffing problems such as ours will be encountered increasingly in inpatient subspecialty settings. PMID:8579659

  15. Length of hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    PubMed

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Liu, Kevin X; Devine, Christopher A; Chavakula, Vamsidhar; Smith, Timothy R; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Although the length of hospital stay is often used as a measure of quality of care, data evaluating the predictors of extended hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor are limited. The goals of this study were to use multivariate regression to examine which preoperative characteristics and postoperative complications predict a prolonged hospital stay and to assess the impact of length of stay on unplanned hospital readmission. METHODS Data were extracted from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2007 to 2013. Patients who underwent craniotomy for resection of a brain tumor were included. Stratification was based on length of hospital stay, which was dichotomized by the upper quartile of the interquartile range (IQR) for the entire population. Covariates included patient age, sex, race, tumor histology, comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, functional status, preoperative laboratory values, preoperative neurological deficits, operative time, and postoperative complications. Multivariate logistic regression with forward prediction was used to evaluate independent predictors of extended hospitalization. Thereafter, hierarchical multivariate logistic regression assessed the impact of length of stay on unplanned readmission. RESULTS The study included 11,510 patients. The median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR 3-8 days), and 27.7% (n = 3185) had a hospital stay of at least 8 days. Independent predictors of extended hospital stay included age greater than 70 years (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28%-1.83%, p < 0.001); African American (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.44%-2.14%, p < 0.001) and Hispanic (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.36%-2.08%) race or ethnicity; ASA class 3 (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.34%-1.73%) or 4-5 (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.82%-2.62%) designation; partially (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.61%-2.35%) or totally dependent (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.95%-5.55%) functional status; insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.16%-1.84%); hematological comorbidities (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.25%-2.24%); and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.51%-2.09%, all p ? 0.009). Several postoperative complications were additional independent predictors of prolonged hospitalization including pulmonary emboli (OR 13.75, 95% CI 4.73%-39.99%), pneumonia (OR 5.40, 95% CI 2.89%-10.07%), and urinary tract infections (OR 11.87, 95% CI 7.09%-19.87%, all p < 0.001). The C-statistic of the model based on preoperative characteristics was 0.79, which increased to 0.83 after the addition of postoperative complications. A length of stay after craniotomy for tumor score was created based on preoperative factors significant in regression models, with a moderate correlation with length of stay (p = 0.43, p < 0.001). Extended hospital stay was not associated with differential odds of an unplanned hospital readmission (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89%-1.06%, p = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS In this NSQIP analysis that evaluated patients who underwent craniotomy for tumor, much of the variance in hospital stay was attributable to baseline patient characteristics, suggesting length of stay may be an imperfect proxy for quality. Additionally, longer hospitalizations were not found to be associated with differential rates of unplanned readmission. PMID:26621410

  16. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  17. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  18. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility...

  19. Cost, Utilization, and Quality of Care: An Evaluation of Illinois’ Medicaid Primary Care Case Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Han, Meiying; Petterson, Stephen M.; Makaroff, Laura A.; Liaw, Winston R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE In 2006, Illinois established Illinois Health Connect (IHC), a primary care case management program for Medicaid that offered enhanced fee-for-service, capitation payments, performance incentives, and practice support. Illinois also implemented a complementary disease management program, Your Healthcare Plus (YHP). This external evaluation explored outcomes associated with these programs. METHODS We analyzed Medicaid claims and enrollment data from 2004 to 2010, covering both pre- and post-implementation. The base year was 2006, and 2006–2010 eligibility criteria were applied to 2004–2005 data to allow comparison. We studied costs and utilization trends, overall and by service and setting. We studied quality by incorporating Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures and IHC performance payment criteria. RESULTS Illinois Medicaid expanded considerably between 2006 (2,095,699 full-year equivalents) and 2010 (2,692,123). Annual savings were 6.5% for IHC and 8.6% for YHP by the fourth year, with cumulative Medicaid savings of $1.46 billion. Per-beneficiary annual costs fell in Illinois over this period compared to those in states with similar Medicaid programs. Quality improved for nearly all metrics under IHC, and most prevention measures more than doubled in frequency. Medicaid inpatient costs fell by 30.3%, and outpatient costs rose by 24.9% to 45.7% across programs. Avoidable hospitalizations fell by 16.8% for YHP, and bed-days fell by 15.6% for IHC. Emergency department visits declined by 5% by 2010. CONCLUSIONS The Illinois Medicaid IHC and YHP programs were associated with substantial savings, reductions in inpatient and emergency care, and improvements in quality measures. This experience is not typical of other states implementing some, but not all, of these same policies. Although specific features of the Illinois reforms may have accounted for its better outcomes, the limited evaluation design calls for caution in making causal inferences. PMID:25354404

  20. Systems and processes that ensure high quality care.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-10-01

    This is the second in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. It considers how the structures and processes for quality governance can affect an organisation's ability to be assured about the quality of care. Complex information systems and procedures can lead to poor quality care, but sound structures and processes alone are insufficient to ensure good governance, and behavioural factors play a significant part in making sure that staff are enabled to provide good quality care. The next article in this series looks at how the information reporting of an organisation can affect its governance. PMID:23252087

  1. Moving towards Routine Evaluation of Quality of Inpatient Pediatric Care in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gathara, David; Nyamai, Rachael; Were, Fred; Mogoa, Wycliffe; Karumbi, Jamlick; Kihuba, Elesban; Mwinga, Stephen; Aluvaala, Jalemba; Mulaku, Mercy; Kosgei, Rose; Todd, Jim; Allen, Elizabeth; English, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular assessment of quality of care allows monitoring of progress towards system goals and identifies gaps that need to be addressed to promote better outcomes. We report efforts to initiate routine assessments in a low-income country in partnership with government. Methods A cross-sectional survey undertaken in 22 ‘internship training’ hospitals across Kenya that examined availability of essential resources and process of care based on review of 60 case-records per site focusing on the common childhood illnesses (pneumonia, malaria, diarrhea/dehydration, malnutrition and meningitis). Results Availability of essential resources was 75% (45/61 items) or more in 8/22 hospitals. A total of 1298 (range 54–61) case records were reviewed. HIV testing remained suboptimal at 12% (95% CI 7–19). A routinely introduced structured pediatric admission record form improved documentation of core admission symptoms and signs (median score for signs 22/22 and 8/22 when form used and not used respectively). Correctness of penicillin and gentamicin dosing was above 85% but correctness of prescribed intravenous fluid or oral feed volumes for severe dehydration and malnutrition were 54% and 25% respectively. Introduction of Zinc for diarrhea has been relatively successful (66% cases) but use of artesunate for malaria remained rare. Exploratory analysis suggests considerable variability of the quality of care across hospitals. Conclusion Quality of pediatric care in Kenya has improved but can improve further. The approach to monitoring described in this survey seems feasible and provides an opportunity for routine assessments across a large number of hospitals as part of national efforts to sustain improvement. Understanding variability across hospitals may help target improvement efforts. PMID:25822492

  2. The physician mentored implementation model: a promising quality improvement framework for health care change.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hinami, Keiki; Hansen, Luke O; Maynard, Gregory; Budnitz, Tina; Williams, Mark V

    2015-03-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts hold great promise for improving care delivery. However, hospitals often struggle with QI implementation and fail to sustain improvement in either process changes or patient outcomes. Physician mentored implementation (PMI) is a novel approach that promotes the success and sustainability of QI initiatives at hospitals. It leverages the expertise of external physician mentors who coach QI teams to implement interventions at their local hospitals. The PMI model includes five core components: (1) a hospital self-assessment tool, (2) a face-to-face training session including direct interaction with a physician mentor, (3) a guided continuous quality improvement and systems approach, (4) yearlong individual physician mentoring, and (5) a learning community supported by a resource center, listserv, and webinars. Mentors provide content and process expertise, rather than offering "one-size-fits-all" technical assistance that might not be sustained after the mentoring year ends. Mentors support and motivate QI teams throughout the planning and implementation phases of their interventions, help to engage hospital leadership, garner local physician buy-in, and address institutional barriers. Mentors also guide hospitals to identify opportunities for the adaptation and customization of original evidence-based models of care while ensuring the fidelity of those models. More than 350 hospitals have used the PMI model to implement successful national and statewide QI initiatives. Academic medical centers are charged with improving the health of patients and reengineering care delivery; thus, they serve as the ideal source for physician mentors and can act as leaders in implementing QI projects using the PMI model. PMID:25354069

  3. The Effects of Health Information Technology on the Costs and Quality of Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Information technology has been linked to productivity growth in a wide variety of sectors, and health information technology (HIT) is a leading example of an innovation with the potential to transform industry-wide productivity. This paper analyzes the impact of health information technology (HIT) on the quality and intensity of medical care. Using Medicare claims data from 1998-2005, I estimate the effects of early investment in HIT by exploiting variation in hospitals’ adoption statuses over time, analyzing 2.5 million inpatient admissions across 3900 hospitals. HIT is associated with a 1.3 percent increase in billed charges (p-value: 5.6%), and there is no evidence of cost savings even five years after adoption. Additionally, HIT adoption appears to have little impact on the quality of care, measured by patient mortality, adverse drug events, and readmission rates. PMID:24463141

  4. 78 FR 43533 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...information on hospital quality of care. We believe...beneficiaries to work with their doctors...to discuss the quality of care hospitals...to hospitals to improve the quality of...sections. QIOs work at the grassroots...Territories in order to improve care for Medicare...Attempts to improve quality through...

  5. Measuring Returns to Hospital Care: Evidence from Ambulance Referral Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Joseph; Graves, John; Gruber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Medicare spending exceeds 4% of GDP in the US each year, and there are concerns that moral hazard problems have led to overspending. This paper considers whether hospitals that treat patients more aggressively and receive higher payments from Medicare improve health outcomes for their patients. An innovation is a new lens to compare hospital performance for emergency patients: plausibly exogenous variation in ambulance-company assignment among patients who live near one another. Using Medicare data from 2002–2010, we show that ambulance company assignment importantly affects hospital choice for patients in the same ZIP code. Using data for New York State from 2000–2006 that matches exact patient addresses to hospital discharge records, we show that patients who live very near each other but on either side of ambulance service area boundaries go to different types of hospitals. Both identification strategies show that higher-cost hospitals achieve better patient outcomes for a variety of emergency conditions. Using our Medicare sample, the estimates imply that a one standard deviation increase in Medicare reimbursement leads to a 4 percentage point reduction in mortality (10% compared to the mean). Taking into account one-year spending after the health shock, the implied cost per at least one year of life saved is approximately $80,000. These results are found across different types of hospitals and patients, as well across both identification strategies. PMID:25750459

  6. [Nurses deliver quality care in the community nurses deliver quality care in the community].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chu; Lin, Chouh-Jiaun

    2009-08-01

    In Taiwan, responsibility for administering healthcare services is being gradually moved out of hospitals and into the community. As such, nurses are increasingly required to address new problems and meet the specific healthcare needs of important subgroups such as Taiwan's growing elderly population and young adult immigrants. Because policies have lagged behind such developments, nurses are expected to provide leadership in addressing these new challenges. Their status within the medical system, however, continues to reflect earlier, more 'traditional' stereotypes and gives inadequate credit for current responsibilities, which include providing long term healthcare and public health nursing, in addition to homecare responsibilities. In the face of these challenges, Taiwan community nurses have continued to develop new ways to provide care and demonstrated innovation, commitment and flexibility in their roles. If nurses are to continue to take a leading role in developing community healthcare services, they require professional recognition as well as appropriate policy support from regulatory and local government authorities. PMID:19634095

  7. Early Medicaid Expansion In Connecticut Stemmed The Growth In Hospital Uncompensated Care.

    PubMed

    Nikpay, Sayeh; Buchmueller, Thomas; Levy, Helen

    2015-07-01

    As states continue to debate whether or not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a key consideration is the impact of expansion on the financial position of hospitals, including their burden of uncompensated care. Conclusive evidence from coverage expansions that occurred in 2014 is several years away. In the meantime, we analyzed the experience of hospitals in Connecticut, which expanded Medicaid coverage to a large number of childless adults in April 2010 under the ACA. Using hospital-level panel data from Medicare cost reports, we performed difference-in-differences analyses to compare the change in Medicaid volume and uncompensated care in the period 2007-13 in Connecticut to changes in other Northeastern states. We found that early Medicaid expansion in Connecticut was associated with an increase in Medicaid discharges of 7-9 percentage points, relative to a baseline rate of 11 percent, and an increase of 7-8 percentage points in Medicaid revenue as a share of total revenue, relative to a baseline share of 10 percent. Also, in contrast to the national and regional trends of increasing uncompensated care during this period, hospitals in Connecticut experienced no increase in uncompensated care. We conclude that uncompensated care in Connecticut was roughly one-third lower than what it would have been without early Medicaid expansion. The results suggest that ACA Medicaid expansions could reduce hospitals' uncompensated care burden. PMID:26153312

  8. External Evaluation of Four Hospitals According to Patient-centred Care Standards

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Nahid; Abbasi, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hospital accreditation is a multi-factorial issue. The aim of the current study was to accredit social security organization and university hospitals (that certificated by ISO 9001-2008) in Isfahan, the second largest city of Iran, based on Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation standards. Methods: Accreditation of four hospitals was evaluated and compared in a cross-sectional study. Seven checklists were driven from patient-centered JCI accreditation standards to cover indices of access of patients to care and continuity of care (ACC), patients and families rights (PFR), patients and families education (PFE), assessment of patients (AOP), care of patients (COP), analgesic and surgical care (ASC), and medication management and use (MMU). They were filled out by seven inspectors. The findings were analyzed by SPSS 14 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Results: Beheshti and Zahra hospitals demonstrated the lowest and the highest mean levels preparation, respectively (60 vs. 68.5 percent, respectively). Also, Beheshti hospital revealed the lowest prepared levels in AOP, ASC, MMU and PFE among all evaluated hospitals; the corresponding mean amounts of preparation were 68, 82.5, 56 and 42 percent, respectively. Whereas Zahra hospital showed the highest prepared levels in AOP, COP, MMU and PFE among all evaluated hospitals; the mean amounts of preparation were 82, 61.5, 84 and 57 percent, respectively. No significant difference was found among the four hospitals in any of the seven indices. Discussion: The four evaluated hospitals were not fully prepared to present the best possible patient-centered care system. PMID:24167387

  9. Fall-Related Hospitalization and Facility Costs among Residents of Institutions Providing Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Norman V.; Delafuente, Jeffrey C.; Cox, Fred M.; Narayanan, Siva

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate hospital and long-term-care costs resulting from falls in long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). Design and Methods: The study used a retrospective, pre/post with comparison group design. We used matching, based on propensity scores, to control for baseline differences between fallers and non-fallers.…

  10. Reducing alternate level of care days at Winchester District Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ricottone, Madeline

    2015-09-01

    Winchester District Memorial Hospital has maintained near-zero alternative level of care census days for three consecutive years by focusing on partnerships, staff/physician engagement, and maintaining a circle of care with patients and families. The strategies and challenges faced revisiting internal discharge processes and linking directly to their local community through change management techniques are discussed. PMID:26152906

  11. MICRO-CARES: An Information Management System for Psychosocial Services in Hospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Jeffrey S.; Lyons, John S.; Strain, James J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible software system that is adaptable to a variety of information management uses across different psychosocial service departments in hospital settings. Initially developed for Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, the present system has now been adapted for a Social Work department and is being adapted to Hospice, Home Care, Patient Representative, and Pastoral Care departmental uses.

  12. Multimorbidity and Quality of Preventive Care in Swiss University Primary Care Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Sven; da Costa, Bruno R.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Weiler, Stefan; Zimmerli, Lukas; Frey, Peter; Cornuz, Jacques; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Battegay, Edouard; Kerr, Eve; Aujesky, Drahomir; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings. Methods We examined a retrospective cohort composed of a random sample of 1,002 patients aged 50–80 years attending four Swiss university primary care settings. Multimorbidity was defined according to the literature and the Charlson index. We assessed the quality of preventive care and cardiovascular preventive care with RAND’s Quality Assessment Tool indicators. Aggregate scores of quality of provided care were calculated by taking into account the number of eligible patients for each indicator. Results Participants (mean age 63.5 years, 44% women) had a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.9) comorbidities and 67.5% had 2 or more comorbidities. The mean Charlson index was 1.8 (SD 1.9). Overall, participants received 69% of recommended preventive care and 84% of cardiovascular preventive care. Quality of care was not associated with higher numbers of comorbidities, both for preventive care and for cardiovascular preventive care. Results were similar in analyses using the Charlson index and after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, center and number of visits. Some patients may receive less preventive care including those with dementia (47%) and those with schizophrenia (35%). Conclusions In Swiss university primary care settings, two thirds of patients had 2 or more comorbidities. The receipt of preventive and cardiovascular preventive care was not affected by comorbidity count or severity, although patients with certain comorbidities may receive lower levels of preventive care. PMID:24760077

  13. The Effect of Minimum Nurse Staffing Legislation on Uncompensated Care Provided by California Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Harless, David W.; Pink, George H.; Spetz, Joanne; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses whether California’s minimum nurse staffing legislation affected the amount of uncompensated care provided by California hospitals. Using data from California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and InterStudy, we divide hospitals into quartiles based on pre-regulation staffing levels. Controlling for other factors, we estimate changes in the growth rate of uncompensated care in the three lowest staffing quartiles relative to the quartile of hospitals with the highest staffing level. Our sample includes short-term general hospitals over the period 1999 to 2006. We find that growth rates in uncompensated care are lower in the first three staffing quartiles as compared to the highest quartile; however, results are statistically significant only for county and for-profit hospitals in quartiles one and three. We conclude that minimum nurse staffing ratios may lead some hospitals to limit uncompensated care, likely due to increased financial pressure. PMID:21156707

  14. Organizational culture and the implementation of person centered care: results from a change process in Swedish hospital care.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Tariq Saleem J; Ekman, Inger; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Dudas, Kerstin; Carlström, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Sweden has one of the oldest, most coherent and stable healthcare systems in the world. The culture has been described as conservative, mechanistic and increasingly standardized. In order to provide a care adjusted to the patient, person centered care (PCC) has been developed and implemented into some parts of the health care industry. The model has proven to decrease patient uncertainty. However, the impact of PCC has been limited in some clinics and hospital wards. An assumption is that organizational culture has an impact on desired outcomes of PCC, such as patient uncertainty. Therefore, in this study we identify the impact of organizational culture on patient uncertainty in five hospital wards during the implementation of PCC. Data from 220 hospitalized patients who completed the uncertainty cardiovascular population scale (UCPS) and 117 nurses who completed the organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) were investigated with regression analysis. The results seemed to indicate that in hospitals where the culture promotes stability, control and goal setting, patient uncertainty is reduced. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that a culture of flexibility, cohesion and trust is positive, a culture of stability can better sustain a desired outcome of reform or implementation of new care models such as person centered care. It is essential for health managers to be aware of what characterizes their organizational culture before attempting to implement any sort of new healthcare model. The organizational values questionnaire has the potential to be used as a tool to aid health managers in reaching that understanding. PMID:23069131

  15. Financial performance of safety-net hospitals in a changing health care environment.

    PubMed

    Gautam, K; Campbell, C; Arrington, B

    1996-08-01

    Safety-net hospitals serving the poor and indigent in inner-cities have received inadequate research attention regarding the determinants of their financial performance in the changing health care environment. We analyze how the 1990-92 financial performance of 275 such hospitals is related to exogenous and endogenous factors such as payer mix, service mix, staffing and ownership. Models of hospital financial performance are developed using operating margin, cost per discharge and revenue per discharge as measures of performance. Stepwise regression is used to test the model with data from the American Hospital Association (AHA) and Health Care Investment Analysts (HCIA). Results suggest that: 1) The profitability of inner-city hospitals appears positively related with technical complexity of care; 2) High interest and low operating surplus may constrain the addition of technically sophisticated services to enhance profitability; 3) There is some evidence that new governmental programs, e.g. Medicaid managed care and Medicaid Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs), may not have improved operating margins, though Medicaid DRGs appear to have contained costs. Follow-up research is needed on this issue; 4) Given external fiscal realities, internal management strategies for inner-city hospitals require research, e.g. developing appropriate managed care systems and timely expansion of sub-acute services and; 5) Services such as AIDS treatment and community health education represent opportunities to respond to community needs, especially since unit cost of such services will decline with high volume. PMID:10160279

  16. Introduction of abortion technologies: a quality of care management approach.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, F C; Winkler, J; Leonard, A H

    1992-01-01

    Development of antiprogestins for use to induce early abortion clearly advances reproductive health to a higher level. A heated debate has arisen over the appropriateness of its being introduced in health care settings, however. Since the introduction of new contraceptive technologies into health care and family planning programs has produced serious shortcomings, some abortion care specialists propose a management approach to introducing RU-486/prostaglandin which stresses women's needs and preferences. This quality of care framework is based on 20 years of experience of introducing manual vacuum aspiration into developing countries. It takes into consideration that decisions about introducing RU-486/prostaglandin are country-specific and often program- or clinic-specific. Decision makers need to look at preparedness of local policy and service delivery infrastructure to take on the specific responsibilities of integrating it into ongoing programs and how this new technology will affect quality of care. The quality of care framework consists of those elements appropriate to women' access to care which include appropriate abortion care technology; technical competence of all members of the health care team at all levels of the health system; interactions between women and providers/staff (respect and support for women and nonjudgemental attitudes); comprehensive information and counseling; quality and accessible postabortion family planning and reproductive health care; and equipment, supplies, and medication. Decision makers need to consider whether RU-486/prostaglandin is acceptable to women and providers, manufactured to high standards, consistent with relevant regulatory requirements and appropriate to specific service delivery settings. PMID:1434757

  17. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  18. Research in action: using positive deviance to improve quality of health care

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Curry, Leslie A; Ramanadhan, Shoba; Rowe, Laura; Nembhard, Ingrid M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite decades of efforts to improve quality of health care, poor performance persists in many aspects of care. Less than 1% of the enormous national investment in medical research is focused on improving health care delivery. Furthermore, when effective innovations in clinical care are discovered, uptake of these innovations is often delayed and incomplete. In this paper, we build on the established principle of 'positive deviance' to propose an approach to identifying practices that improve health care quality. Methods We synthesize existing literature on positive deviance, describe major alternative approaches, propose benefits and limitations of a positive deviance approach for research directed toward improving quality of health care, and describe an application of this approach in improving hospital care for patients with acute myocardial infarction. Results The positive deviance approach, as adapted for use in health care, presumes that the knowledge about 'what works' is available in existing organizations that demonstrate consistently exceptional performance. Steps in this approach: identify 'positive deviants,' i.e., organizations that consistently demonstrate exceptionally high performance in the area of interest (e.g., proper medication use, timeliness of care); study the organizations in-depth using qualitative methods to generate hypotheses about practices that allow organizations to achieve top performance; test hypotheses statistically in larger, representative samples of organizations; and work in partnership with key stakeholders, including potential adopters, to disseminate the evidence about newly characterized best practices. The approach is particularly appropriate in situations where organizations can be ranked reliably based on valid performance measures, where there is substantial natural variation in performance within an industry, when openness about practices to achieve exceptional performance exists, and where there is an engaged constituency to promote uptake of discovered practices. Conclusion The identification and examination of health care organizations that demonstrate positive deviance provides an opportunity to characterize and disseminate strategies for improving quality. PMID:19426507

  19. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...the quality and appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care, well-child care, well-adolescent care and childhood and adolescent immunizations. (b) Access to covered...

  20. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...the quality and appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care, well-child care, well-adolescent care and childhood and adolescent immunizations. (b) Access to covered...

  1. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the quality and appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care, well-child care, well-adolescent care and childhood and adolescent immunizations. (b) Access to covered...

  2. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the quality and appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care, well-child care, well-adolescent care and childhood and adolescent immunizations. (b) Access to covered...

  3. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...the quality and appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care, well-child care, well-adolescent care and childhood and adolescent immunizations. (b) Access to covered...

  4. Child-Care Subsidies: Do They Impact the Quality of Care Children Experience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anna D.; Ryan, Rebecca M.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government's largest investments in early care and education, but little is known about whether it increases low-income children's access to higher quality child care. This study used newly available nationally representative data on 4-year-old children (N = 750) to investigate whether…

  5. The Quality of Care under a Managed-Care Program for Dual Eligibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Homyak, Patricia; Bershadsky, Boris; Lum, Terry; Flood, Shannon; Zhang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare the quality of care provided under the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO), a special program designed to serve dually eligible older persons, to care provided to controls who received fee-for-service Medicare and Medicaid managed care. Design and Methods: Two control groups were used; one was…

  6. Multi-level model of missed nursing care in the context of hospital merger.

    PubMed

    Castner, Jessica; Wu, Yow-Wu B; Dean-Baar, Susan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the multi-level relationships of individual registered nurse (RN) and nursing unit factors on missed nursing care. This was a quantitative model-building study using a descriptive, cross-sectional design. Surveys (N = 553) and administrative unit records from nurses in one hospital system undergoing merger were included. The results showed that 36% of the variation in missed nursing care is due to the unit context, with a corresponding 64% due to individual nurse differences. At the unit level, workload, skill mix, and critical unit type affected the amount of missed nursing care. At the individual nurse level, more experience, supplies problems, communication problems, and involvement in errors of commission all increased the perception of the amount of missed nursing care. Education level was not related to the amount of missed nursing care. The findings highlight the importance of unit- and individual-level interventions to redesign hospital nursing care. PMID:24869493

  7. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  8. The Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative Education Program for Acute Care Nurses and Staff

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Janice L.; Lach, Helen W.; McGillick, Janis; Murphy-White, Maggie; Carroll, Maria B.; Armstrong, Johanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias have 3.2 million hospital stays annually, which is significantly more than older individuals without dementia. Hospitalized patients with dementia are at greater risk of delirium, falls, overwhelming functional decline that may extend the hospital stay, and prolonged and/ or complicated rehabilitation. These risks support the need for staff education on the special care needs of this vulnerable population. In this article we describe a full-day educational program, the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative, designed to teach staff how to provide the specialized care required by patients with dementia. Participants (N=355) from five different hospitals, including 221 nurses, completed a pre-test/ post-test evaluation for the program. Changes in participants’ attitudes/ practices, confidence, and knowledge were evaluated. Scores indicated significant improvement on the post-test. The evaluation provides further evidence for recommending dissemination of the DFHI program. PMID:25299008

  9. Effect of reactive pharmacy intervention on quality of hospital prescribing.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J; Hodgson, S; Norman, A; Daneshmend, T K; Garner, S T

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the medical impact of reactive pharmacy intervention. DESIGN--Analysis of all interventions during 28 days by all 35 pharmacists in hospitals in Nottingham. SETTING--All (six) hospitals in the Nottingham health authority (a teaching district), representing 2530 mainly acute beds, 781 mental illness beds, and 633 mainly health care of the elderly beds. PATIENTS--Hospital inpatients and outpatients. INTERVENTIONS--Recording of every important intervention made by pharmacists to prescriptions for both inpatients and outpatients when they perceived inadequacies of drug prescription or administration, including characterisation of the problem, coding of outcome, recording of time taken to initiate and resolve intervention, and grade of prescribing doctor. The problems were independently assessed for their potential to cause medical harm. RESULTS--769 Interventions (about 2.9% of prescriptions) were made, of which 60 concerned prescriptions rated as having a major potential for medical harm. The commonest problems concerned dosage, which was wrong in 280 prescriptions (102 for antibiotics) and not stated in 50 (one for antibiotics), especially those associated with a major potential for medical harm (32 prescriptions). These concerned sedatives; analgesics; cardiovascular drugs or diuretics; and iron, vitamin, or mineral preparations. Also common were overprolonged prescription of antibiotics (48 prescriptions), confusion of drug names (nine), and inadvertent coprescription of excessive quantities of aspirin or paracetamol in plain and compound preparations (seven). The pharmacist's recommendation was accepted in 639 instances (86%), and the prescription was altered in 575, leading to an appreciable (246 cases) or minor (231 cases) improvement. Interventions had little effect on costs; 427/646 had no effect and 130 produced savings less than 50p. Pharmacy intervention (730/769 interventions) occupied on average 41 minutes per pharmacist per week. CONCLUSIONS--Most reactive pharmacy interventions concerned prescribing errors with a limited potential for medical harm, but a small number of detected errors with a major potential for medical harm; cost savings were not appreciable. PMID:2344509

  10. Societal costs of home and hospital end-of-life care for palliative care patients in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mo; Guerriere, Denise N; Coyte, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    In Canada, health system restructuring has led to a greater focus on home-based palliative care as an alternative to institutionalised palliative care. However, little is known about the effect of this change on end-of-life care costs and the extent to which the financial burden of care has shifted from the acute care public sector to families. The purpose of this study was to assess the societal costs of end-of-life care associated with two places of death (hospital and home) using a prospective cohort design in a home-based palliative care programme. Societal cost includes all costs incurred during the course of palliative care irrespective of payer (e.g. health system, out-of-pocket, informal care-giving costs, etc.). Primary caregivers of terminal cancer patients were recruited from the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care in Toronto, Canada. Demographic, service utilisation, care-giving time, health and functional status, and death data were collected by telephone interviews with primary caregivers over the course of patients' palliative trajectory. Logistic regression was conducted to model an individual's propensity for home death. Total societal costs of end-of-life care and component costs were compared between home and hospital death using propensity score stratification. Costs were presented in 2012 Canadian dollars ($1.00CDN = $1.00USD). The estimated total societal cost of end-of-life care was $34,197.73 per patient over the entire palliative trajectory (4 months on average). Results showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) in total societal costs between home and hospital death patients. Higher hospitalisation costs for hospital death patients were replaced by higher unpaid caregiver time and outpatient service costs for home death patients. Thus, from a societal cost perspective, alternative sites of death, while not associated with a significant change in total societal cost of end-of-life care, resulted in changes in the distribution of costs borne by different stakeholders. PMID:25443659

  11. Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana Adopt-a-Patient Form The Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana cares for over 1,600 wildlife cases every year. Our ability to care for these animals is

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana Adopt-a-Patient Form The Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana cares: Dr. Javier Nevarez, Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! #12;Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana

  12. Quality of care review: Recent experience in Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Donald F.; Bostrom, Albert W.; Rafferty, John

    1986-01-01

    The Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) is an HMO-oriented Medicaid demonstration project serving approximately 170,000 persons throughout the State of Arizona. To assure that its members are receiving high quality care and because of the potentially adverse incentives of capitation, AHCCCS places particular emphasis on quality-of-care review. A key component of that review is the development of annual, statewide medical audits. In this article, we describe the nature and organization of medical care delivery under AHCCCS, outline the evolution of the annual medical audits, describe the most recent of these audits, and present and discuss the results. PMID:10311928

  13. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: The Critical Role of Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Tracy; Ganz, Patricia A.; Sledge, George W.; Levit, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Feeley, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, an influential report that described an ideal cancer care system and issued ten recommendations to address pervasive gaps in the understanding and delivery of quality cancer care. Despite generating much fervor, the report’s recommendations—including two recommendations related to quality measurement—remain largely unfulfilled. Amidst continuing concerns regarding increasing costs and questionable quality of care, the IOM charged a new committee with revisiting the 1999 report and with reassessing national cancer care, with a focus on the aging US population. The committee identified high-quality patient-clinician relationships and interactions as central drivers of quality and attributed existing quality gaps, in part, to the nation’s inability to measure and improve cancer care delivery in a systematic way. In 2013, the committee published its findings in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, which included two recommendations that emphasize coordinated, patient-centered quality measurement and information technology enhancements: Develop a national quality reporting program for cancer care as part of a learning health care system; and,Develop an ethically sound learning health care information technology system for cancer that enables real-time analysis of data from cancer patients in a variety of care settings. These recommendations underscore the need for independent national oversight, public-private collaboration, and substantial funding to create robust, patient-centered quality measurement and learning enterprises to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of cancer care in America. PMID:24839592

  14. Mandated bundled payments compel hospitals to rethink post-acute care.

    PubMed

    Baggot, Deirdre; Edeburn, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Health care is on the brink of an industrywide shift to a bundled payment model in which payment covers episodes of care extending from prehospitalization into post-acute care. Hospitals and health systems should begin development of a post-acute care network strategy in preparation for bundled payments. The strategic effort will require four broad phases: Defining the value proposition. Developing the post-acute care network. Building the bundle. Executing smartly from the start with new delivery models that reduce clinical variation and real-time performance monitoring. PMID:26595978

  15. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

    PubMed

    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are important collaborative referral sources for each other who can work together to improve the lives of cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by improving both quality of care and quality of life. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care involve the delivery of important but underutilized medical services to oncology patients by interdisciplinary teams. These subspecialties are similar in many respects, including their focus on improving cancer-related symptoms or cancer treatment-related side effects, improving health-related quality of life, lessening caregiver burden, and valuing patient-centered care and shared decision-making. They also aim to improve healthcare efficiencies and minimize costs by means such as reducing hospital lengths of stay and unanticipated readmissions. Although their goals are often aligned, different specialized skills and approaches are used in the delivery of care. For example, while each specialty prioritizes goal-concordant care through identification of patient and family preferences and values, palliative care teams typically focus extensively on using patient and family communication to determine their goals of care, while also tending to comfort issues such as symptom management and spiritual concerns. Rehabilitation clinicians may tend to focus more specifically on functional issues such as identifying and treating deficits in physical, psychological, or cognitive impairments and any resulting disability and negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, although palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are trained to diagnose and treat medically complex patients, rehabilitation clinicians also treat many patients with a single impairment and a low symptom burden. In these cases, the goal is often cure of the underlying neurologic or musculoskeletal condition. This report defines and describes cancer rehabilitation and palliative care, delineates their respective roles in comprehensive oncology care, and highlights how these services can contribute complementary components of essential quality care. An understanding of how cancer rehabilitation and palliative care are aligned in goal setting, but distinct in approach may help facilitate earlier integration of both into the oncology care continuum-supporting efforts to improve physical, psychological, cognitive, functional, and quality of life outcomes in patients and survivors. PMID:26314705

  16. Measuring the context of care in an Australian acute care hospital: a nurse survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study set out to achieve three objectives: to test the application of a context assessment tool in an acute hospital in South Australia; to use the tool to compare context in wards that had undergone an evidence implementation process with control wards; and finally to test for relationships between demographic variables (in particular experience) of nurses being studied (n = 422) with the dimensions of context. Methods The Alberta Context Tool (ACT) was administered to all nursing staff on six control and six intervention wards. A total of 217 (62%) were returned (67% from the intervention wards and 56% from control wards). Data were analysed using Stata (v9). The effect of the intervention was analysed using nested (hierarchical) analysis of variance; relationships between nurses' experience and context was examined using canonical correlation analysis. Results Results confirmed the adaptation and fit of the ACT to one acute care setting in South Australia. There was no difference in context scores between control and intervention wards. However, the tool identified significant variation between wards in many of the dimensions of context. Though significant, the relationship between nurses' experience and context was weak, suggesting that at the level of the individual nurse, few factors are related to context. Conclusions Variables operating at the level of the individual showed little relationship with context. However, the study indicated that some dimensions of context (e.g., leadership, culture) vary at the ward level, whereas others (e.g., structural and electronic resources) do not. The ACT also raised a number of interesting speculative hypotheses around the relationship between a measure of context and the capability and capacity of staff to influence it. We propose that context be considered to be dependent on ward- and hospital-level factors. Additionally, questions need to be considered about the unit of measurement of context in studies of knowledge implementation--is individual (micro), ward (meso) or hospital-level (macro) data most appropriate? The preliminary results also raise questions about how best to utilise this instrument in knowledge translation research. PMID:20673373

  17. [Generating health elicits illness? The contradictions of work performed in emergency care units of public hospitals].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Iana Vasconcelos Moreira; Russo, Gláucia Helena Araújo; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves

    2015-10-01

    In general terms, health is influenced and generated by the interaction of biological, social, economic, political and cultural factors. From this standpoint, the scope of this paper was to analyze the relationship between working in emergency care units of public hospitals and the health/sickness of the professionals who work in them. It involved a quantitative and qualitative survey, in which 240 health professionals (doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, dentists, nutritionists, audiologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists) filled out a questionnaire. All the results acknowledged the importance of work to ensure favorable conditions for good health. However, they highlighted its deleterious physical and mental effects on workers, which included stress, lack of a healthy life-style, high blood pressure and musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and sleep disorders. It is therefore important to tackle this reality in order to enhance the health of professionals and, consequently, the quality of care provided to the user, since illnesses among health workers are strongly linked to the existing health model in society. PMID:26465845

  18. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting...Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting...Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality...

  19. Family caregivers in public tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh: Risks and opportunities for infection control

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. Saiful; Luby, Stephen P.; Sultana, Rebeca; Rimi, Nadia Ali; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Uddin, Main; Nahar, Nazmun; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Gurley, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Family caregivers are integral to patient care in Bangladeshi public hospitals. This study explored family caregivers’ activities and their perceptions and practices related to disease transmission and prevention in public hospitals. Methods Trained qualitative researchers conducted a total of 48 hours of observation in 3 public tertiary care hospitals and 12 in-depth interviews with family caregivers. Results Family caregivers provided care 24 hours a day, including bedside nursing, cleaning care, and psychologic support. During observations, family members provided 2,065 episodes of care giving, 75% (1,544) of which involved close contact with patients. We observed family caregivers washing their hands with soap on only 4 occasions. The majority of respondents said diseases are transmitted through physical contact with surfaces and objects that have been contaminated with patient secretions and excretions, and avoiding contact with these contaminated objects would help prevent disease. Conclusion Family caregivers are at risk for hospital-acquired infection from their repeated exposure to infectious agents combined with their inadequate hand hygiene and knowledge about disease transmission. Future research should explore potential strategies to improve family caregivers’ knowledge about disease transmission and reduce family caregiver exposures, which may be accomplished by improving care provided by health care workers. PMID:24406254

  20. Integrative Care Therapies and Pain in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Database Review

    PubMed Central

    Luberto, Christina M.; Bogenschutz, Lois H.; Pelley, Terri J.; Dusek, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Complementary or integrative care therapies are promising adjunctive approaches to pain management for pediatric inpatients that are currently underused and understudied. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefits of integrative care therapies delivered to hospitalized children and adolescents at a large Midwestern academic pediatric medical center over a 1-year period. Methods: A retrospective chart review of an inpatient clinical database maintained by integrative care therapists over a 1-year period was used for the current study. Pre/post pain and relaxation scores associated with the delivery of inpatient integrative care therapies (primarily massage therapy and healing touch) were examined. Results: Five-hundred nineteen hospitalized children and adolescents were treated by integrative care therapists for primarily pain or anxiety needs. Patients had a mean age of 10.2 years (standard deviation, 7.0), 224 were female (43%), 383 were white (74%), and most (393 [77%]) received massage therapy. Mean pain and relaxation scores decreased significantly from pre- to post-therapy across all demographic and clinical subgroups (p?.001). Conclusions: Although integrative care therapies are increasingly requested and offered in children's hospitals, provision of these approaches is driven primarily by consumer demand rather than evidence-informed practice. Future controlled studies should examine the incremental effects of integrative care therapies as an adjunct to conventional treatment, assess how these therapies work mechanistically, and determine whether they improve outcomes, such as pain and cost, for hospitalized children and adolescents. PMID:24175871