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Sample records for quantify oligopeptide acetylation

  1. Application of reverse-phase HPLC to quantify oligopeptide acetylation eliminates interference from unspecific acetyl CoA hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Evjenth, Rune; Hole, Kristine; Ziegler, Mathias; Lillehaug, Johan R

    2009-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a common modification that plays a central role in several cellular processes. The most widely used methods to study these modifications are either based on the detection of radioactively acetylated oligopetide products or an enzyme-coupled reaction measuring conversion of the acetyl donor acetyl CoA to the product CoASH. Due to several disadvantages of these methods, we designed a new method to study oligopeptide acetylation. Based on reverse phase HPLC we detect both reaction products in a highly robust and reproducible way. The method reported here is also fully compatible with subsequent product analysis, e.g. by mass spectroscopy. The catalytic subunit, hNaa30p, of the human NatC protein N-acetyltransferase complex was used for N-terminal oligopeptide acetylation. We show that unacetylated and acetylated oligopeptides can be efficiently separated and quantified by the HPLC-based analysis. The method is highly reproducible and enables reliable quantification of both substrates and products. It is therefore well-suited to determine kinetic parameters of acetyltransferases. PMID:19660098

  2. Oligopeptide-heavy metal interaction monitoring by hybrid gold nanoparticle based assay.

    PubMed

    Politi, Jane; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Iodice, Mario; de Stefano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Phytochelatins are small peptides that can be found in several organisms, which use these oligopeptides to handle heavy metal elements. Here, we report a method for monitoring interactions between lead(ii) ions in aqueous solutions and phytochelatin 6 oligopeptide bioconjugated onto pegylated gold nanorods (PEG-AuNrs). This study is the first step towards a high sensitive label free optical biosensor to quantify heavy metal pollution in water. PMID:25360445

  3. Dynamics of an antibiotic oligopeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middendorf, H. D.; Alves, N.; Zanotti, J.-M.; Gomes, P.; Bastos, M.

    2006-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight spectra were measured for an H 2O-hydrated and a nominally dry sample of a 15-residue antibacterial oligopeptide from 99 to 271 K. Proton mobilities, quasielastic broadenings, and changes in low-frequency inelastic intensities characterise the evolution of the peptide energy landscape as a function of momentum transfer and temperature.

  4. Electronic structure analysis of glycine oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Mengshi; Xu, Can; Wang, Yu; Chen, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Using the density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the energy gap, charge distribution, density of states and chemical activity of glycine (Gn) oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan (GWn) oligopeptides. The results show that: (1) with the increasing of Gn residues, the chemical activity of Gn oligopeptides focuses on the terminal amino and carboxyl groups, which may be the main cause of self-assembly behaviors in Gn oligopeptide chains; (2) the chemical reaction activity has size effect. The size effect disappears when the residue number exceeds 7. The Gn oligopeptides with 7 residues is the shortest chain which has the same reaction activity as that of longer size peptide; (3) the activity of GWn oligopeptides presents size effect and odd-even effect. However, the size effect and odd-even effect both vanish when the chain of GWn oligopeptides is longer than 12 residues. (4) It is difficult in self-assembly for GWn oligopeptide chains, because its activity mainly focuses on the indole ring and the Gn residues at the end of oligopeptides. (5) The big side groups result in the very near energy level of LUMO and LUMO+1 of GWn oligopeptide chains. It shows that the electron-accepting ability of oligopeptide chainsis composed of two orbitals addition. The results in the paper may help us understand the changes of physical and chemical properties of peptide synthesis process.

  5. Quantifying solubility enhancement due to particle size reduction and crystal habit modification: case study of acetyl salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Robert B; Pencheva, Klimentina; Roberts, Kevin J; Auffret, Tony

    2007-08-01

    The poor solubility of potential drug molecules is a significant problem in the design of pharmaceutical formulations. It is well known, however, that the solubility of crystalline materials is enhanced when the particle size is reduced to submicron levels and this factor can be expected to enhance drug product bioavailability. Direct estimation of solubility enhancement, as calculated via the Gibbs-Thompson relationship, demands reasonably accurate values for the particle/solution interfacial tension and, in particular, its anisotropy with respect to the crystal product's habit and morphology. In this article, an improved, more molecule-centered, approach is presented towards the calculation of solubility enhancement factors in which molecular modeling techniques are applied, and the effects associated with both crystal habit modification and solvent choice are examined. A case study for facetted, acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) crystals in equilibrium with saturated aqueous ethanol solution reveals that their solubility will be enhanced in the range (7-58%) for a crystal size of 0.02 microm, with significantly higher enhancement for crystal morphologies in which the hydrophobic crystal faces are more predominant than the hydrophilic faces and for solvents in which the solubility is smaller. PMID:17323349

  6. A toolbox of oligopeptide-modified polymers for tailored elastomers.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Liang, Su; Schweizer, Thomas; Balog, Sandor; Mionić, Marijana; Snellings, Ruben; Cugnoni, Joël; Michaud, Véronique; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are constructed from limited sets of building blocks but exhibit extraordinary and versatile properties, because hierarchical structure formation lets them employ identical supramolecular motifs for different purposes. Here we exert a similar degree of structural control in synthetic supramolecular elastomers and thus tailor them for a broad range of thermomechanical properties. We show that oligopeptide-terminated polymers selectively self-assemble into small aggregates or nanofibrils, depending on the length of the oligopeptides. This process is self-sorting if differently long oligopeptides are combined so that different nanostructures coexist in bulk mixtures. Blends of polymers with oligopeptides matching in length furnish reinforced elastomers that exhibit shear moduli one order of magnitude higher than the parent polymers. By contrast, novel interpenetrating supramolecular networks that display excellent vibration damping properties are obtained from blends comprising non-matching oligopeptides or unmodified polymers. Hence, blends of oligopeptide-modified polymers constitute a toolbox for tailored elastomers with versatile properties. PMID:25198134

  7. In Silico Approach towards Designing Virtual Oligopeptides for HRSV

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ruchi; Piramanayagam, Shanmughavel

    2014-01-01

    HRSV (human respiratory syncytial virus) is a serious cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Designing inhibitors from the proteins involved in virus replication and infection process provides target for new therapeutic treatments. In the present study, in silico docking was performed using motavizumab as a template to design motavizumab derived oligopeptides for developing novel anti-HRSV agents. Additional simulations were conducted to study the conformational propensities of the oligopeptides and confirmed the hypothesis that the designed oligopeptide is highly flexible and capable of assuming stable confirmation. Our study demonstrated the best specific interaction of GEKKLVEAPKS oligopeptide for glycoprotein strain A among various screened oligopeptides. Encouraged by the results, we expect that the proposed scheme will provide rational choices for antibody reengineering which is useful for systematically identifying the possible ways to improve efficacy of existing antibody drugs. PMID:25525622

  8. Effect of grafted oligopeptides on friction.

    PubMed

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Ducker, William A

    2013-05-14

    Frictional and normal forces in aqueous solution at 25 °C were measured between a glass particle and oligopeptide films grafted from a glass plate. Homopeptide molecules consisting of 11 monomers of either glutamine, leucine, glutamic acid, lysine, or phenylalanine and one heteropolymer were each "grafted from" an oxidized silicon wafer using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The peptide films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Frictional force measurements showed that the oligopeptides increased the magnitude of friction compared to that on a bare hydrophilic silicon wafer but that the friction was a strong function of the nature of the monomer unit. Overall we find that the friction is lower for more hydrophilic films. For example, the most hydrophobic monomer, leucine, exhibited the highest friction whereas the hydrophilic monomer, polyglutamic acid, exhibited the lowest friction at zero load. When the two surfaces had opposite charges, there was a strong attraction, adhesion, and high friction between the surfaces. Friction for all polymers was lower in phosphate-buffered saline than in pure water, which was attributed to lubrication via hydrated salt ions. PMID:23594080

  9. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  10. Formation of oligopeptides in high yield under simple programmable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marc; Surman, Andrew J.; Cooper, Geoffrey J.T.; Suárez-Marina, Irene; Hosni, Zied; Lee, Michael P.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Many high-yielding reactions for forming peptide bonds have been developed but these are complex, requiring activated amino-acid precursors and heterogeneous supports. Herein we demonstrate the programmable one-pot dehydration–hydration condensation of amino acids forming oligopeptide chains in around 50% yield. A digital recursive reactor system was developed to investigate this process, performing these reactions with control over parameters such as temperature, number of cycles, cycle duration, initial monomer concentration and initial pH. Glycine oligopeptides up to 20 amino acids long were formed with very high monomer-to-oligomer conversion, and the majority of these products comprised three amino acid residues or more. Having established the formation of glycine homo-oligopeptides, we then demonstrated the co-condensation of glycine with eight other amino acids (Ala, Asp, Glu, His, Lys, Pro, Thr and Val), incorporating a range of side-chain functionality. PMID:26442968

  11. Characterization of the PT clade of oligopeptide transporters in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligopeptide transporters (OPTs) are a group of membrane-localized proteins with a broad range of substrate transport capabilities, and which are thought to contribute to many biological processes. Nine OPTs belonging to the peptide transport (PT) clade were identified in the rice (Oryza sativa L.) ...

  12. Oligopeptides as Biomarkers of Cyanobacterial Subpopulations. Toward an Understanding of Their Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria. PMID:24960202

  13. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  14. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides. PMID:25800013

  15. Hypotensive and vasorelaxant effects of sericin-derived oligopeptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Onsa-Ard, Amnart; Shimbhu, Dawan; Tocharus, Jiraporn; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote; Pantan, Rungusa; Tocharus, Chainarong

    2013-01-01

    Sericin-derived oligopeptides obtained from silk cocoons were investigated for the in vivo hypotensive effect and investigated for the underlying mechanism involved in vasodilation in isolated rat thoracic aorta. In normotensive anesthetized rats, oligopeptides induced an immediate and transient hypotensive activity. In rat aortic rings, oligopeptides induced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in vessels precontracted with both KCl and phenylephrine (PE) with endothelium-intact or endothelium-denuded rings. In endothelium-intact rings, pretreatment with N ω -Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 100 µM), an inhibitor of the NO synthase (NOS) or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 1 µM), a selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, significantly reduced the relaxant effect of oligopeptides. However, indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, had no effect on oligopeptides-induced relaxation. In addition, pretreatment with tetraethylammonium (TEA, 5 mM) reduced the maximal relaxant effect induced by oligopeptides. By contrast, relaxation was not affected by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 1 mM), glibenclamide (10 µM), or barium chloride (BaCl2, 1 mM). In depolarization Ca(2+)-free solution, oligopeptides inhibited calcium chloride- (CaCl2-) induced contraction in endothelium-denuded rings in a concentration-dependent manner. Nevertheless, oligopeptides attenuated transient contractions in Ca(2+)-free medium containing EGTA (1 mM) induced by 1 µM PE, but they were not affected by 20 mM caffeine. It is obvious that potent vasodilation effect of oligopeptides is mediated through both the endothelium and the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:24312733

  16. Evaluating the effects of charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Yi; Yin, Wei-Na; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Tao, Li; Qin, Si-Yong; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, due to their multilineage differentiation potential, have emerged as a promising cell candidate for cell-based therapy. In recent years, biomaterials were artificially synthesized to control the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, a series of charged or neutral oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD were synthesized and used for surface modification using quartz substrates as model. Cell behaviors on the modified surfaces with different charged oligopeptide motifs were studied. It was found that these different charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD were biocompatible for cell proliferation and adhesion. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the positively charged oligopeptide motif could inhibit osteogenic differentiation, while the negatively charged and neutral oligopeptide motifs could enhance osteogenic differentiation in the presence of RGD. This work may bring us enlightenment that different charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD may be used for biomaterial surface modification for different stem cell-based therapies. PMID:25748883

  17. The Fasted/Fed Mouse Metabolic Acetylome: N6-Acetylation Differences Suggest Acetylation Coordinates Organ-Specific Fuel Switching

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Hartil, Kirsten; Robinson, Alan J.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The elucidation of extra-nuclear lysine acetylation has been of growing interest, as the co-substrate for acetylation, acetyl CoA, is at a key metabolic intersection. Our hypothesis was that mitochondrial and cytoplasmic protein acetylation may be part of a fasted/re-fed feedback control system for the regulation of the metabolic network in fuel switching, where acetyl CoA would be provided by fatty acid oxidation, or glycolysis, respectively. To test this we characterized the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylome in various organs that have a high metabolic rate relative to their mass, and/or switch fuels, under fasted and re-fed conditions (brain, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, white and brown adipose tissues). Using immunoprecipitation, coupled with LC-MSMS label free quantification, we show there is a dramatic variation in global quantitative profiles of acetylated proteins from different organs. In total, 733 acetylated peptides from 337 proteins were identified and quantified, out of which 31 acetylated peptides from the metabolic proteins that may play organ-specific roles were analyzed in detail. Results suggest that fasted/re-fed acetylation changes coordinated by organ-specific (de-)acetylases in insulin-sensitive versus insensitive organs may underlie fuel use and switching. Characterization of the tissue-specific acetylome should increase understanding of metabolic conditions wherein normal fuel switching is disrupted, such as in Type II diabetes. PMID:21728379

  18. Molecular interactions between dipeptides, drugs and the human intestinal H+ -oligopeptide cotransporter hPEPT1.

    PubMed

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Loo, Donald D F; Hirayama, Bruce A; Turk, Eric; Wright, Ernest M

    2006-07-01

    The human intestinal proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter hPEPT1 has been implicated in the absorption of pharmacologically active compounds. We have investigated the interactions between a comprehensive selection of drugs, and wild-type and variant hPEPT1s expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using radiotracer uptake and electrophysiological methods. The beta-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin and cefadroxil, the antineoplastics delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta-ALA) and bestatin, and the neuropeptide N-acetyl-Asp-Glu (NAAG), were transported, as judged by their ability to evoke inward currents. When the drugs were added in the presence of the typical substrate glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), the inward currents were equal or less than that induced by Gly-Sar alone. This suggests that the drugs are transported at a lower turnover rate than Gly-Sar, but may also point towards complex interactions between dipeptides, drugs and the transporter. Gly-Sar and the drugs also modified the kinetics of hPEPT1 presteady-state charge movement, by causing a reduction in maximum charge (Qmax) and a shift of the midpoint voltage (V0.5) to more negative potentials. Our results indicate that the substrate selectivity of hPEPT1 is: Gly-Sar > NAAG, delta-ALA, bestatin > cefadroxil, cephalexin > ampicillin, amoxicillin. Based on steady-state and presteady-state analysis of Gly-Sar and cefadroxil transport, we proposed an extension of the 6-state kinetic model for hPEPT1 function that globally accounts for the observed presteady-state and steady-state kinetics of neutral dipeptide and drug transport. Our model suggests that, under saturating conditions, the rate-limiting step of the hPEPT1 transport cycle is the reorientation of the empty carrier within the membrane. Variations in rates of drug cotransport are predicted to be due to differences in affinity and turnover rate. Oral availability of drugs may be reduced in the presence of physiological concentrations of dietary

  19. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) in Xanthomonas species.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Tavares, Milene B; Suzuki, Celso F; Pimenta, Daniel C; Angeli, Claudia B; de Oliveira, Julio C F; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferreira, Luis C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2010-04-01

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA) of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp), in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia). Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis. PMID:21637492

  20. Putative antiparasite defensive system involving ribosomal and nonribosomal oligopeptides in cyanobacteria of the genus Planktothrix.

    PubMed

    Rohrlack, Thomas; Christiansen, Guntram; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Parasitic chytrid fungi can inflict significant mortality on cyanobacteria but frequently fail to keep cyanobacterial dominance and bloom formation in check. Our study tested whether oligopeptide production, a common feature in many cyanobacteria, can be a defensive mechanism against chytrid parasitism. The study employed the cyanobacterial strain Planktothrix NIVA-CYA126/8 and its mutants with knockout mutations for microcystins, anabaenopeptins, and microviridins, major oligopeptide classes to be found in NIVA-CYA126/8. Four chytrid strains were used as parasite models. They are obligate parasites of Planktothrix and are unable to exploit alternative food sources. All chytrid strains were less virulent to the NIVA-CYA126/8 wild type than to at least one of its oligopeptide knockout mutants. One chytrid strain even failed to infect the wild type, while exhibiting considerable virulence to all mutants. It is therefore evident that producing microcystins, microviridins, and/or anabaenopeptins can reduce the virulence of chytrids to Planktothrix, thereby increasing the host's chance of survival. Microcystins and anabaenopeptins are nonribosomal oligopeptides, while microviridins are produced ribosomally, suggesting that Planktothrix resists chytrids by relying on metabolites that are produced via distinct biosynthetic pathways. Chytrids, on the other hand, can adapt to the oligopeptides produced by Planktothrix in different ways. This setting most likely results in an evolutionary arms race, which would probably lead to Planktothrix and chytrid population structures that closely resemble those actually found in nature. In summary, the findings of the present study suggest oligopeptide production in Planktothrix to be part of a defensive mechanism against chytrid parasitism. PMID:23396340

  1. Electronic transport through oligopeptide chains: An artificial prototype of a molecular diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. I. N.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Sarmento, R. G.

    2014-09-01

    Using an effective tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, we investigate the electronic transport through an oligopeptide chain composed by two amino acid pairs alanine-lysine (Ala-Lys) and threonine-alanine (Thr-Ala), respectively, sandwiched between two platinum electrodes. Our results show that factors such as the oligopeptide chain length and the possible combinations between the amino acids residues are crucial to the diode-like profile of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, whose asymmetric curves were analyzed using the inverted rectification ratio (IRR).

  2. Proline rich-oligopeptides: diverse mechanisms for antihypertensive action.

    PubMed

    Morais, Katia L P; Ianzer, Danielle; Miranda, José Rodolfo R; Melo, Robson L; Guerreiro, Juliano R; Santos, Robson A S; Ulrich, Henning; Lameu, Claudiana

    2013-10-01

    Bradykinin-potentiating peptides from Bothrops jararaca (Bj) discovered in the early 1960s, were the first natural inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). These peptides belong to a large family of snake venom proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs). One of these peptides, Bj-PRO-9a, was essential for defining ACE as effective drug target and development of captopril, an active site-directed inhibitor of ACE used worldwide for the treatment of human arterial hypertension. Recent experimental evidences demonstrated that cardiovascular effects exerted by different Bj-PROs are due to distinct mechanisms besides of ACE inhibition. In the present work, we have investigated the cardiovascular actions of four Bj-PROs, namely Bj-PRO-9a, -11e, -12b and -13a. Bj-PRO-9a acts upon ACE and BK activities to promote blood pressure reduction. Although the others Bj-PROs are also able to inhibit the ACE activity and to potentiate the BK effects, our results indicate that antihypertensive effect evoked by them involve new mechanisms. Bj-PRO-11e and Bj-PRO-12b involves induction of [Ca(2+)]i transients by so far unknown receptor proteins. Moreover, we have suggested argininosuccinate synthetase and M3 muscarinic receptor as targets for cardiovascular effects elicited by Bj-PRO-13a. In summary, the herein reported results provide evidence that Bj-PRO-mediated effects are not restricted to ACE inhibition or potentiation of BK-induced effects and suggest different actions for each peptide for promoting arterial pressure reduction. The present study reveals the complexity of the effects exerted by Bj-PROs for cardiovascular control, opening avenues for the better understanding of blood pressure regulation and for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:23933300

  3. Effects of oligopeptide permease in group a streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chia-Yu; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Ming T; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2005-05-01

    The oligopeptide permease (Opp) of group A streptococci (GAS) is a membrane-associated protein and belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. It is encoded by a polycistronic operon containing oppA, oppB, oppC, oppD, and oppF. The biological function of these genes in GAS is poorly understood. In order to understand more about the effects of Opp on GAS virulence factors, an oppA isogenic mutant was constructed by using an integrative plasmid to disrupt the opp operon and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. No transcript was detected in the oppA isogenic mutant by Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR. The growth curve for the oppA isogenic mutant was similar to that for wild-type strain A-20. The oppA isogenic mutant not only decreased the transcription of speB, speX, and rofA but also increased the transcription of speF, sagA (streptolysin S-associated gene A), slo (streptolysin O), pel (pleotrophic effect locus), and dppA (dipeptide permease). No effects on the transcription of emm, sda, speJ, speG, rgg, and csrR were found. The phenotypes of the oppA mutant were restored by the oppA revertant and by the complementation strain. The oppA mutant caused less mortality and tissue damage than the wild-type strain when inoculated into BALB/c mice via an air pouch. Based on these data, we suggest that the opp operon plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GAS infection. PMID:15845494

  4. Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis and Combinatorial Chemistry: A Laboratory Preparation of Oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truran, George A.; Aiken, Karelle S.; Fleming, Thomas R.; Webb, Peter J.; Hodge Markgraf, J.

    2002-01-01

    The principles and practice of solid-phase organic synthesis and combinatorial chemistry are utilized in a laboratory preparation of oligopeptides. A parallel synthesis scheme is used to generate a series of tripeptides. A divergent synthesis scheme is used to prepare two pentapeptides, one of which is leucine enkephalin, a neurotransmitter known to be an analgesic agent.

  5. Influence of fermentation level and geographical origin on cocoa bean oligopeptide pattern.

    PubMed

    Caligiani, Augusta; Marseglia, Angela; Prandi, Barbara; Palla, Gerardo; Sforza, Stefano

    2016-11-15

    Peptides and amino acids generated during cocoa bean fermentation are the most important precursors for the development of cocoa aroma, however cocoa oligopeptide fraction is under-investigated. In this study, we perform a deep investigation of the presence of oligopeptides in unfermented, under fermented, and well-fermented cocoa beans from all of the main producing countries, with the aim to obtain a better definition of cocoa quality and a deeper comprehension of biochemical changes occurring during fermentation. Oligopeptides were determined by UPLC/ESI-MS and 35 low-molecular weight peptides were identified and subjected to semi-quantitative analysis. Results showed that fermented cocoas can be differentiated from unfermented cocoas by their possession of a higher total amount of oligopeptides and a lower ratio of vicilin to 21kDa cocoa seed albumin peptides. A variability in the peptide pattern was observed also among well-fermented cocoa samples of different geographical origin, suggesting diversified proteolytic activities. PMID:27283652

  6. Protein Acetylation and Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. PMID:25326522

  7. Acetyl radical generation in cigarette smoke: Quantification and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Na; Green, Sarah A.

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals are present in cigarette smoke and can have a negative effect on human health. However, little is known about their formation mechanisms. Acetyl radicals were quantified in tobacco smoke and mechanisms for their generation were investigated by computer simulations. Acetyl radicals were trapped from the gas phase using 3-amino-2, 2, 5, 5-tetramethyl-proxyl (3AP) on solid support to form stable 3AP adducts for later analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Simulations were performed using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). A range of 10-150 nmol/cigarette of acetyl radical was measured from gas phase tobacco smoke of both commercial and research cigarettes under several different smoking conditions. More radicals were detected from the puff smoking method compared to continuous flow sampling. Approximately twice as many acetyl radicals were trapped when a glass fiber particle filter (GF/F specifications) was placed before the trapping zone. Simulations showed that NO/NO2 reacts with isoprene, initiating chain reactions to produce hydroxyl radical, which abstracts hydrogen from acetaldehyde to generate acetyl radical. These mechanisms can account for the full amount of acetyl radical detected experimentally from cigarette smoke. Similar mechanisms may generate radicals in second hand smoke.

  8. Acetyl Radical Generation in Cigarette Smoke: Quantification and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Na; Green, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals are present in cigarette smoke and can have a negative effect on human health. However, little is known about their formation mechanisms. Acetyl radicals were quantified in tobacco smoke and mechanisms for their generation were investigated by computer simulations. Acetyl radicals were trapped from the gas phase using 3-amino-2, 2, 5, 5-tetramethyl-proxyl (3AP) on solid support to form stable 3AP adducts for later analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Simulations were performed using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). A range of 10–150 nmol/cigarette of acetyl radical was measured from gas phase tobacco smoke of both commerial and research cigarettes under several different smoking conditions. More radicals were detected from the puff smoking method compared to continuous flow sampling. Approximately twice as many acetyl radicals were trapped when a glass filber particle filter (GF/F specifications) was placed before the trapping zone. Simulations showed that NO/NO2 reacts with isoprene, initiating chain reactions to produce hydroxyl radical, which abstracts hydrogen from acealdehyde to generate acetyl radical. These mechanisms can account for the full amount of acetyl radical detected experimentally from cigarette smoke. Similar mechanisms may generate radicals in second hand smoke. PMID:25253993

  9. The world of protein acetylation.

    PubMed

    Drazic, Adrian; Myklebust, Line M; Ree, Rasmus; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Acetylation is one of the major post-translational protein modifications in the cell, with manifold effects on the protein level as well as on the metabolome level. The acetyl group, donated by the metabolite acetyl-coenzyme A, can be co- or post-translationally attached to either the α-amino group of the N-terminus of proteins or to the ε-amino group of lysine residues. These reactions are catalyzed by various N-terminal and lysine acetyltransferases. In case of lysine acetylation, the reaction is enzymatically reversible via tightly regulated and metabolism-dependent mechanisms. The interplay between acetylation and deacetylation is crucial for many important cellular processes. In recent years, our understanding of protein acetylation has increased significantly by global proteomics analyses and in depth functional studies. This review gives a general overview of protein acetylation and the respective acetyltransferases, and focuses on the regulation of metabolic processes and physiological consequences that come along with protein acetylation. PMID:27296530

  10. Non-Statistical Oligopeptide Fragmentation by IR Photons with λ=16-18 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Komarov, Viacheslav V.; Popova, Anna M.; Schmidt, Lothar

    2015-12-01

    In this article we analyse the vibration excitation and following dissociation of protonated oligopeptide molecules induced by IR photons with λ=16-18 μm. The analysis is based on our previous works in which we considered a specific non-statistical dissociation process in organic molecules containing substructures consisting of chained identical diatomic dipoles such as (CH2)n. Such dipole chains can serve as IR antennas for external radiation in the IR frequency range. The acquired vibration energy accumulated in IR antennas can be large enough to dissociate molecules within a femtosecond time interval by a non-statistical process, which is driven by a radiationless low-energy transport mechanism inside the peptide molecules. We point out in this article that the suggested IR-induced dissociation mechanism can be applied to obtain sequence information of protonated oligopeptides.

  11. Inclusion of Cu nano-cluster 1D arrays inside a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide via co-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ruiying; Li, Fei; Yang, Chunpeng; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside.A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside. Electronic

  12. Synthetic oligopeptide substrates: their diagnostic application in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and other pathologic states

    SciTech Connect

    Huseby, R.M.; Smith, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    This review article with 522 references, focuses on the use of synthetic oligopepide substrates to measure the activity of proteoytic enzymes in human physiology and pathology. A classification of proteinases based on their mechanism of action is presented. The application of these synthetic oligopeptide substrates to understand the disorders of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic system is reviewed. Intracellular functioning proteinases were also assessed in relation to certain pathologies where their abnormal activity is recognized.

  13. The Ubiquitin Ligase Ubr11 Is Essential for Oligopeptide Utilization in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Mai; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-01-01

    Uptake of extracellular oligopeptides in yeast is mediated mainly by specific transporters of the peptide transporter (PTR) and oligopeptide transporter (OPT) families. Here, we investigated the role of potential peptide transporters in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Utilization of naturally occurring dipeptides required only Ptr2/SPBC13A2.04c and none of the other 3 OPT proteins (Isp4, Pgt1, and Opt3), whereas only Isp4 was indispensable for tetrapeptide utilization. Both Ptr2 and Isp4 localized to the cell surface, but under rich nutrient conditions Isp4 localized in the Golgi apparatus through the function of the ubiquitin ligase Pub1. Furthermore, the ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 played a significant role in oligopeptide utilization. The mRNA levels of both the ptr2 and isp4 genes were significantly reduced in ubr11Δ cells, and the dipeptide utilization defect in the ubr11Δ mutant was rescued by the forced expression of Ptr2. Consistent with its role in transcriptional regulation of peptide transporter genes, the Ubr11 protein was accumulated in the nucleus. Unlike the situation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oligopeptide utilization defect in the S. pombe ubr11Δ mutant was not rescued by inactivation of the Tup11/12 transcriptional corepressors, suggesting that the requirement for the Ubr ubiquitin ligase in the upregulation of peptide transporter mRNA levels is conserved in both yeasts; however, the actual mechanism underlying the control appears to be different. We also found that the peptidomimetic proteasome inhibitor MG132 was still operative in a strain lacking all known PTR and OPT peptide transporters. Therefore, irrespective of its peptide-like structure, MG132 is carried into cells independently of the representative peptide transporters. PMID:22226946

  14. Mineral-enhanced hydrothermal oligopeptide formation at the second time scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments. PMID:21671764

  15. Characterization and Evaluation of the Moraxella catarrhalis Oligopeptide Permease A as a Mucosal Vaccine Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Johnson, Antoinette; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common cause of otitis media in children and of lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; therefore, these two groups would benefit from a vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections. A genome mining approach for vaccine antigens identified oligopeptide permease protein A (OppA), an oligopeptide binding protein of an apparent oligopeptide transport system. Analysis of the oppA gene by PCR and sequence analysis revealed that OppA is highly conserved among clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis. Recombinant OppA was expressed as a lipoprotein and purified, and an oppA knockout mutant was constructed. Antiserum raised to recombinant purified OppA recognized epitopes on the bacterial surface of the wild type but not the OppA knockout mutant. Antibodies raised to purified recombinant OppA recognized native OppA in multiple strains. Intranasal immunization of mice induced systemic and mucosal antibodies to OppA and resulted in enhanced clearance of M. catarrhalis in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. OppA is a highly conserved, immunogenic protein that expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface and that induces potentially protective immune responses in a mouse model. OppA should be evaluated further as a vaccine antigen for M. catarrhalis. PMID:21134967

  16. Mineral-Enhanced Hydrothermal Oligopeptide Formation at the Second Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)4 to (Ala)5 and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)4 to (Ala)5 and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments.

  17. Controlled trial of oligopeptide versus amino acid diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, J C; Giaffer, M H; Holdsworth, C D

    1995-01-01

    Elemental diets are effective in inducing remission in active Crohn's disease, but how they exert this therapeutic effect is unclear. In a previous study a whole protein containing diet proved less effective than one in which food antigens were excluded, suggesting that exclusion of food antigens from the gut was a possible mechanism. This study was designed to test whether an oligopeptide diet of hydrolysed proteins was as effective as an amino acid based diet. These diets were equally antigen free but with different nitrogen sources. Forty four patients with active Crohn's disease were randomised in a controlled trial of amino acid versus oligopeptide diet. The feeds were given by nasogastric tube in equicaloric quantities and were the sole form of nutrition. Treatment was continued for four weeks although failure to improve by day 10 resulted in withdrawal. Quantitative leucocyte scintigraphy was used to investigate the effect of diet treatment on gut inflammation. Clinical and nutritional responses to treatment were also measured. Sixteen patients entered remission (including withdrawal of corticosteroids), six patients could not tolerate the nasogastric tube, and 22 patients failed to respond. The two diets were equally effective. Patients who responded had a rapid drop in clinical index of disease activity and a major reduction in the bowel uptake of leucocytes on scintigraphy. The oligopeptide and amino acid based enteral feeds were equally effective at inducing remission in active Crohn's disease. With both diets clinical improvement was accompanied by a reduction in intestinal inflammation. Images Figure 3 PMID:7890238

  18. H(+)/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H(+) gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. PMID:27216463

  19. Acetyl transfer in arylamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. N-Hydroxyacetamidoaryl compounds (hydroxamic acids) are metabolites of arylamides, and an enzyme that transfers the acetyl group from these derivatives to arylamines has been found in rat tissues. The reaction products were identified by thin-layer chromatography and a spectrophotometric method, with 4-amino-azobenzene as acetyl acceptor, was used to measure enzyme activity. 2. The acetyltransferase was in the soluble fraction of rat liver, required a thiol for maximum activity and had a pH optimum between 6·0 and 7·5. 3. The soluble fractions of various rat tissues showed decreasing activity in the following order: liver, adrenal, kidney, lung, spleen, testis, heart; brain was inactive. 4. With the exception of aniline and aniline derivatives all the arylamines tested were effective as acetyl acceptors but aromatic compounds with side-chain amino groups were inactive. 5. The N-hydroxyacetamido derivatives of 2-naphthylamine, 4-amino-biphenyl and 2-aminofluorene were active acetyl donors but N-hydroxyacetanilide showed only slight activity. Acetyl-CoA was not a donor. 6. Some properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other acetyltransferases. PMID:5969287

  20. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  1. Quantifying resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Several frameworks to operationalize resilience have been proposed. A decade ago, a special feature focused on quantifying resilience was published in the journal Ecosystems (Carpenter, Westley & Turner 2005). The approach there was towards identifying surrogates of resilience, but few of the papers proposed quantifiable metrics. Consequently, many ecological resilience frameworks remain vague and difficult to quantify, a problem that this special feature aims to address. However, considerable progress has been made during the last decade (e.g. Pope, Allen & Angeler 2014). Although some argue that resilience is best kept as an unquantifiable, vague concept (Quinlan et al. 2016), to be useful for managers, there must be concrete guidance regarding how and what to manage and how to measure success (Garmestani, Allen & Benson 2013; Spears et al. 2015). Ideas such as ‘resilience thinking’ have utility in helping stakeholders conceptualize their systems, but provide little guidance on how to make resilience useful for ecosystem management, other than suggesting an ambiguous, Goldilocks approach of being just right (e.g. diverse, but not too diverse; connected, but not too connected). Here, we clarify some prominent resilience terms and concepts, introduce and synthesize the papers in this special feature on quantifying resilience and identify core unanswered questions related to resilience.

  2. Only One of Four Oligopeptide Transport Systems Mediates Nitrogen Nutrition in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Hiron, Aurelia; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Juillard, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Oligopeptides internalized by oligopeptide permease (Opp) transporters play key roles in bacterial nutrition, signaling, and virulence. To date, two opp operons, opp-1 and opp-2, have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. Systematic in silico analysis of 11 different S. aureus genomes revealed the existence of two new opp operons, opp-3 and opp-4, plus an opp-5A gene encoding a putative peptide-binding protein. With the exception of opp-4, the opp operons were present in all S. aureus strains. Within a single strain, the different opp operons displayed little sequence similarity and distinct genetic organization. Transcriptional studies showed that opp-1, opp-2, opp-3, and opp-4 operons were polycistronic and that opp-5A is monocistronic. We designed a minimal chemically defined medium for S. aureus RN6390 and showed that all opp genes were expressed but at different levels. Where tested, OppA protein production paralleled transcriptional profiles. opp-3, which encodes proteins most similar to known peptide transport proteins, displayed the highest expression level and was the only transporter to be regulated by specific amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine. Defined deletion mutants in one or several peptide permeases were constructed and tested for their capacity to grow in peptide-containing medium. Among the four putative Opp systems, Opp-3 was the only system able to provide oligopeptides for growth, ranging in length from 3 to 8 amino acids. Dipeptides were imported exclusively by DtpT, a proton-driven di- and tripeptide permease. These data provide a first complete inventory of the peptide transport systems opp and dtpT of S. aureus. Among them, the newly identified Opp-3 appears to be the main Opp system supplying the cell with peptides as nutritional sources. PMID:17496096

  3. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering. PMID:26660885

  4. Focal accumulation of an apolipoprotein B-based synthetic oligopeptide in the healing rabbit arterial wall

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, I.L.; Lees, R.S.; Chang, M.Y.; Lees, A.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The functions of surface-accessible domains of apolipoprotein (apo) B, the protein moiety of low density lipoprotein (LDL), are unknown, aside from the LDL receptor-binding domain, which lies toward the carboxyl-terminal end of apoB. Since LDL accumulation in arterial lesions does not depend on recognition of LDLs by a cell-surface receptor, we synthesized an oligopeptide with the sequence of the trypsin-accessible domain of apoB that lies closest to the amino-terminal end of the protein and compared its biological activity to that of another synthetic oligopeptide with the sequence of the heparin- and apoB/apoE receptor-binding domains of apoE. (Tyrosine was added at the amino-terminal end of each peptide to facilitate radiolabeling.) The 18-amino acid apoB-based peptide included residues 1000-1016 of apoB, for which no function has been previously described. In radioautographs, the 125I-labeled peptide accumulated focally at the healing edges of regenerating endothelial islands in the balloon-catheter deendothelialized rabbit aorta. In contrast, the 21-residue apoE-based peptide, which included residues 129-148 of apoE, accumulated diffusely and uniformly throughout the deendothelialized areas of the aorta. The data show that focal binding of the apoB-based peptide can delineate arterial lesions and suggest that this arterial wall-binding domain of apoB mediates accumulation of LDLs in arterial lesions.

  5. Prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy in vitro using anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide carried by atelocollagen.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maeda, Tasuku; Haruna, Marie; Shiota, Chieko; Ochi, Arisa; Abe, Tomoki; Kohno, Shohei; Ohno, Ayako; Teshima-Kondo, Sigetada; Mori, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Eiji; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs when the rate of protein degradation exceeds that of protein synthesis in various catabolic conditions, such as fasting, disuse, aging, and chronic diseases. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling stimulates muscle growth and suppresses muscle protein breakdown. In atrophied muscles, ubiquitin ligase, Cbl-b, increases and stimulates the ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an intermediate in IGF-1 signaling pathway, resulting in IGF-1 resistance. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of atelocollagen (ATCOL)-transported anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide (Cblin: Cbl-b inhibitor) (consisting of tyrosine phosphorylation domain of IRS-1) in starved C2C12 myotubes. The amount of IRS-1 protein was lower in starved versus unstarved myotubes. The Cblin-ATCOL complex inhibited IRS-1 degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. Myotubes incubated with Cblin-ATCOL complex showed significant resistance to starvation-induced atrophy (p<0.01). Furthermore, the Cblin-ATCOL complex significantly inhibited any decrease in Akt phosphorylation (p<0.01) and localization of FOXO3a to the nucleus in starved myotubes. These results suggest that Cblin prevented starvation-induced C2C12 myotube atrophy by maintaining the IGF-1/Akt/FOXO signaling. Therefore, attachment of anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide, Cblin, to ATCOL enhances its delivery to myotubes and could be a potentially effective strategy in the treatment of atrophic myopathies. PMID:25667084

  6. Horizontally acquired oligopeptide transporters favour adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast to oenological environment.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Sanchez, Isabelle; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has emerged as a major evolutionary process that has shaped the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts. We recently showed that a large Torulaspora microellipsoides genomic island carrying two oligopeptide transporters encoded by FOT genes increases the fitness of wine yeast during fermentation of grape must. However, the impact of these genes on the metabolic network of S. cerevisiae remained uncharacterized. Here we show that Fot-mediated peptide uptake substantially affects the glutamate node and the NADPH/NADP(+) balance, resulting in the delayed uptake of free amino acids and altered profiles of metabolites and volatile compounds. Transcriptome analysis revealed that cells using a higher amount of oligopeptides from grape must are less stressed and display substantial variation in the expression of genes in the central pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid and protein biosynthesis, and the oxidative stress response. These regulations shed light on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms involved in the higher performance and fitness conferred by the HGT-acquired FOT genes, pinpointing metabolic effects that can positively affect the organoleptic balance of wines. PMID:26549518

  7. Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Young-Wook; Adhikary, Partho Protim; Lim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Commercial anti-obesity drugs acting in the gastrointestinal tract or the central nervous system have been shown to have limited efficacy and severe side effects. Anti-obesity drug development is thus focusing on targeting adipocytes that store excess fat. Here, we show that an adipocyte-targeting fusion-oligopeptide gene carrier consisting of an adipocyte-targeting sequence and 9-arginine (ATS-9R) selectively transfects mature adipocytes by binding to prohibitin. Injection of ATS-9R into obese mice confirmed specific binding of ATS-9R to fat vasculature, internalization and gene expression in adipocytes. We also constructed a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for silencing fatty-acid-binding protein 4 (shFABP4), a key lipid chaperone in fatty-acid uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. Treatment of obese mice with ATS-9R/shFABP4 led to metabolic recovery and body-weight reduction (>20%). The ATS-9R/shFABP4 oligopeptide complex could prove to be a safe therapeutic approach to regress and treat obesity as well as obesity-induced metabolic syndromes.

  8. Optimization of Enzymatic Production of Oligopeptides from Apricot Almonds Meal with Neutrase and N120P

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Qiang; Tian, Jinqiang

    2010-01-01

    Neutrase 0.8L and N120P proteases were used for oligopeptide production from apricot almonds meal, and response surface design was carried out to optimize the effect of hydrolysis conditions on hydrolysis degree (DH) and oligopeptide yield rate. Four independent variables were used to optimize the hydrolysis process: hydrolysis temperature (X1), enzyme-to substrate ratio (E/S) (X2), substrate concentration (X3) and reaction time (X4). Statistical analysis indicated that the four variables, quadratic terms of X1, X3, and X4, and the interaction terms with X1 had a significant (p < 0.05) effect on DH. The yield rate was also significantly affected by the four variables and quadratic terms of X1, X2 and X4. Two mathematical models with high determination coefficient were obtained and could be employed to optimize protein hydrolysis. The optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined as follows: hydrolysis temperature 52.5 °C; enzyme-to-substrate ratio (E/S) 7200 U/g; substrate concentration 2%; reaction time 173 min. The initial pH 6.5 and Neutrase-to-N120P dosage ratio 2:1 were fixed in this study according to the preliminary research. Under these conditions, the experimental DH and yield rate were 34.10 ± 5.25% and 72.42 ± 2.27%, respectively. PMID:21614184

  9. Directed self-assembly of π-conjugated oligopeptides for supramolecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Li, Songsong; Zhou, Yuecheng; Tovar, John; Wilson, William; Schroeder, Charles

    The directed mesoscale engineering of nanoscale building blocks holds enormous promise to catalyze a revolution in new functional materials for advanced electronics. Bio-inspired systems can play a key role in this effort due to their inherent ``programmable'' function. In this work, oligopeptide with defined flanking sequences was appended to π-conjugated units, thereby directing their assembly processes in a designed manner. By utilizing custom-designed microfluidic devices and controlled acid vapor diffusion, the self-assembly rate was directed and precisely tuned. Notably, the kinetics was found to play a key role in the morphology of self-assembled π-conjugated oligopeptides. The influence of flanking peptide sequences and π-conjugated core-core interactions on the self-assembly nanostructure was systematically investigated. Importantly, the electronic properties of the synthetic peptide assembly was explored by integration as the active layer of a field effect transistor. The presented study offers insights to the design and fabrication of supramolecular electronics.

  10. Viscoelastic properties and nanoscale structures of composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Laura L; Taraban, Marc B; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y Bruce

    2012-03-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the coassembly of mutually attractive, but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already-existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the coassembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G' decreased from 90 to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 to 100%). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics, and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data, showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formed less stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  11. Effects of phenylalanine and threonine oligopeptides on milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M M; Wu, Y M; Liu, H Y; Liu, J X

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of phenylalanine (Phe) and threonine (Thr) oligopeptides on αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Primary mammary epithelial cells were obtained from Holstein dairy cows and incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-F12 medium (DMEM/F12) containing lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids). Free Phe (117 μg/ml) was substituted partly with peptide-bound Phe (phenylalanylphenylalanine, phenylalanyl threonine, threonyl-phenylalanyl-phenylalanine) in the experimental media. After incubation with experimental medium, cells were collected for gene expression analysis and medium was collected for milk protein or amino acid determination. The results showed that peptide-bound Phe at 10% (11.7 μg/ml) significantly enhanced αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis as compared with equivalent amount of free Phe. When 10% Phe was replaced by phenylalanylphenylalanine, the disappearance of most essential amino acids increased significantly, and gene expression of peptide transporter 2 and some amino acid transporters was significantly enhanced. These results indicate that the Phe and Thr oligopeptides are important for milk protein synthesis, and peptide-bound amino acids could be utilised more efficiently in milk protein synthesis than the equivalent amount of free amino acids. PMID:25199802

  12. Intercalation of amino acids and oligopeptides into Zn Al layered double hydroxide by coprecipitation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisawa, Sumio; Sasaki, Shuji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Nakayama, Hirokazu; Narita, Eiichi

    2006-05-01

    The coprecipitation of amino acids and oligopeptides with the Zn Al LDH was investigated using phenylalanine (Phe), phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (Phe-Phe), glycyl-phenylalanine (Gly Phe), glycine (Gly), glycyl-glycine (Gly Gly), glycyl-glycyl-glycine (Gly Gly Gly) and N-(N-γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl)-glycine (GSH) as guest species. The coprecipitation behavior of amino acids and oligopeptides was found to be influenced by the solution pH and the kind of their side chain groups, and reached the maximum at pH 8 or 9. The basal spacing, d003, of the Phe, Phe-Phe and GSH/LDH was 1.81, 2.41 and 1.64 nm, supporting that guests were arranged vertical to the LDH basal layer. Acceding to the basal spacing of the Gly, Gly Gly and Gly Gly Gly/LDH (d003=0.84 0.88 nm), these guests were oriented horizontal to the LDH basal layer with the co-intercalated NO3-. Moreover, the amount of Phe-Phe, Gly Gly and Gly Gly Gly intercalated was almost the same as that of Phe and Gly despite increasing the number peptide bond and the molecular size. GSH was intercalated into the LDH interlayer space as GSH oxidized form with bridged LDH layers by their carboxylate groups.

  13. Viscoelastic Properties and Nano-scale Structures of Composite Oligopeptide-Polysaccharide Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the co-assembly of mutually attractive but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the co-assembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G′ decreased from 90 kPa to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 % to 100 %). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formedless stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  14. Quantifying contextuality.

    PubMed

    Grudka, A; Horodecki, K; Horodecki, M; Horodecki, P; Horodecki, R; Joshi, P; Kłobus, W; Wójcik, A

    2014-03-28

    Contextuality is central to both the foundations of quantum theory and to the novel information processing tasks. Despite some recent proposals, it still faces a fundamental problem: how to quantify its presence? In this work, we provide a universal framework for quantifying contextuality. We conduct two complementary approaches: (i) the bottom-up approach, where we introduce a communication game, which grasps the phenomenon of contextuality in a quantitative manner; (ii) the top-down approach, where we just postulate two measures, relative entropy of contextuality and contextuality cost, analogous to existent measures of nonlocality (a special case of contextuality). We then match the two approaches by showing that the measure emerging from the communication scenario turns out to be equal to the relative entropy of contextuality. Our framework allows for the quantitative, resource-type comparison of completely different games. We give analytical formulas for the proposed measures for some contextual systems, showing in particular that the Peres-Mermin game is by order of magnitude more contextual than that of Klyachko et al. Furthermore, we explore properties of these measures such as monotonicity or additivity. PMID:24724629

  15. Quantifying entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Ashish Vachaspati

    Entanglement is an essential element of quantum mechanics. The aim of this work is to explore various properties of entanglement from the viewpoints of both physics and information science, thus providing a unique picture of entanglement from an interdisciplinary point of view. The focus of this work is on quantifying entanglement as a resource. We start with bipartite states, proposing a new measure of bipartite entanglement called entanglement of assistance, showing that bound entangled states of rank two cannot exist, exploring the number of members required in the ensemble achieving the entanglement of formation and the possibility of bound entangled states that are negative under partial transposition (NPT bound entangled states). For multipartite states we introduce the notions of reducibilities and equivalences under entanglement non-increasing operations and we study the relations between various reducibilities and equivalences such as exact and asymptotic LOCC, asymptotic LOCCq, cLOCC, LOc, etc. We use this new language to attempt to quantify entanglement for multiple parties. We introduce the idea of entanglement span and minimal entanglement generating set and entanglement coefficients associated with it which are the entanglement measures, thus proposing a multicomponent measure of entanglement for three or more parties. We show that the class of Schmidt decomposable states have only GHZM or Cat-like entanglement. Further we introduce the class of multiseparable states for quantification of their entanglement and prove that they are equivalent to the Schmidt decomposable states, and thus have only Cat-like entanglement. We further explore the conditions under which LOCO equivalences are possible for multipartite isentropic states. We define Cat-distillability, EPRB-distillability and distillability for multipartite mixed states and show that distillability implies EPRB-distillability. Further we show that all non-factorizable pure states are Cat

  16. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  17. An Acute Acetyl Fentanyl Fatality: A Case Report With Postmortem Concentrations.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Trochta, Amber; Gary, Ray D; Malamatos, Mark; Lucas, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we present an evaluation of the distribution of postmortem concentrations of acetyl fentanyl in a fatality attributed to the drug. A young man who had a history of heroin abuse was found deceased at his parents' home. Toxicology testing, which initially screened positive for fentanyl by ELISA, subsequently confirmed acetyl fentanyl by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry specific ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM) analysis following liquid-liquid extraction. No other drugs or medications, including fentanyl, were detected. The acetyl fentanyl peripheral blood concentration was quantified at 260 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 250 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 1,000 ng/kg, the vitreous was 240 ng/mL and the urine was 2,600 ng/mL. The cause of death was certified due to acute acetyl fentanyl intoxication, and the manner of death was certified as an accident. PMID:25917447

  18. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  19. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L; Sansom, Mark S P; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W

    2016-02-18

    Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the ?-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  20. Peptide Selectivity of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporter from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neha; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Anna; Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Peptide transport in living organisms is facilitated by either primary transport, hydrolysis of ATP, or secondary transport, cotransport of protons. In this study, we focused on investigating the ligand specificity of the Neisseria meningitidis proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (NmPOT). It has been shown that the gene encoding this transporter is upregulated during infection. NmPOT conformed to the typical chain length preference as observed in prototypical transporters of this family. In contrast to prototypical transporters, it was unable to accommodate a positively charged peptide residue at the C-terminus position of the substrate peptide. Sequence analysis of the active site of NmPOT displayed a distinctive aromatic patch, which has not been observed in any other transporters from this family. This aromatic patch may be involved in providing NmPOT with its atypical preferences. This study provides important novel information towards understanding how these transporters recognize their substrates. PMID:27438044

  1. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the β-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  2. Mitochondrial Acetylation and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Payne, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, protein lysine acetylation has emerged as a prominent and conserved regulatory posttranslational modification that is abundant on numerous enzymes involved in the processes of intermediary metabolism. Well-characterized mitochondrial processes of carbon utilization are enriched in acetyl-lysine modifications. Although seminal discoveries have been made in the basic biology of mitochondrial acetylation, an understanding of how acetylation states influence enzyme function and metabolic reprogramming during pathological states remains largely unknown. This paper will examine our current understanding of eukaryotic acetate metabolism and present recent findings in the field of mitochondrial acetylation biology. The implications of mitochondrial acetylation for the aging process will be discussed, as well as its potential implications for the unique and localized metabolic states that occur during the aging-associated conditions of heart failure and cancer growth. PMID:21437190

  3. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  4. Stability, metabolism and transport of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala--a model prodrug with affinity for the oligopeptide transporter.

    PubMed

    Steffansen, B; Lepist, E I; Taub, M E; Larsen, B D; Frokjaer, S; Lennernäs, H

    1999-04-01

    The model prodrug D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala has previously been shown to have affinity and to be transported by the oligopeptide transporter PepT1 expressed in Caco-2 cells. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the aqueous stability of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala and its in vitro metabolism in different gastrointestinal media arising from rats and humans, as well as in human plasma. The second major aim of the study was to evaluate our previous study in Caco-2 cell culture, by determining the effective intestinal permeability (Peff) of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala in situ using the single-pass rat perfusion model. The aqueous stability studies show water, general buffer, as well as specific acid and base catalysis of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala. The degradation of the model prodrug was independent of ionic strength. The half-lives in rat jejunal fluid and homogenate were >3 h. In human gastric and intestinal fluids, the half-lives were >3 h and 2.3+/-0. 03 h, respectively. Using the rat single-pass perfusion technique, the effective jejunal permeability (Peff) of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala was determined to be high (1.29+/-0.5.10-4 cm/s). The 32 times higher Peff value found in the perfusion model compared to Caco-2 cells is most likely due to a higher functional expression of the oligopeptide transporter. Rat jejuna Peff was reduced by approximately 50% in the presence of well known oligopeptide transporter substrates, such as Gly-Sar and cephalexin. It may be that D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala is primarily absorbed intact by the rat jejunal oligopeptide transporter, since the stability in the intestinal homogenate and fluids was rather high (t1/2>2.3 h). PMID:10072480

  5. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  6. Investigation Into Efficiency of a Novel Glycol Chitosan-Bestatin Conjugate to Protect Thymopoietin Oligopeptides From Enzymatic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Feng, Jiao; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Chunlei; Shi, Nianqiu; Chen, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a novel glycol chitosan (GCS)-bestatin conjugate was synthesized and evaluated to demonstrate its efficacy in protecting thymopoietin oligopeptides from aminopeptidase-mediated degradation. Moreover, the mechanism and relative susceptibility of three thymopoietin oligopeptides, thymocartin (TP4), thymopentin (TP5), and thymotrinan (TP3), to enzymatic degradation were investigated and compared at the molecular level. Initial investigations indicated that formation of the GCS-bestatin conjugate, with a substitution degree of 7.0% (moles of bestatin per mole of glycol glucosamine unit), could significantly protect all 3 peptides from aminopeptidase-mediated degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. The space hindrance and loss of one pair of hydrogen bonds, resulting from the covalent conjugation of chitosan with bestatin, did not affect the specific interaction between bestatin and aminopeptidase. Moreover, TP4 displayed a higher degradation clearance compared with those of TP5 and TP3 under the same experimental conditions. The varying levels of susceptibility of these 3 peptides to aminopeptidase (TP4 > TP5 > TP3) were closely related to differences in their binding energies to enzyme, which mainly involved Van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions, as supported by the results of molecular dynamics simulations. These results suggest that GCS-bestatin conjugate might be useful in the delivery of thymopoietin oligopeptides by mucosal routes, and that TP3 and TP5 are better alternatives to TP4 for delivery because of their robust resistance against enzymatic degradation. PMID:26173563

  7. Identification of the major endogenous leukotriene metabolite in the bile of rats as N-acetyl leukotriene E4

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, W.; Denzlinger, C.; Rapp, S.; Weckbecker, G.; Keppler, D.

    1986-02-01

    Mercapturic acid formation, an established pathway in the detoxication of xenobiotics, is demonstrated for cysteinyl leukotrienes generated in rats in vivo after endotoxin treatment. The mercapturate N-acetyl-leukotriene E4 (N-acetyl-LTE4) represented a major metabolite eliminated into bile after injection of (/sup 3/H)LTC4 as shown by cochromatography with synthetic N-acetyl-LTE4 in four different HPLC solvent systems. The identity of endogenous N-acetyl-LTE4 elicited by endotoxin in vivo was additionally verified by enzymatic deacetylation followed by chemical N-acetylation. The deacetylation was catalyzed by penicillin amidase. Endogenous cysteinyl leukotrienes were quantified by radioimmunoassay after HPLC separation. A N-acetyl-LTE4 concentration of 80 nmol/l was determined in bile collected between 30 and 60 min after endotoxin injection. Under this condition, other cysteinyl leukotrienes detected in bile by radioimmunoassay amounted to less than 5% of N-acetyl-LTE4. The mercapturic acid pathway, leading from the glutathione conjugate LTC4 to N-acetyl-LTE4, thus plays an important role in the deactivation and elimination of these potent endogenous mediators.

  8. Proteomic profiling of lysine acetylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals the diversity of acetylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and highly regulated post-translational modification with the well demonstrated physiological relevance in eukaryotes. Recently, its important role in the regulation of metabolic processes in bacteria was highlighted. Here, we reported the lysine acetylproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a proteomic approach. We identified 430 unique peptides corresponding to 320 acetylated proteins. In addition to the proteins involved in various metabolic pathways, several enzymes contributing to the lipopolysaccharides biosynthesis were characterized as acetylated. This data set illustrated the abundance and the diversity of acetylated lysine proteins in P. aeruginosa and opens opportunities to explore the role of the acetylation in the bacterial physiology. PMID:25900529

  9. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  10. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  11. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  12. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Junhyun; Kwon, Seomun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:25288980

  13. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  14. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  15. Oligopeptide elicitor-mediated defense gene activation in cultured parsley cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hahlbrock, K; Scheel, D; Logemann, E; Nürnberger, T; Parniske, M; Reinold, S; Sacks, W R; Schmelzer, E

    1995-01-01

    We have used suspension-cultured parsley cells (Petroselinum crispum) and an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a surface glycoprotein of the phytopathogenic fungus Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea to study the signaling pathway from elicitor recognition to defense gene activation. Immediately after specific binding of the elicitor by a receptor in the plasma membrane, large and transient increases in several inorganic ion fluxes (Ca2+, H+, K+, Cl-) and H2O2 formation are the first detectable plant cell responses. These are rapidly followed by transient changes in the phosphorylation status of various proteins and by the activation of numerous defense-related genes, concomitant with the inactivation of several other, non-defense-related genes. A great diversity of cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors appears to be involved in elicitor-mediated gene regulation, similar to the apparently complex nature of the signal transduced intracellularly. With few exceptions, all individual defense responses analyzed in fungus-infected parsley leaves have been found to be closely mimicked in elicitor-treated, cultured parsley cells, thus validating the use of the elicitor/cell culture system as a valuable model system for these types of study. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7753777

  16. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with short oligopeptides for early endosomal escape and enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Le Thi; Mallick, Sudipta; Choi, Joon Sig

    2015-08-15

    Recently, non-viral vectors have become a popular research topic in the field of gene therapy. In this study, we conjugated short oligopeptides to polyamidoamine-generation 4 (PAMAM G4) to achieve higher transfection efficiency. Previous reports have shown that the PAMAM G4-histidine (H)-arginine (R) dendrimer enhances gene delivery by improving cell penetration and internalization mechanisms. Therefore, we synthesized PAMAM G4-H phenylalanine (F) R, PAMAM G4-FHR and PAMAM G4-FR derivatives to determine the best gene carrier with the lowest toxicity. Physicochemical studies were performed to determine mean diameters and surface charge of PAMAM derivatives/pDNA polyplexes. DNA condensation was confirmed using a gel retardation assay. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency were analyzed using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Similar levels of transfection were achieved in both cell lines by using gold standard transfection reagent PEI 25 kD. Therefore, our results show that these carriers are promising and may help achieve higher transfection with negligible cytotoxicity. PMID:26187169

  17. Crystal structure of a putative oligopeptide-binding periplasmic protein from a hyperthermophile.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hee Jung; Mikami, Bunzo; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Oligopeptide-binding proteins (Opps) are part of the ATP-binding cassette system, playing a crucial role in nutrient uptake and sensing the external environment in bacteria, including hyperthermophiles. Opps serve as a binding platform for diverse peptides; however, how these peptides are recognized by Opps is still largely unknown and few crystal structures of Opps from hyperthermophiles have been determined. To facilitate such an understanding, the crystal structure of a putative Opp, OppA from Thermotoga maritima (TmOppA), was solved at 2.6-Å resolution in the open conformation. TmOppA is composed of three domains. The N-terminal domain consists of twelve strands, nine helices, and four 310 helices, and the C-terminal domain consists of five strands, ten helices, and one 310 helix. These two domains are connected by the linker domain, which consists of two strands, three helices, and three 310 helices. Based on structural comparisons of TmOppA with other OppAs and binding studies, we suggest that TmOppA might be a periplasmic Opp. The most distinct feature of TmOppA is the insertion of two helices, which are lacking in other OppAs. A cavity volume between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is suggested to be responsible for binding peptides of various lengths. PMID:27377296

  18. Thermodynamics, morphology, and kinetics of early- stage self-assembly of pi-conjugated oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Bryce; Tovar, John; Ferguson, Andrew

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing π-conjugated cores self-assemble novel materials with attractive electronic and photophysical properties. All-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of Asp-Phe-Ala-Gly-OPV3-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asp peptides were used to parameterize an implicit solvent model to simulate self-assembly. At low-pH conditions, peptides assemble into β-sheet-like stacks with strongly favorable monomer association free energies of ΔF ~ - 25kB T . Aggregation at high-pH produces disordered aggregates destabilized by Coulombic repulsion between negatively charged Asp termini. We model simulations of hundereds of monomers as a continuous-time Markov process. We infer transition rates between different aggregate sizes and microsecond relaxation times for early-stage assembly. Our data suggests a hierarchical model of assembly in which peptides coalesce into small clusters over tens of nanoseconds followed by structural ripening and diffusion limited aggregation on longer time scales. This work provides new molecular-level understanding of early-stage assembly, and a means to study the impact of peptide chemistry upon the thermodynamics, assembly kinetics, and morphology of the supramolecular aggregates. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Award DE-SC0004857. Molecular simulations partially conducted on University of Illinois Computational Science and Engineering Program parallel computing resources.

  19. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response. PMID:26974439

  20. Expression of the Oligopeptide Permease Operon of Moraxella catarrhalis Is Regulated by Temperature and Nutrient Availability.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan M; Murphy, Timothy F

    2015-09-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Together, these two conditions contribute to enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide. The oligopeptide permease (opp) ABC transport system is a nutritional virulence factor important for the utilization of peptides. The substrate binding protein OppA, which binds peptides for uptake, is a potential vaccine antigen, but little was known about the regulation of gene expression. The five opp genes oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA are in the same open reading frame. Sequence analysis predicted two promoters, one located upstream of oppB and one within the intergenic region between oppF and oppA. We have characterized the gene cluster as an operon with two functional promoters and show that cold shock at 26°C for ≤ 0.5 h and the presence of a peptide substrate increase gene transcript levels. Additionally, the putative promoter upstream of oppA contributes to the transcription of oppA but is not influenced by the same environmental cues as the promoter upstream of oppB. We conclude that temperature and nutrient availability contribute to the regulation of the Opp system, which is an important nutritional virulence factor in M. catarrhalis. PMID:26099587

  1. Acetylation phenotypes in patients with bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Breitenfeld, L; Carvalho, A A; Manso, C F

    1988-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the possible association of bladder carcinoma with the slow acetylator phenotype in a portuguese population. 49 patients with bladder carcinoma were compared to a normal control group of 84 individuals. No statistically significant association was detected. But when subdividing the group of slow acetylators it is found that in the subgroup with 12-36% acetylation there is a higher percentage of patients, which is statistically significant. These results are in agreement with two other studies, using populations of similar ethnic origin. PMID:3265609

  2. Impact of acetylation on tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Cheng, Zhou-Li; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of protein lysine residues is a reversible and dynamic process that is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs and SIRTs). Recent studies have revealed that acetylation modulates not only nuclear proteins but also cytoplasmic or mitochondrial proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. In tumors, cellular metabolism is reprogrammed to provide intermediates for biosynthesis such as nucleotides, fatty acids, and amino acids, and thereby favor the rapid proliferation of cancer cells and tumor development. An increasing number of investigations have indicated that acetylation plays an important role in tumor metabolism. Here, we summarize the substrates that are modified by acetylation, especially oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and enzymes that are implicated in tumor metabolism. PMID:27308346

  3. Acetylator phenotypes in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Penketh, R J A; Gibney, S F A; Nurse, G T; Hopkinson, D A

    1983-01-01

    Acetylator phenotypes have been determined in 139 unrelated subjects from the hitherto untested populations of Papua New Guinea, and their relevance to current antituberculous isoniazid chemotherapy is discussed. PMID:6842533

  4. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  5. Levels of histone acetylation in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Cinzia; Passon, Nadia; Lavarone, Elisa; Di Loreto, Carla; Frasca, Francesco; Vella, Veronica; Vigneri, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe

    2011-08-12

    Histone acetylation is a major mechanism to regulate gene transcription. This post-translational modification is modified in cancer cells. In various tumor types the levels of acetylation at several histone residues are associated to clinical aggressiveness. By using immunohistochemistry we show that acetylated levels of lysines at positions 9-14 of H3 histone (H3K9-K14ac) are significantly higher in follicular adenomas (FA), papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) and undifferentiated carcinomas (UC) than in normal tissues (NT). Similar data have been obtained when acetylated levels of lysine 18 of H3 histone (H3K18ac) were evaluated. In this case, however, no difference was observed between NT and UC. When acetylated levels of lysine 12 of H4 histone (H4K12ac) were evaluated, only FA showed significantly higher levels in comparison with NT. These data indicate that modification histone acetylation is an early event along thyroid tumor progression and that H3K18 acetylation is switched off in the transition between differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. By using rat thyroid cell lines that are stably transfected with doxycyclin-inducible oncogenes, we show that the oncoproteins RET-PTC, RAS and BRAF increase levels of H3K9-K14ac and H3K18ac. In the non-tumorigenic rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5, TSH increases levels of H3K18ac. However, this hormone decreases levels of H3K9-K14ac and H4K12ac. In conclusion, our data indicate that neoplastic transformation and hormonal stimulation can modify levels of histone acetylation in thyroid cells. PMID:21763277

  6. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  7. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  8. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  9. Supramolecular assemblies of histidinylated β-cyclodextrin for enhanced oligopeptide delivery into osteoclast precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xuejin; Wang, Rui; Xu, Hong; Chi, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the problem of drug delivery through the cell membrane in order to treat and manage bone diseases recently. The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles made of amino- and histidinyl-modified amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) entrapping osteoclast inhibitor, a hydrophobic oligopeptides drug, across the membrane of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Drug-loaded β-CDs nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the emulsion solvent evaporation technique and fully characterized for size, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. Spherical NPs displaying a hydrodynamic radius of about 295 nm which did not change upon storage as an aqueous dispersion, a positive zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency of drug very close to 98% were produced. Flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetry analysis indicated that the model drug itself was not taken up by the BMMs; however, NP systems underwent significant cellular uptake. In particular, histidinyl group-modified CD (β-CD-H) NPs were taken up more efficiently than amino group-modified (β-CD-A) ones. Cellular uptake mechanism study demonstrated that the permeability of drug-loaded NPs across the membrane of BMMs is probably due to macropinocytosis pathway. Cell viability studies showed that both β-CD-A and β-CD-H exhibited no significant cytotoxicity up to 1.0 mg/ml against the cells. These results highlight the developed β-CD-H NPs have great potential in safely and effectively delivering osteoclast inhibitors and other therapeutic agents toward bone disease. PMID:26907470

  10. The identification of oppA gene homologues as part of the oligopeptide transport system in mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Wium, Martha; Botes, Annelise; Bellstedt, Dirk U

    2015-03-01

    The lack of an annotated oppA gene as part of many oligopeptide permease (opp) operons has questioned the necessity of the oligopeptide-binding domain (OppA) as a part of the Opp transport system in mycoplasmas. This study investigated the occurrence of an oppA gene as part of the oppBCDF operon in 42 mycoplasma genomes. Except for hemoplasma, all mycoplasmas were found to possess one or more copies of the oppBCDF operon and with the help of similarity searches their oppA genes could be identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined OppABCDF amino acid sequences allowed them to be grouped into three types. Each type has a unique set of conserved motifs, which are likely to reflect substrate preference and adaption strategies. Our approach allowed the identification of oppA gene homologues for all mycoplasma opp operons and thereby provides a method for re-evaluating the current annotation of oppA genes in mycoplasma genomes. PMID:25528211

  11. Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vater, Svenja M; Finlay, John; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Ederth, Thomas; Liedberg, Bo; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a 'normal' manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo 'pseudosettlement' whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a 'hit and stick' motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface. PMID:25875964

  12. Binding capability of the enediyne-associated apoprotein to human tumors and constitution of a ligand oligopeptide-integrated protein.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Chen, Hongxia; Miao, Qingfang; Wu, Shuying; Shang, Yue; Zhen, Yongsu

    2009-10-26

    The molecule of lidamycin that belongs to the chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics is composed of an apoprotein (LDP) and an enediyne chromophore. The enediyne moiety of the molecule is responsible for the potent cytotoxicity; however, the biological function of the apoprotein moiety, particularly its interaction with cancer cells, remains unclear. In present study, the binding capability of LDP to human tumors was detected for the first time by tissue microarray. LDP bound to various human tumors with significant difference from the corresponding normal tissues. Positive correlation between binding activity and the overexpression of VEGF and EGFR was confirmed by lung carcinoma tissue microarray. A fusion protein LG-LDP that consists of LDP and a ligand oligopeptide to EGFR was constructed by DNA recombination. LG-LDP showed augmented binding to EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, an energized fusion protein LG-LDP-AE was prepared by integrating the active enediyne (AE) into LG-LDP molecule. By MTT assay, LG-LDP-AE displayed extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells with IC50 approximate to 0.01nM. The results indicate that LDP binds to various human tumors and it might serve as a delivery carrier by integration of ligand oligopeptide to manufacture motif-based, targeted fusion proteins for cancer. PMID:19737585

  13. A genetic algorithm encoded with the structural information of amino acids and dipeptides for efficient conformational searches of oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Ru, Xiao; Song, Ce; Lin, Zijing

    2016-05-15

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is an intelligent approach for finding minima in a highly dimensional parametric space. However, the success of GA searches for low energy conformations of biomolecules is rather limited so far. Herein an improved GA scheme is proposed for the conformational search of oligopeptides. A systematic analysis of the backbone dihedral angles of conformations of amino acids (AAs) and dipeptides is performed. The structural information is used to design a new encoding scheme to improve the efficiency of GA search. Local geometry optimizations based on the energy calculations by the density functional theory are employed to safeguard the quality and reliability of the GA structures. The GA scheme is applied to the conformational searches of Lys, Arg, Met-Gly, Lys-Gly, and Phe-Gly-Gly representative of AAs, dipeptides, and tripeptides with complicated side chains. Comparison with the best literature results shows that the new GA method is both highly efficient and reliable by providing the most complete set of the low energy conformations. Moreover, the computational cost of the GA method increases only moderately with the complexity of the molecule. The GA scheme is valuable for the study of the conformations and properties of oligopeptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833761

  14. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  15. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism. PMID:23696451

  16. Effect of condensation agents and minerals for oligopeptide formation under mild and hydrothermal conditions in related to chemical evolution of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao

    2009-07-01

    The role of condensation agents and minerals for oligopeptide formation was inspected to see whether minerals possess catalytic activity under mild and hydrothermal conditions. Under mild conditions, oligopeptide formation from negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) using different minerals and the elongation of alanine oligopeptides ((Ala) 2-(Ala) 5) were attempted using apatite minerals. Oligo(Asp) up to 10 amino acid units from Asp were observed in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). Notable influence of minerals was not detected for the oligo(Asp) formation. Oligo(Asp) was gradually degraded by the further incubation in the presence of EDC in both the absence and presence of minerals. The formation of oligo(Glu) was less efficient in the presence of carbonyldiimidazole. The elongation from (Ala) 3, (Ala) 4, and (Ala) 5 and the formation of diketopiperazine from (Ala) 2 proceeded immediately in the presence of EDC in the meantime of the sample preparations. In addition, it was unexpected that the disappearance of the products and the reformation of the reactants occurred by the further incubation for 24 h; for instance, (Ala) 5 decreased but (Ala) 4 increased with increasing the reaction time in the reaction of (Ala) 4 with EDC. These facts suggest that the activation of the reactant amino acids or peptides immediately occurs. Under the simulated hydrothermal conditions, EDC did not enhance the formation of oligopeptides from Asp, Glu or Ala nor the spontaneous formation of (Ala) 5 from (Ala) 4.

  17. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as G n H series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu(2+) on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu(2+). There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu(2+) and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu(2+)-dependent quenching of Y

  18. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as GnH series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu2+ on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu2+. There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu2+ and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu2+-dependent quenching of Y

  19. Distinct specificities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and mammalian proteasomes for N-acetyl tripeptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Tsu, Christopher; Dick, Lawrence; Zhou, Xi K; Nathan, Carl

    2008-12-01

    The proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a validated and drug-treatable target for therapeutics. To lay ground-work for developing peptide-based inhibitors with a useful degree of selectivity for the Mtb proteasome over those of the host, we used a library of 5,920 N-acetyl tripeptide-aminomethylcoumarins to contrast the substrate preferences of the recombinant Mtb proteasome wild type and open gate mutant, the Rhodococcus erythropolis proteasome, and the bovine proteasome with activator PA28. The Mtb proteasome was distinctive in strictly preferring P1 = tryptophan, particularly in combination with P3 = glycine, proline, lysine or arginine. Screening results were validated with Michalis-Menten kinetic analyses of 21 oligopeptide aminomethyl-coumarin substrates. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor in clinical use, and 17 analogs varying only at P1 were used to examine the differential impact of inhibitors on human and Mtb proteasomes. The results with the inhibitor panel confirmed those with the substrate panel in demonstrating differential preferences of Mtb and mammalian proteasomes at the P1 amino acid. Changing P1 in bortezomib from Leu to m-CF(3)-Phe led to a 220-fold increase in IC(50) against the human proteasome, whereas changing a P1 Ala to m-F-Phe decreased the IC(50) 400-fold against the Mtb proteasome. The change of a P1 Ala to m-Cl-Phe led to an 8000-fold shift in inhibitory potency in favor of the Mtb proteasome, resulting in 8-fold selectivity. Combinations of preferred amino acids at different sites may thus improve the species selectivity of peptide-based inhibitors that target the Mtb proteasome. PMID:18829465

  20. Acetylation of bleached Kraft pulp: effect of xylan content on properties of acetylated compounds.

    PubMed

    Peredo, Karol; Reyes, Herna; Escobar, Danilo; Vega-Lara, Johana; Berg, Alex; Pereira, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Bleached Kraft pulp (BKP) from Eucalyptus globulus and cotton xylan blends (CXB) was acetylated. The effects of xylan content on cellulose acetylation and the properties of the acetylated material were studied. An increase in xylan content caused a slight decrease in the degree of substitution (2.98 to 2.68 for CXB; 2.93 to 2.84 for BKP). Thermal analysis showed that the melting temperature also decreases from 268.0 to 188.8 °C for CXB and from 221.4 to 212.8 °C for BKP. Moreover, the solubility decreased due to the partial dissolution of acetylated xylans. The presence of xylans during Kraft pulp acetylation does not have a significant negative effect on the physical properties of the acetylated material, but the decrease in melting temperature was beneficial for the application of acetylated polymer as a natural internal plasticizer. This is considered to be an important argument for BKP utilization in the cellulose acetate manufacturing process. PMID:25498729

  1. N-acetyl-l-tryptophan, but not N-acetyl-d-tryptophan, rescues neuronal cell death in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sirianni, Ana C; Jiang, Jiying; Zeng, Jiang; Mao, Lilly L; Zhou, Shuanhu; Sugarbaker, Peter; Zhang, Xinmu; Li, Wei; Friedlander, Robert M; Wang, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss. Evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, glutamate excitotoxicity, and proteasomal dysfunction are all responsible for ALS pathogenesis. N-acetyl-tryptophan has been identified as an inhibitor of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and therefore is a potential neuroprotective agent. By quantifying cell death, we demonstrate that N-acetyl-l-tryptophan (L-NAT) and N-acetyl-DL-tryptophan are neuroprotective in NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells and/or primary motor neurons, while their isomer N-acetyl-d-tryptophan has no protective effect. These findings are consistent with energy minimization and molecular modeling analysis, confirming that L-NAT generates the most stable complex with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). L-NAT inhibits the secretion of Substance P and IL-1β (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and/or dot blots) and mitochondrial dysfunction by effectively inhibiting the release of cytochrome c/Smac/AIF from mitochondria into the cytoplasm and activation of apoptotic pathways, including the activation of caspase-1, -9, and -3, as well as proteasomal dysfunction through restoring chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activity. These data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms by which L-NAT offers neuroprotection in models of ALS and suggest its potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS. We demonstrate that L-NAT (N-acetyl-l-tryptophan), but not D-NAT, rescues NSC-34 cells and primary motor neurons from cell death. L-NAT inhibits the secretion of Substance P and IL-1β, and caspase-1 activation, the release of cytochrome c/Smac/AIF, and the activation of caspase -9, and -3, as well as proteasomal dysfunction. The data suggest the potential of L-NAT as a novel therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). AIF, apoptosis-inducing factor. PMID

  2. Structural Basis for Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation Cross-talk in a Kinase Motif Associated with Myocardial Ischemia and Cardioprotection*

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Benjamin L.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Trefely, Sophie; Hoffman, Nolan J.; White, Melanie Y.; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Hambly, Brett D.; Larsen, Martin R.; James, David E.; Cordwell, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia and cardioprotection by ischemic pre-conditioning induce signal networks aimed at survival or cell death if the ischemic period is prolonged. These pathways are mediated by protein post-translational modifications that are hypothesized to cross-talk with and regulate each other. Phosphopeptides and lysine-acetylated peptides were quantified in isolated rat hearts subjected to ischemia or ischemic pre-conditioning, with and without splitomicin inhibition of lysine deacetylation. We show lysine acetylation (acetyl-Lys)-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, AKT, and PKA kinases during ischemia. Phosphorylation and acetyl-Lys sites mapped onto tertiary structures were proximal in >50% of proteins investigated, yet they were mutually exclusive in 50 ischemic pre-conditioning- and/or ischemia-associated peptides containing the KXXS basophilic protein kinase consensus motif. Modifications in this motif were modeled in the C terminus of muscle-type creatine kinase. Acetyl-Lys increased proximal dephosphorylation by 10-fold. Structural analysis of modified muscle-type creatine kinase peptide variants by two-dimensional NMR revealed stabilization via a lysine-phosphate salt bridge, which was disrupted by acetyl-Lys resulting in backbone flexibility and increased phosphatase accessibility. PMID:25008320

  3. Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation in HeLa Cells and their Essential Roles in Response to UV-induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Chen, Xuanyi; Xu, Xiaoli; Shi, Rongyi; Suo, Shasha; Cheng, Kaiying; Zheng, Zhiguo; Wang, Meixia; Wang, Liangyan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation and succinylation are major types of protein acylation that are important in many cellular processes including gene transcription, cellular metabolism, DNA damage response. Malfunctions in these post-translational modifications are associated with genome instability and disease in higher organisms. In this study, we used high-resolution nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry combined with affinity purification to quantify the dynamic changes of protein acetylation and succinylation in response to ultraviolet (UV)-induced cell stress. A total of 3345 acetylation sites in 1440 proteins and 567 succinylation sites in 246 proteins were identified, many of which have not been reported previously. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are involved in many important biological processes, including cell signalling transduction, protein localization and cell metabolism. Crosstalk analysis between these two modifications indicated that modification switches might regulate protein function in response to UV-induced DNA damage. We further illustrated that FEN1 acetylation at different sites could lead to different cellular phenotypes, suggesting the multiple function involvement of FEN1 acetylation under DNA damage stress. These systematic analyses provided valuable resources and new insight into the potential role of lysine acetylation and succinylation under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27452117

  4. Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation in HeLa Cells and their Essential Roles in Response to UV-induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Chen, Xuanyi; Xu, Xiaoli; Shi, Rongyi; Suo, Shasha; Cheng, Kaiying; Zheng, Zhiguo; Wang, Meixia; Wang, Liangyan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation and succinylation are major types of protein acylation that are important in many cellular processes including gene transcription, cellular metabolism, DNA damage response. Malfunctions in these post-translational modifications are associated with genome instability and disease in higher organisms. In this study, we used high-resolution nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry combined with affinity purification to quantify the dynamic changes of protein acetylation and succinylation in response to ultraviolet (UV)-induced cell stress. A total of 3345 acetylation sites in 1440 proteins and 567 succinylation sites in 246 proteins were identified, many of which have not been reported previously. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are involved in many important biological processes, including cell signalling transduction, protein localization and cell metabolism. Crosstalk analysis between these two modifications indicated that modification switches might regulate protein function in response to UV-induced DNA damage. We further illustrated that FEN1 acetylation at different sites could lead to different cellular phenotypes, suggesting the multiple function involvement of FEN1 acetylation under DNA damage stress. These systematic analyses provided valuable resources and new insight into the potential role of lysine acetylation and succinylation under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27452117

  5. Non-enzymatic protein acetylation detected by NAPPA protein arrays*

    PubMed Central

    Olia, Adam S.; Barker, Kristi; McCullough, Cheryl E.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W.; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification that occurs on thousands of proteins located in many cellular organelles. This process mediates many protein functions and modulates diverse biological processes. In mammalian cells, where acetyl-CoA is the primary acetyl donor, acetylation in the mitochondria is thought to occur by chemical means due to the relatively high concentration of acetyl-CoA located in this organelle. In contrast, acetylation outside of the mitochondria is thought to be mediated predominantly by acetyltransferase enzymes. Here we address the possibility that non-enzymatic chemical acetylation outside of the mitochondria may be more common than previously appreciated. We employed the Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array platform to perform an unbiased screen for human proteins that undergo chemical acetylation, which resulted in the identification of a multitude of proteins with diverse functions and cellular localization. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that basic residues typically precede the acetylated lysine in the −7 to −3 position, and we show by mutagenesis that these basic residues contribute to chemical acetylation capacity. We propose that these basic residues lower the pKa of the substrate lysine for efficient chemical acetylation. Many of the identified proteins reside outside of the mitochondria, and have been previously demonstrated to be acetylated in vivo. As such, our studies demonstrate that chemical acetylation occurs more broadly throughout the eukaryotic cell than previously appreciated, and suggests that this post-translational protein modification may have more diverse roles in protein function and pathway regulation. PMID:26083674

  6. Nucleosome structure incorporated histone acetylation site prediction in arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetylation is a crucial post-translational modification for histones, and plays a key role in gene expression regulation. Due to limited data and lack of a clear acetylation consensus sequence, a few researches have focused on prediction of lysine acetylation sites. Several systematic prediction studies have been conducted for human and yeast, but less for Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Concerning the insufficient observation on acetylation site, we analyzed contributions of the peptide-alignment-based distance definition and 3D structure factors in acetylation prediction. We found that traditional structure contributes little to acetylation site prediction. Identified acetylation sites of histones in Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved and cross predictable with that of human by peptide based methods. However, the predicted specificity is overestimated, because of the existence of non-observed acetylable site. Here, by performing a complete exploration on the factors that affect the acetylability of lysines in histones, we focused on the relative position of lysine at nucleosome level, and defined a new structure feature to promote the performance in predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. thaliana. Conclusion We found a new spacial correlated acetylation factor, and defined a ε-N spacial location based feature, which contains five core spacial ellipsoid wired areas. By incorporating the new feature, the performance of predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. Thaliana was promoted, in which the previous mispredicted acetylable lysines were corrected by comparing to the peptide-based prediction. PMID:21047388

  7. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  8. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  9. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  10. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  11. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  12. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  13. Photospintronics: Magnetic Field-Controlled Photoemission and Light-Controlled Spin Transport in Hybrid Chiral Oligopeptide-Nanoparticle Structures.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Roy, Partha; Kim, Dokyun; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Hagai; Naaman, Ron

    2016-04-13

    The combination of photonics and spintronics opens new ways to transfer and process information. It is shown here that in systems in which organic molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles are combined, matching these technologies results in interesting new phenomena. We report on light induced and spin-dependent charge transfer process through helical oligopeptide-CdSe nanoparticles' (NPs) architectures deposited on ferromagnetic substrates with small coercive force (∼100-200 Oe). The spin control is achieved by the application of the chirality-induced spin-dependent electron transfer effect and is probed by two different methods: spin-controlled electrochemichemistry and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. The injected spin could be controlled by excitation of the nanoparticles. By switching the direction of the magnetic field of the substrate, the PL intensity could be alternated. PMID:27027885

  14. Separation of basic oligopeptides by ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenchun

    The present thesis consist of five chapters. Chapter I introduces background information on the ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography and liquid chromatography in the critical condition. Chapter II decribes our study on the isocratic separation of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) using a fixed content of acetonitrile (ACN) (23%) and different concentrations of HFBA in the mobile phase (0.6-30.6 mM) on a Waters XBridge Shield RP18® column. We found that the retention time of oligolysine increases as the dp increases, because of an increased number of HFBA bound to the peptides. Furthermore, when [HFBA] increased, the retention time increased at different rates. The greater the dp, the faster the rate. Based on a closed pairing model that presumes an equilibrium between an unpaired state and the paired state with a fixed number of HFBA molecules, an equation was derived for the retention factor of oligolysine. In Chapter III, we compare retention behaviors of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) and oligoarginine (dp = 2 to 8) when they are separated on the Waters XBridge Shield RP18® using fixed a ACN content (23%) and difference concentrations of HFBA (0.4-30.6 mM) in the mobile phase. The retention time of oligoarginine also increased at different rates as [HFBA] increased. The greater the dp, the faster the rate. The retention time of oligolysine is shorter than that of oligarginine having the dame dp. We applied Eq.1 to analyze the plot of ln k as a function of [HFBA] for each oligopeptide component to obtain the values for n, Kip,m, and βKd,ip. For oligolysine, n increases linearly as dp increase and oligoarginine exhibits an accelerated increase in n as dp rises. The plot of ln βKd,ip against dp followed a linear relationship for both peptides. In Chapter IV, we study the effect of mobile phase composition on the retention of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) on the Waters XBridge Shield RP18 ®. The ACN content was changed from 20% to 33% and the HFBA concentration from 0.7 to

  15. Quantification of N-Acetyl Aspartyl Glutamate in Human Brain using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elywa, M.

    2015-07-01

    The separation of N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAAG) from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and other metabolites, such as glutamate, by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T is described. This method is based on the stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM), with short and long echo time (TE) and allows quantitative measurements of NAAG in the parietal and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC) of human brain. Two basesets for the LCModel have been established using nuclear magnetic resonance simulator software (NMR-SIM). Six healthy volunteers (age 25-35 years) have been examined at 7 T. It has been established that NAAG can be separated and quantified in the parietal location and does not get quantified in the pgACC location when using a short echo time, TE = 20 ms. On the other hand, by using a long echo time, TE = 74 ms, NAAG can be quantified in pgACC structures.

  16. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  17. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system. PMID:27100509

  18. Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of α-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions. PMID:24265859

  19. Fragrance material review on acetyl cedrene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl cedrene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl cedrene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. The generic formula for this group can be represented as (R1)(R2)CO. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl cedrene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, phototoxicity, photoallergy, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, reproductive toxicity, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2013) (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013. A Toxicologic and Dermatologic Assessment of Alkyl Cyclic Ketones When Used as Fragrance Ingredients. Submitted with this manuscript.) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. PMID:23907023

  20. Homochiral oligopeptides via surface recognition and enantiomeric cross impediment in the polymerization of racemic phenylalanine N-carboxyanhydride crystals suspended in water.

    PubMed

    Nery, Jose Geraldo; Eliash, Ran; Bolbach, Gerard; Weissbuch, Isabelle; Lahav, Meir

    2007-08-01

    As part of our program on the search of possible prebiotic routes for the formation of oligopeptides of homochiral sequence (isotactic) from racemic precursors in aqueous environment, we report the polymerization of racemic crystals of phenylalanine N-carboxyanhydrides, enantioselectively tagged with five deuterium atoms, suspended in water containing various amine initiators. Racemic mixtures of isotactic oligopeptides, comprising up to 25 repeat units of the same handedness, as the dominant component for each length, were observed in a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The racemic mixtures of the peptides could be desymmetrized by initiating the polymerization reaction with water-soluble methyl esters of either enantiopure alpha-amino acids or dipeptides. A three-step mechanism is proposed to account for these results: (i) Surface recognition of the chiral initiator by the chiral sites present at specific faces of the crystal; (ii) Oligopeptide elongation at the polymer/crystal interface; and (iii) Self-assembly of the short isotactic peptides into racemic antiparallel beta-sheets as templates followed by cross-enantiomeric impediment in the growth of enantiomeric chains at the peptide beta-sheet/crystal interface. PMID:17354263

  1. Deep, Quantitative Coverage of the Lysine Acetylome Using Novel Anti-acetyl-lysine Antibodies and an Optimized Proteomic Workflow.

    PubMed

    Svinkina, Tanya; Gu, Hongbo; Silva, Jeffrey C; Mertins, Philipp; Qiao, Jana; Fereshetian, Shaunt; Jaffe, Jacob D; Kuhn, Eric; Udeshi, Namrata D; Carr, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Introduction of antibodies specific for acetylated lysine has significantly improved the detection of endogenous acetylation sites by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe a new, commercially available mixture of anti-lysine acetylation (Kac) antibodies and show its utility for in-depth profiling of the acetylome. Specifically, seven complementary monoclones with high specificity for Kac were combined into a final anti-Kac reagent which results in at least a twofold increase in identification of Kac peptides over a commonly used Kac antibody. We outline optimal antibody usage conditions, effective offline basic reversed phase separation, and use of state-of-the-art LC-MS technology for achieving unprecedented coverage of the acetylome. The methods were applied to quantify acetylation sites in suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid-treated Jurkat cells. Over 10,000 Kac peptides from over 3000 Kac proteins were quantified from a single stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture labeled sample using 7.5 mg of peptide input per state. This constitutes the deepest coverage of acetylation sites in quantitative experiments obtained to-date. The approach was also applied to breast tumor xenograft samples using isobaric mass tag labeling of peptides (iTRAQ4, TMT6 and TMT10-plex reagents) for quantification. Greater than 6700 Kac peptides from over 2300 Kac proteins were quantified using 1 mg of tumor protein per iTRAQ 4-plex channel. The novel reagents and methods we describe here enable quantitative, global acetylome analyses with depth and sensitivity approaching that obtained for other well-studied post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, and should have widespread application in biological and clinical studies employing mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PMID:25953088

  2. Multiple Sites of the Cleavage of 21- and 25-Mer Encephalytogenic Oligopeptides Corresponding to Human Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) by Specific Anti-MBP Antibodies from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Anna M.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Konenkova, Ludmila P.; Buneva, Valentina N.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2013-01-01

    IgGs from patients with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) purified on MBP-Sepharose in contrast to canonical proteases hydrolyze effectively only myelin basic protein (MBP), but not many other tested proteins. Here we have shown for the first time that anti-MBP SLE IgGs hydrolyze nonspecific tri- and tetrapeptides with an extreme low efficiency and cannot effectively hydrolyze longer 20-mer nonspecific oligopeptides corresponding to antigenic determinants (AGDs) of HIV-1 integrase. At the same time, anti-MBP SLE IgGs efficiently hydrolyze oligopeptides corresponding to AGDs of MBP. All sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis of 21-and 25-mer encephalytogenic oligopeptides corresponding to two known AGDs of MBP were found by a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, TLC, and MALDI spectrometry. Several clustered major, moderate, and minor sites of cleavage were revealed in the case of 21- and 25-mer oligopeptides. The active sites of anti-MBP abzymes are localised on their light chains, while heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of abzymes provide high affinity to MBP and specificity of this protein hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-MBP abzymes for intact MBP is approximately 1000-fold higher than for the oligopeptides. The data suggest that all oligopeptides interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal abzymes of total pool of IgGs, which possesses a lower affinity for substrates, and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific than globular protein and can occur in several sites. PMID:23520443

  3. Acetylation and characterization of spruce (Picea abies) galactoglucomannans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunlin; Leppänen, Ann-Sofie; Eklund, Patrik; Holmlund, Peter; Sjöholm, Rainer; Sundberg, Kenneth; Willför, Stefan

    2010-04-19

    Acetylated galactoglucomannans (GGMs) are the main hemicellulose type in most softwood species and can be utilized as, for example, bioactive polymers, hydrocolloids, papermaking chemicals, or coating polymers. Acetylation of spruce GGM using acetic anhydride with pyridine as catalyst under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of acetylation on a laboratory scale, whereas, as a classic method, it can be potentially transferred to the industrial scale. The effects of the amount of catalyst and acetic anhydride, reaction time, temperature and pretreatment by acetic acid were investigated. A fully acetylated product was obtained by refluxing GGM for two hours. The structures of the acetylated GGMs were determined by SEC-MALLS/RI, (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. NMR studies also indicated migration of acetyl groups from O-2 or O-3 to O-6 after a heating treatment in a water bath. The thermal stability of the products was investigated by DSC-TGA. PMID:20144827

  4. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  5. Determination of amphetamine by HPLC after acetylation.

    PubMed

    Veress, T

    2000-01-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for the HPLC determination of amphetamine by off-line pre-column derivatization. The proposed procedure consists of sample preparation by acetylation of amphetamine with acetic anhydride and a subsequent reversed-phase HPLC separation on an octadecyl silica stationary phase with salt-free mobile phase (tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, 0.1% triethylamine in water, 15:15:70 v/v) applying UV-detection. The applicability of the elaborated procedure is demonstrated with results obtained by analysis of real samples seized in the Hungarian black market. PMID:10641931

  6. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  7. Structure, morphology and functionality of acetylated and oxidised barley starches.

    PubMed

    El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Colussi, Rosana; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Bartz, Josiane; Radunz, Marjana; Carreño, Neftali Lenin Villarreal; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Acetylation and oxidation are chemical modifications which alter the properties of starch. The degree of modification of acetylated and oxidized starches is dependent on the catalyst and active chlorine concentrations, respectively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetylation and oxidation on the structural, morphological, physical-chemical, thermal and pasting properties of barley starch. Barley starches were acetylated at different catalyst levels (11%, 17%, and 23% of NaOH solution) and oxidized at different sodium hypochlorite concentrations (1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% of active chlorine). Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractograms, thermal, morphological, and pasting properties, swelling power and solubility of starches were evaluated. The degree of substitution (DS) of the acetylated starches increased with the rise in catalyst concentration. The percentage of carbonyl (CO) and carboxyl (COOH) groups in oxidized starches also increased with the rise of active chlorine level. The presence of hydrophobic acetyl groups, carbonyl and carboxyl groups caused a partial disorganization and depolymerization of starch granules. The structural, morphological and functional changes in acetylated and oxidized starches varied according to reaction conditions. Acetylation makes barley starch more hydrophobic by the insertion of acetyl groups. Also the oxidation promotes low retrogradation and viscosity. All these characteristics are important for biodegradable film production. PMID:25172707

  8. Protein lysine acetylation in bacteria: Current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins are key events in cellular metabolism and physiology regulation. Lysine acetylation is one of the best studied protein modifications in eukaryotes, but, until recently, ignored in bacteria. However, proteomic advances have highlighted the diversity of bacterial lysine-acetylated proteins. The current data support the implication of lysine acetylation in various metabolic pathways, adaptation and virulence. In this review, we present a broad overview of the current knowledge of lysine acetylation in bacteria. We emphasize particularly the significant contribution of proteomics in this field. PMID:26390373

  9. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  10. Probing the acetylation code of histone H4.

    PubMed

    Lang, Diana; Schümann, Michael; Gelato, Kathy; Fischle, Wolfgang; Schwarzer, Dirk; Krause, Eberhard

    2013-10-01

    Histone modifications play crucial roles in genome regulation with lysine acetylation being implicated in transcriptional control. Here we report a proteome-wide investigation of the acetylation-dependent protein-protein interactions of the N-terminal tail of histone H4. Quantitative peptide-based affinity MS experiments using the SILAC approach determined the interactomes of H4 tails monoacetylated at the four known acetylation sites K5, K8, K12, and K16, bis-acetylated at K5/K12, triple-acetylated at K8/12/16 and fully tetra-acetylated. A set of 29 proteins was found enriched on the fully acetylated H4 tail while specific binders of the mono and bis-acetylated tails were barely detectable. These observations are in good agreement with earlier reports indicating that the H4 acetylation state establishes its regulatory effects in a cumulative manner rather than via site-specific recruitment of regulatory proteins. PMID:23970329

  11. Generation of acetyllysine antibodies and affinity enrichment of acetylated peptides

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Kun-Liang; Yu, Wei; Lin, Yan; Xiong, Yue; Zhao, Shimin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has emerged as one of the major post-translational modifications, as indicated by its roles in chromatin remodeling, activation of transcription factors and, most recently, regulation of metabolic enzymes. Identification of acetylation sites in a protein is the first essential step for functional characterization of acetylation in physiological regulation. However, the study of the acetylome is hindered by the lack of suitable physical and biochemical properties of the acetyl group and existence of high-abundance acetylated histones in the cell, and needs a robust method to overcome these problems. Here we present protocols for (i) using chemically acetylated ovalbumin and synthetic acetylated peptide to generate a pan-acetyllysine antibody and a site-specific antibody to Lys288-acetylated argininosuccinate lyase, respectively; (ii) using subcellular fractionation to reduce highly abundant acetylated histones; and (iii) using acetyllysine antibody affinity purification and mass spectrometry to characterize acetylome of human liver tissue. The entire characterization procedure takes ~2–3 d to complete. PMID:21085124

  12. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data. PMID:27092480

  13. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112 †

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10−6, similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >109 cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  14. Influence of Free Amino Acids, Oligopeptides, and Polypeptides on the Formation of Pyrazines in Maillard Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Gustavo Luis Leonardo; Cucu, Tatiana; De Kimpe, Norbert; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-10

    Pyrazines are specific Maillard reaction compounds known to contribute to the unique aroma of many products. Most studies concerning the generation of pyrazines in the Maillard reaction have focused on amino acids, while little information is available on the impact of peptides and proteins. The present study investigated the generation of pyrazines in model systems containing whey protein, hydrolyzed whey protein, amino acids, and glucose. The impact of thermal conditions, ratio of reagents, and water activity (a(w)) on pyrazine formation was measured by headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS. The presence of oligopeptides from hydrolyzed whey protein contributed significantly to an increased amount of pyrazines, while in contrast free amino acids generated during protein hydrolysis contributed to a lesser extent. The generation of pyrazines was enhanced at low a(w) (0.33) and high temperatures (>120 °C). This study showed that the role of peptides in the generation of pyrazines in Maillard reaction systems has been dramatically underestimated. PMID:25971942

  15. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  16. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  17. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112.

    PubMed

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10(-6), similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >10⁸ cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  18. Molecular characterization of group A streptococcal (GAS) oligopeptide permease (opp) and its effect on cysteine protease production.

    PubMed

    Podbielski, A; Pohl, B; Woischnik, M; Körner, C; Schmidt, K H; Rozdzinski, E; Leonard, B A

    1996-09-01

    Bacterial oligopeptide permeases are membrane-associated complexes of five proteins belonging to the ABC-transporter family, which have been found to be involved in obtaining nutrients, cell-wall metabolism, competence, and adherence to host cells. A lambda library of the strain CS101 group A streptococcal (GAS) genome was used to sequence 10,192 bp containing the five genes oppA to oppF of the GAS opp operon. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited 50-84% homology to pneumococcal AmiA to AmiF sequences. The operon organization of the five genes was confirmed by transcriptional analysis and an additional shorter oppA transcript was detected. Insertional inactivation was used to create serotype M49 strains which did not express either the oppA gene or the ATPase genes, oppD and oppF. The mutation in oppA confirmed that the additional shorter oppA transcript originated from the opp operon and was probably due to an intra-operon transcription terminator site located downstream of oppA. While growth kinetics, binding of serum proteins, and attachment to eukaryotic cells were unaffected, the oppD/F mutants showed reduced production of the cysteine protease, SpeB, and a change in the pattern of secreted proteins. Thus, the GAS opp operon appears to contribute to both protease production and export/processing of secreted proteins. PMID:8885277

  19. CgOpt1, a putative oligopeptide transporter from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides that is involved in responses to auxin and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene produces high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in axenic cultures and during plant infection. We generated a suppression subtractive hybridization library enriched for IAA-induced genes and identified a clone, which was highly expressed in IAA-containing medium. Results The corresponding gene showed similarity to oligopeptide transporters of the OPT family and was therefore named CgOPT1. Expression of CgOPT1 in mycelia was low, and was enhanced by external application of IAA. cgopt1-silenced mutants produced less spores, had reduced pigmentation, and were less pathogenic to plants than the wild-type strain. IAA enhanced spore formation and caused changes in colony morphology in the wild-type strain, but had no effect on spore formation or colony morphology of the cgopt1-silenced mutants. Conclusion Our results show that IAA induces developmental changes in C. gloeosporioides. These changes are blocked in cgopt1-silenced mutants, suggesting that this protein is involved in regulation of fungal response to IAA. CgOPT1 is also necessary for full virulence, but it is unclear whether this phenotype is related to auxin. PMID:19698103

  20. Sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) oligopeptides: immunomodulatory effects based on stimulating Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Bin; Chen, Qi-He; Liu, Rui; Ren, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulating activity of small molecule oligopeptides from sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) (SOP) in mice. Seven assays were performed to determine the immunomodulatory effects, including splenic lymphocyte proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity assays (cell-mediated immunity), IgM antibody response of spleen to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and serum hemolysin level assays (humoral immunity), the carbon clearance assay and the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal cavity phagocytes assay (macrophage phagocytosis), and the NK cell activity assay. Spleen T lymphocyte subpopulations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays of serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for small intestinal secretory immunoglobulin were performed to study the mechanism by which SOP affects the immune system. We found that SOP could improve immune functions in mice, which may be due to the enhancement of the functions of cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activity. From the cellular and molecular assays, we postulated that the immunomodulatory effects are most likely attributed to the stimulation of Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production. PMID:26838796

  1. Multi-responsive Hydrogels Derived from the Self-assembly of Tethered Allyl-functionalized Racemic Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Zhang, Fuwu; Li, Richen; Pollack, Kevin A.; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Zou, Jiong; Wooley, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-responsive triblock hydrogelator oligo(dl-allylglycine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-oligo(dl-allylglycine) (ODLAG-b-PEG-b-ODLAG) was synthesized facilely by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of DLAG N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) with a diamino-terminated PEG as the macroinitiator. This system exhibited heat-induced sol-to-gel transitions and either sonication- or enzyme-induced gel-to-sol transitions. The β-sheeting of the oligopeptide segments was confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The β-sheets further displayed tertiary ordering into fibrillar structures that, in turn generated a porous and interconnected hydrogel matrix, as observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reversible macroscopic sol-to-gel transitions triggered by heat and gel-to-sol transitions triggered by sonication were correlated with the transformation of nanostructural morphologies, with fibrillar structures observed in gel and spherical aggregates in sol, respectively. The enzymatic breakdown of the hydrogels was also investigated. This allyl-functionalized hydrogelator can serve as a platform for the design of smart hydrogels, appropriate for expansion into biological systems as bio-functional and bio-responsive materials. PMID:25485113

  2. N-acetylaspartate catabolism determines cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels and histone acetylation in brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, A.; Pelzmann, H. J.; Pessentheiner, A. R.; Huber, K.; Madreiter-Sokolowski, C. T.; Drougard, A.; Schittmayer, M.; Kolb, D.; Magnes, C.; Trausinger, G.; Graier, W. F.; Birner-Gruenberger, R.; Pospisilik, J. A.; Bogner-Strauss, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the abundance of nucleo-cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA. Here, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a highly abundant brain metabolite catabolized by aspartoacylase yielding aspartate and acetate. The latter can be further used for acetyl-CoA production. Prior to this work, the presence of NAA has not been described in adipocytes. Here, we show that accumulation of NAA decreases the brown adipocyte phenotype. We increased intracellular NAA concentrations in brown adipocytes via media supplementation or knock-down of aspartoacylase and measured reduced lipolysis, thermogenic gene expression, and oxygen consumption. Combinations of approaches to increase intracellular NAA levels showed additive effects on lipolysis and gene repression, nearly abolishing the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppara. Transcriptome analyses of aspartoacylase knock-down cells indicate deficiencies in acetyl-CoA and lipid metabolism. Concordantly, cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels and global histone H3 acetylation were decreased. Further, activating histone marks (H3K27ac and H3K9ac) in promoters/enhancers of brown marker genes showed reduced acetylation status. Taken together, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. Thereby, we mechanistically connect the NAA pathway to the epigenomic regulation of gene expression, modulating the phenotype of brown adipocytes. PMID:27045997

  3. Quantifying Faculty Workloads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, J. Andrew

    Teaching load depends on many variables, however most colleges define it strictly in terms of contact or credit hours. The failure to give weight to variables such as number of preparations, number of students served, committee and other noninstructional assignments is usually due to the lack of a formula that will quantify the effects of these…

  4. Catalysis: Quantifying charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Trevor E.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-02-01

    Improving the design of catalytic materials for clean energy production requires a better understanding of their electronic properties, which remains experimentally challenging. Researchers now quantify the number of electrons transferred from metal nanoparticles to an oxide support as a function of particle size.

  5. Thermochemical characteristics of cellulose acetates with different degrees of acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, V. N.; Ur'yash, V. F.; Kushch, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of cellulose acetates with different degrees of acetylation are determined. It is established that there is a proportional dependence of these thermochemical characteristics vs. the degree of acetylation, weight fraction of bonded acetic acid, and molar mass of the repeating unit of cellulose acetates.

  6. Emerging Functions for N-Terminal Protein Acetylation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    N-terminal (Nt-) acetylation is a widespread but poorly understood co-translational protein modification. Two reports now shed light onto the proteome-wide dynamics and protein-specific consequences of Nt-acetylation in relation to plant development, stress-response, and protein stability, identifying this modification as a key regulator of diverse aspects of plant growth and behaviour. PMID:26319188

  7. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies. PMID:26519524

  8. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  9. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  10. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  11. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  12. Antemortem stress regulates protein acetylation and glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Qingwu W; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-07-01

    Although exhaustive research has established that preslaughter stress is a major factor contributing to pale, soft, exudative (PSE) meat, questions remain regarding the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis. In this study, the influence of preslaughter stress on protein acetylation in relationship to glycolysis was studied. The data show that antemortem swimming significantly enhanced glycolysis and the total acetylated proteins in postmortem longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of mice. Inhibition of protein acetylation by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors eliminated stress induced increase in glycolysis. Inversely, antemortem injection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and nicotinamide (NAM), further increased protein acetylation early postmortem and the glycolysis. These data provide new insight into the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis by showing that protein acetylation regulates glycolysis, which may participate in the regulation of preslaughter stress on glycolysis in postmortem muscle. PMID:26920270

  13. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  14. Quantifying Health Across Populations.

    PubMed

    Kershnar, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    In this article, I argue that as a theoretical matter, a population's health-level is best quantified via averagism. Averagism asserts that the health of a population is the average of members' health-levels. This model is better because it does not fall prey to a number of objections, including the repugnant conclusion, and because it is not arbitrary. I also argue that as a practical matter, population health-levels are best quantified via totalism. Totalism asserts that the health of a population is the sum of members' health-levels. Totalism is better here because it fits better with cost-benefit analysis and such an analysis is the best practical way to value healthcare outcomes. The two results are compatible because the theoretical and practical need not always align, whether in general or in the context of population health. PMID:26766584

  15. Quantifying Ubiquitin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Münch, Christian; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB)-driven signaling systems permeate biology, and are often integrated with other types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), most notably phosphorylation. Flux through such pathways is typically dictated by the fractional stoichiometry of distinct regulatory modifications and protein assemblies as well as the spatial organization of pathway components. Yet, we rarely understand the dynamics and stoichiometry of rate-limiting intermediates along a reaction trajectory. Here, we review how quantitative proteomic tools and enrichment strategies are being used to quantify UB-dependent signaling systems, and to integrate UB signaling with regulatory phosphorylation events. A key regulatory feature of ubiquitylation is that the identity of UB chain linkage types can control downstream processes. We also describe how proteomic and enzymological tools can be used to identify and quantify UB chain synthesis and linkage preferences. The emergence of sophisticated quantitative proteomic approaches will set a new standard for elucidating biochemical mechanisms of UB-driven signaling systems. PMID:26000850

  16. Specific oligopeptides in fermented soybean extract inhibit NF-κB-dependent iNOS and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Wu, Hong Min; Lee, Chan Gyu; Sung, Dae Il; Song, Hye Jung; Matsui, Toshiro; Kim, Han Bok; Kim, Sang Geon

    2014-11-01

    The ethanol extract of fermented soybean from Glycine max (chungkookjang, CHU) has been claimed to have chemopreventive and cytoprotective effects. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effect of CHU on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands treatment and attempted to identify the responsible active components. Nitric oxide (NO) content and iNOS levels in the media or RAW264.7 cells were measured using the Griess reagent and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. CHU treatment inhibited NO production and iNOS induction elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4L) in a concentration-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 productions were also diminished. Peptidoglycans (TLR2/6L) and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (TLR9L) from CHU inhibited iNOS induction, but not poly I:C (TLR3L) or loxoribine (TLF7L). The anti-inflammatory effect resulted from the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) through the inhibition of inhibitory-κB degradation. Of the representative components in CHU, specific oligopeptides (AFPG and GVAWWMY) had the ability to inhibit iNOS induction by LPS, whereas others failed to do so. Daidzein, an isoflavone used for comparative purposes, was active at a relatively higher concentration. In an animal model, oral administration of CHU to rats significantly diminished carrageenan-induced paw edema and iNOS induction. Our results demonstrate that CHU has anti-inflammatory effects against TLR ligands by inhibiting NF-κB activation, which may result from specific oligopeptide components in CHU. Since CHU is orally effective, dietary applications of CHU and/or the identified oligopeptides may be of use in the prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25184943

  17. SIAH-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of acetyl-transferases regulate the p53 response and protein acetylation.

    PubMed

    Grishina, Inna; Debus, Katherina; García-Limones, Carmen; Schneider, Constanze; Shresta, Amit; García, Carlos; Calzado, Marco A; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2012-12-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by lysine acetylation regulates many biological processes ranging from signal transduction to chromatin compaction. Here we identify the acetyl-transferases CBP/p300, Tip60 and PCAF as new substrates for the ubiquitin E3 ligases SIAH1 and SIAH2. While CBP/p300 can undergo ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent degradation by SIAH1 and SIAH2, the two other acetyl-transferases are exclusively degraded by SIAH2. Accordingly, SIAH-deficient cells show enhanced protein acetylation, thus revealing SIAH proteins as indirect regulators of the cellular acetylation status. Functional experiments show that Tip60/PCAF-mediated acetylation of the tumor suppressor p53 is antagonized by the p53 target gene SIAH2 which mediates ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation of both acetyl-transferases and consequently diminishes p53 acetylation and transcriptional activity. The p53 kinase HIPK2 mediates hierarchical phosphorylation of SIAH2 at 5 sites, which further boosts its activity as a ubiquitin E3 ligase for several substrates and therefore dampens the late p53 response. PMID:23044042

  18. Quantifying concordance in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehars, Sebastian; Grandis, Sebastian; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the concordance between different cosmological experiments is important for testing the validity of theoretical models and systematics in the observations. In earlier work, we thus proposed the Surprise, a concordance measure derived from the relative entropy between posterior distributions. We revisit the properties of the Surprise and describe how it provides a general, versatile, and robust measure for the agreement between data sets. We also compare it to other measures of concordance that have been proposed for cosmology. As an application, we extend our earlier analysis and use the Surprise to quantify the agreement between WMAP 9, Planck 13, and Planck 15 constraints on the Λ CDM model. Using a principle component analysis in parameter space, we find that the large Surprise between WMAP 9 and Planck 13 (S =17.6 bits, implying a deviation from consistency at 99.8% confidence) is due to a shift along a direction that is dominated by the amplitude of the power spectrum. The Planck 15 constraints deviate from the Planck 13 results (S =56.3 bits), primarily due to a shift in the same direction. The Surprise between WMAP and Planck consequently disappears when moving to Planck 15 (S =-5.1 bits). This means that, unlike Planck 13, Planck 15 is not in tension with WMAP 9. These results illustrate the advantages of the relative entropy and the Surprise for quantifying the disagreement between cosmological experiments and more generally as an information metric for cosmology.

  19. XPS investigation on the structure of two dipeptides studied as models of self-assembling oligopeptides: comparison between experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Monti, S.; Carravetta, V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption on TiO2 surface of two dipeptides AE (L-alanine-L-glutamic acid) and AK (L-alanine-L-lysine), that are 'building blocks' of the more complex self-complementary amphiphilic oligopeptides and are therefore a good model in the interpretation of the complex peptide spectra, has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The chemical structure and composition of thin films of both dipeptides on TiO2 were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Theoretical ab-initio calculations (ΔSCF) were also performed to simulate the spectra allowing a direct comparison between experiment and theory.

  20. Role of the Oligopeptide Permease ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Nutrient Acquisition and Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee L.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract. PMID:25156736

  1. Characterization of O-Acetylation of N-Acetylglucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Elvis; Rolain, Thomas; Courtin, Pascal; Guillot, Alain; Langella, Philippe; Hols, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) N-acetyl muramic acid (MurNAc) O-acetylation is widely spread in Gram-positive bacteria and is generally associated with resistance against lysozyme and endogenous autolysins. We report here the presence of O-acetylation on N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in Lactobacillus plantarum PG. This modification of glycan strands was never described in bacteria. Fine structural characterization of acetylated muropeptides released from L. plantarum PG demonstrated that both MurNAc and GlcNAc are O-acetylated in this species. These two PG post-modifications rely on two dedicated O-acetyltransferase encoding genes, named oatA and oatB, respectively. By analyzing the resistance to cell wall hydrolysis of mutant strains, we showed that GlcNAc O-acetylation inhibits N-acetylglucosaminidase Acm2, the major L. plantarum autolysin. In this bacterial species, inactivation of oatA, encoding MurNAc O-acetyltransferase, resulted in marked sensitivity to lysozyme. Moreover, MurNAc over-O-acetylation was shown to activate autolysis through the putative N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase LytH enzyme. Our data indicate that in L. plantarum, two different O-acetyltransferases play original and antagonistic roles in the modulation of the activity of endogenous autolysins. PMID:21586574

  2. Chitosan Molecular Structure as a Function of N-Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2011-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to characterize the structure and solubility of chitosan nanoparticle-like structures as a function of the deacetylation level (0, 40, 60, and 100%) and the spatial distribution of the N-acetyl groups in the particles. The polysaccharide chains of highly N-deacetylated particles where the N-acetyl groups are uniformly distributed present a high flexibility and preference for the relaxed two-fold helix and five-fold helix motifs. When these groups are confined to a given region of the particle, the chains adopt preferentially a two-fold helix with f and w values close to crystalline chitin. Nanoparticles with up to 40% acetylation are moderately soluble, forming stable aggregates when the N-acetyl groups are unevenly distributed. Systems with 60% or higher N-acetylation levels are insoluble and present similar degrees of swelling regardless the distribution of their N-acetyl groups. Overall particle solvation is highly affected by electrostatic forces resulting from the degree of acetylation. The water mobility and orientation around the polysaccharide chains affects the stability of the intramolecular O3- HO3(n) ... O5(n+ 1) hydrogen bond, which in turn controls particle aggregation.

  3. Role of Histone Acetylation in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Koprinarova, Miglena; Schnekenburger, Michael; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Core histone acetylation is a key prerequisite for chromatin decondensation and plays a pivotal role in regulation of chromatin structure, function and dynamics. The addition of acetyl groups disturbs histone/DNA interactions in the nucleosome and alters histone/histone interactions in the same or adjacent nucleosomes. Acetyl groups can also provide binding sites for recruitment of bromodomain (BRD)-containing non-histone readers and regulatory complexes to chromatin allowing them to perform distinct downstream functions. The presence of a particular acetylation pattern influences appearance of other histone modifications in the immediate vicinity forming the "histone code". Although the roles of the acetylation of particular lysine residues for the ongoing chromatin functions is largely studied, the epigenetic inheritance of histone acetylation is a debated issue. The dynamics of local or global histone acetylation is associated with fundamental cellular processes such as gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair or chromatin condensation. Therefore, it is an essential part of the epigenetic cell response to processes related to internal and external signals. PMID:26303420

  4. Quantifying light pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we review new available indicators useful to quantify and monitor light pollution, defined as the alteration of the natural quantity of light in the night environment due to introduction of manmade light. With the introduction of recent radiative transfer methods for the computation of light pollution propagation, several new indicators become available. These indicators represent a primary step in light pollution quantification, beyond the bare evaluation of the night sky brightness, which is an observational effect integrated along the line of sight and thus lacking the three-dimensional information.

  5. Quantifying surface normal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert B.; Oxley, Mark E.; Eismann, Michael T.; Goda, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    An inverse algorithm for surface normal estimation from thermal polarimetric imagery was developed and used to quantify the requirements on a priori information. Building on existing knowledge that calculates the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and the angle of polarization (AOP) for a given surface normal in a forward model (from an object's characteristics to calculation of the DOLP and AOP), this research quantifies the impact of a priori information with the development of an inverse algorithm to estimate surface normals from thermal polarimetric emissions in long-wave infrared (LWIR). The inverse algorithm assumes a polarized infrared focal plane array capturing LWIR intensity images which are then converted to Stokes vectors. Next, the DOLP and AOP are calculated from the Stokes vectors. Last, the viewing angles, θ v, to the surface normals are estimated assuming perfect material information about the imaged scene. A sensitivity analysis is presented to quantitatively describe the a priori information's impact on the amount of error in the estimation of surface normals, and a bound is determined given perfect information about an object. Simulations explored the impact of surface roughness (σ) and the real component (n) of a dielectric's complex index of refraction across a range of viewing angles (θ v) for a given wavelength of observation.

  6. Evidence for N----O acetyl migration as the mechanism for O acetylation of peptidoglycan in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, C; Clarke, A J

    1991-01-01

    O-acetylated peptidoglycan was purified from Proteus mirabilis grown in the presence of specifically radiolabelled glucosamine derivatives, and the migration of the radiolabel was monitored. Mild-base hydrolysis of the isolated peptidoglycan (to release ester-linked acetate) from cells grown in the presence of 40 microM [acetyl-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in the release of [3H]acetate, as detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The inclusion of either acetate, pyruvate, or acetyl phosphate, each at 1 mM final concentration, did not result in a diminution of mild-base-released [3H]acetate levels. No such release of [3H]acetate was observed with peptidoglycan isolated from either Escherichia coli incubated with the same radiolabel or P. mirabilis grown with [1,6-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or D-[1-14C]glucosamine. These observations support a hypothesis that O acetylation occurs by N----O acetyl transfer within the sacculus. A decrease in [3H]acetate release by mild-base hydrolysis was observed with the peptidoglycan of P. mirabilis cultures incubated in the presence of antagonists of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, penicillin G and D-cycloserine. The absence of free-amino sugars in the peptidoglycan of P. mirabilis but the detection of glucosamine in spent culture broths implies that N----O transacetylation is intimately associated with peptidoglycan turnover. PMID:2066331

  7. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T.; Bakkers, Mark J. G.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host–pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1—a previously identified human candidate gene—is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  8. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T; Bakkers, Mark J G; Buettner, Falk F R; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A; de Groot, Raoul J; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host-pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1--a previously identified human candidate gene--is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  9. Mass spectrometry of oligopeptides in the presence of large amounts of alkali halides using desorption/ionization induced by neutral cluster impact.

    PubMed

    Portz, André; Baur, Markus; Gebhardt, Christoph R; Dürr, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Oligopeptides in the presence of large amounts of salt were desorbed and ionized using desorption/ionization induced by neutral clusters (DINeC) for further analysis by means of mass spectrometry (MS). Using oligopeptides in alkali halide solutions as a model system, DINeC was shown to yield clear and fragmentation free mass spectra of the biomolecules even from environments with a large excess of salt. The results were traced back to a phase separation between salt and biomolecules during sample preparation. The ratio between alkali metal complexes [M+A](+) and bare biomolecules [M+H](+) was controlled using different preparation schemes. DINeC was applied to the products of a tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin in the presence of sodium chloride; the results of a mass fingerprint analysis did not show a major difference for the spectra with and without salt in the original solution. The metal-ion/peptide interaction was further investigated by means of tandem-MS. PMID:26825286

  10. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function

    PubMed Central

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S.; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  11. Rapid test for acetyl-methyl-carbinol formation by Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, S M; Nichols, C W; Qadri, S G; Villarreal, A

    1978-01-01

    A modified Voges-Proskauer test is described which distinguishes within 4 to 8 hours between organisms that can produce acetyl-methyl-carbinol (acetoin) from glucose fermentation and those that cannot. PMID:363745

  12. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function.

    PubMed

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  13. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Joseph E.; David, Larry L.; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification – mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  14. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  15. Partially Acetylated Sugarcane Bagasse For Wicking Oil From Contaminated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sugarcane bagasse was partially acetylated to enhance its oil-wicking ability in saturated environments while holding moisture for hydrocarbon biodegradation. The water sorption capacity of raw bagasse was reduced fourfold after treatment, which indicated considerably increased ...

  16. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  17. Rapid test for acetyl-methyl-carbinol formation by Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Qadri, S M; Nichols, C W; Qadri, S G; Villarreal, A

    1978-10-01

    A modified Voges-Proskauer test is described which distinguishes within 4 to 8 hours between organisms that can produce acetyl-methyl-carbinol (acetoin) from glucose fermentation and those that cannot. PMID:363745

  18. On quantifying insect movements

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, J.A.; Crist, T.O. ); Milne, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    We elaborate on methods described by Turchin, Odendaal Rausher for quantifying insect movement pathways. We note the need to scale measurement resolution to the study insects and the questions being asked, and we discuss the use of surveying instrumentation for recording sequential positions of individuals on pathways. We itemize several measures that may be used to characterize movement pathways and illustrate these by comparisons among several Eleodes beetles occurring in shortgrass steppe. The fractal dimension of pathways may provide insights not available from absolute measures of pathway configuration. Finally, we describe a renormalization procedure that may be used to remove sequential interdependence among locations of moving individuals while preserving the basic attributes of the pathway.

  19. Determination of Oligopeptide Diversity within a Natural Population of Microcystis spp. (Cyanobacteria) by Typing Single Colonies by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fastner, Jutta; Erhard, Marcel; von Döhren, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Besides the most prominent peptide toxin, microcystin, the cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. have been shown to produce a large variety of other bioactive oligopeptides. We investigated for the first time the oligopeptide diversity within a natural Microcystis population by analyzing single colonies directly with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The results demonstrate a high diversity of known cyanobacterial peptides such as microcystins, anabaenopeptins, microginins, aeruginosins, and cyanopeptolins, but also many unknown substances in the Microcystis colonies. Oligopeptide patterns were mostly related to specific Microcystis taxa. Microcystis aeruginosa (Kütz.) Kütz. colonies contained mainly microcystins, occasionally accompanied by aeruginosins. In contrast, microcystins were not detected in Microcystis ichthyoblabe Kütz.; instead, colonies of this species contained anabaenopeptins and/or microginins or unknown peptides. Within a third group, Microcystis wesenbergii (Kom.) Kom. in Kondr., chiefly a cyanopeptolin and an unknown peptide were found. Similar patterns, however, were also found in colonies which could not be identified to species level. The significance of oligopeptides as a chemotaxonomic tool within the genus Microcystis is discussed. It could be demonstrated that the typing of single colonies by MALDI-TOF MS may be a valuable tool for ecological studies of the genus Microcystis as well as in early warning of toxic cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:11679328

  20. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  1. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false N-Acetyl-L-methionine. 172.372 Section 172.372 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.372 N-Acetyl-L-methionine....

  2. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Jin, Weilin

    2015-01-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein has been observed during mouse and human brain development and in multiple sclerosis in several studies, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we provide insight into the mechanism by which acetylation of Olig1 regulates its unique nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling during oligodendrocyte development and how the acetylation status of Olig1 modulates its distinct function in the nucleus versus the cytoplasm. The current study provides a unique example of a lineage-specific transcription factor that is actively translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as the cell differentiates. Importantly, we demonstrate that this process is tightly controlled by acetylation at a single

  3. Nucleosome Dancing at the Tempo of Histone Tail Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Angélique; Thiriet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The impact of histone acetylation on transcription was revealed over 50 years ago by Allfrey and colleagues. However, it took decades for an understanding of the fine mechanism by which this posttranslational modification affects chromatin structure and promotes transcription. Here, we review breakthroughs linking histone tail acetylation, histone dynamics, and transcription. We also discuss the histone exchange during transcription and highlight the important function of a pool of non-chromatinized histones in chromatin dynamics. PMID:26184324

  4. Quantitative determination of sulfisoxazole and its three N-acetylated metabolites using HPLC-MS/MS, and the saturable pharmacokinetics of sulfisoxazole in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyungsoo; Baek, Moon-Chang; Kang, Wonku

    2016-09-10

    Sulfisoxazole (SFX) is still used in combination with trimethoprim in cattle despite adverse drug reactions (e.g., urolithiasis). Recently, SFX is known to be a promising repositioned drug candidate for pulmonary hypertension and cancer. We developed a simultaneous determination method of SFX and its N-acetylated metabolites (N(1)-acetyl SFX, N1AS; N(4)-acetyl SFX, N4AS; diacetyl SFX, DAS) using HPLC-MS/MS for the first time, and examined the pharmacokinetics of SFX in mice. N1AS and DAS were converted rapidly to SFX and N4AS, respectively, in mouse plasma. The time courses of plasma SFX and N4AS concentrations were well-characterised following the oral administration of SFX to mice. The absorption, metabolism, and/or excretion of SFX given at >700mg/kg may be saturable, and in contrast to humans and rats, the extent of systemic exposure of mice to N4AS was much greater than that of SFX. Interestingly, the acetyl groups at both N1- and N4-positions were degraded during the ionisation required to generate precursor ions. In additional experiments the carboxyl group of N-acetyl-5-aminosalicylic acid (NA5AS) was lost instead of the acetyl group during the ionisation, and acetaminophen (AAP) appeared. As the acetyl and carboxyl groups of some substances can be degraded during ionisation in the mass spectrometer, caution is appropriate when it is sought to simultaneously quantify similar structures containing these moieties; chromatographic separation is essential. PMID:27454084

  5. Hexavalent chromium-induced differential disruption of cortical microtubules in some Fabaceae species is correlated with acetylation of α-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Michalopoulou, Vasiliki A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the cortical microtubules (MTs) of five species of the Fabaceae family (Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Vigna sinensis, Vigna angularis, and Medicago sativa) were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after immunolocalization of total tubulin with conventional immunofluorescence techniques and of acetylated α-tubulin with the specific 6-11B-1 monoclonal antibody. Moreover, total α-tubulin and acetylated α-tubulin were quantified by Western immunoblotting and scanning densitometry. Results showed the universality of Cr(VI) detrimental effects to cortical MTs, which proved to be a sensitive and reliable subcellular marker for monitoring Cr(VI) toxicity in plant cells. However, a species-specific response was recorded, and a correlation of MT disturbance with the acetylation status of α-tubulin was demonstrated. In V. faba, MTs were depolymerized at the gain of cytoplasmic tubulin background and displayed low α-tubulin acetylation, while in P. sativum, V. sinensis, V. angularis, and M. sativa, MTs became bundled and changed orientation from perpendicular to oblique or longitudinal. Bundled MTs were highly acetylated as determined by both immunofluorescence and Western immunoblotting. Tubulin acetylation in P. sativum and M. sativa preceded MT bundling; in V. sinensis it followed MT derangement, while in V. angularis the two phenomena coincided. Total α-tubulin remained constant in all treatments. Should acetylation be an indicator of MT stabilization, it is deduced that bundled MTs became stabilized, lost their dynamic properties, and were rendered inactive. Results of this report allow the conclusion that Cr(VI) toxicity disrupts MTs and deranges the MT-mediated functions either by depolymerizing or stabilizing them. PMID:26015161

  6. An acetylation switch controls TDP-43 function and aggregation propensity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Todd J; Hwang, Andrew W; Restrepo, Clark R; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 pathology is a disease hallmark that characterizes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP). Although a critical role for TDP-43 as an RNA-binding protein has emerged, the regulation of TDP-43 function is poorly understood. Here, we identify lysine acetylation as a novel post-translational modification controlling TDP-43 function and aggregation. We provide evidence that TDP-43 acetylation impairs RNA binding and promotes accumulation of insoluble, hyper-phosphorylated TDP-43 species that largely resemble pathological inclusions in ALS and FTLD-TDP. Moreover, biochemical and cell-based assays identify oxidative stress as a signalling cue that promotes acetylated TDP-43 aggregates that are readily engaged by the cellular defense machinery. Importantly, acetylated TDP-43 lesions are found in ALS patient spinal cord, indicating that aberrant TDP-43 acetylation and loss of RNA binding are linked to TDP-43 proteinopathy. Thus, modulating TDP-43 acetylation represents a plausible strategy to fine-tune TDP-43 activity, which could provide new therapeutic avenues for TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:25556531

  7. Effects of peptide acetylation and dimethylation on electrospray ionization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kang, Jeong Won; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2016-02-01

    Peptide acetylation and dimethylation have been widely used to derivatize primary amino groups (peptide N-termini and the ε-amino group of lysines) for chemical isotope labeling of quantitative proteomics or for affinity tag labeling for selection and enrichment of labeled peptides. However, peptide acetylation results in signal suppression during electrospray ionization (ESI) due to charge neutralization. In contrast, dimethylated peptides show increased ionization efficiency after derivatization, since dimethylation increases hydrophobicity and maintains a positive charge on the peptide under common LC conditions. In this study, we quantitatively compared the ESI efficiencies of acetylated and dimethylated model peptides and tryptic peptides of BSA. Dimethylated peptides showed higher ionization efficiency than acetylated peptides for both model peptides and tryptic BSA peptides. At the proteome level, peptide dimethylation led to better protein identification than peptide acetylation when tryptic peptides of mouse brain lysate were analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS. These results demonstrate that dimethylation of tryptic peptides enhanced ESI efficiency and provided up to two-fold improved protein identification sensitivity in comparison with acetylation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26889926

  8. An acetylation switch controls TDP-43 function and aggregation propensity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Hwang, Andrew W.; Restrepo, Clark R.; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 pathology is a disease hallmark that characterizes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP). Although a critical role for TDP-43 as an RNA-binding protein has emerged, the regulation of TDP-43 function is poorly understood. Here we identify lysine acetylation as a novel post-translational modification controlling TDP-43 function and aggregation. We provide evidence that TDP-43 acetylation impairs RNA-binding and promotes accumulation of insoluble, hyper-phosphorylated TDP-43 species that largely resemble pathological inclusions in ALS and FTLD-TDP. Moreover, biochemical and cell-based assays identify oxidative stress as a signaling cue that promotes acetylated TDP-43 aggregates that are readily engaged by the cellular defense machinery. Importantly, acetylated TDP-43 lesions are found in ALS patient spinal cord, indicating that aberrant TDP-43 acetylation and loss of RNA binding are linked to TDP-43 proteinopathy. Thus, modulating TDP-43 acetylation represents a plausible strategy to fine-tune TDP-43 activity, which could provide new therapeutic avenues for TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:25556531

  9. Methods to detect NF-κB Acetylation and Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, JinJing; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-translational modifications of NF-κB, including acetylation and methylation, have emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for determining the duration and strength of NF-κB nuclear activity as well as its transcriptional output. Within the seven NF-κB family proteins, the RelA subunit of NF-κB is the most studied for its regulation by lysine acetylation and methylation. Acetylation or methylation at different lysine residues modulates distinct functions of NF-κB, including DNA binding and transcription activity, protein stability, and its interaction with NF-κB modulators. Here, we describe the experimental methods to monitor the in vitro and in vivo acetylated or methylated forms of NF-κB. These methods include radiolabeling the acetyl- or methyl- groups and immunoblotting with pan or site-specific acetyl- or methyl-lysine antibodies. Radiolabeling is useful in the initial validation of the modifications. Immunoblotting with antibodies provides a rapid and powerful approach to detect and analyze the functions of these modifications in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25736763

  10. Effects of acetyl-L-carnitine on lamb oocyte blastocyst rate, ultrastructure, and mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Reader, Karen L; Cox, Neil R; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Viable lambs can be produced after transfer of in vitro-derived embryos from oocytes harvested from prepubertal lambs. However, this occurs at a much lower efficiency than from adult ewe oocyte donors. The reduced competence of prepubertal oocytes is believed to be due, at least in part, to deficiencies in cytoplasmic maturation. Differences in the cytoplasmic ultrastructure between prepubertal and adult oocytes have been described in the sheep, pig, and cow. Prepubertal lamb oocytes have been shown to have a different distribution of mitochondria and lipid droplets, and less mitochondria and storage vesicles than their adult counterparts. L-carnitine plays a role in supplying energy to the cell by transporting long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for β-oxidation to produce ATP. Both L-carnitine and its derivative acetyl-L-carnitine have been reported to increase the blastocyst rate of oocytes from mice, cows, and pigs, treated during IVM. L-carnitine has also been shown to increase mitochondrial biogenesis in adipose cells. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine if treatment of oocytes from prepubertal lambs with acetyl-L-carnitine during IVM could increase the blastocyst rate and alter mitochondria, vesicle, or lipid droplet number, volume, or distribution. The blastocyst rate was doubled in prepubertal lamb oocytes treated with acetyl-L-carnitine when compared to untreated oocytes (10.0% and 4.6%, respectively; P = 0.028). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and stereology techniques were used to quantify organelles in untreated and acetyl-L-carnitine-treated lamb oocytes, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods were used to measure the mitochondrial DNA copy number. There were no differences in mitochondrial volume, number, or mitochondrial DNA copy number. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment increased the cytoplasmic volume (P = 0.015) of the oocytes, and there were trends toward an increase in the vesicle volume (P = 0

  11. Quantifier Comprehension in Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Corey T.; Clark, Robin; Moore, Peachie; Grossman, Murray

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases to examine a formal linguistic distinction between classes of generalized quantifiers, like "some X" and "less than half of X." Our model of quantifier comprehension proposes that number knowledge is required to understand both first-order and higher-order quantifiers.…

  12. Quantifying solvated electrons' delocalization.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2015-07-28

    Delocalized, solvated electrons are a topic of much recent interest. We apply the electron delocalization range EDR(r;u) (J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 144104) to quantify the extent to which a solvated electron at point r in a calculated wavefunction delocalizes over distance u. Calculations on electrons in one-dimensional model cavities illustrate fundamental properties of the EDR. Mean-field calculations on hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-) show that the density-matrix-based EDR reproduces existing molecular-orbital-based measures of delocalization. Correlated calculations on hydrated electrons and electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters illustrates how electron correlation tends to move surface- and cavity-bound electrons onto the cluster or cavity surface. Applications to multiple solvated electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters provide a novel perspective on the interplay of delocalization and strong correlation central to lithium-ammonia solutions' concentration-dependent insulator-to-metal transition. The results motivate continued application of the EDR to simulations of delocalized electrons. PMID:25994586

  13. Uncertainty quantified trait predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazayeli, Farideh; Kattge, Jens; Banerjee, Arindam; Schrodt, Franziska; Reich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Functional traits of organisms are key to understanding and predicting biodiversity and ecological change, which motivates continuous collection of traits and their integration into global databases. Such composite trait matrices are inherently sparse, severely limiting their usefulness for further analyses. On the other hand, traits are characterized by the phylogenetic trait signal, trait-trait correlations and environmental constraints, all of which provide information that could be used to statistically fill gaps. We propose the application of probabilistic models which, for the first time, utilize all three characteristics to fill gaps in trait databases and predict trait values at larger spatial scales. For this purpose we introduce BHPMF, a hierarchical Bayesian extension of Probabilistic Matrix Factorization (PMF). PMF is a machine learning technique which exploits the correlation structure of sparse matrices to impute missing entries. BHPMF additionally utilizes the taxonomic hierarchy for trait prediction. Implemented in the context of a Gibbs Sampler MCMC approach BHPMF provides uncertainty estimates for each trait prediction. We present comprehensive experimental results on the problem of plant trait prediction using the largest database of plant traits, where BHPMF shows strong empirical performance in uncertainty quantified trait prediction, outperforming the state-of-the-art based on point estimates. Further, we show that BHPMF is more accurate when it is confident, whereas the error is high when the uncertainty is high.

  14. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems. PMID:26716453

  15. Quantifying Loopy Network Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Katifori, Eleni; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2012-01-01

    Biology presents many examples of planar distribution and structural networks having dense sets of closed loops. An archetype of this form of network organization is the vasculature of dicotyledonous leaves, which showcases a hierarchically-nested architecture containing closed loops at many different levels. Although a number of approaches have been proposed to measure aspects of the structure of such networks, a robust metric to quantify their hierarchical organization is still lacking. We present an algorithmic framework, the hierarchical loop decomposition, that allows mapping loopy networks to binary trees, preserving in the connectivity of the trees the architecture of the original graph. We apply this framework to investigate computer generated graphs, such as artificial models and optimal distribution networks, as well as natural graphs extracted from digitized images of dicotyledonous leaves and vasculature of rat cerebral neocortex. We calculate various metrics based on the asymmetry, the cumulative size distribution and the Strahler bifurcation ratios of the corresponding trees and discuss the relationship of these quantities to the architectural organization of the original graphs. This algorithmic framework decouples the geometric information (exact location of edges and nodes) from the metric topology (connectivity and edge weight) and it ultimately allows us to perform a quantitative statistical comparison between predictions of theoretical models and naturally occurring loopy graphs. PMID:22701593

  16. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  17. A SUMO-acetyl switch in PXR biology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenqi; Sun, Mengxi; Zhang, Shupei; Shen, Xunan; Galeva, Nadezhda; Williams, Todd D; Staudinger, Jeff L

    2016-09-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) of nuclear receptor superfamily members regulates various aspects of their biology to include sub-cellular localization, the repertoire of protein-binding partners, as well as their stability and mode of degradation. The nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) is a master-regulator of the drug-inducible gene expression in liver and intestine. The PXR-mediated gene activation program is primarily recognized to increase drug metabolism, drug transport, and drug efflux pathways in these tissues. The activation of PXR also has important implications in significant human diseases including inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. Our recent investigations reveal that PXR is modified by multiple PTMs to include phosphorylation, SUMOylation, and ubiquitination. Using both primary cultures of hepatocytes and cell-based assays, we show here that PXR is modified through acetylation on lysine residues. Further, we show that increased acetylation of PXR stimulates its increased SUMO-modification to support active transcriptional suppression. Pharmacologic inhibition of lysine de-acetylation using trichostatin A (TSA) alters the sub-cellular localization of PXR in cultured hepatocytes, and also has a profound impact upon PXR transactivation capacity. Both the acetylation and SUMOylation status of the PXR protein is affected by its ability to associate with the lysine de-acetylating enzyme histone de-acetylase (HDAC)3 in a complex with silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT). Taken together, our data support a model in which a SUMO-acetyl 'switch' occurs such that acetylation of PXR likely stimulates SUMO-modification of PXR to promote the active repression of PXR-target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26883953

  18. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:20016921

  19. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  1. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K; Jin, Weilin; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-12-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. PMID:26631469

  2. On the use of an explicit chemical mechanism to dissect peroxy acetyl nitrate formation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Likun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xinfeng; Blake, Donald R; Gao, Jian; Nie, Wei; Gao, Rui; Gao, Xiaomei; Xu, Zheng; Ding, Aijun; Huang, Yu; Lee, Shuncheng; Chen, Yizhen; Wang, Shulan; Chai, Fahe; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-12-01

    Peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) is a key component of photochemical smog and plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Though it has been known that PAN is produced via reactions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with some volatile organic compounds (VOCs), it is difficult to quantify the contributions of individual precursor species. Here we use an explicit photochemical model--Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) model--to dissect PAN formation and identify principal precursors, by analyzing measurements made in Beijing in summer 2008. PAN production was sensitive to both NOx and VOCs. Isoprene was the predominant VOC precursor at suburb with biogenic impact, whilst anthropogenic hydrocarbons dominated at downtown. PAN production was attributable to a relatively small class of compounds including NOx, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes, trans/cis-2-butenes, toluene, and propene. MCM can advance understanding of PAN photochemistry to a species level, and provide more relevant recommendations for mitigating photochemical pollution in large cities. PMID:25194270

  3. Bioanalysis of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate as a marker of glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Rojas, Camilo J; Hill, Jeanette R; Shaw, Michael; Slusher, Barbara S

    2010-09-01

    We report the characterization of two methods for the analysis of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) in biological fluids. In the first method, NAAG concentrations were calculated based on differences between glutamate concentrations before and after NAAG hydrolysis with exogenous glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by fluorescence detection. In the second method, NAAG levels were quantified directly using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Analyses of NAAG levels in human cerebrospinal fluid samples using either method gave similar results within experimental error, confirming the validity of the two independent measurements. These methods will be useful in future clinical trials to assess drug-induced GCP II inhibition in biological matrices. PMID:20434427

  4. Cheese peptidomics: a detailed study on the evolution of the oligopeptide fraction in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from curd to 24 months of aging.

    PubMed

    Sforza, S; Cavatorta, V; Lambertini, F; Galaverna, G; Dossena, A; Marchelli, R

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we performed a detailed evaluation of the evolution of the oligopeptide fractions in samples of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from the curd up to 24 mo of aging. The samples were taken from wheels produced the same day, in the same factory, from the same milk, during the same caseification process, thus simplifying the natural variability of a whey-based starter fermentation. This unique and homogeneous sampling plan, never reported before in the literature, provided a detailed study of the peptides produced by enzymatic events during Parmigiano-Reggiano aging. Given the large dimensions of the 35-kg wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano, samples were taken from both the internal and external parts of the cheese, to evidence eventual differences in the oligopeptide composition of the different parts. Fifty-seven peptides were considered, being among the most abundant during at least one of the periods of ripening considered, and their semiquantification indicated that the peptide fraction of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese constantly evolves during the aging period. Five trends in its evolution were outlined, which could be clearly correlated to the enzymatic activities present in the cheese, making it possible to discriminate cheeses according to their aging time. Several known bioactive peptides were also found to be present in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese samples, and for the first time, the age at which they are most abundant has been identified. Aged cheeses have been shown to be dominated by nonproteolytic aminoacyl derivatives, a new class of peptide-like molecules recently reported. Finally, the changing peptide pattern may be related to the changing enzymatic activities occurring inside the cheeses during the aging period, which, in turn, are also related to the microbiological composition. PMID:22720910

  5. Determination of NAT2 acetylation status in the Greenlandic population.

    PubMed

    Geller, Frank; Soborg, Bolette; Koch, Anders; Michelsen, Sascha Wilk; Bjorn-Mortensen, Karen; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Birch, Emilie; Nordholm, Anne Christine; Johansen, Marie Mila Broby; Børresen, Malene Landbo; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads

    2016-04-01

    N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is a well-studied phase II xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme relevant in drug metabolism and cancerogenesis. NAT2 activity is largely determined by genetic polymorphisms in the coding region of the corresponding gene. We investigated NAT2 acetylation status in 1556 individuals from Greenland based on four different single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panels and the tagging SNP rs1495741. There was good concordance between the NAT2 status inferred by the different SNP combinations. Overall, the fraction of slow acetylators was low with 17.5 % and varied depending on the degree of Inuit ancestry; in individuals with <50 % Inuit ancestry, we observed more than 25 % slow acetylators reflecting European ancestry. Greenland has a high incidence of tuberculosis, and individual dosing of isoniazid according to NAT2 status has been shown to improve treatment and reduce side effects. Our findings could be a first step in pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Greenland. PMID:25794903

  6. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol. PMID:25370498

  7. Synthesis of polyrotaxanes from acetyl-β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristić, I. S.; Nikolić, L.; Nikolić, V.; Ilić, D.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    Polyrotaxanes are intermediary products in the synthesis of topological gels. They are created by inclusion complex formation of hydrophobic linear macromolecules with cyclodextrins or their derivatives. Then, pairs of cyclodextrin molecules with covalently linkage were practically forming the nodes of the semi-flexible polymer network. Such gels are called topological gels and they can absorb huge quantities of water due to the net flexibility allowing the poly(ethylene oxide) chains to slide through the cyclodextrin cavities, without being pulled out altogether. For polyrotaxane formation poly(ethylene oxide) was used like linear macromolecules. There are hydroxyl groups at poly(ethylene oxide) chains, whereby the linking of the voluminous molecules should be made. To avoid the reaction of cyclodextrin OH groups with stoppers, they should be protected by, e.g., acetylation. In this work, the acetylation of the OH groups of β-cyclodextrin was performed by acetic acid anhydride with iodine as the catalyst. The acetylation reaction was assessed by the FTIR and HPLC method. By the HPLC analysis was found that the acetylation was completed in 20 minutes. Inserting of poly(ethylene oxide) with 4000 g/mol molecule mass into acetyl-β-cyclodextrin with 2:1 poly(ethylene oxide) monomer unit to acetyl-β-cyclodextrin ratio was also monitored by FTIR, and it was found that the process was completed in 12 h at the temperature of 10°C. If the process is performed at temperatures above 10°C, or for periods longer than 12 hours, the process of uncontrolled hydrolysis of acetate groups was initiated.

  8. Interaction of RNA polymerase II with acetylated nucleosomal core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pineiro, M.; Gonzalez, P.J.; Hernandez, F.; Palacian, E. )

    1991-05-31

    Chemical acetylation of nucleosomal cores is accompanied by an increase in their efficiency as in vitro transcription templates. Low amounts of acetic anhydride cause preferential modification of the amino-terminal tails of core histones. Modification of these domains, which causes moderate structural effects, is apparently correlated with the observed stimulation of RNA synthesis. In contrast, extensive modification of the globular regions of core histones, which is accompanied by a large structural relaxation of the particle, causes little additional effect on transcription. Acetylation of the amino-terminal domains of histones might stimulate transcription by changing the interaction of the histone tails with components of the transcriptional machinery.

  9. Histone acetylation: a switch between repressive and permissive chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Eberharter, Anton; Becker, Peter B.

    2002-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic chromatin has a major impact on all nuclear processes involving DNA substrates. Gene expression is affected by the positioning of individual nucleosomes relative to regulatory sequence elements, by the folding of the nucleosomal fiber into higher-order structures and by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus. Because site-specific acetylation of nucleosomal histones influences all three aspects of chromatin organization, it is central to the switch between permissive and repressive chromatin structure. The targeting of enzymes that modulate the histone acetylation status of chromatin, in synergy with the effects mediated by other chromatin remodeling factors, is central to gene regulation. PMID:11882541

  10. Molecular characterization of a new acetyl xylan esterase (AXEII) from edible straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea with both de-O-acetylation and de-N-acetylation activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiufeng; Ding, Shaojun

    2009-06-01

    A new Volvariella volvacea gene encoding a carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 4 acetyl xylan esterase (AXE) (designated as VvaxeII) was cloned and characterized. The coded polypeptide had 253 amino acid residues, with the first 19 serving as a secretion signal peptide. The VvaxeII transcript levels were high when the fungus was grown on oat spelt xylan, cellobiose, microcrystalline cellulose, carboxymethyl-cellulose, lactose, galactose, and chitin from crab as carbon sources. The recombinant VvAXEII produced by expression of VvaxeII in Pichia pastoris exhibited activity toward acetylated oat spelt xylan and various chitinous substrates, but was totally inactive against artificial aromatic acetates such as beta-nitrophenyl, 4-methylumbelliferyl, and alpha-naphthyl acetates. Enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis was maximal at pH 7.0 and 60 degrees C, and reciprocal plots revealed an apparent K(m) value of 1.42 mg mL(-1) and a V(max) value of 833 IU micromol(-1) protein using glycol chitin as a substrate. The recombinant VvAXEII requires activation by bivalent cations such as Co2+ and Mg2+. Interestingly, the recombinant VvAXEII showed no deacetylation activity to fully acetylated monosaccharides such as xylose tetraacetate. PMID:19473250

  11. Tubulin acetylation: responsible enzymes, biological functions and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules have important functions ranging from maintenance of cell morphology to subcellular transport, cellular signaling, cell migration, and formation of cell polarity. At the organismal level, microtubules are crucial for various biological processes, such as viral entry, inflammation, immunity, learning and memory in mammals. Microtubules are subject to various covalent modifications. One such modification is tubulin acetylation, which is associated with stable microtubules and conserved from protists to humans. In the past three decades, this reversible modification has been studied extensively. In mammals, its level is mainly governed by opposing actions of α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (ATAT1) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Knockout studies of the mouse enzymes have yielded new insights into biological functions of tubulin acetylation. Abnormal levels of this modification are linked to neurological disorders, cancer, heart diseases and other pathological conditions, thereby yielding important therapeutic implications. This review summarizes related studies and concludes that tubulin acetylation is important for regulating microtubule architecture and maintaining microtubule integrity. Together with detyrosination, glutamylation and other modifications, tubulin acetylation may form a unique 'language' to regulate microtubule structure and function. PMID:26227334

  12. Mass spectrometry-based detection of protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Skinner, Mary E.; Lombard, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Improved sample preparation techniques and increasingly sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) analysis have revolutionized the study of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). Here, we describe a general approach for immunopurification and MS-based identification of acetylated proteins in biological samples. This approach is useful characterizing changes in the acetylome in response to biological interventions (1). PMID:24014401

  13. Prebiotically plausible oligoribonucleotide ligation facilitated by chemoselective acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Frank R.; Chan, Christopher K. W.; Duffy, Colm D.; Gerland, Béatrice; Islam, Saidul; Powner, Matthew W.; Sutherland, John D.; Xu, Jianfeng

    2013-05-01

    The recent synthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleoside-2‧,3‧-cyclic phosphates under prebiotically plausible conditions has strengthened the case for the involvement of ribonucleic acid (RNA) at an early stage in the origin of life. However, a prebiotic conversion of these weakly activated monomers, and their purine counterparts, to the 3‧,5‧-linked RNA polymers of extant biochemistry has been lacking (previous attempts led only to short oligomers with mixed linkages). Here we show that the 2‧-hydroxyl group of oligoribonucleotide-3‧-phosphates can be chemoselectively acetylated in water under prebiotically credible conditions, which allows rapid and efficient template-directed ligation. The 2‧-O-acetyl group at the ligation junction of the product RNA strand can be removed under conditions that leave the internucleotide bonds intact. Remarkably, acetylation of mixed oligomers that possess either 2‧- or 3‧-terminal phosphates is selective for the 2‧-hydroxyl group of the latter. This newly discovered chemistry thus suggests a prebiotic route from ribonucleoside-2‧,3‧-cyclic phosphates to predominantly 3‧,5‧-linked RNA via partially 2‧-O-acetylated RNA.

  14. Monitoring sterol uptake, acetylation, and export in yeast.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vineet; Schneiter, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are essential lipid components of eukaryotic membranes. They are synthesized in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) from where they are efficiently transported to the plasma membrane, which harbors ~90% of the free sterol pool of the cell. The molecular mechanisms that govern this lipid transport, however, are not well characterized and are challenging to analyze. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers the opportunity to circumvent some of the technical limitations associated with studying this forward transport of sterols from the ER to the plasma membrane, because the organism can also take up sterols from the environment, incorporate them into the plasma membrane and transport them back to the ER, where the free sterol is converted to steryl esters. This reverse sterol transport, however, occurs only under anaerobic conditions, where the cells become sterol auxotroph, or in mutant cells that cannot synthesize heme. The reverse sterol transport pathway, however, is more amenable to experimental studies, because arrival of the sterol in the ER membrane can be monitored unambiguously by following the formation of steryl esters. Apart from sterol acylation, we have recently described a reversible sterol acetylation cycle that is operating in the lumen of the ER. Acetylation occurs on both cholesterol and pregnenolone, a steroid precursor, and serves as a signal for export of the acetylated sterols into the culture media. The time-dependent appearance of acetylated sterols in the culture supernatant thus provides a new means to monitor the forward transport of chemically modified sterols out of the ER. PMID:19784602

  15. Acetylation regulates DNA repair mechanisms in human cells.

    PubMed

    Piekna-Przybylska, Dorota; Bambara, Robert A; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2016-06-01

    The p300-mediated acetylation of enzymes involved in DNA repair and replication has been previously shown to stimulate or inhibit their activities in reconstituted systems. To explore the role of acetylation on DNA repair in cells we constructed plasmid substrates carrying inactivating damages in the EGFP reporter gene, which should be repaired in cells through DNA mismatch repair (MMR) or base excision repair (BER) mechanisms. We analyzed efficiency of repair within these plasmid substrates in cells exposed to deacetylase and acetyltransferase inhibitors, and also in cells deficient in p300 acetyltransferase. Our results indicate that protein acetylation improves DNA mismatch repair in MMR-proficient HeLa cells and also in MMR-deficient HCT116 cells. Moreover, results suggest that stimulated repair of mismatches in MMR-deficient HCT116 cells is done though a strand-displacement synthesis mechanism described previously for Okazaki fragments maturation and also for the EXOI-independent pathway of MMR. Loss of p300 reduced repair of mismatches in MMR-deficient cells, but did not have evident effects on BER mechanisms, including the long patch BER pathway. Hypoacetylation of the cells in the presence of acetyltransferase inhibitor, garcinol generally reduced efficiency of BER of 8-oxoG damage, indicating that some steps in the pathway are stimulated by acetylation. PMID:27104361

  16. An Acetylation Switch Regulates SUMO-Dependent Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Rebecca; Chien, Christopher D.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Muller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The attachment of the SUMO modifier to proteins controls cellular signaling pathways through noncovalent binding to SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs). Canonical SIMs contain a core of hydrophobic residues that bind to a hydrophobic pocket on SUMO. Negatively charged residues of SIMs frequently contribute to binding by interacting with a basic surface on SUMO. Here we define acetylation within this basic interface as a central mechanism for the control of SUMO-mediated interactions. The acetyl-mediated neutralization of basic charges on SUMO prevents binding to SIMs in PML, Daxx, and PIAS family members but does not affect the interaction between RanBP2 and SUMO. Acetylation is controlled by HDACs and attenuates SUMO- and PIAS-mediated gene silencing. Moreover, it affects the assembly of PML nuclear bodies and restrains the recruitment of the corepressor Daxx to these structures. This acetyl-dependent switch thus expands the regulatory repertoire of SUMO signaling and determines the selectivity and dynamics of SUMO-SIM interactions. PMID:22578841

  17. Protein Acetylation Is Involved in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Ni, Jinjing; Tao, Jing; Lu, Jie; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella causes a range of diseases in different hosts, including enterocolitis and systemic infection. Lysine acetylation regulates many eukaryotic cellular processes, but its function in bacteria is largely unexplored. The acetyltransferase Pat and NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase CobB are involved in the reversible protein acetylation in Salmonella Typhimurium. Here, we used cell and animal models to evaluate the virulence of pat and cobB deletion mutants in S. Typhimurium and found that pat is critical for bacterial intestinal colonization and systemic infection. Next, to understand the underlying mechanism, genome-wide transcriptome was analyzed. RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) is partially dependent on pat In addition, we found that HilD, a key transcriptional regulator of SPI-1, is a substrate of Pat. The acetylation of HilD by Pat maintained HilD stability and was essential for the transcriptional activation of HilA. Taken together, these results suggest that a protein acetylation system regulates SPI-1 expression by controlling HilD in a posttranslational manner to mediate S. Typhimurium virulence. PMID:26810370

  18. Children's interpretations of general quantifiers, specific quantifiers, and generics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Was, Alexandra M.; Koch, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, several scholars have hypothesized that generics are a default mode of generalization, and thus that young children may at first treat quantifiers as if they were generic in meaning. To address this issue, the present experiment provides the first in-depth, controlled examination of the interpretation of generics compared to both general quantifiers ("all Xs", "some Xs") and specific quantifiers ("all of these Xs", "some of these Xs"). We provided children (3 and 5 years) and adults with explicit frequency information regarding properties of novel categories, to chart when "some", "all", and generics are deemed appropriate. The data reveal three main findings. First, even 3-year-olds distinguish generics from quantifiers. Second, when children make errors, they tend to be in the direction of treating quantifiers like generics. Third, children were more accurate when interpreting specific versus general quantifiers. We interpret these data as providing evidence for the position that generics are a default mode of generalization, especially when reasoning about kinds. PMID:25893205

  19. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Alison E; Cieniewicz, Anne M; Taverna, Sean D; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  20. Treating Colon Cancer Cells with FK228 Reveals a Link between Histone Lysine Acetylation and Extensive Changes in the Cellular Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian-yun; Jia, Yan-long; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Qiu-li; Li, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Jun-he; Zhao, Chun-peng; Wang, Xiao-yin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic value of FK228 as a cancer treatment option is well known, and various types of cancer have been shown to respond to this drug. However, the complete mechanism of FK228 and the affect it has on histone lysine acetylation and the colon cancer cell proteome are largely unknown. In the present study, we used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and affinity enrichment followed by high-resolution liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS)/MS analysis to quantitate the changes in the lysine acetylome in HCT-8 cells after FK228 treatment. A total of 1,194 lysine acetylation sites in 751 proteins were quantified, with 115 of the sites in 85 proteins being significantly upregulated and 38 of the sites in 32 proteins being significantly downregulated in response to FK228 treatment. Interestingly, 47 histone lysine acetylation sites were identified in the core histone proteins. We also found a novel lysine acetylation site on H2BK121. These significantly altered proteins are involved in multiple biological functions as well as a myriad of metabolic and enzyme-regulated pathways. Taken together, the link between FK228 function and the downstream changes in the HCT-8 cell proteome observed in response to FK228 treatment is established. PMID:26675280

  1. Quantitative measurement of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 3 T using TE-averaged PRESS spectroscopy and regularized lineshape deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Shizhe; Marenco, Stefano; Shen, Jun

    2011-08-01

    This article introduces regularized lineshape deconvolution in conjunction with TE-averaged PRESS spectroscopy to measure N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG). Averaging different echo times suppressed the signals of multiplets from strongly coupled spin systems near 2 ppm; thus, minimizing the interfering signals to detect the acetyl proton signal of NAAG. Signal distortion was corrected by lineshape deconvolution, and Tikhonov regularization was introduced to reduce noise amplification arising from deconvolution; as a result, spectral resolution was enhanced without significantly sacrificing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This new approach was used to measure NAAG in the two regions of interest of healthy volunteers, dominated by gray matter and white matter, respectively. The acetyl proton signal of NAAG was directly quantified by fitting the deconvoluted spectra to a Voigt-lineshape spectral model function, yielding the NAAG-N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratios of 0.11±0.02 for the gray matter voxels (n=8) and 0.18±0.02 for the white matter voxels (n=12). PMID:21656565

  2. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  3. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael N.; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Rolph, Timothy P.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  4. Complex O-acetylation in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae lipopolysaccharide: evidence for a novel site of O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Håkan H; Li, Jianjun; Richards, James C; Hood, Derek W; Moxon, E Richard; Schweda, Elke K H

    2005-12-12

    The structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae strain 723 has been elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) on O-deacylated LPS and core oligosaccharide material (OS), as well as ESI-MSn on permethylated dephosphorylated OS. It was found that the LPS contains the common structural element of H. influenzae, l-alpha-D-Hepp-(1-->2)-[PEtn-->6]-l-alpha-D-Hepp-(1-->3)-[beta-D-Glcp-(1-->4)]-l-alpha-D-Hepp-(1-->5)-[PPEtn-->4]-alpha-Kdo-(2-->6)-Lipid A, in which the beta-D-Glcp residue (GlcI) is substituted by phosphocholine at O-6 and the distal heptose residue (HepIII) by PEtn at O-3, respectively. In a subpopulation of glycoforms O-2 of HepIII was substituted by beta-D-Galp-(1-->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1--> or beta-D-Glcp-(1-->. Considerable heterogeneity of the LPS was due to the extent of substitution by O-acetyl groups (Ac) and ester-linked glycine of the core oligosaccharide. The location for glycine was found to be at Kdo. Prominent acetylation sites were found to be at GlcI, HepIII, and the proximal heptose (HepI) residue of the triheptosyl moiety. Moreover, GlcI was acetylated at O-3 and/or O-4 and HepI was acetylated at O-2 as evidenced by capillary electrophoresis ESI-MSn in combination with NMR analyses. This is the first study to show that an acetyl group can substitute HepI of the inner-core region of H. influenzae LPS. PMID:16199021

  5. Altered acetylation and succinylation profiles in Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to conditions inducing glutamate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Kubo, Shosei; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru; Kosono, Saori

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is utilized during industrial fermentation to produce amino acids such as L-glutamate. During L-glutamate fermentation, C. glutamicum changes the flux of central carbon metabolism to favor L-glutamate production, but the molecular mechanisms that explain these flux changes remain largely unknown. Here, we found that the profiles of two major lysine acyl modifications were significantly altered upon glutamate overproduction in C. glutamicum; acetylation decreased, whereas succinylation increased. A label-free semi-quantitative proteomic analysis identified 604 acetylated proteins with 1328 unique acetylation sites and 288 succinylated proteins with 651 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation and succinylation targeted enzymes in central carbon metabolic pathways that are directly related to glutamate production, including the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC), a key enzyme regulating glutamate overproduction. Structural mapping revealed that several critical lysine residues in the ODHC components were susceptible to acetylation and succinylation. Furthermore, induction of glutamate production was associated with changes in the extent of acetylation and succinylation of lysine, suggesting that these modifications may affect the activity of enzymes involved in glutamate production. Deletion of phosphotransacetylase decreased the extent of protein acetylation in nonproducing condition, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is active in C. glutamicum. However, no effect was observed on the profiles of acetylation and succinylation in glutamate-producing condition upon disruption of acetyl phosphate metabolism or deacetylase homologs. It was considered likely that the reduced acetylation in glutamate-producing condition may reflect metabolic states where the flux through acid-producing pathways is very low, and substrates for acetylation do not accumulate in the cell. Succinylation would occur more

  6. Role of Carnitine Acetyltransferases in Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra L.; Andrianopoulos, Alex; Davis, Meryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The flow of carbon metabolites between cellular compartments is an essential feature of fungal metabolism. During growth on ethanol, acetate, or fatty acids, acetyl units must enter the mitochondrion for metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) in the cytoplasm is essential for the biosynthetic reactions and for protein acetylation. Acetyl-CoA is produced in the cytoplasm by acetyl-CoA synthetase during growth on acetate and ethanol while β-oxidation of fatty acids generates acetyl-CoA in peroxisomes. The acetyl-carnitine shuttle in which acetyl-CoA is reversibly converted to acetyl-carnitine by carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT) enzymes is important for intracellular transport of acetyl units. In the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans, a cytoplasmic CAT, encoded by facC, is essential for growth on sources of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA while a second CAT, encoded by the acuJ gene, is essential for growth on fatty acids as well as acetate. We have shown that AcuJ contains an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS) and is localized to both peroxisomes and mitochondria, independent of the carbon source. Mislocalization of AcuJ to the cytoplasm does not result in loss of growth on acetate but prevents growth on fatty acids. Therefore, while mitochondrial AcuJ is essential for the transfer of acetyl units to mitochondria, peroxisomal localization is required only for transfer from peroxisomes to mitochondria. Peroxisomal AcuJ was not required for the import of acetyl-CoA into peroxisomes for conversion to malate by malate synthase (MLS), and export of acetyl-CoA from peroxisomes to the cytoplasm was found to be independent of FacC when MLS was mislocalized to the cytoplasm. PMID:21296915

  7. Histone H3 acetylation in the postmortem Parkinson's disease primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Kibrom G; Rademacher, David J

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of epigenetics in Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been extensively studied, α-synuclein, the main component of Lewy bodies, decreased histone H3 acetylation. Here, we determined if there were histone acetylation changes in the primary motor cortex which, according to the Braak model, is one of the last brain regions affected in PD. Net histone H3 acetylation, histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9), histone H3 lysine 14 (H3K14), histone H3 lysine 18 (H3K18), and histone H3 lysine 23 (H3K23) acetylation was assessed in the primary motor cortex of those affected and unaffected by PD. There was net increase in histone H3 acetylation due to increased H3K14 and H3K18 acetylation. There was a decrease in H3K9 acetylation. No between-groups difference was detected in H3K23 acetylation. Relationships between Unified Lewy Body Staging scores and histone H3 acetylation and substantia nigra depigmentation scores and histone H3 acetylation were observed. No relationships were detected between postmortem interval and histone H3 acetylation and expired age and histone H3 acetylation. These correlational data support the notion that the histone H3 acetylation changes observed here are not due to the postmortem interval or aging. Instead, they are due to PD and/or factors that covary with PD. The data suggest enhanced gene transcription in the primary motor cortex of the PD brain due to increase H3K14 and H3K18 acetylation. This effect is partially offset by a decreased H3K9 acetylation, which might repress gene transcription. PMID:27241718

  8. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Zachary S.; Grinter, Michael B.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  9. Multiple Mass Isotopomer Tracing of Acetyl-CoA Metabolism in Langendorff-perfused Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Deng, Shuang; Ibarra, Rafael A.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Brunengraber, Henri; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2015-01-01

    We developed an isotopic technique to assess mitochondrial acetyl-CoA turnover (≈citric acid flux) in perfused rat hearts. Hearts are perfused with buffer containing tracer [13C2,2H3]acetate, which forms M5 + M4 + M3 acetyl-CoA. The buffer may also contain one or two labeled substrates, which generate M2 acetyl-CoA (e.g. [13C6]glucose or [1,2-13C2]palmitate) or/and M1 acetyl-CoA (e.g. [1-13C]octanoate). The total acetyl-CoA turnover and the contributions of fuels to acetyl-CoA are calculated from the uptake of the acetate tracer and the mass isotopomer distribution of acetyl-CoA. The method was applied to measurements of acetyl-CoA turnover under different conditions (glucose ± palmitate ± insulin ± dichloroacetate). The data revealed (i) substrate cycling between glycogen and glucose-6-P and between glucose-6-P and triose phosphates, (ii) the release of small excess acetyl groups as acetylcarnitine and ketone bodies, and (iii) the channeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA from pyruvate dehydrogenase to carnitine acetyltransferase. Because of this channeling, the labeling of acetylcarnitine and ketone bodies released by the heart are not proxies of the labeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA. PMID:25645937

  10. Quantifying Electron Delocalization in Electrides.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2016-01-12

    Electrides are ionic solids whose anions are electrons confined to crystal voids. We show that our electron delocalization range function EDR(r;d), which quantifies the extent to which an electron at point r in a calculated wave function delocalizes over distance d, provides useful insights into electrides. The EDR quantifies the characteristic delocalization length of electride electrons and provides a chemically intuitive real-space picture of the electrons' distribution. It also gives a potential diagnostic for whether a given formula unit will form a solid electride at ambient pressure, quantifies the effects of electron-electron correlation on confined electrons' interactions, and highlights analogies between covalent bonding and the interaction of interstitial quasi-atoms in high-pressure electrides. These results motivate adding the EDR to the toolbox of theoretical methods applied to electrides. PMID:26652208

  11. [Spectrophotometric evaluation of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in urine].

    PubMed

    Potere, C; Di Cosmo, C; Riario-Sforza, G; Di Silverio, F; Albertazzi, A; Cappelli, P

    1982-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the assay of N-Acetyl-beta-Glucosaminidase activity in human undiluted urines is described. The application of this method is recommended for its sensitivity (2,6 X 10(-4)M) and its rapid performance, because it represents a good alternative to current methods and essentially to the fluorimetric technique with which it has a significant statistical correlation. Estimates of normal individuals aged between 1-70 years are reported. PMID:7168631

  12. Selective recognition of acetylated histones by bromodomains in transcriptional co-activators

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed H.; Awad, Salma; Al-Natour, Zeina; Othman, Samah; Mustafa, Farah; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2006-01-01

    Bromodomains are present in many chromatin-associated proteins such as the SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodelling and the SAGA HAT (histone acetyltransferase) complexes, and can bind to acetylated lysine residues in the N-terminal tails of the histones. Lysine acetylation is a histone modification that forms a stable epigenetic mark on chromatin for bromodomain-containing proteins to dock and in turn regulate gene expression. In order to better understand how bromodomains read the ‘histone code’ and interact with acetylated histones, we have tested the interactions of several bromodomains within transcriptional co-activators with differentially acetylated histone tail peptides and HAT-acetylated histones. Using GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays, we show specificity of binding of some bromodomains to differentially acetylated H3 and H4 peptides as well as HAT-acetylated histones. Our results reveal that the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain interacts with various acetylated H3 and H4 peptides, whereas the Gcn5 bromodomain interacts only with acetylated H3 peptides and tetra-acetylated H4 peptides. Additionally we show that the Spt7 bromodomain interacts with acetylated H3 peptides weakly, but not with acetylated H4 peptides. Some bromodomains such as the Bdf1-2 do not interact with most of the acetylated peptides tested. Results of the peptide experiments are confirmed with tests of interactions between these bromodomains and HAT-acetylated histones. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain is important for the binding and the remodelling activity of the SWI/SNF complex on hyperacetylated nucleosomes. The selective recognition of the bromodomains observed in the present study accounts for the broad effects of bromodomain-containing proteins observed on binding to histones. PMID:17049045

  13. Mechanism of action of clostridial glycine reductase: Isolation and characterization of a covalent acetyl enzyme intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Arkowitz, R.A.; Abeles, R.H. )

    1991-04-23

    Clostridial glycine reductase consists of proteins A, B, and C and catalyzes the reaction glycine + P{sub i} + 2e{sup {minus}} {yields} acetyl phosphate + NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Evidence was previously obtained that is consistent with the involvement of an acyl enzyme intermediate in this reaction. The authors now demonstrate that protein C catalyzes exchange of ({sup 32}P)P{sub i} into acetyl phosphate, providing additional support for an acetyl enzyme intermediate on protein C. Furthermore, they have isolated acetyl protein C and shown that it is qualitatively, catalytically competent. Acetyl protein C can be obtained through the forward reaction from protein C and Se-(carboxymethyl)selenocysteine-protein A, which is generated by the reaction of glycine with proteins A and B. Acetyl protein C can also be generated through the reverse reaction by the addition of acetyl phosphate to protein C. Both procedures lead to the same acetyl enzyme. The acetyl enzyme reacts with P{sub i} to give acetyl phosphate. When ({sup 14}C)acetyl protein C is denaturated with TCA and redissolved with urea, radioactivity remained associated with the protein. Treatment with KBH{sub 4} removes all the radioactivity associated with protein C, resulting in the formation of ({sup 14}C)ethanol. They conclude that a thiol group on protein C is acetylated. Proteins A and C together catalyze the exchange of tritium atoms from ({sup 3}H)H{sub 2}O into acetyl phosphate. This exchange reaction supports the proposal that an enol of the acetyl enzyme is an intermediate in the reaction sequence.

  14. N-Acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol), N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide in urine samples from the general population, individuals exposed to aniline and paracetamol users.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, Georg; Weiss, Tobias; Modick, Hendrik; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger M

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest associations between the use of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol) during pregnancy and increased risks of reproductive disorders in the male offspring. Previously we have reported a ubiquitous urinary excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population. Possible sources are (1) direct intake of paracetamol through medication, (2) paracetamol residues in the food chain and (3) environmental exposure to aniline or related substances that are metabolized into N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. In order to elucidate the origins of the excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in urine and to contribute to the understanding of paracetamol and aniline metabolism in humans we developed a rapid, turbulent-flow HPLC-MS/MS method with isotope dilution for the simultaneous quantification of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol and two other aniline related metabolites, N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide. We applied this method to three sets of urine samples: (1) individuals with no known exposure to aniline and also no recent paracetamol medication; (2) individuals after occupational exposure to aniline but no paracetamol medication and (3) paracetamol users. We confirmed the omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. Additionally we revealed an omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-2-aminophenol. In contrast, acetanilide was only found after occupational exposure to aniline, not in the general population or after paracetamol use. The results lead to four preliminary conclusions: (1) other sources than aniline seem to be responsible for the major part of urinary N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population; (2) acetanilide is a metabolite of aniline in man and a valuable biomarker for aniline in occupational settings; (3) aniline baseline levels in the general population measured after chemical hydrolysis do not seem to originate from acetanilide and hence not from a direct exposure to aniline itself and (4) N-acetyl-2-aminophenol does not seem to be

  15. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  16. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  17. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Affects Histone Acetylation and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Verdone, Loredana; La Fortezza, Marco; Ciccarone, Fabio; Caiafa, Paola; Zampieri, Michele; Caserta, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a posttranslational protein modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme family. PARylation regulates a wide variety of biological processes in most eukaryotic cells including energy metabolism and cell death, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and transcription. Inside the nucleus, cross-talk between PARylation and other epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, was already described. In the present work, using PJ34 or ABT888 to inhibit PARP activity or over-expressing poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), we show decrease of global histone H3 and H4 acetylation. This effect is accompanied by a reduction of the steady state mRNA level of p300, Pcaf, and Tnfα, but not of Dnmt1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses, performed at the level of the Transcription Start Site (TSS) of these four genes, reveal that changes in histone acetylation are specific for each promoter. Finally, we demonstrate an increase of global deacetylase activity in nuclear extracts from cells treated with PJ34, whereas global acetyltransferase activity is not affected, suggesting a role for PARP in the inhibition of histone deacetylases. Taken together, these results show an important link between PARylation and histone acetylation regulated transcription. PMID:26636673

  18. Selective cleavage enhanced by acetylating the side chain of lysine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Leixiaomeng; Chen, Tingting; Xue, Gaiqing; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Selective cleavage is of great interest in mass spectrometry studies as it can help sequence identification by promoting simple fragmentation pattern of peptides and proteins. In this work, the collision-induced dissociation of peptides containing internal lysine and acetylated lysine residues were studied. The experimental and computational results revealed that multiple fragmentation pathways coexisted when the lysine residue was two amino acid residues away from N-terminal of the peptide. After acetylation of the lysine side-chain, b(n)+ ions were the most abundant primary fragment products and the Lys(Ac)-Gly amide bond became the dominant cleavage site via an oxazolone pathway. Acetylating the side-chain of lysine promoted the selective cleavage of Lys-Xxx amide bond and generated much more information of the peptide backbone sequence. The results re-evaluate the selective cleavage due to the lysine basic side-chain and provide information for studying the post-translational modification of proteins and other bio-molecules containing Lys residues. PMID:23303756

  19. Chromatin decondensed by acetylation shows an elevated radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Nackerdien, Z.; Michie, J.; Boehm, L.

    1989-02-01

    V-79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts exposed to 5 mM n-sodium butyrate were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays and cell survival was determined by the cell colony assay. In a separate set of experiments the acetylated chromatin obtained from these cells was irradiated and the change of molecular weight of the DNA was evaluated by alkaline sucrose density centrifugation. At a survival level of 10(-2) to 10(-4) cells exposed to butyrate were found to be 1.3-1.4 times more radiosensitive than control cells. Exposure of isolated chromatin to 100 Gy of 60Co gamma irradiation generated 0.9 +/- 0.03 single-strand breaks (ssb) per 10 Gy per 10(8) Da and 2.0 +/- 0.3 ssb/10 Gy/10(8) Da for control and acetylated chromatin, respectively. The elevated radiation sensitivity of chromatin relaxed by acetylation is in good agreement with previous results on chromatin expanded by histone H1 depletion. Packing and accessibility of DNA in chromatin appear to be major factors which influence the radiation sensitivity. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of chromatin in various packing states is discussed in light of the variation of radiation sensitivity of whole cells in the cell cycle which incorporates repair.

  20. Carbon isotope fractionation and the acetyl-CoA pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, Martin; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria can catalyze the reductive synthesis of acetate from CO2 via the acetyl-CoA pathway. Besides this unifying property homoacetogenic bacteria constitute a metabolically and phylogenetically diverse bacteriological group. Therefore their environmental role is difficult to address. It has been recognized that in methanogenic environments homoacetogenic bacteria contribute to the degradation of organic matter. The natural abundance of 13C may be used to understand the functional impact of homoacetogenic bacteria in the soil environment. To distinguish the acetyl-CoA pathway from other dominant processes, the isotopic composition of acetate and CO2 can be determined and the fractionation factors of the individual processes may be used to discriminate between the dominant pathways. To characterize the fractionation factor associated with the acetyl-CoA pathway the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity needs to be considered. Therefore the fractionation factor of substrate utilization and product formation of different homoacetogens (Acetobacterium woodii, Sporomusa ovata, Thermoanaerobacter kivui, Morella thermoautotrophica) has been studied under pure culture conditions in two defined minimal medium with H2/CO2 as sole source of carbon and energy. It became obvious that the cultivation conditions have a major impact on the obtained fractionation factors.

  1. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  2. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  3. Preparation and functional evaluation of oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysate from shrimp (Acetes chinensis) treated with crude protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011.

    PubMed

    He, Hailun; Chen, Xiulan; Sun, Caiyun; Zhang, Yuzhong; Gao, Peiji

    2006-02-01

    Marine organisms are potentially an untapped source of drugs and value-added food production. Currently, Acetes chinensis is an underutilized shrimp species with low commercial value from the Bo Hai Gulf of China. In this paper, the shrimp was digested by a crude protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 and filtered through a 3 kDa ultrafiltration membrane. Biological functions of the hydrolysate and ultrafiltrate were then assayed. The analyses showed that 41% of the oligopeptides in the ultrafiltrate had a molecular mass lower than 3 kDa. The antioxidant activities of the hydrolysate and ultrafiltrate were determined through the scavenger activity of the hydroxyl radical, with inhibitions of 42.38% and 67.95%, respectively. The hydrolysate and ultrafiltrate also had good Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 0.98 mg/ml and 0.22 mg/ml, respectively. In addition, Chitin and chitosan were recovered from the hydrolytic sediment using a much smaller volume of strong acids and bases than is normally needed. With this method, we have shown that A. chinensis can be utilized to generate a high value-added product, and have revealed its hidden potential in the production of functional foods and ACE inhibitory peptides. PMID:15935656

  4. Molecular recognition between oligopeptides and nucleic acids: DNA binding specificity of a series of bis netropsin analogues deduced from footprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, K L; Dabrowiak, J C; Lown, J W

    1990-01-01

    A series of tether-linked bis netropsins have been synthesized in order to assess the phasing problem, which arises because of the lack of dimensional correspondence between oligopeptides and oligonucleotides in DNA binding characteristics. The consequences of incorporating variable-length flexible and rigid tethers [poly(methylene), Z and E ethylene, m- and p-phenylene] between the two netropsin-like moieties on the DNA binding properties were assessed by DNase I footprinting. The conformational freedom associated with two netropsins linked by a flexible methylene tether allows ligand binding in both a mono- and bidentate fashion, with bidentate binding requiring a minimum linker length of (CH2)3. For compounds possessing rigid tethers, for example, cis and trans ethylene moieties, the cis geometry excludes bidentate ligation while the trans structure favors it. Bis netropsins possessing aryl linking groups have reduced DNA binding affinities. This is most plausibly due to the aryl groups, which are not coplanar with the netropsin moieties, thus blocking the ligand from penetrating deeply into the minor groove of DNA. PMID:1966670

  5. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  6. In vivo differentiation of N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate from N-acetyl aspartate at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Edden, Richard A E; Pomper, Martin G; Barker, Peter B

    2007-06-01

    A method is described that allows the in vivo differentiation of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAAG) by in vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS) at 3 Tesla (3T). The method, which is based on MEGA-point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) editing, selectively targets the aspartyl spin system of one species while deliberately removing the other species from the spectrum. This allows quantitative measurements of NAA and NAAG without the need for fitting of unresolved peaks. White matter concentrations of NAA (6.7 +/- 0.3 mM) and NAAG (2.2 +/- 0.3 mM) were measured in 10 healthy volunteers to demonstrate the method. PMID:17534922

  7. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme. PMID:26794803

  8. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  9. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  10. Proteome-wide analysis reveals widespread lysine acetylation of major protein complexes in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Simon A.; Santos, Joana M.; Ochoa, Alejandro; Perlman, David H.; Llinás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in many organisms including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, yet the full extent of acetylation across the parasite proteome remains unresolved. Moreover, the functional significance of acetylation or how specific acetyl-lysine sites are regulated is largely unknown. Here we report a seven-fold expansion of the known parasite ‘acetylome’, characterizing 2,876 acetylation sites on 1,146 proteins. We observe that lysine acetylation targets a diverse range of protein complexes and is particularly enriched within the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) DNA-binding protein family. Using quantitative proteomics we determined that artificial perturbation of the acetate/acetyl-CoA balance alters the acetyl-lysine occupancy of several ApiAP2 DNA-binding proteins and related transcriptional proteins. This metabolic signaling could mediate significant downstream transcriptional responses, as we show that acetylation of an ApiAP2 DNA-binding domain ablates its DNA-binding propensity. Lastly, we investigated the acetyl-lysine targets of each class of lysine deacetylase in order to begin to explore how each class of enzyme contributes to regulating the P. falciparum acetylome. PMID:26813983

  11. Lysine deacetylase inhibition attenuates hypertension and is accompanied by acetylation of mineralocorticoid receptor instead of histone acetylation in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Seok, Young Mi; Lee, Hae Ahm; Park, Kwon Moo; Hwangbo, Mi-Hyang; Kim, In Kyeom

    2016-07-01

    Inhibition of lysine deacetylase (KDAC) attenuated development of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). We hypothesized that KDAC inhibition attenuates hypertension and is accompanied by acetylation of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) instead of histone acetylation in SHRs. Valproate (VPA, 0.71 % wt/vol), an inhibitor of class I KDACs, was administered in drinking water to 7-week-old SHRs and Wistar Kyoto rats for 11 weeks. MR acetylation was determined by immunoprecipitation with anti-MR antibody followed by western blot with anti-acetyl-lysine antibody. Expression levels of acetylated histone H3, KDACs, MR target genes, or MR corepressors in the kidney cortex were measured by using western blot analysis or real-time PCR. Recruitment of MR and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and histone modifications on promoters of target genes were analyzed by performing a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Treatment of SHR with VPA increased MR acetylation without affecting MR expression, which attenuated development of hypertension in SHR VPA decreased expression of KDAC class I but globally increased acetylated histone H3. Although VPA treatment increased histone 3 acetylation (H3Ac) and trimethylation of the fourth lysine (H3K4me3) in the promoter regions of MR target genes, it decreased the expression of target genes as well as recruitment of MR and Pol II. These results suggest that KDAC inhibition attenuates the development of hypertension in SHRs and is accompanied by acetylation of MR that is independent of histone acetylation. PMID:27106211

  12. Acetylator genotype-dependent formation of 2-aminofluorene-hemoglobin adducts in rapid and slow acetylator Syrian hamsters congenic at the NAT2 locus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Rustan, T D; Ferguson, R J; Doll, M A; Hein, D W

    1994-01-01

    Arylamine-hemoglobin adducts are a valuable dosimeter for assessing arylamine exposures and carcinogenic risk. The effects of age, sex, time-course, dose, and acetylator genotype on levels of 2-aminofluorene-hemoglobin adducts were investigated in homozygous rapid (Bio. 82.73/H-Patr) and slow (Bio. 82.73/H-Pats) acetylator hamsters congenic at the polymorphic (NAT2) acetylator locus. Following administration of a single ip dose of [3H]2-aminofluorene, peak 2-aminofluorene-hemoglobin adduct levels were achieved at 12-18 hr and retained a plateau up to 72 hr postinjection in both rapid and slow acetylator congenic hamsters. 2-Aminofluorene-hemoglobin adduct levels did not differ significantly between young (5-6 weeks) and old (32-49 weeks) hamsters or between male and female hamsters within either acetylator genotype. 2-Aminofluorene-hemoglobin adduct levels increased in a dose-dependent manner (r = 0.95, p = 0.0001) and were consistently higher in slow versus rapid acetylator congenic hamsters in studies of both time-course and dose-effect. The magnitude of the acetylator genotype-dependent difference was a function of dose; 2-aminofluorene-hemoglobin adduct levels were 1.5-fold higher in slow acetylator congenic hamsters following a 60 mg/kg 2-aminofluorene dose (p = 0.0013) but 2-fold higher following a 100 mg/kg 2-aminofluorene dose (p < 0.0001). These results show a specific and significant role for NAT2 acetylator genotype in formation of arylamine-hemoglobin adducts, which may reflect the relationship between acetylator genotype and the incidence of different cancers from arylamine exposures. PMID:8291051

  13. New short and general synthesis of three key Maillard flavour compounds: 2-Acetyl-1-pyrroline, 6-acetyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyridine and 5-acetyl-2,3-dihydro-4H-1,4-thiazine.

    PubMed

    Deblander, Jurgen; Van Aeken, Sam; Adams, An; De Kimpe, Norbert; Abbaspour Tehrani, Kourosch

    2015-02-01

    A new general synthetic route towards three key Maillard flavour compounds, namely 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 6-acetyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyridine and 5-acetyl-2,3-dihydro-4H-1,4-thiazine, was developed. The key step in the process is the methylenation reaction of azaheterocyclic carboxylic esters by means of dimethyltitanocene, giving rise to intermediate vinyl ethers which can be considered as excellent and stable precursors for the title compounds, as a simple acidic treatment of these precursors suffices to release the characteristic Maillard flavours. PMID:25172717

  14. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  15. Quantifying and measuring cyber resiliency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybenko, George

    2016-05-01

    Cyber resliency has become an increasingly attractive research and operational concept in cyber security. While several metrics have been proposed for quantifying cyber resiliency, a considerable gap remains between those metrics and operationally measurable and meaningful concepts that can be empirically determined in a scientific manner. This paper describes a concrete notion of cyber resiliency that can be tailored to meet specific needs of organizations that seek to introduce resiliency into their assessment of their cyber security posture.

  16. O-acetylated oligosaccharides from pectins of potato tuber cell walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T

    1997-01-01

    Acetylated trigalacturonides and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-derived oligosaccharides were isolated from a Driselase digest of potato tuber cell walls by ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The oligosaccharides were structurally characterized by fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and glycosyl-linkage composition analysis. One trigalacturonide contained a single acetyl group at O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. A second trigalacturonide contained two acetyl substituents, which were located on O-3 or O-4 of the nonreducing galacturonic acid residue and O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. RG-I backbone-derived oligomers had acetyl groups at O-2 of the galacturonic acid residues. Some of these galacturonic acid residues were O-acetylated at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Rhamnosyl residues of RG-I oligomers were not acetylated. PMID:9112775

  17. Acetylated starch nanocrystals: Preparation and antitumor drug delivery study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huaxi; Yang, Tao; Lin, Qinlu; Liu, Gao-Qiang; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Fengxiang; Chen, Yuejiao

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed a new nanoparticulate system for acetylated starch nanocrystals (ASN) using broken rice. ASN with different degrees of substitution (DS) of 0.04, 0.08 and 0.14 were prepared using acetic anhydride as acetylating agent through reaction with starch nanocrystals (SN). The resulting ASN were investigated for the capability to load and release doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), and the antitumor activities of DOX-loaded SN and DOX-loaded ASN were evaluated as potential drug delivery systems for cancer therapy. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of nanocrystals and the DOX-loaded nanocrystals were investigated using fluorescence microscopy and a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. Compared with acetylated starches (AS) and native starches (NS), ASN with DS 0.14 loaded up to 6.07% of DOX with a higher loading efficiency of 91.1% and had steadier drug-release rates. Toxicity analysis using the rat hepatocytes model suggested that ASN was biocompatible and could be used for drug delivery. Furthermore, ASN were taken up by cancer cells in vitro and significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX against HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells. The IC50 value of DOX-loaded ASN-DS 0.14 was 3.8μg/mL for 24h of treatment, which was significantly lower than that of free DOX (21μg/mL). These results indicate that the prepared ASN using broken rice is a promising vehicle for the controlled delivery of DOX for cancer therapy. PMID:27156696

  18. Autoimmune regulator is acetylated by transcription coactivator CBP/p300

    SciTech Connect

    Saare, Mario; Rebane, Ana; Rajashekar, Balaji; Vilo, Jaak; Peterson, Paert

    2012-08-15

    The Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) is a regulator of transcription in the thymic medulla, where it controls the expression of a large set of peripheral-tissue specific genes. AIRE interacts with the transcriptional coactivator and acetyltransferase CBP and synergistically cooperates with it in transcriptional activation. Here, we aimed to study a possible role of AIRE acetylation in the modulation of its activity. We found that AIRE is acetylated in tissue culture cells and this acetylation is enhanced by overexpression of CBP and the CBP paralog p300. The acetylated lysines were located within nuclear localization signal and SAND domain. AIRE with mutations that mimicked acetylated K243 and K253 in the SAND domain had reduced transactivation activity and accumulated into fewer and larger nuclear bodies, whereas mutations that mimicked the unacetylated lysines were functionally similar to wild-type AIRE. Analogously to CBP, p300 localized to AIRE-containing nuclear bodies, however, the overexpression of p300 did not enhance the transcriptional activation of AIRE-regulated genes. Further studies showed that overexpression of p300 stabilized the AIRE protein. Interestingly, gene expression profiling revealed that AIRE, with mutations mimicking K243/K253 acetylation in SAND, was able to activate gene expression, although the affected genes were different and the activation level was lower from those regulated by wild-type AIRE. Our results suggest that the AIRE acetylation can influence the selection of AIRE activated genes. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE is acetylated by the acetyltransferases p300 and CBP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation occurs between CARD and SAND domains and within the SAND domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation increases the size of AIRE nuclear dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation increases AIRE protein stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE acetylation mimic regulates a different set of AIRE

  19. Tubulin Acetylation Alone Does Not Affect Kinesin-1 Velocity and Run Length In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Wilhelm J.; Beránek, Václav; Fischermeier, Elisabeth; Diez, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-1 plays a major role in anterograde transport of intracellular cargo along microtubules. Currently, there is an ongoing debate of whether α-tubulin K40 acetylation directly enhances the velocity of kinesin-1 and its affinity to the microtubule track. We compared motor motility on microtubules reconstituted from acetylated and deacetylated tubulin. For both, single- and multi-motor in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate that tubulin acetylation alone does not affect kinesin-1 velocity and run length. PMID:22870307

  20. Therapeutics Targeting Protein Acetylation Perturb Latency of Human Viruses.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie

    2016-03-18

    Persistent viral infections are widespread and represent significant public health burdens. Some viruses endure in a latent state by co-opting the host epigenetic machinery to manipulate viral gene expression. Small molecules targeting epigenetic pathways are now in the clinic for certain cancers and are considered as potential treatment strategies to reverse latency in HIV-infected individuals. In this review, we discuss how drugs interfering with one epigenetic pathway, protein acetylation, perturb latency of three families of pathogenic human viruses-retroviruses, herpesviruses, and papillomaviruses. PMID:26845514

  1. Sulfation of deoxynivalenol, its acetylated derivatives, and T2-toxin☆

    PubMed Central

    Fruhmann, Philipp; Skrinjar, Philipp; Weber, Julia; Mikula, Hannes; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Adam, Gerhard; Rosenberg, Erwin; Hametner, Christian; Fröhlich, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of several sulfates of trichothecene mycotoxins is presented. Deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetylated derivatives were synthesized from 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON) and used as substrate for sulfation in order to reach a series of five different DON-based sulfates as well as T2-toxin-3-sulfate. These substances are suspected to be formed during phase-II metabolism in plants and humans. The sulfation was performed using a sulfuryl imidazolium salt, which was synthesized prior to use. All protected intermediates and final products were characterized via NMR and will serve as reference materials for further investigations in the fields of toxicology and bioanalytics of mycotoxins. PMID:25170180

  2. Epigenetic Readers of Lysine Acetylation Regulate Cocaine-Induced Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Gregory C.; Powell, Samuel K.; Brothers, Shaun P.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic processes that regulate histone acetylation play an essential role in behavioral and molecular responses to cocaine. To date, however, only a small fraction of the mechanisms involved in the addiction-associated acetylome have been investigated. Members of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of epigenetic “reader” proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT) bind acetylated histones and serve as a scaffold for the recruitment of macromolecular complexes to modify chromatin accessibility and transcriptional activity. The role of BET proteins in cocaine-induced plasticity, however, remains elusive. Here, we used behavioral, pharmacological, and molecular techniques to examine the involvement of BET bromodomains in cocaine reward. Of the BET proteins, BRD4, but not BRD2 or BRD3, was significantly elevated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice and rats following repeated cocaine injections and self-administration. Systemic and intra-accumbal inhibition of BRD4 with the BET inhibitor, JQ1, attenuated the rewarding effects of cocaine in a conditioned place preference procedure but did not affect conditioned place aversion, nor did JQ1 alone induce conditioned aversion or preference. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we found that repeated cocaine injections enhanced the binding of BRD4, but not BRD3, to the promoter region of Bdnf in the NAc, whereas systemic injection of JQ1 attenuated cocaine-induced expression of Bdnf in the NAc. JQ1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of BRD4 in vitro also reduced expression of Bdnf. These findings indicate that disrupting the interaction between BET proteins and their acetylated lysine substrates may provide a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of drug addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Proteins involved in the “readout” of lysine acetylation marks, referred to as BET bromodomain proteins (including BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT), have been shown to be key regulators of chromatin dynamics and disease, and

  3. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha; Harholt, Jesper; Chong, Sun-Li; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Tenkanen, Maija; Cheng, Kun; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development. The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco)mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell differentiation of cell types with secondary cell walls. PMID:24019426

  4. Aspirin acetylates wild type and mutant p53 in colon cancer cells: identification of aspirin acetylated sites on recombinant p53.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-05-01

    Aspirin's ability to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines is considered to be an important mechanism for its anti-cancer effects. We previously demonstrated that aspirin acetylated the tumor suppressor protein p53 at lysine 382 in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we extended these observations to human colon cancer cells, HCT 116 harboring wild type p53, and HT-29 containing mutant p53. We demonstrate that aspirin induced acetylation of p53 in both cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Aspirin-acetylated p53 was localized to the nucleus. In both cell lines, aspirin induced p21(CIP1). Aspirin also acetylated recombinant p53 (rp53) in vitro suggesting that it occurs through a non-enzymatic chemical reaction. Mass spectrometry analysis and immunoblotting identified 10 acetylated lysines on rp53, and molecular modeling showed that all lysines targeted by aspirin are surface exposed. Five of these lysines are localized to the DNA-binding domain, four to the nuclear localization signal domain, and one to the C-terminal regulatory domain. Our results suggest that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may involve acetylation and activation of wild type and mutant p53 and induction of target gene expression. This is the first report attempting to characterize p53 acetylation sites targeted by aspirin. PMID:26596838

  5. Teleost fish models in membrane transport research: the PEPT1(SLC15A1) H+–oligopeptide transporter as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandro; Barca, Amilcare; Storelli, Carlo; Verri, Tiziano

    2014-01-01

    Human genes for passive, ion-coupled transporters and exchangers are included in the so-called solute carrier (SLC) gene series, to date consisting of 52 families and 398 genes. Teleost fish genes for SLC proteins have also been described in the last two decades, and catalogued in preliminary SLC-like form in 50 families and at least 338 genes after systematic GenBank database mining (December 2010–March 2011). When the kinetic properties of the expressed proteins are studied in detail, teleost fish SLC transporters always reveal extraordinary ‘molecular diversity’ with respect to the mammalian counterparts, which reflects peculiar adaptation of the protein to the physiology of the species and/or to the environment where the species lives. In the case of the H+–oligopeptide transporter PEPT1(SLC15A1), comparative analysis of diverse teleost fish orthologs has shown that the protein may exhibit very eccentric properties in terms of pH dependence (e.g. the adaptation of zebrafish PEPT1 to alkaline pH), temperature dependence (e.g. the adaptation of icefish PEPT1 to sub-zero temperatures) and/or substrate specificity (e.g. the species-specificity of PEPT1 for the uptake of l-lysine-containing peptides). The revelation of such peculiarities is providing new contributions to the discussion on PEPT1 in both basic (e.g. molecular structure–function analyses) and applied research (e.g. optimizing diets to enhance growth of commercially valuable fish). PMID:23981715

  6. Different modes of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26) inhibition by oligopeptides derived from the N-terminus of HIV-1 Tat indicate at least two inhibitor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Susan; Stöckel-Maschek, Angela; Faust, Jürgen; Brandt, Wolfgang; Stiebitz, Beate; Gorrell, Mark D; Kähne, Thilo; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Wrenger, Sabine; Reinhold, Dirk; Ansorge, Siegfried; Neubert, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV, CD26) plays an essential role in the activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, which is shown by the immunosuppressive effects of synthetic DP IV inhibitors. Similarly, both human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein and the N-terminal peptide Tat(1-9) inhibit DP IV activity and T cell proliferation. Therefore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of HIV-1 Tat is important for the inhibition of DP IV. Recently, we characterized the thromboxane A2 receptor peptide TXA2-R(1-9), bearing the N-terminal MWP sequence motif, as a potent DP IV inhibitor possibly playing a functional role during antigen presentation by inhibiting T cell-expressed DP IV [Wrenger, S., Faust, J., Mrestani-Klaus, C., Fengler, A., Stöckel-Maschek, A., Lorey, S., Kähne, T., Brandt, W., Neubert, K., Ansorge, S. & Reinhold, D. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 22180-22186]. Here, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions at different positions of Tat(1-9) can result in a change of the inhibition type. Certain Tat(1-9)-related peptides are found to be competitive, and others linear mixed-type or parabolic mixed-type inhibitors indicating different inhibitor binding sites on DP IV, at the active site and out of the active site. The parabolic mixed-type mechanism, attributed to both non-mutually exclusive inhibitor binding sites of the enzyme, is described in detail. From the kinetic investigations and molecular modeling experiments, possible interactions of the oligopeptides with specified amino acids of DP IV are suggested. These findings give new insights for the development of more potent and specific peptide-based DP IV inhibitors. Such inhibitors could be useful for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:12752434

  7. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  8. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  9. BOP: a basic phenylalanine-rich oligo-peptide located on the surface of glycolate oxidase influences its pI values.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Du, Yingqing; Ma, Guangzhi; Xu, Jie

    2010-06-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) consists of identical subunits and therefore should show one definite pI value, but the isolated GO exhibited a range of pIs. This study investigated the underlying cause of this phenomenon. GO was purified and showed a molecular weight of 40 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Elution behavior on DEAE-cellulose chromatography and cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis indicated that the purified GO was highly basic (pI>10.0). Repeated IEF and cIEF analysis showed that the pI of the purified GO was in the range of 10.0-3.25, either in a smear form or as distinct bands. 2-DE analysis showed that the 40 kDa subunit of GO displayed variable pIs from 9.6 to 3.65. It was likely that the purified GO was actually a complex consisted of GO and an unknown protein. CE-SDS, SDS-cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis and amino acid compositions indicated that the unknown protein was a highly basic polymer (BP) consisting of basic and phenylalanine-rich oligo-peptide (BOP). Many BOPs are located on the surface of the acidic GO via ionic and hydrophobic interactions and formed GO-BOP complex (GC), resulting in a highly basic GC although GO itself was acidic. This hypothesis was further supported by the facts that anti-GC serum failed to recognize GO, and GC showed a peak at 257 nm although GO has few phenylalanine residues. Irregular and incomplete disassociation between GO and BOP was observed in IEF and cIEF, resulting in various intermediates with different ratios of GO/BOP, which could be the reason for the range of pIs observed for GO. PMID:20496344

  10. p53 targets simian virus 40 large T antigen for acetylation by CBP.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; Kung, Andrew L; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-08-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T Ag) interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 and the transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300. Binding of these cellular proteins in a ternary complex has been implicated in T Ag-mediated transformation. It has been suggested that the ability of CBP/p300 to modulate p53 function underlies p53's regulation of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we provide further evidence that CBP activity may be mediated through its synergistic action with p53. We demonstrate that SV40 T Ag is acetylated in vivo in a p53-dependent manner and T Ag acetylation is largely mediated by CBP. The acetylation of T Ag is dependent on its interaction with p53 and on p53's interaction with CBP. We have mapped the site of acetylation on T Ag to the C-terminal lysine residue 697. This acetylation site is conserved between the T antigens of the human polyomaviruses JC and BK, which are also known to interact with p53. We show that both JC and BK T antigens are also acetylated at corresponding sites in vivo. While other proteins are known to be acetylated by CBP/p300, none are known to depend on p53 for acetylation. T Ag acetylation may provide a regulatory mechanism for T Ag binding to a cellular factor or play a role in another aspect of T Ag function. PMID:15254196

  11. First Comprehensive Proteome Analyses of Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation in Seedling Leaves of Brachypodium distachyon L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shoumin; Deng, Xiong; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Gengrui; Cao, Hui; Yuan, Linlin; Yan, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Protein acetylation and succinylation are the most crucial protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) involved in the regulation of plant growth and development. In this study, we present the first lysine-acetylation and lysine-succinylation proteome analysis of seedling leaves in Brachypodium distachyon L (Bd). Using high accuracy nano LC-MS/MS combined with affinity purification, we identified a total of 636 lysine-acetylated sites in 353 proteins and 605 lysine-succinylated sites in 262 proteins. These proteins participated in many biology processes, with various molecular functions. In particular, 119 proteins and 115 sites were found to be both acetylated and succinylated, simultaneously. Among the 353 acetylated proteins, 148 had acetylation orthologs in Oryza sativa L., Arabidopsis thaliana, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and Glycine max L. Among the 262 succinylated proteins, 170 of them were found to have homologous proteins in Oryza sativa L., Escherichia coli, Sacchayromyces cerevisiae, or Homo sapiens. Motif-X analysis of the acetylated and succinylated sites identified two new acetylated motifs (K---K and K-I-K) and twelve significantly enriched succinylated motifs for the first time, which could serve as possible binding loci for future studies in plants. Our comprehensive dataset provides a promising starting point for further functional analysis of acetylation and succinylation in Bd and other plant species. PMID:27515067

  12. Sirtuin-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of glutamine synthetases reveals an autofeedback loop in nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    You, Di; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Li, Zhi-Hai; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Wen-Bang; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-14

    In cells of all domains of life, reversible lysine acetylation modulates the function of proteins involved in central cellular processes such as metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that the nitrogen regulator GlnR of the actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea directly regulates transcription of the acuA gene (SACE_5148), which encodes a Gcn5-type lysine acetyltransferase. We found that AcuA acetylates two glutamine synthetases (GlnA1 and GlnA4) and that this lysine acetylation inactivated GlnA4 (GSII) but had no significant effect on GlnA1 (GSI-β) activity under the conditions tested. Instead, acetylation of GlnA1 led to a gain-of-function that modulated its interaction with the GlnR regulator and enhanced GlnR-DNA binding. It was observed that this regulatory function of acetylated GSI-β enzymes is highly conserved across actinomycetes. In turn, GlnR controls the catalytic and regulatory activities (intracellular acetylation levels) of glutamine synthetases at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels, indicating an autofeedback loop that regulates nitrogen metabolism in response to environmental change. Thus, this GlnR-mediated acetylation pathway provides a signaling cascade that acts from nutrient sensing to acetylation of proteins to feedback regulation. This work presents significant new insights at the molecular level into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein acetylation and nitrogen metabolism in actinomycetes. PMID:27247389

  13. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including K(ac)Y, K(ac)H, K(ac)***R, K(ac)F, FK(ac) and K(ac)***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  14. Acetylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is mediated by GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Juhyung; Yun, Nuri; Kim, Chiho; Song, Min-Young; Park, Kang-Sik; Oh, Young J.

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is present as an acetylated form. • CDK5 is acetylated by GCN5. • CDK5’s acetylation site is mapped at Lys33. • Its acetylation may affect CDK5’s kinase activity. - Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a member of atypical serine/threonine cyclin-dependent kinase family, plays a crucial role in pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Its kinase activity and substrate specificity are regulated by several independent pathways including binding with its activator, phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. In the present study, we report that acetylation of CDK5 comprises an additional posttranslational modification within the cells. Among many candidates, we confirmed that its acetylation is enhanced by GCN5, a member of the GCN5-related N-acetyl-transferase family of histone acetyltransferase. Co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescent localization study indicated that GCN5 physically interacts with CDK5 and they are co-localized at the specific nuclear foci. Furthermore, liquid chromatography in conjunction with a mass spectrometry indicated that CDK5 is acetylated at Lys33 residue of ATP binding domain. Considering this lysine site is conserved among a wide range of species and other related cyclin-dependent kinases, therefore, we speculate that acetylation may alter the kinase activity of CDK5 via affecting efficacy of ATP coordination.

  15. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including KacY, KacH, Kac***R, KacF, FKac and Kac***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  16. Comparative analysis of pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine (Tanganil) and its two isomers (N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine) on vestibular compensation: Behavioral investigation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Tighilet, Brahim; Leonard, Jacques; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Lacour, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Head roll tilt, postural imbalance and spontaneous nystagmus are the main static vestibular deficits observed after an acute unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). In the UVL cat model, these deficits are fully compensated over 6 weeks as the result of central vestibular compensation. N-Acetyl-dl-leucine is a drug prescribed in clinical practice for the symptomatic treatment of acute UVL patients. The present study investigated the effects of N-acetyl-dl-leucine on the behavioral recovery after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) in the cat, and compared the effects of each of its two isomers N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine. Efficacy of these three drug treatments has been evaluated with respect to a placebo group (UVN+saline water) on the global sensorimotor activity (observation grids), the posture control (support surface measurement), the locomotor balance (maximum performance at the rotating beam test), and the spontaneous vestibular nystagmus (recorded in the light). Whatever the parameters tested, the behavioral recovery was strongly and significantly accelerated under pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine and N-acetyl-L-leucine. In contrast, the N-acetyl-D-leucine isomer had no effect at all on the behavioral recovery, and animals of this group showed the same recovery profile as those receiving a placebo. It is concluded that the N-acetyl-L-leucine isomer is the active part of the racemate component since it induces a significant acceleration of the vestibular compensation process similar (and even better) to that observed under treatment with the racemate component only. PMID:26607469

  17. PARAMETERS FOR QUANTIFYING BEAM HALO

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. ALLEN; T.P. WANGLER

    2001-06-01

    Two different parameters for the quantitative description of beam halo are introduced, both based on moments of the particle distribution. One parameter is a measure of spatial halo formation and has been defined previously by Wangler and Crandall [3], termed the profile parameter. The second parameter relies on kinematic invariants to quantify halo formation in phase space; we call it the halo parameter. The profile parameter can be computed from experimental beam profile data. The halo parameter provides a theoretically more complete description of halo in phase space, but is difficult to obtain experimentally.

  18. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Schmeitzl, Clemens; Warth, Benedikt; Fruhmann, Philipp; Michlmayr, Herbert; Malachová, Alexandra; Berthiller, Franz; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON), 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON) and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON), and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G) and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S) as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G) is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G). This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives. PMID:26274975

  19. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Schmeitzl, Clemens; Warth, Benedikt; Fruhmann, Philipp; Michlmayr, Herbert; Malachová, Alexandra; Berthiller, Franz; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON), 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON) and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON), and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G) and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S) as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G) is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G). This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives. PMID:26274975

  20. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  1. Protein acetylation sites mediated by Schistosoma mansoni GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Furtado Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Meirelles Bastosde Oliveira, Francisco; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado

    2008-05-23

    The transcriptional co-activator GCN5, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is part of large multimeric complexes that are required for chromatin remodeling and transcription activation. As in other eukaryotes, the DNA from the parasite Schistosome mansoni is organized into nucleosomes and the genome encodes components of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Using a series of synthetic peptides we determined that Lys-14 of histone H3 was acetylated by the recombinant SmGCN5-HAT domain. SmGCN5 was also able to acetylate schistosome non-histone proteins, such as the nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1, and the co-activator SmNCoA-62. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of SmGCN5 protein in the nuclei of vitelline cells. Within the nucleus, SmGCN5 was found to be located in interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs), which are transcriptionally active structures. The data suggest that SmGCN5 is involved in transcription activation.

  2. Microtubule acetylation promotes kinesin-1 binding and transport.

    PubMed

    Reed, Nathan A; Cai, Dawen; Blasius, T Lynne; Jih, Gloria T; Meyhofer, Edgar; Gaertig, Jacek; Verhey, Kristen J

    2006-11-01

    Long-distance intracellular delivery is driven by kinesin and dynein motor proteins that ferry cargoes along microtubule tracks . Current models postulate that directional trafficking is governed by known biophysical properties of these motors-kinesins generally move to the plus ends of microtubules in the cell periphery, whereas cytoplasmic dynein moves to the minus ends in the cell center. However, these models are insufficient to explain how polarized protein trafficking to subcellular domains is accomplished. We show that the kinesin-1 cargo protein JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1) is localized to only a subset of neurites in cultured neuronal cells. The mechanism of polarized trafficking appears to involve the preferential recognition of microtubules containing specific posttranslational modifications (PTMs) by the kinesin-1 motor domain. Using a genetic approach to eliminate specific PTMs, we show that the loss of a single modification, alpha-tubulin acetylation at Lys-40, influences the binding and motility of kinesin-1 in vitro. In addition, pharmacological treatments that increase microtubule acetylation cause a redirection of kinesin-1 transport of JIP1 to nearly all neurite tips in vivo. These results suggest that microtubule PTMs are important markers of distinct microtubule populations and that they act to control motor-protein trafficking. PMID:17084703

  3. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  4. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control.

  5. Two Arabidopsis Proteins Synthesize Acetylated Xylan in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Breeanna R.; Peña, Maria J.; Moniz, Heather A.; Moremen, Kelley W.; York, William S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Xylan is the third most abundant glycopolymer on earth after cellulose and chitin. As a major component of wood, grain and forage, this natural biopolymer has far-reaching impacts on human life. This highly acetylated cell wall polysaccharide is a vital component of the plant cell wall, which functions as a molecular scaffold, providing plants with mechanical strength and flexibility. Mutations that impair synthesis of the xylan backbone give rise to plants that fail to grow normally due to collapsed xylem cells in the vascular system. Phenotypic analysis of these mutants has implicated many proteins in xylan biosynthesis. However, the enzymes directly responsible for elongation and acetylation of the xylan backbone have not been unambiguously identified. Here we provide direct biochemical evidence that two Arabidopsis thaliana proteins, IRREGULAR XYLEM 10-L (IRX10-L) and ESKIMO1/ TRICOME BIREFRINGENCE 29 (ESK1/TBL29), catalyze these respective processes in vitro. By identifying the elusive xylan synthase and establishing ESK1/TBL29 as the archetypal plant polysaccharide O-acetyltransferase, we have resolved two long-standing questions in plant cell wall biochemistry. These findings shed light on integral steps in the molecular pathways utilized by plants to synthesize a major component of the world's biomass and expand our toolkit for producing glycopolymers with valuable properties. PMID:25141999

  6. Preparation and characterization of N-benzoyl-O-acetyl-chitosan.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinping; Dang, Qifeng; Liu, Chengsheng; Fan, Bing; Yan, Jingquan; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    A novel amphipathic chitosan derivative, N-benzoyl-O-acetyl-chitosan (BACS), was prepared by using the selective partial acylation of chitosan (CS), benzoyl chloride, and acetic acid under high-intensity ultrasound. The chemical structure and physical properties of BACS were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, TGA, and XRD techniques. The degrees of substitution of benzoyl and acetyl for the chitosan derivatives were 0.26 and 1.15, respectively, which were calculated from the peak areas in NMR spectra by using the combined integral methods. The foaming properties of CS and BACS were determined and the results suggested BACS had better foam capacity and stability than those of chitosan. In addition, the antimicrobial activities of CS and BACS were also investigated against two species of bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungus (Aspergillus niger), the results indicated that the antibacterial and antifungal activities of BACS were much stronger than those of the parent chitosan. These findings suggested that BACS was preferable for use as a food additive with a dual role of both foaming agent and food preservative. PMID:25783016

  7. Polymorphic acetylation of arylamines and DNA-adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Weber, W W; Levy, G N; Martell, K J

    1990-01-01

    Inbred mouse strains congenic for rapid and slow N-acetyltransferase (NAT) (A.B6, rapid and B6.A, slow) were used to separate the effect of the NAT polymorphism from the influence of other genetically polymorphic enzymes on DNA adduct formation induced by exposure to arylamine carcinogens. Adduct formation was measured by HPLC analysis of 32P-postlabeled nucleotides from DNA of the urinary bladder and liver. Acetylator phenotype was a significant determinant of DNA damage in females as slow acetylators had higher levels of bladder DNA adducts than rapids. This correlation was the reverse of that seen with liver DNA. Older mice (20-23 weeks) formed much higher bladder DNA adduct levels than young mice (7 week). The increase in bladder adduct formation with age was seen in both sexes of all mouse strains. The older male B6 mice showed a 26-fold increase in bladder adducts and the older females showed no more than a 2-fold increase. In addition, the older male B6 mice produced significant amounts of an unidentified, early eluting adduct peak. Biochemical studies of liver NAT and O-acetyltransferase (OAT) activities showed a direct correlation between the levels of liver 2-aminofluorene (AF) NAT activity and levels of liver DNA-adduct formation, but the role of OAT activity in adduct formation in the mouse remains unclear. These results indicate that the NAT phenotype, age and sex are all important determinants of arylamine-DNA adduct formation in mice. PMID:2134671

  8. Autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, J; Whitman, W B

    1988-01-01

    To detect autotrophic CO2 assimilation in cell extracts of Methanococcus maripaludis, lactate dehydrogenase and NADH were added to convert pyruvate formed from autotrophically synthesized acetyl coenzyme A to lactate. The lactate produced was determined spectrophotometrically. When CO2 fixation was pulled in the direction of lactate synthesis, CO2 reduction to methane was inhibited. Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a potent inhibitor of methanogenesis, enhanced lactate synthesis, and methyl coenzyme M inhibited it in the absence of BES. Lactate synthesis was dependent on CO2 and H2, but H2 + CO2-independent synthesis was also observed. In cell extracts, the rate of lactate synthesis was about 1.2 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. When BES was added, the rate of lactate synthesis increased to 2.3 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. Because acetyl coenzyme A did not stimulate lactate synthesis, pyruvate synthase may have been the limiting activity in these assays. Radiolabel from 14CO2 was incorporated into lactate. The percentages of radiolabel in the C-1, C-2, and C-3 positions of lactate were 73, 33, and 11%, respectively. Both carbon monoxide and formaldehyde stimulated lactate synthesis. 14CH2O was specifically incorporated into the C-3 of lactate, and 14CO was incorporated into the C-1 and C-2 positions. Low concentrations of cyanide also inhibited autotrophic growth, CO dehydrogenase activity, and autotrophic lactate synthesis. These observations are in agreement with the acetogenic pathway of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. PMID:3133359

  9. Towards quantifying fuzzy stream power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, W.; Korup, O.

    2012-04-01

    Deterministic flow direction algorithms such as the D8 have wide application in numerical models of landscape evolution. These simple algorithms play a central role in quantifying drainage basin area, and hence approximating—via empirically derived relationships from regional flood frequency and hydraulic geometry—stream power or fluvial erosion potential. Here we explore how alternative algorithms that employ a probabilistic choice of flow direction affect quantitative estimates of stream power. We test a probabilistic multi-flow direction algorithm within the MATLAB TopoToolbox in model and real landscapes of low topographic relief and minute gradients, where potentially fuzzy drainage divides are dictated by, among others, alluvial fan dynamics, playa infill, and groundwater fluxes and seepage. We employ a simplistic numerical landscape evolution model that simulates fluvial incision and hillslope diffusion and explicitly models the existence and capture of endorheic basins that prevail in (semi-)arid, low-relief landscapes. We discuss how using this probabilistic multi-flow direction algorithm helps represent and quantify uncertainty about spatio-temporal drainage divide locations and how this bears on quantitative estimates of downstream stream power and fluvial erosion potential as well as their temporal dynamics.

  10. Quantifying torso deformity in scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter O.; Kumar, Anish; Durdle, Nelson G.; Raso, V. James

    2006-03-01

    Scoliosis affects the alignment of the spine and the shape of the torso. Most scoliosis patients and their families are more concerned about the effect of scoliosis on the torso than its effect on the spine. There is a need to develop robust techniques for quantifying torso deformity based on full torso scans. In this paper, deformation indices obtained from orthogonal maps of full torso scans are used to quantify torso deformity in scoliosis. 'Orthogonal maps' are obtained by applying orthogonal transforms to 3D surface maps. (An 'orthogonal transform' maps a cylindrical coordinate system to a Cartesian coordinate system.) The technique was tested on 361 deformed computer models of the human torso and on 22 scans of volunteers (8 normal and 14 scoliosis). Deformation indices from the orthogonal maps correctly classified up to 95% of the volunteers with a specificity of 1.00 and a sensitivity of 0.91. In addition to classifying scoliosis, the system gives a visual representation of the entire torso in one view and is viable for use in a clinical environment for managing scoliosis.

  11. Quantifying the Arctic methane budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, Nicola; Cain, Michelle; Pyle, John

    2014-05-01

    The Arctic is a major source of atmospheric methane, containing climate-sensitive emissions from natural wetlands and gas hydrates, as well as the fossil fuel industry. Both wetland and gas hydrate methane emissions from the Arctic may increase with increasing temperature, resulting in a positive feedback leading to enhancement of climate warming. It is important that these poorly-constrained sources are quantified by location and strength and their vulnerability to change be assessed. The MAMM project (Methane and other greenhouse gases in the Arctic: Measurements, process studies and Modelling') addresses these issues as part of the UK NERC Arctic Programme. A global chemistry transport model has been used, along with MAMM and other long term observations, to assess our understanding of the different source and sink terms in the Arctic methane budget. Simulations including methane coloured by source and latitude are used to distinguish between Arctic seasonal variability arising from transport and that arising from changes in Arctic sources and sinks. Methane isotopologue tracers provide a further constraint on modelled methane variability, distinguishing between isotopically light and heavy sources (e.g. wetlands and gas fields). We focus on quantifying the magnitude and seasonal variability of Arctic wetland emissions.

  12. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 Affect Xylan Acetylation and Secondary Wall Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be mono- and di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reduction in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-O-monoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. These results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls. PMID:26745802

  13. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 affect xylan acetylation and secondary wall deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng -Hua; Zhang, Jin -Song

    2016-01-08

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be monoand di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reductionmore » in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-Omonoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls.« less

  14. Generation of mature Nα-terminal acetylated thymosin α 1 by cleavage of recombinant prothymosin α.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Gong, Xin; Chang, Shaohong; Sun, Peng; Wu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    N(α)-terminal acetylation of peptides plays an important biological role but is rarely observed in prokaryotes. N(α)-terminal acetylated thymosin α1 (Tα1), a 28-amino-acid peptide, is an immune modifier that has been used in the clinic to treat hepatitis B and C virus (HBV/HCV) infections. We previously documented N(α)-terminal acetylation of recombinant prothymosin α (ProTα) in E. coli. Here we present a method for production of N(α)-acetylated Tα1 from recombinant ProTα. The recombinant ProTα was cleaved by human legumain expressed in Pichia pastoris to release Tα1 in vitro. The N(α)-acetylated Tα1 peptide was subsequently purified by reverse phase and cation exchange chromatography. Mass spectrometry indicated that the molecular mass of recombinant N(α)-acetylated Tα1 was 3108.79 in, which is identical to the mass of N(α)-acetylated Tα1 produced by total chemical synthesis. This mass corresponded to the nonacetylated Tα1 mass with a 42 Da increment. The retention time of recombinant N(α)-acetylated Tα1 and chemosynthetic N(α)-acetylated Tα1 were both 15.4 min in RP-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These data support the use of an E. coli expression system for the production of recombinant human N(α)-acetylated Tα1 and also will provide the basis for the preparation of recombinant acetylated peptides in E. coli. PMID:24288480

  15. Identification of the Acetylation and Ubiquitin-Modified Proteome during the Progression of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Daniel J.; Judge, Sarah M.; Beharry, Adam W.; Farnsworth, Charles L.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a consequence of several physiological and pathophysiological conditions including muscle disuse, aging and diseases such as cancer and heart failure. In each of these conditions, the predominant mechanism contributing to the loss of skeletal muscle mass is increased protein turnover. Two important mechanisms which regulate protein stability and degradation are lysine acetylation and ubiquitination, respectively. However our understanding of the skeletal muscle proteins regulated through acetylation and ubiquitination during muscle atrophy is limited. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to conduct an unbiased assessment of the acetylation and ubiquitin-modified proteome in skeletal muscle during a physiological condition of muscle atrophy. To induce progressive, physiologically relevant, muscle atrophy, rats were cast immobilized for 0, 2, 4 or 6 days and muscles harvested. Acetylated and ubiquitinated peptides were identified via a peptide IP proteomic approach using an anti-acetyl lysine antibody or a ubiquitin remnant motif antibody followed by mass spectrometry. In control skeletal muscle we identified and mapped the acetylation of 1,326 lysine residues to 425 different proteins and the ubiquitination of 4,948 lysine residues to 1,131 different proteins. Of these proteins 43, 47 and 50 proteins were differentially acetylated and 183, 227 and 172 were differentially ubiquitinated following 2, 4 and 6 days of disuse, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis identified contractile proteins as being enriched among proteins decreased in acetylation and increased in ubiquitination, whereas histone proteins were enriched among proteins increased in acetylation and decreased in ubiquitination. These findings provide the first proteome-wide identification of skeletal muscle proteins exhibiting changes in lysine acetylation and ubiquitination during any atrophy condition, and provide a basis for future mechanistic studies into how the

  16. Acetylation of Gly1 and Lys2 Promotes Aggregation of Human γD-Crystallin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human lens contains three major protein families: α-, β-, and γ-crystallin. Among the several variants of γ-crystallin in the human lens, γD-crystallin is a major form. γD-Crystallin is primarily present in the nuclear region of the lens and contains a single lysine residue at the second position (K2). In this study, we investigated the acetylation of K2 in γD-crystallin in aging and cataractous human lenses. Our results indicated that K2 is acetylated at an early age and that the amount of K2-acetylated γD-crystallin increased with age. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that in addition to K2, glycine 1 (G1) was acetylated in γD-crystallin from human lenses and in γD-crystallin acetylated in vitro. The chaperone ability of α-crystallin for acetylated γD-crystallin was lower than that for the nonacetylated protein. The tertiary structure and the microenvironment of the cysteine residues were significantly altered by acetylation. The acetylated protein exhibited higher surface hydrophobicity, was unstable against thermal and chemical denaturation, and exhibited a higher propensity to aggregate at 80 °C in comparison to the nonacetylated protein. Acetylation enhanced the GdnHCl-induced unfolding and slowed the subsequent refolding of γD-crystallin. Theoretical analysis indicated that the acetylation of K2 and G1 reduced the structural stability of the protein and brought the distal cysteine residues (C18 and C78) into close proximity. Collectively, these results indicate that the acetylation of G1 and K2 residues in γD-crystallin likely induced a molten globule-like structure, predisposing it to aggregation, which may account for the high content of aggregated proteins in the nucleus of aged and cataractous human lenses. PMID:25393041

  17. A redox-sensitive, oligopeptide-guided, self-assembling, and efficiency-enhanced (ROSE) system for functional delivery of microRNA therapeutics for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qida; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xu; Li, Yang; Fu, Qihan; Liang, Tingbo; Tang, Guping

    2016-10-01

    Lack of efficient adjuvant therapy contributes to a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A novel therapeutic is required for adjuvant treatment of HCC. We developed a polymer-based nanosystem (ROSE) for functional gene therapy by synthesizing a supramolecular complex self-assembled from polycations and functional adamantyl modules. The ROSE system condensing tumor suppressor microRNA-34a (miR-34a) therapeutics becomes ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles that could facilitate gene transfection in HCC cells with satisfied stability and efficiency, possibly due to proton sponge effect by polycations, PEGlyation protection, and controlled release by breakdown of disulfide bonds. Meanwhile, modification with a targeting oligopeptide SP94 in ROSE/miR-34a enables approximately higher affinity for LM3 HCC cells than hepatocytes in vitro and greater HCC specificity in vivo. Furthermore, ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth, representing a notable effect improvement over conventional gene delivery strategies. ROSE/miR-34a, featuring redox-responsiveness, oligopeptide-guided specificity, self-assembly, and enhanced transfection, is therefore a potential therapeutic agent in future adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. PMID:27459325

  18. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  19. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  20. Quantifying entanglement with witness operators

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, Fernando G.S.L.

    2005-08-15

    We present a unifying approach to the quantification of entanglement based on entanglement witnesses, which includes several already established entanglement measures such as the negativity, the concurrence, and the robustness of entanglement. We then introduce an infinite family of new entanglement quantifiers, having as its limits the best separable approximation measure and the generalized robustness. Gaussian states, states with symmetry, states constrained to super-selection rules, and states composed of indistinguishable particles are studied under the view of the witnessed entanglement. We derive new bounds to the fidelity of teleportation d{sub min}, for the distillable entanglement E{sub D} and for the entanglement of formation. A particular measure, the PPT-generalized robustness, stands out due to its easy calculability and provides sharper bounds to d{sub min} and E{sub D} than the negativity in most of the states. We illustrate our approach studying thermodynamical properties of entanglement in the Heisenberg XXX and dimerized models.

  1. An Artificial Reaction Promoter Modulates Mitochondrial Functions via Chemically Promoting Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yutaka; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hotta, Kohji; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation, which modulates protein function, is an important process in intracellular signalling. In mitochondria, protein acetylation regulates a number of enzymatic activities and, therefore, modulates mitochondrial functions. Our previous report showed that tributylphosphine (PBu3), an artificial reaction promoter that promotes acetylransfer reactions in vitro, also promotes the reaction between acetyl-CoA and an exogenously introduced fluorescent probe in mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that PBu3 induces the acetylation of mitochondrial proteins and a decrease in acetyl-CoA concentration in PBu3-treated HeLa cells. This indicates that PBu3 can promote the acetyltransfer reaction between acetyl-CoA and mitochondrial proteins in living cells. PBu3-induced acetylation gradually reduced mitochondrial ATP concentrations in HeLa cells without changing the cytoplasmic ATP concentration, suggesting that PBu3 mainly affects mitochondrial functions. In addition, pyruvate, which is converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and transiently increases ATP concentrations in the absence of PBu3, elicited a further decrease in mitochondrial ATP concentrations in the presence of PBu3. Moreover, the application and removal of PBu3 reversibly alternated mitochondrial fragmentation and elongation. These results indicate that PBu3 enhances acetyltransfer reactions in mitochondria and modulates mitochondrial functions in living cells. PMID:27374857

  2. N-Ace: using solvent accessibility and physicochemical properties to identify protein N-acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Lin, Feng-Mao; Chang, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2010-11-30

    Protein acetylation, which is catalyzed by acetyltransferases, is a type of post-translational modification and crucial to numerous essential biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and cytokine signaling. As the experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is time consuming and laboratory intensive, several computational approaches have been developed for identifying the candidates of experimental validation. In this work, solvent accessibility and the physicochemical properties of proteins are utilized to identify acetylated alanine, glycine, lysine, methionine, serine, and threonine. A two-stage support vector machine was applied to learn the computational models with combinations of amino acid sequences, and the accessible surface area and physicochemical properties of proteins. The predictive accuracy thus achieved is 5% to 14% higher than that of models trained using only amino acid sequences. Additionally, the substrate specificity of the acetylated site was investigated in detail with reference to the subcellular colocalization of acetyltransferases and acetylated proteins. The proposed method, N-Ace, is evaluated using independent test sets in various acetylated residues and predictive accuracies of 90% were achieved, indicating that the performance of N-Ace is comparable with that of other acetylation prediction methods. N-Ace not only provides a user-friendly input/output interface but also is a creative method for predicting protein acetylation sites. This novel analytical resource is now freely available at http://N-Ace.mbc.NCTU.edu.tw/. PMID:20839302

  3. Nε−Lysine Acetylation of a Bacterial Transcription Factor Inhibits Its DNA-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Sandy; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible Nε-lysine (Nε-Lys) acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of Nε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs). We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat). Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin)-like protein deacetylase (CobB) deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsBAc), demonstrating that Nε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsBAc and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible Nε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells. PMID:21217812

  4. Roles of Arabidopsis TBL34 and TBL35 in xylan acetylation and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Xylan is one of the major polymers in lignocellulosic biomass and about 60% of its xylosyl residues are acetylated at O-2 and/or O-3. Because acetylation of cell wall polymers contributes to biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production, it is important to investigate the biochemical mechanism underlying xylan acetylation, the knowledge of which could be applied to custom-design biomass composition tailored for biofuel production. In this report, we investigated the functions of Arabidopsis TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE 34 (TBL34) and TBL35, two DUF231-containing proteins, in xylan acetylation. The TBL34 gene was found to be specifically expressed in xylem cells in stems and root-hypocotyls, and both TBL34 and TBL35 were shown to be localized in the Golgi, where xylan biosynthesis occurs. Chemical analysis revealed that simultaneous mutations of TBL34 and TBL35 caused a mild decrease in xylan acetyl content and a specific reduction in xylan 3-O-monoacetylation and 2,3-di-O-acetylation. Furthermore, simultaneous mutations of TBL34, TBL35 and ESKIMO1 (ESK1) resulted in severely collapsed xylem vessels with altered secondary wall structure, and an extremely retarded plant growth. These findings indicate that TBL34 and TBL35 are putative acetyltransferases required for xylan 3-O-monoacetylation and 2,3-di-O-acetylation and that xylan acetylation is essential for normal secondary wall deposition and plant growth. PMID:26795157

  5. Novel Family of Carbohydrate Esterases, Based on Identification of the Hypocrea jecorina Acetyl Esterase Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell walls have been shown to contain acetyl groups in hemicelluloses and pectin. The gene, ae1, encoding the acetyl esterase (Ae1) of Hypocrea jecorina was identified by amino terminal sequencing, peptide mass spectrometry, and genomic sequence analyses. The coded polypeptide had 348 amino ...

  6. The Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Administration on Persons with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    2006-01-01

    Since previous investigations reported improvements in cognition of patients with dementia after acetyl-L-carnitine therapy and since there is an increased risk for persons with Down syndrome to develop Alzheimer disease, this study was designed to investigate the effect of acetyl-L-carnitine administration on neurological, intellectual, and…

  7. Histone Acetylation is Recruited in Consolidation as a Molecular Feature of Stronger Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federman, Noel; Fustinana, Maria Sol; Romano, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression is a key process for memory consolidation. Recently, the participation of epigenetic mechanisms like histone acetylation was evidenced in long-term memories. However, until now the training strength required and the persistence of the chromatin acetylation recruited are not well characterized. Here we studied whether histone…

  8. Polymorphic acetylation of the antibacterials, sulfamethazine and dapsone, in South Indian subjects.

    PubMed

    Peters, J H; Gordon, G R; Karat, A B

    1975-07-01

    A group of South Indian subjects was studied for their capacities to acetylate sulfamethazine (SMZ) and dapsone (DDS) and to clear DDS from the circulation. An apparent trimodal distribution of acetylator phenotypes was found in 49 subjects (51% slow, 12% intermediate, and 37% rapid acetylators) from measurements of the percentage acetylation of SMZ in 6-hour plasma samples after administration of 10 mg SMZ/kg. The intermediate phenotype was not discernible from either the percentage acetylation of SMZ in urine (collected concurrently with the plasma after SMZ) or that of DDS in plasma after the ingestion of 50 mg DDS by the same subjects. The latter two measurements yielded a bimodal distribution of 59% slow and 41% rapid acetylators, nearly identical to earlier reported distributions of isoniazid inactivator phenotypes in larger numbers of South Indian tuberculosis patients. In the current group, acetylation of DDS and SMZ was positively correlated. The half-time of disappearance (T 1/2) of DDS, an expression of the rate of clearance from the plasma, ranged from 13 to 40 hours. No correlation was found between the subject's capacity to acetylate DDS and the T 1/2 value for DDS. These results were generally consistent with earlier observations made during similar studies of American and Filipino subjects. PMID:1155699

  9. Global profiling of lysine acetylation in human histoplasmosis pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Xie, Longxiang; Fang, Wenjie; Deng, Wanyan; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Li, Juan; Chen, Min; Liao, Wanqing; Xie, Jianping; Pan, Weihua

    2016-04-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is the causative agent of human histoplasmosis, which can cause respiratory and systemic mycosis in immune-compromised individuals. Lysine acetylation, a protein posttranslational protein modification, is widespread in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Although increasing evidence suggests that lysine acetylation may play critical roles in fungus physiology, very little is known about its extent and function in H. capsulatum. To comprehensively profile protein lysine acetylation in H. capsulatum, we performed a global acetylome analysis through peptide prefractionation, antibody enrichment, and LC-MS/MS analysis, identifying 775 acetylation sites on 456 acetylated proteins; and functionally analysis showing their involvement in different biological processes. We defined six types of acetylation site motifs, and the results imply that lysine residue of polypeptide with tyrosine at the -1 and +1 positions, histidine at the +1 position, and phenylalanine (F) at the +1 and +2 position is a preferred substrate of lysine acetyltransferase. Moreover, some virulence factors candidates including calmodulin and DnaK are acetylated. In conclusion, our data set may serve as an important resource for the elucidation of associations between functional protein lysine acetylation and virulence in H. capsulatum. PMID:26806293

  10. An Artificial Reaction Promoter Modulates Mitochondrial Functions via Chemically Promoting Protein Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Yutaka; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hotta, Kohji; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation, which modulates protein function, is an important process in intracellular signalling. In mitochondria, protein acetylation regulates a number of enzymatic activities and, therefore, modulates mitochondrial functions. Our previous report showed that tributylphosphine (PBu3), an artificial reaction promoter that promotes acetylransfer reactions in vitro, also promotes the reaction between acetyl-CoA and an exogenously introduced fluorescent probe in mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that PBu3 induces the acetylation of mitochondrial proteins and a decrease in acetyl-CoA concentration in PBu3-treated HeLa cells. This indicates that PBu3 can promote the acetyltransfer reaction between acetyl-CoA and mitochondrial proteins in living cells. PBu3-induced acetylation gradually reduced mitochondrial ATP concentrations in HeLa cells without changing the cytoplasmic ATP concentration, suggesting that PBu3 mainly affects mitochondrial functions. In addition, pyruvate, which is converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and transiently increases ATP concentrations in the absence of PBu3, elicited a further decrease in mitochondrial ATP concentrations in the presence of PBu3. Moreover, the application and removal of PBu3 reversibly alternated mitochondrial fragmentation and elongation. These results indicate that PBu3 enhances acetyltransfer reactions in mitochondria and modulates mitochondrial functions in living cells. PMID:27374857

  11. Acetylation of Starch with Vinyl Acetate in Imidazolium Ionic Liquids and Characterization of Acetate Distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch was acetylated with vinyl acetate in different 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) salts as solvent in effort to produce starches with different acetylation patterns. Overall degree of substitution was much higher for basic anions such as acetate and dicyanimide (dca) than for neutral anions ...

  12. Functional Analyses of Two Acetyl Coenzyme A Synthetases in the Ascomycete Gibberella zeae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghoon; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Jungkwan; Min, Kyunghun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2011-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a crucial metabolite for energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways and is produced in various cellular compartments with spatial and temporal precision. Our previous study on ATP citrate lyase (ACL) in Gibberella zeae revealed that ACL-dependent acetyl-CoA production is important for histone acetylation, especially in sexual development, but is not involved in lipid synthesis. In this study, we deleted additional acetyl-CoA synthetic genes, the acetyl-CoA synthetases (ACS genes ACS1 and ACS2), to identify alternative acetyl-CoA production mechanisms for ACL. The ACS1 deletion resulted in a defect in sexual development that was mainly due to a reduction in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-linoleoyl-rac-glycerol production, which is required for perithecium development and maturation. Another ACS coding gene, ACS2, has accessorial functions for ACS1 and has compensatory functions for ACL as a nuclear acetyl-CoA producer. This study showed that acetate is readily generated during the entire life cycle of G. zeae and has a pivotal role in fungal metabolism. Because ACSs are components of the pyruvate-acetaldehyde-acetate pathway, this fermentation process might have crucial roles in various physiological processes for filamentous fungi. PMID:21666077

  13. A dysregulated acetyl/SUMO switch of FXR promotes hepatic inflammation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Xiao, Zhen; Kwon, Sanghoon; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ryerson, Daniel; Tkac, David; Ma, Ping; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Zhou, Edward; Xu, H Eric; Palvimo, Jorma J; Chen, Lin-Feng; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2015-01-13

    Acetylation of transcriptional regulators is normally dynamically regulated by nutrient status but is often persistently elevated in nutrient-excessive obesity conditions. We investigated the functional consequences of such aberrantly elevated acetylation of the nuclear receptor FXR as a model. Proteomic studies identified K217 as the FXR acetylation site in diet-induced obese mice. In vivo studies utilizing acetylation-mimic and acetylation-defective K217 mutants and gene expression profiling revealed that FXR acetylation increased proinflammatory gene expression, macrophage infiltration, and liver cytokine and triglyceride levels, impaired insulin signaling, and increased glucose intolerance. Mechanistically, acetylation of FXR blocked its interaction with the SUMO ligase PIASy and inhibited SUMO2 modification at K277, resulting in activation of inflammatory genes. SUMOylation of agonist-activated FXR increased its interaction with NF-κB but blocked that with RXRα, so that SUMO2-modified FXR was selectively recruited to and trans-repressed inflammatory genes without affecting FXR/RXRα target genes. A dysregulated acetyl/SUMO switch of FXR in obesity may serve as a general mechanism for diminished anti-inflammatory response of other transcriptional regulators and provide potential therapeutic and diagnostic targets for obesity-related metabolic disorders. PMID:25425577

  14. Per-O-acetylation of cellulose in dimethyl sulfoxide with catalyzed transesterification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Yi; Chen, Ming-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Liu, Chuan-Fu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-04-16

    Cellulose acetylation was investigated in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with isopropenyl acetate (IPA) as acetylating reagent and 1,8-diazabicyclo[5,4,0]undec-7-ene (DBU) as catalyst at 70-130 °C for 3-12 h. The degree of substitution (DS) of acetylated cellulose was comparatively determined by titration and ¹H NMR and confirmed by FT-IR analysis. The results indicated that per-O-acetylation was achieved at >90 °C for a relatively long duration. The three well-resolved peaks of carbonyl carbons in ¹³C NMR spectra also provided evidence of per-O-acetylation. The solubility of cellulose acetates in common organic solvents was examined, and the result showed that chloroform can be an alternative choice as a solvent for fully acetylated cellulose formed in this study besides DMSO. The intrinsic viscosity of acetylated cellulose solution implied almost no degradation of cellulose during acetylation in DMSO except at higher temperature (130 °C) for a long time. PMID:24678805

  15. Requirements for Carnitine Shuttle-Mediated Translocation of Mitochondrial Acetyl Moieties to the Yeast Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    van Rossum, Harmen M.; Kozak, Barbara U.; Niemeijer, Matthijs S.; Dykstra, James C.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In many eukaryotes, the carnitine shuttle plays a key role in intracellular transport of acyl moieties. Fatty acid-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells employ this shuttle to translocate acetyl units into their mitochondria. Mechanistically, the carnitine shuttle should be reversible, but previous studies indicate that carnitine shuttle-mediated export of mitochondrial acetyl units to the yeast cytosol does not occur in vivo. This apparent unidirectionality was investigated by constitutively expressing genes encoding carnitine shuttle-related proteins in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain, in which cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthesis could be switched off by omitting lipoic acid from growth media. Laboratory evolution of this strain yielded mutants whose growth on glucose, in the absence of lipoic acid, was l-carnitine dependent, indicating that in vivo export of mitochondrial acetyl units to the cytosol occurred via the carnitine shuttle. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was identified as the predominant source of acetyl-CoA in the evolved strains. Whole-genome sequencing revealed mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (MCT1), nuclear-mitochondrial communication (RTG2), and encoding a carnitine acetyltransferase (YAT2). Introduction of these mutations into the nonevolved parental strain enabled l-carnitine-dependent growth on glucose. This study indicates intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA concentration and constitutive expression of carnitine shuttle genes as key factors in enabling in vivo export of mitochondrial acetyl units via the carnitine shuttle. PMID:27143389

  16. Effects of acetylation on the emulsifying properties of Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch. polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjun; Hu, Xinzhong; Li, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhen

    2016-06-25

    In the present study, polysaccharides extracted from Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch. seeds (ASKP) were acetylated to improve the emulsifying properties of the macromolecules. Several methods were applied for the acetylation purpose, among which the acetic anhydride-pyridine method with formamide as solvent was found to be the most effective one. Acetylated ASKPs with various degree of substitution (DS) were successfully produced and structurally characterized using HPSEC-MALS, FTIR and (1)H NMR techniques in this study. Results showed that acetylation treatment could cause the degradation of ASKP. Moreover, with the increase of DS, both the molecular weight and radius of gyration increased, as well as the molecular conformation trended to be more compact. Low DS (DS: 0.04 and 0.13) conferred acetylated ASKP a lower viscosity than that of ASKP. With the increase of DS, the viscosity of acetylated ASKPs increased and exceeded that of ASKP. Compared with ASKP, acetylated ASKPs could reduce the surface tension to a greater extent and demonstrated a much smaller droplet size (ZD) in an oil/water emulsion system. Acetylated ASKPs were capable of stabilizing the oil/water emulsion for 3 days at 60°C, whose performance was as good as that of gum acacia. In conclusion, such a hydrophobic modification on ASKP conferred it better emulsifying properties. PMID:27083845

  17. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in biosynthesis of antibiotics in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Guangyuan; Song, Limin; Lv, Binna; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, a Gram-positive bacterium, is very effective for the control of plant pathogens. However, very little is known about the function of lysine acetylation in this organism. Here, we conducted the first lysine acetylome in B. amyloliquefaciens through a combination of highly sensitive immune-affinity purification and high-resolution LC−MS/MS. Overall, we identified 3268 lysine acetylation sites in 1254 proteins, which account for 32.9% of the total proteins in this bacterium. Till date, this is the highest ratio of acetylated proteins that have been identified in bacteria. Acetylated proteins are associated with a variety of biological processes and a large fraction of these proteins are involved in metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, we found that about 71.1% (27/38) and 78.6% (22/28) of all the proteins tightly related to the synthesis of three types of pepketides and five families of lipopeptides were acetylated, respectively. These findings suggest that lysine acetylation plays a critical role in the regulation of antibiotics biosynthesis. These data serves as an important resource for further elucidation of the physiological role of lysine acetylation in B. amyloliquefaciens. PMID:26822828

  18. Lysine acetylation stabilizes SP2 protein in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Sheng, Qing; Jiang, Caiying; Chen, Qin; Lv, Zhengbing; Yao, Juming; Nie, Zuoming

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a vital post-translational modification that plays an important role in many cellular processes in organisms. In the present study, the nutrient storage proteins in hemolymph were first found to be highly acetylated-particularly SP2 protein, which contains 20 potential Kac sites. Further results confirmed that lysine acetylation could stabilize and up-regulate the protein level of anti-apoptosis protein SP2, thereby improving the survival of H2O2-treated BmN cells and suppressing the apoptosis induced by H2O2. The potential mechanism involved in the inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation by crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination. Our results showed that the increase in the acetylation level by TSA could decrease the ubiquitination and improve the protein level of SP2, indicating that lysine acetylation could influence the SP2 protein level through competition between ubiquitination and the suppression of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby stabilizing the protein. SP2 is a major nutrient storage protein from hemolymph for amino acid storage and utilization. The crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination of SP2 might imply an important role of lysine acetylation for nutrient storage and utilization in silkworm. PMID:27374983

  19. Acetylation of RNA Processing Proteins and Cell Cycle Proteins in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Huang, Feilei; Pan, Jing; Josic, Djuro; Yu-Lee, Li-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Mitosis is a highly regulated process in which errors can lead to genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer. During this phase of the cell cycle, transcription is silent and RNA translation is inhibited. Thus, mitosis is largely driven by posttranslational modification of proteins, including phosphorylation, methylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation. Here, we show that protein acetylation is prevalent during mitosis. To identify proteins that are acetylated, we synchronized HeLa cells in early prometaphase and immunoprecipitated lysine-acetylated proteins with anti-acetyl-lysine antibody. The immunoprecipitated proteins were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These include proteins involved in RNA translation, RNA processing, cell cycle regulation, transcription, chaperone function, DNA damage repair, metabolism, immune response and cell structure. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analyses confirmed that two RNA processing proteins, eIF4G and RNA helicase A, and several cell cycle proteins, including APC1, anillin and NudC, were acetylated in mitosis. We further showed that acetylation of APC1 and NudC was enhanced by apicidin treatment, suggesting that their acetylation was regulated by histone deacetylase. Moreover, treating mitotic cells with apicidin or trichostatin A induced spindle abnormalities and cytokinesis failure. These studies suggest that protein acetylation/deacetylation is likely an important regulatory mechanism in mitosis. PMID:20812760

  20. A bioinformatics-based overview of protein Lys-Ne-acetylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among posttranslational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N'-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. T...

  1. Aberrant levels of histone H3 acetylation induce spermatid anomaly in mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Endo, Daisuke; Akiyama, Naotaro; Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Koji, Takehiko

    2015-02-01

    Histone acetylation is involved in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene function. We reported previously that histone H3 acetylation pattern is subject to dynamic changes and limited to certain stages of germ cell differentiation during murine spermatogenesis, suggesting a crucial role for acetylation in the process. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hyper- and hypo-acetylation on spermatogenesis. Changes in acetylation level were induced by either in vivo administration of sodium phenylbutyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, or by knockdown of histone acetyltransferases using short hairpin RNA plasmids transfection. Administration of sodium phenylbutyrate induced accumulation of acetylated histone H3 at lysine 9 and lysine 18 in round spermatids, together with spermatid morphological abnormalities and induction of apoptosis through a Bax-related pathway. Knockdown of steroid receptor coactivator 1, a member of histone acetyltransferases, but not general control of amino acid synthesis 5 nor elongator protein 3 by in vivo electroporation of shRNA plasmids, reduced acetylated histone H3 at lysine 9 in round spermatids, and induced morphological abnormalities. We concluded that the proper regulation of histone H3 acetylation levels is important for spermatid differentiation and complex chromatin remodeling during spermiogenesis. PMID:25326673

  2. Myc-dependent mitochondrial generation of acetyl-CoA contributes to fatty acid biosynthesis and histone acetylation during cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Noonan, Jhoanna; Perez-Olsen, Carissa; Gafken, Philip R; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; Kelleher, Joanne; VanGilst, Marc; Hockenbery, David

    2010-11-19

    Cell reprogramming from a quiescent to proliferative state requires coordinate activation of multiple -omic networks. These networks activate histones, increase cellular bioenergetics and the synthesis of macromolecules required for cell proliferation. However, mechanisms that coordinate the regulation of these interconnected networks are not fully understood. The oncogene c-Myc (Myc) activates cellular metabolism and global chromatin remodeling. Here we tested for an interconnection between Myc regulation of metabolism and acetylation of histones. Using [(13)C(6)]glucose and a combination of GC/MS and LC/ESI tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the fractional incorporation of (13)C-labeled 2-carbon fragments into the fatty acid palmitate, and acetyl-lysines at the N-terminal tail of histone H4 in myc(-/-) and myc(+/+) Rat1A fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that Myc increases mitochondrial synthesis of acetyl-CoA, as the de novo synthesis of (13)C-labeled palmitate was increased 2-fold in Myc-expressing cells. Additionally, Myc induced a forty percent increase in (13)C-labeled acetyl-CoA on H4-K16. This is linked to the capacity of Myc to increase mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA, as we show that mitochondria provide 50% of the acetyl groups on H4-K16. These data point to a key role for Myc in directing the interconnection of -omic networks, and in particular, epigenetic modification of proteins in response to proliferative signals. PMID:20813845

  3. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  4. Investigation of acetylated kapok fibers on the sorption of oil in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jintao; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Aiqin

    2013-02-01

    Kapok fibers have been acetylated for oil spill cleanup in the aqueous environment. The structures of raw and acetylated kapok fiber were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Without severe damage to the lumen structures, the kapok fibers were successfully acetylated and the resulting fibers exhibited a better oil sorption capacity than raw fibers for diesel and soybean oil. Compared with high viscosity soybean oil, low viscosity diesel shows a better affinity to the surface of acetylated fibers. Sorption kinetics is fitted well by the pseudo second-order model, and the equilibrium data can be described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The results implied that acetylated kapok fiber can be used as the substitute for non-biodegradable oil sorption materials. PMID:23596942

  5. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  6. Effect of Acetyl Group on Mechanical Properties of Chitin/Chitosan Nanocrystal: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Junhe; Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2016-01-01

    Chitin fiber is the load-bearing component in natural chitin-based materials. In these materials, chitin is always partially deacetylated to different levels, leading to diverse material properties. In order to understand how the acetyl group enhances the fracture resistance capability of chitin fiber, we constructed atomistic models of chitin with varied acetylation degree and analyzed the hydrogen bonding pattern, fracture, and stress-strain behavior of these models. We notice that the acetyl group can contribute to the formation of hydrogen bonds that can stabilize the crystalline structure. In addition, it is found that the specimen with a higher acetylation degree presents a greater resistance against fracture. This study describes the role of the functional group, acetyl groups, in crystalline chitin. Such information could provide preliminary understanding of nanomaterials when similar functional groups are encountered. PMID:26742033

  7. Effects of gamma irradiation on physicochemical properties of native and acetylated wheat starches.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangli; Zhou, Xin; Sui, Zhongquan; Bao, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on the physicochemical and crystalline properties of the native and acetylated wheat starches were investigated. Peak, hot paste, cool paste and setback viscosities of both native and acetylated wheat starches decreased continuously and significantly with the increase of the irradiation dose, whereas breakdown viscosity increased after irradiation. However, gamma irradiation only exerted slight effects on thermal and retrogradation properties of both native and acetylated wheat starches. X-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that acetylation modification had considerable effects on the molecular structure of wheat starch, and the crystallinity of both untreated and acetylated starches increased slightly with the increase of irradiation dose. However, the V-type crystallinity of amylose-lipid complex was not affected by gamma irradiation treatments with doses up to 9kGy. PMID:27344953

  8. HATs and HDACs in neurodegeneration: a tale of disconcerted acetylation homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, RN; Pahan, K

    2007-01-01

    Gradual disclosure of the molecular basis of selective neuronal apoptosis during neurodegenerative diseases reveals active participation of acetylating and deacetylating agents during the process. Several studies have now successfully manipulated neuronal vulnerability by influencing the dose and enzymatic activity of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), enzymes regulating acetylation homeostasis within the nucleus, thus focusing on the importance of balanced acetylation status in neuronal vitality. It is now increasingly becoming clear that acetylation balance is greatly impaired during neurodegenerative conditions. Herein, we attempt to illuminate molecular means by which such impairment is manifested and how the compromised acetylation homeostasis is intimately coupled to neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of reinstating the HAT–HDAC balance to ameliorate neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16167067

  9. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  10. Histone octamer acetylation affects the free energy of nucleosome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Alex; Manohar, Mridula; Edon, Annick; Nakkula, Robin; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nucleosomes, histone octamer-DNA complexes, form the fundamental repeating units of eukaryotic chromatin. Numerous post-translational modifications of histone octamers are found in vivo and are known to play roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, but the molecular functions of these modifications are not well understood. In this study we consider the effects of acetylating histone protein H3 residues Lys^115 and Lys^122. These modifications reduce the positive surface charge of the histone octamer at contact points with the negatively charged DNA phosphate backbone and add steric bulk in the dyad region. We report results from competitive reconstitutions that show the free energy of nucleosome formation between wild-type and modified histone octamer binding to a strong nucleosome positioning sequence is reduced. These results suggest that these modifications may be involved in nucleosome assembly and disassembly.

  11. Acetylated Hyaluronic Acid: Enhanced Bioavailability and Biological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Saturnino, Carmela; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Puoci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a macropolysaccharidic component of the extracellular matrix, is common to most species and it is found in many sites of the human body, including skin and soft tissue. Not only does HA play a variety of roles in physiologic and in pathologic events, but it also has been extensively employed in cosmetic and skin-care products as drug delivery agent or for several biomedical applications. The most important limitations of HA are due to its short half-life and quick degradation in vivo and its consequently poor bioavailability. In the aim to overcome these difficulties, HA is generally subjected to several chemical changes. In this paper we obtained an acetylated form of HA with increased bioavailability with respect to the HA free form. Furthermore, an improved radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activity has been evidenced, respectively, on ABTS radical cation and murine monocyte/macrophage cell lines (J774.A1). PMID:25114930

  12. Toxoplasma histone acetylation remodelers as novel drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vanagas, Laura; Jeffers, Victoria; Bogado, Silvina S; Dalmasso, Maria C; Sullivan, William J; Angel, Sergio O

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a leading cause of neurological birth defects and a serious opportunistic pathogen. The authors and others have found that Toxoplasma uses a unique nucleosome composition supporting a fine gene regulation together with other factors. Post-translational modifications in histones facilitate the establishment of a global chromatin environment and orchestrate DNA-related biological processes. Histone acetylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications influencing gene expression. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases have been intensively studied as potential drug targets. In particular, histone deacetylase inhibitors have activity against apicomplexan parasites, underscoring their potential as a new class of antiparasitic compounds. In this review, we summarize what is known about Toxoplasma histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases, and discuss the inhibitors studied to date. Finally, the authors discuss the distinct possibility that the unique nucleosome composition of Toxoplasma, which harbors a nonconserved H2Bv variant histone, might be targeted in novel therapeutics directed against this parasite. PMID:23199404

  13. Acetylated flavonoid glycosides potentiating NGF action from Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yushan; Chen, Xigui; Satake, Masayuki; Oshima, Yasukatsu; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2004-04-01

    Three new acetylated flavonoid glycosides, 5,6,4'-trihydroxyflavone 7-O-alpha-L-2,3-di-O-acetylrhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), apigenin 7-O-alpha-L-3-O-acetylrhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), and apigenin 7-O-alpha-L-2,3-di-O-acetylrhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), were isolated from Scoparia dulcis together with the known compound eugenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (4). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2 and 3 showed an enhancing activity of nerve growth factor-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells. PMID:15104516

  14. Acetylated dammarane-type bisdesmosides from Combretum inflatum.

    PubMed

    Williams, Russell B; Norman, Vanessa L; Goering, Matt G; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Eldridge, Gary R; Starks, Courtney M

    2013-09-27

    The first study of the chemical constituents of Combretum inflatum has resulted in the isolation of seven new acetylated dammarane-type bisdesmosides (1-7). Their structures were determined from microgram quantities on hand using Bruker BioSpin TCI 1.7 mm MicroCryoProbe technology, ESIMS, and comparison to data found in the literature. Compounds 1-7 were screened for inhibition of an Escherichia coli strain UTI89 biofilm, MRSA inhibition, and cytotoxicity in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells. Compounds 3-7 reduced the growth of MRSA at 16 μg/mL by 71-45%, and compound 7 had an IC₅₀ value of 3.9 μM in NCI-H460. PMID:23978065

  15. Mechanism of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl coenzyme A: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:..cap alpha..-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase is a lysosomal membrane enzyme, deficient in the genetic disease Sanfilippo C syndrome. The enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA to terminal ..cap alpha..-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate within the organelle. The reaction mechanism was examined using high purified lysosomal membranes from rat liver and human fibroblasts. The N-acetyltransferase reaction is optimal above pH 5.5 and a 2-3 fold stimulation of activity is observed in the presence of 0.1% taurodeoxycholate. Double reciprocal analysis and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme works by a Di-Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. The binding of acetyl-CoA to the enzyme is measured by exchange label from (/sup 3/H)CoA to acetyl-CoA, and is optimal at pH's above 7.0. The acetyl-enzyme intermediate is formed by incubating membranes with (/sup 3/H)acetyl-CoA. The acetyl group can be transferred to glucosamine, forming (/sup 3/H)N-acetylglucosamine; the transfer is optimal between pH 4 and 5. Lysosomal membranes from Sanfilippo C fibroblasts confirm that these half reactions carried out by the N-acetyltransferase. The enzyme is inactivated by N-bromosuccinimide and diethylpyrocarbonate, indicating that a histidine is involved in the reaction. These results suggest that the histidine residue is at the active site of the enzyme. The properties of the N-acetyltransferase in the membrane, the characterization of the enzyme kinetics, the chemistry of a histidine mediated acetylation and the pH difference across the lysosomal membrane all support a transmembrane acetylation mechanism.

  16. Alterations of the degree of xylan acetylation in Arabidopsis xylan mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanhui; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide in secondary walls of dicot plants and one of its structural features is the high degree of acetylation of xylosyl residues. In Arabidopsis, about 60% of xylosyl residues in xylan are acetylated and the biochemical mechanisms controlling xylan acetylation are largely unknown. A recent report by Yuan et al. (2013) revealed the essential role of a DUF231 domain-containing protein, ESKIMO1 (ESK1), in xylan acetylation in Arabidopsis as the esk1 mutation caused specific reductions in the degree of xylan 2-O or 3-O-monoacetylation and in the activity of xylan acetyltransferase. Interestingly, the esk1 mutation also resulted in an elevation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) substitutions in xylan. Since GlcA substitutions in xylan occur at the O-2 position of xylosyl residues, it is plausible that the increase in GlcA substitutions in the esk1 mutant is attributed to the reduction in acetylation at O-2 of xylosyl residues, which renders more O-2 positions available for GlcA substitutions. Here, we investigated the effect of removal of GlcA substitutions on the degree of xylan acetylation. We found that a complete loss of GlcA substitutions in the xylan of the gux1/2/3 triple mutant led to a significant increase in the degree of xylan acetylation, indicating that xylan acetyltransferases and glucuronyltransferases compete with each other for xylosyl residues for their acetylation or GlcA substitutions in planta. In addition, detailed structure analysis of xylan from the rwa1/2/3/4 quadruple mutant revealed that it had a uniform reduction of acetyl substitutions at different positions of the xylosyl residues, which is consistent with the proposed role of RWAs as acetyl coenzyme A transporters. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:24518588

  17. The acetyl group deficit at the onset of contraction in ischaemic canine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Loxham, Susan J G; Poucher, Simon M; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2002-10-15

    Considerable debate surrounds the identity of the precise cellular site(s) of inertia that limit the contribution of mitochondrial ATP resynthesis towards a step increase in workload at the onset of muscular contraction. By detailing the relationship between canine gracilis muscle energy metabolism and contractile function during constant-flow ischaemia, in the absence (control) and presence of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activation by dichloroacetate, the present study examined whether there is a period at the onset of contraction when acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) availability limits mitochondrial ATP resynthesis, i.e. whether a limitation in mitochondrial acetyl group provision exists. Secondly, assuming it does exist, we also aimed to identify the mechanism by which dichloroacetate overcomes this "acetyl group deficit". No increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activation or acetyl group availability occurred during the first 20 s of contraction in the control condition, with strong trends for both acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine to actually decline (indicating the existence of an acetyl group deficit). Dichloroacetate increased resting pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activation, acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine by approximately 20-fold (P < 0.01), approximately 3-fold (P < 0.01) and approximately 4-fold (P < 0.01), respectively, and overcame the acetyl group deficit at the onset of contraction. As a consequence, the reliance upon non-oxidative ATP resynthesis was reduced by approximately 40 % (P < 0.01) and tension development was increased by approximately 20 % (P < 0.05) following 5 min of contraction. The present study has demonstrated, for the first time, the existence of an acetyl group deficit at the onset of contraction and has confirmed the metabolic and functional benefits to be gained from overcoming this inertia. PMID:12381829

  18. Acetylated Lysozyme as Impurity in Lysozyme Crystals: Constant Distribution Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was acetylated to modify molecular charge keeping the molecular size and weight nearly constant. Two derivatives, A and B, more and less acetylated, respectively, were obtained, separated, purified and added to the solution from which crystals of tetragonal HEWL crystals were grown. Amounts of the A or B impurities added were 0.76, 0.38 and 0.1 milligram per millimeter while HEWL concentration were 20, 30 and 40 milligram per milliliter. The crystals grown in 18 experiments for each impurity were dissolved and quantities of A or B additives in these crystals were analyzed by cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. All the data for each set of 18 samples with the different impurity and regular HEWL concentrations is well described by one distribution coefficient K = 2.15 plus or minus 0.13 for A and K = 3.42 plus or minus 0.25 for B. The observed independence of the distribution coefficient on both the impurity concentration and supersaturation is explained by the dilution model described in this paper. It shows that impurity adsorption and incorporation rate is proportional to the impurity concentration and that the growth rate is proportional to the crystallizing protein in solution. With the kinetic coefficient for crystallization, beta = 5.10(exp -7) centimeters per second, the frequency at which an impurity molecule near the growing interface irreversibly joins a molecular site on the crystal was found to be 3 1 per second, much higher than the average frequency for crystal molecules. For best quality protein crystals it is better to have low microheterogeneous protein impurity concentration and high supers aturation.

  19. Pro-autophagic polyphenols reduce the acetylation of cytoplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Mariño, Guillermo; Lissa, Delphine; Vacchelli, Erika; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Zamzami, Naoufal; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol contained in red wine that has been amply investigated for its beneficial effects on organismal metabolism, in particular in the context of the so-called “French paradox,” i.e., the relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease exhibited by a population with a high dietary intake of cholesterol and saturated fats. At least part of the beneficial effect of resveratrol on human health stems from its capacity to promote autophagy by activating the NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1. However, the concentration of resveratrol found in red wine is excessively low to account alone for the French paradox. Here, we investigated the possibility that other mono- and polyphenols contained in red wine might induce autophagy while affecting the acetylation levels of cellular proteins. Phenolic compounds found in red wine, including anthocyanins (oenin), stilbenoids (piceatannol), monophenols (caffeic acid, gallic acid) glucosides (delphinidin, kuronamin, peonidin) and flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, myricetin), were all capable of stimulating autophagy, although with dissimilar potencies. Importantly, a robust negative correlation could be established between autophagy induction and the acetylation levels of cytoplasmic proteins, as determined by a novel immunofluorescence staining protocol that allows for the exclusion of nuclear components from the analysis. Inhibition of sirtuin 1 by both pharmacological and genetic means abolished protein deacetylation and autophagy as stimulated by resveratrol, but not by piceatannol, indicating that these compounds act through distinct molecular pathways. In support of this notion, resveratrol and piceatannol synergized in inducing autophagy as well as in promoting cytoplasmic protein deacetylation. Our results highlight a cause-effect relationship between the deacetylation of cytoplasmic proteins and autophagy induction by red wine components. PMID:23070521

  20. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  1. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    PubMed

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  2. Monoclonal anti-acid-labile subunit oligopeptide antibodies and their use in a two-site immunoassay for ALS measurement in humans.

    PubMed

    Stadler, S; Wu, Z; Dressendörfer, R A; Morrison, K M; Khare, A; Lee, P D; Strasburger, C J

    2001-06-01

    Quantification of the acid-labile subunit (ALS) has to date been restricted to immunoassays utilizing polyclonal antibodies. By immunization with N-terminal and C-terminal specific ALS oligopeptides, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target ALS-specific sequences outside the nonspecific leucine-rich repeats in the ALS molecule. For mAb selection, a special screening method was developed. Monoclonal antibody 5C9, which targets the N-terminus of ALS, is immobilized and the anti-ALS mAb 7H3, directed against the C-terminus, is biotinylated and used as tracer Ab. Due to the extreme pH-lability of ALS, changes in immunorecognition of ALS were investigated after acidification for protein unfolding in different pH ranges and in a time-dependent manner. It was determined that acidification of the serum samples to pH 2.7 for 30 min, followed by neutralization and dilution to 1:100 was the optimal acid-neutralization method. For standardization purposes, a serum pool derived from healthy volunteers was assigned the value 1 U/ml ALS. The sandwich assay has a working range with a linear dose-response curve in a log/log system between 0.005 and 10 U/ml. ALS levels in seven acromegalic patients ranged from 2.0 to 4.2 U/ml, and in 12 untreated growth hormone deficient patients from 0.036 to 0.986 U/ml (mean=0.45 U/ml). After 12 months of growth hormone therapy, ALS levels increased significantly to 1.18+/-0.45 U/ml (mean+/-SD; p<0.0006). The increase ranged from 0.48 to 1.4 U/ml. The change in ALS with growth hormone (GH) therapy correlated closer with the change in IGF-I (r=0.798, p=0.0057; Spearman rank correlation) than with the change in insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3; r=0.549, p=0.057). This specific sandwich assay for the measurement of ALS provides a potentially valuable indicator of growth hormone secretory status. With this mAb-based immunofluorometric assay, the nonspecific detection of other proteins containing leucine-rich repeat

  3. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Heidi A; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  4. Quantifying the vitamin D economy.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Robert P; Armas, Laura A G

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D enters the body through multiple routes and in a variety of chemical forms. Utilization varies with input, demand, and genetics. Vitamin D and its metabolites are carried in the blood on a Gc protein that has three principal alleles with differing binding affinities and ethnic prevalences. Three major metabolites are produced, which act via two routes, endocrine and autocrine/paracrine, and in two compartments, extracellular and intracellular. Metabolic consumption is influenced by physiological controls, noxious stimuli, and tissue demand. When administered as a supplement, varying dosing schedules produce major differences in serum metabolite profiles. To understand vitamin D's role in human physiology, it is necessary both to identify the foregoing entities, mechanisms, and pathways and, specifically, to quantify them. This review was performed to delineate the principal entities and transitions involved in the vitamin D economy, summarize the status of present knowledge of the applicable rates and masses, draw inferences about functions that are implicit in these quantifications, and point out implications for the determination of adequacy. PMID:26024057

  5. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  6. Quantifying the seismicity on Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2013-07-01

    We quantify the seismicity on the island of Taiwan using the frequency-magnitude statistics of earthquakes since 1900. A break in Gutenberg-Richter scaling for large earthquakes in global seismicity has been observed, this break is also observed in our Taiwan study. The seismic data from the Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network are in good agreement with the Gutenberg-Richter relation taking b ≈ 1 when M < 7. For large earthquakes, M ≥ 7, the seismic data fit Gutenberg-Richter scaling with b ≈ 1.5. If the Gutenberg-Richter scaling for M < 7 earthquakes is extrapolated to larger earthquakes, we would expect a M > 8 earthquake in the study region about every 25 yr. However, our analysis shows a lower frequency of occurrence of large earthquakes so that the expected frequency of M > 8 earthquakes is about 200 yr. The level of seismicity for smaller earthquakes on Taiwan is about 12 times greater than in Southern California and the possibility of a M ≈ 9 earthquake north or south of Taiwan cannot be ruled out. In light of the Fukushima, Japan nuclear disaster, we also discuss the implications of our study for the three operating nuclear power plants on the coast of Taiwan.

  7. Quantifying Uncertainty in Epidemiological Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Jha, Sumit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Modern epidemiology has made use of a number of mathematical models, including ordinary differential equation (ODE) based models and agent based models (ABMs) to describe the dynamics of how a disease may spread within a population and enable the rational design of strategies for intervention that effectively contain the spread of the disease. Although such predictions are of fundamental importance in preventing the next global pandemic, there is a significant gap in trusting the outcomes/predictions solely based on such models. Hence, there is a need to develop approaches such that mathematical models can be calibrated against historical data. In addition, there is a need to develop rigorous uncertainty quantification approaches that can provide insights into when a model will fail and characterize the confidence in the (possibly multiple) model outcomes/predictions, when such retrospective analysis cannot be performed. In this paper, we outline an approach to develop uncertainty quantification approaches for epidemiological models using formal methods and model checking. By specifying the outcomes expected from a model in a suitable spatio-temporal logic, we use probabilistic model checking methods to quantify the probability with which the epidemiological model satisfies the specification. We argue that statistical model checking methods can solve the uncertainty quantification problem for complex epidemiological models.

  8. Quantifying the Shape of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wrycza, Tomasz F.; Missov, Trifon I.; Baudisch, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In Biodemography, aging is typically measured and compared based on aging rates. We argue that this approach may be misleading, because it confounds the time aspect with the mere change aspect of aging. To disentangle these aspects, here we utilize a time-standardized framework and, instead of aging rates, suggest the shape of aging as a novel and valuable alternative concept for comparative aging research. The concept of shape captures the direction and degree of change in the force of mortality over age, which—on a demographic level—reflects aging. We 1) provide a list of shape properties that are desirable from a theoretical perspective, 2) suggest several demographically meaningful and non-parametric candidate measures to quantify shape, and 3) evaluate performance of these measures based on the list of properties as well as based on an illustrative analysis of a simple dataset. The shape measures suggested here aim to provide a general means to classify aging patterns independent of any particular mortality model and independent of any species-specific time-scale. Thereby they support systematic comparative aging research across different species or between populations of the same species under different conditions and constitute an extension of the toolbox available to comparative research in Biodemography. PMID:25803427

  9. Detecting, visualising, and quantifying mucins.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Ceri A; Thornton, David J; McGuckin, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The extreme size, extensive glycosylation, and gel-forming nature of mucins make them a challenge to work with, and methodologies for the detection of mucins must take into consideration these features to ensure that one obtains both accurate and meaningful results. In understanding and appreciating the nature of mucins, this affords the researcher a valuable toolkit which can be used to full advantage in detecting, quantifying, and visualising mucins. The employment of a combinatorial approach to mucin detection, using antibody, chemical, and lectin detection methods, allows important information to be gleaned regarding the size, extent of glycosylation, specific mucin species, and distribution of mucins within a given sample. In this chapter, the researcher is guided through considerations into the structure of mucins and how this both affects the detection of mucins and can be used to full advantage. Techniques including ELISA, dot/slot blotting, and Western blotting, use of lectins and antibodies in mucin detection on membranes as well as immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence on both tissues and cells grown on Transwell™ inserts are described. Notes along with each section advice the researcher on best practice and describe any associated limitations of a particular technique from which the researcher can further develop a particular protocol. PMID:22259129

  10. 40 CFR 180.1089 - Poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine; exemption from the requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1089 Poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine; exemption from the requirement... biochemical nematicide poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine on a variety of agricultural crops....

  11. Developmental activation of the lysozyme gene in chicken macrophage cells is linked to core histone acetylation at its enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Myers, Fiona A; Lefevre, Pascal; Mantouvalou, Evangelia; Bruce, Kimberley; Lacroix, Claire; Bonifer, Constanze; Thorne, Alan W; Crane-Robinson, Colyn

    2006-01-01

    Native chromatin IP assays were used to define changes in core histone acetylation at the lysozyme locus during developmental maturation of chicken macrophages and stimulation to high-level expression by lipo-polysaccharide. In pluripotent precursors the lysozyme gene (Lys) is inactive and there is no acetylation of core histones at the gene, its promoter or at the upstream cis-control elements. In myeloblasts, where there is a very low level of Lys expression, H4 acetylation appears at the cis-control elements but not at the Lys gene or its promoter: neither H3 nor H2B become significantly acetylated in myeloblasts. In mature macrophages, Lys expression increases 5-fold: H4, H2B and H2A.Z are all acetylated at the cis-control elements but H3 remains unacetylated except at the -2.4 S silencer. Stimulation with LPS increases Lys expression a further 10-fold: this is accompanied by a rise in H3 acetylation throughout the cis-control elements; H4 and H2B acetylation remain substantial but acetylation at the Lys gene and its promoter remains low. Acetylation is thus concentrated at the cis-control elements, not at the Lys gene or its immediate promoter. H4 acetylation precedes H3 acetylation during development and H3 acetylation is most directly linked to high-level Lys expression. PMID:16914441

  12. Extensive lysine acetylation occurs in evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways and parasite-specific functions during Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic development

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jun; Lawrence, Matthew; Jeffers, Victoria; Zhao, Fangqing; Parker, Daniel; Ge, Ying; Sullivan, William J.; Cui, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lysine acetylation has emerged as a major posttranslational modification involved in diverse cellular functions. Using a combination of immunoisolation and liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, we determined the first acetylome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during its active proliferation in erythrocytes with 421 acetylation sites identified in 230 proteins. Lysine-acetylated proteins are distributed in the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and apicoplast. Whereas occurrence of lysine acetylation in a similarly wide range of cellular functions suggests conservation of lysine acetylation through evolution, the Plasmodium acetylome also revealed significant divergence from those of other eukaryotes and even the closely-related parasite Toxoplasma. This divergence is reflected in the acetylation of a large number of Plasmodium-specific proteins and different acetylation sites in evolutionarily conserved acetylated proteins. A prominent example is the abundant acetylation of proteins in the glycolysis pathway but relatively deficient acetylation of enzymes in the citrate cycle. Using specific transgenic lines and inhibitors, we determined that the acetyltransferase PfMYST and lysine deacetylases play important roles in regulating the dynamics of cytoplasmic protein acetylation. The Plasmodium acetylome provides an exciting start point for further exploration of functions of acetylation in the biology of malaria parasites. PMID:23796209

  13. The effect of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate on white matter oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk, Karolina; Hamilton, Nicola B; Wade, Anna; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur; Attwell, David

    2009-06-01

    Elevations of the levels of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) are associated with myelin loss in the leucodystrophies Canavan's disease and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. NAAG and NAA can activate and antagonize neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and also act on group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Oligodendrocytes and their precursors have recently been shown to express NMDA receptors, and activation of these receptors in ischaemia leads to the death of oligodendrocyte precursors and the loss of myelin. This raises the possibility that the failure to develop myelin, or demyelination, occurring in the leucodystrophies could reflect an action of NAAG or NAA on oligodendrocyte NMDA receptors. However, since the putative subunit composition of NMDA receptors on oligodendrocytes differs from that of neuronal NMDA receptors, the effects of NAAG and NAA on them are unknown. We show that NAAG, but not NAA, evokes an inward membrane current in cerebellar white matter oligodendrocytes, which is reduced by NMDA receptor block (but not by block of metabotropic glutamate receptors). The size of the current evoked by NAAG, relative to that evoked by NMDA, was much smaller in oligodendrocytes than in neurons, and NAAG induced a rise in [Ca(2+)](i) in neurons but not in oligodendrocytes. These differences in the effect of NAAG on oligodendrocytes and neurons may reflect the aforementioned difference in receptor subunit composition. In addition, as a major part of the response in oligodendrocytes was blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX), much of the NAAG-evoked current in oligodendrocytes is a secondary consequence of activating neuronal NMDA receptors. Six hours exposure to 1 mM NAAG did not lead to the death of cells in the white matter. We conclude that an action of NAAG on oligodendrocyte NMDA receptors is unlikely to be a major contributor to white matter damage in the leucodystrophies. PMID:19383832

  14. Mitochondrial protein acetylation as a cell-intrinsic, evolutionary driver of fat storage: chemical and metabolic logic of acetyl-lysine modifications.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Sirisha; Grossmann, Ruth E; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Hormone systems evolved over 500 million years of animal natural history to motivate feeding behavior and convert excess calories to fat. These systems produced vertebrates, including humans, who are famine-resistant but sensitive to obesity in environments of persistent overnutrition. We looked for cell-intrinsic metabolic features, which might have been subject to an evolutionary drive favoring lipogenesis. Mitochondrial protein acetylation appears to be such a system. Because mitochondrial acetyl-coA is the central mediator of fuel oxidation and is saturable, this metabolite is postulated to be the fundamental indicator of energy excess, which imprints a memory of nutritional imbalances by covalent modification. Fungal and invertebrate mitochondria have highly acetylated mitochondrial proteomes without an apparent mitochondrially targeted protein lysine acetyltransferase. Thus, mitochondrial acetylation is hypothesized to have evolved as a nonenzymatic phenomenon. Because the pKa of a nonperturbed Lys is 10.4 and linkage of a carbonyl carbon to an ε amino group cannot be formed with a protonated Lys, we hypothesize that acetylation occurs on residues with depressed pKa values, accounting for the propensity of acetylation to hit active sites and suggesting that regulatory Lys residues may have been under selective pressure to avoid or attract acetylation throughout animal evolution. In addition, a shortage of mitochondrial oxaloacetate under ketotic conditions can explain why macronutrient insufficiency also produces mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Reduced mitochondrial activity during times of overnutrition and undernutrition would improve fitness by virtue of resource conservation. Micronutrient insufficiency is predicted to exacerbate mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Nicotinamide riboside and Sirt3 activity are predicted to relieve mitochondrial inhibition. PMID:24050258

  15. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  16. Quantifying uncertainty from material inhomogeneity.

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Emery, John M.; Brewer, Luke N.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2009-09-01

    Most engineering materials are inherently inhomogeneous in their processing, internal structure, properties, and performance. Their properties are therefore statistical rather than deterministic. These inhomogeneities manifest across multiple length and time scales, leading to variabilities, i.e. statistical distributions, that are necessary to accurately describe each stage in the process-structure-properties hierarchy, and are ultimately the primary source of uncertainty in performance of the material and component. When localized events are responsible for component failure, or when component dimensions are on the order of microstructural features, this uncertainty is particularly important. For ultra-high reliability applications, the uncertainty is compounded by a lack of data describing the extremely rare events. Hands-on testing alone cannot supply sufficient data for this purpose. To date, there is no robust or coherent method to quantify this uncertainty so that it can be used in a predictive manner at the component length scale. The research presented in this report begins to address this lack of capability through a systematic study of the effects of microstructure on the strain concentration at a hole. To achieve the strain concentration, small circular holes (approximately 100 {micro}m in diameter) were machined into brass tensile specimens using a femto-second laser. The brass was annealed at 450 C, 600 C, and 800 C to produce three hole-to-grain size ratios of approximately 7, 1, and 1/7. Electron backscatter diffraction experiments were used to guide the construction of digital microstructures for finite element simulations of uniaxial tension. Digital image correlation experiments were used to qualitatively validate the numerical simulations. The simulations were performed iteratively to generate statistics describing the distribution of plastic strain at the hole in varying microstructural environments. In both the experiments and simulations, the

  17. Mechanism and Regulation of Acetylated Histone Binding by the Tandem PHD Finger of DPF3b

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lei; Zhang, Qiang; Li, SiDe; Plotnikov, Alexander N.; Walsh, Martin J.; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Histone lysine acetylation and methylation are important during gene transcription in a chromatin context1,2. Our knowledge about the types of protein modules that can interact with acetyl-lysine has so far been limited to bromodomains1. Recently, a tandem PHD (plant homeodomain) finger3 (PHD12) of human DPF3b, which functions in association with the BAF chromatin remodelling complex to initiate transcription in the heart and muscle development, was reported to bind histones H3 and H4 in an acetylation sensitive manner4, making it a first alternative to bromodomains for acetyl-lysine binding5. Here, we report the structural mechanism of acetylated histone binding by the double PHD fingers of DPF3b. Our three-dimensional solution structures and biochemical analysis of DPF3b illuminate the molecular basis of the integrated tandem PHD finger, which acts as one functional unit in the sequence-specific recognition of lysine 14-acetylated histone H3 (H3K14ac). Whereas the interaction with H3 is promoted by acetylation at lysine 14, it is inhibited by methylation at lysine 4, and these opposing influences are important during transcriptional activation of DPF3b target genes Pitx2 and Jmjd1c. Binding of this tandem protein module to chromatin can thus be regulated by different histone modifications during the initiation of gene transcription. PMID:20613843

  18. Acetylation at lysine 71 inactivates superoxide dismutase 1 and sensitizes cancer cells to genotoxic agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Xie, Zuoquan; Sun, Wenyi; Luo, Cheng; Ding, Jian; Yuan, Shengtao; Geng, Meiyu; Huang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a high dependency on antioxidant enzymes to cope with the elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Impairing antioxidant capacity in cancer cells disturbs the ROS homeostasis and exposes cancer cells to massive oxidative stress. In this study, we have discovered that superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a major player in maintaining the cellular redox status, was acetylated at lysine 71. This acetylation, which was primarily deacetylated by Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), suppressed the enzymatic activity of SOD1 via disrupting its association with copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS). More importantly, genotoxic agents, such as camptothecin (CPT), induced SOD1 acetylation by disrupting its binding with SIRT1. CPT-induced SOD1 acetylation was stimulated by its provoked ROS, suggesting a positive feedback loop, in which ROS per se impairs the antioxidative defence of cancer cells and reinforces oxidative stress stimulated by anticancer agents. The intrinsic abundance of SOD1 acetylation varied among cancer cells, and high level of SOD1 acetylation was correlated with elevated sensitivity to CPT. Together, our findings gained mechanistic insights into how cytotoxic agents fine tune the intracellular ROS homeostasis to strengthen their anticancer effects, and suggested SOD1 acetylation as a candidate biomarker for predicting response to CPT-based chemotherapy. PMID:26008972

  19. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A.; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J.; Poirier, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as “readers,” which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. PMID:26416878

  20. Improved Species-Specific Lysine Acetylation Site Prediction Based on a Large Variety of Features Set

    PubMed Central

    Wuyun, Qiqige; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yanping; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification. It plays a vital role in numerous essential biological processes, such as gene expression and metabolism, and is related to some human diseases. To fully understand the regulatory mechanism of acetylation, identification of acetylation sites is first and most important. However, experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is often time consuming and expensive. Therefore, the alternative computational methods are necessary. Here, we developed a novel tool, KA-predictor, to predict species-specific lysine acetylation sites based on support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We incorporated different types of features and employed an efficient feature selection on each type to form the final optimal feature set for model learning. And our predictor was highly competitive for the majority of species when compared with other methods. Feature contribution analysis indicated that HSE features, which were firstly introduced for lysine acetylation prediction, significantly improved the predictive performance. Particularly, we constructed a high-accurate structure dataset of H.sapiens from PDB to analyze the structural properties around lysine acetylation sites. Our datasets and a user-friendly local tool of KA-predictor can be freely available at http://sourceforge.net/p/ka-predictor. PMID:27183223

  1. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2015-12-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as "readers," which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. PMID:26416878

  2. Impact of Cell Wall Acetylation on Corn Stover Hydrolysis by Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of variously pretreated corn stover samples showed neutral to mildly acidic pretreatments were more effective at removing xylan from corn stover and more likely to maintain the acetyl to xylopyranosyl ratios present in untreated material than were alkaline treatments. Retention of acetyl groups in the residual solids resulted in greater resistance to hydrolysis by endoxylanase alone, although the synergistic combination of endoxylanase and acetyl xylan esterase enzymes permitted higher xylan conversions to be observed. Acetyl xylan esterase alone did little to improve hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes, although a direct relationship was observed between the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups and improvements in the enzymatic conversion of xylan present in substrates. In all cases, effective xylan conversions were found to significantly improve glucan conversions achievable by cellulolytic enzymes. Additionally, acetyl and xylan removal not only enhanced the respective initial rates of xylan and glucan conversion, but also the overall extents of conversion. This work emphasizes the necessity for xylanolytic enzymes during saccharification processes and specifically for the optimization of acetyl esterase and xylanase synergies when biomass processes include milder pretreatments, such as hot water or sulfite steam explosion.

  3. Improved Species-Specific Lysine Acetylation Site Prediction Based on a Large Variety of Features Set.

    PubMed

    Wuyun, Qiqige; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yanping; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification. It plays a vital role in numerous essential biological processes, such as gene expression and metabolism, and is related to some human diseases. To fully understand the regulatory mechanism of acetylation, identification of acetylation sites is first and most important. However, experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is often time consuming and expensive. Therefore, the alternative computational methods are necessary. Here, we developed a novel tool, KA-predictor, to predict species-specific lysine acetylation sites based on support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We incorporated different types of features and employed an efficient feature selection on each type to form the final optimal feature set for model learning. And our predictor was highly competitive for the majority of species when compared with other methods. Feature contribution analysis indicated that HSE features, which were firstly introduced for lysine acetylation prediction, significantly improved the predictive performance. Particularly, we constructed a high-accurate structure dataset of H.sapiens from PDB to analyze the structural properties around lysine acetylation sites. Our datasets and a user-friendly local tool of KA-predictor can be freely available at http://sourceforge.net/p/ka-predictor. PMID:27183223

  4. Regulation of Glycolysis and Gluconeogenesis by Acetylation of PKM and PEPCK

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Y.; Lei, Q-Y.; Zhao, S.; Guan, K-L.

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis is a catabolic process of glucose hydrolysis needed for energy and biosynthetic intermediates, whereas gluconeogenesis is a glucose production process important for maintaining blood glucose levels during starvation. Although they share many enzymes, these two processes are not simply the reverse of each other and are instead reciprocally regulated. Two key enzymes that regulate irreversible steps in these two processes are pyruvate kinase (PK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxy kinase (PEPCK), which catalyze the last and first step of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, respectively, and are both regulated by lysine acetylation. Acetylation at Lys305 of the PKM (muscle form of PK) decreases its activity and also targets it for chaperone-mediated autophagy and subsequent lysosome degradation. Acetylation of PEPCK, on the other hand, targets it for ubiquitylation by the HECT E3 ligase, UBR5/EDD1, and subsequent proteasomal degradation. These studies established a model in which acetylation regulates metabolic enzymes via different mechanisms and also revealed cross talk between acetylation and ubiquitination. Given that most metabolic enzymes are acetylated, we propose that acetylation is a major posttranslational modifier that regulates cellular metabolism. PMID:22096030

  5. Acetylation within the First 17 Residues of Huntingtin Exon 1 Alters Aggregation and Lipid Binding.

    PubMed

    Chaibva, Maxmore; Jawahery, Sudi; Pilkington, Albert W; Arndt, James R; Sarver, Olivia; Valentine, Stephen; Matysiak, Silvina; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ leads to htt aggregation. The first 17 amino acids (Nt(17)) in htt comprise a lipid-binding domain that undergoes a number of posttranslational modifications that can modulate htt toxicity and subcellular localization. As there are three lysines within Nt(17), we evaluated the impact of lysine acetylation on htt aggregation in solution and on model lipid bilayers. Acetylation of htt-exon1(51Q) and synthetic truncated htt-exon 1 mimicking peptides (Nt(17)-Q35-P10-KK) was achieved using a selective covalent label, sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHSA). With this treatment, all three lysine residues (K6, K9, and K15) in Nt(17) were significantly acetylated. N-terminal htt acetylation retarded fibril formation in solution and promoted the formation of larger globular aggregates. Acetylated htt also bound lipid membranes and disrupted the lipid bilayer morphology less aggressively compared with the wild-type. Computational studies provided mechanistic insights into how acetylation alters the interaction of Nt(17) with lipid membranes. Our results highlight that N-terminal acetylation influences the aggregation of htt and its interaction with lipid bilayers. PMID:27463137

  6. Study of acetylation on Ser/Thr/Tyr/Lys, and trimethylation on Lys using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ball, Haydn L.

    2009-03-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) corresponding to a gain in mass of 42 Da are of increasing interest. It has been widely recognized that acetylation and trimethylation on Lys regulates gene transcription and silencing. In addition, it was recently discovered that acetylation of Ser and Thr residues on a signaling kinase can block its activation. In this paper, three series of model peptides were chemically synthesized to generate comparative MS data. Electrospray collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry was used to characterize the fragmentation pattern of acetylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues. In separate experiments, the fragmentation pattern and efficiency were studied for acetylation and trimethylation on Lys. Our results confirmed those previously reported, that a characteristic immonium ion at m/z 126 corresponds to an acetylated Lys, and we further differentiated acetylation from trimethylation by their effects on peptide fragmentation efficiency. With the same primary sequence, a trimethylated peptide requires higher energy to fragment compared to the acetylated analogue. For peptides containing acetylated Ser, the y-60 and b-60 ions are commonly observed when the acetylation site is at, or close to, the C-terminus or N-terminus of the daughter ion, respectively; for acetylated Thr, in addition to y-60 and b-60 ions, y-42 ions are usually dominant. The loss of 42 Da and 60 Da can correspond to the loss of CH2CO through deacetylation and CH3COOH through [beta]-elimination, respectively. Meanwhile, loss of 42 Da and 18 Da individually can also contribute to the loss of 60 Da. When peptide containing acetylated Tyr/Lys is fragmented, the acetyl group remains attached to their respective side-chains. The fragmentation pattern was similar whether the acetylation site was close to C-terminus or N-terminus of the peptide. This study provides a better understanding of the MSMS fragmentation character of peptides with acetylation on Ser, Thr

  7. Transport and metabolism of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-galactoside in seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komoszynski, M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside labeled with 3H in the indole and 14C in the galactose moieties was applied to kernels of 5 day old germinating seedlings of Zea mays. Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside was not transported into either the shoot or root tissue as the intact molecule but was instead hydrolyzed to yield [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [3H]indole-3-acetic acid which were then transported to the shoot with little radioactivity going to the root. With certain assumption concerning the equilibration of applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[U-14C]galactose with the endogenous pool, it may be concluded that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside in the endosperm supplies about 2 picomoles per plant per hour of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and 1 picomole per plant per hour of indole-3-acetic acid to the shoot and thus is comparable to indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol as a source of indole-acetic acid for the shoot. Quantitative estimates of the amount of galactose in the kernels suggest that [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[14C]galactose is hydrolyzed after the compound leaves the endosperm but before it reaches the shoot. In addition, [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[14C]galactose supplies appreciable amounts of 14C to the shoot and both 14C and 3H to an uncharacterized insoluble fraction of the endosperm.

  8. Aspirin-mediated acetylation induces structural alteration and aggregation of bovine pancreatic insulin.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Taheri, Behnaz; Alavi, Parnian; Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Asadi, Zahra; Ghahramani, Maryam; Niazi, Ali; Alavianmehr, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The simple aggregation of insulin under various chemical and physical stresses is still an important challenge for both pharmaceutical production and clinical formulation. In the storage form, this protein is subjected to various chemical modifications which alter its physicochemical and aggregation properties. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) which is the most widely used medicine worldwide has been indicated to acetylate a large number of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, as insulin treated with aspirin at 37°C, a significant level of acetylation was observed by flourescamine and o-phthalaldehyde assay. Also, different spectroscopic techniques, gel electrophoresis, and microscopic assessment were applied to compare the structural variation and aggregation/fibrillation propensity among acetylated and non-acetylated insulin samples. The results of spectroscopic assessments elucidate that acetylation induces insulin unfolding which is accompanied with the exposure of protein hydrophobic patches, a transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet and increased propensity of the protein for aggregation. The kinetic studies propose that acetylation increases aggregation rate of insulin under both thermal and chemical stresses. Also, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest that acetylation induces insulin oligomerization. Additionally, the results of Thioflavin T fluorescence study, Congo red absorption assessment, and microscopic analysis suggest that acetylation with aspirin enhances the process of insulin fibrillation. Overall, the increased susceptibility of acetylated insulin for aggregation may reflect the fact that this type of modification has significant structural destabilizing effect which finally makes the protein more vulnerable for pathogenic aggregation/fibrillation. PMID:25994118

  9. Aurora B is regulated by acetylation/deacetylation during mitosis in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Weiderhold, Kimberly N.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Chuang, Carol; Pan, Jing; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Protein acetylation has been implicated in playing an important role during mitotic progression. Aurora B kinase is known to play a critical role in mitosis. However, whether Aurora B is regulated by acetylation is not known. Using IP with an anti-acetyl lysine antibody, we identified Aurora B as an acetylated protein in PC3 prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of HDAC3 or inhibiting HDAC3 deacetylase activity led to a significant increase (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively) in Aurora B acetylation as compared to siLuc or vehicle-treated controls. Increased Aurora B acetylation is correlated with a 30% reduction in Aurora B kinase activity in vitro and resulted in significant defects in Aurora B-dependent mitotic processes, including kinetochore-microtubule attachment and chromosome congression. Furthermore, Aurora B transiently interacts with HDAC3 at the kinetochore-microtubule interface of congressing chromosomes during prometaphase. This window of interaction corresponded with a transient but significant reduction (P=0.02) in Aurora B acetylation during early mitosis. Together, these results indicate that Aurora B is more active in its deacetylated state and further suggest a new mechanism by which dynamic acetylation/deacetylation acts as a rheostat to fine-tune Aurora B activity during mitotic progression.—Fadri-Moskwik, M., Weiderhold, K. N., Deeraksa, A., Chuang, C., Pan, J., Lin, S.-H., Yu-Lee, L.-Y. Aurora B is regulated by acetylation/deacetylation during mitosis in prostate cancer cells. PMID:22751009

  10. Identification of Lysine Acetylation in Mycobacterium abscessus Using LC-MS/MS after Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jintao; Wang, Changwei; Han, Yi; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Tian; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yang; Tan, Yaoju; Cai, Xinshan; Cao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Bangxing; Zhang, Buchang; Liu, Chunping; Tan, Shouyong; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB), which manifests in the pulmonary system, is one of the neglected causes of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. Treatment against MAB is difficult, characterized by its intrinsic antibiotic drug resistance. Lysine acetylation can alter the physiochemical property of proteins in living organisms. This study aimed to determine if this protein post-translational modification (PTM) exists in a clinical isolate M. abscessus GZ002. We used the antiacetyl-lysine immunoprecipitation to enrich the low-abundant PTM proteins, followed by the LC-MS/MS analysis. The lysine acetylome of M. abscessus GZ002 was determined. There were 459 lysine acetylation sites found in 289 acetylated proteins. Lysine acetylation occurred in 5.87% of the M. abscessus GZ002 proteome, and at least 25% of them were growth essential. Aerobic respiration and carbohydrate metabolic pathways of M. abscessus GZ002 were enriched with lysine acetylation. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified four major acetyl motif logos (K(ac)Y, K(ac)F, K(ac)H, and DK(ac)). Further comparison of the reported M. tuberculosis (MTB) acetylomes and that of MAB GZ002 revealed several common features between these two species. The lysine residues of several antibiotic-resistance, virulence, and persistence-related proteins were acetylated in both MAB GZ002 and MTB. There were 51 identical acetylation sites in 37 proteins found in common between MAB GZ002 and MTB. Overall, we demonstrate a profile of lysine acetylation in MAB GZ002 proteome that shares similarities with MTB. Interventions that target at these conserved sections may be valuable as anti-NTM or anti-TB therapies. PMID:27323652

  11. Effects of methyl acetyl phosphate, a covalent antisickling agent, on the density profiles of sickle erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Yatco, E; Benjamin, L J; Manning, J M

    1992-07-01

    Methyl acetyl phosphate specifically acetylates valine-1, lysine-82, and lysine-144 in the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binding cleft of hemoglobin S, thereby inhibiting its gelation (greater than 32 gm/dl) at pH 7.4. To extend these findings, the effect of methyl acetyl phosphate on the density of sickle cells has been evaluated by phthalate ester gradient centrifugation and by Larex-Percoll density centrifugation. After treatment with methyl acetyl phosphate (40% modification of the intracellular hemoglobin S), oxygenated sickle erythrocytes had a lowered density profile, as measured in a phthalate ester gradient. Thus 83% of untreated oxygenated sickle cells had densities greater than 1.098 gm/ml, whereas after treatment with methyl acetyl phosphate, 52% of the cells were in this density range. Under anaerobic conditions, methyl acetyl phosphate was even more effective in lowering cell density. For example, 50% of untreated deoxygenated cells had densities greater than 1.098 gm/ml, but none of the cells treated with methyl acetyl phosphate were this dense. For studies with Larex-Percoll density gradients, sickle erythrocytes were first separated into two fractions (densities greater than and less than 1.1 gm/ml) by Percoll-Hypaque centrifugation. The amount of oxygenated sickle cells exhibiting densities greater than 1.074 gm/ml decreased by about 32% on treatment with methyl acetyl phosphate. For deoxygenated sickle cells, treatment with methyl acetyl phosphate resulted in an average decrease of approximately 24% in the number of cells with densities greater than 1.074 gm/ml.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1613320

  12. High polar organic-inorganic hybrid coating stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation of seleno-amino acids and seleno-oligopeptides in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangju; Hu, Bin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei

    2012-09-21

    In this work, partially sulfonated polystyrene-titania (PSP-TiO(2)) organic-inorganic hybrid stir bar coating was prepared by sol-gel and blending methods, and a new method of PSP-TiO(2) coating stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for the analysis of seleno-amino acids (selenocystine (SeCys(2)), methylseleno-cysteine (MeSeCys), selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenoethionine (SeEt)) and seleno-oligopeptides (γ-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine (γ-GluMeSeCys) and selenodiglutathione (GS-Se-SG)) in biological samples. The prepared high polar PSP-TiO(2) hybrid coating avoided the swelling of PSP and cracking of TiO(2) coating by combining the good film-forming property of PSP with the high mechanical strength of TiO(2). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that no obvious swelling and damage occurred for the PSP-TiO(2) hybrid stir bar coating after 30 extraction/desorption cycles. The preparation reproducibility of PSP-TiO(2) coated stir bar, evaluated with the relative standard deviations (RSDs), was in the range of 6.7-12.6% (n=5) in one batch, and 9.9-17.6% (n=7) among different batches. The limits of detection (LODs) of the developed method for six target selenium species were in the range of 50.2-185.5 ngL(-1) (as (77)Se) and 45.9-158.8 ngL(-1) (as (82)Se) with the RSDs within 4.9-11.7%. The dynamic linear range was found to cover three orders of magnitude with correlation coefficient of 0.9995-0.9999. The developed method was applied for the analysis of Certified Reference Material SELM-1 selenium enriched yeast and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method has also been applied for the analysis of seleno-amino acids and seleno-oligopeptides in human urine and garlic samples. Different from the conventional organic polymer SBSE coatings (such as polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS), the extraction mechanism

  13. Meta-analysis of the relationship between slow acetylation of N-acetyl transferase 2 and the risk of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    An, Y; Li, H; Wang, K J; Liu, X H; Qiu, M X; Liao, Y; Huang, J L; Wang, X S

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer is closely associated with exposure to aromatic amines, that can cause cancer only after metabolic activation regulated by N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2). Many studies have indicated that slow acetylation of NAT2 increases the risk of bladder cancer. The major risk factor is tobacco smoke; however, some studies have failed to prove this. This study attempted to explore the correlation between NAT2 slow acetylation and bladder cancer risk through a meta-analysis of published case-control studies. Studies detecting NAT2 gene status in bladder cancer patients and healthy controls were retrieved from PubMed, Cochrane, EMchrane, CBM, and CNKI. We retrieved the data of cited articles and publications to identify and compare NAT2 gene in bladder cancer patients and healthy controls. The variables within and between the studies were also considered. The META module in the Stata v.6.0 software was used for data analysis. Twenty independent studies were enrolled in our meta-analysis according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Individual differences in the bladder cancer susceptibility were, in part, attributed to the effect of carcinogens. The merged odds ratio of the effect of slow acetylation on bladder cancer was 1.31 (95% confidence interval = 1.11-1.55). In conclusion, NAT2 slow acetylation state was associated with bladder cancer risk, and was shown to modestly increase the risk of bladder cancer. PMID:26681036

  14. Inhibition by acetyl-CoA of hepatic carnitine acyltransferase and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, K; Notar-Francesco, V J; Sriwatanakul, K

    1983-01-01

    At micromolar concentrations, acetyl-CoA inhibited hepatic carnitine acyltransferase activity and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The inhibitory effects were not nearly as potent on a molar basis as those of malonyl-CoA; nevertheless, the cytosolic concentrations of acetyl-CoA, as yet unknown, may be sufficient (greater than 30 microM) to curtail appreciably the mitochondrial transfer of long-chain acyl-CoA units and fatty acid oxidation. Hence acetyl-CoA may also partially regulate hepatic ketogenesis. PMID:6661211

  15. The "Gatekeeper" Residue Influences the Mode of Binding of Acetyl Indoles to Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Unzue, Andrea; Zhao, Hongtao; Lolli, Graziano; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jian; Zechner, Melanie; Dolbois, Aymeric; Caflisch, Amedeo; Nevado, Cristina

    2016-04-14

    Small-molecule hits for the bromodomains of CREBBP and BAZ2B have been identified by scaffold hopping followed by docking of a set of ∼200 compounds containing the acetyl indole scaffold. Chemical synthesis of nearly 30 derivatives has resulted in ligands of representatives of three subfamilies of human bromodomains with favorable ligand efficiency. The X-ray crystal structures of three different bromodomains (CREBBP, BAZ2B, and BRPF1b) in complex with acetyl indole derivatives reveal the influence of the gatekeeper residue on the orientation of small-molecule ligands in the acetyl lysine binding site. PMID:26982797

  16. Computational study of the three-dimensional structure of N-acetyltransferase 2-acetyl coenzyme a complex.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Kana; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is one of the most important polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes and plays a significant role in individual differences of drug efficacies and/or side effects. Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor in the experimentally determined crystal structure of NAT2, although the acetyl source of acetylation reactions catalyzed by NAT is not CoA, but rather acetyl CoA. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of NAT2, including acetyl CoA, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. By substituting acetyl CoA for CoA the amino acid residue Gly286, which is known to transform into a glutamate residue by NAT2*7A and NAT2*7B, comes close to the cofactor binding site. In addition, the binding pocket around the sulfur atom of acetyl CoA expanded in the NAT2-acetyl CoA complex. PMID:20930369

  17. Acetylation Targets the M2 Isoform of Pyruvate Kinase for Degradation through Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy and Promotes Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Lei; Li, Dong; Zhao, Di; Lin, Ruiting; Chu, Yajing; Zhang, Heng; Zha, Zhengyu; Liu, Ying; Li, Zi; Xu, Yanping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Yiran; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Most tumor cells take up more glucose than normal cells but metabolize glucose via glycolysis even in the presence of normal levels of oxygen, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. Tumor cells commonly express the embryonic M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) that may contribute to the metabolism shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. Here we show that PKM2 is acetylated on lysine 305 and that this acetylation is stimulated by high glucose concentration. PKM2 K305 acetylation decreases PKM2 enzyme activity and promotes its lysosomal-dependent degradation via chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Acetylation increases PKM2 interaction with HSC70, a chaperone for CMA, and association with lysosomes. Ectopic expression of an acetylation mimetic K305Q mutant accumulates glycolytic intermediates and promotes cell proliferation and tumor growth. These results reveal an acetylation regulation of pyruvate kinase and the link between lysine acetylation and CMA. PMID:21700219

  18. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  19. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition. PMID:21963115

  20. Does non-acetylated salicylate inhibit thromboxane biosynthesis in human platelets?

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; McLaren, M; Russell, R I; Lowe, G D; Forbes, C D

    1988-08-01

    Ingestion of aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid: ASA) may promote bleeding complications due to inhibition of thromboxane biosynthesis, which results in the prolongation of bleeding time. The effect is believed to be achieved by the irreversible acetylation of the enzyme cyclooxygenase by aspirin. This alteration in platelet function by aspirin prohibits its use in patients with bleeding disorders such as haemophiliacs. Choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT; Napp Laboratories Ltd) is a non-acetylated salicylate with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects similar to that of aspirin. However, despite a comparable salicylate absorption from the two drugs, CMT is found to have no inhibitory action in platelet aggregation and to cause less gastric mucosal damage and gastrointestinal blood loss than aspirin. To investigate the role of the acetyl moiety in the inhibition of platelet thromboxane biosynthesis, we studied the effect of CMT and ASA on bleeding time, serum thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and thromboxane (Tx) generation in healthy volunteers. PMID:3187504

  1. Lysine Acetylation: Elucidating the Components of an Emerging Global Signaling Pathway in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Victoria Lucia; Serra, Esteban Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the past ten years the number of acetylated proteins reported in literature grew exponentially. Several authors have proposed that acetylation might be a key component in most eukaryotic signaling pathways, as important as phosphorylation. The enzymes involved in this process are starting to emerge; acetyltransferases and deacetylases are found inside and outside the nuclear compartment and have different regulatory functions. In trypanosomatids several of these enzymes have been described and are postulated to be novel antiparasitic targets for the rational design of drugs. In this paper we overview the most important known acetylated proteins and the advances made in the identification of new acetylated proteins using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Also, we summarize what is known so far about the acetyltransferases and deacetylases in eukaryotes, focusing on trypanosomes and their potential use as chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:23093844

  2. An autopsy case of acetyl fentanyl intoxication caused by insufflation of 'designer drugs'.

    PubMed

    Takase, Izumi; Koizumi, Takako; Fujimoto, Ihoko; Yanai, Aya; Fujimiya, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We present a fatal case of intoxication due to insufflation of acetyl fentanyl. His blood concentration of acetyl fentanyl was 270ng/mL, and the manner of death was classified as an accident. This is the first report of an autopsy case of acetyl fentanyl delivered by insufflation, rather than intravenous administration. He had been snoring loudly for at least 12h prior to death, and transport to a hospital during this time and treatment with naloxone may have saved his life. In this sense, it can be said that his death was preventable. This case reemphasizes the risk of death associated with drug overdose and the narrow range of acetyl fentanyl between the effective dose (ED50) and lethal dose (LD50). The case should also raise awareness among medical professionals of the effectiveness of naloxone and the need to establish a comprehensive system for toxicological analysis while keeping the possibility of use of 'designer drugs' in mind. PMID:27497332

  3. In vivo treatment by diallyl disulfide increases histone acetylation in rat colonocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Druesne-Pecollo, Nathalie . E-mail: Nathalie.Pecollo@jouy.inra.fr; Chaumontet, Catherine; Pagniez, Anthony; Vaugelade, Pierre; Bruneau, Aurelia; Thomas, Muriel; Cherbuy, Claire; Duee, Pierre-Henri; Martel, Paule

    2007-03-02

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is an organosulfur compound from garlic which exhibits various anticarcinogenic properties including inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. DADS antiproliferative effects were previously associated with an increase in histone acetylation in two human tumor colon cell lines, suggesting that DADS-induced histone hyperacetylation could be one of the mechanisms involved in its protective properties on colon carcinogenesis. The effects of DADS on histone H4 and H3 acetylation levels were investigated in vivo in colonocytes isolated from non-tumoral rat. Administrated by intracaecal perfusion or gavage, DADS increases histone H4 and H3 acetylation in colonocytes. Moreover, data generated using cDNA expression arrays suggest that DADS could modulate the expression of a subset of genes. These results suggest the involvement of histone acetylation in modulation of gene expression by DADS in normal rat colonocytes, which might play a role in its biological effects as well as in its anticarcinogenic properties in vivo.

  4. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  5. Dietary, Metabolic, and Potentially Environmental Modulation of the Lysine Acetylation Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Go-Woon; Gocevski, Goran; Wu, Chao-Jung; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2010-01-01

    Healthy lifestyles and environment produce a good state of health. A number of scientific studies support the notion that external stimuli regulate an individual's epigenomic profile. Epigenetic changes play a key role in defining gene expression patterns under both normal and pathological conditions. As a major posttranslational modification, lysine (K) acetylation has received much attention, owing largely to its significant effects on chromatin dynamics and other cellular processes across species. Lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases, two opposing families of enzymes governing K-acetylation, have been intimately linked to cancer and other diseases. These enzymes have been pursued by vigorous efforts for therapeutic development in the past 15 years or so. Interestingly, certain dietary components have been found to modulate acetylation levels in vivo. Here we review dietary, metabolic, and environmental modulators of the K-acetylation machinery and discuss how they may be of potential value in the context of disease prevention. PMID:20976254

  6. Tri3, Which Controls Trichothecene C-15 Acetylation, is Functional in 3ADON Chemotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three different trichothecene chemotypes have been identified in U.S. strains of Fusarium graminearum: 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15ADON), and nivalenol (NIV), although grain is typically contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON) or nivalenol rather than the acetylated ...

  7. Manipulation of the host protein acetylation network by human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Mark Y.; Ali, Ibraheem; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, protein acetylation has emerged as a globally important post-translational modification that fine-tunes major cellular processes in many life forms. This dynamic regulatory system is critical both for complex eukaryotic cells and for the viruses that infect them. HIV-1 accesses the host acetylation network by interacting with several key enzymes, thereby promoting infection at multiple steps during the viral life cycle. Inhibitors of host histone deacetylases and bromodomain-containing proteins are now being pursued as therapeutic strategies to enhance current antiretroviral treatment. As more acetylation-targeting compounds are reaching clinical trials, it is timely to review the role of reversible protein acetylation in HIV-infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:26329395

  8. Histone Acetylation Modifiers in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Wang, Li; Yu, Caijia; Yu, Daohai; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming more evident that histone acetylation, as one of the epigenetic modifications or markers, plays a key role in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Histone acetylases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are the well-known covalent enzymes that modify the reversible acetylation of lysine residues in histone amino-terminal domains. In AD, however, the roles of these enzymes are controversial. Some recent studies indicate that HDAC inhibitors are neuroprotective by regulating memory and synaptic dysfunctions in cellular and animal models of AD; while on the other hand, increase of histone acetylation have been implicated in AD pathology. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the roles of histone acetylation covalent enzymes in AD and discuss how targeting these enzymes can ultimately lead to therapeutic approaches for treating AD. PMID:26136662

  9. Data for global lysine-acetylation analysis in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yehui; Zhang, Kai; Cheng, Zhongyi; Wang, Guo-Liang; Liu, Wende

    2016-06-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops for human consumption and is a staple food for over half of the world׳s population (Yu et al., 2002) [1]. A systematic identification of the lysine acetylome was performed by our research (Xiong et al., 2016) [2]. Rice plant samples were collected from 5 weeks old seedlings (Oryza sativa, Nipponbare). After the trypsin digestion and immunoaffinity precipitation, LC-MS/MS approach was used to identify acetylated peptides. After the collected MS/MS data procession and GO annotation, the InterProScan was used to annotate protein domain. Subcellular localization of the identified acetylated proteins was predicted by WoLF PSORT. The KEGG pathway database was used to annotate identified acetylated protein interactions, reactions, and relations. The data, supplied in this article, are related to "A comprehensive catalog of the lysine-acetylation targets in rice (O. sativa) based on proteomic analyses" by Xiong et al. (2016) [2]. PMID:26977447

  10. Quantitative LC-MS/MS determination of flupirtine, its N-acetylated and two mercapturic acid derivatives in man.

    PubMed

    Scheuch, Eberhard; Methling, Karen; Bednarski, Patrick J; Oswald, Stefan; Siegmund, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The non-opiate analgesic drug flupirtine was shown in vitro to undergo hydrolysis followed by N-acetylation to form D13223, glucuronidation and conjugation with glutathione to form the stable mercapturic acid derivatives M-424 and M-466. To quantify flupirtine and its metabolites in samples obtained in a clinical study in healthy subjects selected on their genotype of NAT2, UGT1A1 and GSTP1, two LC-MS/MS methods were developed. The validation range for flupirtine and D-13223 in serum was 0.5-500 ng/ml. For urine and feces, the validation ranges for flupirtine and D-13223 were 20-5000 ng/ml and 5.0-5000 ng/ml, respectively. M-424 and M-466 could be quantified in urine between 5.0 and 5000 ng/ml. Free flupirtine and D-13223 were separated from serum, urine and feces with liquid-liquid extraction. For flupirtine and D-13223, the chromatography was performed on a XTerra C18 column isocratically with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium formate buffer (pH 3.5mM) and acetonitrile (50:50; v/v), for M-466 and M-424 a Synergi(®) Fusion-RP column was used and a linear gradient method with water/HCOOH (pH 3) and acetonitrile. The mass spectrometer operated both with electro spray ionization in positive multiple reaction monitoring mode. The developed methods fulfilled the current FDA criteria on bioanalytical method validation for accuracy (error: -16.9 to 11.2%), precision (1.2-13.4%), recovery, stability and matrix effects over the observed analytical range. Thus, the methods were suitable to quantify flupirtine absorption and metabolic disposition in man after single intravenous and oral dosing (100mg) and repeated oral administration (400mg once daily). PMID:25459937

  11. Phosphatase inhibitor 2 promotes acetylation of tubulin in the primary cilium of human retinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Brautigan, David L

    2008-01-01

    Background Primary cilia are flagella-like projections from the centriole of mammalian cells that have a key role in cell signaling. Human diseases are linked to defects in primary cilia. Microtubules make up the axoneme of cilia and are selectively acetylated and this is thought to contribute to the stability of the structure. However, mechanisms to regulate tubulin acetylation in cilia are poorly understood. Results Endogenous phosphatase inhibitor-2 (I-2) was found concentrated in cilia of human epithelial cells, and was localized to cilia early in the process of formation, prior to the full acetylation of microtubules. Knockdown of I-2 by siRNA significantly reduced the acetylation of microtubules in cilia, without a net decrease in whole cell tubulin acetylation. There was a reduction in the percentage of I-2 knockdown cells with a primary cilium, but no apparent alteration in the cilium length, suggesting no change in microtubule-based transport processes. Inhibition of either histone deacetylases with trichostatin A, or protein phosphatase-1 with calyculin A in I-2 knockdown cells partially rescued the acetylation of microtubules in cilia and the percentage of cells with a primary cilium. Conclusion The regulatory protein I-2 localizes to the primary cilium where it affects both Ser/Thr phosphorylation and is required for full tubulin acetylation. Rescue of tubulin acetylation in I-2 knockdown cells by different chemical inhibitors shows that deacetylases and phosphatases are functionally interconnected to regulate microtubules. As a multifunctional protein, I-2 may link cell cycle progression to structure and stability of the primary cilium. PMID:19036150

  12. AMPK/Snf1 signaling regulates histone acetylation: Impact on gene expression and epigenetic functions.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its yeast homolog, Snf1, are critical regulators in the maintenance of energy metabolic balance not only stimulating energy production but also inhibiting energy-consuming processes. The AMPK/Snf1 signaling controls energy metabolism by specific phosphorylation of many metabolic enzymes and transcription factors, enhancing or suppressing their functions. The AMPK/Snf1 complexes can be translocated from cytoplasm into nuclei where they are involved in the regulation of transcription. Recent studies have indicated that AMPK/Snf1 activation can control histone acetylation through different mechanisms affecting not only gene transcription but also many other epigenetic functions. For instance, AMPK/Snf1 enzymes can phosphorylate the histone H3S10 (yeast) and H2BS36 (mammalian) sites which activate specific histone acetyltransferases (HAT), consequently enhancing histone acetylation. Moreover, nuclear AMPK can phosphorylate type 2A histone deacetylases (HDAC), e.g. HDAC4 and HDAC5, triggering their export from nuclei thus promoting histone acetylation reactions. AMPK activation can also increase the level of acetyl CoA, e.g. by inhibiting fatty acid and cholesterol syntheses. Acetyl CoA is a substrate for HATs, thus increasing their capacity for histone acetylation. On the other hand, AMPK can stimulate the activity of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) which increases the level of NAD(+). NAD(+) is a substrate for nuclear sirtuins, especially for SIRT1 and SIRT6, which deacetylate histones and transcription factors, e.g. those regulating ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic modification which subsequently can affect chromatin remodeling, e.g. via bromodomain proteins. We will review the signaling mechanisms of AMPK/Snf1 in the control of histone acetylation and subsequently clarify their role in the epigenetic regulation of ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks

  13. A colorimetric and fluorescent probe for fluoride ions based on 6-acetyl-2-naphthol.

    PubMed

    Hou, Peng; Chen, Song; Song, Xiangzhi

    2014-08-01

    A colorimetric and turn-on fluorescent probe for fluoride ions, tert-butyldimethylsilane 6-acetyl-2-naphtholate, was readily synthesized from 6-acetyl-2-naphthol and tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane (TBSCl). The probe exhibits high sensitivity and good selectivity for fluoride ions in acetonitrile. The inherent mechanism involves the cleavage of the Si-O bond in the probe, which induced yellow color formation and prominent fluorescence enhancement. PMID:23881573

  14. Adjunctive N-acetyl-L-cysteine in treatment of murine pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Högen, Tobias; Demel, Cornelia; Giese, Armin; Angele, Barbara; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe; Klein, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Despite antibiotic therapy, acute and long-term complications are still frequent in pneumococcal meningitis. One important trigger of these complications is oxidative stress, and adjunctive antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine was suggested to be protective in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. However, studies of effects on neurological long-term sequelae are limited. Here, we investigated the impact of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine on long-term neurological deficits in a mouse model of meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Eighteen hours after infection, mice were treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and placebo or ceftriaxone and N-acetyl-l-cysteine, respectively. Two weeks after infection, neurologic deficits were assessed using a clinical score, an open field test (explorative activity), a t-maze test (memory function), and auditory brain stem responses (hearing loss). Furthermore, cochlear histomorphological correlates of hearing loss were assessed. Adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine reduced hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis, but the effect was minor. There was no significant benefit of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment in regard to other long-term complications of pneumococcal meningitis. Cochlear morphological correlates of meningitis-associated hearing loss were not reduced by adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine. In conclusion, adjunctive therapy with N-acetyl-l-cysteine at a dosage of 300 mg/kg of body weight intraperitoneally for 4 days reduced hearing loss but not other neurologic deficits after pneumococcal meningitis in mice. These results make a clinical therapeutic benefit of N-acetyl-l-cysteine in the treatment of patients with pneumococcal meningitis questionable. PMID:23877681

  15. Neonatal Isoflurane Exposure Induces Neurocognitive Impairment and Abnormal Hippocampal Histone Acetylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tao; Guo, Qulian; Zou, Wangyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Song, Zongbin; Sun, Bei; He, Xin; Yang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal exposure to isoflurane may induce long-term memory impairment in mice. Histone acetylation is an important form of chromatin modification that regulates the transcription of genes required for memory formation. This study investigated whether neonatal isoflurane exposure-induced neurocognitive impairment is related to dysregulated histone acetylation in the hippocampus and whether it can be attenuated by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.75% isoflurane three times (each for 4 h) at postnatal days 7, 8, and 9. Contextual fear conditioning (CFC) was tested at 3 months after anesthesia administration. TSA was intraperitoneally injected 2 h before CFC training. Hippocampal histone acetylation levels were analyzed following CFC training. Levels of the neuronal activation and synaptic plasticity marker c-Fos were investigated at the same time point. Results Mice that were neonatally exposed to isoflurane showed significant memory impairment on CFC testing. These mice also exhibited dysregulated hippocampal H4K12 acetylation and decreased c-Fos expression following CFC training. TSA attenuated isoflurane-induced memory impairment and simultaneously increased histone acetylation and c-Fos levels in the hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)1 area 1 h after CFC training. Conclusions Memory impairment induced by repeated neonatal exposure to isoflurane is associated with dysregulated histone H4K12 acetylation in the hippocampus, which probably affects downstream c-Fos gene expression following CFC training. The HDAC inhibitor TSA successfully rescued impaired contextual fear memory, presumably by promoting histone acetylation and histone acetylation-mediated gene expression. PMID:25928815

  16. Use of high-performance liquid chromatography in the measurement of in vitro acetylation in man.

    PubMed

    Baty, J D; Lindsay, R M; Sharp, S

    1986-02-26

    Liquid chromatographic methods were developed for the study of the in vitro acetylation of the sulphonamide drug sulphamethazine and a series of aniline derivatives. The sensitivity of the methods have allowed data on the activity of the N-acetyltransferase enzyme(s) in man to be obtained. The use of bonded-phase columns with a series of organic mobile phases has been compared with reversed-phase separation of the acetanilide derivatives, produced in the acetylation reaction. PMID:3700517

  17. Quantitating the specificity and selectivity of Gcn5-mediated acetylation of histone H3.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Andrews, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) play a unique role in regulating gene transcription as well as maintaining the epigenetic state of the cell. KATs such as Gcn5 and p300/CBP can modify multiple residues on a single histone; however, order and specificity of acetylation can be altered by factors such as histone chaperones, subunit proteins or external stimulus. While the importance of acetylation is well documented, it has been difficult to quantitatively measure the specificity and selectivity of acetylation at different residues within a histone. In this paper, we demonstrate a label-free quantitative high throughput mass spectrometry-based assay capable of quantitatively monitoring all known acetylation sites of H3 simultaneously. Using this assay, we are able to analyze the steady-state enzyme kinetics of Gcn5, an evolutionarily conserved KAT. In doing so, we measured Gcn5-mediated acetylation at six residues (K14>K9 ≈ K23> K18> K27 ≈ K36) and the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for K9, K14, K18, and K23 as well as the nonenzymatic acetylation rate. We observed selectivity differences of up to -4 kcal/mol between K14 and K18, the highest and lowest measurable k(cat)/K(m). These data provide a first look at quantitating the specificity and selectivity of multiple lysines on a single substrate (H3) by Gcn5. PMID:23437046

  18. Urinary mutagenicity and N-acetylation phenotype in textile industry workers exposed to arylamines

    SciTech Connect

    Sinues, B.; Perez, J.; Bernal, M.L.; Saenz, M.A.; Lanuza, J.; Bartolome, M. )

    1992-09-15

    Primary aromatic amines have been identified epidemiologically as human carcinogens. It has been suggested that the target organ affected by aromatic amines is dependent on the rate of metabolic activation. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between low acetyl transferase activity and bladder cancer risk. On this basis, our working hypothesis was that the slow acetylators could follow in a higher extent the metabolic pathway independent of N-acetylation, leading to the excretion of conjugates of electrophyles with glucuronic acid. The instability of these glucuronides could be responsible for the association between arylamine-induced bladder cancer and slow acetylator phenotype. A total of 153 individuals were included in this study: 70 exposed to arylamines (working in textile industry) and 83 nonexposed. The following parameters were determined in urine: mutagenic index in the absence of metabolic activation, S9; mutagenic index in the presence of S9; and the mutagenic index after incubation of the urine with beta-glucuronidase. All individuals were phenotyped according to their capacity of N-acetylation by using isoniazid as drug test. The results show that the mutagenic index after incubation of the urine with beta-glucuronidase is statistically higher in exposed subjects when compared with nonexposed individuals (P less than 0.001), this parameter being statistically higher among exposed subjects who were slow acetylators than among rapid metabolizers, independent of the fact that they were smokers or nonsmokers. There were no significant differences between groups for the mutagenicity in urine not incubated with beta-glucuronidase.

  19. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  20. Acetylation in vitro of constituent polypeptides by smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and Golgi membrane fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivam, H.; Murray, R.K.

    1986-05-01

    Many polypeptides of the membranes of the ER are phosphorylated. To determine if any such polypeptides are acetylated, microsomal and other classical subcellular fractions were incubated with (/sup 3/H) acetyl-CoA; the specific activity of the microsomal fraction (MF) was the greatest. SDS-PAGE revealed that some 20 polypeptides of the MF were acetylated; 2-D electrophoretograms extended this number to approximately 60. Separation of the MF into smooth (S) and rough (R) fractions showed that the great majority of the labelled polypeptides belonged to the former. Isolation of a Golgi fraction revealed that its acetylation activity was approximately 3-fold greater than the SER fraction. Extensive proteolytic digestion of the MF followed by radiochromatography disclosed some 9 components whose precise nature (acetylated amino acids and/or sialic acids, etc.) is under study. Assuming that the majority of the radioactivity is in the former components and that a similar process occurs in vivo, the authors suggest that the Golgi apparatus may be a major site of acetylation of membrane and possibly other proteins.

  1. Acetylation of lysine 109 modulates pregnane X receptor DNA binding and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Pasquel, Danielle; Doricakova, Aneta; Li, Hao; Kortagere, Sandhya; Krasowski, Matthew D; Biswas, Arunima; Walton, William G; Redinbo, Matthew R; Dvorak, Zdenek; Mani, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major transcriptional regulator of xenobiotic metabolism and transport pathways in the liver and intestines, which are critical for protecting organisms against potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. Inadvertent activation of drug metabolism pathways through PXR is known to contribute to drug resistance, adverse drug-drug interactions, and drug toxicity in humans. In both humans and rodents, PXR has been implicated in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer. Because of PXR's important functions, it has been a therapeutic target of interest for a long time. More recent mechanistic studies have shown that PXR is modulated by multiple PTMs. Herein we provide the first investigation of the role of acetylation in modulating PXR activity. Through LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified lysine 109 (K109) in the hinge as PXR's major acetylation site. Using various biochemical and cell-based assays, we show that PXR's acetylation status and transcriptional activity are modulated by E1A binding protein (p300) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Based on analysis of acetylation site mutants, we found that acetylation at K109 represses PXR transcriptional activity. The mechanism involves loss of RXRα dimerization and reduced binding to cognate DNA response elements. This mechanism may represent a promising therapeutic target using modulators of PXR acetylation levels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26855179

  2. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  3. Acetylation-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of Core Histones during DNA Repair and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Min-Xian; Pang, Ye; Liu, Cui Hua; Haratake, Kousuke; Du, Bo-Yu; Ji, Dan-Yang; Wang, Guang-Fei; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Song, Wei; Yu, Yadong; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Huang, Hai-Tao; Miao, Shiying; Chen, Lian-Bin; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Shan; Cha, Hwangho; Yang, Dong; Zhai, Yonggong; Komatsu, Takuo; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Li, Haitao; Cao, Cheng; Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Hong; Cheng, Yifan; Chiba, Tomoki; Wang, Linfang; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Proteasomes usually catalyze ATP- and polyubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Here we show that the proteasomes containing the activator PA200 catalyze the polyubiquitin-independent degradation of histones. Most proteasomes in mammalian testes (“spermatoproteasomes”) contain a spermatid/sperm-specific α-subunit α4s/PSMA8 and/or the catalytic β-subunits of immunoproteasomes in addition to PA200. Deletion of PA200 in mice abolishes acetylation-dependent degradation of somatic core histones during DNA double-strand breaks, and delays core histone disappearance in elongated spermatids. Purified PA200 greatly promotes ATP-independent proteasomal degradation of the acetylated core histones, but not polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, acetylation on histones is required for their binding to the bromodomain-like regions in PA200 and its yeast ortholog, Blm10. Thus, PA200/Blm10 specifically targets the core histones for acetylation-mediated degradation by proteasomes, providing mechanisms by which acetylation regulates histone degradation, DNA repair, and spermatogenesis. PMID:23706739

  4. Determination of DNA damage in experimental liver intoxication and role of N-acetyl cysteine.

    PubMed

    Aksit, Hasan; Bildik, Aysegül

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed at detecting DNA damage and fragmentation as well as histone acetylation depending on oxidative stress caused by CCl4 intoxication. Also, the protective role of N-acetyl cysteine, a precursor for GSH, in DNA damage is investigated. Sixty rats were used in this study. In order to induce liver toxicity, CCl4 in was dissolved in olive oil (1/1) and injected intraperitoneally as a single dose (2 ml/kg). N-acetyl cysteine application (intraperitoneal, 50 mg/kg/day) was started 3 days prior to CCl4 injection and continued during the experimental period. Control groups were given olive oil and N-acetyl cysteine. After 6 and 72 h of CCl4 injection, blood and liver tissue were taken under ether anesthesia. Nuclear extracts were prepared from liver. Changes in serum AST and ALT activities as well as MDA, TAS, and TOS levels showed that CCl4 caused lipid peroxidation and liver damage. However, lipid peroxidation and liver damage were reduced in the N-acetyl cysteine group. Increased levels in 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine and histone acetyltransferase activities, decreased histone deacetylase activities, and DNA breakage detected in nuclear extracts showed that CCl4 intoxication induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that N-acetyl cysteine has a protective effect on CCl4-induced DNA damage. PMID:24819310

  5. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  6. Loss of N-terminal Acetylation Suppresses A Prion Phenotype By Modulating Global Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William M.; Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation is among the most ubiquitous of protein modifications in eukaryotes. While loss of N-terminal acetylation is associated with many abnormalities, the molecular basis of these effects is known for only a few cases, where acetylation of single factors has been linked to binding avidity or metabolic stability. In contrast, the impact of N-terminal acetylation for the majority of the proteome, and its combinatorial contributions to phenotypes, are unknown. Here, by studying the yeast prion [PSI+], an amyloid of the Sup35 protein, we show that loss of N-terminal acetylation promotes general protein misfolding, a redeployment of chaperones to these substrates, and a corresponding stress response. These proteostasis changes, combined with the decreased stability of unacetylated Sup35 amyloid, reduce the size of prion aggregates and reverse their phenotypic consequences. Thus, loss of N-terminal acetylation, and its previously unanticipated role in protein biogenesis, globally resculpts the proteome to create a unique phenotype. PMID:25023910

  7. Application of the MIDAS approach for analysis of lysine acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Evans, Caroline A; Griffiths, John R; Unwin, Richard D; Whetton, Anthony D; Corfe, Bernard M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Reaction Monitoring Initiated Detection and Sequencing (MIDAS™) is a mass spectrometry-based technique for the detection and characterization of specific post-translational modifications (Unwin et al. 4:1134-1144, 2005), for example acetylated lysine residues (Griffiths et al. 18:1423-1428, 2007). The MIDAS™ technique has application for discovery and analysis of acetylation sites. It is a hypothesis-driven approach that requires a priori knowledge of the primary sequence of the target protein and a proteolytic digest of this protein. MIDAS essentially performs a targeted search for the presence of modified, for example acetylated, peptides. The detection is based on the combination of the predicted molecular weight (measured as mass-charge ratio) of the acetylated proteolytic peptide and a diagnostic fragment (product ion of m/z 126.1), which is generated by specific fragmentation of acetylated peptides during collision induced dissociation performed in tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Sequence information is subsequently obtained which enables acetylation site assignment. The technique of MIDAS was later trademarked by ABSciex for targeted protein analysis where an MRM scan is combined with full MS/MS product ion scan to enable sequence confirmation. PMID:23381851

  8. Autoregulation of the Rsc4 Tandem Bromodomain by Gcn5 Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    VanDemark,A.; Kasten, M.; Ferris, E.; Heroux, A.; Hill, C.; Cairns, B.

    2007-01-01

    An important issue for chromatin remodeling complexes is how their bromodomains recognize particular acetylated lysine residues in histones. The Rsc4 subunit of the yeast remodeler RSC contains an essential tandem bromodomain (TBD) that binds acetylated K14 of histone H3 (H3K14ac). We report a series of crystal structures that reveal a compact TBD that binds H3K14ac in the second bromodomain and, remarkably, binds acetylated K25 of Rsc4 itself in the first bromodomain. Endogenous Rsc4 is acetylated only at K25, and Gcn5 is identified as necessary and sufficient for Rsc4 K25 acetylation in vivo and in vitro. Rsc4 K25 acetylation inhibits binding to H3K14ac, and mutation of Rsc4 K25 results in altered growth rates. These data suggest an autoregulatory mechanism in which Gcn5 performs both the activating (H3K14ac) and inhibitory (Rsc4 K25ac) modifications, perhaps to provide temporal regulation. Additional regulatory mechanisms are indicated as H3S10 phosphorylation inhibits Rsc4 binding to H3K14ac peptides.

  9. Histone H3 globular domain acetylation identifies a new class of enhancers.

    PubMed

    Pradeepa, Madapura M; Grimes, Graeme R; Kumar, Yatendra; Olley, Gabrielle; Taylor, Gillian C A; Schneider, Robert; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-06-01

    Histone acetylation is generally associated with active chromatin, but most studies have focused on the acetylation of histone tails. Various histone H3 and H4 tail acetylations mark the promoters of active genes. These modifications include acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac), which blocks Polycomb-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3). H3K27ac is also widely used to identify active enhancers, and the assumption has been that profiling H3K27ac is a comprehensive way of cataloguing the set of active enhancers in mammalian cell types. Here we show that acetylation of lysine residues in the globular domain of histone H3 (lysine 64 (H3K64ac) and lysine 122 (H3K122ac)) marks active gene promoters and also a subset of active enhancers. Moreover, we find a new class of active functional enhancers that is marked by H3K122ac but lacks H3K27ac. This work suggests that, to identify enhancers, a more comprehensive analysis of histone acetylation is required than has previously been considered. PMID:27089178

  10. PPARα Activation Induces Nε-Lys-Acetylation of Rat Liver Peroxisomal Multifunctional Enzyme Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Miguel A.; Alzate, Oscar; Singh, Avtar K.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous subcellular organelles that participate in metabolic and disease processes, with few of its proteins undergoing posttranslational modifications. As the role of lysine-acetylation has expanded into the cellular intermediary metabolism, we used a combination of differential centrifugation, organelle isolation by linear density gradient centrifugation, western blot analysis, and peptide fingerprinting and amino acid sequencing by mass spectrometry to investigate protein acetylation in control and ciprofibrate-treated rat liver peroxisomes. Organelle protein samples isolated by density gradient centrifugation from PPARα-agonist treated rat liver screened with an anti-Nε-acetyl lysine antibody revealed a single protein band of 75 kDa. Immunoprecipitation with this antibody resulted in the precipitation of a protein from the protein pool of ciprofibrate-induced peroxisomes, but not from the protein pool of non-induced peroxisomes. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis identified the protein as the peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 1. In addition, mass spectrometry-based amino acid sequencing resulted in the identification of unique peptides containing 4 acetylated-Lys residues (K155, K173, K190, and K583). This is the first report that demonstrates posttranslational acetylation of a peroxisomal enzyme in PPARα-dependent proliferation of peroxisomes in rat liver. PMID:24092543

  11. Acetylation of glucokinase regulatory protein decreases glucose metabolism by suppressing glucokinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jo, Seong-Ho; Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), mainly expressed in the liver and pancreatic β-cells, is critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis. GK expression and kinase activity, respectively, are both modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Post-translationally, GK is regulated by binding the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), resulting in GK retention in the nucleus and its inability to participate in cytosolic glycolysis. Although hepatic GKRP is known to be regulated by allosteric mechanisms, the precise details of modulation of GKRP activity, by post-translational modification, are not well known. Here, we demonstrate that GKRP is acetylated at Lys5 by the acetyltransferase p300. Acetylated GKRP is resistant to degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway, suggesting that acetylation increases GKRP stability and binding to GK, further inhibiting GK nuclear export. Deacetylation of GKRP is effected by the NAD+-dependent, class III histone deacetylase SIRT2, which is inhibited by nicotinamide. Moreover, the livers of db/db obese, diabetic mice also show elevated GKRP acetylation, suggesting a broader, critical role in regulating blood glucose. Given that acetylated GKRP may affiliate with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), understanding the mechanism of GKRP acetylation in the liver could reveal novel targets within the GK-GKRP pathway, for treating T2DM and other metabolic pathologies. PMID:26620281

  12. Dichotomy in the Epigenetic Mark Lysine Acetylation is Critical for the Proliferation of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ravi; Philizaire, Marc; Mujtaba, Shiraz

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of lysine acetylation serve as a major epigenetic mark, which regulates cellular response to inflammation, DNA damage and hormonal changes. Microarray assays reveal changes in gene expression, but cannot predict regulation of a protein function by epigenetic modifications. The present study employs computational tools to inclusively analyze microarray data to understand the potential role of acetylation during development of androgen-independent PCa. The data revealed that the androgen receptor interacts with 333 proteins, out of which at least 92 proteins were acetylated. Notably, the number of cellular proteins undergoing acetylation in the androgen-dependent PCa was more as compared to the androgen-independent PCa. Specifically, the 32 lysine-acetylated proteins in the cellular models of androgen-dependent PCa were mainly involved in regulating stability as well as pre- and post-processing of mRNA. Collectively, the data demonstrate that protein lysine acetylation plays a crucial role during the transition of androgen-dependent to -independent PCa, which importantly, could also serve as a functional axis to unravel new therapeutic targets. PMID:26295410

  13. Intrinsic Tau Acetylation Is Coupled to Auto-Proteolytic Tau Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Constance, Brian H.; Hwang, Andrew W.; James, Michael; Yuan, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins are abnormally aggregated in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, tau has emerged as an extensively post-translationally modified protein, among which lysine acetylation is critical for normal tau function and its pathological aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that tau isoforms have different propensities to undergo lysine acetylation, with auto-acetylation occurring more prominently within the lysine-rich microtubule-binding repeats. Unexpectedly, we identified a unique intrinsic property of tau in which auto-acetylation induces proteolytic tau cleavage, thereby generating distinct N- and C-terminal tau fragments. Supporting a catalytic reaction-based mechanism, mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that tau cysteines, which are required for acetyl group transfer, are also essential for auto-proteolytic tau processing. Further mass spectrometry analysis identified the C-terminal 2nd and 4th microtubule binding repeats as potential sites of auto-cleavage. The identification of acetylation-mediated auto-proteolysis provides a new biochemical mechanism for tau self-regulation and warrants further investigation into whether auto-catalytic functions of tau are implicated in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27383765

  14. The HTLV-1-encoded protein HBZ directly inhibits the acetyl transferase activity of p300/CBP

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Torsten; Wright, Diana G.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The homologous cellular coactivators p300 and CBP contain intrinsic lysine acetyl transferase (termed HAT) activity. This activity is responsible for acetylation of several sites on the histones as well as modification of transcription factors. In a previous study, we found that HBZ, encoded by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), binds to multiple domains of p300/CBP, including the HAT domain. In this study, we found that HBZ inhibits the HAT activity of p300/CBP through the bZIP domain of the viral protein. This effect correlated with a reduction of H3K18 acetylation, a specific target of p300/CBP, in cells expressing HBZ. Interestingly, lower levels of H3K18 acetylation were detected in HTLV-1 infected cells compared to non-infected cells. The inhibitory effect of HBZ was not limited to histones, as HBZ also inhibited acetylation of the NF-κB subunit, p65, and the tumor suppressor, p53. Recent studies reported that mutations in the HAT domain of p300/CBP that cause a defect in acetylation are found in certain types of leukemia. These observations suggest that inhibition of the HAT activity by HBZ is important for the development of adult T-cell leukemia associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:22434882

  15. Processing of Numerical and Proportional Quantifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shikhare, Sailee; Heim, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Huber, Stefan; Willmes, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Quantifier expressions like "many" and "at least" are part of a rich repository of words in language representing magnitude information. The role of numerical processing in comprehending quantifiers was studied in a semantic truth value judgment task, asking adults to quickly verify sentences about visual displays using…

  16. Deaf Learners' Knowledge of English Universal Quantifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berent, Gerald P.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Porter, Jeffrey E.; Fonzi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Deaf and hearing students' knowledge of English sentences containing universal quantifiers was compared through their performance on a 50-item, multiple-picture task that required students to decide whether each of five pictures represented a possible meaning of a target sentence. The task assessed fundamental knowledge of quantifier sentences,…

  17. Scalar Quantifiers: Logic, Acquisition, and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geurts, Bart; Katsos, Napoleon; Cummins, Chris; Moons, Jonas; Noordman, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Superlative quantifiers ("at least 3", "at most 3") and comparative quantifiers ("more than 2", "fewer than 4") are traditionally taken to be interdefinable: the received view is that "at least n" and "at most n" are equivalent to "more than n-1" and "fewer than n+1", respectively. Notwithstanding the prima facie plausibility of this claim, Geurts…

  18. Acetylated tau neuropathology in sporadic and hereditary tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Cohen, Todd J; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E; McCarty-Wood, Elisabeth; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2013-08-01

    We have recently shown acetylation of tau at lysine residue 280 (AC-K280) to be a disease-specific modification in Alzheimer disease (AD), corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy, likely representing a major regulatory tau modification. Herein, we extend our observations using IHC with a polyclonal antibody specific for AC-K280. Thirty brain regions were examined in argyrophilic grain disease (AGD; n = 5), tangle-predominant senile dementia (TPSD; n = 5), Pick disease (n = 4), familial AD (FAD; n = 2; PSEN1 p.G206A and p.S170P), and frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome-17 (FTDP-17; n = 2; MAPT p.P301L and IVS10 + 16). All AGD, TPSD, FAD, and FTDP-17 cases had significant AC-K280 reactivity that was similar in severity and distribution to phosphorylated tau. AC-K280 robustly labeled grain pathological characteristics in AGD and was predominantly associated with thioflavin-S-positive neurofibrillary tangles and less reactive in neuropil threads and extracellular tangles in TPSD and FAD. Thioflavin-S-negative neuronal and glial inclusions of patients with FTDP-17 were robustly AC-K280 reactive. A low degree of AC-K280 was found in a subset of 4-repeat tau-containing lesions in Pick disease. AC-K280 is a prominent feature of both neuronal and glial tau aggregations in tauopathies of various etiologies. The close association of AC-K280 with amyloid and pre-amyloid conformations of tau suggests a potential role in tangle maturation and, thus, could serve as a useful biomarker or therapeutic target in a variety of tauopathies. PMID:23885714

  19. Acetyl salicylic acid attenuates cardiac hypertrophy through Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Gitau, Samuel Chege; Li, Xuelian; Zhao, Dandan; Guo, Zhenfeng; Liang, Haihai; Qian, Ming; Lv, Lifang; Li, Tianshi; Xu, Bozhi; Wang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Chaoqian; Lu, Yanjie; Du, Zhiming; Shan, Hongli; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-12-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular morbid events. The vascular properties of low-dose acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) provide cardiovascular benefits through the irreversible inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase 1; however, the possible anti-hypertrophic properties and potential mechanism of aspirin have not been investigated in detail. In this study, healthy wild-type male mice were randomly divided into three groups and subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham operation. The TAC-operated mice were treated with the human equivalent of low-dose aspirin (10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)); the remaining mice received an equal amount of phosphate buffered saline with 0.65% ethanol, which was used as a vehicle. A cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model induced by angiotensin II (10 nmol·L(-1)) was treated with the human equivalent of low (10 or 100 μmol·L(-1)) and high (1000 μmol·L(-1)) aspirin concentrations in plasma. Changes in the cardiac structure and function were assessed through echocardiography and transmission electron microscopy. Gene expression was determined through RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Results indicated that aspirin treatment abrogated the increased thickness of the left ventricular anterior and posterior walls, the swelling of mitochondria, and the increased surface area in in vivo and in vitro hypertrophy models. Aspirin also normalized the upregulated hypertrophic biomarkers, β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and b-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Aspirin efficiently reversed the upregulation of β-catenin and P-Akt expression and the TAC- or ANG II-induced downregulation of GSK-3β. Therefore, low-dose aspirin possesses significant anti-hypertrophic properties at clinically relevant concentrations for anti-thrombotic therapy. The downregulation of β-catenin and Akt may be the underlying signaling mechanism of the effects of aspirin. PMID:26626190

  20. 13C Isotope-Assisted Methods for Quantifying Glutamine Metabolism in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ahn, Woo Suk; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Keibler, Mark A.; Zhang, Zhe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine has recently emerged as a key substrate to support cancer cell proliferation, and the quantification of its metabolic flux is essential to understand the mechanisms by which this amino acid participates in the metabolic rewiring that sustains the survival and growth of neoplastic cells. Glutamine metabolism involves two major routes, glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation, both of which begin with the deamination of glutamine to glutamate and the conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate. In glutaminolysis, α-ketoglutarate is oxidized via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and decarboxylated to pyruvate. In reductive carboxylation, α-ketoglutarate is reductively converted into isocitrate, which is isomerized to citrate to supply acetyl-CoA for de novo lipogenesis. Here, we describe methods to quantify the metabolic flux of glutamine through these two routes, as well as the contribution of glutamine to lipid synthesis. Examples of how these methods can be applied to study metabolic pathways of oncological relevance are provided. PMID:24862276

  1. Is it Logical to Count on Quantifiers? Dissociable Neural Networks Underlying Numerical and Logical Quantifiers

    PubMed Central

    Troiani, Vanessa; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Clark, Robin; Grossman, Murray

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the neural substrate of two classes of quantifiers: Numerical quantifiers like “at least three” which require magnitude processing, and logical quantifiers like “some” which can be satisfied using a simple form of perceptual logic. We assessed these distinct classes of quantifiers with converging observations from two sources: functional imaging data from healthy adults, and behavioral and structural data from patients with corticobasal degeneration, who have acalculia. Our findings are consistent with the claim that numerical quantifier comprehension depends on a parietal-dorsolateral prefrontal network, but logical quantifier comprehension depends instead on a rostral medial prefrontal-posterior cingulate network. These observations emphasize the important contribution of abstract number knowledge to the meaning of numerical quantifiers in semantic memory and the potential role of a logic-based evaluation in the service of non-numerical quantifiers. PMID:18789346

  2. Acetylated α-Tubulin Regulated by N-Acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline(Ac-SDKP) Exerts the Anti-fibrotic Effect in Rat Lung Fibrosis Induced by Silica.

    PubMed

    Xiaojun, Wang; Yan, Liu; Hong, Xu; Xianghong, Zhang; Shifeng, Li; Dingjie, Xu; Xuemin, Gao; Lijuan, Zhang; Bonan, Zhang; Zhongqiu, Wei; Ruimin, Wang; Brann, Darrell; Fang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is the most serious occupational disease in China. The objective of this study was to screen various proteins related to mechanisms of the pathogenesis of silicosis underlying the anti-fibrotic effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) using proteomic profile analysis. We also aimed to explore a potential mechanism of acetylated α-tubulin (α-Ac-Tub) regulation by Ac-SDKP. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) were used to assess the different protein expression profiles between control and silicosis rats treated with or without Ac-SDKP. Twenty-nine proteins were identified to be potentially involved in the progression of silicosis and the anti-fibrotic effect of Ac-SDKP. Our current study finds that 1) the lost expression of Ac-Tub-α may be a new mechanism in rat silicosis; 2) treatment of silicotic rats with N-acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline (Ac-SDKP) inhibits myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition accompanied by stabilizing the expression of α-Ac-Tub in vivo and in vitro, which is related with deacetylase family member 6 (HDAC6) and α-tubulin acetyl transferase (α-TAT1). Our data suggest that α-Ac-Tub regulation by Ac-SDKP may potentially be a new anti-fibrosis mechanism. PMID:27577858

  3. Acetylated α-Tubulin Regulated by N-Acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline(Ac-SDKP) Exerts the Anti-fibrotic Effect in Rat Lung Fibrosis Induced by Silica

    PubMed Central

    Xiaojun, Wang; Yan, Liu; Hong, Xu; Xianghong, Zhang; Shifeng, Li; Dingjie, Xu; Xuemin, Gao; Lijuan, Zhang; Bonan, Zhang; Zhongqiu, Wei; Ruimin, Wang; Brann, Darrell; Fang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is the most serious occupational disease in China. The objective of this study was to screen various proteins related to mechanisms of the pathogenesis of silicosis underlying the anti-fibrotic effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) using proteomic profile analysis. We also aimed to explore a potential mechanism of acetylated α-tubulin (α-Ac-Tub) regulation by Ac-SDKP. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) were used to assess the different protein expression profiles between control and silicosis rats treated with or without Ac-SDKP. Twenty-nine proteins were identified to be potentially involved in the progression of silicosis and the anti-fibrotic effect of Ac-SDKP. Our current study finds that 1) the lost expression of Ac-Tub-α may be a new mechanism in rat silicosis; 2) treatment of silicotic rats with N-acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline (Ac-SDKP) inhibits myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition accompanied by stabilizing the expression of α-Ac-Tub in vivo and in vitro, which is related with deacetylase family member 6 (HDAC6) and α-tubulin acetyl transferase (α-TAT1). Our data suggest that α-Ac-Tub regulation by Ac-SDKP may potentially be a new anti-fibrosis mechanism. PMID:27577858

  4. Transformation of 1-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-beta-D-glucose into di-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-D-glucose catalysed by enzyme preparations from corn seedlings.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Jaworska, A; Kesy, J; Kopcewicz, J

    1997-01-01

    A new enzymatic activity, which catalyses formation in vitro of di-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-D-glucose from 1-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-beta-D-glucose has been found in extracts of Zea mays seedlings. The structure of di-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-D-glucose, not as yet described, has been assigned by GC-MS, 1H NMR and ammonolysis. PMID:9360710

  5. Acetylation: A Lysine Modification with Neuroprotective Effects in Ischemic Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Alsarraf, Oday; Fan, Jie; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Chou, C. James; Menick, Donald R.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Neuroretinal ischemic injury contributes to several degenerative diseases in the eye and the resulting pathogenic processes involving a series of necrotic and apoptotic events. This study investigates the time and extent of changes in acetylation, and whether this influences function and survival of neuroretinal cells following injury. Methods Studies evaluated the time course of changes in histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, histone-H3 acetylation and caspase-3 activation levels as well as retinal morphology and function (electroretinography) following ischemia. In addition, the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin-A and valproic acid were also investigated. Results In normal eyes, retinal ischemia produced a significant increase in HDAC activity within 2 hours that was followed by a corresponding significant decrease in protein acetylation by 4 hours. Activated caspase-3 levels were significantly elevated by 24 hours. Treatment with HDAC inhibitors blocked the early decrease in protein acetylation and activation of caspase-3. Retinal immunohistochemistry demonstrated that systemic administration of trichostatin-A or valproic acid, resulted in hyperacetylation of all retinal layers after systemic treatment. In addition, HDAC inhibitors provided a significant functional and structural neuroprtection at seven days following injury relative to vehicle-treated eyes. Conclusions These results provide evidence that increases in HDAC activity is an early event following retinal ischemia, and are accompanied by corresponding decreases in acetylation in advance of caspase-3 activation. In addition to preserving acetylation status, the administration of HDAC inhibitors suppressed caspase activation and provided structural and functional neuroprotection in model of ischemic retinal injury. Taken together these data provide evidence that decrease in retinal acetylation status is a central event in ischemic retinal injury, and the hyperacetylation induced by

  6. Obesity-induced lysine acetylation increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation and impairs insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Alrob, Osama Abo; Sankaralingam, Sowndramalingam; Ma, Cary; Wagg, Cory S.; Fillmore, Natasha; Jaswal, Jagdip S.; Sack, Michael N.; Lehner, Richard; Gupta, Mahesh P.; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Padwal, Raj S.; Johnstone, David E.; Sharma, Arya M.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Lysine acetylation is a novel post-translational pathway that regulates the activities of enzymes involved in both fatty acid and glucose metabolism. We examined whether lysine acetylation controls heart glucose and fatty acid oxidation in high-fat diet (HFD) obese and SIRT3 knockout (KO) mice. Methods and results C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a HFD (60% fat) or a low-fat diet (LFD; 4% fat) for 16 or 18 weeks. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates were significantly increased in HFD vs. LFD mice (845 ± 76 vs. 551 ± 87 nmol/g dry wt min, P < 0.05). Activities of the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) were increased in hearts from HFD vs. LFD mice, and were associated with LCAD and β-HAD hyperacetylation. Cardiac protein hyperacetylation in HFD-fed mice was associated with a decrease in SIRT3 expression, while expression of the mitochondrial acetylase, general control of amino acid synthesis 5 (GCN5)-like 1 (GCN5L1), did not change. Interestingly, SIRT3 deletion in mice also led to an increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation compared with wild-type (WT) mice (422 ± 29 vs. 291 ± 17 nmol/g dry wt min, P < 0.05). Cardiac lysine acetylation was increased in SIRT3 KO mice compared with WT mice, including increased acetylation and activity of LCAD and β-HAD. Although the HFD and SIRT3 deletion decreased glucose oxidation, pyruvate dehydrogenase acetylation was unaltered. However, the HFD did increase Akt acetylation, while decreasing its phosphorylation and activity. Conclusion We conclude that increased cardiac fatty acid oxidation in response to high-fat feeding is controlled, in part, via the down-regulation of SIRT3 and concomitant increased acetylation of mitochondrial β-oxidation enzymes. PMID:24966184

  7. Acetylation: a lysine modification with neuroprotective effects in ischemic retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Alsarraf, Oday; Fan, Jie; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Chou, C James; Menick, Donald R; Crosson, Craig E

    2014-10-01

    Neuroretinal ischemic injury contributes to several degenerative diseases in the eye and the resulting pathogenic processes involving a series of necrotic and apoptotic events. This study investigates the time and extent of changes in acetylation, and whether this influences function and survival of neuroretinal cells following injury. Studies evaluated the time course of changes in histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, histone-H3 acetylation and caspase-3 activation levels as well as retinal morphology and function (electroretinography) following ischemia. In addition, the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin-A and valproic acid were also investigated. In normal eyes, retinal ischemia produced a significant increase in HDAC activity within 2 h that was followed by a corresponding significant decrease in protein acetylation by 4 h. Activated caspase-3 levels were significantly elevated by 24 h. Treatment with HDAC inhibitors blocked the early decrease in protein acetylation and activation of caspase-3. Retinal immunohistochemistry demonstrated that systemic administration of trichostatin-A or valproic acid, resulted in hyperacetylation of all retinal layers after systemic treatment. In addition, HDAC inhibitors provided a significant functional and structural neuroprotection at seven days following injury relative to vehicle-treated eyes. These results provide evidence that increases in HDAC activity is an early event following retinal ischemia, and are accompanied by corresponding decreases in acetylation in advance of caspase-3 activation. In addition to preserving acetylation status, the administration of HDAC inhibitors suppressed caspase activation and provided structural and functional neuroprotection in model of ischemic retinal injury. Taken together these data provide evidence that decrease in retinal acetylation status is a central event in ischemic retinal injury, and the hyperacetylation induced by HDAC inhibition can provide acute

  8. Expression of fungal acetyl xylan esterase in Arabidopsis thaliana improves saccharification of stem lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Chong, Sun-Li; Gómez, Leonardo D; Miedes, Eva; Banasiak, Alicja; Ratke, Christine; Gaertner, Cyril; Mouille, Grégory; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Molina, Antonio; Sellstedt, Anita; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall hemicelluloses and pectins are O-acetylated at specific positions, but the significance of these substitutions is poorly understood. Using a transgenic approach, we investigated how reducing the extent of O-acetylation in xylan affects cell wall chemistry, plant performance and the recalcitrance of lignocellulose to saccharification. The Aspergillus niger acetyl xylan esterase AnAXE1 was expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of either the constitutively expressed 35S CAMV promoter or a woody-tissue-specific GT43B aspen promoter, and the protein was targeted to the apoplast by its native signal peptide, resulting in elevated acetyl esterase activity in soluble and wall-bound protein extracts and reduced xylan acetylation. No significant alterations in cell wall composition were observed in the transgenic lines, but their xylans were more easily digested by a β-1,4-endoxylanase, and more readily extracted by hot water, acids or alkali. Enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulose after hot water and alkali pretreatments produced up to 20% more reducing sugars in several lines. Fermentation by Trametes versicolor of tissue hydrolysates from the line with a 30% reduction in acetyl content yielded ~70% more ethanol compared with wild type. Plants expressing 35S:AnAXE1 and pGT43B:AnAXE1 developed normally and showed increased resistance to the biotrophic pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, probably due to constitutive activation of defence pathways. However, unintended changes in xyloglucan and pectin acetylation were only observed in 35S:AnAXE1-expressing plants. This study demonstrates that postsynthetic xylan deacetylation in woody tissues is a promising strategy for optimizing lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. PMID:25960248

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF HISTONE H3 LYSINE 36 ACETYLATION AS A HIGHLY CONSERVED HISTONE MODIFICATION*

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephanie A.; Rao, Bhargavi; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Hake, Sandra B.; Diaz, Robert L.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Allis, C. David; Lieb, Jason D.; Strahl, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    Histone lysine (K) acetylation is a major mechanism by which cells regulate the structure and function of chromatin, and new sites of acetylation continue to be discovered. Here we identify and characterize histone H3K36 acetylation (H3K36ac). By mass spectrometric analyses of H3 purified from Tetrahymena thermophila and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), we find that H3K36 can be acetylated or methylated. Using an antibody specific to H3K36ac, we show that this modification is conserved in mammals. In yeast, genome-wide ChIP-chip experiments show that H3K36ac is localized predominantly to the promoters of RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes, a pattern inversely related to that of H3K36 methylation. The pattern of H3K36ac localization is similar to that of other sites of H3 acetylation, including H3K9ac and H3K14ac. Using histone acetyltransferase complexes purified from yeast, we show that the Gcn5-containing SAGA complex that regulates transcription specifically acetylates H3K36 in vitro. Deletion of GCN5 completely abolishes H3K36ac in vivo. These data expand our knowledge of the genomic targets of Gcn5, show H3K36ac is highly conserved, and raise the intriguing possibility that the transition between H3K36ac and H3K36me acts as an “acetyl/methyl switch” governing chromatin function along transcription units. PMID:17189264

  10. The Intracellular Concentration of Acetyl Phosphate in Escherichia coli Is Sufficient for Direct Phosphorylation of Two-Component Response Regulators▿

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Adam H.; Shulla, Ana; Reimann, Sylvia A.; Keating, David H.; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl phosphate, the intermediate of the AckA-Pta pathway, acts as a global signal in Escherichia coli. Although acetyl phosphate clearly signals through two-component response regulators, it remains unclear whether acetyl phosphate acts as a direct phospho donor or functions through an indirect mechanism. We used two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography to measure the relative concentrations of acetyl phosphate, acetyl coenzyme A, ATP, and GTP over the course of the entire growth curve. We estimated that the intracellular concentration of acetyl phosphate in wild-type cells reaches at least 3 mM, a concentration sufficient to activate two-component response regulators via direct phosphoryl transfer. PMID:17545286

  11. Characterization of nucleolin K88 acetylation defines a new pool of nucleolin colocalizing with pre-mRNA splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Das, Sadhan; Cong, Rong; Shandilya, Jayasha; Senapati, Parijat; Moindrot, Benoit; Monier, Karine; Delage, Hélène; Mongelard, Fabien; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kundu, Tapas K; Bouvet, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    Nucleolin is a multifunctional protein that carries several post-translational modifications. We characterized nucleolin acetylation and developed antibodies specific to nucleolin K88 acetylation. Using this antibody we show that nucleolin is acetylated in vivo and is not localized in the nucleoli, but instead is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that acetylated nucleolin is co-localized with the splicing factor SC35 and partially with Y12. Acetylated nucleolin is expressed in all tested proliferating cell types. Our findings show that acetylation defines a new pool of nucleolin which support a role for nucleolin in the regulation of mRNA maturation and transcription by RNA polymerase II. PMID:23353999

  12. Post-transcriptional regulation of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, W H; Weisblum, B

    1984-01-01

    The +1 site for initiation of inducible chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) mRNA encoded by plasmid pC194 was determined experimentally by using [alpha-32P]ATP-labeled runoff transcripts partially digested with T1 RNase. By partial digestion of the in vitro transcripts with S1, T1, and cobra venom nucleases as probes of mRNA conformation, single- and double-stranded regions, respectively, were also identified. Thus, a prominent inverted complementary repeat sequence was demonstrated spanning the +14 to +50 positions, which contain the complementary sequences CCUCC and GGAGG (the Shine and Dalgarno sequence for synthesis of CAT) symmetrically apposed and paired as part of a perfect 12-base-pair inverted complementary repeat sequence (-19.5 kcal [ca. -81.7 kJ] per mol). The CAT mRNA was stable to digestion by T1 RNase at the four guanosine residues in the Shine and Dalgarno sequence GGAGG , even at 60 degrees C, suggesting that nascent CAT mRNA allows ribosomes to initiate protein synthesis inefficiently and that induction involves post-transcriptional unmasking of the Shine and Dalgarno sequence. Consistent with this model of regulation, we found that cells carrying pC194 , induced with chloramphenicol, contain about the same concentration of pulse-labeled CAT-specific RNA as do uninduced cells. Induction of CAT synthesis by the non- acetylatable chloramphenicol analog fluorothiamphenicol was tested by using minicells of Bacillus subtilis carrying pC194 as well as minicells containing the cloned pC194 derivatives in which parts of the CAT structural gene were deleted in vitro with BAL 31 exonuclease. Optimal induction of both full-length (active) and deleted (inactive) CAT required similar concentrations of fluorothiamphenicol, whereas induction by chloramphenicol required a higher concentration for the wild-type full-length (active) CAT than for the (inactive) deleted CAT. Because synthesis of deleted CAT was inducible, we infer that CAT plays no direct role

  13. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  14. The Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase in Fatty Acid Synthesis in Developing Arabidopsis Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jinshan; Behal, Robert H.; Back, Stephanie L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Oliver, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) formed within the plastid is the precursor for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and, through them, a range of important biomolecules. The source of acetyl-CoA in the plastid is not known, but two enzymes are thought to be involved: acetyl-CoA synthetase and plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To determine the importance of these two enzymes in synthesizing acetyl-CoA during lipid accumulation in developing Arabidopsis seeds, we isolated cDNA clones for acetyl-CoA synthetase and for the ptE1α- and ptE1β-subunits of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To our knowledge, this is the first reported acetyl-CoA synthetase sequence from a plant source. The Arabidopsis acetyl-CoA synthetase preprotein has a calculated mass of 76,678 D, an apparent plastid targeting sequence, and the mature protein is a monomer of 70 to 72 kD. During silique development, the spatial and temporal patterns of the ptE1β mRNA level are very similar to those of the mRNAs for the plastidic heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits. The pattern of ptE1β mRNA accumulation strongly correlates with the formation of lipid within the developing embryo. In contrast, the level of mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase does not correlate in time and space with lipid accumulation. The highest level of accumulation of the mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase during silique development is within the funiculus. These mRNA data suggest a predominant role for plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase in acetyl-CoA formation during lipid synthesis in seeds. PMID:10859180

  15. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveal Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2012-01-01

    N-Lysine acetylation is a posttranslational modification that has been well studied in eukaryotes and is likely widespread in prokaryotes as well. The central metabolic enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase is regulated in both bacteria and eukaryotes by acetylation of a conserved lysine residue in the active site. In the purple photosynthetic α-proteobacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, two protein acetyltransferases (RpPat and the newly identified RpKatA) and two deacetylases (RpLdaA and RpSrtN) regulate the activities of AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases. In this work, we used LC/MS/MS to identify other proteins regulated by the N-lysine acetylation/deacetylation system of this bacterium. Of the 24 putative acetylated proteins identified, 14 were identified more often in a strain lacking both deacetylases. Nine of these proteins were members of the AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase family. RpPat acetylated all nine of the acyl-CoA synthetases identified by this work, and RpLdaA deacetylated eight of them. In all cases, acetylation occurred at the conserved lysine residue in the active site, and acetylation decreased activity of the enzymes by >70%. Our results show that many different AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases are regulated by N-lysine acetylation. Five non-acyl-CoA synthetases were identified as possibly acetylated, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Rpa1177, a putative 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase. Neither RpPat nor RpKatA acetylated either of these proteins in vitro. It has been reported that Salmonella enterica Pat (SePat) can acetylate a number of metabolic enzymes, including GAPDH, but we were unable to confirm this claim, suggesting that the substrate range of SePat is not as broad as suggested previously. PMID:22416131

  16. Kinetic studies on the acid hydrolysis of the methyl ketoside of unsubstituted and O-acetylated N-acetylneuraminic acid

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, A.; Ratcliffe, Wendy A.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrolysis of the model compound 2-O-methyl-4,7,8,9-tetra-O-acetyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid and neuraminidase (Vibrio cholerae) closely resembled that of the O-acetylated sialic acid residues of rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein. This confirmed that O-acetylation was responsible for the unusually slow rate of acid hydrolysis of O-acetylated sialic acid residues observed in rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and their resistance to hydrolysis by neuraminidase. The first-order rate constant of hydrolysis of 2-methyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid by 0.05m-H2SO4 was 56-fold greater than that of 2-O-methyl-4,7,8,9-tetra-O-acetyl-N-acetyl -α-d-neuraminic acid. Kinetic studies have shown that in the pH range 1.00–3.30, the observed rate of hydrolysis of 2-methyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid can be attributed to acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the negatively charged CO2− form of the methyl ketoside. PMID:4748825

  17. Acetylation of raw cotton for oil spill cleanup application: an FTIR and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Adebajo, Moses O; Frost, Ray L

    2004-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy have been used to investigate the acetylation of raw cotton samples with acetic anhydride without solvents in the presence of different amounts of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) catalyst. This is a continuation of our previous investigation of acetylation of commercial cotton in an effort to develop hydrophobic, biodegradable, cellulosic sorbent materials for cleaning up oil spills. The FTIR data have again provided a clear evidence for successful acetylation. The NMR results further confirm the successful acetylation. The extent of acetylation was quantitatively determined using the weight percent gain (WPG) due to acetylation and by calculating the ratio R between the intensity of the acetyl C=O stretching band at 1740-1745 cm(-1) and the intensity of C-O stretching vibration of the cellulose backbone at about 1020-1040 cm(-1). The FTIR technique was found to be highly sensitive and reliable for the determination of the extent of acetylation. The level of acetylation of the raw cotton samples was found to be much higher than that of cotton fabrics and the previously studied commercial cotton. The variation of the R and WPG with reaction time, amount of DMAP catalyst and different samples of raw cotton is discussed. PMID:15249021

  18. Acetyl Coenzyme A Stimulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Promoter Binding by Transcription Factor IID in the Absence of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Galasinski, Shelly K.; Lively, Tricia N.; Grebe de Barron, Alexandra; Goodrich, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Protein acetylation has emerged as a means of controlling levels of mRNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Here we report that acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) stimulates RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro in the absence of histones. The effect of acetyl-CoA on basal and activated transcription was studied in a human RNA polymerase II transcription system reconstituted from recombinant and highly purified transcription factors. Both basal and activated transcription were stimulated by the addition of acetyl-CoA to transcription reaction mixtures. By varying the concentrations of general transcription factors in the reaction mixtures, we found that acetyl-CoA decreased the concentration of TFIID required to observe transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting revealed that acetyl-CoA increased the affinity of the general transcription factor TFIID for promoter DNA in a TBP-associated factor (TAF)-dependent manner. Interestingly, acetyl-CoA also caused a conformational change in the TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex as assessed by DNase I footprinting. These results show that acetyl-CoA alters the DNA binding activity of TFIID and indicate that this biologically important cofactor functions at multiple levels to control gene expression. PMID:10688640

  19. Studies of conformation and interaction of the cyclohexenone and acetyl group of progesterone with liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Bueno, A; Watanabe, S; Sancho, M J; Saito, T

    1991-02-01

    The conformations of the A-ring and the 17-acetyl groups of progesterone were examined within liposomes, which were prepared from L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine in the presence or absence of cholesterol in the buffer, using qualitative nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism of the progesterone spectra in the wavelength regions of 260-360 nm. The preferred conformational assignments, in the rotational conformations of the 17-acetyl group and invertible conformations of the cyclohexenone of progesterone were discussed on the basis of the elliptical strength of the Cotton effect and an energy estimation of the preferred conformers. Energetically unstable conformers of the acetyl group and alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclohexenone of progesterone remarkably increased with an increase in the concentration of the liposomes. The liposomes containing 10% cholesterol were similar to the effect of the liposomes lacking cholesterol on the 17-acetyl group and the alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclohexenone but those containing 50% cholesterol showed an increase in the number of energetically stable conformers of the alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclohexenone. The nuclear magnetic resonance signal from liposomes together with the progesterone indicated the existence of the progesterone adjacent to a double bond or ester moiety in the lipid molecule. Therefore, it was apparent that the liposomes and the cholesterol within the liposomes regulated the conformational populations of both the cyclohexone and acetyl groups of the progesterone molecule. PMID:2004040

  20. Characterization of acetylation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae H2B by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kangling

    2008-11-01

    Following the identification of histone H3 modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [K. Zhang, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 269 (2008) 101-111], here, we report a detailed characterization of post-translational modifications by LC/MS/MS analysis of tryptic and Glu-C digests of H2B proteins isolated from S. cerevisiae. We show that both H2B.1 and H2B.2 are acetylated at K6, K11, K16, K21 and K22 while H2B.2 has an additional acetylation site at K3. All the acetylation sites of yeast H2B except K3 of H2B.2 are located at the same positions on aligned protein sequences of Arabidopsis H2B variants that were reported previously to be acetylated at K6, K11, K27, K32, K38 and K39. A unique acetylation motif AEK is observed in the H2B variants of these two species, indicating a plant/yeast H2B specific acetyltransferase may exist.

  1. Boric acid-dependent decrease in regulatory histone H3 acetylation is not mutagenic in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pointer, Benjamin R; Schmidt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic yeast commonly found on human mucosal membranes that switches from yeast to hyphal morphology in response to environmental factors. The change to hyphal growth requires histone H3 modifications by the yeast-specific histone acetyltransferase Rtt109. In addition to its role in morphogenesis, Rtt109-dependent acetylation of histone H3 lysine residues 9 and 56 has regulatory functions during DNA replication and repair. Boric acid (BA) is a broad-spectrum agent that specifically inhibits C. albicans hyphal growth, locking the fungus in its harmless commensal yeast state. The present study characterizes the effect of BA on C. albicans histone acetylation in respect to specificity, time-course and significance. We demonstrate that sublethal concentrations of BA reduce H3K9/H3K56 acetylation, both on a basal level and in response to genotoxic stress. Acetylation at other selected histone sites were not affected by BA. qRT-PCR expression analysis of the DNA repair gene Rad51 indicated no elevated level of genotoxic stress during BA exposure. A forward-mutation analysis demonstrated the BA does not increase spontaneous or induced mutations. The findings suggest that DNA repair remains effective even when histone H3 acetylation decreases and dispels the notion that BA treatment impairs genome integrity in yeast. PMID:27190149

  2. Global proteomic analysis of protein acetylation affecting metabolic regulation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Sun Ju; Oh, Hye Ryeung; Nam, Doo Hyun; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-02-01

    Daphnia (Daphnia pulex) is a small planktonic crustacean and a key constituent of aquatic ecosystems. It is generally used as a model organism to study environmental toxic problems. In the past decade, genomic and proteomic datasets of Daphnia have been developed. The proteomic dataset allows for the investigation of toxicological effects in the context of "Daphnia proteomics," resulting in greater insights for toxicological research. To exploit Daphnia for ecotoxicological research, information on the post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is necessary, as this is a critical regulator of biological processes. Acetylation of lysine (Kac) is a reversible and highly regulated PTM that is associated with diverse biological functions. However, a comprehensive description of Kac in Daphnia is not yet available. To understand the cellular distribution of lysine acetylation in Daphnia, we identified 98 acetylation sites in 65 proteins by immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyllysine antibody and a liquid chromatography system supported by mass spectroscopy. We identified 28 acetylated sites related to metabolic proteins and six acetylated enzymes associated with the TCA cycle in Daphnia. From GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, we showed that Kac in D. pulex is highly enriched in proteins associated with metabolic processes. Our data provide the first global analysis of Kac in D. pulex and is an important resource for the functional analysis of Kac in this organism. PMID:26700148

  3. Histone acetylation and gene expression analysis of sex lethal mutants in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, U; Pal-Bhadra, M; Birchler, J A

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of sex determination mechanisms is often accompanied by reduction in dosage of genes on a whole chromosome. Under these circumstances, negatively acting regulatory genes would tend to double the expression of the genome, which produces compensation of the single-sex chromosome and increases autosomal gene expression. Previous work has suggested that to reduce the autosomal expression to the female level, these dosage effects are modified by a chromatin complex specific to males, which sequesters a histone acetylase to the X. The reduced autosomal histone 4 lysine 16 (H4Lys16) acetylation results in lowered autosomal expression, while the higher acetylation on the X is mitigated by the male-specific lethal complex, preventing overexpression. In this report, we examine how mutations in the principal sex determination gene, Sex lethal (Sxl), impact the H4 acetylation and gene expression on both the X and autosomes. When Sxl expression is missing in females, we find that the sequestration occurs concordantly with reductions in autosomal H4Lys16 acetylation and gene expression on the whole. When Sxl is ectopically expressed in Sxl(M) mutant males, the sequestration is disrupted, leading to an increase in autosomal H4Lys16 acetylation and overall gene expression. In both cases we find relatively little effect upon X chromosomal gene expression. PMID:10835396

  4. Asymmetric distribution of glucose and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol in geostimulated Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momonoki, Y. S.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-D-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol.

  5. Radioisotopic assays of CoASH and carnitine and their acetylated forms in human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Cederblad, G.; Carlin, J.I.; Constantin-Teodosiu, D.; Harper, P.; Hultman, E. )

    1990-03-01

    Radioisotopic assays for the determination of acetyl-CoA, CoASH, and acetylcarnitine have been modified for application to the amount of human muscle tissue that can be obtained by needle biopsy. In the last step common to all three methods, acetyl-CoA is condensed with (14C)oxaloacetate by citrate synthase to give (14C)-citrate. For determination of CoASH, CoASH is reacted with acetylphosphate in a reaction catalyzed by phosphotransacetylase to yield acetyl-CoA. In the assay for acetylcarnitine, acetylcarnitine is reacted with CoASH in a reaction catalyzed by carnitine acetyltransferase to form acetyl-CoA. Inclusion of new simple steps in the acetylcarnitine assay and conditions affecting the reliability of all three methods are also described. Acetylcarnitine and free carnitine levels in human rectus abdominis muscle were 3.0 +/- 1.5 (SD) and 13.5 +/- 4.0 mumol/g dry wt, respectively. Values for acetyl-CoA and CoASH were about 500-fold lower, 6.7 +/- 1.8 and 21 +/- 8.9 nmol/g dry wt, respectively. A strong correlation between acetylcarnitine (y) and short-chain acylcarnitine (x), determined as the difference between total and free carnitine, was found in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle obtained during intense muscular effort, y = 1.0x + 0.5; r = 0.976.

  6. Purification and Characterization of a Bovine Acetyl Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Reddy, Pranhitha; Kishimoto, Chiharu; Krieger, Monty

    1988-12-01

    The acetyl low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is expressed on macrophages and some endothelial cells and mediates macrophage--foam cell formation in culture. A 220-kDa acetyl LDL binding protein was partially purified from bovine liver membranes and was used to make a specific monoclonal antibody. The 220-kDa protein immunoprecipitated by this antibody retained binding activity, and the antibody was used to detect this protein in cells lining bovine liver sinusoids and on the surface of cultured bovine alveolar macrophages. In the human monocytic cell line THP-1, the expression of both acetyl LDL receptor activity and a 220-kDa acetyl LDL binding protein were dramatically induced in parallel after differentiation to a macrophage-like state induced by phorbol ester. The ligand specificity, tissue and cell-type specificity, and coinduction data indicated that this 220-kDa cell-surface binding protein is probably a receptor that mediates acetyl LDL endocytosis. The 220-kDa protein, which was purified 238,000-fold from bovine lung membranes to near homogeneity using monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography, is a trimer of 77-kDa subunits that contain asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains.

  7. Atomic resolution structure of human α-tubulin acetyltransferase bound to acetyl-CoA

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Michael; Vetter, Melanie; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is an important posttranslational modification found in all domains of life. α-tubulin is specifically acetylated on lysine 40, a modification that serves to stabilize microtubules of axons and cilia. Whereas histone acetyltransferases have been extensively studied, there is no structural and mechanistic information available on α-tubulin acetyltransferases. Here, we present the structure of the human α-tubulin acetyltransferase catalytic domain bound to its cosubstrate acetyl-CoA at 1.05 Å resolution. Compared with other lysine acetyltransferases of known structure, α-tubulin acetyltransferase displays a relatively well-conserved cosubstrate binding pocket but is unique in its active site and putative α-tubulin binding site. Using acetylation assays with structure-guided mutants, we map residues important for acetyl-CoA binding, substrate binding, and catalysis. This analysis reveals a basic patch implicated in substrate binding and a conserved glutamine residue required for catalysis, demonstrating that the family of α-tubulin acetyltransferases uses a reaction mechanism different from other lysine acetyltransferases characterized to date. PMID:23071318

  8. Biochemical and cellular analysis of Ogden syndrome reveals downstream Nt-acetylation defects

    PubMed Central

    Myklebust, Line M.; Van Damme, Petra; Støve, Svein I.; Dörfel, Max J.; Abboud, Angèle; Kalvik, Thomas V.; Grauffel, Cedric; Jonckheere, Veronique; Wu, Yiyang; Swensen, Jeffrey; Kaasa, Hanna; Liszczak, Glen; Marmorstein, Ronen; Reuter, Nathalie; Lyon, Gholson J.; Gevaert, Kris; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The X-linked lethal Ogden syndrome was the first reported human genetic disorder associated with a mutation in an N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) gene. The affected males harbor an Ser37Pro (S37P) mutation in the gene encoding Naa10, the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major human NAT involved in the co-translational acetylation of proteins. Structural models and molecular dynamics simulations of the human NatA and its S37P mutant highlight differences in regions involved in catalysis and at the interface between Naa10 and the auxiliary subunit hNaa15. Biochemical data further demonstrate a reduced catalytic capacity and an impaired interaction between hNaa10 S37P and Naa15 as well as Naa50 (NatE), another interactor of the NatA complex. N-Terminal acetylome analyses revealed a decreased acetylation of a subset of NatA and NatE substrates in Ogden syndrome cells, supporting the genetic findings and our hypothesis regarding reduced Nt-acetylation of a subset of NatA/NatE-type substrates as one etiology for Ogden syndrome. Furthermore, Ogden syndrome fibroblasts display abnormal cell migration and proliferation capacity, possibly linked to a perturbed retinoblastoma pathway. N-Terminal acetylation clearly plays a role in Ogden syndrome, thus revealing the in vivo importance of N-terminal acetylation in human physiology and disease. PMID:25489052

  9. Acetylation of C/EBPε is a prerequisite for terminal neutrophil differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Marije; Govers, Anita M; Fleskens, Veerle; Lourenço, Ana Rita; Pals, Cornelieke E; Vervoort, Stephin J; van Gent, Rogier; Brenkman, Arjan B; Bierings, Marc B; Ackerman, Steven J; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Coffer, Paul J

    2015-03-12

    C/EBPε, a member of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors, is exclusively expressed in myeloid cells and regulates transition from the promyelocytic stage to the myelocytic stage of neutrophil development, being indispensable for secondary and tertiary granule formation. Knowledge concerning the functional role of C/EBPε posttranslational modifications is limited to studies concerning phosphorylation and sumoylation. In the current study, using ectopic expression and ex vivo differentiation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, we demonstrate that C/EBPε is acetylated, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis, identifying 4 acetylated lysines in 3 distinct functional domains. Regulation of C/EBPε acetylation levels by the p300 acetyltransferase and the sirtuin 1 deacetylase controls transcriptional activity, which can at least in part be explained by modulation of DNA binding. During neutrophil development, acetylation of lysines 121 and 198 were found to be crucial for terminal neutrophil differentiation and the expression of neutrophil-specific granule proteins, including lactoferrin and collagenase. Taken together, our data illustrate a critical role for acetylation in the functional regulation of C/EBPε activity during terminal neutrophil development. PMID:25568349

  10. 3,5-Dimethylisoxazoles Act As Acetyl-lysine-mimetic Bromodomain Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Histone–lysine acetylation is a vital chromatin post-translational modification involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Bromodomains bind acetylated lysines, acting as readers of the histone-acetylation code. Competitive inhibitors of this interaction have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. With 57 distinct bromodomains known, the discovery of subtype-selective inhibitors of the histone–bromodomain interaction is of great importance. We have identified the 3,5-dimethylisoxazole moiety as a novel acetyl-lysine bioisostere, which displaces acetylated histone-mimicking peptides from bromodomains. Using X-ray crystallographic analysis, we have determined the interactions responsible for the activity and selectivity of 4-substituted 3,5-dimethylisoxazoles against a selection of phylogenetically diverse bromodomains. By exploiting these interactions, we have developed compound 4d, which has IC50 values of <5 μM for the bromodomain-containing proteins BRD2(1) and BRD4(1). These compounds are promising leads for the further development of selective probes for the bromodomain and extra C-terminal domain (BET) family and CREBBP bromodomains. PMID:21851057

  11. Radiolysis of N-acetyl amino acids as model compounds for radiation degradation of polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne Garrett, R.; Hill, David J. T.; Ho, Sook-Ying; O'Donnell, James H.; O'Sullivan, Paul W.; Pomery, Peter J.

    Radiation chemical yields of (i) the volatile radiolysis products and (ii) the trapped free radicals from the y-radiolysis of the N-acetyl derivatives of glycine, L-valine, L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine in the polycrystalline state have been determined at room temperature (303 K). Carbon dioxide was found to be the major molecular product for all these compounds with G(CO 2) varying from 0.36 for N-acetyl-L-tyrosine to 8 for N-acetyl-L-valine. There was evidence for some scission of the N-C α bond, indicated by the production of acetamide and the corresponding aliphatic acid, but the determination reaction was found to be of much lesser importance than the decarboxylation reaction. A protective effect of the aromatic ring in N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine and in N-acetyl-L-tyrosine was indicated by the lower yields of volatile products for these compounds. The yields of trapped free radicals were found to vary with the nature of the amino acid side chain, increasing with chain length and chain branching. The radical yields were decreased by incorporation of an aromatic moiety in the side chain, this effect being greater for the tyrosyl side chain than for the phenyl side chain. The G(R·) values showed a good correlation with G(CO 2) indicating that a common reaction may be involved in radical production and carbon dioxide formation.

  12. The extracellular release of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 nuclear protein is mediated by acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho Carneiro, Vitor; Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Caetano de Abreu da Silva, Isabel; Furtado Madeira da Costa, Rodrigo; Neto Paiva, Claudia; Torres Bozza, Marcelo; Rosado Fantappie, Marcelo

    2009-12-25

    Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) was revealed to be a substrate for the parasite histone acetyltransferases SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. We found that full-length SmHMGB1, as well as its HMG-box B (but not HMG-box A) were acetylated in vitro by SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. However, SmCBP1 was able to acetylate both substrates more efficiently than SmGCN5. Interestingly, the removal of the C-terminal acidic tail of SmHMGB1 (SmHMGB1{Delta}C) resulted in increased acetylation of the protein. We showed by mammalian cell transfection assays that SmHMGB1 and SmHMGB1{Delta}C were transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment. Importantly, after NaB treatment, SmHMGB1 was also present outside the cell. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of SmHMGB1 plays a role in cellular trafficking, culminating with its secretion to the extracellular milieu. The possible role of SmHMGB1 acetylation in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is discussed.

  13. Acetylation curtails nucleosome binding, not stable nucleosome remodeling, by FoxO1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, M.; Liu, F.; Cirillo, L.A.

    2009-02-20

    Transcriptional activity of FoxO factors is controlled through the actions of multiple growth factors signaling through protein kinase B, whereby phosphorylation of FoxO factors inhibits FoxO-mediated transactivation by promoting nuclear export. Phosphorylation of FoxO factors is enhanced by p300-mediated acetylation, which decreases their affinity for DNA. The negative effect of acetylation on FoxO DNA binding, together with nuclear FoxO mobility, is eliminated by over-expression of the de-acetylase Sirt1, suggesting that acetylation mobilizes FoxO factors in chromatin for inducible gene expression. Here, we show that acetylation significantly curtails the affinity of FoxO1 for its binding sites in nucleosomal DNA but has no effect on either stable nucleosome binding or remodeling by this factor. We suggest that, while acetylation provides a first, essential step toward mobilizing FoxO factors for inducible gene repression, additional mechanisms exist for overcoming their inherent capacity to stably bind and remodel nuclear chromatin.

  14. Alteration of Forkhead Box O (Foxo4) Acetylation Mediates Apoptosis of Podocytes in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Peter Y.; Dai, Yan; Liu, Ruijie; He, Helen; Kretzler, Matthias; Jim, Belinda; Cohen, Clemens D.; He, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The number of kidney podocytes is reduced in diabetic nephropathy. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in patients with diabetes and promote the apoptosis of podocyte by activating the forkhead box O4 (Foxo4) transcription factor to increase the expression of a pro-apoptosis gene, Bcl2l11. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) enhances Foxo4 binding to a forkhead binding element in the promoter of Bcl2lll. AGE-BSA also increases the acetylation of Foxo4. Lysine acetylation of Foxo4 is required for Foxo4 binding and transcription of Bcl2l11 in podocytes treated with AGE-BSA. The expression of a protein deacetylase that targets Foxo4 for deacetylation, sirtuin (Sirt1), is down regulated in cultured podocytes by AGE-BSA treatment and in glomeruli of diabetic patients. SIRT1 over expression in cultured murine podocytes prevents AGE-induced apoptosis. Glomeruli isolated from diabetic db/db mice have increased acetylation of Foxo4, suppressed expression of Sirt1, and increased expression of Bcl2l11 compared to non-diabetic littermates. Together, our data provide evidence that alteration of Foxo4 acetylation and down regulation of Sirt1 expression in diabetes promote podocyte apoptosis. Strategies to preserve Sirt1 expression or reduce Foxo4 acetylation could be used to prevent podocyte loss in diabetes. PMID:21858169

  15. Histone Acetylation Regulation in Sleep Deprivation-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruifeng; Liu, Xiaohua; Wang, Tianhui; Wu, Lei; Gao, Xiujie; Zhang, Zhiqing

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disorders negatively affect cognition and health. Recent evidence has indicated that chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation regulates cognitive function. This study aimed to investigate the possible roles of histone acetylation in sleep deprivation (SD)-induced cognitive impairment. Results of the Morris water maze test showed that 3 days of SD can cause spatial memory impairment in Wistar rats. SD can also decrease histone acetylation levels, increase histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression, and decrease histone acetyltransferase (CBP) expression. Furthermore, SD can reduce H3 and H4 acetylation levels in the promoters of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) gene and thus significantly downregulate BDNF expression and impair the activity of key BDNF signaling pathways (pCaMKII, pErk2, and pCREB). However, treatment with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A attenuated all the negative effects induced by SD. Therefore, BDNF and its histone acetylation regulation may play important roles in SD-induced spatial memory impairment, whereas HDAC inhibition possibly confers protection against SD-induced impairment in spatial memory and hippocampal functions. PMID:27161370

  16. Asymmetric distribution of glucose and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol in geostimulated Zea mays seedlings.

    PubMed

    Momonoki, Y S

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-D-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol. PMID:11537873

  17. Regulation of Plant Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase by Adenylate Nucleotides 1

    PubMed Central

    Eastwell, Kenneth C.; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    The assay of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.2) does not follow ideal zero-order kinetics when assayed in a crude extract from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germ. Our results show that the lack of ideality is the consequence of contamination by ATPase and adenylate kinase. These enzyme activities generate significant amounts of ADP and AMP in the assay mixture, thus limiting the availability of ATP for the carboxylase reaction. Moreover, ADP and AMP are competitive inhibitors, with respect to ATP, of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Similar relationships between adenylate nucleotides and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are found in isolated chloroplasts. There is no evidence that acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in the extracts of the plant systems examined is altered by covalent modification, such as a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. A scheme is presented that illustrates the dependency of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthesis on the energy demands of the chloroplasts in vivo. PMID:16662980

  18. N-acetylation of aromatic amines: implication for skin and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifas, Jutta; Blomeke, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, aromatic amine (AA) contact to the skin occurs via occupational or 'life style' exposure to hair dye intermediates and couplers, usually monocyclic p-phenylenediamines and meta-substituted aminophenols. The transport of AA from the outer surface to the systemic circulation predominantly follows the intracellular route. Skin tends to have relatively higher phase II compared to phase I xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme capacity, and levels are generally regarded as lower than those in liver. Inside skin cells AA are primarily N-acetylated and detoxified by N-acetyltransferase 1. AA activation via hydroxylation or chemical oxidation competes with acetylation and is only of importance under circumstances when N-acetylation capacities are limited. The reactive AA derivatives are able to elicit effects by virtue of their modifications of skin proteins resulting in irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, the effective acetylation of topically applied AAs in skin cells emphasizes a protective role of cutaneous acetylation mediating a classical "first-pass" effect, which attenuates systemic exposure. PMID:25553379

  19. Histone H4 lysine 20 acetylation is associated with gene repression in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Harada, Akihito; Fukuda, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Satoko; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Ryo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Nozaki, Naohito; Takahara, Shiro; Takao, Toshifumi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally associated with gene activation and chromatin decondensation. Recent mass spectrometry analysis has revealed that histone H4 lysine 20, a major methylation site, can also be acetylated. To understand the function of H4 lysine 20 acetylation (H4K20ac), we have developed a specific monoclonal antibody and performed ChIP-seq analysis using HeLa-S3 cells. H4K20ac was enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of minimally expressed genes and in the gene body of expressed genes, in contrast to most histone acetylation being enriched around the TSSs of expressed genes. The distribution of H4K20ac showed little correlation with known histone modifications, including histone H3 methylations. A motif search in H4K20ac-enriched sequences, together with transcription factor binding profiles based on ENCODE ChIP-seq data, revealed that most transcription activators are excluded from H4K20ac-enriched genes and a transcription repressor NRSF/REST co-localized with H4K20ac. These results suggest that H4K20ac is a unique acetylation mark associated with gene repression. PMID:27064113

  20. NUCLEOPHOSMIN/B23 NEGATIVELY REGULATES GCN5-DEPENDENT HISTONE ACETYLATION AND TRANSACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yonglong; Wu, Jun; Giannone, Richard J; Boucher, Lorrie; Du, Hansen; Huang, Ying; Johnson, Dabney K; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Nucleophosmin/B23 is a multifunctional phosphoprotein that is overexpressed in cancer cells and has been shown to be involved in both positive and negative regulation of transcription. In this study, we first identified GCN5 acetyltransferase as a B23-interacting protein by mass spectrometry, which was then confirmed by in vivo co-immunoprecipitation. In vitro assay demonstrated that B23 bound the PCAF-N domain of GCN5 and inhibited GCN5-mediated acetylation of both free and mononucleosomal histones, probably through interfering with GCN5 and masking histones from being acetylated. Mitotic B23 exhibited higher inhibitory activity on GCN5-mediated histone acetylation than interphase B23. Immunodepletion experiments of mitotic extracts revealed that phosphorylation of B23 at Thr199 enhanced the inhibition of GCN5-mediated histone acetylation. Moreover, luciferase reporter and microarray analyses suggested that B23 attenuated GCN5-mediated transactivation in vivo. Taken together, our studies suggest a molecular mechanism of B23 in the mitotic inhibition of GCN5-mediated histone acetylation and transactivation.

  1. Critical role of acetylation in tau-mediated neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Min, Sang-Won; Chen, Xu; Tracy, Tara E; Li, Yaqiao; Zhou, Yungui; Wang, Chao; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Minami, S Sakura; Defensor, Erwin; Mok, Sue Ann; Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Schilling, Birgit; Cong, Xin; Ellerby, Lisa; Gibson, Bradford W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Gestwicki, Jason; Masliah, Eliezer; Verdin, Eric; Gan, Li

    2015-10-01

    Tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases in which tau fibrils accumulate. Recent evidence supports soluble tau species as the major toxic species. How soluble tau accumulates and causes neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we identify tau acetylation at Lys174 (K174) as an early change in AD brains and a critical determinant in tau homeostasis and toxicity in mice. The acetyl-mimicking mutant K174Q slows tau turnover and induces cognitive deficits in vivo. Acetyltransferase p300-induced tau acetylation is inhibited by salsalate and salicylate, which enhance tau turnover and reduce tau levels. In the PS19 transgenic mouse model of FTD, administration of salsalate after disease onset inhibited p300 activity, lowered levels of total tau and tau acetylated at K174, rescued tau-induced memory deficits and prevented hippocampal atrophy. The tau-lowering and protective effects of salsalate were diminished in neurons expressing K174Q tau. Targeting tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy against human tauopathies. PMID:26390242

  2. Effect of (L-Carnitine) on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, L.L.; Lilly, K.; Lysiak, W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from 2-/sup 14/C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  3. Relation between the content of acetyl-coenzyme A and acetylcholine in brain slices.

    PubMed Central

    Rícný, J; Tucek, S

    1980-01-01

    Slices of rat caudate nuclei were incubated in vitro in media containing, among other constituents, three different concentrations of glucose (0.5, 2 and 10 mM), 0.2 mM-choline, paraoxon as an inhibitor of cholinesterase, and 5 mM- or 30 mM-K+. After 30 and 60 min of incubation, the concentrations of acetyl-CoA, acetylcholine and choline in the tissue and of acetylcholine in the incubation medium were measured. The content of acetyl-CoA in the sliced varied in direct relation to the concentration of glucose in the incubation medium. The content of acetylcholine in the slices and, in experiments with high K+, also the amount of acetylcholine released into the incubation medium varied in direct relation to the concentration of glucose in the incubation medium and to the concentration of acetyl-CoA in the slices; the relation between the concentrations of acetyl-CoA and of acetylcholine in the slices was linear. It was concluded that the availability of acetyl-CoA had a decisive influence on both the rate of synthesis of acetylcholine and its steady-state concentration. The observations accord with the view that, at the ultimate level, the synthesis of acetylcholine is controlled by the Law of Mass Action. PMID:7470027

  4. Aberrant lysine acetylation in tumorigenesis: Implications in the development of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kaypee, Stephanie; Sudarshan, Deepthi; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Mukherjee, Debanjan; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-06-01

    The 'language' of covalent histone modifications translates environmental and cellular cues into gene expression. This vast array of post-translational modifications on histones are more than just covalent moieties added onto a protein, as they also form a platform on which crucial cellular signals are relayed. The reversible lysine acetylation has emerged as an important post-translational modification of both histone and non-histone proteins, dictating numerous epigenetic programs within a cell. Thus, understanding the complex biology of lysine acetylation and its regulators is essential for the development of epigenetic therapeutics. In this review, we will attempt to address the complexities of lysine acetylation in the context of tumorigenesis, their role in cancer progression and emphasize on the modalities developed to target lysine acetyltransferases towards cancer treatment. PMID:26808162

  5. Roles of dynamic and reversible histone acetylation in plant development and polyploidy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Tian, Lu

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes is not simply determined by the DNA sequence, but rather mediated through dynamic chromatin modifications and remodeling. Recent studies have shown that reversible and rapid changes in histone acetylation play an essential role in chromatin modification, induce genome-wide and specific changes in gene expression, and affect a variety of biological processes in response to internal and external signals, such as cell differentiation, growth, development, light, temperature, and abiotic and biotic stresses. Moreover, histone acetylation and deacetylation are associated with RNA interference and other chromatin modifications including DNA and histone methylation. The reversible changes in histone acetylation also contribute to cell cycle regulation and epigenetic silencing of rDNA and redundant genes in response to interspecific hybridization and polyploidy. PMID:17556080

  6. Cellulose acetate from oil palm empty fruit bunch via a one step heterogeneous acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wan Daud, Wan Rosli; Djuned, Fauzi Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    Acetone soluble oil palm empty fruit bunch cellulose acetate (OPEFB-CA) of DS 2.52 has been successfully synthesized in a one-step heterogeneous acetylation of OPEFB cellulose without necessitating the hydrolysis stage. This has only been made possible by the mathematical modeling of the acetylation process by manipulating the variables of reaction time and acetic anhydride/cellulose ratio (RR). The obtained model was verified by experimental data with an error of less than 2.5%. NMR analysis showed that the distribution of the acetyl moiety among the three OH groups of cellulose indicates a preference at the C6 position, followed by C3 and C2. XRD revealed that OPEFB-CA is highly amorphous with a degree of crystallinity estimated to be ca. 6.41% as determined from DSC. The OPEFB-CA films exhibited good mechanical properties being their tensile strength and Young's modulus higher than those of the commercial CA. PMID:26256348

  7. Acetylation regulates subcellular localization of the Wnt signaling nuclear effector POP-1

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Frédérique; Calvo, Dominica; Lo, Miao-Chia; Ceron, Julian; Maduro, Morris; Lin, Rueyling; Shi, Yang

    2003-01-01

    Lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) are transcription factors that mediate the Wnt signaling pathway, and have crucial roles during embryonic development in various organisms. Here we report that acetylation enhances nuclear retention of POP-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans LEF/TCF homolog, through increasing nuclear import and blocking nuclear export. We identify three lysines that are acetylated in vivo, and demonstrate their essential requirement for proper nuclear localization and biological activity of POP-1 during C. elegans embryogenesis. The conservation of these lysines among other LEF/TCF family members suggests that acetylation may be an important, evolutionarily conserved mechanism regulating subcellular distribution of LEF/TCF factors. PMID:12651889

  8. Catalytic Depolymerization of Chitin with Retention of N-Acetyl Group.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kuroki, Kyoichi; Ito, Shogo; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine units with β-1,4-glycosidic linkages, is the most abundant marine biomass. Chitin monomers containing N-acetyl groups are useful precursors to various fine chemicals and medicines. However, the selective conversion of robust chitin to N-acetylated monomers currently requires a large excess of acid or a long reaction time, which limits its application. We demonstrate a fast catalytic transformation of chitin to monomers with retention of N-acetyl groups by combining mechanochemistry and homogeneous catalysis. Mechanical-force-assisted depolymerization of chitin with a catalytic amount of H2SO4 gave soluble short-chain oligomers. Subsequent hydrolysis of the ball-milled sample provided N-acetylglucosamine in 53% yield, and methanolysis afforded 1-O-methyl-N-acetylglucosamine in yields of up to 70%. Our process can greatly reduce the use of acid compared to the conventional process. PMID:26538108

  9. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation. PMID:26990986

  10. Molecular mechanism for USP7-mediated DNMT1 stabilization by acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jingdong; Yang, Huirong; Fang, Jian; Ma, Lixiang; Gong, Rui; Wang, Ping; Li, Ze; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-05-01

    DNMT1 is an important epigenetic regulator that plays a key role in the maintenance of DNA methylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of DNMT1 in complex with USP7 at 2.9 Å resolution. The interaction between the two proteins is primarily mediated by an acidic pocket in USP7 and Lysine residues within DNMT1's KG linker. This intermolecular interaction is required for USP7-mediated stabilization of DNMT1. Acetylation of the KG linker Lysine residues impair DNMT1-USP7 interaction and promote the degradation of DNMT1. Treatment with HDAC inhibitors results in an increase in acetylated DNMT1 and decreased total DNMT1 protein. This negative correlation is observed in differentiated neuronal cells and pancreatic cancer cells. Our studies reveal that USP7-mediated stabilization of DNMT1 is regulated by acetylation and provide a structural basis for the design of inhibitors, targeting the DNMT1-USP7 interaction surface for therapeutic applications.

  11. Beta-endorphin and alpha-n-acetyl beta-endorphin; synthesis, conformation and binding parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Lovegren, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    Beta-endorphin (EP) is a 31-residue opioid peptide found in many tissues, including the pituitary, brain and reproductive tract. Alpha-amino-acetyl beta-endorphin (AcEP) was characterized spectroscopically by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism in deuterated water and trifluoroethanol (TFE). Both EP and AcEP bind to neuroblastoma N2a cells. This binding was not mediated through opiate receptors, and both peptides seemed to bind at common sites. Ovarian immunoreactive-EP levels were determined for immature and mature rates. These levels were found to be responsive to exogenous gonadotropin treatment in immature animals. A large percentage of the immunoreactive-EP is present in follicular fluid, and most of the endorphin-like peptides were acetylated, as measured by radioimmunoassay. Chromatogaphic analysis suggested at least three EP-like species: EP, a carboxy-terminally cleaved and an amino-terminally acetylated EP.

  12. Preparation and characterization of acetylated corn starch-(PVOH)/clay nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Katerinopoulou, Katerina; Giannakas, Aris; Grigoriadi, Kalouda; Barkoula, Nektaria M; Ladavos, Athanasios

    2014-02-15

    Acetylated corn starch (ACS)-based clay (NaMMT) nanocomposite films, with or without addition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH), were prepared by casting with glycerol as a plasticizer. The obtained nanocomposite structure was ascertained by XRD study for all polymer-clay nanocomposites. XRD patterns are indicative of an intercalated nanocomposite structure. Mechanical and thermomechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites were studied. The addition of clay induces significant reinforcing effects in the thermoplastic ACS systems. Replacement of glycerol with PVOH in the ACS-NaMMT system results in superior mechanical strength, due to the creation of hydrogen bonds between the ACS and the PVOH chains. Enhancement in water barrier properties was observed for all nanocomposite films, which reaches up to 67% for acetylated starch-PVOH-clay nanocomposites in comparison to acetylated thermoplastic starch, as indicated by water vapor transmission measurements. PMID:24507275

  13. Genome-wide analysis of H4K5 acetylation associated with fear memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histone acetylation has been implicated in learning and memory in the brain, however, its function at the level of the genome and at individual genetic loci remains poorly investigated. This study examines a key acetylation mark, histone H4 lysine 5 acetylation (H4K5ac), genome-wide and its role in activity-dependent gene transcription in the adult mouse hippocampus following contextual fear conditioning. Results Using ChIP-Seq, we identified 23,235 genes in which H4K5ac correlates with absolute gene expression in the hippocampus. However, in the absence of transcription factor binding sites 150 bp upstream of the transcription start site, genes were associated with higher H4K5ac and expression levels. We further establish H4K5ac as a ubiquitous modification across the genome. Approximately one-third of all genes have above average H4K5ac, of which ~15% are specific to memory formation and ~65% are co-acetylated for H4K12. Although H4K5ac is prevalent across the genome, enrichment of H4K5ac at specific regions in the promoter and coding region are associated with different levels of gene expression. Additionally, unbiased peak calling for genes differentially acetylated for H4K5ac identified 114 unique genes specific to fear memory, over half of which have not previously been associated with memory processes. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into potential mechanisms of gene priming and bookmarking by histone acetylation following hippocampal memory activation. Specifically, we propose that hyperacetylation of H4K5 may prime genes for rapid expression following activity. More broadly, this study strengthens the importance of histone posttranslational modifications for the differential regulation of transcriptional programs in cognitive processes. PMID:23927422

  14. Modulation of p300/CBP Acetylation of Nucleosomes by Bromodomain Ligand I-CBP112.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Beth E; Luef, Birgit; Xu, Wei; Henry, Ryan A; Nodelman, Ilana M; Bowman, Gregory D; Andrews, Andrew J; Cole, Philip A

    2016-07-12

    The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes p300 and CBP are closely related paralogs that serve as transcriptional coactivators and have been found to be dysregulated in cancer and other diseases. p300/CBP is a multidomain protein and possesses a highly conserved bromodomain that has been shown to bind acetylated Lys residues in both proteins and various small molecules, including I-CBP112 and CBP30. Here we show that the ligand I-CBP112 can stimulate nucleosome acetylation up to 3-fold while CBP30 does not. Activation of p300/CBP by I-CBP112 is not observed with the isolated histone H3 substrate but requires a nucleosome substrate. I-CBP112 does not impact nucleosome acetylation by the isolated p300 HAT domain, and the effects of I-CBP112 on p300/CBP can be neutralized by CBP30, suggesting that I-CBP112 likely allosterically activates p300/CBP through bromodomain interactions. Using mass spectrometry and Western blots, we have found that I-CBP112 particularly stimulates acetylation of Lys18 of histone H3 (H3K18) in nucleosomes, an established in vivo site of p300/CBP. In addition, we show that I-CBP112 enhances H3K18 acetylation in acute leukemia and prostate cancer cells in a concentration range commensurate with its antiproliferative effects. Our findings extend the known pharmacology of bromodomain ligands in the regulation of p300/CBP and suggest a novel approach to modulating histone acetylation in cancer. PMID:27332697

  15. Polyamine acetylation modulates polyamine metabolic flux, a prelude to broader metabolic consequences.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Debora L; Diegelman, Paula; Jell, Jason; Vujcic, Slavoljub; Merali, Salim; Porter, Carl W

    2008-02-15

    Recent studies suggest that overexpression of the polyamine-acetylating enzyme spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) significantly increases metabolic flux through the polyamine pathway. The concept derives from the observation that SSAT-induced acetylation of polyamines gives rise to a compensatory increase in biosynthesis and presumably to increased flow through the pathway. Despite the strength of this deduction, the existence of heightened polyamine flux has not yet been experimentally demonstrated. Here, we use the artificial polyamine precursor 4-fluoro-ornithine to measure polyamine flux by tracking fluorine unit permeation of polyamine pools in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Conditional overexpression of SSAT was accompanied by a massive increase in intracellular and extracellular acetylated spermidine and by a 6-20-fold increase in biosynthetic enzyme activities. In the presence of 300 microM 4-fluoro-ornithine, SSAT overexpression led to the sequential appearance of fluorinated putrescine, spermidine, acetylated spermidine, and spermine. As fluorinated polyamines increased, endogenous polyamines decreased, so that the total polyamine pool size remained relatively constant. At 24 h, 56% of the spermine pool in the induced SSAT cells was fluorine-labeled compared with only 12% in uninduced cells. Thus, SSAT induction increased metabolic flux by approximately 5-fold. Flux could be interrupted by inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis but not by inhibition of polyamine oxidation. Overall, the findings are consistent with a paradigm whereby flux is initiated by SSAT acetylation of spermine and particularly spermidine followed by a marked increase in key biosynthetic enzymes. The latter sustains the flux cycle by providing a constant supply of polyamines for subsequent acetylation by SSAT. The broader metabolic implications of this futile metabolic cycling are discussed in detail. PMID:18089555

  16. Mucolipidosis III β-N-acetyl-d-hexosaminidase A. Purification and properties

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Barry C.; Hirani, Shirish; Freeze, Hudson H.; Little, Laureen; Miller, Arnold L.

    1982-01-01

    Mucolipidosis III acid hydrolases possess an altered carbohydrate recognition marker needed for their lysosomal localization. As a result of this alteration, a portion of these enzymes is secreted from the cell to the extracellular spaces. The structural changes that may have occurred to one of these secreted enzymes, β-N-acetyl-d-hexosaminidase A (EC 3.2.1.52) were investigated. Normal and mucolipidosis III urinary β-N-acetyl-d-hexosaminidase A were purified to apparent homogeneity by using affinity [Sepharose-2-acetamido-N-(ε-aminocaproyl)-2-deoxy-β- d-glucopyranosylamine] and ion-exchange (DEAE- and CM-cellulose) chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-slab-gel electrophoresis showed that both enzymes had similar subunit patterns consisting of apparent mol.wts. of 68000, 60000–58000, 55000 and 29000. Differences, however, were noted in the relative proportions of the protein bands where the normal urinary β-N-acetyl-d-hexosaminidase A contained predominantly the smaller subunits, whereas the mucolipidosis III enzyme had a predominance of the larger subunits. The binding of mucolipidosis III β-N-acetyl-d-hexosaminidase A to Ricinus communis lectin and concanavalin A with and without endo-β-N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase H treatment indicated that the mutation leads to a modification of a portion of the normally occurring high-mannose-type oligosaccharide units to the complex-type. This was further supported by carbohydrate compositional analysis, which revealed a mannose/galactose ratio of 2.1 for the mucolipidosis III β-N-acetyl-d-hexosaminidase A compared with a ratio of 3.5 for the normal enzyme. Our results indicate that as a result of their inability to be properly localized to the lysosome the majority of the mucolipidosis III lysosomal hydrolase high-mannose oligosaccharide units are further processed to the complex-type before secretion of predominantly higher-molecular-weight subunits from the cell. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:6219664

  17. Changes to biological activity following acetylation of dendrotoxin I from Dendroaspis polylepis (black mamba).

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Rowan, E G; Vatanpour, H; Engström, A; Westerlund, B; Karlsson, E

    1997-08-01

    The potassium channel blocker dendrotoxin I was acetylated with acetic anhydride. Mono-acetyl derivatives of all seven lysine residues (N-terminus blocked) and a di-derivative were isolated by chromatography on the cation-exchanger Bio-Rex 70 and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The derivative acetyl-Lys 29 and the di-derivative of Tyr 24 and Lys 28 had more than 1000 times lower affinity than the native toxin as determined by inhibition of the 125I-dendrotoxin binding to synaptosomal membranes from rat brain. Lys 29 is part of the triplet Lys-Lys-Lys (28-30) which also occurs in the homologous alpha-dendrotoxin where the triplet is not in the functional site, as shown by site-directed mutagenesis. Acetylation of Lys 29 may have produced large structural perturbations that inactivated the toxin. Acetylation of Lys 28 alone had little effect, but the toxin became almost inactive when both Lys 28 and Tyr 24 were modified. Ten experiments were conducted under similar conditions, but a derivative of Tyr 24 was obtained only three times. In these cases the toxin apparently had a different structure, with Tyr 24 accessible to the reagent. This may depend on freeze-drying, which can alter the structure of proteins. The third derivative with low activity was acetyl-Lys 5, with affinity decreased 20-fold. Lys 5 has a protruding side-chain that does not interact with any other group in the toxin molecule. Therefore, Lys 5 is probably part of the functional site for dendrotoxin's binding to the voltage-dependent K+ channels. PMID:9278975

  18. MicroRNA-29a Promotion of Nephrin Acetylation Ameliorates Hyperglycemia-Induced Podocyte Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Liang; Lee, Pei-Hsien; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Ko, Jih-Yang; Chuang, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Shao-Yu; Wu, Shin-Long; Chen, Yu-Shan; Chiang, Wen-Chih; Reiser, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Podocyte dysfunction is a detrimental feature in diabetic nephropathy, with loss of nephrin integrity contributing to diabetic podocytopathy. MicroRNAs (miRs) reportedly modulate the hyperglycemia-induced perturbation of renal tissue homeostasis. This study investigated whether regulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) actions and nephrin acetylation by miR-29 contributes to podocyte homeostasis and renal function in diabetic kidneys. Hyperglycemia accelerated podocyte injury and reduced nephrin, acetylated nephrin, and miR-29a levels in primary renal glomeruli from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Diabetic miR-29a transgenic mice had better nephrin levels, podocyte viability, and renal function and less glomerular fibrosis and inflammation reaction compared with diabetic wild-type mice. Overexpression of miR-29a attenuated the promotion of HDAC4 signaling, nephrin ubiquitination, and urinary nephrin excretion associated with diabetes and restored nephrin acetylation. Knockdown of miR-29a by antisense oligonucleotides promoted HDAC4 action, nephrin loss, podocyte apoptosis, and proteinuria in nondiabetic mice. In vitro, interruption of HDAC4 signaling alleviated the high glucose–induced apoptosis and inhibition of nephrin acetylation in podocyte cultures. Furthermore, HDAC4 interference increased the acetylation status of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), the enrichment of H3K9Ac in miR-29a proximal promoter, and miR-29a transcription in high glucose–stressed podocytes. In conclusion, hyperglycemia impairs miR-29a signaling to intensify HDAC4 actions that contribute to podocyte protein deacetylation and degradation as well as renal dysfunction. HDAC4, via epigenetic H3K9 hypoacetylation, reduces miR-29a transcription. The renoprotective effects of miR-29a in diabetes-induced loss of podocyte integrity and renal homeostasis highlights the importance of post-translational acetylation reactions in podocyte microenvironments. Increasing miR-29a action may

  19. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus , a New Twist on ATP Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Nguyen, Hong H.; Yang, Yanan; Xie, Yongming; Erde, Jonathan; et al

    2016-08-16

    Syntrophus aciditrophicusis a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation byS. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome ofS. aciditrophicusleaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show thatS. aciditrophicususes AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1)more » for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA.acs1mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, ofS. aciditrophicusgrown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts ofS. aciditrophicushad low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified fromS. aciditrophicusand recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) inS. aciditrophicuscells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus,S. aciditrophicushas a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. We find bacteria use two enzymes, phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, to make ATP from acetyl-CoA, while acetate-forming archaea use a single enzyme, an ADP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase, to synthesize ATP and acetate from acetyl-CoA.Syntrophus aciditrophicusapparently relies on a different approach to conserve energy during acetyl-CoA metabolism, as

  20. ATP-Citrate Lyase Is Required for Production of Cytosolic Acetyl Coenzyme A and Development in Aspergillus nidulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism and in the biosynthesis of cellular molecules. A source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA is essential for the production of fatty acids and sterols and for protein acetylation, including histone acetylation in the nucleus. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans acetyl-CoA is produced from acetate by cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, while in plants and animals acetyl-CoA is derived from citrate via ATP-citrate lyase. In the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans, tandem divergently transcribed genes (aclA and aclB) encode the subunits of ATP-citrate lyase, and we have deleted these genes. Growth is greatly diminished on carbon sources that do not result in cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as glucose and proline, while growth is not affected on carbon sources that result in the production of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as acetate and ethanol. Addition of acetate restores growth on glucose or proline, and this is dependent on facA, which encodes cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, but not on the regulatory gene facB. Transcription of aclA and aclB is repressed by growth on acetate or ethanol. Loss of ATP-citrate lyase results in severe developmental effects, with the production of asexual spores (conidia) being greatly reduced and a complete absence of sexual development. This is in contrast to Sordaria macrospora, in which fruiting body formation is initiated but maturation is defective in an ATP-citrate lyase mutant. Addition of acetate does not repair these defects, indicating a specific requirement for high levels of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA during differentiation. Complementation in heterokaryons between aclA and aclB deletions for all phenotypes indicates that the tandem gene arrangement is not essential. PMID:20495057

  1. ATP-citrate lyase is required for production of cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A and development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Murray, Sandra L

    2010-07-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism and in the biosynthesis of cellular molecules. A source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA is essential for the production of fatty acids and sterols and for protein acetylation, including histone acetylation in the nucleus. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans acetyl-CoA is produced from acetate by cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, while in plants and animals acetyl-CoA is derived from citrate via ATP-citrate lyase. In the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans, tandem divergently transcribed genes (aclA and aclB) encode the subunits of ATP-citrate lyase, and we have deleted these genes. Growth is greatly diminished on carbon sources that do not result in cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as glucose and proline, while growth is not affected on carbon sources that result in the production of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as acetate and ethanol. Addition of acetate restores growth on glucose or proline, and this is dependent on facA, which encodes cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, but not on the regulatory gene facB. Transcription of aclA and aclB is repressed by growth on acetate or ethanol. Loss of ATP-citrate lyase results in severe developmental effects, with the production of asexual spores (conidia) being greatly reduced and a complete absence of sexual development. This is in contrast to Sordaria macrospora, in which fruiting body formation is initiated but maturation is defective in an ATP-citrate lyase mutant. Addition of acetate does not repair these defects, indicating a specific requirement for high levels of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA during differentiation. Complementation in heterokaryons between aclA and aclB deletions for all phenotypes indicates that the tandem gene arrangement is not essential. PMID:20495057

  2. Characterization of Semisynthetic and Naturally Nα-Acetylated α-Synuclein in Vitro and in Intact Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fauvet, Bruno; Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Samuel, Filsy; Dikiy, Igor; Tandon, Anurag; Eliezer, David; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a very common post-translational modification, although its role in regulating protein physical properties and function remains poorly understood. α-Synuclein (α-syn), a protein that has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease, is constitutively Nα-acetylated in vivo. Nevertheless, most of the biochemical and biophysical studies on the structure, aggregation, and function of α-syn in vitro utilize recombinant α-syn from Escherichia coli, which is not N-terminally acetylated. To elucidate the effect of Nα-acetylation on the biophysical and biological properties of α-syn, we produced Nα-acetylated α-syn first using a semisynthetic methodology based on expressed protein ligation (Berrade, L., and Camarero, J. A. (2009) Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 66, 3909–3922) and then a recombinant expression strategy, to compare its properties to unacetylated α-syn. We demonstrate that both WT and Nα-acetylated α-syn share a similar secondary structure and oligomeric state using both purified protein preparations and in-cell NMR on E. coli overexpressing Nα-acetylated α-syn. The two proteins have very close aggregation propensities as shown by thioflavin T binding and sedimentation assays. Furthermore, both Nα-acetylated and WT α-syn exhibited similar ability to bind synaptosomal membranes in vitro and in HeLa cells, where both internalized proteins exhibited prominent cytosolic subcellular distribution. We then determined the effect of attenuating Nα-acetylation in living cells, first by using a nonacetylable mutant and then by silencing the enzyme responsible for α-syn Nα-acetylation. Both approaches revealed similar subcellular distribution and membrane binding for both the nonacetylable mutant and WT α-syn, suggesting that N-terminal acetylation does not significantly affect its structure in vitro and in intact cells. PMID:22718772

  3. Quantifying renewable groundwater stress with GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Alexandra S.; Thomas, Brian F.; Lo, Min-Hui; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Voss, Katalyn; Swenson, Sean; Rodell, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Groundwater is an increasingly important water supply source globally. Understanding the amount of groundwater used versus the volume available is crucial to evaluate future water availability. We present a groundwater stress assessment to quantify the relationship between groundwater use and availability in the world's 37 largest aquifer systems. We quantify stress according to a ratio of groundwater use to availability, which we call the Renewable Groundwater Stress ratio. The impact of quantifying groundwater use based on nationally reported groundwater withdrawal statistics is compared to a novel approach to quantify use based on remote sensing observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Four characteristic stress regimes are defined: Overstressed, Variable Stress, Human-dominated Stress, and Unstressed. The regimes are a function of the sign of use (positive or negative) and the sign of groundwater availability, defined as mean annual recharge. The ability to mitigate and adapt to stressed conditions, where use exceeds sustainable water availability, is a function of economic capacity and land use patterns. Therefore, we qualitatively explore the relationship between stress and anthropogenic biomes. We find that estimates of groundwater stress based on withdrawal statistics are unable to capture the range of characteristic stress regimes, especially in regions dominated by sparsely populated biome types with limited cropland. GRACE-based estimates of use and stress can holistically quantify the impact of groundwater use on stress, resulting in both greater magnitudes of stress and more variability of stress between regions.

  4. Quantifying renewable groundwater stress with GRACE

    PubMed Central

    Richey, Alexandra S.; Thomas, Brian F.; Lo, Min‐Hui; Reager, John T.; Voss, Katalyn; Swenson, Sean; Rodell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Groundwater is an increasingly important water supply source globally. Understanding the amount of groundwater used versus the volume available is crucial to evaluate future water availability. We present a groundwater stress assessment to quantify the relationship between groundwater use and availability in the world's 37 largest aquifer systems. We quantify stress according to a ratio of groundwater use to availability, which we call the Renewable Groundwater Stress ratio. The impact of quantifying groundwater use based on nationally reported groundwater withdrawal statistics is compared to a novel approach to quantify use based on remote sensing observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Four characteristic stress regimes are defined: Overstressed, Variable Stress, Human‐dominated Stress, and Unstressed. The regimes are a function of the sign of use (positive or negative) and the sign of groundwater availability, defined as mean annual recharge. The ability to mitigate and adapt to stressed conditions, where use exceeds sustainable water availability, is a function of economic capacity and land use patterns. Therefore, we qualitatively explore the relationship between stress and anthropogenic biomes. We find that estimates of groundwater stress based on withdrawal statistics are unable to capture the range of characteristic stress regimes, especially in regions dominated by sparsely populated biome types with limited cropland. GRACE‐based estimates of use and stress can holistically quantify the impact of groundwater use on stress, resulting in both greater magnitudes of stress and more variability of stress between regions. PMID:26900185

  5. Conformational studies of bacterial peptidoglycan: structure and stereochemistry of N-acetyl-β- D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-β- D-muramic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, P. N. S.; Rai, D. K.; Yadav, J. S.

    1989-03-01

    The energies of various conformations of N-acetyl-β- D-glucosamine (NAG) and its 3-O- D-lactic acid derivative N-acetyl-β- D-muramic acid (NAM) have been calculated by geometry optimization using the molecular mechanics program MM2. The geometries of these systems have been analyzed in the light of ring torsion, bond lengths, bond angles and conformational states of side groups of the pyranosyl ring and compared with available experimental data of similar pyranose derivatives. The present study indicates the presence of hydrogen bonds to stabilize the side group conformations. Discrepancies with experimental data that are seen in a few cases are ascribed to the nature of the side groups and their geometry.

  6. Sensitivity to non-acetylated salicylates in a patient with asthma, nasal polyps, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chudwin, D S; Strub, M; Golden, H E; Frey, C; Richmond, G W; Luskin, A T

    1986-08-01

    A woman experienced exacerbations of bronchial asthma after taking aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis. On oral challenges, she developed an urticarial reaction after tartrazine; urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after salicylsalicylic acid; and urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after choline magnesium trisalicylate. Non-acetylated salicylates have been recommended for use in aspirin- and/or tartrazine-sensitive patients. The results of sensitivity studies of our patient indicates that such patients may also be sensitive to non-acetylated salicylates. PMID:3740556

  7. Mutants of Phycomyces blakesleeanus Defective in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    PubMed

    Garre; Torres-Martinez

    1996-03-01

    Nine mutants of the filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to fluoroacetate. None of the isolates uses acetate as the sole carbon source. Genetic complementation experiments revealed that all the mutants belong to the same complementation group. Biochemical analysis indicated that the acetate-induced acetyl-CoA synthetase activity is abolished in all nine mutants, thus suggesting that they are affected in the gene coding for acetyl-CoA synthetase (facA). PMID:8812287

  8. Isolation of the facA (acetyl-CoA synthetase) gene of Phycomyces blakesleeanus.

    PubMed

    Garre, V; Murillo, F J; Torres-Martínez, S

    1994-08-01

    A 5.6 kb DNA fragment from the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus has been cloned and sequenced. The fragment contains a gene that probably codes for the enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (facA). The amino acid sequence deduced for the P. blakesleeanus protein is highly homologous to those of acetyl-coA-synthetases from other organisms. When placed under the control of a constitutive promoter from Aspergillus nidulans, the cloned gene complemented a facA- mutation of this organism. In P. blakesleeanus, the expression of facA is induced by acetate. PMID:7914670

  9. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  10. Deacylation reactions of 20-acetyl dinorcholanic lactones and 20,23-diacetyl furost-22-enes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Linares, Ma Guadalupe; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jesús; Meza-Reyes, Socorro; Montiel-Smith, Sara; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Bernès, Sylvain

    2010-03-01

    We report the deacylation of (20R)-20-acetyl-23,24-dinorcholanic lactones by hydrazine hydrate, under microwave irradiation in high yields. The elimination of the 20-acetyl group proceeded with retention of configuration which contrast with other proved deacylation methods that yield a mixture of diastereoisomers. In this way, unnatural (20R)-23,24-dinorcholanic lactones can be produced rapidly on a large scale. Both (20R)- and (20S)-lactones were prepared starting from diosgenin, hecogenin and sarsasapogenin, in 72-80% overall yields. PMID:20034505

  11. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics has considerable potential, but the evidence needs to be further substantiated. Vitamin A, iron, and zinc have been associated with adverse effects and caution is warranted for their use. PMID:22254046

  12. Structural Basis for the De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine in Gram-positive Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In staphylococci, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the extracellular protein IcaB is required for biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of IcaB from Ammonifex degensii (IcaBAd) has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution. The structure of IcaBAd reveals a (β/α)7 barrel common to the family four carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) with the canonical motifs circularly permuted. The metal dependence of IcaBAd is similar to most CE4s showing the maximum rates of de-N-acetylation with Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+. From docking studies with β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers and structural comparison to PgaB from Escherichia coli, the Gram-negative homologue of IcaB, we identify Arg-45, Tyr-67, and Trp-180 as key residues for PNAG binding during catalysis. The absence of these residues in PgaB provides a rationale for the requirement of a C-terminal domain for efficient deacetylation of PNAG in Gram-negative species. Mutational analysis of conserved active site residues suggests that IcaB uses an altered catalytic mechanism in comparison to other characterized CE4 members. Furthermore, we identified a conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic loop found only in Gram-positive homologues of IcaB. Our data suggest that this loop is required for membrane association and likely anchors IcaB to the membrane during polysaccharide biosynthesis. The work presented herein will help guide the design of IcaB inhibitors to combat biofilm formation by staphylococci. PMID:25359777

  13. Analysis of urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase using 2,4-dinitrophenyl-1-thio N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide as the substrate.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Magohei; Fujita, Toshio

    2003-01-01

    2,4-Dinitrophenyl-1-thio N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide was examined as a new substrate for analyzing the level of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in the urine of patients suffering from renal diseases. The analysis is based on the fact that the substrate, when hydrolyzed in the presence of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase, liberates 2,4-dinitrothiophenol as the chromogen. The optimum pH for the enzyme reaction is 4.6, which is covered by the optimal range for the UV absorbance of the chromogen. The first-order rate of increase of the absorbance at this pH was linear to the enzyme concentration up to 600 U/L, with a high sensitivity. Analytical reagents with glucosaminides of 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol are less stable than the reagent with glucosaminide of 2,4-dinitrothiophenol. The optimum pH for the absorbance of p-nitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol does not match that for the enzyme reaction. PMID:12784261

  14. Temporal Regulation of the Bacillus subtilis Acetylome and Evidence for a Role of MreB Acetylation in Cell Wall Growth

    PubMed Central

    Carabetta, Valerie J.; Greco, Todd M.; Tanner, Andrew W.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Dubnau, David

    2016-01-01

    Nε-Lysine acetylation has been recognized as a ubiquitous regulatory posttranslational modification that influences a variety of important biological processes in eukaryotic cells. Recently, it has been realized that acetylation is also prevalent in bacteria. Bacteria contain hundreds of acetylated proteins, with functions affecting diverse cellular pathways. Still, little is known about the regulation or biological relevance of nearly all of these modifications. Here we characterize the cellular growth-associated regulation of the Bacillus subtilis acetylome. Using acetylation enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry, we investigate the logarithmic and stationary growth phases, identifying over 2,300 unique acetylation sites on proteins that function in essential cellular pathways. We determine an acetylation motif, EK(ac)(D/Y/E), which resembles the eukaryotic mitochondrial acetylation signature, and a distinct stationary-phase-enriched motif. By comparing the changes in acetylation with protein abundances, we discover a subset of critical acetylation events that are temporally regulated during cell growth. We functionally characterize the stationary-phase-enriched acetylation on the essential shape-determining protein MreB. Using bioinformatics, mutational analysis, and fluorescence microscopy, we define a potential role for the temporal acetylation of MreB in restricting cell wall growth and cell diameter. IMPORTANCE The past decade highlighted Nε-lysine acetylation as a prevalent posttranslational modification in bacteria. However, knowledge regarding the physiological importance and temporal regulation of acetylation has remained limited. To uncover potential regulatory roles for acetylation, we analyzed how acetylation patterns and abundances change between growth phases in B. subtilis. To demonstrate that the identification of cell growth-dependent modifications can point to critical regulatory acetylation events, we further characterized MreB, the

  15. Identification and Analysis of the Acetylated Status of Poplar Proteins Reveals Analogous N-Terminal Protein Processing Mechanisms with Other Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Cai; Zhu, Hang-Yong; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Ning, De-Li; Wang, Hong-Xia; Li, Wei-Hua; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background The N-terminal protein processing mechanism (NPM) including N-terminal Met excision (NME) and N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation) represents a common protein co-translational process of some eukaryotes. However, this NPM occurred in woody plants yet remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To reveal the NPM in poplar, we investigated the Nα-acetylation status of poplar proteins during dormancy by combining tandem mass spectrometry with TiO2 enrichment of acetylated peptides. We identified 58 N-terminally acetylated (Nα-acetylated) proteins. Most proteins (47, >81%) are subjected to Nα-acetylation following the N-terminal removal of Met, indicating that Nα-acetylation and NME represent a common NPM of poplar proteins. Furthermore, we confirm that poplar shares the analogous NME and Nα-acetylation (NPM) to other eukaryotes according to analysis of N-terminal features of these acetylated proteins combined with genome-wide identification of the involving methionine aminopeptidases (MAPs) and N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nat) enzymes in poplar. The Nα-acetylated reactions and the involving enzymes of these poplar proteins are also identified based on those of yeast and human, as well as the subcellular location information of these poplar proteins. Conclusions/Significance This study represents the first extensive investigation of Nα-acetylation events in woody plants, the results of which will provide useful resources for future unraveling the regulatory mechanisms of Nα-acetylation of proteins in poplar. PMID:23536812

  16. The role of the plant-specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 protein in Arabidopsis cell wall polysaccharide O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-04-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  17. Quantitative Measurement of Histone Tail Acetylation Reveals Stage-Specific Regulation and Response to Environmental Changes during Drosophila Development.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ryan A; Singh, Tanu; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Biester, Alison; O'Keefe, Abigail; Lee, Sandy; Andrews, Andrew J; O'Reilly, Alana M

    2016-03-22

    Histone modification plays a major role in regulating gene transcription and ensuring the healthy development of an organism. Numerous studies have suggested that histones are dynamically modified during developmental events to control gene expression levels in a temporal and spatial manner. However, the study of histone acetylation dynamics using currently available techniques is hindered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring acetylation of the numerous potential sites of modification present in histones. Here, we present a methodology that allows us to combine mass spectrometry-based histone analysis with Drosophila developmental genetics. Using this system, we characterized histone acetylation patterns during multiple developmental stages of the fly. Additionally, we utilized this analysis to characterize how treatments with pharmacological agents or environmental changes such as γ-irradiation altered histone acetylation patterns. Strikingly, γ-irradiation dramatically increased the level of acetylation at H3K18, a site linked to DNA repair via nonhomologous end joining. In mutant fly strains deficient in DNA repair proteins, however, this increase in the level of H3K18 acetylation was lost. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our combined mass spectrometry system with a Drosophila model system and provide interesting insight into the changes in histone acetylation during development, as well as the effects of both pharmacological and environmental agents on global histone acetylation. PMID:26836402

  18. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  19. Solid-Phase Synthesis and Hybrization Behavior of Partially 2′/3′-O-Acetylated RNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of partially 2′/3′-O-acetylated oligoribonucleotides has been accomplished by using a 2′/3′-O-acetyl orthogonal protecting group strategy in which non-nucleophilic strong-base (DBU) labile nucleobase protecting groups and a UV-light cleavable linker were used. Strong-base stability of the photolabile linker allowed on-column nucleobase and phosphate deprotection, followed by a mild cleavage of the acetylated oligonucleotides from the solid support with UV light. Two 17nt oligonucleotides, which were synthesized possessing one specific internal 2′- or 3′-acetyl group, were used as synthetic standards in a recent report from this laboratory detailing the prebiotically plausible ligation of RNA oligonucleotides. In order to further investigate the effect of 2′/3′-O-acetyl groups on the stability of RNA duplex structure, two complementary bis-acetylated RNA oligonucleotides were also expediently obtained with the newly developed protocols. UV melting curves of 2′-O-acetylated RNA duplexes showed a consistent ∼3.1 °C decrease in Tm per 2′-O-acetyl group. PMID:24666354

  20. Acetylation of Lysine 201 Inhibits the DNA-Binding Ability of PhoP to Regulate Salmonella Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Sang, Yu; Tan, Yongcong; Tao, Jing; Ni, Jinjing; Liu, Shuting; Fan, Xia; Zhao, Wei; Lu, Jie; Wu, Wenjuan; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The two-component system PhoP-PhoQ is highly conserved in bacteria and regulates virulence in response to various signals for bacteria within the mammalian host. Here, we demonstrate that PhoP could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by deacetylase CobB enzymatically in vitro and in vivo in Salmonella Typhimurium. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 201(K201) in winged helix-turn-helix motif at C-terminal DNA-binding domain of PhoP could be acetylated, and its acetylation level decreases dramatically when bacteria encounter low magnesium, acid stress or phagocytosis of macrophages. PhoP has a decreased acetylation and increased DNA-binding ability in the deletion mutant of pat. However, acetylation of K201 does not counteract PhoP phosphorylation, which is essential for PhoP activity. In addition, acetylation of K201 (mimicked by glutamine substitute) in S. Typhimurium causes significantly attenuated intestinal inflammation as well as systemic infection in mouse model, suggesting that deacetylation of PhoP K201 is essential for Salmonella pathogenesis. Therefore, we propose that the reversible acetylation of PhoP K201 may ensure Salmonella promptly respond to different stresses in host cells. These findings suggest that reversible lysine acetylation in the DNA-binding domain, as a novel regulatory mechanism of gene expression, is involved in bacterial virulence across microorganisms. PMID:26943369