These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

The quality of care in hospitals.  

PubMed

In recent years there has been an increase in the regulation of the medical profession. In the past there have been problems. The GMC can act only when things go seriously wrong. It has, however, introduced the health and performance procedures, increased the proportion of lay members, is working on revalidation and has introduced Good Medical Practice which makes very clear what is expected of a doctor and will be relevant to doctors' contracts. The medical Royal Colleges can be influential in raising general standards but the activities of the different colleges are not well co-ordinated and they cannot compel doctors to take part in continuing medical education, although this is an aim. Without statutory powers to introduce changes they have to carry their members with them. Audit has its problems and these are understandable because of the natural defensiveness which can occur if there is a threat of possible litigation. The Department of Health has had no proper system for measuring the quality of the care for which it is responsible and largely sees this as the responsibility of individual doctors. Responsibility for the quality of care is shared in a confusing way between different groups. But there is change in the air. There are moves for a 'patient led NHS'. The Government has a new emphasis on quality of care, there is greater sophistication in the methods used for surveying patients' experiences. Measurement of hard outcome data such as adjusted death rates can reveal underlying system failures. Finally, there is a growing realisation that within medicine, as within other complex organisations, doctors are not perfect and will always make errors. Blaming individuals will not in itself make much contribution to the improvement of the overall system: we have to work towards ways of reducing system failures. PMID:10717887

Jarman, B

2000-01-01

2

Quality of Hospital Care for Stroke Patients in The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the quality of some aspects of medical hospital care an explicit review instrument (a 'criteria map') was developed on the basis of available evidence and consensus statements. The criteria are presented as ‘optimal care trajectories’, which depend on the patient's clinical profile. The criteria map was applied in a study of 738 stroke patients over 45 years of

A. van Straten; H. van Crevel; J. D. F. Habbema; M. Limburg

1997-01-01

3

How has hospital consolidation affected the price and quality of hospital care?  

PubMed

During the 1990s, the hospital industry was transformed by mergers and acquisitions. This synthesis looks at why this rapid consolidation occurred and what impact it had on the price and quality for patients, and the cost of care for hospitals. Key findings include: Managed care was not a main driver of consolidation, but fear of managed care may have played a part. Other factors, including technological advances that reduced inpatient demand, and an antitrust environment that was receptive to consolidation contributed to consolidation. Research suggests hospital prices increased by 5 percent or more as a result of consolidation. When two hospitals merge, not only does the surviving hospital raise prices but so do its competitors. Evidence of the impact of consolidation on quality of care is limited and mixed, but the strongest studies show a reduction in quality. Hospital consolidation does modestly reduce the cost to hospitals of providing care. PMID:22051574

Vogt, William B; Town, Robert; Williams, Claudia H

2006-02-01

4

Comparing public and private hospital care service quality.  

PubMed

The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian's framework to compare and contrast Malta's public and private hospital care service quality. Through the identification of 16 service quality indicators and the use of a Likert-type scale, two questionnaires were developed. The first questionnaire measured patient pre-admission expectations for public and private hospital service quality (in respect of one another). It also determined the weighted importance given to the different service quality indicators. The second questionnaire measured patient perceptions of provided service quality. Results showed that private hospitals are expected to offer a higher quality service, particularly in the "hotel services", but it was the public sector that was exceeding its patients' expectations by the wider margin. A number of implications for public and private hospital management and policy makers were identified. PMID:10185325

Camilleri, D; O'Callaghan, M

1998-01-01

5

Helping You Choose Quality Hospital Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Quality Measures CLABSI Toolkit Topics Topics Ebola Preparedness Emergency Management High Reliability Infection Prevention and HAI Portal Monographs & Papers Pain Management Patient Safety Sentinel Event - Sentinel Event Alert ...

6

Spatial competition for quality in the market for hospital care.  

PubMed

This study analyses the market for secondary health care services when patient choice depends on the quality/distance mix that achieves utility maximization. First, the hospital's equilibrium in a Hotelling spatial competition model under simultaneous quality choices is analyzed to define hospitals' strategic behavior. A first equilibrium outcome is provided, the understanding of which is extremely useful for the policy maker wishing to improve social welfare. Second, patients are assumed to be unable, because of asymmetry of information, to observe the true quality provided. Their decisions reflect the perceived quality, which is affected by bias. Using the mean-variance method, the equilibrium previously found is investigated in a stochastic framework. PMID:15791476

Montefiori, Marcello

2005-06-01

7

Acute Care Practices Relevant to Quality End-of-life Care: A Survey of Pennsylvania Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Improving end-of-life care in the hospital is a national priority. Purpose To explore the prevalence and reasons for implementation of hospital-wide and ICU practices relevant to quality care in key end-of-life care domains,and to discern major structural determinants of practice implementation. Design Cross-sectional mixed-mode survey of Chief Nursing Officers of Pennsylvania structural determinants of practice implementation. Results The response rate was 74% (129 of 174). The prevalence of hospital and ICU practices ranged from 95% for a hospital-wide formal code policy to 6% for regularly scheduled family meetings with an attending physician in the ICU. Most practices had less than 50% implementation; most were implemented primarily for quality improvement or to keep up with the standard of care. In a multivariable model including hospital structural characteristics, only hospital size independently predicted the presence of one or more hospital initiatives (ethics consult service, OR 6.13, adjusted p=0.02; private conference room in the ICU for family meetings, OR 4.54, adjusted p<0.001). Conclusions There is low penetration of hospital practices relevant to quality end-of-life care in Pennsylvania acute care hospitals. Our results may serve to inform the development of future benchmark goals. It is critical establish a strong evidence base for the practices most associated with improved end-of-life care outcomes and to develop quality measures for end-of-life care to complement existing hospital quality measures that primarily focus on life extension. PMID:20427307

Lin, Caroline Y.; Arnold, Robert; Lave, Judith R.; Angus, Derek C.; Barnato, Amber

2014-01-01

8

Perceived nursing service quality in a tertiary care hospital, Maldives.  

PubMed

The present study explored nurses' and patients' expectations of nursing service quality, their perception of performance of nursing service quality performed by nurses, and compared nursing service quality, as perceived by nurses and patients. The sample consisted of 162 nurses and 383 patients from 11 inpatient wards/units in a tertiary care hospital in the Maldives. Data were collected using the Service Quality scale, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The results indicated that the highest expected dimension and perceived dimension for nursing service quality was Reliability. The Responsiveness dimension was the least expected dimension and the lowest performing dimension for nursing service quality as perceived by nurses and patients. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing service quality perceived by nurses and patients. The study results could be used by nurse administrators to develop strategies for improving nursing service quality so that nursing service delivery process can be formulated in such a way as to reduce differences of perception between nurses and patients regarding nursing service quality. PMID:22093756

Nashrath, Mariyam; Akkadechanunt, Thitinut; Chontawan, Ratanawadee

2011-12-01

9

Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

2012-01-01

10

Blue Shield ensures uninterrupted access to quality medical care after Palm Drive Hospital ceases operations  

E-print Network

Blue Shield ensures uninterrupted access to quality medical care after Palm Drive Hospital ceases emergency care and in-patient care at Palm Drive. We are working with our members to ensure a smooth of California member in the Sonoma County area seeking emergency medical services or inpatient care, please

Ravikumar, B.

11

Quality of Care for Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In the mid-1990s, significant gaps existed in the quality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care between rural and urban hospitals. Since then, overall AMI care quality has improved. This study uses more recent data to determine whether rural-urban AMI quality gaps have persisted. Methods: Using inpatient records data for 34,776…

Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Chan, Leighton; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Huff, Edwin D.; Hart, L. Gary

2010-01-01

12

Quality and Innovations for Caring Hospitalized Older Persons in the Unites States  

PubMed Central

Older persons are occasionally acutely ill and their hospitalizations frequently end up with complications and adverse outcomes. Medicare from U.S. federal government’s payment resource for older persons is facing financial strain. Medicare highlights both cost-saving and high quality of care while older persons are hospitalized. Several health policy changes were initiated to achieve Medicare’s goals. In response to Medicare’s health policy changes, U.S. hospital environments have been changed and these resulted in hospital quality measurements’ improvement. American seniors are facing the challenges during and around their hospital care. Several innovative measures are suggested to overcome these challenges. PMID:24490116

Yoo, Ji Won; Kim, Sun Jung; Geng, Yan; Shin, Hyun Phil; Nakagawa, Shunichi

2014-01-01

13

Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

2004-01-01

14

Hospital staffing, organization, and quality of care: Cross-national findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the effects of nurse staffing and organizational support for nursing care on nurses' dissatisfaction with their jobs, nurse burnout, and nurse reports of quality of patient care in an international sample of hospitals. Design: Multisite cross-sectional survey Setting: Adult acute-care hospitals in the U.S. (Pennsylvania), Canada (Ontario and British Columbia), England and Scotland. Study Participants: 10319 nurses

Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane

2002-01-01

15

Organizational factors associated with quality of care in US teaching hospitals.  

PubMed

This study is unique because it uses multiple regression and data envelopment analysis (DEA) to evaluate teaching hospital quality. The results support the premise that teaching hospital leadership through the effective allocation of resources can improve the quality of care. This study has managerial implications by demonstrating the positive correlation between HMO market penetration and improved clinical quality outcomes. This would suggest that improved efficiency caused by limited HMO reimbursement and tight utilization controls encourage hospitals to cut waste as well as improve their clinical care processes. Additionally, our research found that teaching hospitals with higher levels of long-term debt also had improved quality. This shows that increased investments in facilities and advanced technology at teaching hospitals can lead to enhanced quality. PMID:22329326

Harrison, Jeffrey P; Lambiase, Louis R; Zhao, Mei

2010-01-01

16

Evaluation of maternal and neonatal hospital care: quality index of completeness  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Develop an index to evaluate the maternal and neonatal hospital care of the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This descriptive cross-sectional study of national scope was based on the structure-process-outcome framework proposed by Donabedian and on comprehensive health care. Data from the Hospital Information System and the National Registry of Health Establishments were used. The maternal and neonatal network of Brazilian Unified Health System consisted of 3,400 hospitals that performed at least 12 deliveries in 2009 or whose number of deliveries represented 10.0% or more of the total admissions in 2009. Relevance and reliability were defined as criteria for the selection of variables. Simple and composite indicators and the index of completeness were constructed and evaluated, and the distribution of maternal and neonatal hospital care was assessed in different regions of the country. RESULTS A total of 40 variables were selected, from which 27 single indicators, five composite indicators, and the index of completeness of care were built. Composite indicators were constructed by grouping simple indicators and included the following variables: hospital size, level of complexity, delivery care practice, recommended hospital practice, and epidemiological practice. The index of completeness of care grouped the five variables and classified them in ascending order, thereby yielding five levels of completeness of maternal and neonatal hospital care: very low, low, intermediate, high, and very high. The hospital network was predominantly of small size and low complexity, with inadequate child delivery care and poor development of recommended and epidemiological practices. The index showed that more than 80.0% hospitals had a low index of completeness of care and that most qualified heath care services were concentrated in the more developed regions of the country. CONCLUSIONS The index of completeness proved to be of great value for monitoring the maternal and neonatal hospital care of Brazilian Unified Health System and indicated that the quality of health care was unsatisfactory. However, its application does not replace specific evaluations. PMID:25210827

da Silva, Ana Lúcia Andrade; Mendes, Antonio da Cruz Gouveia; Miranda, Gabriella Morais Duarte; de Sá, Domicio Aurélio; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Lyra, Tereza Maciel

2014-01-01

17

Quality of outpatient hospital care for children under 5 years in Afghanistan  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the quality of outpatient hospital care for children under 5 years in Afghanistan. Design Case management observations were conducted on 10–12 children under five selected by systematic random sampling in 31 outpatient hospital clinics across the country, followed by interviews with caretakers and providers. Main Outcome Measures Quality of care defined as adherence to the clinical standards described in the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Results Overall quality of outpatient care for children was suboptimal based on patient examination and caretaker counseling (median score: 27.5 on a 100 point scale). Children receiving care from female providers had better care than those seen by male providers (OR: 6.6, 95% CI: 2.0–21.9, P = 0.002), and doctors provided better quality of care than other providers (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.1–6.4, P = 0.02). The poor were more likely to receive better care in hospitals managed by non-governmental organizations than those managed by other mechanisms (OR: 15.2, 95% CI: 1.2–200.1, P = 0.04). Conclusions Efforts to strengthen optimal care provision at peripheral health clinics must be complemented with investments at the referral and tertiary care facilities to ensure care continuity. The findings of improved care by female providers, doctors and NGO's for poor patients, warrant further empirical evidence on care determinants. Optimizing care quality at referral hospitals is one of the prerequisites to ensure service utilization and outcomes for the achievement of the Child health Millennium Development Goals for Afghanistan. PMID:21242157

Lind, Allison; Edward, Anbrasi; Bonhoure, Philippe; Mustafa, Lais; Hansen, Peter; Burnham, Gilbert; Peters, David H.

2011-01-01

18

Physician Job Satisfaction and Quality of Care Among Hospital Employed Physicians in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Physician job satisfaction is reportedly associated with interpersonal quality of care, such as patient satisfaction, but\\u000a its association with technical quality of care, as determined by whether patients are offered recommended services, is unknown.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  We explored whether the job satisfaction of hospital-employed physicians in Japan is associated with the technical quality\\u000a of care, with an emphasis on process qualities as

Makiko Utsugi-Ozaki; Seiji Bito; Shinji Matsumura; Yasuaki Hayashino; Shunichi Fukuhara

2009-01-01

19

Quality of Care of Hospitalized Internal Medicine Patients Bedspaced to Non-Internal Medicine Inpatient Units  

PubMed Central

Background When the number of patients requiring hospital admission exceeds the number of available department-allotted beds, patients are often placed on a different specialty's inpatient ward, a practice known as “bedspacing”. Whether bedspacing affects quality of patient care has not been previously studied. Methods We reviewed consecutive general internal medicine (GIM) admissions for congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pneumonia at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada, from 2007 to 2011 and examined whether quality of care differs between bedspaced and nonbedspaced patients. We matched each bedspaced patient with a GIM ward patient admitted on the same call shift with the same diagnosis. The primary outcome was the ratio of the actual to the estimated length of stay (ELOS). General and disease specific measures for CHF, COPD, and pneumonia (e.g. fluid restriction) were evaluated, as well as 30-day Emergency Department (ED) and hospital readmissions. Results Overall, 1639 consecutive admissions were reviewed, and 39 matched pairs for CHF, COPD and pneumonia were studied. Differences in both general and disease specific care measures were not detected between groups. For many disease-specific comparisons, ordering and adherence to quality of care indicators was low in both groups. Conclusions We were unable to detect differences in quality of care between bedspaced and nonbedspaced patients. As high patient volumes and hospital overcrowding remains, bedspacing will likely continue. More research is required in order to determine if quality of care is compromised by this ongoing practice. PMID:25184480

Liu, Jessica; Griesman, Joshua; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Bell, Chaim M.

2014-01-01

20

Are diagnosis specific outcome indicators based on administrative data useful in assessing quality of hospital care?  

PubMed Central

Background: Hospital performance reports based on administrative data should distinguish differences in quality of care between hospitals from case mix related variation and random error effects. A study was undertaken to determine which of 12 diagnosis-outcome indicators measured across all hospitals in one state had significant risk adjusted systematic (or special cause) variation (SV) suggesting differences in quality of care. For those that did, we determined whether SV persists within hospital peer groups, whether indicator results correlate at the individual hospital level, and how many adverse outcomes would be avoided if all hospitals achieved indicator values equal to the best performing 20% of hospitals. Methods: All patients admitted during a 12 month period to 180 acute care hospitals in Queensland, Australia with heart failure (n = 5745), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 3427), or stroke (n = 2955) were entered into the study. Outcomes comprised in-hospital deaths, long hospital stays, and 30 day readmissions. Regression models produced standardised, risk adjusted diagnosis specific outcome event ratios for each hospital. Systematic and random variation in ratio distributions for each indicator were then apportioned using hierarchical statistical models. Results: Only five of 12 (42%) diagnosis-outcome indicators showed significant SV across all hospitals (long stays and same diagnosis readmissions for heart failure; in-hospital deaths and same diagnosis readmissions for AMI; and in-hospital deaths for stroke). Significant SV was only seen for two indicators within hospital peer groups (same diagnosis readmissions for heart failure in tertiary hospitals and inhospital mortality for AMI in community hospitals). Only two pairs of indicators showed significant correlation. If all hospitals emulated the best performers, at least 20% of AMI and stroke deaths, heart failure long stays, and heart failure and AMI readmissions could be avoided. Conclusions: Diagnosis-outcome indicators based on administrative data require validation as markers of significant risk adjusted SV. Validated indicators allow quantification of realisable outcome benefits if all hospitals achieved best performer levels. The overall level of quality of care within single institutions cannot be inferred from the results of one or a few indicators. PMID:14757797

Scott, I; Youlden, D; Coory, M

2004-01-01

21

Closing the quality gap: promoting evidence-based breastfeeding care in the hospital.  

PubMed

Evidence shows that hospital-based practices affect breastfeeding duration and exclusivity throughout the first year of life. However, a 2007 CDC survey of US maternity facilities documented poor adherence with evidence-based practice. Of a possible score of 100 points, the average hospital scored only 63 with great regional disparities. Inappropriate provision and promotion of infant formula were common, despite evidence that such practices reduce breastfeeding success. Twenty-four percent of facilities reported regularly giving non-breast milk supplements to more than half of all healthy, full-term infants. Metrics available for measuring quality of breastfeeding care, range from comprehensive Baby-Friendly Hospital Certification to compliance with individual steps such as the rate of in-hospital exclusive breastfeeding. Other approaches to improving quality of breastfeeding care include (1) education of hospital decision-makers (eg, through publications, seminars, professional organization statements, benchmark reports to hospitals, and national grassroots campaigns), (2) recognition of excellence, such as through Baby-Friendly hospital designation, (3) oversight by accrediting organizations such as the Joint Commission or state hospital authorities, (4) public reporting of indicators of the quality of breastfeeding care, (5) pay-for-performance incentives, in which Medicaid or other third-party payers provide additional financial compensation to individual hospitals that meet certain quality standards, and (6) regional collaboratives, in which staff from different hospitals work together to learn from each other and meet quality improvement goals at their home institutions. Such efforts, as well as strong central leadership, could affect both initiation and duration of breastfeeding, with substantial, lasting benefits for maternal and child health. PMID:19752082

Bartick, Melissa; Stuebe, Alison; Shealy, Katherine R; Walker, Marsha; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M

2009-10-01

22

Impact of Physician Specialty on Quality Care for Patients Hospitalized with Decompensated Cirrhosis  

PubMed Central

Background Decompensated cirrhosis is a common precipitant for hospitalization, and there is limited information concerning factors that influence the delivery of quality care in cirrhotic inpatients. We sought to determine the relation between physician specialty and inpatient quality care for decompensated cirrhosis. Design We reviewed 247 hospital admissions for decompensated cirrhosis, managed by hospitalists or intensivists, between 2009 and 2013. The primary outcome was quality care delivery, defined as adherence to all evidence-based specialty society practice guidelines pertaining to each specific complication of cirrhosis. Secondary outcomes included new complications, length-of-stay, and in-hospital death. Results Overall, 147 admissions (59.5%) received quality care. Quality care was given more commonly by intensivists, compared with hospitalists (71.7% vs. 53.1%, P = .006), and specifically for gastrointestinal bleeding (72% vs. 45.8%, P = .03) and hepatic encephalopathy (100% vs. 63%, P = .005). Involvement of gastroenterology consultation was also more common in admissions in which quality care was administered (68.7% vs. 54.0%, P = .023). Timely diagnostic paracentesis was associated with reduced new complications in admissions for refractory ascites (9.5% vs. 46.6%, P = .02), and reduced length-of-stay in admissions for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (5 days vs. 13 days, P = .02). Conclusions Adherence to quality indicators for decompensated cirrhosis is suboptimal among hospitalized patients. Although quality care adherence appears to be higher among cirrhotic patients managed by intensivists than by hospitalists, opportunities for improvement exist in both groups. Rational and cost-effective strategies should be sought to achieve this end. PMID:25837700

Lim, Nicholas; Lidofsky, Steven D.

2015-01-01

23

Development of quality of care indicators from systematic reviews: the case of hospital delivery  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this research is to generate quality of care indicators from systematic reviews to assess the appropriateness of obstetric care in hospitals. Methods A search for systematic reviews about hospital obstetric interventions, conducted in The Cochrane Library, clinical evidence and practice guidelines, identified 303 reviews. We selected 48 high-quality evidence reviews, which resulted in strong clinical recommendations using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The 255 remaining reviews were excluded, mainly due to a lack of strong evidence provided by the studies reviewed. Results A total of 18 indicators were formulated from these clinical recommendations, on antepartum care (8), care during delivery and postpartum (9), and incomplete miscarriage (1). Authors of the systematic reviews and specialists in obstetrics were consulted to refine the formulation of indicators. Conclusions High-quality systematic reviews, whose conclusions clearly claim in favour or against an intervention, can be a source for generating quality indicators of delivery care. To make indicators coherent, the nuances of clinical practice should be considered. Any attempt made to evaluate the extent to which delivery care in hospitals is based on scientific evidence should take the generated indicators into account. PMID:23574918

2013-01-01

24

A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

Khan, Arshia A.

2012-01-01

25

Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

2014-06-01

26

Payments and quality of care in private for-profit and public hospitals in Greece  

PubMed Central

Background Empirical evidence on how ownership type affects the quality and cost of medical care is growing, and debate on these topics is ongoing. Despite the fact that the private sector is a major provider of hospital services in Greece, little comparative information on private versus public sector hospitals is available. The aim of the present study was to describe and compare the operation and performance of private for-profit (PFP) and public hospitals in Greece, focusing on differences in nurse staffing rates, average lengths of stay (ALoS), and Social Health Insurance (SHI) payments for hospital care per patient discharged. Methods Five different datasets were prepared and analyzed, two of which were derived from information provided by the National Statistical Service (NSS) of Greece and the other three from data held by the three largest SHI schemes in the country. All data referred to the 3-year period from 2001 to 2003. Results PFP hospitals in Greece are smaller than public hospitals, with lower patient occupancy, and have lower staffing rates of all types of nurses and highly qualified nurses compared with public hospitals. Calculation of ALoS using NSS data yielded mixed results, whereas calculations of ALoS and SHI payments using SHI data gave results clearly favoring the public hospital sector in terms of cost-efficiency; in all years examined, over all specialties and all SHI schemes included in our study, unweighted ALoS and SHI payments for hospital care per discharge were higher for PFP facilities. Conclusions In a mixed healthcare system, such as that in Greece, significant performance differences were observed between PFP and public hospitals. Close monitoring of healthcare provision by hospital ownership type will be essential to permit evidence-based decisions on the future of the public/private mix in terms of healthcare provision. PMID:21943020

2011-01-01

27

Service quality in the health care industry: how are hospitals evaluated by the general public?  

PubMed

This paper investigates the "expectations" aspect of service quality in the health care industry. Specifically, an examination is made of the importance of various hospital characteristics to consumers, the dimensionality of service quality, and the relative importance of these dimensions across demographic groups. The results suggest that the competency and the behavior of physicians are the most important characteristics in the minds of consumers. Moreover, it was found that hospitals are evaluated along: (1) interpersonal, (2) amenities, (3) capabilities, and (4) accessibility dimensions. These findings are consistent with previous research in this regard. Additionally, significant differences in the importance of these factors were found across respondent gender, age, income, and education. PMID:10125829

Elliott, K M; Hall, M C; Stiles, G W

1992-01-01

28

A Perinatal Care Quality and Safety Initiative: Hospital Costs and Potential Savings  

PubMed Central

Background There is increasing national focus on hospital initiatives to improve obstetric and neonatal outcomes. While costs of providing care may decrease with improved quality, the accompanying reduced adverse outcomes may impact hospital revenues. The purpose of this study was to estimate, from a hospital perspective, the financial impacts of implementing a perinatal quality and safety initiative. Methods In 2008, a Minnesota-based health system (Fairview Health Services) launched the Zero Birth Injury (ZBI) initiative, which uses evidence-based care bundles to guide management of obstetric services. We conducted a pre-post analysis of financial impacts of ZBI, using hospital administrative records to measure costs and revenues associated with changes in maternal and neonatal birth injuries before (2008) and after (2009–11) the initiative. Results After adjusting for relevant covariates, implementation of ZBI was associated with an 11% decrease in the rate of maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes between 2008 and 2011 (AOR=0.89, p=0.076). As a result of the adverse events avoided, the hospital system saved $284,985 in costs but earned $324,333 less revenue, which produced a net financial decrease of $39,348 (or a $305 net financial loss per adverse event avoided) in 2011, compared with 2008. Conclusions Adoption of a perinatal quality and safety initiative that reduced birth injuries had little net financial impact on the hospital. ZBI produced better clinical results at a lower cost, which represents potential savings for payers, but the hospital system offering increased quality reaped no clear financial rewards. These results highlight the important role for shared-savings collaborations (among patients, providers, government and third-party payers, and employers) to incentivize quality improvement. Widespread adoption of perinatal safety initiatives combined with innovative payment models may contribute to better health at reduced cost. PMID:23991507

Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Sommerness, Samantha; Rauk, Phillip; Gams, Rebecca; Hirt, Charles; Davis, Stanley; Miller, Kristi K.; Landers, Daniel V.

2013-01-01

29

The hospital standardised mortality ratio: a powerful tool for Dutch hospitals to assess their quality of care?  

PubMed Central

Aim of the study To use the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR), as a tool for Dutch hospitals to analyse their death rates by comparing their risk-adjusted mortality with the national average. Method The method uses routine administrative databases that are available nationally in The Netherlands—the National Medical Registration dataset for the years 2005–2007. Diagnostic groups that led to 80% of hospital deaths were included in the analysis. The method adjusts for a number of case-mix factors per diagnostic group determined through a logistic regression modelling process. Results In The Netherlands, the case-mix factors are primary diagnosis, age, sex, urgency of admission, length of stay, comorbidity (Charlson Index), social deprivation, source of referral and month of admission. The Dutch HSMR model performs well at predicting a patient's risk of death as measured by a c statistic of the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.91. The ratio of the HSMR of the Dutch hospital with the highest value in 2005–2007 is 2.3 times the HSMR of the hospital with the lowest value. Discussion Overall hospital HSMRs and mortality at individual diagnostic group level can be monitored using statistical process control charts to give an early warning of possible problems with quality of care. The use of routine data in a standardised and robust model can be of value as a starting point for improvement of Dutch hospital outcomes. HSMRs have been calculated for several other countries. PMID:20172876

Pieter, D; van der Veen, A A; Kool, R B; Aylin, P; Bottle, A; Westert, G P; Jones, S

2010-01-01

30

Standard operating procedure changed pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour: a quality control study  

PubMed Central

Introduction The ability of standard operating procedures to improve pre-hospital critical care by changing pre-hospital physician behaviour is uncertain. We report data from a prospective quality control study of the effect on pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour of implementing a standard operating procedure for pre-hospital controlled ventilation. Materials and methods Anaesthesiologists from eight pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region prospectively registered pre-hospital advanced airway-management data according to the Utstein-style template. We collected pre-intervention data from February 1st 2011 to January 31st 2012, implemented the standard operating procedure on February 1st 2012 and collected post intervention data from February 1st 2012 until October 31st 2012. We included transported patients of all ages in need of controlled ventilation treated with pre-hospital endotracheal intubation or the insertion of a supraglottic airways device. The objective was to evaluate whether the development and implementation of a standard operating procedure for controlled ventilation during transport could change pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour and thereby increase the use of automated ventilators in these patients. Results The implementation of a standard operating procedure increased the overall prevalence of automated ventilator use in transported patients in need of controlled ventilation from 0.40 (0.34-0.47) to 0.74 (0.69-0.80) with a prevalence ratio of 1.85 (1.57-2.19) (p?=?0.00). The prevalence of automated ventilator use in transported traumatic brain injury patients in need of controlled ventilation increased from 0.44 (0.26-0.62) to 0.85 (0.62-0.97) with a prevalence ratio of 1.94 (1.26-3.0) (p?=?0.0039). The prevalence of automated ventilator use in patients transported after return of spontaneous circulation following pre-hospital cardiac arrest increased from 0.39 (0.26-0.48) to 0.69 (0.58-0.78) with a prevalence ratio of 1.79 (1.36-2.35) (p?=?0.00). Conclusion We have shown that the implementation of a standard operating procedure for pre-hospital controlled ventilation can significantly change pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour. PMID:24308781

2013-01-01

31

Quality of nursing care and satisfaction of patients attended at a teaching hospital1  

PubMed Central

Objectives assess the quality of nursing care, the patients' satisfaction and the correlation between both. Method cross-sectional study, involving 275 patients hospitalized at a teaching hospital in the Central-West of Brazil. The data were collected through the simultaneous application of three instruments. Next, they were included in an electronic database and analyzed in function of the positivity, median value and Spearman's correlation coefficients. Results among the nursing care assessed, only two were considered safe - hygiene and physical comfort; nutrition and hydration - while the remainder were classified as poor. Nevertheless, the patients were satisfied with the care received in the domains assessed: technical-professional, confidence and educational. This can be justified by the weak to moderate correlation that was observed among these variables. Conclusion Despite the quality deficit, the patients' satisfaction level with the nursing care received was high. These results indicate that the institution needs to center its objectives on a continuing evaluation system of the care quality, aiming to attend to the patients' expectations. PMID:25029057

de Freitas, Juliana Santana; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Minamisava, Ruth; Bezerra, Ana Lúcia Queiroz; de Sousa, Maiana Regina Gomes

2014-01-01

32

Management matters: the link between hospital organisation and quality of patient care  

PubMed Central

Some hospital trusts and health authorities consistently outperform others on different dimensions of performance. Why? There is some evidence that "management matters", as well as the combined efforts of individual clinicians and teams. However, studies that have been conducted on the link between the organisation and management of services and quality of patient care can be criticised both theoretically and methodologically. A larger, and arguably more rigorous, body of work exists on the performance of firms in the private sector, often conducted within the disciplines of organisational behaviour or human resource management. Studies in these traditions have focused on the effects of decentralisation, participation, innovative work practices, and "complementarities" on outcome variables such as job satisfaction and performance. The aim of this paper is to identify a number of reviews and research traditions that might bring new ideas into future work on the determinants of hospital performance. Ideally, future research should be more theoretically informed and should use longitudinal rather than cross sectional research designs. The use of statistical methods such as multilevel modelling, which allow for the inclusion of variables at different levels of analysis, would enable estimation of the separate contribution that structure and process make to hospital outcomes. Key Words: hospital organisation; hospital performance; management; quality of care PMID:11239143

West, E.

2001-01-01

33

Health-related Quality of Life among hospitalized older people awaiting residential aged care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Health related quality of life (HRQoL) in very late life is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to assess HRQoL and health outcomes at four months follow-up in a group of older people awaiting transfer to residential aged care. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial conducted in three public hospitals in

Lynne C Giles; Graeme Hawthorne; Maria Crotty

2009-01-01

34

University Hospitals: creating the infrastructure for quality and value through accountable care.  

PubMed

University Hospitals Health System Inc. (UH), in Cleveland, Ohio, like many hospitals and healthcare systems, sought to anticipate the dramatic changes of healthcare reform, including its increased focus on quality and outcomes. UH evaluated incentives to keep patients out of hospital and to ease mounting pressures on reimbursement and costs. During UH's strategic planning sessions in 2009 and 2010, we identified value--the combination of quality and efficiency--to be a key driver of our future success. Ahead of the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, in early 2010 we chose to proceed with the formation of an accountable care organization (ACO). We believed the ACO was a novel vehicle by which to improve the efficient delivery of our high-quality healthcare to maximize the value of the services we provide. We also believed that the most successful strategy, if it can be achieved, is to build on success. A major success, or a series of smaller successes, will go a long way toward achieving operational buy-in, enhancing respect for strategic initiatives, and convincing physicians of the need for change. Through thoughtful governance, effective plan design, customized data analytics, physician networks and incentives, innovative patient engagement, and supplemental coordination resources, our ACOs have succeeded in improving population health and delivering value. PMID:25671992

Zenty, Thomas F; Bieber, Eric J; Hammack, Elizabeth R

2014-01-01

35

Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Record Systems and Process Quality of Care: Evidence from a Panel Data Analysis of U.S. Acute-Care Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate the incremental effects of transitions in electronic health record (EHR) system capabilities on hospital process quality. Data Source Hospital Compare (process quality), Health Information and Management Systems Society Analytics (EHR use), and Inpatient Prospective Payment System (hospital characteristics) for 2006–2010. Study Setting Hospital EHR systems were categorized into five levels (Level_0 to Level_4) based on use of eight clinical applications. Level_3 systems can meet 2011 EHR “meaningful use” objectives. Process quality was measured as composite scores on a 100-point scale for heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, and surgical care infection prevention. Statistical analyses were conducted using fixed effects linear panel regression model for all hospitals, hospitals stratified on condition-specific baseline quality, and for large hospitals. Principal Findings Among all hospitals, implementing Level_3 systems yielded an incremental 0.35–0.49 percentage point increase in quality (over Level_2) across three conditions. Hospitals in bottom quartile of baseline quality increased 1.16–1.61 percentage points across three conditions for reaching Level_3. However, transitioning to Level_4 yielded an incremental decrease of 0.90–1.0 points for three conditions among all hospitals and 0.65–1.78 for bottom quartile hospitals. Conclusions Hospitals transitioning to EHR systems capable of meeting 2011 meaningful use objectives improved process quality, and lower quality hospitals experienced even higher gains. However, hospitals that transitioned to more advanced systems saw quality declines. PMID:22816527

Appari, Ajit; Eric Johnson, M; Anthony, Denise L

2013-01-01

36

Differentiated practice, patient-oriented care and quality of work in a hospital in the Netherlands.  

PubMed

This article describes a quantitative study of the relationship between differentiated practice on the one side and patient-oriented care and quality of work on the other. Nursing wards where differentiated practice has been implemented (intervention group) have been compared with wards where differentiated practice has not been implemented (reference group). The research variables with regard to differentiated practice, patient-oriented care and quality of work have been measured by questionnaires. Subjects were 68 nurses and six supervisors from six nursing wards from one hospital. The results show that the extent to which differentiated practice had been implemented varied between the wards. With regard to patient-oriented care differences have been found between the intervention and reference group on the variables patient assignment and use of the nursing process, but not on the variables of tasks and communication. Concerning quality of work, differences have been found on: social support from the supervisor, social-emotional leadership and health complaints. Rank order correlations between differentiated practice and patient-oriented care and between differentiated practice and quality of work were not significant. Practical implications with regard to the use of differentiated practice and implications for further research are discussed. PMID:15005662

Boumans, Nicolle P G; Landeweerd, Jan A; Visser, Mildred

2004-03-01

37

Understanding the Role of the Professional Practice Environment on Quality of Care in Magnet® and Non-Magnet Hospitals  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between Magnet Recognition® and nurse-reported quality of care. BACKGROUND Magnet® hospitals are recognized for nursing excellence and quality patient outcomes; however, few studies have explored contributing factors for these superior outcomes. METHODS This was a secondary analysis of linked nurse survey data, hospital administrative data, and a listing of American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet hospitals. Multivariate regressions were modeled before and after propensity score matching to assess the relationship between Magnet status and quality of care. A mediation model assessed the indirect effect of the professional practice environment on quality of care. RESULTS Nurse-reported quality of care was significantly associated with Magnet Recognition after matching. The professional practice environment mediates the relationship between Magnet status and quality of care. CONCLUSION A prominent feature of Magnet hospitals, a professional practice environment that is supportive of nursing, plays a role in explaining why Magnet hospitals have better nurse-reported quality of care. PMID:24316613

Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Rosen, Jennifer E.; McHugh, Matthew D.

2014-01-01

38

ADOPTION OF THE WHO ASSESSMENT TOOL ON THE QUALITY OF HOSPITAL CARE FOR MOTHERS AND NEWBORNS IN ALBANIA  

PubMed Central

Aim: The aim of the adoption process of the “Quality of hospital care for mothers and newborns babies, assessment tool” (WHO, 2009) was to provide the Albanian health professionals of maternity hospitals with a tool that may help them assess the quality of perinatal care and identify key areas of pregnancy, childbirth and newborn care that need to be improved. Methods: Four maternity hospitals (one university hospital and three regional hospitals) were selected for the assessment using this standard tool covering over 600 items grouped into 13 areas ranging from supportive services to case management. Sources of information consisted of site visits, hospital statistics, medical records, observation of cases and interviews with staff and patients. A score was assigned to each item (range 0-3) and area of care. The assessments were carried out in two rounds: in 2009 and in 2011. These assessments provided semi-quantitative data on the quality of hospital care for mothers and newborns. Results: Data collected on the first round established a baseline assessment, whereas the second round monitored the subsequent changes. The findings of the second round revealed improvements encountered in all maternities, notwithstanding differences in the levels of improvement between maternities, not necessarily linked with extra financial inputs. Conclusions: The Albanian experience indicates a successful process of the adoption of the WHO tool on the quality of hospital care for mothers and newborn babies. The adopted tool can be used country-wide as a component of a quality improvement strategy in perinatal health care in Albania. PMID:23378688

Mersini, Ehadu; Novi, Silvana; Tushe, Eduard; Gjoni, Maksim; Burazeri, Genc

2012-01-01

39

[Quality indicators in the acute coronary syndrome for the analysis of the pre- and in-hospital care process].  

PubMed

We present a map of 27 indicators to measure the care quality given to patients with acute coronary syndrome attended in the pre- and hospital area. This includes technical process indicators (registration of care intervals, performance of electrocardiogram, monitoring and vein access, assessment of prognostic risk, hemorrhage and in-hospital mortality, use of reperfusion techniques and performance of echocardiograph), pharmacological process indicators (platelet receptors inhibition, anticoagulation, thrombolysis, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting inhibitors and lipid lowering drugs) and outcomes indicators (quality scales of the care given and mortality). PMID:20451303

Felices-Abad, F; Latour-Pérez, J; Fuset-Cabanes, M P; Ruano-Marco, M; Cuñat-de la Hoz, J; del Nogal-Sáez, F

2010-01-01

40

Investigating organizational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organizational culture, professional involvement and the quality of care in European hospitals: the 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe (DUQuE)' project  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Hospitals in European countries apply a wide range of quality improvement strategies. Knowledge of the effectiveness of these strategies, implemented as part of an overall hospital quality improvement system, is limited. METHODS\\/DESIGN: We propose to study the relationships among organisational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organisational culture, professionals' involvement with the quality of hospital care, including clinical effectiveness, patient

Oliver Groene; Niek Klazinga; Cordula Wagner; Onyebuchi A Arah; Andrew Thompson; Charles Bruneau; Rosa Suñol

2010-01-01

41

Reducing unnecessary hospital days to improve quality of care through physician accountability: a cluster randomised trial  

PubMed Central

Background Over 20% of hospital bed use is inappropriate, implying a waste of resources and the increase of patient iatrogenic risk. Methods This is a cluster, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, carried out in a large University Hospital of Northern Italy, aiming to evaluate the effect of a strategy to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The primary outcome was the percentage of patient-days compatible with discharge. Among secondary objectives, to describe the strategy’s effect in the long-term, as well as on hospital readmissions, considered to be a marker of the quality of hospital care. The 12 medical wards with the longest length of stay participated. Effectiveness was measured at the individual level on 3498 eligible patients during monthly index days. Patients admitted or discharged on index days, or with stay >90 days, were excluded. All ward staff was blinded to the index days, while staff in the control arm and data analysts were blinded to the trial’s objectives and interventions. The strategy comprised the distribution to physicians of the list of their patients whose hospital stay was compatible with discharge according to a validated Delay Tool, and of physician length of stay profiles, followed by audits managed autonomously by the physicians of the ward. Results During the 12 months of data collection, over 50% of patient-days were judged to be compatible with discharge. Delays were mainly due to problems with activities under medical staff control. Multivariate analysis considering clustering showed that the strategy reduced patient-days compatible with discharge by 16% in the intervention vs control group, (OR=0.841; 95% CI, 0.735 to 0.963; P=0.012). Follow-up at 1 year did not yield a statistically significant difference between the percentages of patient-days judged to be compatible with discharge between the two arms (OR=0.818; 95% CI, 0.476 to 1.405; P=0.47). There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission and mortality rates for all eligible patients (N=3498) between the two arms. Conclusions Results indicate that a strategy, involving physician direct accountability, can reduce unnecessary hospital days. Relatively simple interventions, like the one assessed in this study, should be implemented in all hospitals with excessive lengths of stay, since unnecessary prolongation may be harmful to patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01422811. PMID:23305251

2013-01-01

42

Quality of Care is Similar for Safety-Net and Non-Safety-Net Hospitals  

MedlinePLUS

... on your PDA or mobile device Health Care Innovations Exchange Innovations and Tools to Improve Quality and Reduce Disparities ... Comparative Effectiveness Cross-Agency Communications Health Information Technology Innovations & Emerging Issues Patient Safety Prevention & Care Management Value ...

43

Critical role of nutrition in improving quality of care: an interdisciplinary call to action to address adult hospital malnutrition.  

PubMed

The current era of health care delivery, with its focus on providing high-quality, affordable care, presents many challenges to hospital-based health professionals. The prevention and treatment of hospital malnutrition offers a tremendous opportunity to optimize the overall quality of patient care, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce costs. Unfortunately, malnutrition continues to go unrecognized and untreated in many hospitalized patients. This article represents a call to action from the interdisciplinary Alliance to Advance Patient Nutrition to highlight the critical role of nutrition intervention in clinical care and suggest practical ways for prompt diagosis and treatment of malnourished patients and those at risk for malnutrition. We underscore the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to addressing malnutrition both in the hospital and in the acute post-hospital phase. It is well recognized that malnutrition is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although data vary across studies, available evidence shows early nutrition intervention can reduce complication rates, length of hospital stay, re-admission rates, mortality, and cost of care. The key is to identify patients systematically who are malnourished or at risk and to promptly intervene. We present a novel care model to drive improvement, emphasizing the following six principles: (1) create an institutional culture where all stakeholders value nutrition; (2) redefine clinicians' roles to include nutrition care; (3) recognize and diagnose all malnourished patients and those at risk; (4) rapidly implement comprehensive nutrition interventions and continued monitoring; (5) communicate nutrition care plans; and (6) develop a comprehensive discharge nutrition care and education plan. PMID:23865276

Tappenden, Kelly A; Quatrara, Beth; Parkhurst, Melissa L; Malone, Ainsley M; Fanjiang, Gary; Ziegler, Thomas R

2013-01-01

44

Quality of surgical care in hospitals providing internship training in Kenya: a cross sectional survey.  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate services in hospitals providing internship training to graduate doctors in Kenya. Methods A survey of 22 internship training hospitals was conducted. Availability of key resources spanning infrastructure, personnel, equipment and drugs was assessed by observation. Outcomes and process of care for pre-specified priority conditions (head injury, chest injury, fractures, burns and acute abdomen) were evaluated by auditing case records. Results Each hospital had at least one consultant surgeon. Scheduled surgical outpatient clinics, major ward rounds and elective (half day) theatre lists were provided once per week in 91%, 55% and 9%, respectively. In all other hospitals, these were conducted twice weekly. Basic drugs were not always available (e.g. gentamicin, morphine and pethidine in 50%, injectable antistaphylococcal penicillins in 5% hospitals). Fewer than half of hospitals had all resources needed to provide oxygen. One hundred and forty-five of 956 cases evaluated underwent operations under general or spinal anaesthesia. We found operation notes for 99% and anaesthetic records for 72%. Pre-operatively measured vital signs were recorded in 80% of cases, and evidence of consent to operation was found in 78%. Blood loss was documented in only one case and sponge and instrument counts in 7%. Conclusions Evaluation of surgical services would be improved by development and dissemination of clear standards of care. This survey suggests that internship hospitals may be poorly equipped and documented care suggests inadequacies in quality and training. Objectif Evaluer les services dans les hôpitaux offrant des stages de formation à des médecins diplômés au Kenya. Méthodes Enquête auprès de 22 hôpitaux offrant des stages de formation. La disponibilité des ressources clés incluant infrastructure, personnel, matériel et médicaments a été évaluée par observation. Les résultats et processus de soins pour des affections prioritaires prédéfinies (blessure à la tête, blessure à la poitrine, fractures, brûlures et maux d'estomac aigus) ont été évalués par l'audit des dossiers des cas. Résultats Chaque hôpital avait au moins un chirurgien consultant. Les cliniques chirurgicales ambulatoires planifiées, les principales tournées dans les chambres d'hospitalisation et des listes d'opérations choisies (demi-journée) ont été fournies une fois par semaine dans 91%, 55% et 9% des cas respectivement. Dans tous les autres hôpitaux, cela a été effectué deux fois par semaine. Les médicaments de base n’étaient pas toujours disponibles (par ex. la gentamicine, la morphine et la péthidine dans 50% des hôpitaux, les pénicillines anti-staphylococciques injectables dans 5%). Moins de la moitié des hôpitaux disposaient de toutes les ressources nécessaires pour fournir de l'oxygène. 145 sur 956 cas évalués ont subi des opérations sous anesthésie générale ou rachidienne. Nous avons retrouvé des notes d'opération pour 99% des cas et des dossiers d'anesthésie pour 72%. Les mesures préopératoires des signes vitaux ont été enregistrées dans 80% des cas et la preuve du consentement pour l'opération a été trouvée dans 78% des cas. La perte de sang a été documentée dans un seul cas et le comptage des éponges et instruments dans 7% des cas. Conclusions L’évaluation des services de chirurgie serait améliorée par le développement et la dissémination de normes de soins claires. Cette étude suggère que les hôpitaux offrant des stages peuvent être mal équipés et les soins enregistrés suggèrent des insuffisances dans la qualité et la formation. Objetivo Evaluar los servicios en hospitales que proveen entrenamiento a m

Mwinga, Stephen; Kulohoma, Colette; Mwaniki, Paul; Idowu, Rachel; Masasabi, John; English, Mike

2015-01-01

45

Using statistical process control chart techniques to ensure quality of care in pharmacy department of a hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ensure high quality pharmaceutical care in a 1200-bed teaching hospital in southern Taiwan, patient- centered performance indicators, developed based on medication-use indicators, and pharmacy operational indicators were routinely monitored using sequential detection analysis of control charts. A sequential control chart approach was proposed to automatically inspect the outliers at the last time point and email each responsible pharmacist their

T. W. Chien; Agnes L. F. Chan; Henry W. C. Leung

2011-01-01

46

Measuring Rural Hospital Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

2004-01-01

47

Improving paediatric and neonatal care in rural district hospitals in the highlands of Papua New Guinea: a quality improvement approach  

PubMed Central

Background In developing countries such as Papua New Guinea (PNG), district hospitals play a vital role in clinical care, training health-care workers, implementing immunization and other public health programmes and providing necessary data on disease burdens and outcomes. Pneumonia and neonatal conditions are a major cause of child admission and death in hospitals throughout PNG. Oxygen therapy is an essential component of the management of pneumonia and neonatal conditions, but facilities for oxygen and care of the sick newborn are often inadequate, especially in district hospitals. Improving this area may be a vehicle for improving overall quality of care. Method A qualitative study of five rural district hospitals in the highlands provinces of Papua New Guinea was undertaken. A structured survey instrument was used by a paediatrician and a biomedical technician to assess the quality of paediatric care, the case-mix and outcomes, resources for delivery of good-quality care for children with pneumonia and neonatal illnesses, existing oxygen systems and equipment, drugs and consumables, infection-control facilities and the reliability of the electricity supply to each hospital. A floor plan was drawn up for the installation of the oxygen concentrators and a plan for improving care of sick neonates, and a process of addressing other priorities was begun. Results In remote parts of PNG, many district hospitals are run by under-resourced non-government organizations. Most hospitals had general wards in which both adults and children were managed together. Paediatric case-loads ranged between 232 and 840 patients per year with overall case-fatality rates (CFR) of 3–6% and up to 15% among sick neonates. Pneumonia accounts for 28–37% of admissions with a CFR of up to 8%. There were no supervisory visits by paediatricians, and little or no continuing professional development of staff. Essential drugs were mostly available, but basic equipment for the care of sick neonates was often absent or incomplete. Infection control measures were inadequate in most hospitals. Cylinders were the major source of oxygen for the district hospitals, and logistical problems and large indirect costs meant that oxygen was under-utilized. There were multiple electricity interruptions, but hospitals had back-up generators to enable the use of oxygen concentrators. After 6 months in each of the five hospitals, high-dependency care areas were planned, oxygen concentrators installed, staff trained in their use, and a plan was set out for improving neonatal care. Interpretation If MGD-4 targets for child health are to be met, reducing neonatal mortality and deaths from pneumonia will have to include better quality services in district hospitals. Establishing better oxygen supplies with a systems approach can be a vehicle for addressing other areas of quality and safety in district hospitals. PMID:24621233

Sa’avu, Martin; Duke, Trevor; Matai, Sens

2014-01-01

48

Is health care a special challenge to quality management? Insights from the Danderyd Hospital case.  

PubMed

A 10-year quality journey of a Swedish university hospital is described in this case study based on a variety of data sources. A series of quality initiatives were implemented according to total quality management (TQM) "best practice." Many projects were successful, but still a majority of those did not meet the staff's requirement of practical relevance, and they provoked scepticism toward instruments introduced and resistance to service-related quality definitions. The hospital's incentive structures did not reward an engagement in improvement activities. The findings are interpreted as demonstrating that the programs were viewed upon as part of a "management" rather than "professional" agenda, despite the underlying philosophy of TQM. It is suggested that applying professional practice development approaches to improvement initiatives might help to overcome the barrier thus created. PMID:14603787

Striem, Jörgen; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats

2003-01-01

49

Improving hospital-based quality of care by reducing HIV-related stigma: evaluation results from Vietnam.  

PubMed

Operations Research conducted at four hospitals in Vietnam sought to reduce HIV-related stigma and discrimination among hospital workers. The quasi-experimental study compared effects of focusing on 'fear-based' stigma (stemming from lack of knowledge) versus both fear-based and social stigma (stemming from moral judgments). Interventions included staff training (ranging from physicians to ward cleaners), hospital policy development, and supplies provision. At baseline (n = 795), reported stigma was substantial (e.g., about half of hospital workers indicated fear of casually touching PLHIV, and felt HIV was a punishment for bad behavior). By endline, stigma measures had improved significantly for both intervention groups (e.g., proportion reporting signs on beds indicating HIV status decreased from 51 to 24 % in Arm 1, and 31 to 7 % in Arm 2), with the combined intervention group showing greater effects. This study highlights successful strategies to reduce stigma, and thus, improve quality of care for PLHIV. PMID:25382350

Pulerwitz, Julie; Oanh, Khuat Thi Hai; Akinwolemiwa, Dayo; Ashburn, Kim; Nyblade, Laura

2015-02-01

50

Using simulation technique and genetic algorithm to improve the quality care of a hospital emergency department  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report shows how the quality of service at a hospital emergency department (ED) can be improved by utilizing simulation and a genetic algorithm (GA) to appropriately adjust nurses’ schedules without hiring additional staff. The simulation model is developed to cover the complete flow for the patient through the ED. The GA is then applied to find a near-optimal nurse

Jinn-yi Yeh; Wen-shan Lin

2007-01-01

51

Can Networked Hospital Performance Comparisons Be Linked with Total Quality Management?A Scenario Based on the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council publishes annually performance comparisons on hospitals in nine regions of the state. As a result, hospitals are under public pressure to use these data in Total Quality Management programs. This article illustrates both the opportunity and the risk that pub licly funded information poses for hospitals.

J. Marvin Bentley

1993-01-01

52

Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.  

PubMed

Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n?=?357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

2013-10-01

53

A 10?year (2000–2010) systematic review of interventions to improve quality of care in hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Against a backdrop of rising healthcare costs, variability in care provision and an increased emphasis on patient satisfaction, the need for effective interventions to improve quality of care has come to the fore. This is the first ten year (2000–2010) systematic review of interventions which sought to improve quality of care in a hospital setting. This review moves beyond a broad assessment of outcome significance levels and makes recommendations for future effective and accessible interventions. Methods Two researchers independently screened a total of 13,195 English language articles from the databases PsychInfo, Medline, PubMed, EmBase and CinNahl. There were 120 potentially relevant full text articles examined and 20 of those articles met the inclusion criteria. Results Included studies were heterogeneous in terms of approach and scientific rigour and varied in scope from small scale improvements for specific patient groups to large scale quality improvement programmes across multiple settings. Interventions were broadly categorised as either technical (n?=?11) or interpersonal (n?=?9). Technical interventions were in the main implemented by physicians and concentrated on improving care for patients with heart disease or pneumonia. Interpersonal interventions focused on patient satisfaction and tended to be implemented by nursing staff. Technical interventions had a tendency to achieve more substantial improvements in quality of care. Conclusions The rigorous application of inclusion criteria to studies established that despite the very large volume of literature on quality of care improvements, there is a paucity of hospital interventions with a theoretically based design or implementation. The screening process established that intervention studies to date have largely failed to identify their position along the quality of care spectrum. It is suggested that this lack of theoretical grounding may partly explain the minimal transfer of health research to date into policy. It is recommended that future interventions are established within a theoretical framework and that selected quality of care outcomes are assessed using this framework. Future interventions to improve quality of care will be most effective when they use a collaborative approach, involve multidisciplinary teams, utilise available resources, involve physicians and recognise the unique requirements of each patient group. PMID:22925835

2012-01-01

54

The Influence of Primary Care Quality on Hospital Admissions for People with Dementia in England: A Regression Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives To test the impact of a UK pay-for-performance indicator, the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) dementia review, on three types of hospital admission for people with dementia: emergency admissions where dementia was the primary diagnosis; emergency admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs); and elective admissions for cataract, hip replacement, hernia, prostate disease, or hearing loss. Methods Count data regression analyses of hospital admissions from 8,304 English general practices from 2006/7 to 2010/11. We identified relevant admissions from national Hospital Episode Statistics and aggregated them to practice level. We merged these with practice-level data on the QOF dementia review. In the base case, the exposure measure was the reported QOF register. As dementia is commonly under-diagnosed, we tested a predicted practice register based on consensus estimates. We adjusted for practice characteristics including measures of deprivation and uptake of a social benefit to purchase care services (Attendance Allowance). Results In the base case analysis, higher QOF achievement had no significant effect on any type of hospital admission. However, when the predicted register was used to account for under-diagnosis, a one-percentage point improvement in QOF achievement was associated with a small reduction in emergency admissions for both dementia (-0.1%; P=0.011) and ACSCs (-0.1%; P=0.001). In areas of greater deprivation, uptake of Attendance Allowance was consistently associated with significantly lower emergency admissions. In all analyses, practices with a higher proportion of nursing home patients had significantly lower admission rates for elective and emergency care. Conclusion In one of three analyses at practice level, the QOF review for dementia was associated with a small but significant reduction in unplanned hospital admissions. Given the rising prevalence of dementia, increasing pressures on acute hospital beds and poor outcomes associated with hospital stays for this patient group, this small change may be clinically and economically relevant. PMID:25816231

Kasteridis, Panagiotis; Mason, Anne R.; Goddard, Maria K.; Jacobs, Rowena; Santos, Rita; McGonigal, Gerard

2015-01-01

55

Relationship of Workplace Factors and Job Involvement of Healthcare Employees with Quality of Patient Care in Teaching and Non-teaching Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the effects of certain hospital workplace factors on job involvement among healthcare employees\\u000a at the paramedical levels and quality of patient care in public hospitals in North India. The sample consisted of paramedical\\u000a healthcare employees (N?=?200), from a medical college affiliated teaching hospital and public hospitals (non-teaching) run by the railway services.\\u000a Data were analyzed statistically

Manisha Agarwal; Abhishek Sharma

2010-01-01

56

Serendipity: translational research, high quality care, and the children's hospital. Jay and Margie Grosfeld Lecture.  

PubMed

The word "serendipity" was coined by Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford, in a letter he wrote in January 1754. He defined serendipity as the making of "….discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which [you] were not in quest of….you must observe that no discovery of a thing you are looking for comes under this description." I would like to make the case that a children's hospital can be a superb setting in which to attempt this feat-to generate Serendipity. I would also like to convince you that this attribute is absolutely essential to providing the very best care for children. PMID:24439574

Kandel, Jessica J

2014-01-01

57

[The value of hospital data bases in the quality of patient care].  

PubMed

Massive gathering of clinical records started quite soon, at the turn of the last century, about 100 years ago. In that period keeping and gathering of medical records gradually evolved from paper medical records to computer-based medical records. Software that we use for this is quite different. We are witnessing tendency that each medical institution is creating software solely for their use, that leads to difference of gathered medical data and their validity for further analysis. In this paper we tested value of gathering and processing medical records through a hospital software, regarding time consumption in everyday work, as well as value of gathered and processed data. Statistically significant difference was found in terms of time needed for complete gathering and processing of medical data of hospitalized patients, as well as most of its segments (administering of admission, forming a medical history, forming a discharge letter). No statistically significant differences were found in terms of value of gathered and processed data in the forms of electronical records, compared to those formed on "traditional" basis. We conclude that the future of gathering, forming and processing of medical documentation of hospitalized patients is solely through interactive computer databases, and that their everyday spreading through all systems and levels of health care is absolutely necessary. Only that way we shall be able to fully use possibilities that such interactive system offers in improving management of patients. PMID:15137229

Zubcevi?, Smail; Dozi?, Melika; Catibusi?, Feriha; Suljevi?-Dropi?, Vesna

2004-01-01

58

Quality of Diabetes Care at Outpatient Clinic, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the clinical care of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) patients at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), a countrywide tertiary referral center in Muscat, Oman.? Methods We performed a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study using a total of 673 Omani T2D patients from the Diabetes and Family Medicine Clinics at SQUH. We collected patient data from June 2010 to February 2012 from the Hospital Information System (HIS). Patients had to be Omani, aged more than 18 years old, and have T2D with active follow-up and at least three visits within one year to be included in the study. Ninety-three percent of the patients (n=622) were on oral hypoglycemic drugs and/or insulin, and 70% were on statins. Patients’ anthropometric data, biochemical investigations, blood pressure, and duration of diabetes were recorded from the HIS.? Results Using the recommended standards and guidelines of medical care in diabetes (American Diabetes Association and the American National Cholesterol Education Program III NCDP NIII standards), we observed that 22% of the patients achieved a HbA1C goal of <7%, 47% achieved blood pressure goal of <140/80mm Hg, 48% achieved serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol goal of <2.6mmol/L, 67% achieved serum triglycerides goal of <1.7 mmol/L, 59% of males and 43% of females achieved high density lipoprotein cholesterol goals (males>1.0; females >1.3mmol/L). Almost 60% of the patients had urinary microalbumin/creatinine ratio within the normal range.? Conclusions The clinical outcomes of the care that T2D patients get at SQUH were lower than those reported in Europe and North America. However, it is similar to those reported in other countries in the Arabian Gulf.

Al-Sinani, Sawsan; Al-Mamari, Ali; Woodhouse, Nicolas; Al-Shafie, Omaiyma; Amar, Fatima; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Hassan, Mohammed; Bayoumi, Riad

2015-01-01

59

Quality improvement of nursing care in hospitals in India: the dynamic approach.  

PubMed

A workshop was held in Calcutta in August 1992 by the Nurses' Research Society of India (NRSI), in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing of the UK, Dynamic Quality Improvement Programme (DQIP), to introduce an approach to quality improvement to nurses in India interested in evaluating and improving the care they provide. Since then, three sites have implemented the system for standard setting and audit (Dynamic Standard Setting System) which is the method for evaluating care used within that approach. An appraisal of the progress of the sites to date indicates that, in the clinical setting, nurses are progressing well with the writing of standards and have experienced little difficulty in understanding the theory and processes involved. They are currently revising the standards written with a view to implementing them and auditing them in the near future. This article outlines the introduction of dynamic quality improvement and the Dynamic Standard Setting System to the nurses in India and describes the progress of one of the test-sites currently working on its implementation. PMID:7655810

Duff, L; Harvey, G; Handa, U; Kitson, A

1995-06-01

60

Quality Control in Linen and Laundry Service at A Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in India  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The clean bedding and clean clothes installs psychological confidence in the patients and the public and enhances their faith in the services rendered by the hospital. Being an important Component in the management of the patients, a study was carried out to find out the current quality status and its conformity with the known standards and identify the areas of intervention in order to further increase the patient and staff satisfaction regarding the services provided by linen and laundry department Methods: Quality control practised in the Linen and Laundry Service was studied by conducting a prospective study on the concept of Donabedian model of structure, process and outcome. Study was done by pre-designed Proforma along with observation / Interviews / Questionnaire and study of records. The input studied included physical facilities, manpower, materials, equipments and environmental factors. The various elements of manpower studied consisted of number of staff working, their qualification, training, promotion avenues, motivation and job satisfaction. Process was studied by carrying out observations in linen and laundry service through a predesigned flow chart which was supplemented by interviews with different category of staff. Patient satisfaction, staff satisfaction and microbial count of laundered linen (quality dimensions) were studied in the outcome. Results: The current study found that in spite of certain deficiencies in the equipment, manpower and process, the linen and laundry service is providing a satisfactory service to its users. However the services can be further improved by removing the present deficiencies both at structure and process level. PMID:21475509

Singh, Dara; Qadri, GJ; Kotwal, Monica; Syed, AT; Jan, Farooq

2009-01-01

61

Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.  

PubMed

Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

2014-09-01

62

Health Care for Black and Poor Hospitalized Medicare Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether elderly patients who are black or from poor neighborhoods receive worse hospital care than other patients, taking account of hospital effects and using validated measures of quality of care. DESIGN: We compare quality of care provided to insured, hospitalized Medicare patients who are black or live in poor neighborhoods as compared with others, using simple and

Marjorie L. Pearson; Ellen R; Katherine A; William H; Robert H. Brook; Emmett B. Keeler

1994-01-01

63

The effect of soft budget constraints on access and quality in hospital care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given an increasingly complex web of financial pressures on providers, studies have examined how hospitals’ overall financial\\u000a health affects different aspects of hospital operations. In our study, we develop an empirical proxy for the concept of soft\\u000a budget constraint (SBC, Kornai, Kyklos 39:3–10, 1986) as an alternative financial measure of a hospital’s overall financial\\u000a health and offer an initial estimate

Yu-Chu Shen; Karen Eggleston

2009-01-01

64

PERCEPTION AND SATISFACTION WITH QUALITY OF ANTENATAL CARE SERVICES AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN AT THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL, IBADAN, NIGERIA  

PubMed Central

Background: Antenatal care is an important health service which detects and sometimes reduces the risk of complications among pregnant women. The quality of care is likely to influence effective utilization and compliance with interventions. Objectives: This study evaluated clients’ perception of antenatal care quality at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan and determined levels of client satisfaction. Methods: Women presenting for antenatal care at the study centre were interviewed in a cross-sectional design using a structured questionnaire. Items in the questionnaire included sociodemographic and obstetric variables, assessment of quality of amenities, waiting time and level of satisfaction. Data analysis was done using frequency tables, Chi-square cross tabulations and logistic regression. The p-value was set at P<0.05. Results: There were 239 participants; 74% percent of the women were aged 25-34 years; majority of the respondents (86%) had tertiary education while 49.4% were skilled workers or professionals. In 57.7% of women, the gestational age was between 13 and 27 weeks while 66.1% were Para 1-4. Amenities and water supply were regarded as unsatisfactory in 60.7% and 61.9% respectively. The clinic services were regarded as good in 81.1% of respondents; the only significant association with patient satisfaction was the desire to register in the same facility in the next pregnancy. Conclusion: There is a high overall level of satisfaction with antenatal services among pregnant women in UCH. Policy makers and health providers should however address improvement of amenities, reduction of waiting time and ensure that health interventions are available for all clients. PMID:25161419

Nwaeze, I.L.; Enabor, O.O.; Oluwasola, T.A.O.; Aimakhu, C.O.

2013-01-01

65

Data-driven quality improvement in the Emergency Department at a level one trauma and tertiary care hospital.  

PubMed

To demonstrate how a comprehensive and internally driven Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) program was designed and implemented in our Emergency Department (ED) in 1999. This program involved monthly data collection and analysis, data-driven process change, staff education in the core concepts of quality, and data reanalysis. Data components collected during the program included census data, physician profiling, and focused clinical audits. CQI measures collected at the beginning of the program and quarterly included: (1) CQI metric data (turnaround times [TAT] and rates of left against medical advice [AMA] or left without being seen [LWOBS]), (2) rates and nature of patient complaints, and (3) results of patient satisfaction surveys performed by an outside consulting firm contracted by hospital administration. During the 4 years since its implementation the program demonstrated improvement in all measured areas. Despite an increase in patient volume of 32% to nearly 37,000 visits/year, and only minimal staffing adjustments, the mean quarterly TAT decreased from 183 min to 165 min (9.8% decrease), the rate of complaints dropped by 56.1% (2.1 per 1000 patients to 0.92), and patients leaving AMA or LWOBS decreased 66.7% from 2.7% to 0.9%. Overall, 44.8% of ED patients rated their care as "excellent." In summary, we demonstrate how a comprehensive quality improvement program was structured and implemented at a tertiary care center and how such a program demonstrated improvement in specific CQI parameters. PMID:16677976

Welch, Shari J; Allen, Todd L

2006-04-01

66

Improving the quality of palliative and terminal care in the hospital by a network of palliative care nurse champions: the study protocol of the PalTeC-H project  

PubMed Central

Background The quality of care of patients dying in the hospital is often judged as insufficient. This article describes the protocol of a study to assess the quality of care of the dying patient and the contribution of an intervention targeted on staff nurses of inpatient wards of a large university hospital in the Netherlands. Methods/Design We designed a controlled before and after study. The intervention is the establishment of a network for palliative care nurse champions, aiming to improve the quality of hospital end-of-life care. Assessments are performed among bereaved relatives, nurses and physicians on seven wards before and after introduction of the intervention and on 11 control wards where the intervention is not applied. We focus on care provided during the last three days of life, covered in global ratings of the quality of life in the last three days of life and the quality of dying, and various secondary endpoints of treatment and care affecting quality of life and dying. Discussion With this study we aim to improve the understanding of and attention for patients’ needs, and the quality of care in the dying phase in the hospital and measure the impact of a quality improvement intervention targeted at nurses. PMID:23530686

2013-01-01

67

Clinical pathways--an evaluation of its impact on the quality of care in an acute care general hospital in Singapore.  

PubMed

A critical or clinical pathway defines the optimal care process, sequencing and timing of interventions by healthcare professionals for a particular diagnosis or procedure. It is a relatively new clinical process improvement tool that has been gaining popularity across hospitals and various healthcare organisations in many parts of the world. It is now slowly gaining momentum and popularity in Asia and Singapore. Clinical pathways are developed through collaborative efforts of clinicians, case managers, nurses, and other allied healthcare professionals with the aim of improving the quality of patient care, while minimising cost to the patient. Clinical pathways have been shown to reduce unnecessary variation in patient care, reduce delays in discharge through more efficient discharge planning, and improve the cost-effectiveness of clinical services. The approach and objectives of clinical pathways are consistent with those of total quality management (TQM) and continuous clinical quality improvement (CQI), and is essentially the application of these principles at the patient's bedside. However, despite the growing popularity of pathways, their impact on clinical outcomes and their clinical effectiveness remains largely untested and unproven through rigorous clinical trials. This paper begins with an overview of the nature of clinical pathways and the analysis of variances from the pathway, their benefits to the healthcare organisation, their application as a tool for CQI activities in direct relation to patient care, and their effectiveness in a variety of healthcare settings. The paper describes an evaluation of the impact of a clinical pathway on the quality of care for patients admitted for uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction (AMI) through an analysis of variances. The author carried out a one year evaluation of a clinical pathway on uncomplicated AMI in Changi General Hospital (CGH) to determine its effectiveness and impact on a defined set of outcomes. A before and after nonrandomized study of two groups of patients admitted to the Hospital for uncomplicated AMI was done. A total of 169 patients were managed on the clinical pathway compared to 100 patients in the control (historical comparison) group. Outcomes were compared between the two groups of patients. Restriction and matching of study subjects in both groups ensured that the patients selected were comparable in terms of severity of illness. The results showed that the patients on the clinical pathway and the comparison group were similar with respect to demographic variables, prevalence of risk factors and comorbidities. There was a statistically significant reduction in the average length of stay after implementation of the clinical pathway. This was achieved without any adverse effect on short term clinical outcomes such as in-hospital mortality, complication rate and morbidity. There were no significant difference in readmission rates at 6 months after discharge. The paper concludes that clinical pathways, implemented in the context of an acute care general hospital, is able to significantly improve care processes through better collaboration among healthcare professionals and improvements in work systems. PMID:11026801

Cheah, J

2000-07-01

68

Challenges in the Delivery of Quality Breast Cancer Care: Initiation of Adjuvant Hormone Therapy at an Urban Safety Net Hospital  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Breast cancer treatment disparities in racial/ethnic minority and low-income populations are well documented; however, underlying reasons remain poorly understood. This study sought to identify barriers to the delivery of quality breast cancer treatment, addressing compliance with the National Quality Forum (NQF) quality metric for adjuvant hormone therapy (HT; administration of HT within 365 days of diagnosis in eligible patients) at an urban safety net hospital. Methods: This retrospective, observational study included women diagnosed with nonmetastatic, T1c or greater, estrogen and/or progesterone receptor–positive breast cancer from 2006 to 2008. Data sources included the hospital cancer registry and electronic medical record. Compliance with the NQF quality metric was defined as HT prescription within 365 days of diagnosis. Bivariate analysis compared compliant with noncompliant patients. Qualitative analysis assessed reasons for delayed compliance (HT at > 365 days) and never compliance (no HT at 4 years). Results: Of 113 eligible patients, the majority were racial/ethnic minority (56%), stage II (54%), unmarried (60%), and had public or no insurance (72%). Sixty-four percent were compliant, and 36% were noncompliant. Of the noncompliant, 78% had delayed compliance, and 22% were never compliant. Noncompliant patients were significantly more likely to be Black, Hispanic, foreign-born, and stage III at diagnosis. Ten reasons for delayed compliance were identified, including patient- and system-level barriers. Most patients (56%) had more than one reason contributing to delay. Conclusion: Urgently needed interventions to reduce disparities in breast cancer treatment should take into account obstacles inherent among immigrant and indigent populations and complexities of multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:24345397

Crowley, Meaghan M.; McCoy, Molly E.; Bak, Sharon M.; Caron, Sarah E.; Ko, Naomi Y.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Alvis, Faber; Battaglia, Tracy A.

2014-01-01

69

Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.  

PubMed

We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the administration of vaccines by nursing staff as well as the CoPs for critical access hospitals relating to the provision of acute care inpatient services. We are finalizing proposals issued in two separate proposed rules that included payment policies related to patient status: payment of Medicare Part B inpatient services; and admission and medical review criteria for payment of hospital inpatient services under Medicare Part A. PMID:23977713

2013-08-19

70

Quality of hospital care evaluated by Danish nurses and doctors - based on experience from their own or a close family member's hospitalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: No studies have systematically asked larger groups of health professionals about their own experience as patients. This study estimated the level of satisfaction with hospital care among health professionals based on experience from their own hospital admission or that of a close family member. Methodology: A cross-sectional questionnaire study of 1995 doctors (41% women) and 1472 nurses (98% women)

Finn Gyntelberg; Poul Suadicani; Bo Andreassen Rix; Peder Skov; Poul Ebbe Nielsen; Erik Juhl

71

EuroQol (EQ-5D) measure of quality of life predicts mortality, emergency department utilization, and hospital discharge rates in HIV-infected adults under care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is a relevant and quantifiable outcome of care. We implemented HR-QOL assessment at all primary care visits at UCSD Owen Clinic using EQ-5D. The study aim was to estimate the prognostic value of EQ-5D for survival, hospitalization, and emergency department (ED) utilization after controlling for CD4 and HIV plasma viral load (pVL). METHODS: We

William C Mathews; Susanne May

2007-01-01

72

End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be effective, health

Ros Sorensen; Rick Iedema

2011-01-01

73

End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

2011-01-01

74

Beyond the clinic: redefining hospital ambulatory care.  

PubMed

Responding to changes in health care financing, government policy, technology, and clinical judgment, and the rise of managed care, hospitals are shifting services from inpatient to outpatient settings and moving them into the community. Institutions are evolving into integrated delivery systems, developing the capacity to provide a continuum of coordinated services in an array of settings and to share financial risk with physicians and managed care organizations. Over the past several years, hospitals in New York City have shifted considerable resources into ambulatory care. In their drive to expand and enhance services, however, they face serious challenges, including a well-established focus on hospitals as inpatient centers of tertiary care and medical education, a heavy reliance upon residents as providers of medical care, limited access to capital, and often inadequate physical plants. In 1995, the United Hospital Fund awarded $600,000 through its Ambulatory Care Services Initiative to support hospitals' efforts to meet the challenges of reorganizing services, compete in a managed care environment, and provide high-quality ambulatory care in more efficient ways. Through the initiative, 12 New York City hospitals started projects to reorganize service delivery and build an infrastructure of systems, technology, and personnel. Among the projects undertaken by the hospitals were:--broad-based reorganization efforts employing primary care models to improve and expand existing ambulatory care services, integrate services, and better coordinate care;--projects to improve information management, planning and testing new systems for scheduling appointments, registering patients, and tracking ambulatory care and its outcomes;--training programs to increase the supply of primary care providers (both nurse practitioners and primary care physicians), train clinical and support staff in the skills needed to deliver more efficient and better ambulatory care, prepare staff for practicing in a managed care environment, and help staff communicate with a culturally diverse patient population and promote the importance of primary care within the community. Significant innovations and improvements were realized through the projects. Several hospitals expanded the availability of primary care services, trained new primary care providers, and helped patients gain access to primary care clinicians for the first time. Better methods for documenting ambulatory care were introduced. To increase efficiency and improve service to patients, some of the hospitals instituted automated appointment systems and improved medical record services. To reduce fragmentation and contain personnel costs, support staff positions were redesigned, and staff were retrained to carry out new multi-tasked responsibilities. Many of the components vital to high-quality ambulatory care can take years to develop, and significant investments of capital. Increased primary care capacity, new specialty group practices, state-of-the-art equipment for diagnosis and treatment, advanced information technology to manage and coordinate care and link services at multiple locations, and highly trained clinical and support staff all require strong commitment and support from a team of senior management executives and medical staff leaders, sufficient staffing resources, and outside expertise. Once the infrastructure is in place, hospitals must continue to reach out to their communities, helping people to understand the health care system and use it effectively. PMID:10351749

Rogut, L

1997-07-01

75

Influence of hospital and nursing home quality on hospital readmissions.  

PubMed

Objectives To determine whether the quality of the hospital and of the nursing home (NH) to which a patient was discharged were related to the likelihood of rehospitalization. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of 1,382,477 individual hospitalizations discharged to 15,356 NHs from 3683 hospitals between 2006 and 2008. Methods Data come from Medicare claims and enrollment records, Minimum Data Set, Online Survey Certification and Reporting Dataset, Hospital Compare, and the American Hospital Association Database. Cross-classified random effects models were used to test the association of hospital and NH quality measures and the likelihood of 30-day rehospitalization. Results Patients discharged from higher-quality hospitals (as indicated by higher scores on their accountability process measures and high nurse staffing levels) and patients who received care in higher-quality NHs (as indicated by high nurse staffing levels and lower deficiency scores) were less likely to be rehospitalized within 30 days. Conclusions The passage of the Affordable Care Act changed the accountability of hospitals for patients' outcomes after discharge. This study highlights the joint accountability of hospitals and NHs for rehospitalization of patients. PMID:25730351

Thomas, Kali S; Rahman, Momotazur; Mor, Vincent; Intrator, Orna

2014-01-01

76

Hospital Quality, Efficiency, and Input Slack Differentials  

PubMed Central

Objective To use an advance in data envelopment analysis (DEA) called congestion analysis to assess the trade-offs between quality and efficiency in U.S. hospitals. Study Setting Urban U.S. hospitals in 34 states operating in 2004. Study Design and Data Collection Input and output data from 1,377 urban hospitals were taken from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and the Medicare Cost Reports. Nurse-sensitive measures of quality came from the application of the Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) module of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Quality Indicator software to State Inpatient Databases (SID) provided by the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). Data Analysis In the first step of the study, hospitals’ relative output-based efficiency was determined in order to obtain a measure of congestion (i.e., the productivity loss due to the occurrence of patient safety events). The outputs were adjusted to account for this productivity loss, and a second DEA was performed to obtain input slack values. Differences in slack values between unadjusted and adjusted outputs were used to measure either relative inefficiency or a need for quality improvement. Principal Findings Overall, the hospitals in our sample could increase the total amount of outputs produced by an average of 26 percent by eliminating inefficiency. About 3 percent of this inefficiency can be attributed to congestion. Analysis of subsamples showed that teaching hospitals experienced no congestion loss. We found that quality of care could be improved by increasing the number of labor inputs in low-quality hospitals, whereas high-quality hospitals tended to have slack on personnel. Conclusions Results suggest that reallocation of resources could increase the relative quality among hospitals in our sample. Further, higher quality in some dimensions of care need not be achieved as a result of higher costs or through reduced access to health care. PMID:18783457

Valdmanis, Vivian G; Rosko, Michael D; Mutter, Ryan L

2008-01-01

77

Better Quality of Care or Healthier Patients? Hospital Utilization by Medicare Advantage and Fee-for-Service Enrollees  

PubMed Central

Do differences in rates of use among managed care and Fee-for-Service Medicare beneficiaries reflect selection bias or successful care management by insurers? I demonstrate a new method to estimate the treatment effect of insurance status on health care utilization. Using clinical information and risk-adjustment techniques on data on acute admission that are unrelated to recent medical care, I create a proxy measure of unobserved health status. I find that positive selection accounts for between one-quarter and one-third of the risk-adjusted differences in rates of hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and elective procedures among Medicare managed care and Fee-for-Service enrollees in 7 years of Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases from Arizona, Florida, New Jersey and New York matched to Medicare enrollment data. Beyond selection effects, I find that managed care plans reduce rates of potentially preventable hospitalizations by 12.5 per 1,000 enrollees (compared to mean of 46 per 1,000) and reduce annual rates of elective admissions by 4 per 1,000 enrollees (mean 18.6 per 1,000). PMID:24533012

Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

2013-01-01

78

Is personality a determinant of patient satisfaction with hospital care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. We investigated to what extent personality is associated with patient satisfaction with hospital care. A sizeable association with personality would render patient satisfaction invalid as an indicator of hospital care quality. Design. Overall satisfaction and satisfaction with aspects of care were regressed on the Big Five dimensions of personality, controlled for patient characteristics as possible explanatory variables of observed

A. A. J. Hendriks; E. M. A. Smets; M. R. Vrielink; Es van S. Q; Haes de J. C. J. M

2006-01-01

79

A Multifaceted Intervention to Improve the Quality of Care of Children in District Hospitals in Kenya: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background To improve care for children in district hospitals in Kenya, a multifaceted approach employing guidelines, training, supervision, feedback, and facilitation was developed, for brevity called the Emergency Triage and Treatment Plus (ETAT+) strategy. We assessed the cost effectiveness of the ETAT+ strategy, in Kenyan hospitals. Further, we estimate the costs of scaling up the intervention to Kenya nationally and potential cost effectiveness at scale. Methods and Findings Our cost-effectiveness analysis from the provider's perspective used data from a previously reported cluster randomized trial comparing the full ETAT+ strategy (n?=?4 hospitals) with a partial intervention (n?=?4 hospitals). Effectiveness was measured using 14 process measures that capture improvements in quality of care; their average was used as a summary measure of quality. Economic costs of the development and implementation of the intervention were determined (2009 US$). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were defined as the incremental cost per percentage improvement in (average) quality of care. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to assess uncertainty. The cost per child admission was US$50.74 (95% CI 49.26–67.06) in intervention hospitals compared to US$31.1 (95% CI 30.67–47.18) in control hospitals. Each percentage improvement in average quality of care cost an additional US$0.79 (95% CI 0.19–2.31) per admitted child. The estimated annual cost of nationally scaling up the full intervention was US$3.6 million, approximately 0.6% of the annual child health budget in Kenya. A “what-if” analysis assuming conservative reductions in mortality suggests the incremental cost per disability adjusted life year (DALY) averted by scaling up would vary between US$39.8 and US$398.3. Conclusion Improving quality of care at scale nationally with the full ETAT+ strategy may be affordable for low income countries such as Kenya. Resultant plausible reductions in hospital mortality suggest the intervention could be cost-effective when compared to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of other priority child health interventions. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:22719233

Barasa, Edwine W.; Ayieko, Philip; Cleary, Susan; English, Mike

2012-01-01

80

The Effect of Communication Skills Training on Quality of Care, Self-Efficacy, Job Satisfaction and Communication Skills Rate of Nurses in Hospitals of Tabriz, Iran  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Having an effective relationship with the patient in the process of treatment is essential. Nurses must have communication skills in order to establish effective relationships with the patients. This study evaluated the impact of communication skills training on quality of care, self-efficacy, job satisfaction and communication skills of nurses. Methods: This is an experimental study with a control group that has been done in 2012. The study sample consisted of 73 nurses who work in hospitals of Tabriz; they were selected by proportional randomizing method. The intervention was only conducted on the experimental group. In order to measure the quality of care 160 patients, who had received care by nurses, participated in this study. The Data were analyzed by SPSS (ver.13). Results: Comparing the mean scores of communication skills showed a statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups after intervention. The paired t-test showed a statistically significant difference in the experimental group before and after the intervention. Independent t-test showed a statistically significant difference between the rate of quality of care in patients of control and experimental groups after the intervention. Conclusion: The results showed that the training of communication skills can increase the nurse's rate of communication skills and cause elevation in quality of nursing care. Therefore, in order to improve the quality of nursing care it is recommended that communication skills be established and taught as a separate course in nursing education. PMID:25276707

Khodadadi, Esmail; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Moghaddasian, Sima; Babapour, Jalil

2013-01-01

81

Update in Hospital Palliative Care  

PubMed Central

Background Seriously ill patients frequently receive care in hospitals, and palliative care is a core competency for hospitalists. We aimed to summarize and critique recent research that has the potential to impact the clinical practice of palliative care in the hospital. Methods We reviewed articles published between January 2012 and May 2013, identified through hand-search of leading journals and PubMed. The authors collectively selected 9 articles based on their scientific rigor and relevance to hospital practice. We review their findings, strengths and limitations and make recommendations for practice. Results Key finding include: Indwelling pleural catheters and talc pleurodesis provide similar relief of dyspnea in patients with malignant pleural effusions; Oxygen many not be needed to prevent dyspnea in many dying patients; Docusate may not be needed in addition to sennosides to treat opioid-induced constipation; Atropine is no more effective than placebo in treating respiratory rattles in dying patients; Many older adult survivors of in-hospital CPR are alive up to one year after discharge; Observing CPR may decrease family post-traumatic stress; Surrogates of ICU patients often interpret prognostic information optimistically; Many patients with metastatic cancer feel that chemotherapy may cure their disease; Viewing a goals of care video may decrease preference for CPR in patients being admitted to skilled nursing facilities. Conclusions Recent research provides important insights into the effectiveness of medications and interventions for symptom management, outcomes of CPR for patients and families, and communication and advance care planning in the hospital. PMID:24214838

Anderson, Wendy G.; Flint, Lynn A.; Horton, Jay R.; Johnson, Kimberly; Mourad, Michelle; Sharpe, Bradley A.

2013-01-01

82

What Do the Hospital Pharmacists Think about the Quality of Pharmaceutical Care Services in a Pakistani Province? A Mixed Methodology Study  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of hospital pharmacists regarding quality of pharmaceutical care services in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) Province, Pakistan, through qualitative as well as quantitative approach. For qualitative study, snow ball sampling technique was used. In quantitative part, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 112 hospital pharmacists (out of 128 accessed ones) from both private and public hospitals in six major divisions (divisions are the third tier of government in Pakistan, between the provinces and districts) of KPK. The qualitative study yielded five major themes during thematic analysis: (a) patients reporting, (b) lack of patient counseling, (c) lack of participation in health awareness programs, (d) pharmacists reducing the prescribing errors, and (e) insufficient number of pharmacists. A great proportion (67.9%) of the pharmacists was unsatisfied with their participation in health awareness programs. Findings of both phases revealed that hospital pharmacists in Pakistan are not actively participating in the provision of pharmaceutical care services. They are facing various hurdles for their active participation in patient care; major obstacles include the unavailability of sufficient number of pharmacists, lack of appropriate time for patient counseling, and poor relationship between pharmacists and other health care providers. PMID:25649021

Kousar, Rozina; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Mahmood, Qaisar

2015-01-01

83

Quality of Care  

Cancer.gov

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) defines quality of care as "the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge." In 1999, the IOM issued Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, a report that documented significant gaps in the quality of cancer care in the United States.

84

Relationships between determinants of hospital quality management and service quality performance—a path analytic model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of quality management in hospitals is to establish a system that measures and manages patient care in a way that provides the optimal care for all patients. This study empirically explores the relationship between hospital quality management and service quality performance for a sample of US community hospitals using a path analytic model. The research reveals strong relationships

L. X. Li

1997-01-01

85

CMS emphasizes quality patient care.  

PubMed

The Inpatient Prospective Payment System proposed rule for fiscal 2015 continues the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' move toward basing reimbursement on quality of care, not quantity. The rule also asks for public input on the two-midnight rule and a policy to address short-stay patients. CMS is implementing the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program, which penalizes hospitals that perform poorly. The agency proposes to add two safety measures to value-based purchasing in the future. PMID:24946382

2014-07-01

86

Nurses' Reports On Hospital Care In Five Countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: The current nursing shortage, high hospital nurse job dissatisfac- tion, and reports of uneven quality of hospital care are not uniquely American phenomena. This paper presents reports from 43,000 nurses from more than 700 hospitals in the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, and Germany in 1998–1999. Nurses in countries,with distinctly different health care systems report,similar shortcomings,in their work,environments,and,the quality

Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane; J. A. Sochalski; Reinhard Busse; Heather Clarke; Phyllis Giovannetti; Jennifer Hunt; Anne Marie Rafferty; Judith Shamian

2001-01-01

87

Care of dying patients in hospital.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To study the process of care of dying patients in general hospitals. DESIGN--Non-participant observer (MM) carried out regular periods of continuous comprehensive observation in wards where there were dying patients, recording the quantity and quality of care given. Observations were made in 1983. SETTING--13 wards (six surgical, six medical, and one specialist unit) in four large teaching hospitals (bed capacity 504-796) in west of Scotland. SUBJECTS--50 dying patients (29 female, 21 male) with mean age of 66 (range 40-89); 29 were dying from cancer and 21 from non-malignant disease. RESULTS--Final period of hospitalisation ranged from 6 hours to 24 weeks. More than half of all patients retained consciousness until shortly before death. Basic interventions to maintain patients' comfort were often not provided: oral hygiene was often poor, thirst remained unquenched, and little assistance was given to encourage eating. Contact between nurses and the dying patients was minimal; distancing and isolation of patients by most medical and nursing staff were evident; this isolation increased as death approached. CONCLUSIONS--Care of many of the dying patients observed in these hospitals was poor. We need to identify and implement practical steps to facilitate high quality care of the dying. Much can be learned from the hospice movement, but such knowledge and skills must be replicated in all settings. PMID:8086948

Mills, M.; Davies, H. T.; Macrae, W. A.

1994-01-01

88

[The quality of pharmacological management in hospitals].  

PubMed

A new approach based on the control of the quality of pharmacological management in hospitals has been undertaken by the public authorities in order to fight against pharmacological iatrogenesis. The requirements imposed by regulations are completed by numerous support measures and operational tools with a view to making the drug distribution circuit in hospitals safe. This programme will be developed across the whole of the patient's care pathway. PMID:24839682

Azard, Julie

2014-04-01

89

Preventable Hospitalizations and Access to Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the higher hospital admission rates for chronic medical conditions such as asthma, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes in low-income communities resulted from community differences in access to care, prevalence of the diseases, propensity to seek care, or physician admitting style. DESIGN: Analysis of California hospital discharge data. We calculated the hospitalization

Andrew B. Bindman; Kevin Grumbach; Dennis Osmond; Miriam Komaromy; Karen Vranizan; Nicole Lurie; John Billings; Anita Stewart; Robert F. Wagner

2010-01-01

90

Supply chain automation and the effects on clinician satisfaction and patient care quality in the hospital setting  

E-print Network

The healthcare industry, more specifically hospitals, has in recent times been experiencing a steady rise in nursing shortages and cost pressures. To offset these problems hospitals have increasingly relied upon supply ...

Xie, Yue, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01

91

Inpatient Care Intensity And Patients’ Ratings Of Their Hospital Experiences: What could explain the fact that Americans with chronic illnesses who receive less hospital care report better hospital experiences?  

PubMed Central

The intensity of hospital care provided to chronically ill Medicare patients varies greatly among regions, independent of illness. We examined the associations among hospital care intensity, the technical quality of hospital care, and patients’ ratings of their hospital experiences. Greater inpatient care intensity was associated with lower quality scores and lower patient ratings; lower quality scores were associated with lower patient ratings. The common thread linking greater care intensity with lower quality and less favorable patient experiences may be poorly coordinated care. PMID:19124860

Bronner, Kristen; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Fisher, Elliott S.; Goodman, David C.

2009-01-01

92

Continuous quality improvement, total quality management, and reengineering: one hospital's continuous quality improvement journey.  

PubMed

In recent years, there has been significantly increasing interest in the application of continuous quality improvement (CQI) and total quality management (TQM) in the health care arena. This case analysis is designed to identify and assess the strategies and processes that led to the successful implementation of CQI in the Emergency Care Center at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI. PMID:9735478

Klein, D; Motwani, J; Cole, B

1998-01-01

93

Productivity and quality changes in Greek public hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this paper is to estimate productivity changes after the inclusion of quality variables for a panel of Greek\\u000a public hospitals during the period 2002–2007. We measure hospital productivity and quality changes through a non-parametric\\u000a estimation of the quality adjusted Malmquist productivity index by using the percentage of survival after admissions as a\\u000a proxy of hospital care services

Roxani Karagiannis; Kostas Velentzas

94

Global health care trends and innovation in Korean hospitals.  

PubMed

Health care is one of the most significant global issues. The Korean health care systems, which has both good and bad features, is grabbing international attention because of its cost effectiveness. However, it is also facing a lot of challenges such as a rapidly ageing population, increases in expenditure and too many competing acute hospitals. Therefore, many Korean hospitals have been trying to find innovative ways to survive. This article introduces some possible answers such as expansion and consolidation strategies, quality assureance, converging ICT and health care, attracting foreign patients, research-driven hospitals, public-private partnerships and a focus on service design and patient experience. PMID:24683814

Jun, Lee Wang

2013-01-01

95

Evaluation of the built environment at a children's convalescent hospital: development of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory parent and staff satisfaction measures for pediatric health care facilities.  

PubMed

In preparation for the design, construction, and postoccupancy evaluation of a new Children's Convalescent Hospital, focus groups were conducted and measurement instruments were developed to quantify and characterize parent and staff satisfaction with the built environment of the existing pediatric health care facility, a 30-year-old, 59-bed, long-term, skilled nursing facility dedicated to the care of medically fragile children with complex chronic conditions. The measurement instruments were designed in close collaboration with parents, staff, and senior management involved with the existing and planned facility. The objectives of the study were to develop pediatric measurement instruments that measured the following: (1) parent and staff satisfaction with the built environment of the existing pediatric health care facility, (2) parent satisfaction with the health care services provided to their child, and (3) staff satisfaction with their coworker relationships. The newly developed Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scales demonstrated internal consistency reliability (average alpha = 0.92 parent report, 0.93 staff report) and initial construct validity. As anticipated, parents and staff were not satisfied with the existing facility, providing detailed qualitative and quantitative data input to the design of the planned facility and a baseline for postoccupancy evaluation of the new facility. Consistent with the a priori hypotheses, higher parent satisfaction with the built environment structure and aesthetics was associated with higher parent satisfaction with health care services (r =.54, p <.01; r =.59, p <.01, respectively). Higher staff satisfaction with the built environment structure and aesthetics was associated with higher coworker relationship satisfaction (r =.53; p <.001; r =.51; p <.01, respectively). The implications of the findings for the architectural design and evaluation of pediatric health care facilities are discussed. PMID:14767351

Varni, James W; Burwinkle, Tasha M; Dickinson, Paige; Sherman, Sandra A; Dixon, Pamela; Ervice, Judy A; Leyden, Pat A; Sadler, Blair L

2004-02-01

96

Conflicting interests in private hospital care.  

PubMed

This article looks at key changes impacting on private hospital care: the increasing corporate ownership of private hospitals; the Commonwealth Government's support for private health; the significant increase in health fund membership; and the contracting arrangements between health funds and private hospitals. The changes highlight the often conflicting interests of hospitals, doctors, Government, health funds and patients in the provision of private hospital care. These conflicts surfaced in the debate around allegations of 'cherry picking' by private hospitals of more profitable patients. This is also a good illustration of the increasing entanglement of the Government in the fortunes of the private health industry. PMID:12474506

O'Loughlin, Mary Ann

2002-01-01

97

Strategic service quality management for health care.  

PubMed

Quality management has become one of the most important and most debated topics within the service sector. This is especially true for health care, as the controversy rages on how the existing American system should be restructured. Health care reform aimed at reducing costs and ensuring access to all Americans cannot be allowed to jeopardize the quality of care. As such, total quality management (TQM) has become a vital ingredient to strategic planning within the health care domain. At the heart of any such quality improvement effort is the issue of measurement. TQM cannot be effectively utilized as a competitive weapon unless quality can be accurately defined, measured, evaluated, and monitored over time. Through such analysis a hospital can elect how to expend its limited resources toward those quality improvement projects which will impact customer perceptions of service quality the most. Thus, the purpose of this report is to establish a framework by which to approach the issue of quality measurement, delineate the various components of quality that exist in health care, and explore how these elements affect one another. We propose that the issue of quality measurement in health care be approached as an integration of service quality attributes common to other service organizations and technical quality attributes unique to health care. We hope that this research will serve as a first step toward the synthesis of the various quality attributes inherent in the health care domain and encourage other researchers to address the interactions of the various quality attributes. PMID:8763215

Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

1996-01-01

98

Hospital value-based purchasing (VBP) program: measurement of quality and enforcement of quality improvement.  

PubMed

VBP program is a novel medicare payment estimatin tool used to encourage clinical care quality improvement as well as improvement of patient experience as a customer of a health care system. The program utilizes well established tools of measuring clinical care quality and patient satisfaction such as the hospital IQR program and HCAHPS survey to estimate Medicare payments and encourage hospitals to continuosly improve the level of care they provide. PMID:24600783

Szablowski, Katarzyna M

2014-01-01

99

Spiritual care in hospitalized patients  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Spiritual needs are among an individual's essential needs in all places and times. With his physical and spiritual dimensions and the mutual effect of these two dimensions, human has spiritual needs as well. These needs are an intrinsic need throughout the life; therefore, they will remain as a major element of holistic nursing care. One of the greatest challenges for nurses is to satisfy the patients’ spiritual needs. METHODS: This is a qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Data were collected from 16 patients hospitalized in internal medicine-surgery wards and 6 nurses in the respective wards. Data were generated by open-ended interview and analyzed using Diekelmann's seven-stage method. Rigorousness of findings was confirmed by use of this method as well as team interpretation, and referring to the text and participants. RESULTS: In final interpretation of the findings, totally 10 sub-themes, three themes including formation of mutual relation with patient, encouraging the patient, and providing the necessary conditions for patient's connection with God, and one constitutive pattern, namely spiritual need of hospitalized patients. CONCLUSIONS: Spiritual needs are those needs whose satisfaction causes the person's spiritual growth and make the person a social, hopeful individual who always thanks God. They include the need for communication with others, communication with God, and being hopeful. In this study, the three obtained themes are the spiritual needs whose satisfaction is possible in nursing system. Considering these spiritual aspects accelerates patient's treatment. PMID:22039390

Yousefi, Hojjatollah; Abedi, Heidar Ali

2011-01-01

100

The sentinel hospitalization and the role of palliative care.  

PubMed

With current healthcare reform and calls for improving care quality and safety, there is renewed emphasis on high-value care. Moreover, given the significant healthcare resource utilization for patients with chronically progressive illnesses or for patients at the end of life, innovative and efficient care delivery models are urgently needed. We propose here the concept of a sentinel hospitalization, defined as a transitional point in the patient's disease course that heralds a need to reassess prognosis, patient understanding, treatment options and intensities, and goals of care. Hospitalists are well positioned to recognize a patient's sentinel hospitalization and use it as an opportunity for active integration of palliative care that provides high-quality and cost-saving care through its patient- and family-oriented approach, its interdisciplinary nature, and its focus on symptom control and care coordination. PMID:24474682

Lin, Richard J; Adelman, Ronald D; Diamond, Randi R; Evans, Arthur T

2014-05-01

101

Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

2014-01-01

102

Quality of Cancer Care  

Cancer.gov

Work is underway to make cancer a working model for quality of care research and the translation of this research into practice. This requires addressing how data collection about cancer care can be standardized and made most useful to a variety of audiences including providers, patients and their families, purchasers, payers, researchers, and policymakers. The Applied Research Program has spearheaded several key activities to carry out this initiative.

103

Transitional Care Strategies From Hospital to Home  

PubMed Central

Hospitals are challenged with reevaluating their hospital’s transitional care practices, to reduce 30-day readmission rates, prevent adverse events, and ensure a safe transition of patients from hospital to home. Despite the increasing attention to transitional care, there are few published studies that have shown significant reductions in readmission rates, particularly for patients with stroke and other neurologic diagnoses. Successful hospital-initiated transitional care programs include a “bridging” strategy with both predischarge and postdischarge interventions and dedicated transitions provider involved at multiple points in time. Although multicomponent strategies including patient engagement, use of a dedicated transition provider, and facilitation of communication with outpatient providers require time and resources, there is evidence that neurohospitalists can implement a transitional care program with the aim of improving patient safety across the continuum of care. PMID:25553228

Ranji, Sumant R.

2015-01-01

104

Keys for successful implementation of total quality management in hospitals.  

PubMed

Editor's Note: This article reports the findings of an analysis of the implementation of continuous quality improvement (CQI) or total quality management (TQM) programs in 10 hospitals. This analysis is the result of a 2-year study designed to identify and assess the ingredients that lead to the successful implementation of CQI programs in acute care hospitals. This article first appeared in Health Care Management Review 21(1), 48-60. Copyright © 1996 Aspen Publishers, Inc. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). PMID:20844354

Carman, James M; Shortell, Stephen M; Foster, Richard W; Hughes, Edward F X; Boerstler, Heidi; O' Brien, James L; O'Connor, Edward J

2010-01-01

105

Changes in Hospital Quality after Conversion in Ownership Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the effects of conversions between For-Profit and Not-For-Profit forms on quality of medical care in California hospitals. The sample includes elderly patients treated in California's private hospitals from 1990 to 1998 for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Congestive Heart Failure. The results suggest that converted hospitals have experienced quality changes before conversion and that ignoring these changes may

Mehdi Farsi

2004-01-01

106

Does implementation of a hospitalist program in a Canadian community hospital improve measures of quality of care and utilization? an observational comparative analysis of hospitalists vs. traditional care providers  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the growth of hospitalist programs in Canada, little is known about their effectiveness for improving quality of care and use of scarce healthcare resources. The objective of this study is to compare measures of cost and quality of care (in-hospital mortality, 30-day same-facility readmission, and length of stay) of hospitalists vs. traditional physician providers in a large Canadian community hospital setting. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) Discharge Abstract Database, using multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses comparing performance of four provider groups of traditional family physicians (FPs), traditional internal medicine subspecialists (other-IM), family physician-trained hospitalists (FP-Hospitalist), and general internal medicine-trained hospitalists (GIM-Hospitalist). Results Compared to traditional FPs, FP-Hospitalists and GIM-Hospitalists demonstrate lower mortality [OR 0.881, (CI 0.779 – 0.996); and OR 0.355, (CI 0.288 – 0.436)] and readmission rates [OR 0.766, (CI 0.678 – 0.867); and OR 0.800, (CI 0.675 – 0.948)]. Compared to traditional FPs, GIM-Hospitalists appear to improve length of stay [OR?2.975, (CI ?3.302 – -2.647)] while FP-Hospitalists perform similarly [OR 0.096, (CI ?0.136 – 0.329)]. Compared to other-IM, GIM-Hospitalists have similar performance on all measures while FP-Hospitalists show a mixed impact. Conclusions Compared to traditional family physicians, hospitalists appear to improve measures of quality and resource utilization. Specifically, hospitalists demonstrate lower in-hospital mortality and 30-day readmission rates while improving (or at least showing similar) length of stay. Compared to traditional subspecialists, hospitalists demonstrate similar performance despite looking after sicker and more complex medical patients. PMID:23734931

2013-01-01

107

38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.45 Hospital care for research purposes....

2010-07-01

108

Is the maturity of hospitals' quality improvement systems associated with measures of quality and patient safety?  

PubMed Central

Background Previous research addressed the development of a classification scheme for quality improvement systems in European hospitals. In this study we explore associations between the 'maturity' of the hospitals' quality improvement system and clinical outcomes. Methods The maturity classification scheme was developed based on survey results from 389 hospitals in eight European countries. We matched the hospitals from the Spanish sample (113 hospitals) with those hospitals participating in a nation-wide, voluntary hospital performance initiative. We then compared sample distributions and explored associations between the 'maturity' of the hospitals' quality improvement system and a range of composite outcomes measures, such as adjusted hospital-wide mortality, -readmission, -complication and -length of stay indices. Statistical analysis includes bivariate correlations for parametrically and non-parametrically distributed data, multiple robust regression models and bootstrapping techniques to obtain confidence-intervals for the correlation and regression estimates. Results Overall, 43 hospitals were included. Compared to the original sample of 113, this sample was characterized by a higher representation of university hospitals. Maturity of the quality improvement system was similar, although the matched sample showed less variability. Analysis of associations between the quality improvement system and hospital-wide outcomes suggests significant correlations for the indicator adjusted hospital complications, borderline significance for adjusted hospital readmissions and non-significance for the adjusted hospital mortality and length of stay indicators. These results are confirmed by the bootstrap estimates of the robust regression model after adjusting for hospital characteristics. Conclusions We assessed associations between hospitals' quality improvement systems and clinical outcomes. From this data it seems that having a more developed quality improvement system is associated with lower rates of adjusted hospital complications. A number of methodological and logistic hurdles remain to link hospital quality improvement systems to outcomes. Further research should aim at identifying the latent dimensions of quality improvement systems that predict quality and safety outcomes. Such research would add pertinent knowledge regarding the implementation of organizational strategies related with quality of care outcomes. PMID:22185479

2011-01-01

109

Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

2004-01-01

110

Maternal satisfaction with organized perinatal care in Serbian public hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Understanding the experiences and expectations of women across the continuum of antenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care is important to assess the quality of maternal care and to determine problematic areas which could be improved. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with maternal satisfaction with hospital-based perinatal care in Serbia. Methods Our survey was conducted from January 2009 to January 2010 using a 28-item, self-administered questionnaire. The sample consisted of 50% of women who expected childbirths during the study period from all 76 public institutions with obstetric departments in Serbia. The following three composite outcome variables were constructed: satisfaction with technical and professional aspects of care; communication and interpersonal aspects of care; and environmental factors. Results We analyzed 34,431 completed questionnaires (84.2% of the study sample). The highest and lowest average satisfaction scores (4.43 and 3.25, respectively) referred to the overall participation of midwives during delivery and the quality of food served in the hospital, respectively. Younger mothers and multiparas were less concerned with the environmental conditions (OR?=?0.55, p?=?0.006; OR?=?1.82, p?=?0.004). Final model indicated that mothers informed of patients’ rights, pregnancy and delivery through the Maternal Counseling Service were more likely to be satisfied with all three outcome variables. The highest value of the Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was between the overall satisfaction score and satisfaction with communication and interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusions Our study illuminated the importance of interpersonal aspects of care and education for maternal satisfaction. Improvement of the environmental conditions in hospitals, the WHO program, Baby-friendly Hospital, and above all providing all pregnant women with antenatal education, are recommendations which would more strongly affect the perceptions of quality and satisfaction with perinatal care in Serbian public hospitals by women. PMID:24410839

2014-01-01

111

Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective - improving hospital care for migrant children  

PubMed Central

Background The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Results Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient’s family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. Conclusions International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care for PMs at both policy and service levels is an investment in the future that will benefit native and migrant families. PMID:24093461

2013-01-01

112

78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and Postacute Care Transfer Issues...786-2590, Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare...Prospective Payment Assessment Commission...nonmedical health care institution...psychiatric long-term care...

2013-05-10

113

Tweets about hospital quality: a mixed methods study  

PubMed Central

Background Twitter is increasingly being used by patients to comment on their experience of healthcare. This may provide information for understanding the quality of healthcare providers and improving services. Objective To examine whether tweets sent to hospitals in the English National Health Service contain information about quality of care. To compare sentiment on Twitter about hospitals with established survey measures of patient experience and standardised mortality rates. Design A mixed methods study including a quantitative analysis of all 198?499 tweets sent to English hospitals over a year and a qualitative directed content analysis of 1000 random tweets. Twitter sentiment and conventional quality metrics were compared using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Key results 11% of tweets to hospitals contained information about care quality, with the most frequent topic being patient experience (8%). Comments on effectiveness or safety of care were present, but less common (3%). 77% of tweets about care quality were positive in tone. Other topics mentioned in tweets included messages of support to patients, fundraising activity, self-promotion and dissemination of health information. No associations were observed between Twitter sentiment and conventional quality metrics. Conclusions Only a small proportion of tweets directed at hospitals discuss quality of care and there was no clear relationship between Twitter sentiment and other measures of quality, potentially limiting Twitter as a medium for quality monitoring. However, tweets did contain information useful to target quality improvement activity. Recent enthusiasm by policy makers to use social media as a quality monitoring and improvement tool needs to be carefully considered and subjected to formal evaluation. PMID:24748372

Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Antony A; Cano, Daniel Ramirez; Moilanen, Karo; Pulman, Stephen; Darzi, Ara; Millett, Christopher

2014-01-01

114

38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and...17.45 Hospital care for research purposes. Subject to...Department of Veterans Affairs research project and there are...

2011-07-01

115

38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and...17.45 Hospital care for research purposes. Subject to...Department of Veterans Affairs research project and there are...

2014-07-01

116

38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and...17.45 Hospital care for research purposes. Subject to...Department of Veterans Affairs research project and there are...

2012-07-01

117

38 CFR 17.45 - Hospital care for research purposes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Hospital care for research purposes. 17.45 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and...17.45 Hospital care for research purposes. Subject to...Department of Veterans Affairs research project and there are...

2013-07-01

118

The Link Between Hospital Quality and Profitability of Outpatient Services Offered  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis studies the relationship between hospital quality and hospital profits for a sample of 94 Alabama hospitals. Quality is measured by four groups of procedures performed on newly-admitted patients as suggested by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Profit is measured for five outpatient services. We find that the quality of inpatient care predicts profits in three of

Donald R. Self; Charles E. Hegji; Robin M. Self

2009-01-01

119

Limited Use of Price and Quality Advertising Among American Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Consumer-directed policies, including health savings accounts, have been proposed and implemented to involve individuals more directly with the cost of their health care. The hope is this will ultimately encourage providers to compete for patients based on price or quality, resulting in lower health care costs and better health outcomes. Objective To evaluate American hospital websites to learn whether hospitals advertise directly to consumers using price or quality data. Methods Structured review of websites of 10% of American hospitals (N=474) to evaluate whether price or quality information is available to consumers and identify what hospitals advertise about to attract consumers. Results On their websites, 1.3% (6/474) of hospitals advertised about price and 19.0% (90/474) had some price information available; 5.7% (27/474) of hospitals advertised about quality outcomes information and 40.9% (194/474) had some quality outcome data available. Price and quality information that was available was limited and of minimal use to compare hospitals. Hospitals were more likely to advertise about service lines (56.5%, 268/474), access (49.6%, 235/474), awards (34.0%, 161/474), and amenities (30.8%, 146/474). Conclusions Insufficient information currently exists for consumers to choose hospitals on the basis of price or quality, making current consumer-directed policies unlikely to realize improved quality or lower costs. Consumers may be more interested in information not related to cost or clinical factors when choosing a hospital, so consumer-directed strategies may be better served before choosing a provider, such as when choosing a health plan. PMID:23988296

Wilks, Chrisanne E A; Richter, Jason P

2013-01-01

120

Quality of care emerges as a determinant of creditworthiness.  

PubMed

Sophisticated profiles of the quality of care provided in hospitals are prompting investors and bond rating agencies to ask questions about debt capitalization: What elements of the quality of care--measured by illness outcome, length of stay, morbidity, and mortality--will improve as a result of a proposed capital financing? Can the hospital demonstrate that cost benefits will result from a proposed financing by correlating costs with measurable improvements in patient outcomes? Can the hospital show, through financial feasibility analyses that reflect quality assessments, that its market share will remain stable? Hospitals' ability to gain access to credit markets will be influenced materially by their answers to these questions. PMID:10145599

Oszustowicz, R J

1992-03-01

121

Evaluation of correlation of BODE index with health-related quality of life among patients with stable COPD attending a tertiary care hospital  

PubMed Central

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive deterioration of respiratory function along with systemic effects which have a great impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Classification of severity of airflow limitation in COPD does not represent the clinical consequences of COPD. Hence, combined COPD assessment should be preferred. BODE index (Body mass index, Airflow obstruction, Dyspnea and Exercise capacity) has recently been proposed to provide useful prognostic information. Objectives: To find out correlations between the BODE index and HRQoL, and between GOLD classification of COPD severity and HRQoL in stable COPD patients, and to compare between these two correlations. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal observational study was carried out with 114 stable COPD patients recruited over 10 months at the outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata, India. Patients were classified according to GOLD classification of severity of airflow limitation after performing spirometry. BODE index was calculated for each patient. Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) was used to assess the HRQoL. Results: BODE scores were categorized into four quartiles, quartile one to four with scores of 0-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-10, respectively. Higher BODE quartiles were associated with higher total SGRQ scores and SGRQ subscale scores (symptom, activity and impact). Very strong correlations were found between BODE quartiles and total SGRQ scores (P = 0.914; P < 0.01). In contrast, GOLD classes showed moderate correlation with total SGRQ scores (P = 0.590; P < 0.01). Conclusions: BODE index was strongly correlated with the HRQoL in stable COPD patients and it was better than GOLD classes of COPD severity to reflect the health status in patients with stable COPD. PMID:25624592

Sarkar, Samir Kumar; Basuthakur, Sumitra; Das, Sibes K.; Das, Anirban; Das, Soumya; Choudhury, Sabyasachi; Datta, Samadarshi

2015-01-01

122

Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care  

PubMed Central

Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

2012-01-01

123

76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care...the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute...

2011-09-26

124

77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care...the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute...

2012-10-17

125

77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care...the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute...

2012-02-01

126

78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care...and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute...

2013-03-13

127

National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released public-use data files for the 1997 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). The NHAMCS "collect[s] data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital emergency and outpatient departments." The Website for the survey describes methodology and data, provides technical documentation for accessing and manipulating the data, and links users to related reports. The data and documentation for the survey may be downloaded from the Website or from the NCHS FTP server.

128

Factors and Models Associated with the amount of Hospital Care Services as Demanded by Hospitalized Patients: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Hospitals are constantly being challenged to provide high-quality care despite ageing populations, diminishing resources, and budgetary restraints. While the costs of care depend on the patients' needs, it is not clear which patient characteristics are associated with the demand for care and inherent costs. The aim of this study was to ascertain which patient-related characteristics or models can predict the need for medical and nursing care in general hospital settings. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase, Business Source Premier and CINAHL. Pre-defined eligibility criteria were used to detect studies that explored patient characteristics and health status parameters associated to the use of hospital care services for hospitalized patients. Two reviewers independently assessed study relevance, quality with the STROBE instrument, and performed data analysis. Results From 2,168 potentially relevant articles, 17 met our eligibility criteria. These showed a large variety of factors associated with the use of hospital care services; models were found in only three studies. Age, gender, medical and nursing diagnoses, severity of illness, patient acuity, comorbidity, and complications were the characteristics found the most. Patient acuity and medical and nursing diagnoses were the most influencing characteristics. Models including medical or nursing diagnoses and patient acuity explain the variance in the use of hospital care services for at least 56.2%, and up to 78.7% when organizational factors were added. Conclusions A larger variety of factors were found to be associated with the use of hospital care services. Models that explain the extent to which hospital care services are used should contain patient characteristics, including patient acuity, medical or nursing diagnoses, and organizational and staffing characteristics, e.g., hospital size, organization of care, and the size and skill mix of staff. This would enable healthcare managers at different levels to evaluate hospital care services and organize or reorganize patient care. PMID:24878506

van Oostveen, Catharina J.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Huis in het Veld, Judith G.; Bakker, Piet J.; Vermeulen, Hester

2014-01-01

129

An approach to hospital quality improvement.  

PubMed

This study demonstrates many of the important features and challenges of improving hospital care. The unique confluence of software technology advances and increasingly complex clinical needs have made possible a redesign of the process by which discharge documentation is generated and disseminated. Using knowledge of the patients' experience of hospital care, a multidisciplinary team identified communication at the time of discharge as a key interaction point in the system of care. With this need in mind, the team identified an aim of improving the accuracy and timeliness of discharge data and their dissemination. The project leveraged existing information technology to help satisfy the general aims of recording only useful information only once and reducing wait times for information [14]. The ability to manage structured medication data and translate this information and specialized care instructions into patient-directed language facilitated the creation of a document that would ensure that patients knew what was expected of them after discharge. Implementation of a discharge form requires understanding all of the constituencies within a medical center. It was therefore necessary to put together a team that included representation from all the groups who interact with this discharge information. The authors proceeded with a small-scale test of change during which they identified training and education needs that would be useful as the new process expands to other areas of the hospital. The case illustrates how in one project a team needs to address all of the challenges to improving hospital quality. The discharge form clearly required understanding the patient's perspective. The approach taken by the team to change the discharge form also showed detailed understanding of the process of discharging a patient from the hospital. Many microsystems are involved in this process and the change that was implemented took into account the needs of each of those subsystems and drew on resources from the macroorganization (computer information system). Measurement was embedded into the system for monitoring. Organizational culture was addressed in that the organization itself was moving in the direction of greater use of electronic information for better patient care. Finally, multiple staff members needed to come together to accomplish this task, all working together as a team. They created an implementation plan that allowed them to do the work in staged, planned efforts, and to learn from each endeavor. Was the change an improvement? The team was able to implement successively a change in the discharge process as measured by utilization of the new form. Will the quality of care improve? Probably, although that remains to be seen. Improvements in care do not need to be sophisticated, they do not need to be elaborate, and they do not need to involve new devices or new technologies. Improvements start with thinking about the way work is done and reflecting on how the work might be done differently to meet and exceed patients' needs and expectations. PMID:12365342

Lurie, Jon D; Merrens, Edward J; Lee, Joshua; Splaine, Mark E

2002-07-01

130

75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long- Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and...Payment Rates Implementing the Affordable Care Act AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

2010-06-02

131

Quality of Care in the US Territories  

PubMed Central

Background Health care quality in the US territories is poorly characterized. We used process measures to compare the performance of hospitals in the US territories and in the US states. Methods Our sample included nonfederal hospitals located in the United States and its territories discharging Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) patients with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), or pneumonia (PNE) (July 2005–June 2008). We compared risk-standardized 30-day mortality and readmission rates between territorial and stateside hospitals, adjusting for performance on core process measures and hospital characteristics. Results In 57 territorial hospitals and 4799 stateside hospitals, hospital mean 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates were significantly higher in the US territories (P < .001) for AMI (18.8% vs 16.0%), HF (12.3% vs 10.8%), and PNE (14.9% vs 11.4%). Hospital mean 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRRs) were also significantly higher in the US territories for AMI (20.6% vs 19.8%; P=.04), and PNE (19.4% vs 18.4%; P=.01) but was not significant for HF (25.5% vs 24.5%; P=.07). The higher risk-standardized mortality rates in the US territories remained statistically significant after adjusting for hospital characteristics and core process measure performance. Hospitals in the US territories had lower performance on all core process measures (P< .05). Conclusions Compared with hospitals in the US states, hospitals in the US territories have significantly higher 30-day mortality rates and lower performance on every core process measure for patients discharged after AMI, HF, and PNE. Eliminating the substantial quality gap in the US territories should be a national priority. PMID:21709184

Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Herrin, Jeph; Santana, Calie; Curry, Leslie A.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2011-01-01

132

Effects of budgeting on health care services in Dutch hospitals.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. In 1983 hospital budgeting was introduced in the Netherlands. We studied the effect of the enactment of budgeting on the efficiency and effectiveness of health care. METHODS. In four different age groups, the admission rate, length of stay, type and number of surgical inpatient procedures, and hospital mortality were measured in all short-term hospitals from 1977 through 1988. Data were standardized by age and sex. RESULTS. For the total population, the hospital admission rate and the operation rate decreased after 1982. However, for the subgroup of patients beyond the age of 65 both rates are still on the rise, but the increase in the admission rate for elderly patients has slowed significantly since 1983. The tendency toward a shorter length of stay, together with the diminished admission rates, led to a 22% decrease in standardized hospital days between 1982 and 1988. The severity of the operations increased. Most operations performed on elderly patients were aimed at improving the quality of their lives rather than lengthening their life expectancy. The hospital mortality rate decreased in all age groups. CONCLUSIONS. The findings suggest that modern medicine in the Netherlands has become more efficient and more effective. Better health care for older patients was achieved within the same budget. The tendency toward more efficiency by hospitals has been reinforced since 1983. PMID:1951801

Casparie, A F; Hoogendoorn, D

1991-01-01

133

The health care market: can hospitals survive?  

PubMed

Does it sound familiar? Resources are scarce, competition is tough, and government regulations and a balanced budget are increasingly hard to meet at the same time. This is not the automobile or oil industry but the health care industry, and hospital managers are facing the same problems. And, maintains the author of this article, they must borrow some proven marketing techniques from business to survive in the new health care market. He first describes the features of the new market (the increasing economic power of physicians, new forms of health care delivery, prepaid health plans, and the changing regulatory environment) and then the possible marketing strategies for dealing with them (competing hard for physicians who control the patient flow and diversifying and promoting the mix of services). He also describes various planning solutions that make the most of a community's hospital facilities and affiliations. PMID:10247957

Goldsmith, J C

1980-01-01

134

Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without National Health Insurance Attending a Primary Care Clinic in a Resource-Poor Environment of a Tertiary Hospital in Eastern Nigeria in the Era of Scaling up the Nigerian Formal Sector Health Insurance Scheme  

PubMed Central

Background: The increasing importance of the concept of patients’ satisfaction as a valuable tool for assessing quality of care is a current global healthcare concerns as regards consumer-oriented health services. Aim: This study assessed satisfaction with quality of care received by patients without national health insurance (NHI) attending a primary care clinic in a resource-poor environment of a tertiary hospital in South-Eastern Nigeria. Subject and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on 400 non-NHI patients from April 2011 to October 2011 at the primary care clinic of Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria. Adult patients seen within the study period were selected by systematic sampling using every second non-NHI patient that registered to see the physicians and who met the selection criteria. Data were collected using pretested, structured interviewer administered questionnaire designed on a five points Likert scale items with 1 and 5 indicating the lowest and highest levels of satisfaction respectively. Satisfaction was measured from the following domains: patient waiting time, patient–staff communication, patient-staff relationship, and cost of care, hospital bureaucracy and hospital environment. Operationally, patients who scored 3 points and above in the assessed domain were considered satisfied while those who scored less than 3 points were dissatisfied. Results: The overall satisfaction score of the respondents was 3.1. Specifically, the respondents expressed satisfaction with patient–staff relationship (3.9), patient–staff communication (3.8), and hospital environment (3.6) and dissatisfaction with patient waiting time (2.4), hospital bureaucracy (2.5), and cost of care (2.6). Conclusion: The overall non-NHI patient's satisfaction with the services provided was good. The hospital should set targets for quality improvement in the current domains of satisfaction while the cost of care has implications for government intervention as it mirrors the need to make NHI universal for all Nigerians irrespective of the employment status. PMID:23634326

Iloh, GUP; Ofoedu, JN; Njoku, PU; Okafor, GOC; Amadi, AN; Godswill-Uko, EU

2013-01-01

135

Patient-Centered But Employee Delivered: Patient Care Innovation, Turnover, and Organizational Outcomes in Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospitals are increasingly experimenting with workplace innovations designed to improve the quality of patient care, alleviate financial pressures, and retain staff. The authors examine one such innovation, patient-centered care (PCC), and its effects on clinical and employee outcomes in hospitals in the United Kingdom. Employing PCC entails a shift from an institutional and physician focus to one that emphasizes patients’

Ariel C Avgar; Rebecca Kolins Givan; Mingwei Liu

2011-01-01

136

78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...786-2590, Long-Term Care Hospital...Consumer Assessment of Healthcare...ALTHA Acute Long Term Hospital...hospital CARE [Medicare] Continuity Assessment Record...Prospective Payment Assessment Commission...nonmedical health care institution...psychiatric long-term care...

2013-08-19

137

The Hospital Medicine Reengineering Network (HOMERuN): a learning organization focused on improving hospital care.  

PubMed

Converting the health care delivery system into a learning organization is a key strategy for improving health outcomes. Although the collaborative learning organization approach has been successful in neonatal intensive care units and disease-specific collaboratives, there are few examples in general medicine and none in adult medicine that have leveraged the role of hospitalists nationally across multiple institutions to implement improvements. The authors describe the rationale for and early work of the Hospital Medicine Reengineering Network (HOMERuN), a collaborative of hospitals, hospitalists, and multidisciplinary care teams founded in 2011 that seeks to measure, benchmark, and improve the efficiency, quality, and outcomes of care in the hospital and afterwards. Robust and timely evaluation, with learning and refinement of approaches across institutions, should accelerate improvement efforts. The authors review HOMERuN's collaborative model, which focuses on a community-based participatory approach modified to include hospital-based staff as well as the larger community. HOMERuN's initial project is described, focusing on care transition measurement using perspectives from the patient, caregiver, and providers. Next steps and sustainability of the organization are discussed, including benchmarking, collaboration, and effective dissemination of best practices to stakeholders. PMID:24448050

Auerbach, Andrew D; Patel, Mitesh S; Metlay, Joshua P; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Williams, Mark V; Robinson, Edmondo J; Kripalani, Sunil; Lindenauer, Peter K

2014-03-01

138

Acute sports injuries requiring hospital care.  

PubMed Central

The present investigation reports 138 consecutive patients injured in sports, who needed treatment as in-patients in a one year period. More injuries were sustained in soccer than in other sports. The lower extremity was the site of most injuries, fractures and dislocations being the most common type of injury. At follow-up 50% of the patients complained of discomfort. The average stay in hospital after a sports injury requiring hospital care was 6 days. In 52% of the patients the duration of sports incapacity was at least six months and in seven per cent the sports incapacity after the sustained injury was permanent. PMID:3779346

Sandelin, J

1986-01-01

139

Moving Towards the Age-friendly Hospital: A Paradigm Shift for the Hospital-based Care of the Elderly  

PubMed Central

Introduction Care of the older adult in the acute care hospital is becoming more challenging. Patients 65 years and older account for 35% of hospital discharges and 45% of hospital days. Up to one-third of the hospitalized frail elderly loses independent functioning in one or more activities of daily living as a result of the ‘hostile environment’ that is present in the acute hospitals. A critical deficit of health care workers with expertise and experience in the care of the elderly also jeopardizes successful care delivery in the acute hospital setting. Methods We propose a paradigm shift in the culture and practice of event-driven acute hospital-based care of the elderly which we call the Age-friendly Hospital concept. Guiding principles include: a favourable physical environment; zero tolerance for ageism throughout the organization; an integrated process to develop comprehensive services using the geriatric approach; assistance with appropriateness decision-making and fostering links between the hospital and the community. Our current proposed strategy is to focus on delirium management as a hospital-wide condition that both requires and highlights the Geriatric Medicine specialist as an expert of content, for program development and of evaluation. Conclusion The Age-friendly Hospital concept we propose may lead the way to enable hospitals in the fast-moving health care system to deliver high-quality care without jeopardizing risk-benefit, function, and quality of life balances for the frail elderly. Recruitment and retention of skilled health care professionals would benefit from this positive ‘branding’ of an institution. Convincing hospital management and managing change are significant challenges, especially with competing priorities in a fiscal environment with limited funding. The implementation of a hospital-wide delirium management program is an example of an intervention that embodies many of the principles in the Age-friendly Hospital concept. It is important to change the way hospital care is delivered to older adults in time to meet our needs when we need hospital services ourselves. PMID:23251321

Huang, Allen R.; Larente, Nadine; Morais, Jose A.

2011-01-01

140

42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412...long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. ...criteria in § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care...

2013-10-01

141

42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412...long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. ...criteria in § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care...

2014-10-01

142

Financial and organizational determinants of hospital diversification into subacute care.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine the financial, market, and organizational determinants of hospital diversification into subacute inpatient care by acute care hospitals in order to guide hospital managers in undertaking such diversification efforts. STUDY SETTING: All nongovernment, general, acute care, community hospitals that were operating during the years 1985 through 1991 (3,986 hospitals in total). DATA SOURCES: Cross-sectional, time-series data were drawn from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals, the Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) Medicare Cost Reports, a latitude and longitude listing for all community hospital addresses, and the Area Resource File (ARF) published in 1992, which provides county level environmental variables. STUDY DESIGN: The study is longitudinal, enabling the specification of temporal patterns in conversion, causal inferences, and the treatment of right-censoring problems. The unit of analysis is the individual hospital. KEY FINDINGS: Significant differences were found in the average level of subacute care offered by investor-owned versus tax-exempt hospitals. After controlling for selection bias, financial performance, risk, size, occupancy, and other variables, IO hospitals offered 31.3 percent less subacute care than did NFP hospitals. Financial performance and risk are predictors of IO hospitals' diversification into subacute care, but not of NFP hospitals' activities in this market. Resource availability appears to expedite expansion into subacute care for both types of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Investment criteria and strategy differ between investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals. PMID:10201852

Wheeler, J R; Burkhardt, J; Alexander, J A; Magnus, S A

1999-01-01

143

Uncompensated Hospital Care: Charitable Mission or Profitable Business Decision?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provision of hospital uncompensated care is generally assumed to be adversely affected as increased healthcare competition decreases demand for compensated hospital services. Economic theory, however, suggests the question is more complex. Non-profit hospitals are assumed in this paper to maximize utility as a function of uncompensated care, subject to the constraint that revenues cover costs. For-profit hospitals, in contrast, are

Dwayne A. Banks; Mary Paterson; Jeanne Wendel

1997-01-01

144

[Reorganize hospitals to improve efficiency and quality].  

PubMed

The current economic difficulties and the changed epidemiological picture, characterized by an increase in life expectancy, which shows in the elderly, chronically ill and disabled the main, both health and social, care needs,r equires a remark on the hospital network and organization. Today, most of the application assistance is usually at low intensity of care, whereas the acute event is shrinking. The prevalence of hospital admissions concern the elderly, who get into acute events but on a substrate of chronicity and co-morbidity conditions. There must be a new model of hospital network, with the possibility of converting some hospital centres for medium intensity care and selecting few centres for high intensity care, where concentrating the more expensive technology and the skill and expertise of the professional. The -suggestion is a renewed health planning that detects:- hospitals for widespread disease, equipped with emergency war for minor codes-hospital at high intensity of care for emergency-urgency- hospital for particular fields of medical speciality and research. PMID:25486686

Macchi, L; Pavan, A

2014-01-01

145

The role of stepdown beds in hospital care.  

PubMed

Stepdown beds provide an intermediate level of care for patients with requirements somewhere between that of the general ward and the intensive care unit. Models of care include incorporation of stepdown beds into intensive care units, stand-alone units, or incorporation of beds into standard wards. Stepdown beds may be used to provide a higher level of care for patients deteriorating on a ward ("step-up"), a lower level of care for patients transitioning out of intensive care ("stepdown") or a lateral transfer of care from a recovery room for postoperative patients. These units are one possible strategy to improve critical care cost-effectiveness and patient flow without compromising quality, but these potential benefits remain primarily theoretical as few patient-level studies provide concrete evidence. This narrative review provides a general overview of the theory of stepdown beds in the care of hospitalized patients and a summary of what is known about their impact on patient flow and outcomes and highlights areas for future research. PMID:25163008

Prin, Meghan; Wunsch, Hannah

2014-12-01

146

Does a hospital's quality depend on the quality of other hospitals? A spatial econometrics approach  

PubMed Central

We examine whether a hospital's quality is affected by the quality provided by other hospitals in the same market. We first sketch a theoretical model with regulated prices and derive conditions on demand and cost functions which determine whether a hospital will increase its quality if its rivals increase their quality. We then apply spatial econometric methods to a sample of English hospitals in 2009–10 and a set of 16 quality measures including mortality rates, readmission, revision and redo rates, and three patient reported indicators, to examine the relationship between the quality of hospitals. We find that a hospital's quality is positively associated with the quality of its rivals for seven out of the sixteen quality measures. There are no statistically significant negative associations. In those cases where there is a significant positive association, an increase in rivals' quality by 10% increases a hospital's quality by 1.7% to 2.9%. The finding suggests that for some quality measures a policy which improves the quality in one hospital will have positive spillover effects on the quality in other hospitals.

Gravelle, Hugh; Santos, Rita; Siciliani, Luigi

2014-01-01

147

Total quality in health care.  

PubMed

Quality is at the top of American consumers' demand list, and consequently American manufacturing companies have been forced to assign priority to the development of high-quality products. To improve the quality of what they offer, many manufacturers use the management philosophy known as total quality management (TQM), and now the service sector is following in their footsteps. The health care industry is a good example of a service industry that can benefit greatly from TQM, and it is the purpose of this article to show how a health care provider can implement TQM and evaluate its effects. PMID:10178544

Brannan, K M

1998-05-01

148

Effectiveness of self-management interventions on mortality, hospital readmissions, chronic heart failure hospitalization rate and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis review examined the effectiveness of self-management interventions compared to usual care on mortality, all-cause hospital readmissions, chronic heart failure hospitalization rate and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure.

Joanne B. Ditewig; Helene Blok; Jeroen Havers; Haske van Veenendaal

2010-01-01

149

Information vs advertising in the market for hospital care.  

PubMed

Recent health care reforms have introduced prospective payments and have allowed patients to choose their preferred providers. The expected outcome is efficiency in production and an increase in the quality level. The former objective should be obtained by the prospective payment scheme; the latter by the demand mechanism, through the competition between providers. Unfortunately, because of asymmetry of information, patients are unable to observe the true quality and the demand for health care services depends on a perceived quality as influenced by the hospital advertising. Inefficiency in the resource allocation and social welfare loss are the two likely effects. In this paper we show how the purchaser can implement effective policies to overcome these undesired effects. PMID:17659373

Montefiori, Marcello

2008-09-01

150

The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust  

PubMed Central

Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

2014-01-01

151

Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil, 2000 and 2010  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze hospitalization rates and the proportion of deaths due to ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations and to characterize them according to coverage by the Family Health Strategy, a primary health care guidance program. METHODS An ecological study comprising 853 municipalities in the state of Minas Gerais, under the purview of 28 regional health care units, was conducted. We used data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations in 2000 and 2010 were compared. Population data were obtained from the demographic censuses. RESULTS The number of ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations declined from 20.75/1,000 inhabitants [standard deviation (SD) = 10.42) in 2000 to 14.92/thousand inhabitants (SD = 10.04) in 2010 Heart failure was the most frequent cause in both years. Hospitalizations rates for hypertension, asthma, and diabetes mellitus, decreased, whereas those for angina pectoris, prenatal and birth disorders, kidney and urinary tract infections, and other acute infections increased. Hospitalization durations and the proportion of deaths due to ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS Mean hospitalization rates for sensitive conditions were significantly lower in 2010 than in 2000, but no correlation was found with regard to the expansion of the population coverage of the Family Health Strategy. Hospitalization rates and proportion of deaths were different between the various health care regions in the years evaluated, indicating a need to prioritize the primary health care with high efficiency and quality.

Rodrigues-Bastos, Rita Maria; Campos, Estela Márcia Saraiva; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio; Bastos, Mauro Gomes; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa

2014-01-01

152

Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

153

Trends and geographic variation of potentially avoidable hospitalizations in the veterans health-care system.  

PubMed

The rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) has been widely accepted as an indicator of access and quality of primary care. This study aimed to examine the trends and geographic variation of ACSC hospitalizations in US veterans health-care system, to identify factors associated with ACSC hospitalizations and to develop a quality indicator that can monitor access and effectiveness of primary care at hospital level. Using fiscal years 1997-2007 data, we found total ACSC hospitalizations per 1000 ACSC patients decreased by 58%; ACSC hospitalizations as percentage of total hospitalizations decreased 9%. However, significant geographic variations of ACSC hospitalizations remained and we found that adjustment of case-mix or confounding factors was essential in making meaningful comparisons among hospitals in a health-care system. Further, this study also reveals that low-income veterans still had higher ACSC hospitalization rates and patient travel time less than 30 minutes to the nearest VA providers was associated with fewer ACSC hospitalizations, which possess important policy implications. PMID:20424274

Finegan, Michael S; Gao, Jian; Pasquale, Donald; Campbell, James

2010-05-01

154

How Costly is Hospital Quality? A Revealed-Preference Approach*  

PubMed Central

We analyze the cost of quality improvement in hospitals, dealing with two challenges. Hospital quality is multidimensional and hard to measure, while unobserved productivity may influence quality supply. We infer the quality of hospitals in Los Angeles from patient choices. We then incorporate ‘revealed quality’ into a cost function, instrumenting with hospital demand. We find that revealed quality differentiates hospitals, but is not strongly correlated with clinical quality. Revealed quality is quite costly, and tends to increase with hospital productivity. Thus, non-clinical aspects of the hospital experience (perhaps including patient amenities) play important roles in hospital demand, competition, and costs. PMID:22299199

Romley, John A.; Goldman, Dana P.

2013-01-01

155

Telemedicine for the care of children in the hospital setting.  

PubMed

Telemedicine is by no means a new technology, given that audio-video telecommunication links have been utilized for the provision of medical services since the 1950s. Nonetheless, telemedicine is currently in a phase of rapid growth and evolution. The combination of increasingly affordable and powerful networking, computing, and communication technology, along with the continued nationwide crisis in health care access and costs, has created a "tipping point," whereby telemedicine has progressed from a novel means of practicing medicine to practical tool to help address our nation's health care needs. Telemedicine has also evolved beyond a means of providing care to remote communities to becoming a versatile tool in the delivery of health care in a variety of non-rural settings. Although no one can be everywhere at once, telemedicine allows us to be in more places at once than we've ever been before. The problems of disparities and access to care are even more evident in pediatrics, where subspecialists are fewer in number and more regionalized than adult providers. Numerous successful telemedicine programs across the country have demonstrated the impact that these technologies can have in pediatrics, with many more programs in development. As a versatile means of delivering care, telemedicine can be used at any point during the course of a health care encounter as not only a means of expanding our reach, but also as a means of increasing efficiency. Using telemedicine to provide consultations to community hospitals has been shown to improve quality of care, strengthen the referral base for the consulting facilities, facilitate cost savings, and improve the financial bottom line for both referring and consulting facilities. This review highlights some of the ways in which telemedicine is being used to facilitate timely and effective pediatric care in a variety of hospital settings. PMID:24512161

McSwain, S David; Marcin, James P

2014-02-01

156

The history of quality measurement in home health care.  

PubMed

Quality improvement is as central to home health care as to any other field of health care. With the mandated addition in 2000 of Outcome Assessment and Information Set (OASIS) and outcome-based quality improvement (OBQI), Medicare home health agencies entered a new era of documenting, tracking, and systematically improving quality. OBQI is augmented by the Medicare Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) program, which is now entering the ninth in a series of work assignments, with the tenth scope in the planning stages. Evidence has shown that applied quality improvement methods can drive better outcomes using important metrics, such as acute care hospitalization. This article reviews key findings from the past 2 decades of home care quality improvement research and public policy advances, describes specific examples of local and regional programmatic approaches to quality improvement, and forecasts near-future trends in this vital arena of home health care. PMID:19217497

Rosati, Robert J

2009-02-01

157

Quality competition and uncertainty in a horizontally differentiated hospital market.  

PubMed

The chapter studies hospital competition in a spatially differentiated market in which patient demand reflects the quality/distance mix that maximizes their utility. Treatment is free at the point of use and patients freely choose the provider which best fits their expectations. Hospitals might have asymmetric objectives and costs, however they are reimbursed using a uniform prospective payment. The chapter provides different equilibrium outcomes, under perfect and asymmetric information. The results show that asymmetric costs, in the case where hospitals are profit maximizers, allow for a social welfare and quality improvement. On the other hand, the presence of a publicly managed hospital which pursues the objective of quality maximization is able to ensure a higher level of quality, patient surplus and welfare. However, the extent of this outcome might be considerably reduced when high levels of public hospital inefficiency are detectable. Finally, the negative consequences caused by the presence of asymmetric information are highlighted in the different scenarios of ownership/objectives and costs. The setting adopted in the model aims at describing the up-coming European market for secondary health care, focusing on hospital behavior and it is intended to help the policy-maker in understanding real world dynamics. PMID:24864388

Montefiori, Marcello

2014-01-01

158

A framework of pediatric hospital discharge care informed by legislation, research, and practice.  

PubMed

To our knowledge, no widely used pediatric standards for hospital discharge care exist, despite nearly 10?000 pediatric discharges per day in the United States. This lack of standards undermines the quality of pediatric hospital discharge, hinders quality-improvement efforts, and adversely affects the health and well-being of children and their families after they leave the hospital. In this article, we first review guidance regarding the discharge process for adult patients, including federal law within the Social Security Act that outlines standards for hospital discharge; a variety of toolkits that aim to improve discharge care; and the research evidence that supports the discharge process. We then outline a framework within which to organize the diverse activities that constitute discharge care to be executed throughout the hospitalization of a child from admission to the actual discharge. In the framework, we describe processes to (1) initiate pediatric discharge care, (2) develop discharge care plans, (3) monitor discharge progress, and (4) finalize discharge. We contextualize these processes with a clinical case of a child undergoing hospital discharge. Use of this narrative review will help pediatric health care professionals (eg, nurses, social workers, and physicians) move forward to better understand what works and what does not during hospital discharge for children, while steadily improving their quality of care and health outcomes. PMID:25155156

Berry, Jay G; Blaine, Kevin; Rogers, Jayne; McBride, Sarah; Schor, Edward; Birmingham, Jackie; Schuster, Mark A; Feudtner, Chris

2014-10-01

159

Managerial attitude to the implementation of quality management systems in Lithuanian support treatment and nursing hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The regulations of the Quality Management System (QMS) implementation in health care organizations were approved by the Lithuanian Ministry of Health in 1998. Following the above regulations, general managers of health care organizations had to initiate the QMS implementation in hospitals. As no research on the QMS implementation has been carried out in Lithuanian support treatment and nursing hospitals

Ilona Buciuniene; Sonata Malciankina; Zigmas Lydeka; Ruta Kazlauskaite

2006-01-01

160

Hospital Coding Practice, Data Quality, and DRG-Based Reimbursement under the Thai Universal Coverage Scheme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the Thai Universal Coverage scheme, hospital providers are paid for their inpatient care using Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) reimbursement. Questionable quality of the submitted DRG codes has been of concern whereas knowledge about hospital coding practice has been lacking. The objectives of this thesis are (1) To explore hospital coding…

Pongpirul, Krit

2011-01-01

161

[Current legal initiative to integrated care - effects of outpatient care in hospitals].  

PubMed

The strict separation of the out-patient and hospital-based health care delivery sectors in Germany leads to deficits in effectiveness and efficiency. Newly introduced legal initiatives to overcome this separation, namely "Ambulantes Operieren" (section 115 b SGB V), "Ambulante Behandlung durch Krankenhäuser" and Disease Management Programs (sections 116a-b SGB V) are described in detail in this article. Their impact on hospital-based health provision for out-patients is discussed. The aim of a better integration of different sectors with a better quality and a more efficient use of resources seems to be the target of these initiatives. PMID:15088171

Wohlgemuth, W A; Mayer, J; Nagel, E; Bohndorf, K

2004-04-01

162

Public perceptions of Australia's doctors, hospitals and health care systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess public perceptions of Australia's doctors, hospitals and health care systems. Design and participants: A cross-sectional national telephone survey of a random sample of 800 Australian adults in August 2007. Main outcome measures: Ratings of subjective trust in health care providers, public and private hospitals, private health insurers and Medicare; attitudinal ratings for the current health care system,

Elizabeth A Hardie; Christine R Critchley

163

The Loneliest Babies: Foster Care in the Hospital  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses an ignored problem--the plight of infants and toddlers in foster care who find themselves hospitalized. A majority of the children in foster care will be hospitalized for medical treatment while in foster care because they are more likely to have serious medical problems or developmental disabilities than their age peers.…

Dicker, Sheryl

2012-01-01

164

38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

2013-07-01

165

38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

2012-07-01

166

38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

2014-07-01

167

38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

2011-07-01

168

38 CFR 17.196 - Aid for hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aid for hospital care. 17.196 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.196 Aid for hospital care. Aid may be...

2010-07-01

169

Pediatric intensive care quality factors.  

PubMed

Intensive care has been in the forefront of quality investigations. Outcomes researchers have taken advantage of reliable and robust methods to adjust for severity of illness and other case mix variables, and readily identifiable relevant outcomes (survival and death) to investigate quality factors associated with improved risk-adjusted outcomes. Current studies are limited by using databases of convenience, use of historical controls, small sample sizes, and inadequate case-mix adjustment. Only one study has focused on the comparative advantage of pediatric versus adult intensive care units for injured children; it demonstrated substantially improved risk-adjusted mortality rates. The effect of volume on quality of pediatric intensive care has been the subject of multiple evaluations, although each of these studies has serious limitations. Other studies have demonstrated that the experience of the bedside caregiver is important in patient outcomes. PMID:18091207

Pollack, Murray M

2007-12-01

170

Advance Care Planning and the Quality of End-of-Life Care among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Background Advance care planning is increasingly common, but whether it influences end-of-life quality of care remains controversial. Design Medicare data and survey data from the Health and Retirement Study were combined to determine whether advance care planning was associated with quality metrics. Setting The nationally representative Health and Retirement Study. Participants 4394 decedent subjects (mean age 82.6 years at death, 55% women). Measurements Advance care planning was defined as having an advance directive, durable power of attorney or having discussed preferences for end-of-life care with a next-of-kin. Outcomes included previously reported quality metrics observed during the last month of life (rates of hospital admission, in-hospital death, >14 days in the hospital, intensive care unit admission, >1 emergency department visit, hospice admission, and length of hospice ?3 days). Results Seventy-six percent of subjects engaged in advance care planning. Ninety-two percent of advance directives stated a preference to prioritize comfort. After adjustment, subjects who engaged in advance care planning were less likely to die in a hospital (adjusted RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80-0.94), more likely to be enrolled in hospice (aRR 1.68, 1.43-1.97), and less likely to receive hospice for ?3 days before death (aRR 0.88, 0.85-0.91). Having an advance directive, a durable-power-of-attorney or an advance care planning discussion were each independently associated with a significant increase in hospice use (p<0.01 for all). Conclusion Advance care planning was associated with improved quality of care at the end of life, including less in-hospital death and increased use of hospice. Having an advance directive, assigning a durable power of attorney and conducting advance care planning discussions are all important elements of advance care planning. PMID:23350921

Bischoff, Kara E.; Sudore, Rebecca; Miao, Yinghui; Boscardin, W. John; Smith, Alexander K.

2013-01-01

171

The quality of caring relationships.  

PubMed

In health care, relationships between patients or disabled persons and professionals are at least co-constitutive for the quality of care. Many patients complain about the contacts and communication with caregivers and other professionals. From a care-ethical perspective a good patient-professional relationship requires a process of negotiation and shared understanding about mutual normative expectations. Mismatches between these expectations will lead to misunderstandings or conflicts. If caregivers listen to the narratives of identity of patients, and engage in a deliberative dialogue, they will better be able to attune their care to the needs of patients. We will illustrate this with the stories of three women with multiple sclerosis. Their narratives of identity differ from the narratives that caregivers and others use to understand and identify them. Since identities give rise to normative expectations in all three cases there is a conflict between what the women expect of their caregivers and vice-versa. These stories show that the quality of care, defined as doing the right thing, at the right time, in the right way, for the right person, is dependent on the quality of caring relationships. PMID:22110320

Abma, Tineke A; Oeseburg, Barth; Widdershoven, Guy Am; Verkerk, Marian

2009-01-01

172

38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. 17.43 Section 17.43 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. Hospital or domiciliary...

2014-07-01

173

38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. 17.43 Section 17.43 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. Hospital or domiciliary...

2012-07-01

174

38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. 17.43 Section 17.43 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. Hospital or domiciliary...

2013-07-01

175

38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. 17.43 Section 17.43 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care. Hospital or domiciliary...

2011-07-01

176

The quality-value proposition in health care.  

PubMed

Powerful forces are converging in US health care to finally cause recognition of the inherently logical relationship between quality and money. The forces, or marketplace "drivers," which are converging to compel recognition of the relationship between cost and quality are: (1) the increasing costs of care; (2) the recurrence of another medical malpractice crisis; and (3) the recognition inside and outside of health care that quality is inconsistent and unacceptable. It is apparent that hospital administrators, financial officers, board members, and medical staff leadership do not routinely do two things: (1) relate quality to finance; and (2) appreciate the intra-hospital structural problems that impede quality attainment. This article discusses these factors and offers a positive method for re-structuring quality efforts and focusing the hospital and its medical staff on quality. The simple but compelling thesis of the authors is that health care must immediately engage in the transformation to making quality of medical care the fundamental business strategy of the organization. PMID:14977035

Feazell, G Landon; Marren, John P

2003-01-01

177

Competition, Payers, and Hospital Quality1  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate the effects of competition for both Medicare and HMO patients on the quality decisions of hospitals in Southern California. Data Source Secondary discharge data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development for the State of California for the period 1989–1993. Study Design Outcome variables are the risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates for pneumonia (estimated by the authors) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (reported by the state of California). Measures of competition are constructed for each hospital and payer type. The competition measures are formulated to mitigate the possibility of endogeneity bias. The relationships between risk-adjusted mortality and the different competition measures are estimated using ordinary least squares. Principal Findings The study finds that an increase in the degree of competition for health maintenance organization (HMO) patients is associated with a decrease in risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates. Conversely, an increase in competition for Medicare enrollees is associated with an increase in risk-adjusted mortality rates for hospitals. Conclusions In conjunction with previous research, the estimates indicate that increasing competition for HMO patients appears to reduce prices and save lives and hence appears to improve welfare. However, increases in competition for Medicare appear to reduce quality and may reduce welfare. Increasing competition has little net effect on hospital quality in our sample. PMID:14727780

Gowrisankaran, Gautam; Town, Robert J

2003-01-01

178

Organizing integrated care in a university hospital: application of a conceptual framework  

PubMed Central

Background and aim As a result of New Public Management, a number of industrial models of quality management have been implemented in health care, mainly in hospitals. At the same time, the concept of integrated care has been developed within other parts of the health sector. The aim of the article is to discuss the relevance of integrated care for hospitals. Theory and methods The discussion is based on application of a conceptual framework outlining a number of organizational models of integrated care. These models are illustrated in a case study of a Danish university hospital implementing a new organization for improving the patient flows of the hospital. The study of the reorganization is based mainly on qualitative data from individual and focus group interviews. Results The new organization of the university hospital can be regarded as a matrix structure combining a vertical integration of clinical departments with a horizontal integration of patient flows. This structure has elements of both interprofessional and interorganizational integration. A strong focus on teamwork, meetings and information exchange is combined with elements of case management and co-location. Conclusions It seems that integrated care can be a relevant concept for a hospital. Although the organizational models may challenge established professional boundaries and financial control systems, this concept can be a more promising way to improve the quality of care than the industrial models that have been imported into health care. This application of the concept may also contribute to widen the field of integrated care. PMID:24966806

Axelsson, Runo; Axelsson, Susanna Bihari; Gustafsson, Jeppe; Seemann, Janne

2014-01-01

179

Board oversight of quality: any differences in process of care and mortality?  

PubMed

In response to legal and accreditation mandates as well as pressures from purchasers and consumers for quality improvement, hospital governing boards seek to improve their oversight of quality of care by adopting various practices. Based on a previous survey of hospital presidents/chief executive officers, this study examines differences in hospital quality performance associated with the adoption of particular practices in board oversight of quality. Quality was measured by performance in process of care and risk-adjusted mortality, using the Hospital Compare data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project inpatient databases of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Board practices found to be associated with better performance in both process of care and mortality include (1) having a board quality committee; (2) establishing strategic goals for quality improvement; (3) being involved in setting the quality agenda for the hospital; (4) including a specific item on quality in board meetings; (5) using a dashboard with national benchmarks that includes indicators for clinical quality, patient safety, and patient satisfaction; and (6) linking senior executives' performance evaluation to quality and patient safety indicators. Involvement of physician leadership in the board quality committee further enhanced the hospital's quality performance. Taken together, these findings seem to support the will-execution-constancy of purpose framework on improving the effectiveness of hospital boards in overseeing quality. Future study should examine how specific board practices influence the culture and operations of the hospital that lead to better quality of care. PMID:19227851

Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Bass, Karma; Fraser, Irene

2009-01-01

180

The results of a randomized trial of a quality improvement intervention in the care of patients with heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Quality improvement and disease management programs for heart failure have improved quality of care and patient outcomes at large tertiary care hospitals. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a regional, multihospital, collaborative quality improvement intervention on care and outcomes in heart failure in community hospitals.PATIENTS AND METHODS: This randomized controlled study included 10 acute

Edward F Philbin; Thomas A Rocco; Norman W Lindenmuth; Kathleen Ulrich; Maureen McCall; Paul L Jenkins

2000-01-01

181

Measuring outcomes of hospital care using multiple risk-adjusted indexes.  

PubMed

Using existing data sources, we developed three risk-adjusted measures of hospital quality: the risk-adjusted mortality index (RAMI), the risk-adjusted readmissions index (RARI), and the risk-adjusted complication index (RACI). We describe the construction and validation of each of these indexes. After these measures were developed, we tested the relationships among the three indexes using a sample of 300 hospitals. Actual numbers of adverse events were observed for each hospital and compared to the number predicted by the RAMI, RARI, and RACI models. Then each hospital was ranked on each index. Our results showed that no relationship existed between a hospital's ranking on any one of these indexes and its ranking on the other two indexes. This result provides some evidence that no measure of quality should be used by itself to represent different aspects of the quality of hospital care. Adequate overall measures of hospital quality will need to include multiple measures in order to be credible and to reflect the complexity of hospital care. The findings suggest that consumers, payers, and policymakers cannot simply choose one hospitalwide measure, such as the mortality rate, to validly represent a hospital's performance: those hospitals with high rankings on their mortality rates do not necessarily rank high on their readmission rates or complication rates. PMID:1917500

DesHarnais, S; McMahon, L F; Wroblewski, R

1991-10-01

182

[The nutritional status and care of hospitalized elderly patients].  

PubMed

Malnutrition is common in the elderly. Nutritional care in the hospital includes: (1) Nutritional screening and care plan. (2) Food service-including food acceptable to the elderly. (3) Follow-up of clinical outcome. In the elderly, reduced portion sizes and increased energy-protein density have been shown to be effective in decreasing wastage and improving intake. There must be greater cooperation between nutritional care teams in order for the hospitalized elderly to receive optimal nutritional care. PMID:15614658

Cheng, Chin-Pao

2004-10-01

183

Managing variability to improve quality, capacity and cost in the perioperative process at Massachusetts General Hospital  

E-print Network

The widely held assumption is that to improve access and quality of health care, we need to spend more. In fact, that is not necessarily true. The results of this project, performed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), ...

Price, Devon J. (Devon Jameson)

2011-01-01

184

The Objective Impact of Clinical Peer Review on Hospital Quality and Safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite its importance, the objective impact of clinical peer review on the quality and safety of care has not been studied. Data from 296 acute care hospitals show that peer review program and related organizational factors can explain up to 18% of the variation in standardized measures of quality and patient safety. The majority of programs rely on an outmoded

Marc T. Edwards

2011-01-01

185

Does Investor Ownership of Nursing Homes Compromise the Quality of Care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the 1.6 million Americans who reside in nursing homes, the quality of care largely de- termines the quality of life. Most patients in acute-care hospitals will return to their homes and families, regaining command of their sleep schedules, food choices, hygiene, and mobility. They can generally change physicians and hospitals if dissatisfied. But most nursing home patients cannot go

Charlene Harrington; Steffie Woolhandler; Joseph Mullan; Helen Carrillo; David U. Himmelstein

2001-01-01

186

Hospitals on the path to accountable care: highlights from a 2011 national survey of hospital readiness to participate in an accountable care organization.  

PubMed

Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are forming in communities across the country. In ACOs, health care providers take responsibility for a defined patient popu­lation, coordinate their care across settings, and are held jointly accountable for the quality and cost of care. This issue brief reports on results from a survey that assesses hospitals' readiness to participate in ACOs. Results show we are at the beginning of the ACO adop­tion curve. As of September 2011, only 13 percent of hospital respondents reported partici­pating in an ACO or planning to participate within a year, while 75 percent reported not considering participation at all. Survey results indicate that physician-led ACOs are the second most common governance model, far exceeding payer-led models, highlighting an encouraging paradigm shift away from acute care and toward primary care. Findings also point to significant gaps, including the infrastructure needed to take on financial risks and to manage population health. PMID:22928221

Audet, Anne-Marie J; Kenward, Kevin; Patel, Shreya; Joshi, Maulik S

2012-08-01

187

Disciplined care for disciplined patients: experience of hospitalized blind patients.  

PubMed

Blindness is a permanent condition that alters daily life of blind people. Interpretive phenomenology was used to understand lived experiences of the hospitalized blind people. "Disciplined care for disciplined patients" was one of the themes that emerged from the data. Provision of disciplined care can help health care professionals provide a holistic and comprehensive competent care for blind patients. PMID:24121699

Shamshiri, Mahmood; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Sadeghi, Tahereh

2013-01-01

188

Situational awareness, relational coordination and integrated care delivery to hospitalized elderly in The Netherlands: a comparison between hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background It is known that interprofessional collaboration is crucial for integrated care delivery, yet we are still unclear about the underlying mechanisms explaining effectiveness of integrated care delivery to older patients. In addition, we lack research comparing integrated care delivery between hospitals. Therefore, this study aims to (i) provide insight into the underlying components ‘relational coordination’ and ‘situational awareness’ of integrated care delivery and the role of team and organizational context in integrated care delivery; and (ii) compare situational awareness, relational coordination, and integrated care delivery of different hospitals in the Netherlands. Methods This cross-sectional study took place in 2012 among professionals from three different hospitals involved in the delivery of care to older patients. A total of 215 professionals filled in the questionnaire (42% response rate).Descriptive statistics and paired-sample t-tests were used to investigate the level of situational awareness, relational coordination, and integrated care delivery in the three different hospitals. Correlation and multilevel analyses were used to investigate the relationship between background characteristics, team context, organizational context, situational awareness, relational coordination and integrated care delivery. Results No differences in background characteristics, team context, organizational context, situational awareness, relational coordination and integrated care delivery were found among the three hospitals. Correlational analysis revealed that situational awareness (r?=?0.30; p?care delivery. Stepwise multilevel analyses showed that formal internal communication (p?care delivery. Team climate was not significantly associated with integrated care delivery when situational awareness and relational coordination were included in the equation. Thus situational awareness acted as mediator between team climate and integrated care delivery among professionals delivering care to older hospitalized patients. Conclusions The results of this study show the importance of formal internal communication and situational awareness for quality of care delivery to hospitalized older patients. PMID:24410889

2014-01-01

189

[Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].  

PubMed

The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

2014-07-01

190

A Survey of Nursing Home Organizational Characteristics Associated with Potentially Avoidable Hospital Transfers and Care Quality in One Large British Columbia Health Region  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hospitalization of nursing home residents can be futile as well as costly, and now evidence indicates that treating nursing home residents in place produces better outcomes for some conditions. We examined facility organizational characteristics that previous research showed are associated with potentially avoidable hospital transfers and with…

McGregor, Margaret J.; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Abu-Laban, Riyad B.; McGrail, Kimberlyn M.; Andrusiek, Dug; Globerman, Judith; Berg, Shannon; Cox, Michelle B.; Salomons, Kia; Volker, Jan; Ronald, Lisa

2011-01-01

191

Effect of hospital asthma nurse appointment on inpatient asthma care  

Microsoft Academic Search

While asthma nurses are funded by many health authorities within the U.K. National Health Service, for the improvement of clinical management in both inpatient and outpatient settings in secondary care, the effect of asthma nurse appointment on acute asthma care in hospitalized children has been inadequately studied. Here, we test the hypothesis that the employment of a full-time hospital asthma

E. SMITH; V. ALEXANDER; C. BOOKER; C. MCCOWAN; S. OGSTON; S. MUKHOPADHYAY

2000-01-01

192

Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

2007-01-01

193

Channel leadership in health care marketing: a natural role for hospitals.  

PubMed

Health care has entered an era of rapid change. Most observers agree that important long-term changes will fundamentally reshape health care as we know it. To that end, health care providers should consider the benefits of operating vertically integrated marketing system with hospitals as the channel leader. Whether an administered VMS (hospitals have the power to gain compliance) or a corporate VMS (hospitals own successive levels of care providers), integrated channel management holds the promise of cost containment and quality patient care for the future. However, a great deal of integrating work must be done before VMSs will become a practical solution. Research studies are needed on each of the issues just discussed. As marketers, it is time we make a transition from treating health care marketing as a disjointed entity and instead treat it as an industry where all marketing principles are considered including channel management. PMID:10106898

Fugate, D L; Decker, P J

1990-01-01

194

Application of a robot for critical care rounding in small rural hospitals.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to present an option for a model of care that allows small rural hospitals to be able to provide specialty physicians for critical care patient needs in lieu of on-site critical care physician coverage. A real-time, 2-way audio and video remote presence robot is used to bring a specialist to the bedside to interact with patients. This article discusses improvements in quality and finance outcomes as well as care team and patient satisfaction associated with this model. Discussion also includes expansion of the care model to the emergency department for acute stroke care. PMID:25438890

Murray, Cindy; Ortiz, Elizabeth; Kubin, Cay

2014-12-01

195

Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care  

PubMed Central

Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on “QIs and breast cancer” and “benchmarking and breast cancer care”, and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

van Dam, P.A.; Verkinderen, L.; Hauspy, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Dirix, L.; Huizing, M.; Altintas, S.; Papadimitriou, K.; Peeters, M.; Tjalma, W.

2013-01-01

196

Comparative hospital databases: value for management and quality.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--To establish an accurate and reliable comparative database of discharge abstracts and to appraise its value for assessments of quality of care. DESIGN--Retrospective review of case notes by trained research abstractors and comparison with matched information as routinely collected by the hospitals' own information systems. SETTING--Three district general hospitals and two major London teaching hospitals. PATIENTS--The database included 3905 medical and surgical cases and 2082 obstetric cases from 1990 and 1991. MAIN MEASURES--Accessibility of case notes; measures of reliability between reviewers and of validity of case note content; application of high level quality indicators. RESULTS--The existing hospital systems extracted insufficient detail from case notes to conduct clinical comparative analyses for medical and surgical cases. The research abstractors at least doubled the diagnostic codes extracted. Interabstractor agreement of about 70% was obtained for primary diagnosis and assignment to diagnosis related group. These data were sufficient to create a comparative database and apply high level quality indicators designed to flag topics for further study. For obstetric-specific indicators the rates were comparable for abstractors and the hospital information systems, which in each case was a departmentally based system (SMMIS) producing more detailed and accessible data. CONCLUSIONS--Current methods of extracting and coding diagnostic and procedural data from case notes in this sample of hospitals is unsatisfactory: notes were difficult to access and recording is unacceptably incomplete. IMPLICATIONS--Improvements as piloted in this project, are readily available should the NHS, hospital managers, and clinicians see the value of these data in their clinical and managerial activities. PMID:10136257

Cleary, R; Beard, R; Coles, J; Devlin, B; Hopkins, A; Schumacher, D; Wickings, I

1994-01-01

197

Defining Quality Child Care: Multiple Stakeholder Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multiple perspectives regarding the definition of quality child care, and how child care quality can be improved, were examined using a focus group methodology. Participants were representatives from stakeholder groups in the child care profession, including child care center owners and directors (3 groups), parents (3 groups), child caregivers (3…

Harrist, Amanda W.; Thompson, Stacy D.; Norris, Deborah J.

2007-01-01

198

Development of a Multiple-item Scale for Measuring Hospital Service Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many hospitals apply modern marketing ideas to serve customer markets in a more efficient and effective way. An important strategic variable in this respect is service quality. Gives a theoretical conceptualization of the service-quality construct and discusses its major underlying assumptions and concepts. Also describes some specific characteristics of the quality construct in the health-care sector. Explores the dimensionality of

R. Vandamme; J. Leunis

1993-01-01

199

Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital, an acute-care medical facility  

E-print Network

Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital, an acute-care medical facility relationships as well as the organizational transformation of "moving from good to great," the hospital has achieved exceptional clinical, service, and financial outcomes. "Good Sam," as it is popularly known

Magee, Joseph W.

200

A study of evaluation methods for hospital medical care systems.  

PubMed

When we seek to evaluate hospital medical care services, we first collect data regarding the existing system in order to gather information and to develop a method of analysis that we can use for evaluation. We took the OPD system as an example, taking into account systematic OPD services based on queuing theory and computer simulation. As a result of the computer simulation model based on experimental conditions, we were able to offer recommendations for modifications of the present system that could improve patient service. The hospital manager can use this information to aid him in the decision making processes concerning the hospital. A study of the methods for the evaluation of hospital medical care services is important. It is necessary to develop a regional medical care information system as well as a hospital medical care information system. PMID:10120546

Nobukawa, M; Eussen, M E

1992-07-01

201

Modeling hospital infrastructure by optimizing quality, accessibility and efficiency via a mixed integer programming model  

PubMed Central

Background The majority of curative health care is organized in hospitals. As in most other countries, the current 94 hospital locations in the Netherlands offer almost all treatments, ranging from rather basic to very complex care. Recent studies show that concentration of care can lead to substantial quality improvements for complex conditions and that dispersion of care for chronic conditions may increase quality of care. In previous studies on allocation of hospital infrastructure, the allocation is usually only based on accessibility and/or efficiency of hospital care. In this paper, we explore the possibilities to include a quality function in the objective function, to give global directions to how the ‘optimal’ hospital infrastructure would be in the Dutch context. Methods To create optimal societal value we have used a mathematical mixed integer programming (MIP) model that balances quality, efficiency and accessibility of care for 30 ICD-9 diagnosis groups. Typical aspects that are taken into account are the volume-outcome relationship, the maximum accepted travel times for diagnosis groups that may need emergency treatment and the minimum use of facilities. Results The optimal number of hospital locations per diagnosis group varies from 12-14 locations for diagnosis groups which have a strong volume-outcome relationship, such as neoplasms, to 150 locations for chronic diagnosis groups such as diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Conclusions In conclusion, our study shows a new approach for allocating hospital infrastructure over a country or certain region that includes quality of care in relation to volume per provider that can be used in various countries or regions. In addition, our model shows that within the Dutch context chronic care may be too concentrated and complex and/or acute care may be too dispersed. Our approach can relatively easily be adopted towards other countries or regions and is very suitable to perform a ‘what-if’ analysis. PMID:23768234

2013-01-01

202

Bayesian Inference for Hospital Quality in a Selection Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops new econometric methods to infer hospital quality in a model with discrete dependent variables and nonrandom selection. Mortality rates in patient discharge records are widely used to infer hospital quality. However, hospital admission is not random and some hospitals may attract patients with greater unobserved severity of illness than others. In this situation the assumption of random

John Geweke; Gautam Gowrisankaran; Robert J. Town

2003-01-01

203

Managing the quality of health care.  

PubMed

This article reviews quality of health care initiatives beginning with the quality assessment/quality assurance movement of the 1970s. Conceptually, modern quality of care management is rooted in the intellectual work of Avedis Donabedian who defined quality of care as a combination of structure, process, and outcome. Donabedian's model is presented and some limitations are pointed out. In the late 1980s and 1990s. the health care industry adopted total quality management (TQM). More recently, the pursuit of health care quality has led to substantial performance measurement initiatives such as ORYX by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and MEDIS by the National Commission of Quality Assurance. The importance of CONQUEST, a freely available performance measurement database developed at the Harvard School of Public Health, is noted and discussed. The article concludes with a list of challenges facing public and private parties interests in health care quality improvement. PMID:15188996

Larson, James S; Muller, Andreas

2002-01-01

204

Primary Care Quality among Different Health Care Structures in Tibet, China  

PubMed Central

Objective. To compare the primary care quality among different health care structures in Tibet, China. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire survey including Primary Care Assessment Tool-Tibetan version was used to obtain data from a total of 1386 patients aged over 18 years in the sampling sites in two prefectures in Tibet. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between health care structures and primary care quality while controlling for sociodemographic and health care characteristics. Results. The services provided by township health centers were more often used by a poor, less educated, and healthy population. Compared with prefecture (77.42) and county hospitals (82.01), township health centers achieved highest total score of primary care quality (86.64). Factors that were positively and significantly associated with higher total assessment scores included not receiving inpatient service in the past year, less frequent health care visits, good self-rated health status, lower education level, and marital status. Conclusions. This study showed that township health centers patients reported better primary care quality than patients visiting prefecture and county hospitals. Government health reforms should pay more attention to THC capacity building in Tibet, especially in the area of human resource development.

Yin, Aitian; Mao, Zongfu; Liu, Xiaoyun

2015-01-01

205

Primary Care Quality among Different Health Care Structures in Tibet, China.  

PubMed

Objective. To compare the primary care quality among different health care structures in Tibet, China. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire survey including Primary Care Assessment Tool-Tibetan version was used to obtain data from a total of 1386 patients aged over 18 years in the sampling sites in two prefectures in Tibet. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between health care structures and primary care quality while controlling for sociodemographic and health care characteristics. Results. The services provided by township health centers were more often used by a poor, less educated, and healthy population. Compared with prefecture (77.42) and county hospitals (82.01), township health centers achieved highest total score of primary care quality (86.64). Factors that were positively and significantly associated with higher total assessment scores included not receiving inpatient service in the past year, less frequent health care visits, good self-rated health status, lower education level, and marital status. Conclusions. This study showed that township health centers patients reported better primary care quality than patients visiting prefecture and county hospitals. Government health reforms should pay more attention to THC capacity building in Tibet, especially in the area of human resource development. PMID:25861619

Wang, Wenhua; Shi, Leiyu; Yin, Aitian; Mao, Zongfu; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Liu, Xiaoyun

2015-01-01

206

Perceptions and Utilization of Palliative Care Services in Acute Care Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objective To understand perceptions of palliative care in acute care hospitals and identify barriers to earlier use of palliative care in the illness trajectory. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 120 providers involved in decision making or discharge planning and “shadowed” health care providers on intensive care unit rounds in 11 Pennsylvania hospitals, and then used qualitative methods to analyze field notes and transcripts. Results Most participants characterized palliative care as end-of-life or hospice care that is initiated after the decision to limit treatment is made. Few recognized the role of palliative care in managing symptoms and addressing the psychosocial needs of patients with chronic illnesses other than cancer. Participants viewed earlier and broader palliative care consultations less in terms of clinical benefits than in terms of cost savings accrued from shorter terminal hospitalizations. In general, participants thought nurses were most likely to facilitate palliative care consults, surgeons were most likely to resist them, and intensive care specialists were most likely to view palliative care as within their own scope of practice. Suggestions for increasing and broadening palliative care integration and utilization included providing workforce development, education, and training; improving financial reimbursement and sustainability for palliative care; and fostering a hospital culture that turns to high -intensity care only if it meets the individual needs and goals of patients with chronic illnesses. Conclusions Initiating palliative care consultations earlier during hospitalization will require an emphasis on patient benefits and assurances that palliative care will not threaten provider autonomy. PMID:17298258

RODRIGUEZ, KERI L.; BARNATO, AMBER E.; ARNOLD, ROBERT M.

2014-01-01

207

38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient...medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling...

2011-07-01

208

38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient...medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling...

2014-07-01

209

38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient...medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling...

2013-07-01

210

38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 ...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient...medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling...

2012-07-01

211

38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care...outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling...

2010-07-01

212

38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in foreign...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical...Foreign Countries § 17.35 Hospital care and medical services in...

2010-07-01

213

Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care  

PubMed Central

Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p?<0.?001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

2014-01-01

214

Can Hospital Cultural Competency Reduce Disparities in Patient Experiences with Care?  

PubMed Central

Background Cultural competency has been espoused as an organizational strategy to reduce health disparities in care. Objective To examine the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Research Design The first model predicted Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from hospital random effects, plus fixed effects for hospital cultural competency, individual race/ethnicity/language, and case-mix variables. The second model tested if the association between a hospital’s cultural competency and HCAHPS scores differed for minority and non-Hispanic white patients. Subjects The National CAHPS® Benchmarking Database’s (NCBD) HCAHPS Surveys and the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Surveys for California hospitals were merged, resulting in 66 hospitals and 19,583 HCAHPS respondents in 2006. Measures Dependent variables include ten HCAHPS measures: six composites (communication with doctors, communication with nurses, staff responsiveness, pain control, communication about medications, and discharge information), two individual items (cleanliness, and quietness of patient rooms), and two global items (overall hospital rating, and whether patient would recommend hospital). Results Hospitals with greater cultural competency have better HCAHPS scores for doctor communication, hospital rating, and hospital recommendation. Furthermore, HCAHPS scores for minorities were higher at hospitals with greater cultural competency on four other dimensions: nurse communication, staff responsiveness, quiet room, and pain control. Conclusions Greater hospital cultural competency may improve overall patient experiences, but may particularly benefit minorities in their interactions with nurses and hospital staff. Such effort may not only serve longstanding goals of reducing racial/ethnic disparities in inpatient experience, but may also contribute to general quality improvement. PMID:23064277

Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N.; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Hall, Allyson; Hays, Ron D.

2013-01-01

215

[Process-oriented quality management in the hospital].  

PubMed

Procedures and experiences concerning the implementation of quality management in a midsize hospital with 6 medical disciplines are described. Quality of infrastructure was checked with lists and the quality of medical performance assessed by means of standardized numerical audit with all professional groups. Weaknesses were identified by comparing the result to each quality indicator with target standards. As examples, causal relations and consequences of deficiencies in clinical care documentation, scheme of preoperative diagnosis, co-ordination of surgical procedures and handling of complications are given in more detail. Obstacles were rated depending on frequency and risk potential, sometimes cost effectiveness. Members of all professional groups and departments involved participated in trouble solving teams to which external expert assistance was provided. For example, interventions leading to improved co-ordination of surgical activities and their impacts are specified. Improving systematically the quality of clinical procedures is one gateway to establish quality management in hospitals continuously and thoroughly becoming an integrated part of the corporate culture. Investment of resources is necessary but justified by midrange benefits. PMID:9577902

Wolters, H G

1998-03-01

216

Quality of Informal Care Is Multidimensional  

PubMed Central

Purpose To demonstrate that assessing quality of informal care involves more than merely determining whether care recipient needs for assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) are satisfied on a routine basis. Potentially harmful behavior (PHB), adequate care, and exemplary care (EC) are conceptually distinct dimensions of quality of care. We investigated the extent to which these three dimensions also are empirically distinguishable. Design 237 care recipients completed the quality of care measures, and their caregivers completed psychosocial measures of depressed affect, life events, cognitive status, and perceived pre-illness relationship quality. Results Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that PHB, adequate care, and EC are empirically distinct factors. Although PHB was moderately related to EC, adequate care was not associated with PHB and was only slightly related to EC. Psychosocial variables were not related to adequate care but were differentially associated with PHB and EC, providing further evidence for the distinction between the measures of quality of care used in this study. Conclusions Assessing quality of informal care is a complex endeavor. ADL assistance can be adequate in the presence of PHB and/or the absence of EC. Declines in EC may signal increases in PHB, independent of adequacy of care. These findings produce a brief, portable, and more comprehensive instrument for assessing quality of informal care. PMID:19469607

Christie, Juliette; Smith, G. Rush; Williamson, Gail M.; Lance, Charles. E.; Shovali, Tamar E.; Silva, Luciana

2010-01-01

217

Acute Care For Elders Units Produced Shorter Hospital Stays At Lower Cost While Maintaining Patients’ Functional Status  

PubMed Central

Acute Care for Elders Units offer enhanced care for older adults in specially designed hospital units. The care is delivered by interdisciplinary teams, which can include geriatricians, advanced practice nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and physical therapists. In a randomized controlled trial of 1,632 elderly patients, length-of-stay was significantly shorter—6.7 days per patient versus 7.3 days per patient—among those receiving care in the Acute Care for Elders Unit compared to usual care. This difference produced lower total inpatient costs—$9,477 per patient versus $10,451 per patient—while maintaining patients’ functional abilities and not increasing hospital readmission rates. The practices of Acute Care for Elders Units, and the principles they embody, can provide hospitals with effective strategies for lowering costs while preserving quality of care for hospitalized elders. PMID:22665834

Barnes, Deborah E.; Palmer, Robert M.; Kresevic, Denise M.; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Kowal, Jerome; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Landefeld, C. Seth

2013-01-01

218

The Relationship between Social Capital and Quality Management Systems in European Hospitals: A Quantitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Strategic leadership is an important organizational capability and is essential for quality improvement in hospital settings. Furthermore, the quality of leadership depends crucially on a common set of shared values and mutual trust between hospital management board members. According to the concept of social capital, these are essential requirements for successful cooperation and coordination within groups. Objectives We assume that social capital within hospital management boards is an important factor in the development of effective organizational systems for overseeing health care quality. We hypothesized that the degree of social capital within the hospital management board is associated with the effectiveness and maturity of the quality management system in European hospitals. Methods We used a mixed-method approach to data collection and measurement in 188 hospitals in 7 European countries. For this analysis, we used responses from hospital managers. To test our hypothesis, we conducted a multilevel linear regression analysis of the association between social capital and the quality management system score at the hospital level, controlling for hospital ownership, teaching status, number of beds, number of board members, organizational culture, and country clustering. Results The average social capital score within a hospital management board was 3.3 (standard deviation: 0.5; range: 1-4) and the average hospital score for the quality management index was 19.2 (standard deviation: 4.5; range: 0-27). Higher social capital was associated with higher quality management system scores (regression coefficient: 1.41; standard error: 0.64, p=0.029). Conclusion The results suggest that a higher degree of social capital exists in hospitals that exhibit higher maturity in their quality management systems. Although uncontrolled confounding and reverse causation cannot be completely ruled out, our new findings, along with the results of previous research, could have important implications for the work of hospital managers and the design and evaluation of hospital quality management systems. PMID:24392027

Hammer, Antje; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; DerSarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Mannion, Russell; Wagner, Cordula; Ommen, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Pfaff, Holger

2013-01-01

219

Medicare's fee schedule for hospital outpatient care.  

PubMed

Medicare's hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) went live on August 1, 2000, after a decade of developmental work. The new system introduced a fee schedule that replaced the cost-related methods that Medicare previously used to reimburse various hospital outpatient services. Hospitals are now paid predetermined rates or fees based on the Ambulatory Patient Classification (APC) groups assigned to the services that Medicare patients receive during outpatient encounters. The new system aims to simplify Medicare's intricate cost-based reimbursement policies, improve hospital efficiency, ensure that payments are sufficient to compensate hospitals for reasonable Medicare costs, and reduce Medicare coinsurance amounts for beneficiaries. Implementation of OPPS-related administrative and operational changes has been a major challenge for hospitals. PMID:12079149

Grimaldi, Paul L

2002-01-01

220

Quality improvement in nursing care facilities: extent, impetus, and impact.  

PubMed

This study examines the extent, motivation, and performance implications of normal quality improvement (QI) programs in Pennsylvania nursing care facilities. Responses to a 20-item survey sent to facility administrators indicate that continuous quality improvement/total quality management (CQI/TQM) adopters are more motivated by quality of care and human resource concerns in implementing QI, more satisfied with the results of QI efforts, and more aware of a competitive environment than are non-adopters. There are few differences between adopters and non-adopters with respect to organizational characteristics or performance on quality of care measures. Comparison with the results of a study of QI implementation in hospitals reveals some differences in motivation, but similarities in satisfaction with results. PMID:9116533

Zinn, J S; Brannon, D; Weech, R

1997-01-01

221

Quality of everyday life in long stay institutions for the elderly. An observational study of long stay hospital and nursing home care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The observational study reported here was part of a wider evaluation of long stay care for elderly people. The observational study showed that it was essential not to rely on interview material alone. Qualitative techniques provided insights into behaviours, moods and interactions which would have been difficult to measure using traditional survey techniques. The data collected was analyzed in relation

Patricia Clark; Ann Bowling

1990-01-01

222

Quality in health care. Medical or managerial?  

PubMed

Explores the notion that the introduction of total quality management (TQM) in the public health-care sector indicates a conceptual break with a tradition in which the authority to define and interpret the meaning of medical practice has been located solely within the medical profession. It also serves to shift the focus of medical practice away from its contextual and interactional character towards numerical representations and codification in monetary terms. Further, it is argued that the realization of management ideals in everyday practice is dependent more on the availability of pre-existing technologies and standard procedures than on the ingenuity of particular organizational and institutional actors. These arguments are illustrated with the reutilization for TQM purposes of "local incident reports" in a Swedish hospital organization. PMID:11200301

Hansson, J

2000-01-01

223

Quality care—commonplace or chimera  

Microsoft Academic Search

Publicity for (and laterly increased economic stringency which makes more likely), failures of care in the NHS engender concern for care quality while its assurance remains the subject of a fragmented and unhelpful literature. A selective attempt is made to examine some underlying principles by posing and answering three questions. What is the quality of care? What basic principles must

B. L. Donald

1978-01-01

224

The effects of improving hospital physicians working conditions on patient care: a prospective, controlled intervention study  

PubMed Central

Background Physicians, particularly in hospitals, suffer from adverse working conditions. There is a close link between physicians’ psychosocial work environment and the quality of the work they deliver. Our study aimed to explore whether a participatory work-design intervention involving hospital physicians is effective in improving working conditions and quality of patient care. Methods A prospective, controlled intervention study was conducted in two surgical and two internal departments. Participants were 57 hospital physicians and 1581 inpatients. The intervention was a structured, participatory intervention based on continuous group meetings. Physicians actively analyzed problematic working conditions, developed solutions, and initiated their implementation. Physicians’ working conditions and patients’ perceived quality of care were outcome criteria. These variables were assessed by standardized questionnaires. Additional data on implementation status were gathered through interviews. Results Over the course of ten months, several work-related problems were identified, categorized, and ten solutions were implemented. Post-intervention, physicians in the intervention departments reported substantially less conflicting demands and enhanced quality of cooperation with patients’ relatives, compared to control group physicians. Moreover, positive changes in enhanced colleague support could be attributed to the intervention. Regarding patient reports of care quality of care, patient ratings of physicians organization of care improved for physicians in the intervention group. Five interviews with involved physicians confirm the plausibility of obtained results, provide information on implementation status and sustainability of the solutions, and highlight process-related factors for re-design interventions to improve hospital physicians work. Conclusions This study demonstrates that participatory work design for hospital physicians is a promising intervention for improving working conditions and promoting patient quality of care. PMID:24103290

2013-01-01

225

National and international quality initiatives to improve stroke care.  

PubMed

Stroke, the second leading cause of death throughout the world, has a major impact on society. This article provides a summary of quality improvement initiatives, including those relating to hospitals, the system of care delivery infrastructure, and legislative efforts in the United States and in various countries outside of the United States. Through quality improvement initiatives, it is projected that stroke outcomes may improve and the economic burden of stroke may be reduced. PMID:19026908

Fedder, Wende

2008-11-01

226

Satisfaction of women from cesarean section care services in public and private hospitals of Tabriz  

PubMed Central

Background: Consumer satisfaction is recognized as an important parameter for assessing the quality of patient care services. Materials and Methods: By using quota sampling method and questionnaire device, 392 mothers were selected who had been hospitalized for cesarean section in the public and private hospitals of Tabriz. statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 13, descriptive statistics, independent t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and correlation tests were used for data analysis. Results: Findings indicated that the highest rate for mothers’ satisfaction was in the physical and comfort categories and the least satisfaction was in the informational aspect. The analysis of data showed significant difference between mothers’ satisfaction with all aspects of care in the public and private hospitals (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The results showed that mothers were more satisfied of physical and comfortable aspects, but informational aspect of care in both kinds of hospitals was low and there is a need for promote aspect. PMID:24554939

Azari, Sahar; Sehaty, Fahimmeh; Ebrahimi, Hosseyn

2013-01-01

227

Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.  

PubMed

Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p < .01). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients (age, gender, education level) with regard to patient satisfaction were determined. Several statistically significant differences were found between the sociodemographic characteristics and weighted scores for dimensions of SERVQUAL (p < 0.5). According to results, the SQ gap scores for five dimensions were negative to meet expectations. The negative scores for tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care. PMID:11668854

Uzun, O

2001-10-01

228

Improvement in inpatient glycemic care: pathways to quality.  

PubMed

The management of inpatient hyperglycemia is a focus of quality improvement projects across many hospital systems while remaining a point of controversy among clinicians. The association of inpatient hyperglycemia with suboptimal hospital outcomes is accepted by clinical care teams; however, the clear benefits of targeting hyperglycemia as a mechanism to improve hospital outcomes remain contentious. Glycemic management is also frequently confused with efforts aimed at intensive glucose control, further adding to the confusion. Nonetheless, several regulatory agencies assign quality rankings based on attaining specified glycemic targets for selected groups of patients (Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) measures). The current paper reviews the data supporting the benefits associated with inpatient glycemic control projects, the components of a successful glycemic control intervention, and utilization of the electronic medical record in implementing an inpatient glycemic control project. PMID:25715828

Aloi, Joseph A; Mulla, Christopher; Ullal, Jagdeesh; Lieb, David C

2015-04-01

229

Trends in managed care contracting among U.S. hospitals.  

PubMed

This article describes the changing profile of hospitals initiating managed care contracts as of 1992. Based on statistical tests, early contractors rank higher on profitability, case mix, bed size, affiliation, and urban location. In contrast, recent and noncontractors are predominantly rural, freestanding hospitals with low case mix, low profitability, high subacute services, and government ownership. A number of lessons for the future are drawn and a stage-by-stage approach to studying managed care issues is proposed. PMID:8820299

Gautam, K; Campbell, C; Arrington, B

1995-01-01

230

Using quality and cost for employee incentives in a reengineered hospital setting.  

PubMed

The Mount Sinai Hospital is reengineering its inpatient services to increase the quality of patient care and achieve greater operational efficiency. The central component of this redesign has been the establishment of "care centers," which are administratively and fiscally separate "hospitals within the hospital." To promote quality and financial goals set for each care center, a novel employee incentive compensation program was created. Performance on both quality and financial indicators determines the level of bonus payments to hourly employees. The incentive compensation plan was initiated in the first quarter of 1996. By achieving two of the three performance targets, employees earned a bonus of 6% of base salary for the first two quarters. Nurses and pharmacists did not accept bonus payments because of collective bargaining agreements. The early experience of the Cardiac Care Center has been highly favorable. Changes are planned to improve the process further. PMID:9161060

Nash, I S; Coughlin, C; Caine, C C

1997-01-01

231

Panel: Physicians Use Small Microcomputers for Hospital Patient Care  

PubMed Central

“Physician's Use Small Microcomputers for Hospital Patient Care - A Panel Presentation” advances the view-points of the participants. Physician, Nurse, Pharmacist, Records Librarian, Computer Services and the Administrator present perspectives on small microcomputer use by Physicians. The Panelists have inaugurated a program of such nature in their four hundred beds, private, general hospital and discuss salient features.

Splitstone, Dale; Hartney, Thomas C.; Kaplan, Robert; Keene, Beverly; Masencup, Bonnie; Trotter, John

1984-01-01

232

An intelligent pre-hospital patient care system.  

PubMed

iRevive is a sensor-supported, pre-hospital patient care system for the capture and transmittal of electronic patient data from the field to hospitals. It is being developed by 10Blade and Boston MedFlight. iRevive takes advantage of emerging technologies to offer a robust, flexible, and extensible IT infrastructure for patient data collection. PMID:18048264

Gaynor, Mark; Myung, Dan; Hashmi, Nada; Shankaranarayanan, G

2007-01-01

233

Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

2013-01-01

234

[Quality management in intensive care medicine].  

PubMed

Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

Martin, J; Braun, J-P

2014-02-01

235

[Quality management in intensive care medicine].  

PubMed

Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:23846174

Martin, J; Braun, J-P

2013-09-01

236

42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...as the long-term care hospital or satellite of the long-term care hospital...provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals...

2012-10-01

237

42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...as the long-term care hospital or satellite of the long-term care hospital...provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals...

2014-10-01

238

42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals that...as the long-term care hospital or satellite of the long-term care hospital...provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals...

2013-10-01

239

Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient–provider language concordance  

PubMed Central

Background Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients’ discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient–provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. Methods This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0–100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Results Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient–provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients’ discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Conclusion Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients. PMID:25075273

2014-01-01

240

Effective Marketing of Quality Child Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies negative public and professional attitudes that lie beneath the contemporary negative image of quality child care. Argues that concepts and principles of marketing are appropriate for influencing parents to choose high quality services and helping ensure that supplementary care is of sufficient quality to enhance, not inhibit, the…

Caldwell, Bettye M.; Boyd, Harper W., Jr.

1984-01-01

241

Quality of Care and Quality of Life: Convergence or Divergence?  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to explore the impact of quality of care (QoC) on patients’ quality of life (QoL). In a cross-sectional study, two domains of QoC and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref questionnaire were combined to collect data from 1,059 pre-discharge patients in four accredited hospitals (ACCHs) and four non-accredited hospitals (NACCHs) in Saudi Arabia. Health and well-being are often restricted to the characterization of sensory qualities in certain settings such as unrestricted access to healthcare, effective treatment, and social welfare. The patients admitted to tertiary health care facilities are generally able to present themselves with a holistic approach as to how they experience the impact of health policy. The statistical results indicated that patients reported a very limited correlation between QoC and QoL in both settings. The model established a positive, but ultimately weak and insignificant, association between QoC (access and effective treatment) and QoL (r = 0.349, P = 0.000; r = 0.161, P = 0.000, respectively). Even though the two settings are theoretically different in terms of being able to conceptualize, adopt, and implement QoC, the outcomes from both settings demonstrated insignificant relationships with QoL as the results were quite similar. Though modern medicine has substantially improved QoL around the world, this paper proposes that health accreditation has a very limited impact on improving QoL. This paper raises awareness of this topic with multiple healthcare professionals who are interested in correlating QoC and QoL. Hopefully, it will stimulate further research from other professional groups that have new and different perspectives. Addressing a transitional health care system that is in the process of endorsing accreditation, investigating the experience of tertiary cases, and analyzing deviated data may limit the generalization of this study. Global interest in applying public health policy underlines the impact of such process on patients’ outcomes. As QoC accreditation does not automatically produce improved QoL outcomes, the proposed study encourages further investigation of the value of health accreditation on personal and social well-being. PMID:25114568

Alonazi, Wadi B; Thomas, Shane A

2014-01-01

242

Linking Home Care Interventions and Hospitalization Outcomes for Frail and Non-frail Elderly Patients  

PubMed Central

Structured clinical data generated using standardized terminologies such as the Omaha System are available for evaluating health care quality and patient outcomes. New intervention management grouping approaches are needed to deal with large, complex clinical intervention data sets. We evaluated 56 intervention groups derived using four data management approaches with a data set of 165,700 interventions from 14 home care agencies to determine which approaches and interventions predicted hospitalizations among frail (n=386) and non-frail (n=1,364) elders. Hospitalization predictors differed for frail and non-frail elders. Low frequencies in some intervention groups were positively associated with hospitalization outcomes, suggesting that there may be a mismatch between the level of care that is needed and the level of care that is provided. PMID:21360551

Monsen, Karen A.; Westra, Bonnie L.; Oancea, S. Cristina; Yu, Fang; Kerr, Madeleine J.

2015-01-01

243

Current status of quality evaluation of nursing care through director review and reflection from the Nursing Quality Control Centers  

PubMed Central

Background: The quality evaluation of nursing care is a key link in medical quality management. It is important and worth studying for the nursing supervisors to know the disadvantages during the process of quality evaluation of nursing care and then to improve the whole nursing quality. This study was to provide director insight on the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care from Nursing Quality Control Centers (NQCCs). Material and Methods: This qualitative study used a sample of 12 directors from NQCCs who were recruited from 12 provinces in China to evaluate the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care. Data were collected by in-depth interviews. Content analysis method was used to analyze the data. Results: Four themes emerged from the data: 1) lag of evaluation index; 2) limitations of evaluation content; 3) simplicity of evaluation method; 4) excessive emphasis on terminal quality. Conclusion: It is of great realistic significance to ameliorate nursing quality evaluation criteria, modify the evaluation content based on patient needs-oriented idea, adopt scientific evaluation method to evaluate nursing quality, and scientifically and reasonably draw horizontal comparisons of nursing quality between hospitals, as well as longitudinal comparisons of a hospital’s nursing quality. These methods mentioned above can all enhance a hospital’s core competitiveness and benefit more patients. PMID:25419427

Duan, Xia; Shi, Yan

2014-01-01

244

Quality of life after acute myocardial infarction: A comparison of diabetic versus non-diabetic acute myocardial infarction patients in Quebec acute care hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have evaluated the individual effects of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and diabetes mellitus on health-related quality of life outcomes (QOL). Due to the rising incidence of these comorbid conditions, it is important to examine the synergistic impact of diabetes mellitus and AMI on QOL. METHODS: In this study, we assessed using several previously validated questionnaires the QOL

Ewurabena Simpson; Louise Pilote

2005-01-01

245

Patient satisfaction surveys and quality of care: an information paper.  

PubMed

With passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, payment incentives were created to improve the "value" of health care delivery. Because physicians and physician practices aim to deliver care that is both clinically effective and patient centered, it is important to understand the association between the patient experience and quality health outcomes. Surveys have become a tool with which to quantify the consumer experience. In addition, results of these surveys are playing an increasingly important role in determining hospital payment. Given that the patient experience is being used as a surrogate marker for quality and value of health care delivery, we will review the patient experience-related pay-for-performance programs and effect on emergency medicine, discuss the literature describing the association between quality and the patient-reported experience, and discuss future opportunities for emergency medicine. PMID:24656761

Farley, Heather; Enguidanos, Enrique R; Coletti, Christian M; Honigman, Leah; Mazzeo, Anthony; Pinson, Thomas B; Reed, Kevin; Wiler, Jennifer L

2014-10-01

246

Patterns of Care/Quality of Care  

Cancer.gov

POC studies began in 1987 with SEER cases serving as controls for a study that examined the provision of state-of-the-art therapy in Community Clinical Oncology Program hospitals. In 1990, the number of cases included in the POC initiative was increased substantially to obtain more stable estimates of community practice in a population-based sample of cases.

247

The multidisciplinary in-hospital wound care team: two models.  

PubMed

The cost of community- and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers is particularly high in terms of both patient morbidity and economics. Multidisciplinary wound care teams were developed independently at two different hospitals to deal with the needs of patients with pressure ulcers and to control costs. Although the goals of the teams at both institutions were similar, the strategies for achieving the goals were different because they were adapted to the needs of the particular institution. As a result, care and prevention of pressure ulcers have improved at both hospitals. PMID:9729938

Granick, M S; Ladin, D A

1998-01-01

248

Integrating hospital administrative data to improve health care efficiency and outcomes: "the socrates story".  

PubMed

Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P

2013-03-01

249

Integrating Hospital Administrative Data to Improve Health Care Efficiency and Outcomes: “The Socrates Story”  

PubMed Central

Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P.

2013-01-01

250

Clinical career ladders: St. Vincent Hospital and Health Care Center.  

PubMed

The career ladder program developed for pharmacists at St. Vincent Hospital and Health Care Center (SVH), a 625-bed community hospital, is described. Before 1986 the only advancement program for pharmacists at SVH was a traditional managerial one. The need for a system that would reward outstanding pharmacists both professionally and financially and prevent increases in turnover led to the development of a three-tiered ladder system in which clinical expertise and participation in elective professional activities are important keys to advancement. All baccalaureate-level pharmacists are hired at level I. Level II represents the standard of pharmacy practice at SVH. Pharmacists promoted to level III have made a major contribution. Advancement is contingent upon the accumulation of points awarded for performance evaluations, elective activities, and tenure. In addition to distributive and clinical duties, level II and III pharmacists must participate in special projects or on committees. Promoted pharmacists must accumulate additional points annually to remain at the higher level. The program was objected to by some staff members who believed that it would cut into personal time and give certain pharmacists preferred work schedules. Nevertheless, several promotions have quickened interest in the program, and participation in advancement-related activities has increased. The career ladder program has stimulated employees' professional and financial growth, enhanced the quality and quantity of pharmaceutical services, and averted potential increases in staff turnover. PMID:2589343

Wills, T M; Garing, T L

1989-11-01

251

Is managed care restraining the adoption of technology by hospitals?  

PubMed

As health care costs increase, cost-control mechanisms become more widespread and it is crucial to understand their implications for the health care market. This paper examines the effect that managed care activity (based on the aim to control health care expenditure) has on the adoption of technologies by hospitals. We use a hazard rate model to investigate whether higher levels of managed care market share are associated with a decrease on medical technology adoption during the period 1982-1995. We analyze annual data on 5390 US hospitals regarding the adoption of 13 different technologies. Our results are threefold: first, we find that managed care has a negative effect on hospitals' technology acquisition for each of the 13 medical technologies in our study, and its effect is stronger for those technologies diffusing in the 1990s, when the managed care sector is at its largest. If managed care enrollment had remained at its 1984 level, there would be 5.3%, 7.3% and 4.1% more hospitals with diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy and cardiac technologies, respectively. Second, we find that the rise in managed care leads to long-term reductions in medical cost growth. Finally, we take into account that profitability analysis is one of the main dimensions considered by hospitals when deciding about the adoption of new technologies. In order to determine whether managed care affects technologies differently if they have a different cost-reimbursement ratio (CRR), we have created a unique data set with information on the cost-reimbursement for each of the 13 technologies and we find that managed care enrollment has a considerably larger negative effect on the adoption of less profitable technologies. PMID:18417230

Mas, Núria; Seinfeld, Janice

2008-07-01

252

Development of the breastfeeding quality improvement in hospitals learning collaborative in New York state.  

PubMed

Exclusive breastfeeding is a public health priority. A strong body of evidence links maternity care practices, based on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, to increased breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Despite having written breastfeeding policies, New York (NY) hospitals vary widely in reported maternity care practices and in prevalence rates of breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding, during the birth hospitalization. To improve hospital maternity care practices, breastfeeding support, and the percentage of infants exclusively breastfeeding, the NY State Department of Health developed the Breastfeeding Quality Improvement in Hospitals (BQIH) Learning Collaborative. The BQIH Learning Collaborative was the first to use the Institute for Health Care Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology to specifically focus on increasing hospital breastfeeding support. The evidence-based maternity care practices from the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding provided the basis for the Change Package and Data Measurement Plan. The present article describes the development of the BQIH Learning Collaborative. The engagement of breastfeeding experts, partners, and stakeholders in refining the Learning Collaborative design and content, in defining the strategies and interventions (Change Package) that drive hospital systems change, and in developing the Data Measurement Plan to assess progress in meeting the Learning Collaborative goals and hospital aims is illustrated. The BQIH Learning Collaborative is a model program that was implemented in a group of NY hospitals with plans to spread to additional hospitals in NY and across the country. PMID:23586627

Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Dennison, Barbara A; Welge, Sara Bonam; Hisgen, Stephanie; Boyce, Patricia Simino; Waniewski, Patricia A

2013-06-01

253

Facilitating Transition From Hospital Stay to Nursing Home Admission: A Hospital-Based Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Older Americans Act requires all states to establish Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs in nursing homes as well as in personal care homes. However, the law does not specify that hospitals that have special beds to provide skilled nursing care need to have long-term care ombudsmen. Many of these hospital patients subsequently enter a nursing or personal care home. Therefore,

Carolyn Cox; Maureen Bylina; Emily Krogmann; Hank Krambeck

2009-01-01

254

Internet Point of Care Learning at a Community Hospital  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Internet point of care (PoC) learning is a relatively new method for obtaining continuing medical education credits. Few data are available to describe physician utilization of this CME activity. Methods: We describe the Internet point of care system we developed at a medium-sized community hospital and report on its first year of…

Sinusas, Keith

2009-01-01

255

Care coordination program for washington state medicaid enrollees reduced inpatient hospital costs.  

PubMed

Managing clinically complex populations poses a major challenge for state agencies trying to control health care costs and improve quality of care for Medicaid beneficiaries. In Washington State a care coordination intervention, the Chronic Care Management program, was implemented for clinically complex Medicaid beneficiaries who met risk criteria defined by a predictive modeling algorithm. We used propensity score matching to evaluate the program's impact on health care spending and utilization and mortality. We found large and significant reductions in inpatient hospital costs ($318 per member per month) among patients who used the program. The estimated reduction in overall medical costs of $248 per member per month exceeded the cost of the intervention but did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that well-designed targeted care coordination services could reduce health care spending for Medicaid beneficiaries with complex health care needs. PMID:25847649

Xing, Jingping; Goehring, Candace; Mancuso, David

2015-04-01

256

Prenatal hospitalization and compliance with guidelines for prenatal care.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between compliance with the US Public Health Service guidelines for prenatal care and the rate of prenatal hospitalization. METHODS: For all women admitted to a Boston referral center during January and February 1993 with a pregnancy of at least 18 weeks gestation (n = 1400), a proportional hazards model was used to examine factors associated with prenatal hospitalization. RESULTS: Prenatal hospitalization occurred during 248 (17.7%) pregnancies. The median length of stay for all prenatal admissions was 4 days; the medial total charge was $5667. Prior medical and obstetrical problems were strongly associated with prenatal hospitalization. After adjustment for age, race, and medical and obstetrical complications, women who received less than 70% of the prenatal care recommended were significantly more likely to be hospitalized (relative risk [RR] = 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.50, 3.06). CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal hospitalization is a common, costly complication of pregnancy. Because of its association with compliance with the Public Health Service guidelines for the content of prenatal care, prenatal hospitalization may be a sentinel indicator of inadequate prenatal care amenable to intervention. PMID:8659655

Haas, J S; Berman, S; Goldberg, A B; Lee, L W; Cook, E F

1996-01-01

257

Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?  

PubMed

The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

2014-05-01

258

Improving the quality of language services delivery: findings from a hospital quality improvement initiative.  

PubMed

Over 24 million individuals in the United States speak English "less than very well" and are considered limited English proficient (LEP). Due to challenges inherent in patient-provider interactions with LEP patients, LEP individuals are at risk for a wide array of negative health consequences. Evidence suggests that having an interpreter present to facilitate interactions between LEP patients and health professionals can mitigate many of these disparities. This article presents the results and lessons learned from Speaking Together: National Language Services Network, a quality improvement (QI) collaborative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to improve the quality of language services (LS) in hospitals. Using five LS performance metrics, hospitals were able to demonstrate that meaningful improvement was possible through targeted QI efforts. By the end of the collaborative, each of the hospitals demonstrated improvement by more than five percentage points on at least one of the five recorded quality metrics. Lessons learned from this work, such as the helpful use of quality metrics to track performance, and the engagement of physician champions and executive leadership to promote improvement can be utilized in hospitals across the country because they seek to improve care for LEP patients. PMID:23552202

Regenstein, Marsha; Huang, Jenny; West, Cathy; Trott, Jennifer; Mead, Holly; Andres, Ellie

2012-01-01

259

Hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care, with and without an intermediate care hospital – a qualitative study of health professionals' experiences  

PubMed Central

Introduction Intermediate care is an organisational approach to improve the coordination of health care services between health care levels. In Central Norway an intermediate care hospital was established in a municipality to improve discharge from a general hospital to primary health care. The aim of this study was to investigate how health professionals experienced hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care with and without an intermediate care hospital. Methods A qualitative study with data collected through semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews. Results Discharge via the intermediate care hospital was contrasted favourably compared to discharge directly from hospital to primary health care. Although increased capacity to receive patients from hospital and prepare them for discharge to primary health care was viewed as a benefit, professionals still requested better communication with the preceding care level concerning further treatment and care for the elderly patients. Conclusions The intermediate care hospital reduced the coordination challenges during discharge of elderly patients from hospital to primary health care. Nevertheless, the intermediate care was experienced more like an extension of hospital than an included part of primary health care and did not meet the need for communication across care levels. PMID:24868194

Dahl, Unni; Steinsbekk, Aslak; Jenssen, Svanhild; Johnsen, Roar

2014-01-01

260

A comparative study of total quality management of health care system in India and Iran  

PubMed Central

Background Total quality management (TQM) has a great potential to address quality problems in a wide range of industries and improve the organizational performance. The growing need to take initiatives by hospitals in countries like India and Iran to improve the service quality and reduce wastage of resources has inspired the authors to develop a survey instrument to measure health care quality and performance in the two countries. Methods Based on the Baldrige health care criteria for performance excellence 2009-2010 and the guidelines proposed by the American Hospitals Association for hospitals in pursuit of excellence, compared health care services in three countries. The data are collected from the capital cities and their nearby places in India and Iran. Using ANOVAs, three groups in quality planning and performance have been compared. Result Results showed there is significantly difference between groups and in no case the hospitals from India and Iran are found scoring close to the benchmarks. The average scores of Indian and Iranian hospitals on different constructs of the IHCQPM model are compared with the major results achieved by the recipients of the MBNQ award. Conclusion In no case the hospitals from India and Iran are found scoring close to the benchmarks (Baldrige health care criteria for performance excellence 2009-2010 and the guidelines proposed by the American Hospitals Association for hospitals). These results suggested to health care services more attempt to achieve high quality in management and performance. PMID:22204664

2011-01-01

261

42 CFR 405.1206 - Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. 405.1206 Section 405...Terminations, and Procedures for Inpatient Hospital Discharges § 405.1206 Expedited...determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. (a)...

2010-10-01

262

38 CFR 17.55 - Payment for authorized public or private hospital care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Payment for authorized public or private hospital care. 17.55 Section 17.55 ...MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.55 Payment for authorized public or private hospital care. Except as otherwise...

2010-07-01

263

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-print Network

industries. Symptoms of poor IAQ in a building, contaminants causing poor IAQ, features of HVAC systems for a hospital for better IAQ are briefly discussed in this paper. Strategies to improve indoor air quality in hospitals and the current international...

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01

264

Emergency legal preparedness for hospitals and health care personnel.  

PubMed

During the past decade, hospital emergency preparedness has become a focus of local, state, and federal governments seeking to address emergencies or disasters that affect the public health. Integral to hospital emergency preparedness are numerous legal challenges that hospitals and their health care personnel face during declared states of emergencies. In this article, we evaluate legal requirements for hospital emergency preparedness, key legal concerns that hospitals should consider in emergency preparedness activities, and how the changing legal landscape during emergencies necessitates real-time decision making. We then analyze legal issues including negligence, discrimination, and criminal culpability that may arise during or after medical triage. Finally, we examine the legal risks of evading preparedness, specifically asking how a hospital and its personnel may be held liable for failing to plan or prepare for an emergency. PMID:19491586

Hodge, James G; Garcia, Andrea M; Anderson, Evan D; Kaufman, Torrey

2009-06-01

265

[Quality of care in inflammatory bowel disease].  

PubMed

Since inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and relapsing disorder, maintaining high quality of care plays an important role in the management of patients with IBD. To develop process-based quality indicator set to improve quality of care, the indicator should be based directly on evidence and consensus. Initially, ImproveCareNow group demonstrated quality improvement by learning how to apply quality improvement methods to improve the care of pediatric patients with IBD. The American Gastroenterological Association has developed adult IBD physician performance measures set and Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) has developed a set of ten most highly rated process and outcome measures. Recently, The Emerging Practice in IBD Collaborative (EPIC) group generated defining quality indicators for best-practice management of IBD in Canada. Quality of Care through the Patient's Eyes (QUOTE-IBD) was developed as a questionnaire to measure quality of care through the eyes of patients with IBD, and it is widely used in European countries. The current concept of quality of care as well as quality indicator will be discussed in this article. (Korean J Gastroenterol 2015;65:139-144). PMID:25797376

Seo, Geom Seog

2015-03-25

266

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Quality of Care  

Cancer.gov

The issue of quality of care involves many different components, including what cancer care quality looks like, which patients are more likely to receive poor quality care, and ways to measure healthcare quality.

267

Quality management in Malaysian public health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The main aim of the study is to provide an empirical analysis of quality management practice among Malaysian Ministry of Health hospital employees, ranging from medical specialists to health attendants. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Self-administered questionnaires collected data and cluster sampling used to select hospitals, while stratified random sampling selected employee respondents. The research was limited to peninsular Malaysian public

Noor Hazilah Abd. Manaf

2005-01-01

268

Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

Child Trends, 2010

2010-01-01

269

Hospital Admission of Cancer Patients: Avoidable Practice or Necessary Care?  

PubMed Central

Background Cancer patients are frequently admitted to hospital due to acute conditions or refractory symptoms. This occurs through the emergency departments and requires medical oncologists to take an active role. The use of acute-care hospital increases in the last months of life. Patients and methods We aimed to describe the admissions to a medical oncology inpatient service within a 16-month period with respect to patients and tumor characteristics, and the outcome of the hospital stay. Results 672 admissions of 454 patients were analysed. The majority of admissions were urgent (74.1%), and were due to uncontrolled symptoms (79.6%). Among the chief complaints, dyspnoea occurred in 15.7%, pain in 15.2%, and neurological symptoms in 14.5%. The majority of the hospitalizations resulted in discharge to home (60.6%); in 26.5% the patient died and in 11.0% was transferred to a hospice. Admissions due to symptoms correlated with a longer hospital stay and a higher incidence of in-hospital death. Conclusion We suggest that hospital use is not necessarily a sign of inappropriately aggressive care: inpatient care is probably an unavoidable step in the cancer trajectory. Optimization of inpatient supportive procedures should be a specific task of modern medical oncology. PMID:25812117

Numico, Gianmauro; Cristofano, Antonella; Mozzicafreddo, Alessandro; Cursio, Olga Elisabetta; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Courthod, Giulia; Trogu, Antonio; Malossi, Alessandra; Cucchi, Mariella; Sirotovà, Zuzana; Alvaro, Maria Rosa; Stella, Anna; Grasso, Fulvia; Spinazzé, Silvia; Silvestris, Nicola

2015-01-01

270

Validation Protocol: First Step of a Lean-Total Quality Management Principle in a New Laboratory Set-up in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India.  

PubMed

Method validation is pursued as the first step in establishing Lean-Total Quality Management in a new clinical laboratory, in order to eliminate error in test results. Validation of all the new tests were done (with particular reference to alkaline phosphatase) by verifying reference intervals, analytical accuracy and precision, inter-assay and intra-assay variations, analytical sensitivity, limit of detection, linearity and reportable range, i.e. (i) Analytical measurement range (AMR) and (ii) Clinically reportable range (CRR). Our obtained reference range was within that of the manufacturer's and showed high degree of analytical accuracy between two laboratories (r(2) = 0.99). Precision was comparable with the manufacturer's claim with inter-assay variation CV 1.04% and intra-assay variation CV 1.54%. Lowest limit of detection was 1.0324 ± 0.007 with CV 0.34%. AMR was also verified with CV 1.26 and 0.69%, for level 1 and level 2 control sera, respectively. The assay was linear with different dilutions. Lean concept was also verified with high recovery percentage. Validation ensures that accurate and precise results are reported in a clinically relevant turn around time. PMID:22754186

Das, Barnali

2011-07-01

271

Undignified care: violation of patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care from a nurse's perspective.  

PubMed

Patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care is a complex yet central phenomenon. Research is needed on the concept of dignity's specific contextual attributes since nurses are responsible for providing dignified care in psychiatric care. The aim was to describe nurses' experiences of violation of patient dignity in clinical caring situations in involuntary psychiatric hospital care. A qualitative design with a hermeneutic approach was used to analyze and interpret data collected from group interviews. Findings reveal seven tentative themes of nurses' experiences of violations of patient dignity: patients not taken seriously, patients ignored, patients uncovered and exposed, patients physically violated, patients becoming the victims of others' superiority, patients being betrayed, and patients being predefined. Understanding the contextual experiences of nurses can shed light on the care of patients in involuntary psychiatric hospital care. PMID:23820018

Gustafsson, Lena-Karin; Wigerblad, Ase; Lindwall, Lillemor

2014-03-01

272

42 CFR 412.536 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals and satellites of long-term care...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located...care hospitals that discharged Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not located...payments for discharges of Medicare patients admitted from a hospital not...

2010-10-01

273

Quality of Care in Historical Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the quality of care in two mid-19th-century day nurseries in North America. Finds that quality was associated with saving children's lives within a context of charity-based social welfare. The concern for the health and safety of children led to the entrenchment of a custodial model of child care, which proved resilient into the 20th…

Prochner, Larry

1996-01-01

274

The effect of managed care on hospital staffing and technological diffusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, it has been suggested that managed care is having a major impact on the health care system most notably the hospital sector. Managed care is now responsible for the majority of hospital revenues and as a result hospitals must respond to the incentives created by managed care. In this paper, the impact of managed care on

Nannan Zhang; Linda Kohn; Robert McGarrah; Gerard Anderson

1999-01-01

275

Structure and process components of trauma care services in Israeli acute-care hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years a vigorous effort has been made to improve primary trauma care in Israel. The Ministry of Health and other authorities have invested in new facilities in various hospitals which are engaged in trauma care. A survey was conducted in order to identify deficiencies in organization, personnel and equipment required to provide optimal trauma care. A cross-country survey

R. Ben Abraham; R. J. Heruti; Y. Abramovitch; B. Marganit; J. Shermer; M. Stein

1998-01-01

276

The effect of managed care on hospital marketing orientation.  

PubMed

Marketing is a central activity of modern organizations. To survive and succeed, organizations must know their markets, attract sufficient resources, convert these resources into appropriate services, and communicate them to various consuming publics. In the hospital industry, a marketing orientation is currently recognized as a necessary management function in a highly competitive and resource-constrained environment. Further, the literature supports a marketing orientation as superior to other orientation types, namely production, product and sales. In this article, the results of the first national cross-sectional study of the marketing orientation of U.S. hospitals in a managed care environment are reported. Several key lessons for hospital executives have emerged. First, to varying degrees, U.S. hospitals have adopted a marketing orientation. Second, hospitals that are larger, or that have developed strong affiliations with other providers that involve some level of financial interdependence, have the greatest marketing orientation. Third, as managed care organizations have increased their presence in a state, hospitals have become less marketing oriented. Finally, contrary to prior findings, for-profit institutions are not intrinsically more marketing oriented than their not-for-profit counterparts. This finding is surprising because of the traditional role of marketing in non-health for-profit enterprises and management's greater emphasis on profitability. An area of concern for hospital executives arises from the finding that as managed care pressure increases, hospital marketing orientation decreases. Although a marketing orientation is posited to lead to greater customer satisfaction and improved business results, a managed care environment seems to force hospitals to focus more on cost control than on customer satisfaction. Hospital executives are cautioned that cost-cutting, the primary focus in intense managed care environments, may lead to short-term gains by capturing managed care business, but may not be sufficient for long-term success and survival. Understanding consumer needs and perceptions, and using appropriate marketing strategies to ensure greater customer satisfaction and repeat business, will be among the key tasks for hospital executives in the future. PMID:10181799

Loubeau, P R; Jantzen, R

1998-01-01

277

Are the CMS Hospital Outpatient Quality Measures Relevant for Rural Hospitals?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Quality measures focused on outpatient settings are of increasing interest to policy makers, but little research has been conducted on hospital outpatient quality measures, especially in rural settings. Purpose: To evaluate the relevance of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) outpatient quality measures for rural hospitals,…

Casey, Michelle M.; Prasad, Shailendra; Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

2012-01-01

278

Patient Experience of Nursing Quality in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Background: Examining the quality of nursing care from the patient's perspective is an important element in quality evaluation. The extent to which patients’ expectations are met will influence their perceptions and their satisfaction with the quality of care received. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among admitted patients at King Khalid Teaching Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected (from January 2011 to March 2011) from a convenience sample of 448 patients using a 42-items questionnaire assessing six dimensions of the nursing care provided to, during hospitalization. Results: On a four–point scale (4-higly agree,3-agree, 2-disagree, and 1-higly disagree). The individual items of nursing care showing the lowest means were the information received from the nurses about self-help (2.81), the information about the laboratory results (2.76) and the way the nurse shared the patient's feeling (2.72). A strong correlation existed between the overall perception level and the variables of gender (P=0.01), and the types of department (0.004). Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrate negative experiences of patients with nursing care in dimensions of information, caring behavior, and nurse competency and technical care. Awareness of the importance of these dimensions of nursing care and ongoing support to investigate patients’ perception periodically toward quality of nursing care are critical to success the philosophy of patient centered health care. PMID:23113223

Al Momani, M; Al Korashy, H

2012-01-01

279

Health-related quality of life of multiple organ dysfunction patients one year after intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of intensive care survivors 1 year after discharge with special emphasis on multiple organ dysfunction (MOD). Design: Prospective, observational study. Setting: A ten-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital. Patients: Among the 591 consecutive patients admitted in the year 1995, 307 of 378 patients who survived 1 year were

Ville Pettilä; Anne Kaarlola; Annikki Mäkeläinen

2000-01-01

280

Location-Aware Fall Detection System for Medical Care Quality Improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are one of the most common adverse events in hospitals and fall management remains a major challenge in the medical care quality. Falls in patients are associated with major health complications that can result in health decline and increased medical care cost. To deliver medical care in time, reliable location-aware fall detection is needed. In this paper, we propose

Chih-ning Huang; Chih-yen Chiang; Jui-sheng Chang; Yi-chieh Chou; Ya-xuan Hong; Steen J. Hsu; Woei-chyn Chu; Chia-tai Chan

2009-01-01

281

Quality of Cancer Care - Applied Research  

Cancer.gov

The purpose of these efforts, substantially supported by the Applied Research Program, is to enhance the state of the science on the quality of cancer care and inform federal and private-sector decision making on care delivery, coverage, regulation, and standard setting. Work is underway to make cancer a working model for quality of care research and the translation of this research into practice.

282

Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings  

PubMed Central

Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

2011-01-01

283

A decision support database for nurse care planning as part of a hospital information system.  

PubMed

This paper, based on a doctoral thesis, describes the development and evaluation of a computerized care planning database at the Royal Hampshire County Hospital. It is part of an integrated Hospital Information System, the first to be installed in an United Kingdom. The research examines nurses' attitudes to the Nursing Process to the new care planning system before, three months after, and one year after its implementation. The quality of manual vs. computer care planning is compared in the same time periods using an existing quality assurance instrument and an audit tool, developed during the research. All data was analyzed in each time period in a framework of personal and organizational change theories. The proactive nature of the research allowed findings to be used as a basis for modifications during the process, which culminated in a further project to provide a database of standard based care plans. Results showed that an understanding of the Nursing Process was inadequate and that most nurses were ambivalent about paper care planning and the proposed computer care plans. Three months after implementation, attitudes became more unfavorable; however, after a year, attitudes showed a significant shift towards the positive pole. Conversely, the overall quality-of-care planning improved significantly. PMID:8591458

Newton, C

1995-01-01

284

Mindfulness meditation to improve care quality and quality of life in long-term care settings.  

PubMed

Quality of long-term care has been the focus of 2 recent Institute of Medicine reports: "Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care"(1) and "Improving the Quality of Care in Nursing Homes."(2) Although there has been some improvement in care quality since regulatory reforms were enacted in 1987,(3) poor care persists.(4) Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are challenged in the provision of optimal care by chronic stress in the workplace, leading to absenteeism, reduced job satisfaction, and increased turnover.(5-7) Mindfulness training, which cultivates a practice of being present in the moment, recognizing stressful situations when they arise, and responding to stress in an adaptive manner,(8) holds promise as a simple, inexpensive approach to reduce CNA stress and improve quality of care and quality of life for residents in long-term care settings. Formal and informal mindfulness practices can readily be incorporated into CNA educational programs. PMID:21239085

Zeller, Janice M; Lamb, Karen

2011-01-01

285

A study on poisoning cases in a tertiary care hospital  

PubMed Central

Acute poisoning with various substance is common everywhere. The earlier the initial resuscitations, gastric decontamination and use of specific antidotes, the better the outcome. The aim of this study was to characterize the poisoning cases admitted to the tertiary care hospital, Warangal district, Andhra Pradesh, Southern India. All cases admitted to the emergency department of the hospital between the months of January and December, 2007, were evaluated retrospectively. We reviewed data obtained from the hospital medical records and included the following factors: socio-demographic characteristics, agents and route of intake and time of admission of the poisoned patients. During the outbreak in 2007, 2,226 patients were admitted to the hospital with different poisonings; the overall case fatality rate was 8.3% (n = 186). More detailed data from 2007 reveals that two-third of the patients were 21–30 years old, 5.12% (n = 114) were male and 3.23% (n = 72) were female, who had intentionally poisoned themselves. In summary, the tertiary care hospitals of the Telangana region, Warangal, indicate that significant opportunities for reducing mortality are achieved by better medical management and further sales restrictions on the most toxic pesticides. This study highlighted the lacunae in the services of tertiary care hospitals and the need to establish a poison information center for the better management and prevention of poisoning cases. PMID:22096334

Kumar, Subash Vijaya; Venkateswarlu, B.; Sasikala, M.; Kumar, G. Vijay

2010-01-01

286

Health care technology and quality of care.  

PubMed

The increasing costs and complexity of technologic advances in diagnosis and treatment have been accompanied by other important issues. They are often moral or ethical in nature; they include the public's desire and determination to have access to these "high-tech" advances; and the quality and equity with which those advances are apportioned and applied must be addressed. Seven criteria that can be applied to technology assessment are identified as is a process for that assessment. Together, these procedures can provide valuable information and assistance to those who make decisions about health benefits coverage--both in the public and the private sectors. PMID:2980910

Schaffarzick, R W

1987-08-01

287

A hospital's non-delegable duty of care.  

PubMed

Visiting, honorary and staff medical practitioners, to name but a few, provide medical treatment and services to a variety of "patients", including private, public, in-patients and out-patients. The legal implications arising from the often complex fact situations created by the interactions of these participants and the relationship between hospitals and these participants can lead to hospitals both incurring and avoiding liability for injuries sustained by patients from negligent medical treatment. This article discusses the legal principles governing hospitals' liabilities in this context on the more onerous non-delegable duty of care ground. PMID:12650005

Boston, T R O

2003-02-01

288

The optimal outcomes of post-hospital care under medicare.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the differences in functional outcomes attributable to discharge to one of four different venues for post-hospital care for each of five different types of illness associated with post-hospital care: stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF), hip procedures, and hip fracture, and to estimate the costs and benefits associated with discharge to the type of care that was estimated to produce the greatest improvement. STUDY SETTING/DATA SOURCES: Consecutive patients with any of the target diagnoses were enrolled from 52 hospitals in three cities. Data sources included interviews with patients or their proxies, medical record reviews, and the Medicare Automated Data Retrieval System. ANALYSIS: A two-stage regression model looked first at the factors associated with discharge to each type of post-hospital care and then at the outcomes associated with each location. An instrumental variables technique was used to adjust for selection bias. A predictive model was created for each patient to estimate how that person would have fared had she or he been discharged to each type of care. The optimal discharge location was determined as that which produced the greatest improvement in function after adjusting for patients' baseline characteristics. The costs of discharge to the optimal type of care was based on the differences in mean costs for each location. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Data were collected from patients or their proxies at discharge from hospital and at three post-discharge follow-up times: six weeks, six months, and one year. In addition, the medical records for each participant were abstracted by trained abstractors, using a modification of the Medisgroups method, and Medicare data were summarized for the years before and after the hospitalization. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In general, patients discharged to nursing homes fared worst and those sent home with home health care or to rehabilitation did best. Because the cost of rehabilitation is high, greater use of home care could result in improved outcomes at modest or no additional cost. CONCLUSIONS: Better decisions about where to discharge patients could improve the course of many patients. It is possible to save money by making wiser discharge planning decisions. Nursing homes are generally associated with poorer outcomes and higher costs than the other post-hospital care modalities. PMID:10966088

Kane, R L; Chen, Q; Finch, M; Blewett, L; Burns, R; Moskowitz, M

2000-01-01

289

A system-wide analysis using a senior-friendly hospital framework identifies current practices and opportunities for improvement in the care of hospitalized older adults.  

PubMed

Older adults are vulnerable to hospital-associated complications such as falls, pressure ulcers, functional decline, and delirium, which can contribute to prolonged hospital stay, readmission, and nursing home placement. These vulnerabilities are exacerbated when the hospital's practices, services, and physical environment are not sufficiently mindful of the complex, multidimensional needs of frail individuals. Several frameworks have emerged to help hospitals examine how organization-wide processes can be customized to avoid these complications. This article describes the application of one such framework-the Senior-Friendly Hospital (SFH) framework adopted in Ontario, Canada-which comprises five interrelated domains: organizational support, processes of care, emotional and behavioral environment, ethics in clinical care and research, and physical environment. This framework provided the blueprint for a self-assessment of all 155 adult hospitals across the province of Ontario. The system-wide analysis identified practice gaps and promising practices within each domain of the SFH framework. Taken together, these results informed 12 recommendations to support hospitals at all stages of development in becoming friendly to older adults. Priorities for system-wide action were identified, encouraging hospitals to implement or further develop their processes to better address hospital-acquired delirium and functional decline. These recommendations led to collaborative action across the province, including the development of an online toolkit and the identification of accountability indicators to support hospitals in quality improvement focusing on senior-friendly care. PMID:25355067

Wong, Ken S; Ryan, David P; Liu, Barbara A

2014-11-01

290

Leadership and the quality of care  

PubMed Central

The importance of good leadership is becoming increasingly apparent within health care. This paper reviews evidence which shows that it has effects, not only on financial management, but on the quality of care provided. Some theories of leadership are discussed, primarily in terms of how different types of leaders might affect quality in different ways, including the effects that they might have on the stress or wellbeing of their staff which, in turn, is related to the quality of care produced. Finally, the conflicts shown in terms of leadership within the context of health care are discussed, leading to the conclusion that development programmes must be specially tailored to address the complexities of this arena. Key Words: leadership; quality of care; stress; personality PMID:11700372

Firth-Cozens, J; Mowbray, D

2001-01-01

291

Cost sharing and hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.  

PubMed

During the last decade, Chile's private health sector has experienced a dramatic increase in hospitalization rates, growing at four times the rate of ambulatory visits. Such evolution has raised concern among policy-makers. We studied the effect of ambulatory and hospital co-insurance rates on hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) among individuals with private insurance in Chile. We used a large administrative dataset of private insurance claims for the period 2007-8 and a final sample of 2,792,662 individuals to estimate a structural model of two equations. The first equation was for ambulatory visits and the second for future hospitalizations for ACSC. We estimated the system by Two Stage Least Squares (2SLS) corrected by heteroskedasticity via Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) estimation. Results show that increased ambulatory visits reduced the probability of future hospitalizations, and increased ambulatory co-insurance decreased ambulatory visits for the adult population (19-65 years-old). Both findings indicate the need to reduce ambulatory co-insurance as a way to reduce hospitalizations for ACSC. Results also showed that increasing hospital co-insurance does have a statistically significant reduction on hospitalizations for the adult group, while it does not seem to have a significant effect on hospitalizations for the children (1-18 years-old) group. This paper's contribution is twofold: first, it shows how the level of co-insurance can be a determinant in avoiding unnecessary hospitalizations for certain conditions; second, it highlights the relevance for policy-making of using data on ACSC to improve the efficiency of health systems by promoting ambulatory care as well as population health. PMID:25461868

Arrieta, Alejandro; García-Prado, Ariadna

2015-01-01

292

Hospitals caring for rural Aboriginal patients: holding response and denial.  

PubMed

Objective To investigate how policy requiring cultural respect and attention to health equity is implemented in the care of rural and remote Aboriginal people in city hospitals. Methods Interviews with 26 staff in public hospitals in Adelaide, South Australia, were analysed (using a framework based on cultural competence) to identify their perceptions of the enabling strategies and systemic barriers against the implementation of official policy in the care of rural Aboriginal patients. Results The major underlying barriers were lack of knowledge and skills among staff generally, and the persistent use of 'business as usual' approaches in their hospitals, despite the clear need for proactive responses to the complex care journeys these patients undertake. Staff reported a sense that while they are required to provide responsive care, care systems often fail to authorise or guide necessary action to enable equitable care. Conclusions Staff caring for rural Aboriginal patients are required to respond to complex particular needs in the absence of effective authorisation. We suggest that systemic misinterpretation of the principle of equal treatment is an important barrier against the development of culturally competent organisations. What is known about this topic? The care received by Aboriginal patients is less effective than it is for the population generally, and access to care is poorer. Those in rural and remote settings experience both severe access barriers and predictable complexity in their patient care journeys. This situation persists despite high-level policies that require tailored responses to the particular needs of Aboriginal people. What does this paper add? Staff who care for these patients develop skills and modify care delivery to respond to their particular needs, but they do so in the absence of systematic policies, procedures and programs that would 'build in' or authorise the required responsiveness. What are the implications for practitioners? Systematic attention, at hospital and clinical unit level, to operationalising high policy goals is needed. The framework of cultural competence offers relevant guidance for efforts (at system, organisation and care delivery levels) to improve care, but requires organisations to address misinterpretation of the principle of equal treatment. PMID:25099681

Dwyer, Judith; Willis, Eileen; Kelly, Janet

2014-11-01

293

Smoke-Free Policies Improve Air Quality in Hospitality Settings  

MedlinePLUS

... Health More CDC Sites Smoke-Free Policies Improve Air Quality in Hospitality Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... and public places, including bars and restaurants, improve air quality and reduce exposure to secondhand smoke. 1-14 ...

294

The associations between organizational culture, organizational structure and quality management in European hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objective To better understand associations between organizational culture (OC), organizational management structure (OS) and quality management in hospitals. Design A multi-method, multi-level, cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants As part of the DUQuE project (Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe), a random sample of 188 hospitals in 7 countries (France, Poland, Turkey, Portugal, Spain, Germany and Czech Republic) participated in a comprehensive questionnaire survey and a one-day on-site surveyor audit. Respondents for this study (n = 158) included professional quality managers and hospital trustees. Main outcome measures Extent of implementation of quality management systems, extent of compliance with existing management procedures and implementation of clinical quality activities. Results Among participating hospitals, 33% had a clan culture as their dominant culture type, 26% an open and developmental culture type, 16% a hierarchical culture type and 25% a rational culture type. The culture type had no statistically significant association with the outcome measures. Some structural characteristics were associated with the development of quality management systems. Conclusion The type of OC was not associated with the development of quality management in hospitals. Other factors (not culture type) are associated with the development of quality management. An OS that uses fewer protocols is associated with a less developed quality management system, whereas an OS which supports innovation in care is associated with a more developed quality management system. PMID:24671119

Wagner, C.; Mannion, R.; Hammer, A.; Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; Dersarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

2014-01-01

295

Providing high-quality care in primary care settings  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

2014-01-01

296

Facilitating the provision of quality spiritual care in palliative care.  

PubMed

In 1948, Dame Cicely Saunders, the founder of the modem hospice movement, established a core principle of palliative care, Total Pain, which is defined as physical, spiritual, psychological, and social suffering. In 2009, a consensus panel (Puchalski, Ferrell, Virani, Otis-Green, Baird, Bull, et al., 2009) was convened to address the important issue of integrating spirituality in palliative care, which led to renewed efforts to focus on spiritual care as a critical component of quality palliative care. This project is a combination of advocacy for the importance of spiritual care, training chaplains, seminarians, community clergy, and healthcare professionals in palliative care, and creating a spiritual care curriculum which can be self-taught or taught to members of transdisciplinary teams. PMID:23977777

Bodek, Hillel

2013-01-01

297

Control Costs, Enhance Quality, and Increase Revenue in Three Top General Public Hospitals in Beijing, China  

PubMed Central

Background With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. Methods We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. Findings There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001), from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. Interpretations These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely market-oriented health-care reform could also misguide future healthcare reform. PMID:23977243

Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

2013-01-01

298

A comparison of hospice and hospital care for the spouses of people who die.  

PubMed

To compare the quality of care for spouses of dying people in St Christopher's Hospice, London and nearby hospitals in 1994 and to make comparisons with earlier studies of the same setting, interviews were undertaken with spouses of people who had died from cancer in these settings, matched by the deceased's age and sex. The subjects comprised 66 people whose spouses had died in 1994, 33 of whom had died in the hospice, 33 in local hospitals. The mean age was 69.3; 61% were female. No significant differences between groups were found on the outcome measures (adjustment to bereavement, anxiety and psychosomatic symptoms at the time of the final admission), largely replicating earlier studies in the same setting. In various respects hospitals have moved closer to hospice practice: in contrast to earlier studies, there were no differences in visiting patterns or in spouses helping with inpatient care. Bereavement follow-up is now initiated in some cases by hospitals. Liberal visiting hours could be stressful, however, and spouses sometimes helped with care to remedy staff shortcomings. Regret at not being present at the death was more common in the hospital group. Bereavement interventions may have more effect on subsequent adjustment if targeted on high-risk individuals. Other benefits than adjustment, however, may be achievable. Steps to create a calm atmosphere on hospital wards where people can be with their relatives near the time of death are desirable. PMID:9156105

Seale, C; Kelly, M

1997-03-01

299

A Conceptual Framework for Quality of Care  

PubMed Central

Despite extensive research on defining and measuring health care quality, little attention has been given to different stakeholders’ perspectives of high-quality health care services. The main purpose of this study was to explore the attributes of quality healthcare in the Iranian context. Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with key healthcare stakeholders including clients, providers, managers, policy makers, payers, suppliers and accreditation panel members to identify the healthcare service quality attributes and dimensions. Data analysis was carried out by content analysis, with the constant comparative method. Over 100 attributes of quality healthcare service were elicited and grouped into five categories. The dimensions were: efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, empathy, and environment. Consequently, a comprehensive model of service quality was developed for health care context. The findings of the current study led to a conceptual framework of healthcare quality. This model leads to a better understanding of the different aspects of quality in health care and provides a better basis for defining, measuring and controlling quality of health care services. PMID:23922534

Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

2012-01-01

300

[Quality of health care and its evaluation].  

PubMed

The focus on quality improvement of health care has been emerging in last decade, due to rapidly increasing competition, cost containment by governmental and private health financing corporations (including health insurance), and high costs structure of health care providing institutions. Accordingly, necessity of evaluation on results of care/outcome (discharge and discontinuation) of care has been drawn prompt attention of decision makers and administrators in health care institutions. However, since, original motive of quality care has been generated from the aspect of care providers' oriented (in US: Market and costs oriented, in Europe: Legislation oriented) bases and directions, in terms of cost performance, downsizing operation, improvement of competing capability and creating new profit making opportunity, evaluation approach, prioritization, itemization, setting goal, and standards were forced to set as forth to meet the providers' objective, in stead of patient's benefit and maximization of patient's satisfaction. Therefore, effective evaluation structure of quality balance management in operation must be built and consisted of four major 1)-4) cores to maintain patient oriented quality and optimal level of quality obligation to community. 1) In process 2) In Services 3) In Inhabitant Benefits 4) In Producing Assured Results. Through the efforts, it is proposed to urge "Evaluation Effectiveness Initiative (EEI) by Japan's leadership" to achieve sustainable safety and effective quality in balance of process through whole operations. PMID:9423195

Tsubo, T

1997-10-01

301

Hospitality and Facility Care Services. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for hospitality and facility care occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

302

Universal access to health care would alter hospital planning.  

PubMed

What would be the impact on hospitals of a federally mandated plan for universal access to health care? The author suggests that it could lead to fundamental changes in planning, marketing, patient mix and reimbursement patterns, especially considering that the uninsured population is larger in size, and less homogenous, than those receiving Medicare or Medicaid benefits. PMID:10116901

Weil, T P

1992-03-01

303

[Quality improvement of health care services in Croatian emergency medicine].  

PubMed

Emergency medical services (EMS) in the Republic of Croatia are currently organized as part of the existing health care system and delivered in the form of pre-hospital and hospital EMS. The pre-hospital EMS are delivered by standalone EMS Centers, EMS units set up in community health centers, and by general practitioners working in shifts and on call in remote and scarcely populated areas. In hospitals, each ward usually has its own emergency reception area, and only in a couple of cases there is an integrated emergency admission unit for the entire hospital. The current EMS structure does not meet the basic requirements that would make an EMS system optimal, i.e. equal quality, equal access, effectiveness and appropriate equipment. The EMS Restructuring Project is part of the Croatian health care system reform and is addressed by the National Health Development Strategy 2006-2011. As part of restructuring efforts, the Croatian National Institute of Emergency Medicine, 21 County Institutes of Emergency Medicine and county-level call centers are going to be set up. In addition, the project will introduce the following: integrated emergency admission areas at hospitals; telemedicine as part of emergency medicine; emergency medicine specialty for physicians and additional specialized training for nurses/technicians; separation of emergency and non-emergency transport; standards for vehicles and equipment and guidelines/protocols/algorithms for care. The Croatian National Institute of Emergency Medicine is an umbrella EMS organization. It shapes the EMS in Croatia and proposes, plans, monitors and analyzes EMS actions in Croatia. In addition, it submits a proposal of the Emergency Medicine Network to the minister, sets standards for EMS transport, and coordinates, guides and supervises the work of County Institutes of Emergency Medicine. County Institutes organize and deliver pre-hospital EMS in their counties. Integrated hospital emergency admission units represent a single point of entry for all emergencies at a particular hospital. Upon triage, depending on the level of emergency, patients are provided with appropriate care and treatment. The introduction of EMS specialty for physicians and additional specialized training for nurses/ technicians is going to increase competencies of all EMS team members. The main objectives of the EMS Restructuring Project to be achieved in the 5-year period are the following: to reduce the response time of pre-hospital EMS teams to 10 minutes in urban areas and 20 minutes in rural areas in 20% of team interventions; to bring patients to hospital within the "golden hour" in 80% of cases; to have 200 physicians specialized in emergency medicine; and to have 220 nurses/technicians that have successfully completed their specialized training in emergency medicine. The objectives are going to be monitored through indicators as part of the World Bank Project for which data have already been collected throughout Croatia: number of interventions; number of emergency interventions; time between call receipt and arrival to scene; time between call receipt and arrival to hospital emergency reception area; percentage of arrivals to hospital by EMS vehicles within 12 hours of symptom onset; polytrauma and cardiac arrest survival rate before admission to hospital; time spent in hospital emergency reception areas and integrated hospital emergency admission units; polytrauma and cardiac arrest survival rate within 24 hours of hospital admission; number of integrated hospital emergency admission units per county; and number of pre-hospital EMS teams per capita. PMID:21692265

Predavec, Sanja; Sogori?, Selma; Jurkovi?, Drazen

2010-12-01

304

The role of hospital managers in quality and patient safety: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives To review the empirical literature to identify the activities, time spent and engagement of hospital managers in quality of care. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods A search was carried out on the databases MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, HMIC. The search strategy covered three facets: management, quality of care and the hospital setting comprising medical subject headings and key terms. Reviewers screened 15?447 titles/abstracts and 423 full texts were checked against inclusion criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed on 19 included articles. Results The majority of studies were set in the USA and investigated Board/senior level management. The most common research designs were interviews and surveys on the perceptions of managerial quality and safety practices. Managerial activities comprised strategy, culture and data-centred activities, such as driving improvement culture and promotion of quality, strategy/goal setting and providing feedback. Significant positive associations with quality included compensation attached to quality, using quality improvement measures and having a Board quality committee. However, there is an inconsistency and inadequate employment of these conditions and actions across the sample hospitals. Conclusions There is some evidence that managers’ time spent and work can influence quality and safety clinical outcomes, processes and performance. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies, further weakened by a lack of objective outcome measures and little examination of actual actions undertaken. We present a model to summarise the conditions and activities that affect quality performance. PMID:25192876

Parand, Anam; Dopson, Sue; Renz, Anna; Vincent, Charles

2014-01-01

305

Quality improvement in cardiac critical care.  

PubMed

Our quality improvement program began in 2004 to improve cardiac surgery outcomes. Early tracheal extubation in the cardiovascular intensive unit was utilized as a multidisciplinary driver for the quality improvement program. Continuous improvement in the rate of early extubation to drive multidisciplinary quality improvement in cardiac critical care correlated with decreased mortality, morbidity, and improved operational efficiency. Supportive educational efforts included, but were not limited to, principles of change, trust, competing values, crew resource management, evidence based medicine, and quality improvement. PMID:23439222

Lobdell, K; Camp, S; Stamou, S; Swanson, R; Reames, M; Madjarov, J; Stiegel, R; Skipper, E; Geller, R; Velardo, B; Mishra, A; Robicsek, F

2009-01-01

306

Healthcare technologies, quality improvement programs and hospital organizational culture in Canadian hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Healthcare technology and quality improvement programs have been identified as a means to influence healthcare costs and healthcare quality in Canada. This study seeks to identify whether the ability to implement healthcare technology by a hospital was related to usage of quality improvement programs within the hospital and whether the culture within a hospital plays a role in the adoption of quality improvement programs. Methods A cross-sectional study of Canadian hospitals was conducted in 2010. The sample consisted of hospital administrators that were selected by provincial review boards. The questionnaire consisted of 3 sections: 20 healthcare technology items, 16 quality improvement program items and 63 culture items. Results Rasch model analysis revealed that a hierarchy existed among the healthcare technologies based upon the difficulty of implementation. The results also showed a significant relationship existed between the ability to implement healthcare technologies and the number of quality improvement programs adopted. In addition, culture within a hospital served a mediating role in quality improvement programs adoption. Conclusions Healthcare technologies each have different levels of difficulty. As a consequence, hospitals need to understand their current level of capability before selecting a particular technology in order to assess the level of resources needed. Further the usage of quality improvement programs is related to the ability to implement technology and the culture within a hospital. PMID:24119419

2013-01-01

307

HOSPITAL QUALITY: INGREDIENTS FOR SUCCESS— A CASE STUDY OF EL CAMINO HOSPITAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of their study on quality improvement initiatives in U.S. hospitals, the Economic and Social Research Institute and The Severyn Group conducted in-depth site visits at four top-performing hospitals from around the country to identify the factors that drive and challenge these institutions in their realization of quality goals. El Camino Hospital, located in Mountain View, Calif., was one

Jack A. Meyer; Sharon Silow-Carroll; Todd Kutyla; Larry S. Stepnick; Lise S. Rybowski

308

Air quality in Ain Shams University Surgery Hospital.  

PubMed

Through air sampling, it was possible to evaluate microbial contamination in environments at high risk of infection, and to check the efficiency of ventilation system and the medical team's hygiene procedures. This study measured the concentration of particulate matter (PM) 2.5 or less microns and microbiological organisms in operating rooms (OR), intensive care units (ICU) and emergency rooms (ER) in Ain Shams University Surgery Hospital, and to assess ventilation characteristics in operating rooms in the hospital. The passive air sampling was done from ICUs, ORs, and ERs in Ain Shams University Surgery Hospital. Also for each operating room, an observational checklist was done to record other factors that may affect air quality in the room. The evaluated air quality indices were: suspended (PM) 2.5 micrometer or less, culture media and microbial identification of bacteria and fungi, and temperature and relative humidity. The results showed that the highest mean found for bacterial (105.70±30.49) and fungi concentration (7.50±5.30) was in ER. The three settings did not differ statistically as regard levels of PM 2.5, temperature, and relative humidity. A positive correlation exits between bacteria and fungi concentration on one hand and relative humidity on the other. Diphteroid, CONS, MRSA, S. aureus, and Anthracoid were the most frequent isolated bacterial types, while Penicillium and Asperigillus fumigatus were the most frequent isolated fungi. In operating rooms, the percent of unmasked persons present and the temperature positively influence the bacterial count, while ventilation condition is negatively influencing fungi count, and the number of persons present in the operating room positively affects the PM level. PMID:25643516

El Awady, M Y; El Rahman, A T Abd; Al Bagoury, L S; Mossad, I M

2014-12-01

309

A cost-minimization analysis of oncology home care versus hospital care  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared the costs of patient care for two groups of 10 oncology patients. The test group was treated at home and had access to 24 h telephone support, and the control group was treated in hospital, either as inpatients or as outpatients. Direct variable costs were provided by health insurance companies. The time invested by the health-care staff was

2001-01-01

310

[The "Zurich Quality Model of Nursing Care", based on the "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM): a new perspective in measuring quality in nursing care].  

PubMed

Ensuring and maintaining a high level of quality in nursing care becomes more and more important as economic pressure is increasing and personnel is being reduced. The nursing executives of four large Swiss hospitals therefore commissioned a group of nursing scientists and nursing experts with the task of developing a trendsetting model to represent, assess, and interpret the quality of nursing care. The "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM) served as a basis for development. More than 60 nurses from acute care hospitals and specialized clinics assessed a first draft of the model in hearings and by means of questionnaires. The model integrated earlier attempts at quality screening regarding structures, processes and results, complementing these three elements with a fourth: the patients, whose characteristics influence the results of nursing care remarkably. Thus, the former one-dimensional, linear viewpoint was resolved into a dynamic representation of all four elements, illustrating a specific concept of nursing care. Through the multi-dimensionality of the model the complexity of the nursing process is better represented. The model's core consists of eight exemplary indicators of quality, each of which is relevant to nursing and for each of which criteria and assessment tools have been formulated. The model is seen as a basis and reference for the quality development and first opportunities for clinical application have been succesfully employed. The project can serve as a paradigm of networking amongst hospitals and cooperation between nursing scientists and experts, and of the critical significance of such collaboration to the advancement of nursing quality. PMID:18850535

Schmid-Büchi, Silvia; Rettke, Horst; Horvath, Eva; Marfurt-Russenberger, Katrin; Schwendimann, René

2008-10-01

311

Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment  

PubMed Central

The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

2014-01-01

312

Effect of reactive pharmacy intervention on quality of hospital prescribing  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the medical impact of reactive pharmacy intervention. DESIGN--Analysis of all interventions during 28 days by all 35 pharmacists in hospitals in Nottingham. SETTING--All (six) hospitals in the Nottingham health authority (a teaching district), representing 2530 mainly acute beds, 781 mental illness beds, and 633 mainly health care of the elderly beds. PATIENTS--Hospital inpatients and outpatients. INTERVENTIONS--Recording of every

C J Hawkey; S Hodgson; A Norman; T K Daneshmend; S T Garner

1990-01-01

313

Mothers’ Satisfaction With Two Systems of Providing Care to Their Hospitalized Children  

PubMed Central

Background: Despite the paramount importance of the patient’s satisfaction, there are limited data on mothers’ satisfaction with the nursing care provided to their children in Iranian clinical settings. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate mothers’ satisfaction with two systems of providing care to their hospitalized children. Patients and Methods: This research was a two-group quasi-experimental study. Primarily, the basics of the case method and the functional care delivery systems were educated to the practicing nurses of the study setting. Each system was implemented independently. After the implementation of each system, 200 mothers whose children were hospitalized in the pediatric care ward of Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, Iran, were invited to respond to the 28 -item Pediatric Family Satisfaction Questionnaire. Study data were analyzed by SPSS v. 16.0. Results: Results were indicative of mothers’ satisfaction with medical care delivered by case method as 13.2 ± 5.2 and by functional method as 13.17 ± 5.56. Also, no significant difference was seen between two groups (P = 0.4). Mothers’ satisfaction with nursing care delivered by case method was 17.7 ± 4.43 and by functional method was 13.33 ± 5.69 and there was a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.004). Mothers’ satisfaction with accommodations by case method was 16.78 ± 4.07 and by functional method was 17.9 ± 6.67 with a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.06). Conclusions: Improving the quality of care is associated with higher patient’s satisfaction. Accordingly, developing and implementing programs for improving nurses’ communication and clinical skills can improve both care quality and patient outcomes.

Hosseinian, Masoumeh; Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Esalat Manesh, Soophia

2015-01-01

314

Depression among hospitalized and non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in karachi.  

PubMed

The study aimed at determining the differences in the levels of depression between hospitalized and non-hospitalized Gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi. The present study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre and Civil Hospital, Karachi, from July to October 2009. One hundred adult patients diagnosed with Gonadal cancer volunteered for the study. Cases with any other co-morbidity were excluded. Urdu version of Siddiqui Shah Depression Scale (SSDS) was administered. Purposive and snowball sampling methods were used for data collection. The ages of participants in the sample ranged from 20 to 27 years with the mean age of 23.85 years. The participants belonged to the lower and middle classes. Out of the 30 hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 40% were moderately depressed and 60% were severely depressed, whereas out of 70 non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 74.3% were mildly depressed, 24.3% were moderately depressed and only 1.4% were severely depressed, which clearly indicated that the depression level of hospitalized gonadal cancer patients was high as compared to non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients. PMID:25772968

Yousaf, Tahira; Zadeh, Zainab Fotowwat

2015-03-01

315

Child Care Subsidy and Program Quality Revisited  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Previous research has documented conflicting results on the relationship between program quality and the percentage of children receiving subsidized child care (subsidy density) in early childhood centers. This research examined the relationship between subsidy density and the quality of infant and preschool classrooms in child…

Antle, Becky F.; Frey, Andy; Barbee, Anita; Frey, Shannon; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Cox, Megan

2008-01-01

316

Hospital Quality and Selective Contracting: Evidence from Kidney Transplantation*  

PubMed Central

Most private health insurers offer a limited network of providers to enrollees. Critics have questioned whether selective contracting benefits patients. Plans counter that they take quality into account when choosing providers. Using data on five plans’ networks for kidney transplant hospitals, this study shows that in-network hospitals have better outcomes than out-of-network facilities. Conditional logit estimates using patient level data confirm this result: compared to Medicare patients, privately-insured patients are more likely to register at hospitals with higher survival rates. Restricting choice has the potential to improve patient welfare if plans steer uninformed patients to high quality hospitals and physicians. PMID:19079762

Howard, David H.

2008-01-01

317

28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

2012-07-01

318

28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

2013-07-01

319

28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial...SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment § 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization...suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization of...

2014-07-01

320

Are teamwork and professional autonomy compatible, and do they result in improved hospital care?  

PubMed

A postal questionnaire survey of 10 022 staff nurses in 32 hospitals in England was undertaken to explore the relationship between interdisciplinary teamwork and nurse autonomy on patient and nurse outcomes and nurse assessed quality of care. The key variables of nursing autonomy, control over resources, relationship with doctors, emotional exhaustion, and decision making were found to correlate with one another as well as having a relationship with nurse assessed quality of care and nurse satisfaction. Nursing autonomy was positively correlated with better perceptions of the quality of care delivered and higher levels of job satisfaction. Analysis of team working by job characteristics showed a small but significant difference in the level of teamwork between full time and part time nurses. No significant differences were found by type of contract (permanent v short term), speciality of ward/unit, shift length, or job title. Nurses with higher teamwork scores were significantly more likely to be satisfied with their jobs, planned to stay in them, and had lower burnout scores. Higher teamwork scores were associated with higher levels of nurse assessed quality of care, perceived quality improvement over the last year, and confidence that patients could manage their care when discharged. Nurses with higher teamwork scores also exhibited higher levels of autonomy and were more involved in decision making. A strong association was found between teamwork and autonomy; this interaction suggests synergy rather than conflict. Organisations should therefore be encouraged to promote nurse autonomy without fearing that it might undermine teamwork. PMID:11700377

Rafferty, A M; Ball, J; Aiken, L H

2001-12-01

321

The quality improvement system in the hospitals of Padua (Italy).  

PubMed

A quality improvement system has been established in 1989 in the hospital network of Padua and its organization is described. Three selected experiences are reported. (1) Appropriateness of the use of human albumin. After the assessment of the clinical policy, new guidelines were experimentally introduced and an evaluation after 3 months has shown a decrease of the total number of prescriptions (25%) and of inappropriate indications (9% vs 40.1%). (2) Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) and indwelling catheterization. The study showed 49% of conditions related to UTI and some corrigible inadequacies in the process of care: 37.2% of indications were probably not justified; 40% of patients who did not undergo urineculture had indications and 13% who underwent urineculture had no indications to the test. Guidelines for appropriate indications and a continuing education programme have been introduced. (3) Falls by hospitalized patients. The patient fall rate was 0.3/1000. As the reporting system showed inaccuracies (for example, the severity of injury was not collected in 34% of cases), a new notification form was introduced in 1991. PMID:1511152

Favaretti, C; Mariotto, A

1992-06-01

322

Family Participation in the Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Few studies, especially in Iran, have assessed the status of family participation in the care of the hospitalized patients. Objectives: This study was conducted to assess why family members partake in caregiving of their patients in hospitals, the type of care that family provide, and the outcomes of the participation in the opinions of nurses and family members. Patients and Methods: In this comparative-descriptive study, data was collected by a two- version researcher-developed questionnaire, from 253 family members of patients by quota sampling method and 83 nurses by census sampling method from wards which had licensed for entering the families. Each questionnaire has three sections: the care needs of the patients which family participated to provide, the reasons to take part, and the outcomes of this collaborative care. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and also chi-squared test through SPSS software version 11.5. Results: The patients received more unskilled and non- professional nursing care from their family members. Most of the nurses and families believed that family participation is both voluntary and compulsory. The shortage of personnel in different categories of nursing and speeding up the patient-related affairs were the most important outcome of the participation, from the nurses’ viewpoint was speeding up the patient-related affairs and from the side of the family members, it was the patients’ feeling of satisfaction from the presence of one of their relatives beside them. Conclusions: Co understanding, skillfulness and competence of families and nurses in collaboration with each other were not good enough.Few studies, especially in Iran, have assessed the status of family participation in the care of the hospitalized patients. PMID:24719705

Khosravan, Shahla; Mazlom, Behnam; Abdollahzade, Naiemeh; Jamali, Zeinab; Mansoorian, Mohammad Reza

2014-01-01

323

38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

2013-07-01

324

38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

2014-07-01

325

38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

2012-07-01

326

38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or...MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged...

2011-07-01

327

Improving the quality of health care: what's taking so long?  

PubMed

Nearly fourteen years ago the Institute of Medicine's report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, triggered a national movement to improve patient safety. Despite the substantial and concentrated efforts that followed, quality and safety problems in health care continue to routinely result in harm to patients. Desired progress will not be achieved unless substantial changes are made to the way in which quality improvement is conducted. Alongside important efforts to eliminate preventable complications of care, there must also be an effort to seriously address the widespread overuse of health services. That overuse, which places patients at risk of harm and wastes resources at the same time, has been almost entirely left out of recent quality improvement endeavors. Newer and much more effective strategies and tools are needed to address the complex quality challenges confronting health care. Tools such as Lean, Six Sigma, and change management are proving highly effective in tackling problems as difficult as hand-off communication failures and patient falls. Finally, the organizational culture of most American hospitals and other health care organizations must change. To create a culture of safety, leaders must eliminate intimidating behaviors that suppress the reporting of errors and unsafe conditions. Leaders must also hold everyone accountable for adherence to safe practices. PMID:24101066

Chassin, Mark R

2013-10-01

328

Reinventing VA health care: systematizing quality improvement and quality innovation.  

PubMed

The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) manages the largest fully integrated health care system in the United States. In 1995, the VHA initiated a reinvention effort that included the most radical redesign of VA health care to occur since the veterans health care system was formally established in 1946. The 2 paramount goals of this reinvention effort were to ensure the predictable and consistent provision of high-quality care everywhere in the system and to optimize the value of VA health care. Although still a work in progress, dramatic results have been achieved toward these ends during the past 5 years. This article provides an overview of the veterans health care system, and it highlights selected aspects of the system's reengineering. It also describes various steps that have been taken to better manage performance and to systematize quality improvement and quality innovation. This information provides a global context that should facilitate understanding of the genesis and purposes of the Quality Enhancement Research Initiative that is described in other articles in this issue of Medical Care. PMID:10843266

Kizer, K W; Demakis, J G; Feussner, J R

2000-06-01

329

Care adjustments for people with learning disabilities in hospitals.  

PubMed

Health inequalities start early in life for people with learning disabilities. In the UK, they can arise from various barriers that people experience when trying to access care that should be appropriate, timely and effective. Inequalities in health care are likely to result in many NHS organisations breaching their legal responsibilities, as outlined in the Disability Discrimination Acts 1995 and 2005, the Equality Act 2010 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (Emerson and Baines 2010). This article seeks to help nurses, healthcare professionals and hospital managers ensure that better services are delivered by encouraging them to explore how reasonable adjustments can improve outcomes for people with learning disabilities. PMID:22256461

Blair, Jim

2011-12-01

330

Quality of care in Crohn's disease  

PubMed Central

Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the intestine. Overall, healthcare delivery for patients with CD is not optimal at the present time and therefore needs improvement. There are evidences which suggest that there is a variation in the care provided to patients with CD by the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experts and community care providers. The delivery of healthcare for patients with CD is often complex and requires coordination between gastroenterologists/IBD specialist, gastrointestinal surgeon, radiologists and IBD nurses. In order to improve the quality of health care for patients with CD, there is need that we focus on large-scale, system-wide changes including creation of IBD comprehensive care units, provision to provide continuous care, efforts to standardize care, and education of the community practitioners. PMID:25400990

Makharia, Govind K

2014-01-01

331

Redesigning Care For Patients At Increased Hospitalization Risk: The Comprehensive Care Physician Model  

PubMed Central

Patients who have been hospitalized often experience care coordination problems that worsen outcomes and increase costs. One reason is that hospital care and ambulatory care are often provided by different physicians. However, interventions to improve care coordination for hospitalized patients have not consistently improved outcomes and generally have not reduced costs. We describe the rationale for the Comprehensive Care Physician model, in which physicians focus their practice on patients at increased risk of hospitalization so that they can provide both inpatient and outpatient care to their patients. We also describe the design and implementation of a study supported by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to assess the model’s effects on costs and outcomes. Evidence concerning the effectiveness of the program is expected by 2016. If the program is found to be effective, the next steps will be to assess the durability of its benefits and the model’s potential for dissemination; evidence to the contrary will provide insights into how to alter the program to address sources of failure. PMID:24799573

Meltzer, David O.; Ruhnke, Gregory W.

2015-01-01

332

What is the current state of care for older people with dementia in general hospitals? A literature review.  

PubMed

This paper summarises a literature review focusing on the literature directly pertaining to the acute care of older people with dementia in general hospitals from 2007 onwards. Following thematic analysis, one overarching theme emerged: the consequences of being in hospital with seven related subthemes. Significantly, this review highlights that overall there remains mostly negative consequences and outcomes for people with dementia when they go into general hospitals. Although not admitted to hospital directly due to dementia, there are usually negative effects on the dementia condition from hospitalisation. The review suggests this is primarily because there is a tension between prioritisation of acute care for existing co-morbidities and person-centred dementia care. This is complicated by insufficient understanding of what constitutes person-centred care in an acute care context and a lack of the requisite knowledge and skills set in health care practitioners. The review also reveals a worrying lack of evidence for the effectiveness of mental health liaison posts and dementia care specialist posts in nursing. Finally, although specialist posts such as liaison and clinical nurse specialists and specialist units/shared care wards can enhance quality of care and reduce adverse consequences of hospitalisation (they do not significantly) impact on reducing length of stay or the cost of care. PMID:24459188

Dewing, Jan; Dijk, Saskia

2014-01-23

333

The spiritual needs and resources of hospitalized primary care patients.  

PubMed

Previous studies have recognized the importance of hospitalized primary care patients' spiritual issues and needs. The sources patients consult to address these spiritual issues, including the role of their attending physician, have been largely unstudied. We sought to study patients' internal and external resources for addressing spiritual questions, while also exploring the physician's role in providing spiritual care. Our multicenter observational study evaluated 326 inpatients admitted to primary care physicians in four midwestern hospitals. We assessed how frequently these patients identified spiritual concerns during their hospitalization, the manner in which spiritual questions were addressed, patients' desires for spiritual interaction, and patient outcome measures associated with spiritual care. Nearly 30% of respondents (referred to as "R/S respondents") reported religious struggle or spiritual issues associated specifically with their hospitalization. Eight-three percent utilized internal religious coping for dealing with spiritual issues. Chaplains, clergy, or church members visited 54% of R/S respondents; 94% found those visits helpful. Family provided spiritual support to 45% of R/S respondents. Eight percent of R/S respondents desired, but only one patient actually received, spiritual interaction with their physician, even though 64% of these patients' physicians agreed that doctors should address spiritual issues with their patients. We conclude that inpatients quite commonly utilize internal resources and quite rarely utilize physicians for addressing their spiritual issues. Spiritual caregiving is well received and is primarily accomplished by professionals, dedicated laypersons, or family members. A significantly higher percentage of R/S patients desire spiritual interaction with their physician than those who actually receive it. PMID:22311475

Ellis, Mark R; Thomlinson, Paul; Gemmill, Clay; Harris, William

2013-12-01

334

Patient satisfaction scores and their relationship to hospital website quality measures.  

PubMed

Hospitals and health systems are using web-based and social media tools to market themselves to consumers with increasingly sophisticated strategies. These efforts are designed to shape the consumers' expectations, influence their purchase decisions, and build a positive reputation in the marketplace. Little is known about how these web-based marketing efforts are taking form and if they have any relationship to consumers' satisfaction with the services they receive. The purpose of this study is to assess if a relationship exists between the quality of hospitals' public websites and their aggregated patient satisfaction ratings. Based on analyses of 1,952 U.S. hospitals, our results show that website quality is significantly and positively related to patients' overall rating of the hospital and their intention to recommend the facility to others. The potential for web-based information sources to influence consumer behavior has important implications for policymakers, third-party payers, health care providers, and consumers. PMID:24308412

Ford, Eric W; Huerta, Timothy R; Diana, Mark L; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Menachemi, Nir

2013-01-01

335

Improving hospital care for young children in the context of HIV/AIDS and poverty.  

PubMed

Paediatric wards in South African government hospitals are occupied predominantly by children with HIV and AIDS-related illnesses. Although access to anti-retroviral treatment for adults is being scaled up, it is likely to be many years before South Africa achieves anywhere near universal access for children. Currently, most children living with HIV or AIDS are identified only when they become acutely or chronically ill and/or hospitalized, if at all. In the absence of treatment, the stress of caring for ill and hospitalized HIV-positive children often results in emotional withdrawal among both health professionals and caregivers. The demoralizing cycle of repeated admissions, treatment failure and death also affect the quality of the care given to HIV-negative children in over-burdened wards. This article describes the development of simple, low-cost and context-relevant interventions to improve the care environment for young hospitalized children within the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and poverty. PMID:19713404

Richter, Linda; Chandan, Upjeet; Rochat, Tamsen

2009-09-01

336

The Effects of Quality of Care on Costs: A Conceptual Framework  

PubMed Central

Context The quality of health care and the financial costs affected by receiving care represent two fundamental dimensions for judging health care performance. No existing conceptual framework appears to have described how quality influences costs. Methods We developed the Quality-Cost Framework, drawing from the work of Donabedian, the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method, reports by the Institute of Medicine, and other sources. Findings The Quality-Cost Framework describes how health-related quality of care (aspects of quality that influence health status) affects health care and other costs. Structure influences process, which, in turn, affects proximate and ultimate outcomes. Within structure, subdomains include general structural characteristics, circumstance-specific (e.g., disease-specific) structural characteristics, and quality-improvement systems. Process subdomains include appropriateness of care and medical errors. Proximate outcomes consist of disease progression, disease complications, and care complications. Each of the preceding subdomains influences health care costs. For example, quality improvement systems often create costs associated with monitoring and feedback. Providing appropriate care frequently requires additional physician visits and medications. Care complications may result in costly hospitalizations or procedures. Ultimate outcomes include functional status as well as length and quality of life; the economic value of these outcomes can be measured in terms of health utility or health-status-related costs. We illustrate our framework using examples related to glycemic control for type 2 diabetes mellitus or the appropriateness of care for low back pain. Conclusions The Quality-Cost Framework describes the mechanisms by which health-related quality of care affects health care and health status–related costs. Additional work will need to validate the framework by applying it to multiple clinical conditions. Applicability could be assessed by using the framework to classify the measures of quality and cost reported in published studies. Usefulness could be demonstrated by employing the framework to identify design flaws in published cost analyses, such as omitting the costs attributable to a relevant subdomain of quality. PMID:23758513

Nuckols, Teryl K; Escarce, José J; Asch, Steven M

2013-01-01

337

The Relationship Between Nursing Home Residents' Perceptions of Nursing Staff and Quality of Nursing Home Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to determine if nursing home patients' perception of nursing staff members were associated with quality of nursing home care. Three hospital professional staff members who were familiar with the homes in the study rated the LO homes on a 1 = excellent to 4 = poor quality. Patients (N = 239) admitted to the

Shayna Stein; Margaret W. Linn; Elliott M. Stein

1986-01-01

338

Health Care Indicators: Hospital, Employment, and Price Indicators for the Health Care Industry: Second Quarter 1999  

PubMed Central

This feature presents highlights from statistics on health care utilization, prices, expenses, employment, and work hours, as well as on national economic activity, with brief analysis of these economic indicators. These statistics provide an early indication of changes occurring in the health care sector and within the general economy. Although most statistics include data for the second quarter of 1999, American Hospital Association data are through the third quarter of 1998. PMID:11481776

Seifert, Mary Lee; Heffler, Stephen K.; Donham, Carolyn S.

1999-01-01

339

Health Care Indicators: Hospital, Employment, and Price Indicators for the Health Care Industry: First Quarter 1999  

PubMed Central

This feature presents highlights from statistics on health care utilization, prices, expenses, employment, and work hours, as well as on national economic activity, with brief analysis of these economic indicators. These statistics provide an early indication of changes occurring in the health care sector and within the general economy. Although most data are for the first quarter of 1999, American Hospital Association data (Tables 1 and 2) refer to the third quarter of 1998. PMID:11481737

Seifert, Mary Lee; Heffler, Stephen K.; Donham, Carolyn S.

1999-01-01

340

Racial disparities in outcomes after cardiac surgery: the role of hospital quality.  

PubMed

Patients from racial and ethnic minorities experience higher mortality after cardiac surgery compared to white patients, both during the early postoperative phase as well as long term. A number of factors likely explain poor outcomes in black and minority patients, which include differences in biology, comorbid health conditions, socioeconomic background, and quality of hospital care. Recent evidence suggests that a major factor underlying excess mortality in these groups is due to their over-representation in low-quality hospitals, where all patients regardless of race have worse outcomes. In this review, we examine the factors underlying racial disparities in outcomes after cardiac surgery, with a primary focus on the role of hospital quality. PMID:25894800

Khera, Rohan; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Rosenthal, Gary E; Girotra, Saket

2015-05-01

341

Caring and Learning Environments: Quality in Child Care Centres across Canada. You Bet I Care!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Canadian experts in diverse fields as well as people concerned about social justice and cohesion have identified quality child care as a crucial component in addressing a variety of broad societal goals. This study explored the relationships between child care center quality and: center characteristics; teaching staff wages and working conditions;…

Goelman, Hillel; Doherty, Gillian; Lero, Donna S.; LaGrange, Annette; Tougas, Jocelyne

342

Outlier Payments For Cardiac Surgery And Hospital Quality  

PubMed Central

In 2002, several hospitals in the Tenet system were accused of overbilling Medicare for cardiac surgery. This led to increased scrutiny of so-called outlier payments, which are used to compensate hospitals when actual costs far exceed those anticipated under prospective payment. Since then, the overall proportion of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedures associated with outlier payments has fallen from 13 percent in 2000–02 to 8 percent in 2003–06. Still, there is variation across U.S. hospitals, with some hospitals experiencing much higher rates. These findings imply that there is potential for quality improvement to reduce costs while improving morbidity and mortality. PMID:19597215

Baser, Onur; Fan, Zhahoui; Dimick, Justin B.; Staiger, Douglas O.; Birkmeyer, John D.

2010-01-01

343

Hospitality quality: new directions and new challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This article aims to discuss issues related to service quality in the hotel industry. It highlights unique aspects of hotel work and the implications for service delivery, and discusses methods used to measure service quality and expectations. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Through an assessment of the extensive body of literature on quality service in general and within hotel contexts, some

Anne P. Crick; Andrew Spencer

2011-01-01

344

Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.  

PubMed

The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities. PMID:23568381

Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

2013-10-01

345

Managerial attitude to the implementation of quality management systems in Lithuanian support treatment and nursing hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background The regulations of the Quality Management System (QMS) implementation in health care organizations were approved by the Lithuanian Ministry of Health in 1998. Following the above regulations, general managers of health care organizations had to initiate the QMS implementation in hospitals. As no research on the QMS implementation has been carried out in Lithuanian support treatment and nursing hospitals since, the objective of this study is to assess its current stage from a managerial perspective. Methods A questionnaire survey of general managers of Lithuanian support treatment and nursing hospitals was carried out in the period of January through March 2005. Majority of the items included in the questionnaire were measured on a seven-point Likert scale. During the survey, a total of 72 questionnaires was distributed, out of which 58 filled-in ones were returned (response rate 80.6 per cent; standard sampling error 0.029 at 95 per cent level of confidence). Results Quality Management Systems were found operating in 39.7 per cent of support treatment and nursing hospitals and currently under implementation in 46.6 per cent of hospitals (13.7% still do not have it). The mean of the respondents' perceived QMS significance is 5.8 (on a seven-point scale). The most critical issues related to the QMS implementation include procedure development (5.5), lack of financial resources (5.4) and information (5.1), and development of work guidelines (4.6), while improved responsibility and power sharing (5.2), better service quality (5.1) and higher patient satisfaction (5.1) were perceived by the respondents as the key QMS benefits. The level of satisfaction with the QMS among the management of the surveyed hospitals is mediocre (3.6). However it was found to be higher among respondents who were more competent in quality management, were familiar with ISO 9000 standards, and had higher numbers of employees trained in quality management. Conclusion QMSs are perceived to be successfully running in one third of the Lithuanian support treatment and nursing hospitals. Its current implementation stage is dependent on the hospital size – the bigger the hospital the more success it meets in the QMS implementation. As to critical Quality Management (QM) issues, hospitals tend to encounter such major problems as lack of financial resources, information and training, as well as difficulties in procedure development. On the other hand, the key factors that assist to the success of the QMS implementation comprise managerial awareness of the QMS significance and the existence of employee training systems and audit groups in hospitals. PMID:16987416

Buciuniene, Ilona; Malciankina, Sonata; Lydeka, Zigmas; Kazlauskaite, Ruta

2006-01-01

346

AHRQ prevention quality indicators to assess the quality of primary care of local providers: a pilot study from Italy  

PubMed Central

Background: Outside the USA, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) prevention quality indicators (PQIs) have been used to compare the quality of primary care services only at a national or regional level. However, in several national health systems, primary care is not directly managed by the regions but is in charge of smaller territorial entities. We evaluated whether PQIs might be used to compare the performance of local providers such as Italian local health authorities (LHAs) and health districts. Methods: We analysed the hospital discharge abstracts of 44 LHAs (and 11 health districts) of five Italian regions (including ?18 million residents) in 2008–10. Age-standardized PQI rates were computed following AHRQ specifications. Potential predictors were investigated using multilevel modelling. Results: We analysed 11 470 722 hospitalizations. The overall rates of preventable hospitalizations (composite PQI 90) were 1012, 889 and 988 (×100 000 inhabitants) in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Composite PQIs were able to differentiate LHAs and health districts and showed small variation in the performance ranking over years. Conclusion: Although further research is required, our findings support the use of composite PQIs to evaluate the performance of relatively small primary health care providers (50 000–60 000 enrollees) in countries with universal health care coverage. Achieving high precision may be crucial for a structured quality assessment system to align hospitalization rate indicators with measures of other contexts of care (cost, clinical management, satisfaction/experience) that are typically computed at a local level. PMID:24367065

Flacco, Maria Elena; De Vito, Corrado; Arcà, Silvia; Carle, Flavia; Capasso, Lorenzo; Marzuillo, Carolina; Muraglia, Angelo; Samani, Fabio; Villari, Paolo

2014-01-01

347

Respiratory care of the hospitalized patient with cystic fibrosis.  

PubMed

Hospitalization can occur at any age for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The leading cause for admission is an acute worsening of signs and symptoms that can be called a pulmonary exacerbation. The reasons for admission are usually the need for intravenous antibiotics and aggressive airway clearance with good nutritional support. Respiratory therapists (RTs) play a key role in the care of CF patients in the out-patient clinics and taking care of the patients while hospitalized. Following the CF pulmonary guidelines, they administer aerosol delivery and airway clearance while also providing education to patients and families. The RT should have the skills to perform and teach all manners of airway clearance and understand the medications and delivery devices that make up a CF treatment. As CF lung disease progresses, so does the chance that these patients may develop complications such as pneumothorax and hemoptysis, which may require different strategies, especially when airway clearance is performed. The RT needs to have the skills that can take the patient from simple oxygen therapy as lung function deteriorates to the point where chronic oxygen or noninvasive ventilation is needed, or to the point where the end-stage patient waits for a lung transplant. An important aspect of the hospitalization is the interaction between the RT and the patient. To give good therapy is to be a great coach. From infection control to following proper nebulizer protocol, to consistency with airway clearance, to education, the CF RT is there for the life of the patient. PMID:19467163

Newton, Thomas J

2009-06-01

348

Is Readmission a Valid Indicator of the Quality of Inpatient Psychiatric Care?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early return to hospital is a frequently measured outcome in mental health system performance monitoring yet its validity\\u000a for evaluating quality of inpatient care is unclear. This study reviewed research conducted in the last decade on predictors\\u000a of early readmission (within 30 to 90 days of discharge) to assess the association between this indicator and quality of inpatient\\u000a psychiatric care. Only

Janet Durbin; Elizabeth Lin; Crystal Layne; Moira Teed

2007-01-01

349

Vehicle entrapment rescue and pre-hospital trauma care.  

PubMed

From 1 April 1991 to 31 March 1993 the Royal London Hospital Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) attended 737 road traffic accidents, 90 (12 per cent) of which involved entrapments. Nine casualties (10 per cent) died, of which five died at the scene. Thirty-two patients with a median ISS 17 (range 1-59) were transported by helicopter to the Royal London Hospital. Of these, four subsequently died in hospital. The median ISS of the non-survivors was 44 (range 24-59). The remaining 53 patients were transported to the nearest hospital. In 45 cases (50 per cent) patient extrication took longer than 30 min. The methods and standards for the release of trapped road traffic accident victims were reviewed to allow physicians a working understanding of Fire Service techniques. Entrapment rescue should create rapid access to the accident victim, allowing stabilization and release with minimum delay. Immediate and uncontrolled release of trapped victims is only indicated if there is immediate danger to life from the surroundings. We recommend a rigorous target of less than 30 min for the release of the casualty. To achieve this will require systematic extrication training for Fire Service crews and medical teams who are involved in immediate care. PMID:8746311

Wilmink, A B; Samra, G S; Watson, L M; Wilson, A W

1996-01-01

350

Care control and collaborative working in a prison hospital.  

PubMed

This paper reports findings from a qualitative research project, using interviews, focus groups and participant observations, which sought to investigate "good practice" in a nurse-led prison hospital wing for male prisoners. The study raised issues about tensions between "caring" and "control" of prisoners from the perspectives of professionals working or visiting the wing. This paper discusses collaborative working between professionals from different backgrounds, including nurses and healthcare (prison) officers who were based on the wing and others who visited such as probation, medical, Inreach team or Counselling Advice, Referral, Assessment and Through Care team staff (CARAT). The key finding was that there is a balance between therapy and security/risk. In order to maintain this, the two main groups based on the hospital wing--nurses and prison officers--moved between at times cooperating, coordinating and collaborating with each other to maintain this balance. Other themes were care and control, team working, individual and professional responsibilities and communication issues. Enhancing the role of nurses should be encouraged so that therapy remains paramount, and we conclude with some recommendations to encourage collaborative working in prison healthcare settings to ensure that therapy continues to be paramount while security and safety are maintained. PMID:23078591

Foster, John; Bell, Linda; Jayasinghe, Neil

2013-03-01

351

Total quality management issues in managed care.  

PubMed

The implementation of total quality management (TQM) in health care has gone on in parallel with the growth of managed care. What is the interaction between the two? Key issues are the ascendance of cost control over quality in many areas, erosion of employee commitment and loyalty, and a short-run orientation. Associated with this is an emphasis on organizational learning rather than learning by autonomous professionals. Both TQM and managed care acknowledge the dynamic nature of clinical processes and the ability and responsibility of both institutions and clinicians to improve their processes. Both are consistent with efforts to identify and implement best practices. However, these similarities should not mask fundamental differences. Continuous improvement must shift its focus from avoiding unnecessary variation to facilitating rapid organizational learning and institutionalizing mass customization into the delivery of health services. PMID:9327355

McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D

1997-01-01

352

Examining Quality Improvement Programs: The Case of Minnesota Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine if there is a hierarchy of improvement program adoption by hospitals and outline that hierarchy. Data Sources Primary data were collected in the spring of 2007 via e-survey from 210 individuals representing 109 Minnesota hospitals. Secondary data from 2006 were assembled from the Leapfrog database. Study Design As part of a larger survey, respondents were given a list of improvement programs and asked to identify those programs that are used in their hospital. Data Collection/Data Extraction Rasch Model Analysis was used to assess whether a unidimensional construct exists that defines a hospital's ability to implement performance improvement programs. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of the Rasch ability scores with Leapfrog Safe Practices Scores to validate the research findings. Principal Findings The results of the study show that hospitals have widely varying abilities in implementing improvement programs. In addition, improvement programs present differing levels of difficulty for hospitals trying to implement them. Our findings also indicate that the ability to adopt improvement programs is important to the overall performance of hospitals. Conclusions There is a hierarchy of improvement programs in the health care context. A hospital's ability to successfully adopt improvement programs is a function of its existing capabilities. As a hospital's capability increases, the ability to successfully implement higher level programs also increases. PMID:18761677

Olson, John R; Belohlav, James A; Cook, Lori S; Hays, Julie M

2008-01-01

353

Health care update: hospital employment or private practice?  

PubMed

The increased operating cost of running a practice, decreasing reimbursement, and general pessimism is leading to increasing number of physicians choosing employment by hospitals and large physician groups. Although over 50% of members of the Society for Vascular Surgery are currently in a practice of less than 3 surgeons and over half of all private practitioners are employed by physician groups, the landscape is shifting quickly. Younger physicians finishing training are increasingly opting for employment. Hospitals are also anxious to hire vascular surgeons to maintain or increase market share of chronic disease management and preempt hiring difficulties with future shortages of vascular surgeons. New vascular surgeons have to carefully weigh the pros and cons of employment before making a decision. PMID:24259521

Satiani, Bhagwan

2013-12-01

354

Recognition of depression and anxiety and their association with quality of life, hospitalization and mortality in primary care patients with heart failure – study protocol of a longitudinal observation study  

PubMed Central

Background International disease management guidelines recommend the regular assessment of depression and anxiety in heart failure patients. Currently there is little data on the effect of screening for depression and anxiety on the quality of life and the prognosis of heart failure (HF). We will investigate the association between the recognition of current depression/anxiety by the general practitioner (GP) and the quality of life and the patients’ prognosis. Methods/Design In this multicenter, prospective, observational study 3,950 patients with HF are recruited by general practices in Germany. The patients fill out questionnaires at baseline and 12-month follow-up. At baseline the GPs are interviewed regarding the somatic and psychological comorbidities of their patients. During the follow-up assessment, data on hospitalization and mortality are provided by the general practice. Based on baseline data, the patients are allocated into three observation groups: HF patients with depression and/or anxiety recognized by their GP (P+/+), those with depression and/or anxiety not recognized (P+/?) and patients without depression and/or anxiety (P?/?). We will perform multivariate regression models to investigate the influence of the recognition of depression and/or anxiety on quality of life at 12 month follow-up, as well as its influences on the prognosis (hospital admission, mortality). Discussion We will display the frequency of GP-acknowledged depression and anxiety and the frequency of installed therapeutic strategies. We will also describe the frequency of depression and anxiety missed by the GP and the resulting treatment gap. Effects of correctly acknowledged and missed depression/anxiety on outcome, also in comparison to the outcome of subjects without depression/anxiety will be addressed. In case results suggest a treatment gap of depression/anxiety in patients with HF, the results of this study will provide methodological advice for the efficient planning of further interventional research. PMID:24279590

2013-01-01

355

Implementing Essentials of Critical Care Orientation: one hospital's experience with an online critical care course.  

PubMed

Critical care is a specialty area that requires a significant investment of time and money for clinical and classroom learning. One solution for learning that is flexible and cost-effective is the American Association of Critical Care Nurses' Essentials of Critical Care Orientation (ECCO). ECCO lays the theoretical groundwork for nurses to practice safely in critical care. Utilization of ECCO in one community hospital has been a 3-year process, which is continually refined by the critical care education team. Advantages to using ECCO include that it is self-paced, maintained by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, and allows learners to flex their time and location for learning. Obstacles encountered include difficulties associated with computer learning, lack of hard copy notes, lack of face-to-face time interaction between orientees and education staff, increased work load for one education staff member, and keeping learners on track with their time and orientation. This article describes one hospital's experience with implementation of ECCO as the classroom portion of orientation to several critical care units. PMID:16862023

Peterson, Kristine J; Van Buren, Krystal

2006-01-01

356

The implementation of quality management systems in hospitals: a comparison between three countries  

PubMed Central

Background Is the implementation of Quality Management (QM) in health care proceeding satisfactorily and can national health care policies influence the implementation process? Policymakers and researchers in a country need to know the answer to this question. Cross country comparisons can reveal whether sufficient progress is being made and how this can be stimulated. The objective of the study was to investigate agreement and disparities in the implementation of QMS between The Netherlands, Hungary and Finland with respect to the evaluation model used and the national policy strategy of the three countries. Methods The study has a cross sectional design, based on measurements in 2000. Empirical data about QM-activities in hospitals were gathered by a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires were answered by the directors of the hospitals or the quality coordinators. The analyses are based on data from 101 hospitals in the Netherlands, 116 hospitals in Hungary and 59 hospitals in Finland. Outcome measures are the developmental stage of the Quality Management System (QMS), the development within five focal areas, and distinct QM-activities which were listed in the questionnaire. Results A mean of 22 QM-activities per hospital was found in the Netherlands and Finland versus 20 QM-activities in Hungarian hospitals. Only a small number of hospitals has already implemented a QMS (4% in The Netherlands,0% in Hungary and 3% in Finland). More hospitals in the Netherlands are concentrating on quality documents, whereas Finnish hospitals are concentrating on training in QM and guidelines. Cyclic quality improvement activities have been developed in the three countries, but in most hospitals the results were not used for improvements. All three countries pay hardly any attention to patient participation. Conclusion The study demonstrates that the implementation of QM-activities can be measured at national level and that differences between countries can be assessed. The hypothesis that governmental legislation or financial reimbursement can stimulate the implementation of QM-activities, more than voluntary recommendations, could not be confirmed. However, the results show that specific obligations can stimulate the implementation of QM-activities more than general, framework legislation. PMID:16608510

Wagner, C; Gulácsi, L; Takacs, E; Outinen, M

2006-01-01

357

The Relationship Between Business Process Re-engineering and Internet Usage: Survey of Acute Care Hospitals in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

The data from a national survey of acute care hospitals was used for analysis. Hatcher discusses the complete questionnaire, data collection procedure, and sample selection.(1)The relationship between business process Re-engineering, total quality management, innovation system approaches, and internet usage and potential usage will be reported and discussed.

Myron Hatcher

1999-01-01

358

Patients' functioning as predictor of nursing workload in acute hospital units providing rehabilitation care: a multi-centre cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Management decisions regarding quality and quantity of nurse staffing have important consequences for hospital budgets. Furthermore, these management decisions must address the nursing care requirements of the particular patients within an organizational unit. In order to determine optimal nurse staffing needs, the extent of nursing workload must first be known. Nursing workload is largely a function of the composite

Martin Mueller; Stefanie Lohmann; Ralf Strobl; Christine Boldt; Eva Grill

2010-01-01

359

Composite Measures for Rating Hospital Quality with Major Surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the value of a novel composite measure for identifying the best hospitals for major procedures. Data Source We used national Medicare data for patients undergoing five high-risk surgical procedures between 2005 and 2008. Study Design For each procedure, we used empirical Bayes techniques to create a composite measure combining hospital volume, risk-adjusted mortality with the procedure of interest, risk-adjusted mortality with other related procedures, and other variables. Hospitals were ranked based on 2005–2006 data and placed in one of three groups: 1-star (bottom 20 percent), 2-star (middle 60 percent), and 3-star (top 20 percent). We assessed how well these ratings forecasted risk-adjusted mortality rates in the next 2 years (2007–2008), compared to other measures. Principal Findings For all five procedures, the composite measures based on 2005–2006 data performed well in predicting future hospital performance. Compared to 1-star hospitals, risk-adjusted mortality was much lower at 3-star hospitals for esophagectomy (6.7 versus 14.4 percent), pancreatectomy (4.7 versus 9.2 percent), coronary artery bypass surgery (2.6 versus 5.0 percent), aortic valve replacement (4.5 versus 8.5 percent), and percutaneous coronary interventions (2.4 versus 4.1 percent). Compared to individual surgical quality measures, the composite measures were better at forecasting future risk-adjusted mortality. These measures also outperformed the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare ratings. Conclusion Composite measures of surgical quality are very effective at predicting hospital mortality rates with major procedures. Such measures would be more informative than existing quality indicators in helping patients and payers identify high-quality hospitals with specific procedures. PMID:22985030

Dimick, Justin B; Staiger, Douglas O; Osborne, Nicholas H; Nicholas, Lauren H; Birkmeyer, John D

2012-01-01

360

Approaches to Quality of Control in Diabetes Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management methods for quality of diabetes care need new approaches because of the poor metabolic control of most of these patients. Poor quality of care generally results from poor instruction and training rather than from misbehaviour of both patients and their families. Structure quality of care (who and where?), process quality (how?, which are the goals, what resolution is taken

F. Chiarelli; A. Verrotti; L. di Ricco; M. de Martino; G. Morgese

1998-01-01

361

A Canadian Experience of Integrating Complementary Therapy in a Hospital Palliative Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background The provision of complementary therapy in palliative care is rare in Canadian hospitals. An Ontario hospital's palliative care unit developed a complementary therapy pilot project within the interdisciplinary team to explore potential benefits. Massage, aromatherapy, Reiki, and Therapeutic Touch™ were provided in an integrated approach. This paper reports on the pilot project, the results of which may encourage its replication in other palliative care programs. Objectives The intentions were (1) to increase patients'/families' experience of quality and satisfaction with end-of-life care and (2) to determine whether the therapies could enhance symptom management. Results Data analysis (n=31) showed a significant decrease in severity of pain, anxiety, low mood, restlessness, and discomfort (p<0.01, 95% confidence interval); significant increase in inner stillness/peace (p<0.01, 95% confidence interval); and convincing narratives on an increase in comfort. The evaluation by staff was positive and encouraged continuation of the program. Conclusions An integrated complementary therapy program enhances regular symptom management, increases comfort, and is a valuable addition to interdisciplinary care. PMID:24020920

Tavares, Marianne; Berger, Brian

2013-01-01

362

Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective  

PubMed Central

Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients. PMID:22299830

2012-01-01

363

Hospital utilization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: health outcome disparities associated with race and ethnicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our study examines associations between race and ethnicity and hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions for working age adults, and for individuals age 65 or older. We use ACS hospitalization as an outcome indicator to evaluate access to primary care. The prevalence of ACS conditions in the population, including those not hospitalized, and the occurrence of ACS and non-ACS

James N. Laditka; Sarah B. Laditka; Melanie P. Mastanduno

2003-01-01

364

A typology for legal risk management in patient care in Australian hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author reviewed the literature on legal risk management in patient care, and carried out research in two acute care hospitals. The hospital research involved auditing policies and procedures, interviewing key people in the hospital, reviewing external legal and policy trends, and examining selected complaints files and legal cases. The results were used to develop a 'typology' of legal risk

Liza Newby

1996-01-01

365

Self-Care Activities Among Patients with Diabetes Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mangalore Karnataka, India  

PubMed Central

Background: Increasing prevalence of diabetes in India is resulting in an epidemiological transition. The care of the people with diabetes is traditionally seen as doctor centered, but the concept of self-care of people with diabetes is a new domain and is proven beneficial. Aim: The aim was to determine the practice of self-care activities among people with diabetes attending a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore. Subjects and Methods: A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Government Wenlock Hospital, Mangalore during September–October 2012. A total of 290 patients with >1-year duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) were asked to respond to summary diabetes self-care activities questionnaire after obtaining the consent from them. The statistical analysis was performed in terms of descriptive statistics and association between the variables was tested using Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: A healthy eating plan on a daily basis was followed by 45.9% (133/290) of the participants, daily exercises for 30 min were followed by 43.4% (126/290), and regular blood sugar monitoring was done by 76.6% (222/290). Regarding the adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin, daily adherence to medication was seen among 60.5% (155/256) and 66.9% (138/206) were found to be adherent to insulin injections on a daily basis. Conclusions: Self-care practices were found to be unsatisfactory in almost all aspects except for blood sugar monitoring and treatment adherence. As these practices are essential for prevention of complications and better quality-of -life, more efforts should be put to educate the people with diabetes.

Rajasekharan, D; Kulkarni, V; Unnikrishnan, B; Kumar, N; Holla, R; Thapar, R

2015-01-01

366

Do hospitalist physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery? A systematic review of process, efficiency and outcome measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Despite more than a decade of research on hospitalists and their performance, disagreement still exists regarding whether\\u000a and how hospital-based physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery. This systematic review summarizes the findings\\u000a from 65 comparative evaluations to determine whether hospitalists provide a higher quality of inpatient care relative to traditional\\u000a inpatient physicians who maintain hospital privileges with concurrent

Heather L White; Richard H Glazier

2011-01-01

367

Improving the Quality of Maternal and Neonatal Care: the Role of Standard Based Participatory Assessments  

PubMed Central

Background Gaps in quality of care are seriously affecting maternal and neonatal health globally but reports of successful quality improvement cycles implemented at large scale are scanty. We report the results of a nation-wide program to improve quality of maternal and neonatal hospital care in a lower-middle income country focusing on the role played by standard-based participatory assessments. Methods Improvements in the quality of maternal and neonatal care following an action-oriented participatory assessment of 19 areas covering the whole continuum from admission to discharge were measured after an average period of 10 months in four busy referral maternity hospitals in Uzbekistan. Information was collected by a multidisciplinary national team with international supervision through visit to hospital services, examination of medical records, direct observation of cases and interviews with staff and mothers. Scores (range 0 to 3) attributed to over 400 items and combined in average scores for each area were compared with the baseline assessment. Results Between the first and the second assessment, all four hospitals improved their overall score by an average 0.7 points out of 3 (range 0.4 to 1), i.e. by 22%. The improvements occurred in all main areas of care and were greater in the care of normal labor and delivery (+0.9), monitoring, infection control and mother and baby friendly care (+0.8) the role of the participatory action-oriented approach in determining the observed changes was estimated crucial in 6 out of 19 areas and contributory in other 8. Ongoing implementation of referral system and new classification of neonatal deaths impede the improved process of care to be reflected in current statistics. Conclusions Important improvements in the quality of hospital care provided to mothers and newborn babies can be achieved through a standard-based action-oriented and participatory assessment and reassessment process. PMID:24167616

Tamburlini, Giorgio; Yadgarova, Klara; Kamilov, Asamidin; Bacci, Alberta

2013-01-01

368

A multidisciplinary diabetic foot protocol at Chiang Mai University Hospital: cost and quality of life.  

PubMed

The consensus is that a multidisciplinary approach for patients with diabetic foot ulcer is effective in reducing the number of leg amputations. Concern remains, however, about cost and health-related quality of life issues. From August 2005 to March 2007, a multidisciplinary diabetic foot protocol (DFP) was used at the authors' teaching hospital.There were devices to reduce pressure on the foot.After healing, there were custom-fabricated orthoses and footwear, and monitoring of progress in ambulation. All subjects were educated about diabetic foot disease and its complications and prevention.They were also instructed to call and visit the hospital if there were any signs of new lesions.This study compared responses to the short form 36 questionnaires (SF-36) about health-related quality of life and the cost of medical care for patients receiving DFP care from August 2005 to March 2007 and those who had standard care from August 2003 to July 2005.There were 56 and 40 diabetic foot ulcer patients on DFP and standard care packages, respectively. Their gender distribution and mean age were similar. The average total cost of DFP patients was significantly lower than that for standard care patients ($1127.02 and $1824.58, respectively, P = .02). DFP patients had significantly higher scores on the SF-36 for both the physical and mental health dimensions than standard care patients. It was concluded that DFP was less expensive and gave patients a better quality of life, compared to standard care. On the basis of this finding, DFP should be used by every hospital to improve outcomes for patients with diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:19703951

Rerkasem, K; Kosachunhanun, N; Tongprasert, S; Guntawongwan, K

2009-09-01

369

Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care  

PubMed Central

Background Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. Methods The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. Results The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. Conclusions The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study provides a first exploratory quantitative insight into stakeholder positions concerning innovation in health care, and presents a novel way to study differences in stakeholder preferences. The results may be taken into account by decision makers involved in the implementation of innovations. PMID:23947398

2013-01-01

370

Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system  

PubMed Central

Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18?months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was £50?000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was £65?000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was £16?000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

2015-01-01

371

Sociodemographic and Health Characteristics, Rather Than Primary Care Supply, are Major Drivers of Geographic Variation in Preventable Hospitalizations in Australia  

PubMed Central

Background: Geographic rates of preventable hospitalization are used internationally as an indicator of accessibility and quality of primary care. Much research has correlated the indicator with the supply of primary care services, yet multiple other factors may influence these admissions. Objective: To quantify the relative contributions of the supply of general practitioners (GPs) and personal sociodemographic and health characteristics, to geographic variation in preventable hospitalization. Methods: Self-reported questionnaire data for 267,091 participants in the 45 and Up Study, Australia, were linked with administrative hospital data to identify preventable hospitalizations. Multilevel Poisson models, with participants clustered in their geographic area of residence, were used to explore factors that explain geographic variation in hospitalization. Results: GP supply, measured as full-time workload equivalents, was not a significant predictor of preventable hospitalization, and explained only a small amount (2.9%) of the geographic variation in hospitalization rates. Conversely, more than one-third (36.9%) of variation was driven by the sociodemographic composition, health, and behaviors of the population. These personal characteristics explained a greater amount of the variation for chronic conditions (37.5%) than acute (15.5%) or vaccine-preventable conditions (2.4%). Conclusions: Personal sociodemographic and health characteristics, rather than GP supply, are major drivers of preventable hospitalization. Their contribution varies according to condition, and if used for performance comparison purposes, geographic rates of preventable hospitalization should be reported according to individual condition or potential pathways for intervention. PMID:25793270

Jorm, Louisa R.; Douglas, Kirsty A.; Blyth, Fiona M.; Elliott, Robert F.; Leyland, Alastair H.

2015-01-01

372

Is having quality as an item on the executive board agenda associated with the implementation of quality management systems in European hospitals: a quantitative analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess whether there is a relationship between having quality as an item on the board's agenda, perceived external pressure (PEP) and the implementation of quality management in European hospitals. Design A quantitative, mixed method, cross-sectional study in seven European countries in 2011 surveying CEOs and quality managers and data from onsite audits. Participants One hundred and fifty-five CEOs and 155 quality managers. Setting One hundred and fifty-five randomly selected acute care hospitals in seven European countries (Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Main outcome measure(s) Three constructs reflecting quality management based on questionnaire and audit data: (i) Quality Management System Index, (ii) Quality Management Compliance Index and (iii) Clinical Quality Implementation Index. The main predictor was whether quality performance was on the executive board's agenda. Results Discussing quality performance at executive board meetings more often was associated with a higher quality management system score (regression coefficient b = 2.53; SE = 1.16; P = 0.030). We found a trend in the associations of discussing quality performance with quality compliance and clinical quality implementation. PEP did not modify these relationships. Conclusions Having quality as an item on the executive board's agenda allows them to review and discuss quality performance more often in order to improve their hospital's quality management. Generally, and as this study found, having quality on the executive board's agenda matters. PMID:24550260

Botje, Daan; Klazinga, N.S.; Suñol, R.; Groene, O.; Pfaff, H.; Mannion, R.; Depaigne-Loth, A.; Arah, O.A.; Dersarkissian, M.; Wagner, C.; Klazinga, N.; Kringos, D.S.; Lombarts, M.J.M.H.; Plochg, T.; Lopez, M.A.; Vallejo, P.; Saillour-Glenisson, F.; Car, M.; Jones, S.; Klaus, E.; Bottaro, S.; Garel, P.; Saluvan, M.; Bruneau, C.; Depaigne-Loth, A.; Hammer, A.; Ommen, O.; Pfaff, H.; Botje, D.; Escoval, A.; Lívio, A.; Eiras, M.; Franca, M.; Leite, I.; Almeman, F.; Kus, H.; Ozturk, K.; Mannion, R.; Wang, A.; Thompson, A.

2014-01-01

373

Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality  

PubMed Central

Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

2015-01-01

374

Hospital readiness for health information exchange: development of metrics associated with successful collaboration for quality improvement  

PubMed Central

Objective The development of readiness metrics for organizational participation in health information exchange is critical for monitoring progress toward, and achievement of, successful inter-organizational collaboration. In preparation for the development of a tool to measure readiness for data-sharing, we tested whether organizational capacities known to be related to readiness were associated with successful participation in an American data-sharing collaborative for quality improvement. Design Cross-sectional design, using an on-line survey of hospitals in a large, mature data-sharing collaborative organized for benchmarking and improvement in nursing care quality. Measurements Factor analysis was used to identify salient constructs, and identified factors were analyzed with respect to “successful” participation. “Success” was defined as the incorporation of comparative performance data into the hospital dashboard. Results The most important factor in predicting success included survey items measuring the strength of organizational leadership in fostering a culture of quality improvement (QI Leadership): 1) presence of a supportive hospital executive; 2) the extent to which a hospital values data; 3) the presence of leaders’ vision for how the collaborative advances the hospital’s strategic goals; 4) hospital use of the collaborative data to track quality outcomes; and 5) staff recognition of a strong mandate for collaborative participation (? = 0.84, correlation with Success 0.68 [P < 0.0001]). Conclusion The data emphasize the importance of hospital QI Leadership in collaboratives that aim to share data for QI or safety purposes. Such metrics should prove useful in the planning and development of this complex form of inter-organizational collaboration. PMID:21330191

Korst, Lisa M.; Aydin, Carolyn E.; Signer, Jordana M. K.; Fink, Arlene

2011-01-01

375

[Interruptions of physicians' work at hospitals. A threat to quality?].  

PubMed

When the working hours of junior doctors at a medical clinic were reduced from 44 to 40.7 hours per week a questionnaire was distributed to the doctors themselves and to the different categories of nurses to find out how this change had affected the schedule for investigation and treatment of the patient, care of the patient, discharge from hospital, and collaboration with other health professionals. In the opinion of doctors and nurses alike, the reduced working hours had led to delays in investigation of patients, poorer care, problems in connection with discharge from hospital, and poorer collaboration with other professional groups. It could well be difficult to achieve normal working hours for junior doctors in hospitals with patients under continuous treatment without this having av decided negative effect on continuity of treatment. PMID:8658395

Bøhmer, T; Pedersen, T

1996-04-20

376

Transitional Care of Older Adults Hospitalized with Heart Failure: A Randomized, Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness of a transi- tional care intervention delivered by advanced practice nurses (APNs) to elders hospitalized with heart failure. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial with follow-up through 52 weeks postindex hospital discharge. SETTING: Six Philadelphia academic and community hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred thirty-nine eligible pa- tients were aged 65 and older and hospitalized with heart failure. INTERVENTION:

Mary D. Naylor; Dorothy A. Brooten; Roberta L. Campbell; Greg Maislin; Kathleen M. McCauley; J. Sanford Schwartz

2004-01-01

377

7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Community Facility hospital and health care facility loans. Those...restructuring is to keep the hospital or health care facility in operation with...be determined by adding the fair market value of FmHA or...facility continuing to offer health care services which may,...

2012-01-01

378

7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Community Facility hospital and health care facility loans. Those...restructuring is to keep the hospital or health care facility in operation with...be determined by adding the fair market value of FmHA or...facility continuing to offer health care services which may,...

2011-01-01

379

7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Community Facility hospital and health care facility loans. Those...restructuring is to keep the hospital or health care facility in operation with...be determined by adding the fair market value of FmHA or...facility continuing to offer health care services which may,...

2014-01-01

380

7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Community Facility hospital and health care facility loans. Those...restructuring is to keep the hospital or health care facility in operation with...be determined by adding the fair market value of FmHA or...facility continuing to offer health care services which may,...

2013-01-01

381

Who's Who in Your Health Care, Part 1: In the Hospital  

MedlinePLUS

Who's Who in Your Health Care, Part 1: In the Hospital Who's Who in Your Health Care, Part 1: In the Hospital htmNEWSICN20040614152812 For people in ... understanding who all your caregivers were. Even when health care professionals introduce themselves and tell patients why they ...

382

Should Hospitals Keep Their Patients Longer? The Role of Inpatient and Outpatient Care in Reducing  

E-print Network

in substantial costs to the U.S. government. As part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, the Hospital Readmissions. Introduction Section 3025 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), signed into law in MarchShould Hospitals Keep Their Patients Longer? The Role of Inpatient and Outpatient Care in Reducing

Chan, Carri W.

383

78 FR 55671 - Hospital Care and Medical Services for Camp Lejeune Veterans  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO78 Hospital Care and Medical Services for Camp Lejeune Veterans...statutory mandate that VA provide health care to certain veterans who served at Camp...The law requires VA to furnish hospital care and medical services for these...

2013-09-11

384

Assessment of foodservice quality and identification of improvement strategies using hospital foodservice quality model.  

PubMed

The purposes of this study were to assess hospital foodservice quality and to identify causes of quality problems and improvement strategies. Based on the review of literature, hospital foodservice quality was defined and the Hospital Foodservice Quality model was presented. The study was conducted in two steps. In Step 1, nutritional standards specified on diet manuals and nutrients of planned menus, served meals, and consumed meals for regular, diabetic, and low-sodium diets were assessed in three general hospitals. Quality problems were found in all three hospitals since patients consumed less than their nutritional requirements. Considering the effects of four gaps in the Hospital Foodservice Quality model, Gaps 3 and 4 were selected as critical control points (CCPs) for hospital foodservice quality management. In Step 2, the causes of the gaps and improvement strategies at CCPs were labeled as "quality hazards" and "corrective actions", respectively and were identified using a case study. At Gap 3, inaccurate forecasting and a lack of control during production were identified as quality hazards and corrective actions proposed were establishing an accurate forecasting system, improving standardized recipes, emphasizing the use of standardized recipes, and conducting employee training. At Gap 4, quality hazards were menus of low preferences, inconsistency of menu quality, a lack of menu variety, improper food temperatures, and patients' lack of understanding of their nutritional requirements. To reduce Gap 4, the dietary departments should conduct patient surveys on menu preferences on a regular basis, develop new menus, especially for therapeutic diets, maintain food temperatures during distribution, provide more choices, conduct meal rounds, and provide nutrition education and counseling. The Hospital Foodservice Quality Model was a useful tool for identifying causes of the foodservice quality problems and improvement strategies from a holistic point of view. PMID:20461206

Kim, Kyungjoo; Kim, Minyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun

2010-04-01

385

Assessment of foodservice quality and identification of improvement strategies using hospital foodservice quality model  

PubMed Central

The purposes of this study were to assess hospital foodservice quality and to identify causes of quality problems and improvement strategies. Based on the review of literature, hospital foodservice quality was defined and the Hospital Foodservice Quality model was presented. The study was conducted in two steps. In Step 1, nutritional standards specified on diet manuals and nutrients of planned menus, served meals, and consumed meals for regular, diabetic, and low-sodium diets were assessed in three general hospitals. Quality problems were found in all three hospitals since patients consumed less than their nutritional requirements. Considering the effects of four gaps in the Hospital Foodservice Quality model, Gaps 3 and 4 were selected as critical control points (CCPs) for hospital foodservice quality management. In Step 2, the causes of the gaps and improvement strategies at CCPs were labeled as "quality hazards" and "corrective actions", respectively and were identified using a case study. At Gap 3, inaccurate forecasting and a lack of control during production were identified as quality hazards and corrective actions proposed were establishing an accurate forecasting system, improving standardized recipes, emphasizing the use of standardized recipes, and conducting employee training. At Gap 4, quality hazards were menus of low preferences, inconsistency of menu quality, a lack of menu variety, improper food temperatures, and patients' lack of understanding of their nutritional requirements. To reduce Gap 4, the dietary departments should conduct patient surveys on menu preferences on a regular basis, develop new menus, especially for therapeutic diets, maintain food temperatures during distribution, provide more choices, conduct meal rounds, and provide nutrition education and counseling. The Hospital Foodservice Quality Model was a useful tool for identifying causes of the foodservice quality problems and improvement strategies from a holistic point of view. PMID:20461206

Kim, Kyungjoo; Kim, Minyoung

2010-01-01

386

Improving the quality of care for Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction: results from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

CONTEXT: Medicare has a legislative mandate for quality assurance, but the effectiveness of its population-based quality improvement programs has been difficult to establish.\\u000aOBJECTIVE: To improve the quality of care for Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction.\\u000aDESIGN: Quality improvement project with baseline measurement, feedback, remeasurement, and comparison samples.\\u000aSETTING: All acute care hospitals in the United States.\\u000aPATIENTS: Preintervention

Thomas A. Marciniak; Edward F. Ellerbeck; Martha J. Radford; Timothy F. Kresowik; Jay A. Gold; Harlan M. Krumholz; Catarina I. Kiefe; Richard M. Allman; Robert A. Vogel; Stephen F. Jencks

1998-01-01

387

Hospital out-lying through lack of beds and its impact on care and patient outcome  

PubMed Central

Background When medical wards become saturated, the common practice is to resort to outlying patients in another ward until a bed becomes free. Objectives Compare the quality of care provided for inpatients who are outlying (O) in inappropriate wards because of lack of vacant beds in appropriate specialty wards to the care given to non outlying (NO) patients. Methods We propose a matched-pair cluster study. The exposed group consisted of inpatients that were outliers in inappropriate wards because of lack of available beds. Non-exposed subjects (the control group) were those patients who were hospitalized in the ward that corresponded to the reason for their admission. Each patient of the exposed group was matched to a specific control subject. The principal objective was to prospectively measure differences in the length of hospital stays, the secondary objectives were to assess mortality, rate of re-admission at 28 days, and rate of transfer into intensive care. Results 238 were included in the NO group, 245 in the O group. More patients in the O group (86% vs 76%) were transferred into a ward with prescription completed. O patients remained in hospital for 8 days [4-15] vs 7 days [4-13] for NO patients (p?=?0.04). 124 (52%) of the NO patients received heparin-based thromboembolic prevention during their stay in hospital vs 104 (42%) of the O patient group (p?=?0.03). 66 (27%) O patients were re-admitted to hospital within 28 days vs 40 (17%) NO patients (p?=?0.008). Conclusion O patients had a worse prognosis than NO patients. PMID:23497699

2013-01-01

388

[Support to spiritual needs in hospital care. Integration perspective in modern hospitals].  

PubMed

Within the course of medical care in the most advanced health care settings, an increasing attention is being paid to the so-called care humanization. According to this perspective, we try to integrate the usual care pathways with aspects related to the spiritual and religious dimension of all people and their families, as well as the employees themselves. It is clearly important to establish this kind of practices on the basis of scientific evidences. That is the reason why it's a necessity to improve the knowledge about the importance that spiritual assistance can offer within the current health service. The aim of this work is to show the relevance of the integration of spiritual perspectives in the hospital setting according to a multidisciplinary point of view. In this work many data that emerge from the international scientific literature, as well as the definition that is given to the concept of "spirituality" are analyzed; about this definition in fact there is not unanimous consent even today. It is also analyzed the legal situation in force within the European territory according to the different laws and social realities. Finally, the possible organizational practices related to spiritual support are described and the opportunity to specific accreditation pathways and careful training of chaplains able to integrate traditional religious practices with modern spiritual perspectives is discussed. PMID:25072543

Proserpio, Tullio; Piccinelli, Claudia; Arice, Carmine; Petrini, Massimo; Mozzanica, Mario; Veneroni, Laura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo

2014-01-01

389

Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures  

PubMed Central

Introduction Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures. Methodology Included in the study were elderly patients (75+) receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41) were carried out by two researchers. Results Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1) next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering), (2) patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions), (3) health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles), (4) information exchange (oral, written, electronic), (5) context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers) and (6) patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment). Conclusion Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings. PMID:24868196

Storm, Marianne; Siemsen, Inger Margrete D.; Laugaland, Kristin; Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Aase, Karina

2014-01-01

390

Patient Needs, Required Level of Care, and Reasons Delaying Hospital Discharge for Nonacute Patients Occupying Acute Hospital Beds.  

PubMed

This study aims to determine the proportion of nonacute patients occupying acute care beds and to describe their needs, the appropriate level of alternative care, and reasons preventing discharge. Data from 952 patients hospitalized in an acute care unit for 30 days were obtained from their medical charts and by consulting with the medical team at two tertiary teaching hospitals. Among them, 333 (35%) were determined nonacute on day 30 of hospitalization. According to the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP), 55% had no medical, nursing, or patient needs. Among nonacute patients with AEP needs, 88% were related to nursing/life-support services and 12% related to patient condition factors. Regarding alternative level of care, 186 (56%) were waiting for out-of-hospital resources, of which 36% were waiting for palliative care, 33% for long-term care, 18% for rehabilitation, and 12% for home care. For the remaining 147 (44%) nonacute patients, the alternative resources remained undetermined although acute care was no longer required. Main reasons preventing discharge included unavailability of alternative resources, ongoing assessment to determine appropriate resources, ongoing process with community care, and family/patient education/counseling. Available subacute facilities and community-based care would liberate acute care beds and facilitate their appropriate use. PMID:25124492

Afilalo, Marc; Xue, Xiaoqing; Soucy, Nathalie; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

2014-08-14

391

Quality of care in humanitarian surgery.  

PubMed

Humanitarian surgical programs are set up de novo, within days or hours in emergency or disaster settings. In such circumstances, insuring quality of care is extremely challenging. Basic structural inputs such as a safe structure, electricity, clean water, a blood bank, sterilization equipment, a post-anesthesia recovery unit, appropriate medications should be established. Currently, no specific credentials are needed for surgeons to operate in a humanitarian setting; the training of more humanitarian surgeons is desperately needed. Standard perioperative protocols for the humanitarian setting after common procedures such as Cesarean section, burn care, open fractures, and amputations and antibiotic prophylaxis, and post-operative pain management must be developed. Outcome data, especially long-term outcomes, are difficult to collect as patients often do not return for follow-up and may be difficult to trace; standard databases for post-operative infections and mortality rates should be established. Checklists have recently received significant attention as an instrument to support the improvement of surgical quality; knowing which items are most applicable to humanitarian settings remains unknown. In conclusion, the quality of surgical services in humanitarian settings must be regulated. Many other core medical activities of humanitarian organizations such as therapeutic feeding, mass vaccination, and the treatment of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus, are subject to rigorous reporting of quality indicators. There is no reason why surgery should be exempted from quality oversight. The surgical humanitarian community should pull together before the next disaster strikes. PMID:21487849

Chu, Kathryn M; Trelles, Miguel; Ford, Nathan P

2011-06-01

392

Did a quality improvement collaborative make stroke care better? A cluster randomized trial  

PubMed Central

Background Stroke can result in death and long-term disability. Fast and high-quality care can reduce the impact of stroke, but UK national audit data has demonstrated variability in compliance with recommended processes of care. Though quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) are widely used, whether a QIC could improve reliability of stroke care was unknown. Methods Twenty-four NHS hospitals in the Northwest of England were randomly allocated to participate either in Stroke 90:10, a QIC based on the Breakthrough Series (BTS) model, or to a control group giving normal care. The QIC focused on nine processes of quality care for stroke already used in the national stroke audit. The nine processes were grouped into two distinct care bundles: one relating to early hours care and one relating to rehabilitation following stroke. Using an interrupted time series design and difference-in-difference analysis, we aimed to determine whether hospitals participating in the QIC improved more than the control group on bundle compliance. Results Data were available from nine interventions (3,533 patients) and nine control hospitals (3,059 patients). Hospitals in the QIC showed a modest improvement from baseline in the odds of average compliance equivalent to a relative improvement of 10.9% (95% CI 1.3%, 20.6%) in the Early Hours Bundle and 11.2% (95% CI 1.4%, 21.5%) in the Rehabilitation Bundle. Secondary analysis suggested that some specific processes were more sensitive to an intervention effect. Conclusions Some aspects of stroke care improved during the QIC, but the effects of the QIC were modest and further improvement is needed. The extent to which a BTS QIC can improve quality of stroke care remains uncertain. Some aspects of care may respond better to collaboratives than others. Trial registration ISRCTN13893902. PMID:24690267

2014-01-01

393

Managing care, incentives, and information: an exploratory look inside the "black box" of hospital efficiency.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE. We sought to estimate the impact of individual dimensions of hospitals' managed care strategies on the cost per hospital discharge. STUDY SETTING/DATA SOURCES. Thirty-seven member hospitals of seven health systems in the Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and Southwest regions of the United States were studied. STUDY DESIGN. Separate cross-sectional regression analyses of 21,135 inpatient discharges were performed in 1991 and 23,262 discharges in 1992. The multivariate model was estimated with hospital cost per discharge as the dependent variable. Model robustness was checked by comparing regression results at the individual discharge level with those at the level of the hospital/clinical condition pair. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Information on hospitals' managed care strategies was provided by mail and phone survey of key informants in 1991 and 1992. Other hospital characteristics were collected from AHA Annual Survey data, and discharge data from hospital abstracting systems. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The pooled discharge analysis indicated three dimensions of hospital managed care strategy that consistently related to lower costs per hospital discharge: the proportion of hospital revenues derived from per case or capitation payment, the hospital's mechanisms for sharing information on resource consumption with clinicians, and the use of formalized, systematic care coordination mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS. Three strategies appear to hold promise for enhancing the efficiency of inpatient resource use: (1) "fixed price" hospital payment incentives, (2) hospital approaches to sharing resource use information with clinicians, and (3) the application of formal care management mechanisms for specific clinical conditions. PMID:8698584

Conrad, D; Wickizer, T; Maynard, C; Klastorin, T; Lessler, D; Ross, A; Soderstrom, N; Sullivan, S; Alexander, J; Travis, K

1996-01-01

394

Quality of integrated care for patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer: variations and determinants of care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In the current study, the authors focused on determinants influencing the quality of care and variations in the actual quality of integrated care for patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to estimate whether there is room for improvement. METHODS: The authors tested the quality of integrated care for 276 NSCLC patients with 14 quality indicators of professional (4

Mariëlle M. M. T. J. Ouwens; Rosella R. P. M. G. Hermens; René A. R. Termeer; Saskia Y. Vonk-Okhuijsen; Vivianne C. G. Tjan-Heijnen; Ad F. T. M. Verhagen; Marlies M. E. J. L. Hulscher; Henri A. M. Marres; Hub C. H. Wollersheim; Richard P. T. M. Grol

2007-01-01

395

Quality of care indicators for gout management  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Despite the significant health impact of gout, there is no consensus on management standards. To guide physician practice, we sought to develop quality of care indicators for gout management.\\u000aMETHODS: A systematic literature review of gout therapy was performed using the Medline database. Two abstractors independently reviewed each of the articles for relevance and satisfaction of minimal inclusion criteria.

Ted R. Mikuls; Catherine H. MacLean; Jason Olivieri; Fausto G. Patino; Jeroan J. Allison; John T. Farrar; Warren B. Bilker; Kenneth G. Saag

2004-01-01

396

Care resource utilization and direct costs incurred by people with diabetes in a Spanish hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of our study was to determine the hospital care resource utilization and direct medical costs incurred for in-patients with diabetes compared with non-diabetic in-patients. The data were obtained from the records division of the Puerta del Mar University Hospital, an 800-bed tertiary care hospital in Cádiz in the south of Spain. We assessed the rate of hospital admissions,

Florentino Carral; Gabriel Olveira; José Salas; Lourdes Garc??a; Álvaro Sillero; Manuel Aguilar

2002-01-01

397

Nosocomial Infections at Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit in Nairobi, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify the common bacteria isolated from patients, antibiotics used, sensitivity patterns, therapeutic procedures and cleaning protocols practised in Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit (ICU). Kenyatta National Hospital is a 1,800-bed referral and tertiary-care hospital which is also the Teaching University Hospital. The ICU has 20 beds. Two members of staff, a consultant and

Z. W. W. Ngumi

2006-01-01

398

Psychosocial stress at work and perceived quality of care among clinicians in surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the association between job stress and job performance among surgeons, although physicians' well-being could be regarded as an important quality indicator. This paper examines associations between psychosocial job stress and perceived health care quality among German clinicians in surgery. Methods Survey data of 1,311 surgeons from 489 hospitals were analysed. Psychosocial stress at work was measured by the effort-reward imbalance model (ERI) and the demand-control model (job strain). The quality of health care was evaluated by physicians' self-assessed performance, service quality and error frequency. Data were collected in a nationwide standardised mail survey. 53% of the contacted hospitals sent back the questionnaire; the response rate of the clinicians in the participating hospitals was about 65%. To estimate the association between job stress and quality of care multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results Clinicians exposed to job stress have an increased risk of reporting suboptimal quality of care. Magnitude of the association varies depending on the respective job stress model and the indicator of health care quality used. Odds ratios, adjusted for gender, occupational position and job experience vary between 1.04 (CI 0.70-1.57) and 3.21 (CI 2.23-4.61). Conclusion Findings indicate that theoretical models of psychosocial stress at work can enrich the analysis of effects of working conditions on health care quality. Moreover, results suggest interventions for job related health promotion measures to improve the clinicians' working conditions, their quality of care and their patients' health. PMID:21599882

2011-01-01

399

Nurses' Emotional Intelligence Impact on the Quality of Hospital Services  

PubMed Central

Background Emotional intelligence is the potential to feel, use, communicate, recognize, remember, describe, identify, learn from, manage, understand and explain emotions. Service quality also can be defined as the post-consumption assessment of the services by consumers that are determined by many variables. Objectives This study was aimed to determine the nurses’ emotional intelligence impact on the delivered services quality. Materials and Methods This descriptive - applied study was carried out through a cross-sectional method in 2010. The research had 2 populations comprising of patients admitted to three academic hospitals of Yazd and the hospital nurses. Sample size was calculated by sample size formula for unlimited (patients) and limited (nursing staff) populations and obtained with stratified- random method. The data was collected by 4 valid questionnaires. Results The results of study indicated that nurses' emotional intelligence has a direct effect on the hospital services quality. The study also revealed that nurse's job satisfaction and communication skills have an intermediate role in the emotional intelligence and service quality relation. Conclusions This paper reports a new determinant of hospital services quality. PMID:23482866

Ranjbar Ezzatabadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Hadizadeh, Farzaneh; Arab, Masoomeh; Nasiri, Soheyla; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi Tehrani, Gholamreza

2012-01-01

400

Religious Hospitals and Primary Care Physicians: Conflicts over Policies for Patient Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND  Religiously affiliated hospitals provide nearly 20% of US beds, and many prohibit certain end-of-life and reproductive health\\u000a treatments. Little is known about physician experiences in religious institutions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE  Assess primary care physicians’ experiences and beliefs regarding conflict with religious hospital policies for patient care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN  Cross-sectional survey.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PARTICIPANTS  General internists, family physicians, and general practitioners from the AMA Masterfile.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MAIN MEASURES  In a questionnaire

Debra B. Stulberg; Ryan E. Lawrence; Jason Shattuck; Farr A. Curlin

2010-01-01