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Sample records for quantifying carbon fixation

  1. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that alternative pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials. PMID:22647231

  2. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  4. Low Carbon Costs of Nitrogen Fixation in Tropical Dry Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Legume tree species with the ability to fix nitrogen (N) are highly diverse and widespread across tropical forests but in particular in the dry tropics. Their ecological success in lower latitudes has been called a "paradox": soil N in the tropics is thought to be high, while acquiring N through fixation incurs high energetic costs. However, the long held assumptions that N fixation is limited by photosynthate and that N fixation penalizes plant productivity have rarely been tested, particularly in legume tree species. We show results from three different experiments where we grew eleven species of tropical dry forest legumes. We quantified plant biomass and N fixation using nodulation and the 15N natural isotope abundance (Ndfa or nitrogen derived from fixation). These data show little evidence for costs of N fixation in seedlings grown under different soil fertility, light regimes, and with different microbial communities. Seedling productivity did not incur major costs because of N fixation: indeed, the average slope between Ndfa and biomass was positive (range in slopes: -0.03 to 0.3). Moreover, foliar N, which varied among species, was tightly constrained and not correlated with Ndfa. This finding implies that legume species have a target N that does not change depending on N acquisition strategies. The process of N fixation in tropical legumes may be more carbon efficient than previously thought. This view is more consistent with the hyperabundance of members of this family in tropical ecosystems.

  5. Quantifying the effect of fire disturbance on free-living nitrogen fixation in tropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Oliveira Bomfim, B.; Silva, L. C. R.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Marimon, B.; Horwath, W. R.; Neves, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests and savannas are among the most important biomes on Earth, supporting more than half of all plant and animal species on the planet. Despite growing interest in biogeochemical processes that affect tropical forest dynamics, many, including biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), are still poorly understood. Free-living N-fixers are thought to play a key role in tropical ecosystems, alleviating N and P limitation, supporting above and below ground biomass production, as well as carbon storage in plants and soil, but this influence has yet to be quantified. Of particular interest, the spatial distribution and identity of free-living BNF under disturbance regimes that commonly lead to the conversion of forests to savannas is currently unknown. To address this critical gap in knowledge, we measured free-living BNF quantifying rates of N fixation under contrasting fire regimes in the Amazon-Cerrado transition of central Brazil. Samples were collected in 4 ha of floodable forests affected by fire and 1 ha of unburned (seasonally flooded) forest located at the Araguaia State Park, Mato Grosso State, Brazil. Free-living N-fixation rates were measured by both 15N2 (98 atom% 15N) and acethylene reduction assay (ARA). Samples were incubated in the field and left in the dark at room temperature for 12 hours. In the next few weeks we will quantify N fixation rates that will be presented in the upcoming AGU meeting.

  6. Ubiquitous Gammaproteobacteria dominate dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Dyksma, Stefan; Bischof, Kerstin; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Hoffmann, Katy; Meier, Dimitri; Meyerdierks, Anke; Pjevac, Petra; Probandt, David; Richter, Michael; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Marine sediments are the largest carbon sink on earth. Nearly half of dark carbon fixation in the oceans occurs in coastal sediments, but the microorganisms responsible are largely unknown. By integrating the 16S rRNA approach, single-cell genomics, metagenomics and transcriptomics with (14)C-carbon assimilation experiments, we show that uncultured Gammaproteobacteria account for 70-86% of dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments. First, we surveyed the bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity of 13 tidal and sublittoral sediments across Europe and Australia to identify ubiquitous core groups of Gammaproteobacteria mainly affiliating with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. These also accounted for a substantial fraction of the microbial community in anoxic, 490-cm-deep subsurface sediments. We then quantified dark carbon fixation by scintillography of specific microbial populations extracted and flow-sorted from sediments that were short-term incubated with (14)C-bicarbonate. We identified three distinct gammaproteobacterial clades covering diversity ranges on family to order level (the Acidiferrobacter, JTB255 and SSr clades) that made up >50% of dark carbon fixation in a tidal sediment. Consistent with these activity measurements, environmental transcripts of sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation genes mainly affiliated with those of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. The co-localization of key genes of sulfur and hydrogen oxidation pathways and their expression in genomes of uncultured Gammaproteobacteria illustrates an unknown metabolic plasticity for sulfur oxidizers in marine sediments. Given their global distribution and high abundance, we propose that a stable assemblage of metabolically flexible Gammaproteobacteria drives important parts of marine carbon and sulfur cycles. PMID:26872043

  7. Dark Carbon Fixation: An Important Process in Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Ana Lúcia; Bastviken, David; Gudasz, Cristian; Tranvik, Lars; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Close to redox boundaries, dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria may be a large contributor to overall carbon fixation. Still, little is known about the relative importance of this process in lake systems, in spite the potentially high chemoautotrophic potential of lake sediments. We compared rates of dark carbon fixation, bacterial production and oxygen consumption in sediments from four Swedish boreal and seven tropical Brazilian lakes. Rates were highly variable and dark carbon fixation amounted up to 80% of the total heterotrophic bacterial production. The results indicate that non-photosynthetic carbon fixation can represent a substantial contribution to bacterial biomass production, especially in sediments with low organic matter content. PMID:23776549

  8. Phytoplankton plasticity drives large variability in carbon fixation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée.; Lévy, Marina; Aumont, Olivier; Resplandy, Laure; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Sciandra, Antoine; Bernard, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplankton C:N stoichiometry is highly flexible due to physiological plasticity, which could lead to high variations in carbon fixation efficiency (carbon consumption relative to nitrogen). However, the magnitude, as well as the spatial and temporal scales of variability, remains poorly constrained. We used a high-resolution biogeochemical model resolving various scales from small to high, spatially and temporally, in order to quantify and better understand this variability. We find that phytoplankton C:N ratio is highly variable at all spatial and temporal scales (5-12 molC/molN), from mesoscale to regional scale, and is mainly driven by nitrogen supply. Carbon fixation efficiency varies accordingly at all scales (±30%), with higher values under oligotrophic conditions and lower values under eutrophic conditions. Hence, phytoplankton plasticity may act as a buffer by attenuating carbon sequestration variability. Our results have implications for in situ estimations of C:N ratios and for future predictions under high CO2 world.

  9. Enzyme Regulation& Catalysis in Carbon Fixation Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-12-14

    The overall long term goal of this program is the elucidation of molecular events in carbon assimilation. It has become axiomatic that control of flux through metabolic pathways is effectively imposed at irreversible reactions situated early in those pathways. The current focal point of this project is phosphoribulokinase (PRK), which catalyzes formation of the carbon dioxide acceptor, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. This reaction represents an early irreversible step unique to Calvin's reductive pentose phosphate pathway. Predictably, the PRK reaction represents an important control point in carbon fixation, regulated by a light dependent thiol/disulfide exchange in eukaryotes and by allosteric effectors in prokaryotes. Characterization of naturally occurring mutants as well as gene knockout experiments substantiate the importance of PRK to in vivo control of carbon assimilation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Thus, given the potential impact of enhancement or inhibition of PRK activity on energy (biomass/biofuel) production, elucidation of the molecular events that account for PRK activity is a significant scientific goal.

  10. Beyond the Calvin Cycle: Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügler, Michael; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms capable of autotrophic metabolism assimilate inorganic carbon into organic carbon. They form an integral part of ecosystems by making an otherwise unavailable form of carbon available to other organisms, a central component of the global carbon cycle. For many years, the doctrine prevailed that the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle is the only biochemical autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway of significance in the ocean. However, ecological, biochemical, and genomic studies carried out over the last decade have not only elucidated new pathways but also shown that autotrophic carbon fixation via pathways other than the CBB cycle can be significant. This has ramifications for our understanding of the carbon cycle and energy flow in the ocean. Here, we review the recent discoveries in the field of autotrophic carbon fixation, including the biochemistry and evolution of the different pathways, as well as their ecological relevance in various oceanic ecosystems.

  11. The Emergence and Early Evolution of Biological Carbon-Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The fixation of into living matter sustains all life on Earth, and embeds the biosphere within geochemistry. The six known chemical pathways used by extant organisms for this function are recognized to have overlaps, but their evolution is incompletely understood. Here we reconstruct the complete early evolutionary history of biological carbon-fixation, relating all modern pathways to a single ancestral form. We find that innovations in carbon-fixation were the foundation for most major early divergences in the tree of life. These findings are based on a novel method that fully integrates metabolic and phylogenetic constraints. Comparing gene-profiles across the metabolic cores of deep-branching organisms and requiring that they are capable of synthesizing all their biomass components leads to the surprising conclusion that the most common form for deep-branching autotrophic carbon-fixation combines two disconnected sub-networks, each supplying carbon to distinct biomass components. One of these is a linear folate-based pathway of reduction previously only recognized as a fixation route in the complete Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, but which more generally may exclude the final step of synthesizing acetyl-CoA. Using metabolic constraints we then reconstruct a “phylometabolic” tree with a high degree of parsimony that traces the evolution of complete carbon-fixation pathways, and has a clear structure down to the root. This tree requires few instances of lateral gene transfer or convergence, and instead suggests a simple evolutionary dynamic in which all divergences have primary environmental causes. Energy optimization and oxygen toxicity are the two strongest forces of selection. The root of this tree combines the reductive citric acid cycle and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway into a single connected network. This linked network lacks the selective optimization of modern fixation pathways but its redundancy leads to a more robust topology, making it more plausible than

  12. Silanediol-catalyzed carbon dioxide fixation.

    PubMed

    Hardman-Baldwin, Andrea M; Mattson, Anita E

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is an abundant and renewable C1 source. However, mild transformations with carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure are difficult to accomplish. Silanediols have been discovered to operate as effective hydrogen-bond donor organocatalysts for the atom-efficient conversion of epoxides to cyclic carbonates under environmentally friendly conditions. The reaction system is tolerant of a variety of epoxides and the desired cyclic carbonates are isolated in excellent yields. PMID:25328125

  13. Carbon fixation by basalt-hosted microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Beth N.; Sylvan, Jason B.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Delaney, Jennifer; Lee, Raymond W.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic crust is a massive potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet our understanding of this ecosystem is limited due to difficulty in access. In particular, measurements of rates of microbial activity are sparse. We used stable carbon isotope incubations of crustal samples, coupled with functional gene analyses, to examine the potential for carbon fixation on oceanic crust. Both seafloor-exposed and subseafloor basalts were recovered from different mid-ocean ridge and hot spot environments (i.e., the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Loihi Seamount) and incubated with 13C-labeled bicarbonate. Seafloor-exposed basalts revealed incorporation of 13C-label into organic matter over time, though the degree of incorporation was heterogeneous. The incorporation of 13C into biomass was inconclusive in subseafloor basalts. Translating these measurements into potential rates of carbon fixation indicated that 0.1–10 nmol C g-1rock d-1 could be fixed by seafloor-exposed rocks. When scaled to the global production of oceanic crust, this suggests carbon fixation rates of 109–1012 g C year-1, which matches earlier predictions based on thermodynamic calculations. Functional gene analyses indicate that the Calvin cycle is likely the dominant biochemical mechanism for carbon fixation in basalt-hosted biofilms, although the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway and reverse TCA cycle likely play some role in net carbon fixation. These results provide empirical evidence for autotrophy in oceanic crust, suggesting that basalt-hosted autotrophy could be a significant contributor of organic matter in this remote and vast environment. PMID:26441854

  14. Carbon fixation by basalt-hosted microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Beth N; Sylvan, Jason B; Rogers, Daniel R; Delaney, Jennifer; Lee, Raymond W; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic crust is a massive potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet our understanding of this ecosystem is limited due to difficulty in access. In particular, measurements of rates of microbial activity are sparse. We used stable carbon isotope incubations of crustal samples, coupled with functional gene analyses, to examine the potential for carbon fixation on oceanic crust. Both seafloor-exposed and subseafloor basalts were recovered from different mid-ocean ridge and hot spot environments (i.e., the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Loihi Seamount) and incubated with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate. Seafloor-exposed basalts revealed incorporation of (13)C-label into organic matter over time, though the degree of incorporation was heterogeneous. The incorporation of (13)C into biomass was inconclusive in subseafloor basalts. Translating these measurements into potential rates of carbon fixation indicated that 0.1-10 nmol C g(-1) rock d(-1) could be fixed by seafloor-exposed rocks. When scaled to the global production of oceanic crust, this suggests carbon fixation rates of 10(9)-10(12) g C year(-1), which matches earlier predictions based on thermodynamic calculations. Functional gene analyses indicate that the Calvin cycle is likely the dominant biochemical mechanism for carbon fixation in basalt-hosted biofilms, although the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway and reverse TCA cycle likely play some role in net carbon fixation. These results provide empirical evidence for autotrophy in oceanic crust, suggesting that basalt-hosted autotrophy could be a significant contributor of organic matter in this remote and vast environment. PMID:26441854

  15. Malate Synthesis by Dark Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Carolyn; Perchorowicz, John T.; Gibbs, Martin

    1978-01-01

    The rates of dark CO2 fixation and the label distribution in malate following dark 14CO2 fixation in a C-4 plant (maize), a C-3 plant (sunflower), and two Crassulacean acid metabolism plants (Bryophyllum calycinum and Kalanchoë diagremontianum leaves and plantlets) are compared. Within the first 30 minutes of dark 14CO2 fixation, leaves of maize, B. calycinum, and sunflower, and K. diagremontianum plantlets fix CO2 at rates of 1.4, 3.4, 0.23, and 1.0 μmoles of CO2/mg of chlorophyll· hour, respectively. Net CO2 fixation stops within 3 hours in maize and sunflower, but Crassulaceans continue fixing CO2 for the duration of the 23-hour experiment. A bacterial procedure using Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC No. 8014 and one using malic enzyme to remove the β-carboxyl (C4) from malate are compared. It is reported that highly purified malic enzyme and the bacterial method provide equivalent results. Less purified malic enzyme may overestimate the label in C4 as much as 15 to 20%. The contribution of carbon atom 1 of malate is between 18 and 21% of the total carboxyl label after 1 minute of dark CO2 fixation. Isotopic labeling in the two carboxyls approached unity with time. The rate of increase is greatest in sunflower leaves and Kalanchoë plantlets. In addition, Kalanchoë leaves fix 14CO2 more rapidly than Kalanchoë plantlets and the equilibration of the malate carboxyls occurs more slowly. The rates of fixation and the randomization are tissue-specific. The rate of fixation does not correlate with the rate of randomization of isotope in the malate carboxyls. PMID:16660319

  16. Quantifying Carbon Bioavailability in Northeast Siberian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslop, J.; Chandra, S.; Sobczak, W. V.; Spektor, V.; Davydova, A.; Holmes, R. M.; Bulygina, E. B.; Schade, J. D.; Frey, K. E.; Bunn, A. G.; Walter Anthony, K.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.

    2010-12-01

    Soils in Northeast Siberia, particularly carbon-rich yedoma (Pleistocene permafrost) soils, have the potential to release large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane due to permafrost thaw and thermokarst activity. In order to quantify the amount of carbon release potential in these soils, it is important to understand carbon bioavailability for microbial consumption in the permafrost. In this study we measured amounts of bioavailable soil carbon across five locations in the Kolyma River Basin, NE Siberia. At each location, we sampled four horizons (top active layer, bottom active layer, Holocene optimum permafrost, and Pleistocene permafrost) and conducted soil extracts for each sample. Filtered and unfiltered extracts were used in biological oxygen demand experiments to determine the dissolved and particulate bioavailable carbon potential for consumption in the soil. Concentrations of bioavailable carbon were 102-608 mg C/kg dry soil for filtered extracts and 115-703 mg C/kg dry soil for unfiltered extracts. Concentrations of carbon respired per gram of dry soil were roughly equal for both the DOC and POC extracts (P<0.001), suggesting that bioavailable soil carbon is predominately in the dissolved form or the presence of an additional unknown limitation preventing organisms from utilizing carbon in the particulate form. Concentrations of bioavailable carbon were similar across the different sampling locations but differed among horizons. The top active layer (102-703 mg C/kg dry soil), Holocene optimum permafrost (193-481 mg C/kg dry soil), and Pleistocene permafrost (151-589 mg C/kg dry soil) horizons had the highest amounts of bioavailable carbon, and the bottom active layer (115-179 mg C/kg dry soil) horizon had the lowest amounts. For comparison, ice wedges had bioavailable carbon concentrations of 23.0 mg C/L and yedoma runoff from Duvyanni Yar had concentrations of 306 mg C/L. Pleistocene permafrost soils had similar concentrations of bioavailable carbon

  17. Potential carbon dioxide fixation by industrially important microalgae.

    PubMed

    Sydney, Eduardo Bittencourt; Sturm, Wilerson; de Carvalho, Julio Cesar; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Larroche, Christian; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2010-08-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the carbon metabolism in terms of carbon dioxide fixation and its destination in microalgae cultivations. To this purpose, analysis of growth parameters, media of cultivation, biomass composition and productivity and nutrients balance were performed. Four microalgae suitable for mass cultivation were evaluated: Dunaliella tertiolecta SAD-13.86, Chlorella vulgaris LEB-104, Spirulina platensis LEB-52 and Botryococcus braunii SAG-30.81. Global rates of carbon dioxide and oxygen were determinated by a system developed in our laboratory. B. braunii presented the highest CO(2) fixation rate, followed by S. platensis,D. tertiolecta and C. vulgaris (496.98, 318.61, 272.4 and 251.64 mg L(-1)day(-1), respectively). Carbon dioxide fixated was mainly used for microalgal biomass production. Nitrogen, phosphorus (calcium for D. tertiolecta), potassium and magnesium consumption rates (mg gX(-1)) were evaluated for the four microalgae. Biomass composition presented a predominance of proteins but also a high amount of lipids, especially in D. tertiolecta and B. braunii. PMID:20350804

  18. Carbon sequestration in soybean crop soils: the role of hydrogen-coupled CO2 fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A.; Layzell, D. B.; Scott, N. A.; Cen, Y.; Kyser, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    Conversion of native vegetation to agricultural land in order to support the world's growing population is a key factor contributing to global climate change. However, the extent to which agricultural activities contribute to greenhouse gas emissions compared to carbon storage is difficult to ascertain, especially for legume crops, such as soybeans. Soybean establishment often leads to an increase in N2O emissions because N-fixation leads to increased soil available N during decomposition of the low C:N legume biomass. However, soybean establishment may also reduce net greenhouse gas emissions by increasing soil fertility, plant growth, and soil carbon storage. The mechanism behind increased carbon storage, however, remains unclear. One explanation points to hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation; the process by which nitrogen fixation releases H2 into the soil system, thereby promoting chemoautotrophic carbon fixation by soil microbes. We used 13CO2 as a tracer to track the amount and fate of carbon fixed by hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation during one-year field and laboratory incubations. The objectives of the research are to 1) quantify rates of 13CO2 fixation in soil collected from a field used for long-term soybean production 2) examine the impact of H2 gas concentration on rates of 13CO2 fixation, and 3) measure changes in δ13C signature over time in 3 soil fractions: microbial biomass, light fraction, and acid stable fraction. If this newly-fixed carbon is incorporated into the acid-stable soil C fraction, it has a good chance of contributing to long-term soil C sequestration under soybean production. Soil was collected in the field both adjacent to root nodules (nodule soil) and >3cm away (root soil) and labelled with 13CO2 (1% v/v) in the presence and absence of H2 gas. After a two week labelling period, δ13C signatures already revealed differences in the four treatments of bulk soil: -17.1 for root, -17.6 for nodule, -14.2 for root + H2, and -6.1 for nodule + H2

  19. Carboxylase Levels and Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Claisse, L. M.; Stoppani, A. O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphopyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) were compared in wild-type bakers' yeast (I), a cytoplasmic-respiratory mutant (II), a biotin-deficient wild-type yeast (III), and a biotin-deficient respiratory mutant (IV). PC activities were greatly reduced in III and IV, whereas PEPC was reduced in II and IV. Malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) could not be detected in any of the yeasts. With yeast I growing on glucose as the sole carbon source, PEPC decreased to negligible levels during the logarithmic phase of growth (glucose repression effect), whereas PC increased. Both enzymes reverted to their original levels during the stationary phase, when glucose in the medium was exhausted. In agreement with the leading role of PC for CO2 assimilation, the rates of 14CO2 fixation in yeasts I and II were approximately equal and were much higher than that in yeast IV. With I and II, most of the 14C was distributed similarly in oxalacetate derivatives; with yeast IV, most of 14C appeared in a compound apparently unrelated to CO2 fixation via C4-dicarboxylic acids. PMID:5732499

  20. Recovering of carbon fixation in a eucalyptus site after felling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. M.; Pita, G. P. A.; Mateus, A.; Santos Pereira, J.

    2009-04-01

    Espirra site (38°38'N,8°36'W) is located in a 300ha Eucalyptus globulus plantation, with a Mediterranean type climate with a mean annual precipitation of 709mm and a mean annual air temperature of 15.9°C. The plantation was established in 1986 with about 1100 trees ha-1. A 33m observation tower was installed in 2002, with an ultrasonic Gill anemometer R2, an open path analyzer IRGA LI-7500 and a microclimate unit at its top. A harvesting of trees was made at the end of the 2nd rotation period, from November to December 2006. During the last four years of the second rotation the coppice were 20m height. Harvesting was planned in order to initiate a new 12 year productive cycle. In October 2008 a first thinning was made in three fourths of emerging stems from stumps. At this stage the forest trees had a mean height of 6m. For the 2002-2006 period, mean annual values of carbon net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross production(GPP) and ecosystem respiration(Reco) were -533.3 gCm-2, 1628.6 gCm-2 and 1095.2 gCm-2. Seasonal patterns of carbon fixation for the five years showed a decrease in July-August periods due to highest air temperatures, atmospheric water vapour deficits and stomata partial closure to prevent water transpiration losses. For the period 2002-2006, the dry year of 2005 with a precipitation of about 390 mm, corresponded to the smaller carbon fixation of 390 gCm-2. Similarly, values of Reco, GPP and estimated leaf area index (less than three) were also minimal in 2005. Water use efficiency, WUE (ratio GPP/precipitation) was maximum in summer periods and in driest years, reaching values of about 12g/L-1. Recovery of carbon sink capacity, after the felling, begun after August 2007. The 2007 and 2008 annual NEE values were respectively 105.8 gCm-2 and -35.78 gCm-2. This negative value of NEE for 2008 is indicative of a carbon sink recovery. Annual Reco values for 2007 and 2008 were respectively 1059.03 gCm-2 and 1148.21 gCm-2. For GPP the annual values of

  1. Phytoplankton carbon fixation, chlorophyll-biomass and diagnostic pigments in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulton, Alex J.; Holligan, Patrick M.; Hickman, Anna; Kim, Young-Nam; Adey, Tim R.; Stinchcombe, Mark C.; Holeton, Claire; Root, Sarah; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2006-07-01

    We have made daily measurements of phytoplankton pigments, size-fractionated (<2 and >2-μm) carbon fixation and chlorophyll- a concentration during four Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) cruises in 2003-04. Surface rates of carbon fixation ranged from <0.2-mmol C m -3 d -1 in the subtropical gyres to 0.2-0.5-mmol C m -3 d -1 in the tropical equatorial Atlantic. Significant intercruise variability was restricted to the subtropical gyres, with higher chlorophyll- a concentrations and carbon fixation in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum during spring in either hemisphere. In surface waters, although picoplankton (<2-μm) represented the dominant fraction in terms of both carbon fixation (50-70%) and chlorophyll- a (80-90%), nanoplankton (>2-μm) contributions to total carbon fixation (30-50%) were higher than to total chlorophyll- a (10-20%). However, in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum picoplankton dominated both carbon fixation (70-90%) and chlorophyll- a (70-90%). Thus, in surface waters chlorophyll-normalised carbon fixation was 2-3 times higher for nanoplankton and differences in picoplankton and nanoplankton carbon to chlorophyll- a ratios may lead to either higher or similar growth rates. These low chlorophyll-normalised carbon fixation rates for picoplankton may also reflect losses of fixed carbon (cell leakage or respiration), decreases in photosynthetic efficiency, grazing losses during the incubations, or some combination of all these. Comparison of nitrate concentrations in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum with estimates of those required to support the observed rates of carbon fixation (assuming Redfield stoichiometry) indicate that primary production in the chlorophyll maximum may be light rather than nutrient limited.

  2. Abundance and Distribution of Diagnostic Carbon Fixation Genes in a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Gradient Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, H. N.; Kelley, D. S.; Girguis, P. R.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2010-12-01

    hydrothermal chimneys. Ongoing analyses are aimed at quantifying the abundances of these diagnostic carbon fixation genes within the hydrothermal chimney gradients. These data are being compared to a broad array of contextual data to provide insight into the environmental and biological controls that may impact the distribution of the various carbon fixation pathways. Application of genomic approaches to the hydrothermal chimney ecosystem will provide insight into the microbial ecology of such structures and refine our ability to measure autotrophy in hydrothermal habitats sustained by chemical energy.

  3. Carbon and nitrogen fixation differ between successional stages of biological soil crusts in the Colorado Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Housman, D.C.; Powers, H.H.; Collins, A.D.; Belnap, J.

    2006-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (cyanobacteria, mosses and lichens collectively) perform essential ecosystem services, including carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fixation. Climate and land-use change are converting later successional soil crusts to early successional soil crusts with lower C and N fixation rates. To quantify the effect of such conversions on C and N dynamics in desert ecosystems we seasonally measured diurnal fixation rates in different biological soil crusts. We classified plots on the Colorado Plateau (Canyonlands) and Chihuahuan Desert (Jornada) as early (Microcoleus) or later successional (Nostoc/Scytonema or Placidium/Collema) and measured photosynthesis (Pn), nitrogenase activity (NA), and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) on metabolically active (moist) soil crusts. Later successional crusts typically had greater Pn, averaging 1.2-1.3-fold higher daily C fixation in Canyonlands and 2.4-2.8-fold higher in the Jornada. Later successional crusts also had greater NA, averaging 1.3-7.5-fold higher daily N fixation in Canyonlands and 1.3-25.0-fold higher in the Jornada. Mean daily Fv/Fm was also greater in later successional Canyonlands crusts during winter, and Jornada crusts during all seasons except summer. Together these findings indicate conversion of soil crusts back to early successional stages results in large reductions of C and N inputs into these ecosystems.

  4. Temporal sequences quantify the contributions of individual fixations in complex perceptual matching tasks.

    PubMed

    Busey, Thomas; Yu, Chen; Wyatte, Dean; Vanderkolk, John

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual tasks such as object matching, mammogram interpretation, mental rotation, and satellite imagery change detection often require the assignment of correspondences to fuse information across views. We apply techniques developed for machine translation to the gaze data recorded from a complex perceptual matching task modeled after fingerprint examinations. The gaze data provide temporal sequences that the machine translation algorithm uses to estimate the subjects' assumptions of corresponding regions. Our results show that experts and novices have similar surface behavior, such as the number of fixations made or the duration of fixations. However, the approach applied to data from experts is able to identify more corresponding areas between two prints. The fixations that are associated with clusters that map with high probability to corresponding locations on the other print are likely to have greater utility in a visual matching task. These techniques address a fundamental problem in eye tracking research with perceptual matching tasks: Given that the eyes always point somewhere, which fixations are the most informative and therefore are likely to be relevant for the comparison task? PMID:23489107

  5. Deep Soil: Quantifying and Modeling Subsurface Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Devine, W.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Some soil carbon datasets that are spatially rich, such as the USDA Forest Service Inventory and Analysis National Program dataset, sample soil to only 20 cm (8 inches), despite evidence that substantial stores of soil C can be found deeper in the soil profile. The maximum extent of tree rooting is typically many meters deep and provides: direct exchange with the soil solution; redistribution of water from deep horizons toward the surface during times of drought; resources for active microbial communities in deep soil around root channels; and direct carbon inputs through exudates and root turnover. This study examined soil carbon to a depth of 2.5 meters across 22 soils in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests. Excavations at 20 additional sites took place in summer 2014, greatly expanding the spatial coverage and extent of the data set. Forest floor and mineral soil bulk density samples were collected at depths of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 meters. Pool estimates from systematic sampling depths shallower than 1.5 m yielded significantly smaller estimates than the total soil stock to 2.5 meters (P<0.01). On average, only 5% of soil C was found in the litter layer, 35% was found below 0.5 meter, and 21% was found below 1.0 meter. Due to the difficulty of excavating and measuring deep soil carbon, a series of nonlinear mixed effect models were fit to the data to predict deep soil carbon stocks given sampling to 1.0 meter. A model using an inverse polynomial function predicted soil carbon to 2.5 meters with -5.6% mean error. The largest errors occurred in Andisols with non-crystalline minerals, which can adsorb large quantities of carbon on mineral surfaces and preserve it from decomposition. An accurate spatial dataset of soil depth to bedrock would be extremely useful to constrain models of the vertical distribution of soil carbon. Efforts to represent carbon in spatial models would benefit from considering the vertical distribution of carbon in soil. Sampling

  6. Phytoplankton Productivity in an Arctic Fjord (West Greenland): Estimating Electron Requirements for Carbon Fixation and Oxygen Production

    PubMed Central

    Hancke, Kasper; Dalsgaard, Tage; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Markager, Stiig; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification of pelagic primary production is essential for quantifying the marine carbon turnover and the energy supply to the food web. Knowing the electron requirement (Κ) for carbon (C) fixation (ΚC) and oxygen (O2) production (ΚO2), variable fluorescence has the potential to quantify primary production in microalgae, and hereby increasing spatial and temporal resolution of measurements compared to traditional methods. Here we quantify ΚC and ΚO2 through measures of Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry, C fixation and O2 production in an Arctic fjord (Godthåbsfjorden, W Greenland). Through short- (2h) and long-term (24h) experiments, rates of electron transfer (ETRPSII), C fixation and/or O2 production were quantified and compared. Absolute rates of ETR were derived by accounting for Photosystem II light absorption and spectral light composition. Two-hour incubations revealed a linear relationship between ETRPSII and gross 14C fixation (R2 = 0.81) during light-limited photosynthesis, giving a ΚC of 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± S.E.) mol é (mol C)−1. Diel net rates also demonstrated a linear relationship between ETRPSII and C fixation giving a ΚC of 11.2 ± 1.3 mol é (mol C)−1 (R2 = 0.86). For net O2 production the electron requirement was lower than for net C fixation giving 6.5 ± 0.9 mol é (mol O2)−1 (R2 = 0.94). This, however, still is an electron requirement 1.6 times higher than the theoretical minimum for O2 production [i.e. 4 mol é (mol O2)−1]. The discrepancy is explained by respiratory activity and non-photochemical electron requirements and the variability is discussed. In conclusion, the bio-optical method and derived electron requirement support conversion of ETR to units of C or O2, paving the road for improved spatial and temporal resolution of primary production estimates. PMID:26218096

  7. Simultaneous Quantification of Active Carbon- and Nitrogen-Fixing Communities and Estimation of Fixation Rates Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Alicia K.; Raes, Eric J.; Waite, Anya M.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interconnectivity of oceanic carbon and nitrogen cycles, specifically carbon and nitrogen fixation, is essential in elucidating the fate and distribution of carbon in the ocean. Traditional techniques measure either organism abundance or biochemical rates. As such, measurements are performed on separate samples and on different time scales. Here, we developed a method to simultaneously quantify organisms while estimating rates of fixation across time and space for both carbon and nitrogen. Tyramide signal amplification fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH) of mRNA for functionally specific oligonucleotide probes for rbcL (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; carbon fixation) and nifH (nitrogenase; nitrogen fixation) was combined with flow cytometry to measure abundance and estimate activity. Cultured samples representing a diversity of phytoplankton (cyanobacteria, coccolithophores, chlorophytes, diatoms, and dinoflagellates), as well as environmental samples from the open ocean (Gulf of Mexico, USA, and southeastern Indian Ocean, Australia) and an estuary (Galveston Bay, Texas, USA), were successfully hybridized. Strong correlations between positively tagged community abundance and 14C/15N measurements are presented. We propose that these methods can be used to estimate carbon and nitrogen fixation in environmental communities. The utilization of mRNA TSA-FISH to detect multiple active microbial functions within the same sample will offer increased understanding of important biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. PMID:25172848

  8. Carbon dioxide fixation and lipid storage by Scenedesmus obtusiusculus.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Cervantes, Alma; Morales, Marcia; Novelo, Eberto; Revah, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    An indigenous microalga was isolated from the springs in Cuatro Ciénegas, México. It was morphologically identified as Scenedesmus obtusiusculus and cultivated in bubble-column photobioreactors in batch operation mode. This microalga grows at 10% of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) showing a maximum CO(2) fixation rate of 970gm(-3)d(-1). The microalga, without any nutrient limitation, contained 20% of nonpolar lipids with a biomass productivity of 500gm(-3)d(-1) and a maximum biomass concentration of around 6,000gm(-3) at 5% CO(2) and irradiance of 134μmolm(-2)s(-1). Furthermore, it was observed that the microalga stored 55.7% of nonpolar lipids when 5% CO(2) was fed at 0.8vvm and 54.7μmolm(-2)s(-1) under nitrogen starvation. The lipid profile included C16:0, C18:0, C18:1n9t, C18:1n9c, C18:3n6 with a productivity of 200g lipid m(-3)d(-1). Therefore, the microalga may have biotechnological potential producing lipids for biodiesel. PMID:23334023

  9. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  10. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-10-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology.

  11. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2−0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  12. A Simple Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Acid Production in CAM Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R. L.; McWha, James A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an experiment investigating carbon dioxide fixation in the dark and the diurnal rhythm of acid production in plants exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism. Included are suggestions for four further investigations. (SL)

  13. Soil carbon sequestration: Quantifying this ecosystem service

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils have a crucial role in supplying many goods and services that society depends upon on a daily basis. These include food and fiber production, water cleansing and supply, nutrient cycling, waste isolation and degradation. Soils also provide a significant amount of carbon s...

  14. Quantifying the Carbon Intensity of Biomass Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, E. L.; Wise, M.; Clarke, L.; McJeon, H.; Mignone, B.

    2012-12-01

    Regulatory agencies at the national and regional level have recognized the importance of quantitative information about greenhouse gas emissions from biomass used in transportation fuels or in electricity generation. For example, in the recently enacted California Low-Carbon Fuel Standard, the California Air Resources Board conducted a comprehensive study to determine an appropriate methodology for setting carbon intensities for biomass-derived transportation fuels. Furthermore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently conducting a multi-year review to develop a methodology for estimating biogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from stationary sources. Our study develops and explores a methodology to compute carbon emission intensities (CIs) per unit of biomass energy, which is a metric that could be used to inform future policy development exercises. To compute CIs for biomass, we use the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), which is an integrated assessment model that represents global energy, agriculture, land and physical climate systems with regional, sectoral, and technological detail. The GCAM land use and land cover component includes both managed and unmanaged land cover categories such as food crop production, forest products, and various non-commercial land uses, and it is subdivided into 151 global land regions (wiki.umd.edu/gcam), ten of which are located in the U.S. To illustrate a range of values for different biomass resources, we use GCAM to compute CIs for a variety of biomass crops grown in different land regions of the U.S. We investigate differences in emissions for biomass crops such as switchgrass, miscanthus and willow. Specifically, we use GCAM to compute global carbon emissions from the land use change caused by a marginal increase in the amount of biomass crop grown in a specific model region. Thus, we are able to explore how land use change emissions vary by the type and location of biomass crop grown in the U.S. Direct

  15. Fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide by a cadmium(II) macrocyclic complex.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Daron E; Botros, Maikel E; VanDerveer, Donald G; Grant, Gregory J

    2007-12-01

    A crystal structure showing an unusual trinuclear Cd(II) cluster bridged in mu3 fashion by a carbonate ligand is reported. The carbonate ion is formed by fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide from the corresponding cadmium mononuclear complex containing an aza crown ether. PMID:18271488

  16. Carbon and energy fixation of great duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza growing in swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenguo; Yang, Chuang; Tang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Qili; Pan, Ke; Cai, Denggao; Hu, Qichun; Ma, Danwei

    2015-10-01

    The ability to fix carbon and energy in swine wastewater of duckweeds was investigated using Spirodela polyrhiza as the model species. Cultures of S. polyrhiza were grown in dilutions of both original swine wastewater (OSW) and anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) based on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN). Results showed that elevated concentrations of TAN caused decreased growth, carbon fixation, and energy production rates, particularly just after the first rise in two types of swine wastewater. Also, OSW was more suitable for S. polyrhiza cultivation than ADE. Maximum carbon and energy fixation were achieved at OSW-TAN concentrations of 12.08 and 13.07 mg L(-1), respectively. Photosynthetic activity of S. polyrhiza could be inhibited by both nutrient stress (in high-concentration wastewater) and nutrient limitation (in low-concentration wastewater), affecting its growth and ability for carbon-energy fixation. PMID:26036587

  17. Effects of model structural uncertainty on carbon cycle projections: biological nitrogen fixation as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, William R.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Lawrence, David M.; Bonan, Gordon B.

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainties in terrestrial carbon (C) cycle projections increase uncertainty of potential climate feedbacks. Efforts to improve model performance often include increased representation of biogeochemical processes, such as coupled carbon-nitrogen (N) cycles. In doing so, models are becoming more complex, generating structural uncertainties in model form that reflect incomplete knowledge of how to represent underlying processes. Here, we explore structural uncertainties associated with biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and quantify their effects on C cycle projections. We find that alternative plausible structures to represent BNF result in nearly equivalent terrestrial C fluxes and pools through the twentieth century, but the strength of the terrestrial C sink varies by nearly a third (50 Pg C) by the end of the twenty-first century under a business-as-usual climate change scenario representative concentration pathway 8.5. These results indicate that actual uncertainty in future C cycle projections may be larger than previously estimated, and this uncertainty will limit C cycle projections until model structures can be evaluated and refined.

  18. A Sustainability Initiative to Quantify Carbon Sequestration by Campus Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Over 3,900 trees on a university campus were inventoried by an instructor-led team of geography undergraduates in order to quantify the carbon sequestration associated with biomass growth. The setting of the project is described, together with its logistics, methodology, outcomes, and benefits. This hands-on project provided a team of students…

  19. A model for diurnal patterns of carbon fixation in a Precambrian microbial mat based on a modern analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    Microbial mat communities are one of the first and most prevalent biological communities known from the Precambrian fossil record. These fossil mat communities are found as laminated sedimentary rock structures called stromatolites. Using a modern microbial mat as an analog for Precambrian stromatolites, a study of carbon fixation during a diurnal cycle under ambient conditions was undertaken. The rate of carbon fixation depends primarily on the availability of light (consistent with photosynthetic carbon fixation) and inorganic carbon, and not nitrogen or phosphorus. Atmospheric PCO2 is thought to have decreased from 10 bars at 4 Ga (10(9) years before present) to approximately 10(-4) bars today, implying a change in the availability of inorganic carbon for carbon fixation. Experimental manipulation of levels of inorganic carbon to levels that may have been available to Precambrian mat communities resulted in increased levels of carbon fixation during daylight hours. Combining these data with models of daylength during the Precambrian, models are derived for diurnal patterns of photosynthetic carbon fixation in a Precambrian microbial mat community. The models suggest that, even in the face of shorter daylengths during the Precambrian, total daily carbon fixation has been declining over geological time, with most of the decrease having occurred during the Precambrian.

  20. A method for quantifying bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rectanus, H.V.; Widdowson, M.; Novak, J.; Chapelle, F.

    2005-01-01

    The fact that naturally occurring microorganisms can biodegrade PCE and TCE allows the use of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy at chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. Research at numerous chlorinated solvent sites indicates an active dechlorinating microbial population coupled with an ample supply of organic carbon are conditions needed to sustain reductive dechlorination. A series of extraction experiments was used to compare the ability of the different extractants to remove organic carbon from aquifer sediments. The different extractants included pyrophosphate, sodium hydroxide, and polished water. Pyrophosphate served as a mild extractant that minimally alters the organic structure of the extracted material. Three concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1%) of pyrophosphate extracted 18.8, 24.9, and 30.8% of sediment organic carbon, respectively. Under alkali conditions (0.5 N NaOH), which provided the harshest extractant, 30.7% of the sediment organic carbon was recovered. Amorphous organic carbon, measured by potassium persulfate oxidization, consisted of 44.6% of the sediment organic carbon and served as a baseline control for maximum carbon removal. Conversely, highly purified water provided a minimal extraction control and extracted 5.7% of the sediment organic carbon. The removal of organic carbon was quantified by aqueous TOC in the extract and residual sediment organic carbon content. Characterization of the organic carbon extracts by compositional analysis prior and after exposure to the mixed culture might indicate the type organic carbon and functional groups used and/or generated by the organisms. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  1. Carbon dioxide fixation and respiration relationships observed during closure experiments in Biosphere 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William; Allen, John P.

    Biosphere 2 enclosed several ecosystems - ones analogous to rainforest, tropical savannah, thornscrub, desert, marsh and coral reef - and a diverse agro-ecology, with dozens of food crops, in virtual material isolation from Earth's environment. This permits a detailed examination of fixation and respiration from the continuous record of carbon dioxide concentration from sensors inside the facility. Unlike the Earth, all the ecosystems were active during sunlight hours, while phyto and soil respiration dominated nighttime hours. This resulted in fluctuations of as much as 600-700 ppm CO2 daily during days of high sunlight input. We examine the relationships between daytime fixation as driven by photosynthesis to nighttime respiration and also fixation and respiration as related to carbon dioxide concentration. Since carbon dioxide concentrations varied from near Earth ambient levels to over 3000 ppm (during low-light winter months), the response of the plant communities and impact on phytorespiration and soil respiration may be of relevance to the global climate change research community. An investigation of these dynamics will also allow the testing of models predicting the response of community metabolism to variations in sunlight and degree of previous net carbon fixation.

  2. Sulfur oxidizers dominate carbon fixation at a biogeochemical hot spot in the dark ocean

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Timothy E; Nunn, Brook L; Marshall, Katharine T; Proskurowski, Giora; Kelley, Deborah S; Kawka, Orest E; Goodlett, David R; Hansell, Dennis A; Morris, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea in the dark ocean (>200 m) comprise 0.3–1.3 billion tons of actively cycled marine carbon. Many of these microorganisms have the genetic potential to fix inorganic carbon (autotrophs) or assimilate single-carbon compounds (methylotrophs). We identified the functions of autotrophic and methylotrophic microorganisms in a vent plume at Axial Seamount, where hydrothermal activity provides a biogeochemical hot spot for carbon fixation in the dark ocean. Free-living members of the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade of marine gamma-proteobacterial sulfur oxidizers (GSOs) are distributed throughout the northeastern Pacific Ocean and dominated hydrothermal plume waters at Axial Seamount. Marine GSOs expressed proteins for sulfur oxidation (adenosine phosphosulfate reductase, sox (sulfur oxidizing system), dissimilatory sulfite reductase and ATP sulfurylase), carbon fixation (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO)), aerobic respiration (cytochrome c oxidase) and nitrogen regulation (PII). Methylotrophs and iron oxidizers were also active in plume waters and expressed key proteins for methane oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation (particulate methane monooxygenase/methanol dehydrogenase and RuBisCO, respectively). Proteomic data suggest that free-living sulfur oxidizers and methylotrophs are among the dominant primary producers in vent plume waters in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. PMID:23842654

  3. Phosphoribulokinase mediates nitrogenase-induced carbon dioxide fixation gene repression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Ryan M; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-11-01

    In many organisms there is a balance between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. These observations extend to the nitrogen-fixing, nonsulfur purple bacteria, which have the classic family of P(II) regulators that coordinate signals of carbon and nitrogen status to regulate nitrogen metabolism. Curiously, these organisms also possess a reverse mechanism to regulate carbon metabolism based on cellular nitrogen status. In this work, studies in Rhodobacter sphaeroides firmly established that the activity of the enzyme that catalyses nitrogen fixation, nitrogenase, induces a signal that leads to repression of genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway. Additionally, genetic and metabolomic experiments revealed that NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase is an intermediate in the signalling pathway. Thus, nitrogenase activity appears to be linked to cbb gene repression through phosphoribulokinase. PMID:26306848

  4. Light Modulates the Biosynthesis and Organization of Cyanobacterial Carbon Fixation Machinery through Photosynthetic Electron Flow.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaqi; Casella, Selene; Fang, Yi; Huang, Fang; Faulkner, Matthew; Barrett, Steve; Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved effective adaptive mechanisms to improve photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. The central CO2-fixing machinery is the carboxysome, which is composed of an icosahedral proteinaceous shell encapsulating the key carbon fixation enzyme, Rubisco, in the interior. Controlled biosynthesis and ordered organization of carboxysomes are vital to the CO2-fixing activity of cyanobacterial cells. However, little is known about how carboxysome biosynthesis and spatial positioning are physiologically regulated to adjust to dynamic changes in the environment. Here, we used fluorescence tagging and live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging to explore the biosynthesis and subcellular localization of β-carboxysomes within a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, in response to light variation. We demonstrated that β-carboxysome biosynthesis is accelerated in response to increasing light intensity, thereby enhancing the carbon fixation activity of the cell. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow impairs the accumulation of carboxysomes, indicating a close coordination between β-carboxysome biogenesis and photosynthetic electron transport. Likewise, the spatial organization of carboxysomes in the cell correlates with the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain. This study provides essential knowledge for us to modulate the β-carboxysome biosynthesis and function in cyanobacteria. In translational terms, the knowledge is instrumental for design and synthetic engineering of functional carboxysomes into higher plants to improve photosynthesis performance and CO2 fixation. PMID:26956667

  5. The effect of nutrients on carbon and nitrogen fixation by the UCYN-A-haptophyte symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Krupke, Andreas; Mohr, Wiebke; LaRoche, Julie; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Amann, Rudolf I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-07-01

    Symbiotic relationships between phytoplankton and N2-fixing microorganisms play a crucial role in marine ecosystems. The abundant and widespread unicellular cyanobacteria group A (UCYN-A) has recently been found to live symbiotically with a haptophyte. Here, we investigated the effect of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), iron (Fe) and Saharan dust additions on nitrogen (N2) fixation and primary production by the UCYN-A-haptophyte association in the subtropical eastern North Atlantic Ocean using nifH expression analysis and stable isotope incubations combined with single-cell measurements. N2 fixation by UCYN-A was stimulated by the addition of Fe and Saharan dust, although this was not reflected in the nifH expression. CO2 fixation by the haptophyte was stimulated by the addition of ammonium nitrate as well as Fe and Saharan dust. Intriguingly, the single-cell analysis using nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that the increased CO2 fixation by the haptophyte in treatments without added fixed N is likely an indirect result of the positive effect of Fe and/or P on UCYN-A N2 fixation and the transfer of N2-derived N to the haptophyte. Our results reveal a direct linkage between the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles that is fuelled by the atmospheric deposition of dust. The comparison of single-cell rates suggests a tight coupling of nitrogen and carbon transfer that stays balanced even under changing nutrient regimes. However, it appears that the transfer of carbon from the haptophyte to UCYN-A requires a transfer of nitrogen from UCYN-A. This tight coupling indicates an obligate symbiosis of this globally important diazotrophic association. PMID:25535939

  6. Quantifying historical carbon and climate debts among nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, H. Damon

    2016-01-01

    Contributions to historical climate change have varied substantially among nations. These differences reflect underlying inequalities in wealth and development, and pose a fundamental challenge to the implementation of a globally equitable climate mitigation strategy. This Letter presents a new way to quantify historical inequalities among nations using carbon and climate debts, defined as the amount by which national climate contributions have exceeded a hypothetical equal per-capita share over time. Considering only national CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion, accumulated carbon debts across all nations from 1990 to 2013 total 250 billion tonnes of CO2, representing 40% of cumulative world emissions since 1990. Expanding this to reflect the temperature response to a range of emissions, historical climate debts accrued between 1990 and 2010 total 0.11 °C, close to a third of observed warming over that period. Large fractions of this debt are carried by industrialized countries, but also by countries with high levels of deforestation and agriculture. These calculations could contribute to discussions of climate responsibility by providing a tangible way to quantify historical inequalities, which could then inform the funding of mitigation, adaptation and the costs of loss and damages in those countries that have contributed less to historical warming.

  7. Carbohydrate metabolism and carbon fixation in Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Feng, Xueyang; Tang, Yinjie J; Blankenship, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The Roseobacter clade of aerobic marine proteobacteria, which compose 10-25% of the total marine bacterial community, has been reported to fix CO(2), although it has not been determined what pathway is involved. In this study, we report the first metabolic studies on carbohydrate utilization, CO(2) assimilation, and amino acid biosynthesis in the phototrophic Roseobacter clade bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114. We develop a new minimal medium containing defined carbon source(s), in which the requirements of yeast extract reported previously for the growth of R. denitrificans can be replaced by vitamin B(12) (cyanocobalamin). Tracer experiments were carried out in R. denitrificans grown in a newly developed minimal medium containing isotopically labeled pyruvate, glucose or bicarbonate as a single carbon source or in combination. Through measurements of (13)C-isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids, gene expression profiles, and enzymatic activity assays, we report that: (1) R. denitrificans uses the anaplerotic pathways mainly via the malic enzyme to fix 10-15% of protein carbon from CO(2); (2) R. denitrificans employs the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway for carbohydrate metabolism and the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway for the biosynthesis of histidine, ATP, and coenzymes; (3) the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP, glycolysis) pathway is not active and the enzymatic activity of 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) cannot be detected in R. denitrificans; and (4) isoleucine can be synthesized from both threonine-dependent (20% total flux) and citramalate-dependent (80% total flux) pathways using pyruvate as the sole carbon source. PMID:19794911

  8. Chemoautotrophic Carbon Fixation Rates and Active Bacterial Communities in Intertidal Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Boschker, Henricus T. S.; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Bolhuis, Henk; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja W. C.; Moodley, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Chemoautotrophy has been little studied in typical coastal marine sediments, but may be an important component of carbon recycling as intense anaerobic mineralization processes in these sediments lead to accumulation of high amounts of reduced compounds, such as sulfides and ammonium. We studied chemoautotrophy by measuring dark-fixation of 13C-bicarbonate into phospholipid derived fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers at two coastal sediment sites with contrasting sulfur chemistry in the Eastern Scheldt estuary, the Netherlands. At one site where free sulfide accumulated in the pore water right to the top of the sediment, PLFA labeling was restricted to compounds typically found in sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. At the other site, with no detectable free sulfide in the pore water, a very different PLFA labeling pattern was found with high amounts of label in branched i- and a-PLFA besides the typical compounds for sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. This suggests that other types of chemoautotrophic bacteria were also active, most likely Deltaproteobacteria related to sulfate reducers. Maximum rates of chemoautotrophy were detected in first 1 to 2 centimeters of both sediments and chemosynthetic biomass production was high ranging from 3 to 36 mmol C m−2 d−1. Average dark carbon fixation to sediment oxygen uptake ratios were 0.22±0.07 mol C (mol O2)−1, which is in the range of the maximum growth yields reported for sulfur oxidizing bacteria indicating highly efficient growth. Chemoautotrophic biomass production was similar to carbon mineralization rates in the top of the free sulfide site, suggesting that chemoautotrophic bacteria could play a crucial role in the microbial food web and labeling in eukaryotic poly-unsaturated PLFA was indeed detectable. Our study shows that dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria is a major process in the carbon cycle of coastal sediments, and should therefore receive more attention in future studies on

  9. Chemoautotrophic carbon fixation rates and active bacterial communities in intertidal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Boschker, Henricus T S; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Bolhuis, Henk; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja W C; Moodley, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Chemoautotrophy has been little studied in typical coastal marine sediments, but may be an important component of carbon recycling as intense anaerobic mineralization processes in these sediments lead to accumulation of high amounts of reduced compounds, such as sulfides and ammonium. We studied chemoautotrophy by measuring dark-fixation of 13C-bicarbonate into phospholipid derived fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers at two coastal sediment sites with contrasting sulfur chemistry in the Eastern Scheldt estuary, The Netherlands. At one site where free sulfide accumulated in the pore water right to the top of the sediment, PLFA labeling was restricted to compounds typically found in sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. At the other site, with no detectable free sulfide in the pore water, a very different PLFA labeling pattern was found with high amounts of label in branched i- and a-PLFA besides the typical compounds for sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. This suggests that other types of chemoautotrophic bacteria were also active, most likely Deltaproteobacteria related to sulfate reducers. Maximum rates of chemoautotrophy were detected in first 1 to 2 centimeters of both sediments and chemosynthetic biomass production was high ranging from 3 to 36 mmol C m(-2) d(-1). Average dark carbon fixation to sediment oxygen uptake ratios were 0.22±0.07 mol C (mol O2)(-1), which is in the range of the maximum growth yields reported for sulfur oxidizing bacteria indicating highly efficient growth. Chemoautotrophic biomass production was similar to carbon mineralization rates in the top of the free sulfide site, suggesting that chemoautotrophic bacteria could play a crucial role in the microbial food web and labeling in eukaryotic poly-unsaturated PLFA was indeed detectable. Our study shows that dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria is a major process in the carbon cycle of coastal sediments, and should therefore receive more attention in future studies on

  10. A global two component signal transduction system that integrates the control of photosynthesis, carbon dioxide assimilation, and nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Hemalata M.; Tabita, F. Robert

    1996-01-01

    Photosynthesis, biological nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide assimilation are three fundamental biological processes catalyzed by photosynthetic bacteria. In the present study, it is shown that mutant strains of the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, containing a blockage in the primary CO2 assimilatory pathway, derepress the synthesis of components of the nitrogen fixation enzyme complex and abrogate normal control mechanisms. The absence of the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) reductive pentose phosphate CO2 fixation pathway removes an important route for the dissipation of excess reducing power. Thus, the mutant strains develop alternative means to remove these reducing equivalents, resulting in the synthesis of large amounts of nitrogenase even in the presence of ammonia. This response is under the control of a global two-component signal transduction system previously found to regulate photosystem biosynthesis and the transcription of genes required for CO2 fixation through the CBB pathway and alternative routes. In addition, this two-component system directly controls the ability of these bacteria to grow under nitrogen-fixing conditions. These results indicate that there is a molecular link between the CBB and nitrogen fixation process, allowing the cell to overcome powerful control mechanisms to remove excess reducing power generated by photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. Furthermore, these results suggest that the two-component system integrates the expression of genes required for the three processes of photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:8962083

  11. Irreversibly increased nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium experimentally adapted to elevated carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, David A.; Walworth, Nathan G.; Webb, Eric A.; Saito, Mak A.; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Gale, Jasmine; Fu, Fei-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation rates of the globally distributed, biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium increase under high carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in short-term studies due to physiological plasticity. However, its long-term adaptive responses to ongoing anthropogenic CO2 increases are unknown. Here we show that experimental evolution under extended selection at projected future elevated CO2 levels results in irreversible, large increases in nitrogen fixation and growth rates, even after being moved back to lower present day CO2 levels for hundreds of generations. This represents an unprecedented microbial evolutionary response, as reproductive fitness increases acquired in the selection environment are maintained after returning to the ancestral environment. Constitutive rate increases are accompanied by irreversible shifts in diel nitrogen fixation patterns, and increased activity of a potentially regulatory DNA methyltransferase enzyme. High CO2-selected cell lines also exhibit increased phosphorus-limited growth rates, suggesting a potential advantage for this keystone organism in a more nutrient-limited, acidified future ocean. PMID:26327191

  12. Assessment of carbon fibre composite fracture fixation plate using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Saidpour, Seyed H

    2006-07-01

    In the internal fixation of fractured bone by means of bone-plates fastened to the bone on its tensile surface, an on-going concern has been the excessive stress shielding of the bone by the excessively-stiff stainless-steel plate. The compressive stress shielding at the fracture-interface immediately after fracture-fixation delays callus formation and bone healing. Likewise, the tensile stress shielding in the layer of bone underneath the plate can cause osteoporosis and decrease in tensile strength of this layer. In this study a novel forearm internal fracture fixation plate made from short carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was used in an attempt to address the problem. Accordingly, it has been possible to analyse the stress distribution in the composite plates using finite-element modelling. A three-dimensional, quarter-symmetric finite element model was generated for the plate system. The stress state in the underlying bone was examined for several loading conditions. Based on the analytical results the composite plate system is likely to reduce stress-shielding effects at the fracture site when subjected to bending and torsional loads. The design of the plate was further optimised by reducing the width around the innermost holes. PMID:16732432

  13. Irreversibly increased nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium experimentally adapted to elevated carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, David A.; Walworth, Nathan G.; Webb, Eric A.; Saito, Mak A.; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Gale, Jasmine; Fu, Fei-Xue

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen fixation rates of the globally distributed, biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium increase under high carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in short-term studies due to physiological plasticity. However, its long-term adaptive responses to ongoing anthropogenic CO2 increases are unknown. Here we show that experimental evolution under extended selection at projected future elevated CO2 levels results in irreversible, large increases in nitrogen fixation and growth rates, even after being moved back to lower present day CO2 levels for hundreds of generations. This represents an unprecedented microbial evolutionary response, as reproductive fitness increases acquired in the selection environment are maintained after returning to the ancestral environment. Constitutive rate increases are accompanied by irreversible shifts in diel nitrogen fixation patterns, and increased activity of a potentially regulatory DNA methyltransferase enzyme. High CO2-selected cell lines also exhibit increased phosphorus-limited growth rates, suggesting a potential advantage for this keystone organism in a more nutrient-limited, acidified future ocean.

  14. Bioengineering of carbon fixation, biofuels, and biochemicals in cyanobacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Rosgaard, Lisa; de Porcellinis, Alice Jara; Jacobsen, Jacob H; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2012-11-30

    Development of sustainable energy is a pivotal step towards solutions for today's global challenges, including mitigating the progression of climate change and reducing dependence on fossil fuels. Biofuels derived from agricultural crops have already been commercialized. However the impacts on environmental sustainability and food supply have raised ethical questions about the current practices. Cyanobacteria have attracted interest as an alternative means for sustainable energy productions. Being aquatic photoautotrophs they can be cultivated in non-arable lands and do not compete for land for food production. Their rich genetic resources offer means to engineer metabolic pathways for synthesis of valuable bio-based products. Currently the major obstacle in industrial-scale exploitation of cyanobacteria as the economically sustainable production hosts is low yields. Much effort has been made to improve the carbon fixation and manipulating the carbon allocation in cyanobacteria and their evolutionary photosynthetic relatives, algae and plants. This review aims at providing an overview of the recent progress in the bioengineering of carbon fixation and allocation in cyanobacteria; wherever relevant, the progress made in plants and algae is also discussed as an inspiration for future application in cyanobacteria. PMID:22677697

  15. Molecular Regulation of Photosynthetic Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Nonsulfur Purple Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, Fred Robert

    2015-12-01

    The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanism by which a transcriptional activator protein affects CO2 fixation (cbb) gene expression in nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria, with special emphasis to Rhodobacter sphaeroides and with comparison to Rhodopseudomonas palustris. These studies culminated in several publications which indicated that additional regulators interact with the master regulator CbbR in both R. sphaeroides and R. palustris. In addition, the interactive control of the carbon and nitrogen assimilatory pathways was studied and unique regulatory signals were discovered.

  16. High CO2 subsurface environment enriches for novel microbial lineages capable of autotrophic carbon fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, A. J.; Jerett, J.; Castelle, C. J.; Thomas, B. C.; Sharon, I.; Brown, C. T.; Anantharaman, K.; Emerson, J. B.; Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tringe, S. G.; Woyke, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface environments span the planet but remain little understood from the perspective of the capacity of the resident organisms to fix CO2. Here we investigated the autotrophic capacity of microbial communities in range of a high-CO2 subsurface environments via analysis of 250 near-complete microbial genomes (151 of them from distinct species) that represent the most abundant organisms over a subsurface depth transect. More than one third of the genomes belonged to the so-called candidate phyla radiation (CPR), which have limited metabolic capabilities. Approximately 30% of the community members are autotrophs that comprise 70% of the microbiome with metabolism likely supported by sulfur and nitrogen respiration. Of the carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin Benson Basham Cycle was most common, but the Wood-Ljungdhal pathway was present in the greatest phylogenetic diversity of organisms. Unexpectedly, one organism from a novel phylum sibling to the CPR is predicted to fix carbon by the reverse TCA cycle. The genome of the most abundant organism, an archaeon designated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum", was also found in subsurface samples from other continents including Europe and Asia. The archaeon was proven to be a carbon fixer using a novel reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. These results provide evidence that carbon dioxide is the major carbon source in these environments and suggest that autotrophy in the subsurface represents a substantial carbon dioxide sink affecting the global carbon cycle.

  17. A "footprint" of plant carbon fixation cycle functions during the development of a heterotrophic fungus.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xueliang; Shen, Cuicui; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Hu, Zijin; Tang, Lihua; Tang, Liguang; Ding, Feng; Li, Kunfei; Wu, Song; Hu, Yanping; Luo, Lilian; Li, Yuanhao; Wang, Qihua; Li, Guoqing; Cheng, Jiasen

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation pathway of plants (CFPP) in photosynthesis converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. Intriguingly, a large number of heterotrophic fungi also possess enzymes functionally associated with CFPP, raising the questions about their roles in fungal development and in evolution. Here, we report on the presence of 17 CFPP associated enzymes (ten in Calvin-Benson-Basham reductive pentose phosphate pathway and seven in C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle) in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a heterotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, and only two unique enzymes: ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) were absent. This data suggested an incomplete CFPP-like pathway (CLP) in fungi. Functional profile analysis demonstrated that the activity of the incomplete CLP was dramatically regulated during different developmental stages of S. sclerotiorum. Subsequent experiments confirmed that many of them were essential to the virulence and/or sclerotial formation. Most of the CLP associated genes are conserved in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of them have undergone gene duplication, gene acquisition or loss and functional diversification in evolutionary history. These findings showed an evolutionary links in the carbon fixation processes of autotrophs and heterotrophs and implicated the functions of related genes were in course of continuous change in different organisms in evolution. PMID:26263551

  18. Carboxysomal carbonic anhydrases: Structure and role in microbial CO2 fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2010-06-23

    Cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophic bacteria are able to grow in environments with limiting CO2 concentrations by employing a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that allows them to accumulate inorganic carbon in their cytoplasm to concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than that on the outside. The final step of this process takes place in polyhedral protein microcompartments known as carboxysomes, which contain the majority of the CO2-fixing enzyme, RubisCO. The efficiency of CO2 fixation by the sequestered RubisCO is enhanced by co-localization with a specialized carbonic anhydrase that catalyzes dehydration of the cytoplasmic bicarbonate and ensures saturation of RubisCO with its substrate, CO2. There are two genetically distinct carboxysome types that differ in their protein composition and in the carbonic anhydrase(s) they employ. Here we review the existing information concerning the genomics, structure and enzymology of these uniquely adapted carbonic anhydrases, which are of fundamental importance in the global carbon cycle.

  19. PH-NEUTRAL CONCRETE FOR ATTACHED MICROALGAE AND ENHANCED CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION - PHASE I

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry M. Dooley; F. Carl Knopf; Robert P. Gambrell

    1999-05-31

    The novelty/innovation of the proposed work is as follows. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO {sub 2})-based extrusion and molding technology can be used to produce significantly improved (in terms of strength/unit weight, durability, hardness and chemical resistance) cement-based products. SC-CO{sub 2} can rapidly convert the calcium hydroxide in cured cement to calcium carbonate, which increases the density and unconfined compressive strength in the treated region. In cured concrete, this treated region is typically a several-mm thick layer (generally <{approx}5mm, unless treatment time is excessive). However, we have found that by treating the entire cement matrix with SC-CO{sub 2} as part of the curing process, we can carbonate it rapidly, regardless of the thickness. By ''rapidly'' we mean simultaneous carbonation/curing in < 5 ks even for large cement forms, compared to typical carbonation times of several days or even years at low pressures. Carbonation changes the pH in the treated region from {approx}13 to {approx}8, almost exactly compatible with seawater. Therefore the leaching rates from these cements is reduced. These cement improvements are directed to the development of strong but thin artificial reefs, to which can be attached microalgae used for the enhanced fixation of CO{sub 2}. It is shown below that attached microalgae, as algal beds or reefs, are more efficient for CO{sub 2} fixation by a factor of 20, compared to the open ocean on an area basis. We have performed preliminary tests of the pH-neutral cements of our invention for attachment of microalgae populations. We have found pH-neutral materials which attach microalgae readily. These include silica-enriched (pozzolanic) cements, blast-furnace slags and fly ash, which are also silica-rich. We have already developed technology to simultaneously foam, carbonate and cure the cements; this foaming process further increases cement surface areas for microalgae attachment, in some cases to >10 m

  20. CbbR, the Master Regulator for Microbial Carbon Dioxide Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Dangel, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Biological carbon dioxide fixation is an essential and crucial process catalyzed by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms to allow ubiquitous atmospheric CO2 to be reduced to usable forms of organic carbon. This process, especially the Calvin-Bassham-Benson (CBB) pathway of CO2 fixation, provides the bulk of organic carbon found on earth. The enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) performs the key and rate-limiting step whereby CO2 is reduced and incorporated into a precursor organic metabolite. This is a highly regulated process in diverse organisms, with the expression of genes that comprise the CBB pathway (the cbb genes), including RubisCO, specifically controlled by the master transcriptional regulator protein CbbR. Many organisms have two or more cbb operons that either are regulated by a single CbbR or employ a specific CbbR for each cbb operon. CbbR family members are versatile and accommodate and bind many different effector metabolites that influence CbbR's ability to control cbb transcription. Moreover, two members of the CbbR family are further posttranslationally modified via interactions with other transcriptional regulator proteins from two-component regulatory systems, thus augmenting CbbR-dependent control and optimizing expression of specific cbb operons. In addition to interactions with small effector metabolites and other regulator proteins, CbbR proteins may be selected that are constitutively active and, in some instances, elevate the level of cbb expression relative to wild-type CbbR. Optimizing CbbR-dependent control is an important consideration for potentially using microbes to convert CO2 to useful bioproducts. PMID:26324454

  1. CbbR, the Master Regulator for Microbial Carbon Dioxide Fixation.

    PubMed

    Dangel, Andrew W; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-11-01

    Biological carbon dioxide fixation is an essential and crucial process catalyzed by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms to allow ubiquitous atmospheric CO2 to be reduced to usable forms of organic carbon. This process, especially the Calvin-Bassham-Benson (CBB) pathway of CO2 fixation, provides the bulk of organic carbon found on earth. The enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) performs the key and rate-limiting step whereby CO2 is reduced and incorporated into a precursor organic metabolite. This is a highly regulated process in diverse organisms, with the expression of genes that comprise the CBB pathway (the cbb genes), including RubisCO, specifically controlled by the master transcriptional regulator protein CbbR. Many organisms have two or more cbb operons that either are regulated by a single CbbR or employ a specific CbbR for each cbb operon. CbbR family members are versatile and accommodate and bind many different effector metabolites that influence CbbR's ability to control cbb transcription. Moreover, two members of the CbbR family are further posttranslationally modified via interactions with other transcriptional regulator proteins from two-component regulatory systems, thus augmenting CbbR-dependent control and optimizing expression of specific cbb operons. In addition to interactions with small effector metabolites and other regulator proteins, CbbR proteins may be selected that are constitutively active and, in some instances, elevate the level of cbb expression relative to wild-type CbbR. Optimizing CbbR-dependent control is an important consideration for potentially using microbes to convert CO2 to useful bioproducts. PMID:26324454

  2. Predicting the Electron Requirement for Carbon Fixation in Seas and Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenz, Evelyn; Silsbe, Greg; Capuzzo, Elisa; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Forster, Rodney M.; Simis, Stefan G. H.; Prášil, Ondřej; Kromkamp, Jacco C.; Hickman, Anna E.; Moore, C. Mark; Forget, Marie-Hélèn; Geider, Richard J.; Suggett, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton account for about 50% of all global net primary productivity (NPP). Active fluorometry, mainly Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf), has been advocated as means of providing high resolution estimates of NPP. However, not measuring CO2-fixation directly, FRRf instead provides photosynthetic quantum efficiency estimates from which electron transfer rates (ETR) and ultimately CO2-fixation rates can be derived. Consequently, conversions of ETRs to CO2-fixation requires knowledge of the electron requirement for carbon fixation (Φe,C, ETR/CO2 uptake rate) and its dependence on environmental gradients. Such knowledge is critical for large scale implementation of active fluorescence to better characterise CO2-uptake. Here we examine the variability of experimentally determined Φe,C values in relation to key environmental variables with the aim of developing new working algorithms for the calculation of Φe,C from environmental variables. Coincident FRRf and 14C-uptake and environmental data from 14 studies covering 12 marine regions were analysed via a meta-analytical, non-parametric, multivariate approach. Combining all studies, Φe,C varied between 1.15 and 54.2 mol e− (mol C)−1 with a mean of 10.9±6.91 mol e− mol C)−1. Although variability of Φe,C was related to environmental gradients at global scales, region-specific analyses provided far improved predictive capability. However, use of regional Φe,C algorithms requires objective means of defining regions of interest, which remains challenging. Considering individual studies and specific small-scale regions, temperature, nutrient and light availability were correlated with Φe,C albeit to varying degrees and depending on the study/region and the composition of the extant phytoplankton community. At the level of large biogeographic regions and distinct water masses, Φe,C was related to nutrient availability, chlorophyll, as well as temperature and/or salinity in most regions, while

  3. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  4. Variations in short term products of inorganic carbon fixation in exponential and stationary phase cultures of Aphanocapsa 6308.

    PubMed

    Weathers, P J; Allen, M M

    1978-03-01

    Aphanocapsa 6308 metabolizes both NaHCO3 and Na2CO3. The short term incorporation (5-s) metabolic pattern and the patterns of incorporation of bicarbonate for exponential versus stationary phase cultures differ, however. Cells were equilibrated for 10 min in air and distilled water prior to injection of either NaH14CO3 at pH 8.0, or Na214CO3 at pH 11.0. Hot ethanol extracts were analyzed via paper chromatography and autoradiography for products of CO2 fixation. At 5 s, malate (51.5%) predominates slightly as a primary bicarbonate fixation product over 3-phosphoglycerate (40.3%); 3-phosphoglycerate is the primary product of carbonate fixation. At 60 s, the carbonate and bicarbonate labelling patterns are similar. Cells in stationary phase fix in 5 s a greater proportion of bicarbonate into malate (36% vs. 14% for 3-phosphoglycerate) than do cells in exponential growth. Likewise, 60 s incorporations show a large amount of bicarbonate fixed into aspartate (30.9%) in stationary phase cells over that of exponential phase (11.6%). These data suggest an operative C4 pathway for purposes not related to carbohydrate synthesis but rather as compensation for the incomplete tricarboxylic acid cycle in cyanobacteria. The enhancement of both aspartate fixation and CO2 fixation into citrulline in stationary phase correlates with an increase in cyanophycin granule production which requires both aspartate and arginine. PMID:417691

  5. A simple, gravimetric method to quantify inorganic carbon in calcareous soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total carbon (TC) in calcareous soils has two components: inorganic carbon (IC) as calcite and or dolomite and organic carbon (OC) in the soil organic matter. The IC must be measured and subtracted from TC to obtain OC. Our objective was to develop a simple gravimetric technique to quantify IC. Th...

  6. Heterocystous Cyanobacteria in Microbialites Play an Important Role in N2 Fixation and Carbonate Mineral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcantara-Hernandez, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Alchichica is a maars type crater-lake located in Central Mexico (pH > 8.9, EC ~13.39 mS cm-1). This limnological system harbors two types of microbialites that can be found around the entire perimeter of the lake (Fig. 1). These structures are representative examples of complex and diverse microbiological assemblages, where microbial activity promotes lithification by trapping, binding and/or precipitating detrital or chemical sediments. Previous studies determined that the microbialites of Lake Alchichica fix N2 to thrive under the N-limiting conditions of the lake, and that these nitrogenase activity peaks are related to heterocystous cyanobacteria that couple photosynthesis to N2 fixation during daylight periods. Heterocystous cyanobacteria (Nostocales) together with Oscillatoriales (non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria) and other cyanobacterial groups have been described as the most abundant cyanobacteria in Alchichica microbialites, and in lithifying mats. Our results suggest that heterocystous cyanobacteria play an important role not only by fixing N2 for biomass construction, but also because their heterocysts host in their external cell membranes main sites for carbonate mineral precipitation including calcium carbonates and siderite. Previous research has shown that the heterocyst is the specialized site for cellular respiration associated to the pH decrease of vegetative/photosynthetic cells, contributing thus to the precipitation of carbonates and the accretion of the organosedimentary structure

  7. High cell-specific rates of nitrogen and carbon fixation by the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon sp. at low temperatures in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Svedén, Jennie B; Adam, Birgit; Walve, Jakob; Nahar, Nurun; Musat, Niculina; Lavik, Gaute; Whitehouse, Martin J; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Ploug, Helle

    2015-12-01

    Aphanizomenon is a widespread genus of nitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacteria in lakes and estuaries, accounting for a large fraction of the summer N2-fixation in the Baltic Sea. However, information about its cell-specific carbon (C)- and N2-fixation rates in the early growth season has not previously been reported. We combined various methods to study N2-fixation, photosynthesis and respiration in field-sampled Baltic Sea Aphanizomenon sp. during early summer at 10°C. Stable isotope incubations at in situ light intensities during 24 h combined with cell-specific secondary ion mass spectrometry showed an average net N2-fixation rate of 55 fmol N cell(-1) day(-1). Dark net N2-fixation rates over a course of 12 h were 20% of those measured in light. C-fixation, but not N2-fixation, was inhibited by high ambient light intensities during daytime. Consequently, the C:N fixation ratio varied substantially over the diel cycle. C- and N2-fixation rates were comparable to those reported for Aphanizomenon sp. in August at 19°C, using the same methods. High respiration rates (23% of gross photosynthesis) were measured with (14)C-incubations and O2-microsensors, and presumably reflect the energy needed for high N2-fixation rates. Hence, Aphanizomenon sp. is an important contributor to N2-fixation at low in situ temperatures in the early growth season. PMID:26511856

  8. Quantifying Energetics of Topological Frustration in Carbon Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Zachary; Costa Girao, Eduardo; Daniels, Colin; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a graph theoretical formalism to account for the fact that sp2 carbon can become spin ordered or generate free radicals for purely topological reasons. The graph theory method is combined with open-density-functional theory calculations to establish the existence of a universal energy of frustration term that is shown to greatly improve the description of carbon nanostructure energetics using classical force-fields. The methodology is illustrated for a number of systems and, owing to the small computational overhead associated, is shown to be easily integratable into any modeling approach based on an adjacency matrix.

  9. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We

  10. Identification of Missing Genes and Enzymes for Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in Crenarchaeota▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Vera, W. Hugo; Weiss, Michael; Strittmatter, Eric; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Two autotrophic carbon fixation cycles have been identified in Crenarchaeota. The dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle functions in anaerobic or microaerobic autotrophic members of the Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales. The 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle occurs in aerobic autotrophic Sulfolobales; a similar cycle may operate in autotrophic aerobic marine Crenarchaeota. Both cycles form succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) from acetyl-CoA and two molecules of inorganic carbon, but they use different means. Both cycles have in common the (re)generation of acetyl-CoA from succinyl-CoA via identical intermediates. Here, we identified several missing enzymes/genes involved in the seven-step conversion of succinyl-CoA to two molecules of acetyl-CoA in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Thermoproteales), Ignicoccus hospitalis (Desulfurococcales), and Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales). The identified enzymes/genes include succinyl-CoA reductase, succinic semialdehyde reductase, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, bifunctional crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and beta-ketothiolase. 4-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase, which catalyzes a mechanistically intriguing elimination of water, is well conserved and rightly can be considered the key enzyme of these two cycles. In contrast, several of the other enzymes evolved from quite different sources, making functional predictions based solely on genome interpretation difficult, if not questionable. PMID:21169482

  11. Advances in spectroscopic methods for quantifying soil carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, James B., III; McCarty, Gregory W.; Calderon, Francisco; Hively, W. Dean

    2012-01-01

    The current gold standard for soil carbon (C) determination is elemental C analysis using dry combustion. However, this method requires expensive consumables, is limited by the number of samples that can be processed (~100/d), and is restricted to the determination of total carbon. With increased interest in soil C sequestration, faster methods of analysis are needed, and there is growing interest in methods based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible, near-infrared or mid-infrared spectral ranges. These spectral methods can decrease analytical requirements and speed sample processing, be applied to large landscape areas using remote sensing imagery, and be used to predict multiple analytes simultaneously. However, the methods require localized calibrations to establish the relationship between spectral data and reference analytical data, and also have additional, specific problems. For example, remote sensing is capable of scanning entire watersheds for soil carbon content but is limited to the surface layer of tilled soils and may require difficult and extensive field sampling to obtain proper localized calibration reference values. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the present state of spectroscopic methods for determination of soil carbon.

  12. Quantifying energetics of topological frustration in carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Zachary; Costa Girão, Eduardo; Daniels, Colin; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    We develop a graph theoretical formalism to account for the fact that sp2 carbon can become spin ordered or generate free radicals for purely topological reasons. While this phenomenon has been previously considered a binary operator, we here show a quantification in discrete units of frustrations. The graph theory method is combined with open density functional theory calculations to establish the existence of an energy of frustration that is shown to greatly improve the description of carbon nanostructure energetics using classical force fields. The methodology is illustrated for a number of systems and, owing to the small computational overhead associated with its evaluation, is expected to be easily integrable into any modeling approach based on a structure's adjacency matrix.

  13. Light Modulates the Biosynthesis and Organization of Cyanobacterial Carbon Fixation Machinery through Photosynthetic Electron Flow1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaqi; Casella, Selene

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved effective adaptive mechanisms to improve photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. The central CO2-fixing machinery is the carboxysome, which is composed of an icosahedral proteinaceous shell encapsulating the key carbon fixation enzyme, Rubisco, in the interior. Controlled biosynthesis and ordered organization of carboxysomes are vital to the CO2-fixing activity of cyanobacterial cells. However, little is known about how carboxysome biosynthesis and spatial positioning are physiologically regulated to adjust to dynamic changes in the environment. Here, we used fluorescence tagging and live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging to explore the biosynthesis and subcellular localization of β-carboxysomes within a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, in response to light variation. We demonstrated that β-carboxysome biosynthesis is accelerated in response to increasing light intensity, thereby enhancing the carbon fixation activity of the cell. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow impairs the accumulation of carboxysomes, indicating a close coordination between β-carboxysome biogenesis and photosynthetic electron transport. Likewise, the spatial organization of carboxysomes in the cell correlates with the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain. This study provides essential knowledge for us to modulate the β-carboxysome biosynthesis and function in cyanobacteria. In translational terms, the knowledge is instrumental for design and synthetic engineering of functional carboxysomes into higher plants to improve photosynthesis performance and CO2 fixation. PMID:26956667

  14. Carbon-Fixation Rates and Associated Microbial Communities Residing in Arid and Ephemerally Wet Antarctic Dry Valley Soils

    PubMed Central

    Niederberger, Thomas D.; Sohm, Jill A.; Gunderson, Troy; Tirindelli, Joëlle; Capone, Douglas G.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Cary, S. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fixation is a critical process in severely oligotrophic Antarctic Dry Valley (DV) soils and may represent the major source of carbon in these arid environments. However, rates of C-fixation in DVs are currently unknown and the microorganisms responsible for these activities unidentified. In this study, C-fixation rates measured in the bulk arid soils (<5% moisture) ranged from below detection limits to ∼12 nmol C/cc/h. Rates in ephemerally wet soils ranged from ∼20 to 750 nmol C/cc/h, equating to turnover rates of ∼7–140 days, with lower rates in stream-associated soils as compared to lake-associated soils. Sequencing of the large subunit of RuBisCO (cbbL) in these soils identified green-type sequences dominated by the 1B cyanobacterial phylotype in both arid and wet soils including the RNA fraction of the wet soil. Red-type cbbL genes were dominated by 1C actinobacterial phylotypes in arid soils, with wetted soils containing nearly equal proportions of 1C (actinobacterial and proteobacterial signatures) and 1D (algal) phylotypes. Complementary 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene sequencing also revealed distinct differences in community structure between biotopes. This study is the first of its kind to examine C-fixation rates in DV soils and the microorganisms potentially responsible for these activities. PMID:26696969

  15. Advances in spectroscopic methods for quantifying soil carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebig, Mark; Franzluebbers, Alan J.; Follett, Ronald F.; Hively, W. Dean; Reeves, James B., III; McCarty, Gregory W.; Calderon, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard for soil C determination is combustion. However, this method requires expensive consumables, is limited to the determination of the total carbon and in the number of samples which can be processed (~100/d). With increased interest in soil C sequestration, faster methods are needed. Thus, interest in methods based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible, near-infrared or mid-infrared ranges using either proximal or remote sensing. These methods have the ability to analyze more samples (2 to 3X/d) or huge areas (imagery) and do multiple analytes simultaneously, but require calibrations relating spectral and reference data and have specific problems, i.e., remote sensing is capable of scanning entire watersheds, thus reducing the sampling needed, but is limiting to the surface layer of tilled soils and by difficulty in obtaining proper calibration reference values. The objective of this discussion is the present state of spectroscopic methods for soil C determination.

  16. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Adam M.; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. PMID:24762737

  17. Characterization of microalgae-bacteria consortium cultured in landfill leachate for carbon fixation and lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Sheng; Qiu, Duanyang; Schideman, Lance; Chai, Xiaoli; Zhao, Youcai

    2014-03-01

    The characteristics of cultivating high-density microalgae-bacteria consortium with landfill leachate was tested in this study. Landfill leachate was collected from Laogang landfill operated for over 10 years in Shanghai, China. The maximum biomass concentration of 1.58g L(-1) and chlorophyll a level of 22mg L(-1) were obtained in 10% leachate spike ratio. Meanwhile, up to 90% of the total nitrogen in landfill leachate was removed in culture with 10% leachate spike ratio with a total nitrogen concentration of 221.6mg L(-1). The fluorescence peak of humic-like organic matters red shifted to longer wavelengths by the end of culture, indicating that microalgae-bacteria consortium was effective for treating landfill leachate contaminants. Furthermore, with the leachate spike ratio of 10%, the maximum lipid productivity and carbon fixation were 24.1 and 65.8mg L(-1)d(-1), respectively. Results of this research provide valuable information for optimizing microalgae culture in landfill leachate. PMID:24525217

  18. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Ryan M; Whitmore, Laura M; Moran, James J; Kreuzer, Helen W; Inskeep, William P

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of diverse organic compounds that support heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of a dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organism (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) originally isolated from these environments. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon dioxide fixation pathway were identified in M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Highly similar M. yellowstonensis genes for this pathway were identified in metagenomes of replicate Fe(III)-oxide mats, as were genes for the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable-isotope ((13)CO2) labeling demonstrated CO2 fixation by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. The results showed that strain MK1 fixes CO2 with a fractionation factor of ∼2.5‰. Analysis of the (13)C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C, and microbial mat C showed that mat C is from both DIC and non-DIC sources. An isotopic mixing model showed that biomass C contains a minimum of 42% C of DIC origin, depending on the fraction of landscape C that is present. The significance of DIC as a major carbon source for Fe(III)-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms (i.e., Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.) in simplified natural communities. PMID:24532073

  19. Carbon Dioxide Fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and Acidothermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Communities from Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Ryan M.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of diverse organic compounds that support heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of a dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organism (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) originally isolated from these environments. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon dioxide fixation pathway were identified in M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Highly similar M. yellowstonensis genes for this pathway were identified in metagenomes of replicate Fe(III)-oxide mats, as were genes for the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable-isotope (13CO2) labeling demonstrated CO2 fixation by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. The results showed that strain MK1 fixes CO2 with a fractionation factor of ∼2.5‰. Analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C, and microbial mat C showed that mat C is from both DIC and non-DIC sources. An isotopic mixing model showed that biomass C contains a minimum of 42% C of DIC origin, depending on the fraction of landscape C that is present. The significance of DIC as a major carbon source for Fe(III)-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms (i.e., Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.) in simplified natural communities. PMID:24532073

  20. Rates of fixation by lightning of carbon and nitrogen in possible primitive atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Chameides, W L; Walker, J C

    1981-12-01

    A thermochemical-hydrodynamic model of the production of trace species by electrical discharges has been used to estimate the rates of fixation of C and N by lightning in the primitive atmosphere. Calculations for various possible mixtures of CH4, CO2, CO, N2, H2, and H2O reveal that the prime species produced were probably HCN and NO and that the key parameter determining the rates of fixation was the ratio of C atoms to O atoms in the atmosphere. Atmospheres with C more abundant than O have large HCN fixation rates, in excess of 10(17) molecules J-1, but small NO yields. However, when O is more abundant than C, the NO fixation rate approaches 10(17) molecules J-1 while the HCN yield is small. The implications for the evolution of life are discussed. PMID:6276836

  1. The reallocation of carbon in P deficient lupins affects biological nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, Aleysia; Venter, Mauritz; Kossmann, Jens; Valentine, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    It is not known how phosphate (P) deficiency affects the allocation of carbon (C) to biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in legumes. The alteration of the respiratory and photosynthetic C costs of BNF was investigated under P deficiency. Although BNF can impose considerable sink stimulation on host respiratory and photosynthetic C, it is not known how the change in the C and energy allocation during P deficiency may affect BNF. Nodulated Lupinus luteus plants were grown in sand culture, using a modified Long Ashton nutrient solution containing no nitrogen (N) for ca. four weeks, after which one set was exposed to a P-deficient nutrient medium, while the other set continued growing on a P-sufficient nutrient medium. Phosphorus stress was measured at 20 days after onset of P-starvation. During P stress the decline in nodular P levels was associated with lower BNF and nodule growth. There was also a shift in the balance of photosynthetic and respiratory C toward a loss of C during P stress. Below-ground respiration declined under limiting P conditions. However, during this decline there was also a shift in the proportion of respiratory energy from maintenance toward growth respiration. Under P stress, there was an increased allocation of C toward root growth, thereby decreasing the amount of C available for maintenance respiration. It is therefore possible that the decline in BNF under P deficiency may be due to this change in resource allocation away from respiration associated with direct nutrient uptake, but rather toward a long term nutrient acquisition strategy of increased root growth. PMID:25155758

  2. Role of dark carbon dioxide fixation in root nodules of soybean. [Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.; Layzell, D.B.; Canvin, D.T.

    1986-05-01

    The magnitude and role of dark Co/sub 2/ fixation were examined in nodules of intact soybean plants (Harosoy 63 x Rhizobium japonicum strain USDA 16). The estimated rate of nodule dark CO/sub 2/ fixation, based on a 2 minute pulse-feed with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ under saturating conditions, was 102 micromoles per gram dry weight per hour. This was equivalent to 14% of net nodule respiration. Only 18% of this CO/sub 2/ fixation was estimated to be required for organic and amino acid synthesis for growth and export processes. The major portion (75-92%) of fixed label was released as CO/sub 2/ within 60 minutes. The labeling pattern during pulse-chase experiments was consistent with CO/sub 2/ fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. During the chase, the greatest loss of label occurred in organic acids. Exposure of nodulated roots to Ar:O/sub 2/(80:20) did not affect dark CO/sub 2/ fixation, while exposure to O/sub 2/:CO/sub 2/(95:5) resulted in 54% inhibition. From these results, it was concluded that at least 66% of dark CO/sub 2/ fixation in soybean may be involved with the production of organic acids, which when oxidized would be capable of providing at least 48% of the requirement for ATP equivalents to support nitrogenase activity.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Related Properties in Sections of the Developing Green Maize Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Perchorowicz, John T.; Gibbs, Martin

    1980-01-01

    Light and dark 14CO2 assimilation, pulse-chase (14CO2 followed by 12CO2) labeling experiments both in the light and in the dark, photorespiratory activity and some enzymes (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, and NADP-malic enzyme) were followed in sections of 2.5 centimeters from the base (younger tissue) to the tip (oldest tissue) of the green maize leaf. Tissue was taken from the third leaf of 12- to 16-day-old plants consisting of sections 0 to 2.5 centimeters (base), 4.5 to 7.0 centimeters (center) and 9.0 to 11.5 centimeters (top) measured from the base. Some of these properties were also determined in the intact leaves of 4-day-old maize plants. Electron microscopy indicated a Kranz anatomy in all sections. Differentiation into mesophyll granal chloroplasts and bundle sheath agranal chloroplasts had taken place only in the center and top pieces. All of the sections contained PEP carboxylase, RuBP carboxylase, and NADP-malic enzyme. The ratio of PEP:RuBP carboxylase increased from 3.03 (top) to 4.66 (base) whereas the PEP carboxylase:NADP-malic enzyme ratio rose from 2.87 (top) to 9.57 (base). Under conditions of light or dark, the majority of the newly incorporated 14CO2 was found in malate and aspartate in all sections and in 4-day-old leaves. The 14C-labeling pattern typical of C4 plants was present in the center and top sections and to a lesser extent in the 4-day-old leaves. In the base tissue, the percentage of radioactivity in malate and aspartate remained relatively constant both during photosynthesis and pulse-chase experiments. In contrast, radioactivity in glycerate-3-phosphate decreased with time coupled to an increase in sugar phosphates. To account for the isotopic pattern in the base tissue, parallel fixation by PEP carboxylase and RuBP carboxylase was proposed with the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle functioning to some extent independently within the bundle sheath chloroplasts. The

  4. Diurnal variation in the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and carbon fixation in iron-limited phytoplankton in the NE subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuback, N.; Flecken, M.; Maldonado, M. T.; Tortell, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Active chlorophyll a fluorescence approaches, including fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF), have the potential to provide estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. FRRF-derived productivity rates are based on estimates of charge separation at PSII (ETRRCII), which must be converted into ecologically relevant units of carbon fixation. Understanding sources of variability in the coupling of ETRRCII and carbon fixation provides physiological insight into phytoplankton photosynthesis, and is critical for the application of FRRF as a primary productivity measurement tool. In the present study, we simultaneously measured phytoplankton carbon fixation and ETRRCII in the iron-limited NE subarctic Pacific, over the course of a diurnal cycle. We show that rates of ETRRCII are closely tied to the diurnal cycle in light availability, whereas rates of carbon fixation appear to be influenced by endogenous changes in metabolic energy allocation under iron-limited conditions. Unsynchronized diurnal oscillations of the two rates led to 3.5 fold changes in the conversion factor coupling ETRRCII and carbon fixation (Φe:C / nPSII). Consequently, diurnal variability in phytoplankton carbon fixation cannot be adequately captured with FRRF approaches if a constant conversion factor is applied. Utilizing several auxiliary photophysiological measurements, we observed that a high conversion factor is associated with conditions of excess light, and correlates with the expression of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the pigment antenna, as derived from FRRF measurements. The observed correlation between NPQ and the conversion factor Φe:C / nPSII has the potential to improve estimates of phytoplankton carbon fixation rates from FRRF measurements alone.

  5. Diurnal variation in the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and carbon fixation in iron-limited phytoplankton in the NE subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuback, Nina; Flecken, Mirkko; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2016-02-01

    Active chlorophyll a fluorescence approaches, including fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF), have the potential to provide estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. FRRF-derived productivity rates are based on estimates of charge separation in reaction center II (ETRRCII), which must be converted into ecologically relevant units of carbon fixation. Understanding sources of variability in the coupling of ETRRCII and carbon fixation provides physiological insight into phytoplankton photosynthesis and is critical for the application of FRRF as a primary productivity measurement tool. In the present study, we simultaneously measured phytoplankton carbon fixation and ETRRCII in the iron-limited NE subarctic Pacific over the course of a diurnal cycle. We show that rates of ETRRCII are closely tied to the diurnal cycle in light availability, whereas rates of carbon fixation appear to be influenced by endogenous changes in metabolic energy allocation under iron-limited conditions. Unsynchronized diurnal oscillations of the two rates led to 3.5-fold changes in the conversion factor between ETRRCII and carbon fixation (Kc / nPSII). Consequently, diurnal variability in phytoplankton carbon fixation cannot be adequately captured with FRRF approaches if a constant conversion factor is applied. Utilizing several auxiliary photophysiological measurements, we observed that a high conversion factor is associated with conditions of excess light and correlates with the increased expression of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the pigment antenna, as derived from FRRF measurements. The observed correlation between NPQ and Kc / nPSII requires further validation but has the potential to improve estimates of phytoplankton carbon fixation rates from FRRF measurements alone.

  6. Quantifying terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed, upper Yangtze, China from 1975 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Yin, Runsheng; Li, Zhengpeng; Deng, Yulin; Tan, Kun; Deng, Xiangzheng; Rothstein, David; Qi, Jiaguo

    2010-03-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal dynamics of carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems and carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is critical to our understanding of regional patterns of carbon budgets. Here we use the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System to simulate the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed of China's upper Yangtze basin from 1975 to 2000, based on unique combinations of spatial and temporal dynamics of major driving forces, such as climate, soil properties, nitrogen deposition, and land use and land cover changes. Our analysis demonstrates that the Jinsha watershed ecosystems acted as a carbon sink during the period of 1975-2000, with an average rate of 0.36 Mg/ha/yr, primarily resulting from regional climate variation and local land use and land cover change. Vegetation biomass accumulation accounted for 90.6% of the sink, while soil organic carbon loss before 1992 led to a lower net gain of carbon in the watershed, and after that soils became a small sink. Ecosystem carbon sink/source patterns showed a high degree of spatial heterogeneity. Carbon sinks were associated with forest areas without disturbances, whereas carbon sources were primarily caused by stand-replacing disturbances. It is critical to adequately represent the detailed fast-changing dynamics of land use activities in regional biogeochemical models to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of regional carbon sink/source patterns. PMID:19296154

  7. Quantifying terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed, Upper Yangtze, China from 1975 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Shuqing

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal dynamics of carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems and carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is critical to our understanding of regional patterns of carbon budgets. Here we use the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System to simulate the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed of China’s upper Yangtze basin from 1975 to 2000, based on unique combinations of spatial and temporal dynamics of major driving forces, such as climate, soil properties, nitrogen deposition, and land use and land cover changes. Our analysis demonstrates that the Jinsha watershed ecosystems acted as a carbon sink during the period of 1975–2000, with an average rate of 0.36 Mg/ha/yr, primarily resulting from regional climate variation and local land use and land cover change. Vegetation biomass accumulation accounted for 90.6% of the sink, while soil organic carbon loss before 1992 led to a lower net gain of carbon in the watershed, and after that soils became a small sink. Ecosystem carbon sink/source patterns showed a high degree of spatial heterogeneity. Carbon sinks were associated with forest areas without disturbances, whereas carbon sources were primarily caused by stand-replacing disturbances. It is critical to adequately represent the detailed fast-changing dynamics of land use activities in regional biogeochemical models to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of regional carbon sink/source patterns.

  8. Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

    2011-06-02

    In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

  9. Biomass production, nutrient cycling, and carbon fixation by Salicornia brachiata Roxb.: A promising halophyte for coastal saline soil rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Aditya P; Chaudhary, Doongar R; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-08-01

    In order to increase our understanding of the interaction of soil-halophyte (Salicornia brachiata) relations and phytoremediation, we investigated the aboveground biomass, carbon fixation, and nutrient composition (N, P, K, Na, Ca, and Mg) of S. brachiata using six sampling sites with varying characteristics over one growing season in intertidal marshes. Simultaneously, soil characteristics and nutrient concentrations were also estimated. There was a significant variation in soil characteristics and nutrient contents spatially (except pH) as well as temporally. Nutrient contents in aboveground biomass of S. brachiata were also significantly differed spatially (except C and Cl) as well as temporally. Aboveground biomass of S. brachiata ranged from 2.51 to 6.07 t/ha at maturity and it was positively correlated with soil electrical conductivity and available Na, whereas negatively with soil pH. The K/Na ratio in plant was below one, showing tolerance to salinity. The aboveground C fixation values ranged from 0.77 to 1.93 C t/ha at all six sampling sites. This study provides new understandings into nutrient cycling-C fixation potential of highly salt-tolerant halophyte S. brachiata growing on intertidal soils of India. S. brachiata have a potential for amelioration of the salinity due to higher Na bioaccumulation factor. PMID:26852782

  10. An ancient pathway combining carbon dioxide fixation with the generation and utilization of a sodium ion gradient for ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Schmidt, Silke; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Goenrich, Meike; Vollmers, John; Thürmer, Andrea; Bertsch, Johannes; Schuchmann, Kai; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Thauer, Rudolf K; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Müller, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of acetate from carbon dioxide and molecular hydrogen is considered to be the first carbon assimilation pathway on earth. It combines carbon dioxide fixation into acetyl-CoA with the production of ATP via an energized cell membrane. How the pathway is coupled with the net synthesis of ATP has been an enigma. The anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii uses an ancient version of this pathway without cytochromes and quinones. It generates a sodium ion potential across the cell membrane by the sodium-motive ferredoxin:NAD oxidoreductase (Rnf). The genome sequence of A. woodii solves the enigma: it uncovers Rnf as the only ion-motive enzyme coupled to the pathway and unravels a metabolism designed to produce reduced ferredoxin and overcome energetic barriers by virtue of electron-bifurcating, soluble enzymes. PMID:22479398

  11. An Ancient Pathway Combining Carbon Dioxide Fixation with the Generation and Utilization of a Sodium Ion Gradient for ATP Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Schmidt, Silke; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Goenrich, Meike; Vollmers, John; Thürmer, Andrea; Bertsch, Johannes; Schuchmann, Kai; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Müller, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of acetate from carbon dioxide and molecular hydrogen is considered to be the first carbon assimilation pathway on earth. It combines carbon dioxide fixation into acetyl-CoA with the production of ATP via an energized cell membrane. How the pathway is coupled with the net synthesis of ATP has been an enigma. The anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii uses an ancient version of this pathway without cytochromes and quinones. It generates a sodium ion potential across the cell membrane by the sodium-motive ferredoxin:NAD oxidoreductase (Rnf). The genome sequence of A. woodii solves the enigma: it uncovers Rnf as the only ion-motive enzyme coupled to the pathway and unravels a metabolism designed to produce reduced ferredoxin and overcome energetic barriers by virtue of electron-bifurcating, soluble enzymes. PMID:22479398

  12. Development of a Rapid Assessment Method for Quantifying Carbon Sequestration on Reclaimed Coal Mine Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, S.; Barton, C. D.; Karathanasis, A. D.

    2005-12-01

    Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies designed to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed coal mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. However, quantifying new carbon (carbon that has been added to soil through recent biological processes) on reclaimed mine soils have proven to be difficult due to carbonates and coal particles present in the reclaimed coal mine spoils. Visible coal particles can be removed, but the microscopic coal dust particles remain. Additionally, with the advent of carbon trading on the stock market, rapid quantification of newly sequestered carbon has proven to be elusive. The focus of this project is to assess the potential of thermogravimetric analysis as a rapid, simple and direct method for differentiating and quantifying new carbon from old carbon (carbon of geologic origin) on reclaimed coal mine sites and provide a standard procedure for determining carbon sequestered in soil sinks. Thermogravimetry is a physico-chemical technique where the weight change is measured and recorded during the incremental heating of the soil sample over a temperature range of 25 to 1000 ° C. Grass litter and limestone were used as representative organic and inorganic carbon fractions, while coal was used to differentiate the old and new carbon within the organic fraction. Recoveries of mixtures at the 95 % confidence interval were found to be 94.49 ± 4.23 % (coal) , 93.67 ± 2.11 % (litter) , and 108.88 ± 2.88 % (limestone) respectively. Each of the above components appeared as distinct separate peaks on the thermograph, with litter appearing between 260 to 390 ° C, coal 425 to 480 ° C, and limestone 640 to 740 ° C. Overlapping peaks for the organic carbon represented by the grass litter may be indicative of cellulose and lignin fractions. Ongoing work in this area is

  13. Will Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration Amplify the Benefits of Nitrogen Fixation in Legumes?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence suggests there are three key features of the response of legumes to elevated [CO2]: (1) unlike other non-leguminous C3 plants, only legumes have the potential to maximize the benefit of elevated [CO2] by matching stimulated photosynthesis with increased N2 fixation; (2) this potenti...

  14. Ammonia fixation by humic substances: A nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 NMR study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of ammonia fixation has been studied in three well characterized and structurally diverse fulvic and humic acid samples. The Suwannee River fulvic acid, and the IHSS peat and leonardite humic acids, were reacted with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N NMR spectrometry. Elemental analyses and liquid phase 13C NMR spectra also were recorded on the samples before and after reaction with ammonium hydroxide. The largest increase in percent nitrogen occurred with the Suwannee River fulvic acid, which had a nitrogen content of 0.88% before fixation and 3.17% after fixation. The 15N NMR spectra revealed that ammonia reacted similarly with all three samples, indicating that the functional groups which react with ammonia exist in structural configurations common to all three samples. The majority of nitrogcn incorporated into the samples appears to be in the form of indole and pyrrole nitrogen, followed by pyridine, pyrazine, amide and aminohydroquinone nitrogen. Chemical changes in the individual samples upon fixation could not be discerned from the 13C NMR spectra.

  15. Evidence of Carbon Fixation Pathway in a Bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 Revealed with Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere. PMID:25310003

  16. Carbon dioxide effects on fruits : III. The fixation of C(14)O 2 in lemon in an atmosphere enriched with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Young, R E; Biale, J B

    1968-09-01

    1. The first products of C(14)O2 fixation by lemon fruit in the dark were found to be malic, citric and aspartic acids. It is presumed that exalacetic is actually the first product to be labeled but that it is converted rapidly to the three other acids. 2. Malonic acid was identified as one of the products of exposure to C(14)O2. 3. Aconitic, fumaric and α-ketoglutaric acids could not be detected in the extracts of lemon peel, thus raising the possibility of the existence of at least two pools for the products of CO2 fixation. 4. The suggestion was advanced that accumulation of citric acid in the vacuole leads to a deficiency of oxalacetic acid and thus limits overall oxidation. Carbon dioxide stimulates respiration by increasing the supply of oxalacetic acid. PMID:24519678

  17. CO2 Fixation, Lipid Production, and Power Generation by a Novel Air-Lift-Type Microbial Carbon Capture Cell System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Liu, Baojun; Zhou, Jiti; Jin, Ruofei; Qiao, Sen; Liu, Guangfei

    2015-09-01

    An air-lift-type microbial carbon capture cell (ALMCC) was constructed for the first time by using an air-lift-type photobioreactor as the cathode chamber. The performance of ALMCC in fixing high concentration of CO2, producing energy (power and biodiesel), and removing COD together with nutrients was investigated and compared with the traditional microbial carbon capture cell (MCC) and air-lift-type photobioreactor (ALP). The ALMCC system produced a maximum power density of 972.5 mW·m(-3) and removed 86.69% of COD, 70.52% of ammonium nitrogen, and 69.24% of phosphorus, which indicate that ALMCC performed better than MCC in terms of power generation and wastewater treatment efficiency. Besides, ALMCC demonstrated 9.98- and 1.88-fold increases over ALP and MCC in the CO2 fixation rate, respectively. Similarly, the ALMCC significantly presented a higher lipid productivity compared to those control reactors. More importantly, the preliminary analysis of energy balance suggested that the net energy of the ALMCC system was significantly superior to other systems and could theoretically produce enough energy to cover its consumption. In this work, the established ALMCC system simultaneously achieved the high level of CO2 fixation, energy recycle, and municipal wastewater treatment effectively and efficiently. PMID:26270956

  18. Light microenvironment and single-cell gradients of carbon fixation in tissues of symbiont-bearing corals.

    PubMed

    Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Pernice, Mathieu; Guagliardo, Paul; Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L; Polerecky, Lubos; Kühl, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Recent coral optics studies have revealed the presence of steep light gradients and optical microniches in tissues of symbiont-bearing corals. Yet, it is unknown whether such resource stratification allows for physiological differences of Symbiodinium within coral tissues. Using a combination of stable isotope labelling and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry, we investigated in hospite carbon fixation of individual Symbiodinium as a function of the local O2 and light microenvironment within the coral host determined with microsensors. We found that net carbon fixation rates of individual Symbiodinium cells differed on average about sixfold between upper and lower tissue layers of single coral polyps, whereas the light and O2 microenvironments differed ~15- and 2.5-fold, respectively, indicating differences in light utilisation efficiency along the light microgradient within the coral tissue. Our study suggests that the structure of coral tissues might be conceptually similar to photosynthetic biofilms, where steep physico-chemical gradients define form and function of the local microbial community. PMID:26241503

  19. A “footprint” of plant carbon fixation cycle functions during the development of a heterotrophic fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Xueliang; Shen, Cuicui; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Hu, Zijin; Tang, Lihua; Tang, Liguang; Ding, Feng; Li, Kunfei; Wu, Song; Hu, Yanping; Luo, Lilian; Li, Yuanhao; Wang, Qihua; Li, Guoqing; Cheng, Jiasen

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation pathway of plants (CFPP) in photosynthesis converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. Intriguingly, a large number of heterotrophic fungi also possess enzymes functionally associated with CFPP, raising the questions about their roles in fungal development and in evolution. Here, we report on the presence of 17 CFPP associated enzymes (ten in Calvin-Benson-Basham reductive pentose phosphate pathway and seven in C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle) in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a heterotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, and only two unique enzymes: ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) were absent. This data suggested an incomplete CFPP-like pathway (CLP) in fungi. Functional profile analysis demonstrated that the activity of the incomplete CLP was dramatically regulated during different developmental stages of S. sclerotiorum. Subsequent experiments confirmed that many of them were essential to the virulence and/or sclerotial formation. Most of the CLP associated genes are conserved in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of them have undergone gene duplication, gene acquisition or loss and functional diversification in evolutionary history. These findings showed an evolutionary links in the carbon fixation processes of autotrophs and heterotrophs and implicated the functions of related genes were in course of continuous change in different organisms in evolution. PMID:26263551

  20. Widespread Occurrence of Two Carbon Fixation Pathways in Tubeworm Endosymbionts: Lessons from Hydrothermal Vent Associated Tubeworms from the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Hügler, Michael; Blümel, Martina; Baumann, Heike I.; Gärtner, Andrea; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Strauss, Harald; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Petersen, Sven; Cowart, Dominique A.; Fisher, Charles R.; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2012-01-01

    Vestimentiferan tubeworms (siboglinid polychetes) of the genus Lamellibrachia are common members of cold seep faunal communities and have also been found at sedimented hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific. As they lack a digestive system, they are nourished by chemoautotrophic bacterial endosymbionts growing in a specialized tissue called the trophosome. Here we present the results of investigations of tubeworms and endosymbionts from a shallow hydrothermal vent field in the Western Mediterranean Sea. The tubeworms, which are the first reported vent-associated tubeworms outside the Pacific, are identified as Lamellibrachia anaximandri using mitochondrial ribosomal and cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene sequences. They harbor a single gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. Carbon isotopic data, as well as the analysis of genes involved in carbon and sulfur metabolism indicate a sulfide-oxidizing chemoautotrophic endosymbiont. The detection of a hydrogenase gene fragment suggests the potential for hydrogen oxidation as alternative energy source. Surprisingly, the endosymbiont harbors genes for two different carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle as well as the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle, as has been reported for the endosymbiont of the vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila. In addition to RubisCO genes we detected ATP citrate lyase (ACL – the key enzyme of the rTCA cycle) type II gene sequences using newly designed primer sets. Comparative investigations with additional tubeworm species (Lamellibrachia luymesi, Lamellibrachia sp. 1, Lamellibrachia sp. 2, Escarpia laminata, Seepiophila jonesi) from multiple cold seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico revealed the presence of acl genes in these species as well. Thus, our study suggests that the presence of two different carbon fixation pathways, the CBB cycle and the rTCA cycle, is not restricted to the Riftia endosymbiont, but rather might be common in vestimentiferan tubeworm endosymbionts

  1. Autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle by the denitrifying methanotroph "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera".

    PubMed

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Kool, Dorien M; Jetten, Mike S M; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Ettwig, Katharina F

    2014-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and the most abundant hydrocarbon in the Earth's atmosphere. Methanotrophic microorganisms can use methane as their sole energy source and play a crucial role in the mitigation of methane emissions in the environment. "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is a recently described intra-aerobic methanotroph that is assumed to use nitric oxide to generate internal oxygen to oxidize methane via the conventional aerobic pathway, including the monooxygenase reaction. Previous genome analysis has suggested that, like the verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" encodes and transcribes genes for the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle for carbon assimilation. Here we provide multiple independent lines of evidence for autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation by "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" via the CBB cycle. The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), a key enzyme of the CBB cycle, in cell extracts from an "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" enrichment culture was shown to account for up to 10% of the total methane oxidation activity. Labeling studies with whole cells in batch incubations supplied with either (13)CH4 or [(13)C]bicarbonate revealed that "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" biomass and lipids became significantly more enriched in (13)C after incubation with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate (and unlabeled methane) than after incubation with (13)C-labeled methane (and unlabeled bicarbonate), providing evidence for autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation. Besides this experimental approach, detailed genomic and transcriptomic analysis demonstrated an operational CBB cycle in "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera." Altogether, these results show that the CBB cycle is active and plays a major role in carbon assimilation by "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" bacteria. Our results suggest that autotrophy might be more widespread among methanotrophs than was previously assumed and implies that a methanotrophic

  2. Autotrophic Carbon Dioxide Fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle by the Denitrifying Methanotroph “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Dorien M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and the most abundant hydrocarbon in the Earth's atmosphere. Methanotrophic microorganisms can use methane as their sole energy source and play a crucial role in the mitigation of methane emissions in the environment. “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” is a recently described intra-aerobic methanotroph that is assumed to use nitric oxide to generate internal oxygen to oxidize methane via the conventional aerobic pathway, including the monooxygenase reaction. Previous genome analysis has suggested that, like the verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” encodes and transcribes genes for the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle for carbon assimilation. Here we provide multiple independent lines of evidence for autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation by “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” via the CBB cycle. The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), a key enzyme of the CBB cycle, in cell extracts from an “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” enrichment culture was shown to account for up to 10% of the total methane oxidation activity. Labeling studies with whole cells in batch incubations supplied with either 13CH4 or [13C]bicarbonate revealed that “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” biomass and lipids became significantly more enriched in 13C after incubation with 13C-labeled bicarbonate (and unlabeled methane) than after incubation with 13C-labeled methane (and unlabeled bicarbonate), providing evidence for autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation. Besides this experimental approach, detailed genomic and transcriptomic analysis demonstrated an operational CBB cycle in “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera.” Altogether, these results show that the CBB cycle is active and plays a major role in carbon assimilation by “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” bacteria. Our results suggest that autotrophy might be more widespread among methanotrophs than was previously assumed and implies that a

  3. Rapid resonance Raman microspectroscopy to probe carbon dioxide fixation by single cells in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengqiu; Canniffe, Daniel P; Jackson, Philip J; Davison, Paul A; FitzGerald, Simon; Dickman, Mark J; Burgess, J Grant; Hunter, C Neil; Huang, Wei E

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms play crucial roles in aquatic ecosystems and are the major primary producers in global marine ecosystems. The discovery of new bacteria and microalgae that play key roles in CO2 fixation is hampered by the lack of methods to identify hitherto-unculturable microorganisms. To overcome this problem we studied single microbial cells using stable-isotope probing (SIP) together with resonance Raman (RR) microspectroscopy of carotenoids, the light-absorbing pigments present in most photosynthetic microorganisms. We show that fixation of 13CO2 into carotenoids produces a red shift in single-cell RR (SCRR) spectra and that this SCRR–SIP technique is sufficiently sensitive to detect as little as 10% of 13C incorporation. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of labelled cellular proteins verifies that the red shift in carotenoid SCRR spectra acts as a reporter of the 13C content of single cells. Millisecond Raman imaging of cells in mixed cultures and natural seawater samples was used to identify cells actively fixing CO2, demonstrating that the SCRR–SIP is a noninvasive method for the rapid and quantitative detection of CO2 fixation at the single cell level in a microbial community. The SCRR–SIP technique may provide a direct method for screening environmental samples, and could help to reveal the ecophysiology of hitherto-unculturable microorganisms, linking microbial species to their ecological function in the natural environment. PMID:22113377

  4. Volatile fatty acid impacts on nitrite oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Merve T; Robinson, Kevin G; Layton, Alice C; Sayler, Gary S

    2006-02-01

    Batch test were performed to assess nitrite removal, nitrate formation, CO2 fixation, gaseous nitrogen production and microbial density in activated sludge exposed to volatile fatty acid (VFA) mixtures. Nitrite removal and nitrate formation were both affected by the presence of VFAs, but to different degrees. Nitrate formation rates were reduced to a greater extent (79%) than nitrite removal rates (36%) resulting in an apparent unbalanced nitrite oxidation reaction. Since the total bacterial density and the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB, Nitrospira) concentration remained essentially constant under all test conditions, the reduction in rates was not due to heterotrophic uptake of nitrogen or to a decrease in the NOB population. In contrast to the nitrogen results, VFAs were not found to impact CO2 fixation efficiency. It appeared that nitrite oxidation occurred when VFAs were present since the oxidation of nitrite provides energy for CO2 fixation. However, nitrate produced from the oxidation of nitrite was reduced to gaseous nitrogen products. N2O gas was detected in the presence of VFAs which was a clear indication that VFAs stimulated an alternative pathway, such as aerobic denitrification, during biotransformation of nitrogen in activated sludge. PMID:16436292

  5. Carbon fixation and chlorophyll in bottom sediments of brackish Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, P. H.; De Bree, B. H. H.

    Chlorophyll a concentrations in the upper 10 cm (sliced per cm) of Lake Grevelingen sediments are given for the years 1977-1980. Chlorophyll a in the upper cm of the bottom varied between 20-400 mg·m -2. Average values in 1-3 m deep sandy and silty-sandy stations amounted to 67.5-82.2 mg·m -2 in the upper cm. A 7 m deep siltystation contained on an average 42.7 mg·m -2 chlorophyll a in the upper cm of the sediment. Both within year and year-to-year variations were large. A restricted number of phaeopigment data for 1977 revealed an average phaeopigment-chlorophyll a ratio of 0.03 (sand) to 0.39 (silt). POC measured in 1977 and 1978 in the top cm of the sediment showed annual average values ranging between 0.2 and 0.7% of sediment dry weight. 14C fixation data in the light, as measured in a laboratory incubator, are given for 1979 and 1980, with highest values during summer (200-500 mg C·m -2·d -1) and lower values in winter. Integrated annual values give average 14C fixation estimates per station, ranging between 47 g C·m -2·a -1 and 71 g C·m -1, with a variation coefficient of 35 to 49% of the mean. Average 14C dark fixation values varied between 13 and 27% of average light fixation values. An arbitrarily and tentatively derived net microphytobenthos primary production estimate for entire Lake Grevelingen amounts to 35 g C·m -2 for 1979 and 32 g C·m -2 for 1980. The relationship between POC and chlorophyll a concentration was sometimes significant, between annual chlorophyll a concentration and light fixation values it was not. A literature comparison between the 14C and the O 2 exchange method leads to the conclusion that both methods have serious drawbacks when applied to benthic systems.

  6. Quantifying regional changes in terrestrial carbon storage by extrapolation from local ecosystem models

    SciTech Connect

    King, A W

    1991-12-31

    A general procedure for quantifying regional carbon dynamics by spatial extrapolation of local ecosystem models is presented Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the expected value of one or more local models, explicitly integrating the spatial heterogeneity of variables that influence ecosystem carbon flux and storage. These variables are described by empirically derived probability distributions that are input to the Monte Carlo process. The procedure provides large-scale regional estimates based explicitly on information and understanding acquired at smaller and more accessible scales.Results are presented from an earlier application to seasonal atmosphere-biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange for circumpolar ``subarctic`` latitudes (64{degree}N-90{degree}N). Results suggest that, under certain climatic conditions, these high northern ecosystems could collectively release 0.2 Gt of carbon per year to the atmosphere. I interpret these results with respect to questions about global biospheric sinks for atmospheric CO{sub 2} .

  7. Crop yield and CO2 fixation monitoring over Asia by a photosynthetic-sterility model comparing with MODIS and carbon amounts in grain yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Daijiro; Yang, Peng; Kumakura, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    The authors have developed a photosynthesis crop model for grain production under the background of climate change and Asian economic growth in developing countries. This paper presents an application of the model to grain fields of paddy rice, winter wheat, and maize in China and Southeast Asia. The carbon hydrate in grains has the same chemical formula as that of cellulose in grain vegetation. The partitioning of carbon in grain plants can validate fixation amounts of computed carbon using a satellite-based photosynthesis model. The model estimates the photosynthesis fixation of rice reasonably in Japan and China. Results were validated through examination of carbon in grains, but the model tends to underestimate results for winter wheat and maize. This study also provides daily distributions of the PSN, which is the CO2 fixation in Asian areas combined with a land-cover distribution classified from MODIS data, NDVI from SPOT VEGETATION, and meteorological re-analysis data by European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF). The mean CO2 and carbon fixation rates in paddy areas were 25.92 (t CO2/ha) and 5.28 (t/ha) in Japan, respectively. The method is based on routine observation data, enabling automated monitoring of crop yields.

  8. Quantifying Contemporary Terrestrial Carbon Sources and Sinks in the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Loveland, T.

    2003-12-01

    U.S. land likely accounts for a significant portion of the unidentified global carbon sink, although the magnitude is highly uncertain. The ultimate goal of this study is to quantify the contemporary temporal and spatial patterns of carbon sources and sinks in the conterminous United States from the early 1970s to 2000, and to explain the mechanisms that cause the variability and changes. Because of the difficulty and massive cost for developing land cover change databases for the conterminous United States, we adopt an ecoregion-based sampling approach. Carbon dynamics within thousands of 20 km by 20 km or 10 km by 10 km sampling blocks, stratified by Omernik Level III ecoregions, are simulated using the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System at the spatial resolution of 60 m by 60 m. The land use change data, providing unprecedented accuracy and consistency, are derived from Landsat imagery for five time points (nominally 1972, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000). Mechanisms have been implemented to assimilate data from key national benchmark databases (including the USDA Forest Service­_s Forest Inventory and Analysis data and the USDA­_s agricultural census data). The dynamics of carbon stocks in vegetation, soil, and harvested wood materials are quantified. Results from three ecoregions (i.e., Southeastern Plains, Piedmont, and Northern Piedmont) indicated that the carbon sink strength has been decreasing from the 1970s to 2000. The relative contribution of biomass accumulation to the sink decreased during this period, while those of soil organic carbon and harvested wood materials increased.

  9. Quantifying fire-wide carbon emissions in interior Alaska using field measurements and Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, B. M.; Veraverbeke, S.; Azzari, G.; Czimczik, C. I.; Holden, S. R.; Mouteva, G. O.; Sedano, F.; Treseder, K. K.; Randerson, J. T.

    2014-08-01

    Carbon emissions from boreal forest fires are projected to increase with continued warming and constitute a potentially significant positive feedback to climate change. The highest consistent combustion levels are reported in interior Alaska and can be highly variable depending on the consumption of soil organic matter. Here we present an approach for quantifying emissions within a fire perimeter using remote sensing of fire severity. Combustion from belowground and aboveground pools was quantified at 22 sites (17 black spruce and five white spruce-aspen) within the 2010 Gilles Creek burn in interior Alaska, constrained by data from eight unburned sites. We applied allometric equations and estimates of consumption to calculate carbon losses from aboveground vegetation. The position of adventitious spruce roots within the soil column, together with estimated prefire bulk density and carbon concentrations, was used to quantify belowground combustion. The differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) exhibited a clear but nonlinear relationship with combustion that differed by forest type. We used a multiple regression model based on transformed dNBR and deciduous fraction to scale carbon emissions to the fire perimeter, and a Monte Carlo framework to assess uncertainty. Because of low-severity and unburned patches, mean combustion across the fire perimeter (1.98 ± 0.34 kg C m-2) was considerably less than within a defined core burn area (2.67 ± 0.40 kg C m-2) and the mean at field sites (2.88 ± 0.23 kg C m-2). These areas constitute a significant fraction of burn perimeters in Alaska but are generally not accounted for in regional-scale estimates. Although total combustion in black spruce was slightly lower than in white spruce-aspen forests, black spruce covered most of the fire perimeter (62%) and contributed the majority (67 ± 16%) of total emissions. Increases in spring albedo were found to be a viable alternative to dNBR for modeling emissions.

  10. Activity of carbon dioxide fixation by anthers and leaves of cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Kirichenko, E.B.; Chernyad'ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.; Talibullina, K.K.; Voronkova, T.V.

    1986-05-01

    This paper gives a comparative evaluation of the photosynthetic activity of anthers and flag leaves in winter wheat, rye, and triticale. The content of chlorophylls in anthers and leaves was determined. The activity of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation by anthers and leaf disks was determined by the radiometric method in a chamber floating on mercury under standard exposure conditions (0.1% concentration of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, illumination of 15,000 1x, temperature of 23 C). Analyses were conducted in three replications and the results of typical biological experiments are cited. Data show that chlorophyll is actively synthesized in the anthers of cereal grains.

  11. Titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework for chemical fixation of carbon dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    A titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (Ti-ZIF) with high surface area and porous morphology was synthesized and itsefficacy was demonstrated in the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide.

  12. Quantifying the Effects of Formalin Fixation on the Mechanical Properties of Cortical Bone Using Beam Theory and Optimization Methodology With Specimen-Specific Finite Element Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guan-Jun; Yang, Jie; Guan, Feng-Jiao; Chen, Dan; Li, Na; Cao, Libo; Mao, Haojie

    2016-09-01

    The effects of formalin fixation on bone material properties remain debatable. In this study, we collected 36 fresh-frozen cuboid-shaped cortical specimens from five male bovine femurs and immersed half of the specimens into 4% formalin fixation liquid for 30 days. We then conducted three-point bending tests and used both beam theory method and an optimization method combined with specimen-specific finite element (FE) models to identify material parameters. Through the optimization FE method, the formalin-fixed bones showed a significantly lower Young's modulus (-12%) compared to the fresh-frozen specimens, while no difference was observed using the beam theory method. Meanwhile, both the optimization FE and beam theory methods revealed higher effective failure strains for formalin-fixed bones compared to fresh-frozen ones (52% higher through the optimization FE method and 84% higher through the beam theory method). Hence, we conclude that the formalin fixation has a significant effect on bovine cortical bones at small, elastic, as well as large, plastic deformations. PMID:27447849

  13. Impact of ultraviolet-B radiation on photosystem II activity and its relationship to the inhibition of carbon fixation rates for antarctic ice algae communities

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, O.; Prezelin, B.B.; Kroon, B.M.A.

    1995-10-01

    One goal of the Icecolors 1993 study was to determine whether or not photosystem II (PSII) was a major target site for photoinhibition by ultraviolet-B radiation (Q{sub UVB}, 280-320 nm) in natural communities. Second, the degree to which Q{sub UVB} inhibition of PSII could account for Q{sub UVB} effects on whole cell rates of carbon fixation in phytoplankton was assessed. On 1 October, 1993, at Palmer Station (Antarctica), dense samples of a frazil ice algal community were collected and maintained outdoors in the presence or absence of Q{sub UVB} and/or ultraviolet-A (Q{sub UVA}, 320-400 nm) radiation. The time of day course of UV inhibition of primary production was tracted. Over the day, {phi}{sub IIe}{degrees} declined due to increasing time-integrated dose exposure of Q{sub UVB}. The Q{sub UVB}-driven inhibition of {phi}{sub IIe}{degrees} increased from 4% in the early morning hours to a maximum of 23% at the end of the day. The Q{sub UVB} photoinhibition of PSII quantum yield did not recover by 6 h after sunset. In contrast, photoinhibition by Q{sub UVA} and photosynthetically available radiation (Q{sub PAR}, 400-700 nm) recovered during the late afternoon. Fluorescence-based estimates of carbon fixation rates were linearly correlated with measured carbon fixation. Fluorescence overestimated the observed Q{sub UVB} inhibition in measured carbon fixation rates. Researchers should be cautious in using fluorescence measurements to infer ultraviolet inhibition for rates of carbon fixation until there is a greater understanding of the coupling of carbon metabolism to PSII activity for natural populations. Despite these current limitations, fluorescence-based technologies represent powerful tools for studying the impact of the ozone hole on natural populations on spatial/temporal scales not possible using conventional productivity techniques. 55 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Photosynthetic carbon fixation characteristics of fruiting structures of Brassica campestris L

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, H.R.; Sheoran, I.S.; Singh, R.

    1987-04-01

    Activities of key enzymes of the Calvin cycle and C/sub 4/ metabolism, rates of CO/sub 2/ fixation, and the initial products of photosynthetic /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation were determined in the podwall, seed coat (fruiting structures), and the subtending leaf (leaf below a receme) of Brassica campestris L. cv Toria. Compared to activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and other Calvin cycle enzymes, e.g. NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, the activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and other enzymes of C/sub 4/ metabolism, viz. NADP-malate dehydrogenase, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, were generally much higher in seed than in podwall and leaf. Podwall and leaf were comparable to each other. Pulse-chase experiments showed that in seed the major product of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ assimilation was malate (in short time), whereas in podwall and leaf, the label initially appeared in 3-PGA. With time, the label moved to sucrose. In contrast to legumes, Brassica pods were able to fix net CO/sub 2/ during light. However, respiratory losses were very high during the dark period.

  15. Quantifying forest disturbance and regrowth in support of the North American Carbon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Goward, S. N.; Masek, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Forest disturbance and regrowth are assumed to be significant forces modulating North American carbon balance. Quantifying the carbon fluxes of forest changes requires the changes be assessed with appropriate spatial and temporal details. The Landsat imagery archive accumulated since 1972 provides a unique data source for carrying out this work over the last 30+ years. Through two NASA funded projects "North American Forest Disturbance and Regrowth since 1972 (NAFDR)" and "Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS)", Landsat images are being used to assess forest changes across the North American continent. In the NAFDR project, dense time series (quasi-2-year) of Landsat images are being compiled to quantify forest changes for statistically sampled locations selected to permit national estimates of disturbance and regrowth. In the LEDAPS project, wall-to-wall North American Landsat images acquired and orthorectified under the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program for the 1970s, 1990s and 2000 are being used to examine forest change for the entire North American continent between these 3 decades. The change products derived through the two projects will be cross-calibrated using field plot data collected through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program. Results from the two projects should provide spatially and temporally comprehensive assessments of forest disturbance history of the North American continent, therefore allowing more accurate estimation of the carbon flux arising from such changes.

  16. Multicomponent self-assembly of a pentanuclear Ir-Zn heterometal-organic polyhedron for carbon dioxide fixation and sulfite sequestration.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuezhao; Wu, Jinguo; He, Cheng; Zhang, Rong; Duan, Chunying

    2016-04-14

    By incorporating a fac-tris(4-(2-pyridinyl)phenylamine)iridium as the backbone of the tripodal ligand to constrain the coordination geometry of Zn(II) ions, a pentanuclear Ir-Zn heterometal-organic luminescent polyhedron was obtained via a subcomponent self-assembly for carbon dioxide fixation and sulfite sequestration. PMID:26932204

  17. RuBP limitation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during NH sub 3 assimilation: Interactions between photosynthesis, respiration, and ammonium assimilation in N-limited green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Elrifi, I.R.; Holmes, J.J.; Weger, H.G.; Mayo, W.P.; Turpin, D.H. )

    1988-06-01

    The effects of ammonium assimilation on photosynthetic carbon fixation and O{sub 2} exchange were examined in two species of N-limited green algae, Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum minutum. Under light-saturating conditions, ammonium assimilation resulted in a suppression of photosynthetic carbon fixation by S. minutum but not by C. pyrenoidosa. These different responses are due to different relationships between cellular ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) concentration and the RuBP binding site density of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). In both species, ammonium assimilation resulted in a decrease in RuBP concentration. In S. minutum the concentration fell below the RuBP binding site density of Rubisco, indicating RuBP limitation of carboxylation. In contrast, RuBP concentration remained above the binding site density in C. pyrenoidosa. Compromising RuBP regeneration in C. pyrenoidosa with low light resulted in an ammonium-induced decrease in RuBP concentration below the RuBP binding site density of Rubisco. This resulted in a decrease in photosynthetic carbon fixation. In both species, ammonium assimilation resulted in a larger decrease in net O{sub 2} evolution than in carbon fixation. Mass spectrometric analysis shows this to be a result of an increase in the rate of mitochondrial respiration in the light.

  18. Quantifying the Uncertainties in the Carbon Content of the Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; Yang, X.

    2003-12-01

    According to the IPCC (2001), the 1980s estimates for all major terms in the global carbon budget are subject to uncertainties. However, uncertainties in land use changes and terrestrial sinks are the largest, up to 200%. Here, we quantify the uncertainties in regional land use emissions as well as net terrestrial flux over the period 1765-2000. Using the terrestrial carbon cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) coupled with observed atmospheric CO2, temperature and precipitation data, the effects of different land cover data sets on the response of plant and soil carbon stocks are assessed. This geographically-explicit implementation of ISAM simulates the carbon fluxes to and from different compartments of the terrestrial biosphere with 0.5-by-0.5 degree spatial resolution. Each grid cell contains at least one of the thirteen land coverage classifications, which represent both highly managed land uses and less managed biomes. Changes in the areal extent of land cover classifications are driven by shifts in land use related to agriculture, afforestation, deforestation, and reforestation. Within each grid cell and land-coverage classification, the modeled carbon cycle includes feedback processes such as CO2 fertilization and temperature effects on photosynthesis, and respiration. ISAM model simulations indicate that uncertainties in net terrestrial fluxes during the 1980s is mainly due to the large uncertainties in land cover change data for tropical Africa and south and south east Asia.

  19. Quantifying the Carbon Abundances in the Secondary Stars of SS Cygni, RU Pegasi, and GK Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T.

    2015-11-01

    We use a modified version of MOOG to generate large grids of synthetic spectra in an attempt to derive quantitative abundances for three CVs (GK Per, RU Peg, and SS Cyg) by comparing the models to moderate resolution (R ˜ 25,000) K-band spectra obtained with NIRSPEC on Keck. For each of the three systems we find solar, or slightly sub-solar values for [Fe/H], but significant deficits of carbon: for SS Cyg we find [C/Fe] = -0.50, for RU Peg [C/Fe] = -0.75, and for GK Per [C/Fe] = -1.00. We show that it is possible to use lower resolution (R ˜ 2000) spectra to quantify carbon deficits. We examine realistic veiling scenarios and find that emission from H i or CO cannot reproduce the observations.

  20. Carbon dioxide fixation by microalgae photosynthesis using actual flue gas discharged from a boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Hiroyo; Shioji, Norio; Hamasaki, Akihiro

    1995-12-31

    To mitigate CO{sub 2} discharged from thermal power plants, studies on CO{sub 2} fixation by the photosynthesis of microalgae using actual exhaust gas have been carried out. The results are as follows: (1) A method is proposed for evaluating the maximum photosynthesis rate in the raceway cultivator using only the algal physical properties; (2) Outdoor cultivation tests taking actual flue gas were performed with no trouble or break throughout 1 yr using the strain collected in the test; (3) The produced microalgae is effective as solid fuel; and (4) The feasibility studies of this system were performed. The system required large land area, but the area is smaller than that required for other biomass systems, such as tree farms.

  1. Origin and mechanism of crassulacean acid metabolism in orchids as implied by comparative transcriptomics and genomics of the carbon fixation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangsheng; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Niu, Shance; Xiong, Jin-Song; Lin, Zhenguo; Cheng, Zong-Ming Max; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-04-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2 fixation pathway that maximizes water-use efficiency (WUE), compared with the C3/C4 CO2 pathway, which permits CAM plants to adapt to arid environments. The CAM pathway provides excellent opportunities to genetically design plants, especially bioenergy crops, with a high WUE and better photosynthetic performance than C3/C4 in arid environments. The information available on the origin and evolution of CAM is scant, however. Here, we analyzed transcriptomes from 13 orchid species and two existing orchid genomes, covering CAM and C3 plants, with an emphasis on comparing 13 gene families involved in the complete carbon fixation pathway. The dosage of the core photosynthesis-related genes plays no substantial role in the evolution of CAM in orchids; however, CAM may have evolved primarily by changes at the transcription level of key carbon fixation pathway genes. We proposed that in both dark and light, CO2 is primarily fixed and then released through two metabolic pathways via known genes, such as PPC1, PPDK and PPCK. This study reports a comprehensive comparison of carbon fixation pathway genes across different photosynthetic plants, and reveals the importance of the level of expression of key genes in the origin and evolution of CAM. PMID:26959080

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon uptake in Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is Δp- and ATP-sensitive and enhances RubisCO-mediated carbon fixation.

    PubMed

    Menning, Kristy J; Menon, Balaraj B; Fox, Gordon; Scott, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is an aerobic sulfur-oxidizing hydrothermal vent chemolithoautotroph that has a CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which generates intracellular dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations much higher than extracellular, thereby providing substrate for carbon fixation at sufficient rate. This CCM presumably requires at least one active DIC transporter to generate the elevated intracellular concentrations of DIC measured in this organism. In this study, the half-saturation constant (K CO2) for purified carboxysomal RubisCO was measured (276 ± 18 µM) which was much greater than the K CO2 of whole cells (1.03 µM), highlighting the degree to which the CCM facilitates CO2 fixation under low CO2 conditions. To clarify the bioenergetics powering active DIC uptake, cells were incubated in the presence of inhibitors targeting ATP synthesis (DCCD) or proton potential (CCCP). Incubations with each of these inhibitors resulted in diminished intracellular ATP, DIC, and fixed carbon, despite an absence of an inhibitory effect on proton potential in the DCCD-incubated cells. Electron transport complexes NADH dehydrogenase and the bc 1 complex were found to be insensitive to DCCD, suggesting that ATP synthase was the primary target of DCCD. Given the correlation of DIC uptake to the intracellular ATP concentration, the ABC transporter genes were targeted by qRT-PCR, but were not upregulated under low-DIC conditions. As the T. crunogena genome does not include orthologs of any genes encoding known DIC uptake systems, these data suggest that a novel, yet to be identified, ATP- and proton potential-dependent DIC transporter is active in this bacterium. This transporter serves to facilitate growth by T. crunogena and other Thiomicrospiras in the many habitats where they are found. PMID:26581415

  3. Significance of non-sinking particulate organic carbon and dark CO2 fixation to heterotrophic carbon demand in the mesopelagic northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltar, Federico; Arístegui, Javier; Sintes, Eva; Gasol, Josep M.; Reinthaler, Thomas; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2010-05-01

    It is generally assumed that sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) constitutes the main source of organic carbon supply to the deep ocean's food webs. However, a major discrepancy between the rates of sinking POC supply (collected with sediment traps) and the prokaryotic organic carbon demand (the total amount of carbon required to sustain the heterotrophic metabolism of the prokaryotes; i.e., production plus respiration, PCD) of deep-water communities has been consistently reported for the dark realm of the global ocean. While the amount of sinking POC flux declines exponentially with depth, the concentration of suspended, buoyant non-sinking POC (nsPOC; obtained with oceanographic bottles) exhibits only small variations with depth in the (sub)tropical Northeast Atlantic. Based on available data for the North Atlantic we show here that the sinking POC flux would contribute only 4-12% of the PCD in the mesopelagic realm (depending on the primary production rate in surface waters). The amount of nsPOC potentially available to heterotrophic prokaryotes in the mesopelagic realm can be partly replenished by dark dissolved inorganic carbon fixation contributing between 12% to 72% to the PCD daily. Taken together, there is evidence that the mesopelagic microheterotrophic biota is more dependent on the nsPOC pool than on the sinking POC supply. Hence, the enigmatic major mismatch between the organic carbon demand of the deep-water heterotrophic microbiota and the POC supply rates might be substantially smaller by including the potentially available nsPOC and its autochthonous production in oceanic carbon cycling models.

  4. Predictable and efficient carbon sequestration in the North Pacific Ocean supported by symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karl, David M.; Church, Matthew J.; Dore, John E.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Mahaffey, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The atmospheric and deep sea reservoirs of carbon dioxide are linked via physical, chemical, and biological processes. The last of these include photosynthesis, particle settling, and organic matter remineralization, and are collectively termed the “biological carbon pump.” Herein, we present results from a 13-y (1992–2004) sediment trap experiment conducted in the permanently oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre that document a large, rapid, and predictable summertime (July 15–August 15) pulse in particulate matter export to the deep sea (4,000 m). Peak daily fluxes of particulate matter during the summer export pulse (SEP) average 408, 283, 24.1, 1.1, and 67.5 μmol·m−2·d−1 for total carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus (PP), and biogenic silica, respectively. The SEP is approximately threefold greater than mean wintertime particle fluxes and fuels more efficient carbon sequestration because of low remineralization during downward transit that leads to elevated total carbon/PP and organic carbon/PP particle stoichiometry (371:1 and 250:1, respectively). Our long-term observations suggest that seasonal changes in the microbial assemblage, namely, summertime increases in the biomass and productivity of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in association with diatoms, are the main cause of the prominent SEP. The recurrent SEP is enigmatic because it is focused in time despite the absence of any obvious predictable stimulus or habitat condition. We hypothesize that changes in day length (photoperiodism) may be an important environmental cue to initiate aggregation and subsequent export of organic matter to the deep sea. PMID:22308450

  5. Nitrogen-Dependent Carbon Fixation by Picoplankton In Culture and in the Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey Smith; Marguerite W. Coomes; Thomas E. Smith

    2005-04-30

    The pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, was isolated and sequenced. PEPC is an anaplerotic enzyme, but it may also contribute to overall CO2 fixation through β-carboxylation reactions. A consensus sequence generated by aligning the pepc genes of Anabaena variabilis, Anacystis nidulans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 was used to design two sets of primers that were used to amplify segments of Synechococcus PCC 7002 pepc. In order to isolate the gene, the sequence of the PCR product was used to search for the pepc nucleotide sequence from the publicly available genome of Synechococcus PCC 7002. At the time, the genome for this organism had not been completed although sequences of a significant number of its fragments are available in public databases. Thus, the major challenge was to find the pepc gene among those fragments and to complete gaps as necessary. Even though the search did not yield the complete gene, PCR primers were designed to amplify a DNA fragment using a high fidelity thermostable DNA polymerase. An open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 2988 base pairs coding for 995 amino acids was found in the 3066 bp PCR product. The pepc gene had a GC content of 52% and the deduced protein had a calculated molecular mass of 114,049 Da. The amino acid sequence was closely related to that of PEPC from other cyanobacteria, exhibiting 59-61% identity. The sequence differed significantly from plant and E. coli PEPC with only 30% homology. However, comparing the Synechococcus PCC 7002 sequence to the recently resolved E. coli PEPC revealed that most of the essential domains and amino acids involved in PEPC activity were shared by both proteins. The recombinant Synechococcus PCC 7002 PEPC was expressed in E. coli.

  6. Potential role of multiple carbon fixation pathways during lipid accumulation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a unicellular diatom in the class Bacillariophyceae. The full genome has been sequenced (<30 Mb), and approximately 20 to 30% triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation on a dry cell basis has been reported under different growth conditions. To elucidate P. tricornutum gene expression profiles during nutrient-deprivation and lipid-accumulation, cell cultures were grown with a nitrate to phosphate ratio of 20:1 (N:P) and whole-genome transcripts were monitored over time via RNA-sequence determination. Results The specific Nile Red (NR) fluorescence (NR fluorescence per cell) increased over time; however, the increase in NR fluorescence was initiated before external nitrate was completely exhausted. Exogenous phosphate was depleted before nitrate, and these results indicated that the depletion of exogenous phosphate might be an early trigger for lipid accumulation that is magnified upon nitrate depletion. As expected, many of the genes associated with nitrate and phosphate utilization were up-expressed. The diatom-specific cyclins cyc7 and cyc10 were down-expressed during the nutrient-deplete state, and cyclin B1 was up-expressed during lipid-accumulation after growth cessation. While many of the genes associated with the C3 pathway for photosynthetic carbon reduction were not significantly altered, genes involved in a putative C4 pathway for photosynthetic carbon assimilation were up-expressed as the cells depleted nitrate, phosphate, and exogenous dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) levels. P. tricornutum has multiple, putative carbonic anhydrases, but only two were significantly up-expressed (2-fold and 4-fold) at the last time point when exogenous DIC levels had increased after the cessation of growth. Alternative pathways that could utilize HCO3- were also suggested by the gene expression profiles (e.g., putative propionyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylases). Conclusions The results indicate that P. tricornutum continued

  7. Regulation of photosynthetic carbon fixation on the ocean margins. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.H.

    1997-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is concerned with the fate of energy-related materials, including carbon dioxide, in the marine environment. Using laboratory studies, as well as field studies, an attempt was made to understand the molecular regulation of photosynthetic carbon reduction. The objectives were: to determine the mechanism of regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) in phytoplankton in response to changes in light fields; and to determine regulation of (RuBPCase) in response to light under nutrient deprivation.

  8. Quantifying thermal constraints on carbon and water fluxes in a mixed-conifer sky island ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Z.; Minor, R. L.; Potts, D. L.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Western North American forests represent a potential, yet uncertain, sink for atmospheric carbon. Revealing how predicted climatic conditions of warmer temperatures and longer inter-storm periods of moisture stress might influence the carbon status of these forests requires a fuller understanding of plant functional responses to abiotic stress. While data related to snow dominated montane ecosystems has become more readily available to parameterize ecosystem function models, there is a paucity of data available for Madrean sky island mixed-conifer forests, which receive about one third of their precipitation from the North American Monsoon. Thus, we quantified ecophysiological responses to moisture and temperature stress in a Madrean mixed-conifer forest near Tucson, Arizona, within the footprint of the Mt. Bigelow Eddy Covariance Tower. In measuring a series of key parameters indicative of carbon and water fluxes within the dominant species across pre-monsoon and monsoon conditions, we were able to develop a broader understanding of what abiotic drivers are most restrictive to plant performance in this ecosystem. Within Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir), and Pinus strobiformis (Southwestern White Pine) we quantified: (i) the optimal temperature (Topt) for maximum photosynthesis (Amax), (ii) the range of temperatures over which photosynthesis was at least 50% of Amax (Ω50), and (iii) each conifer's water use efficiency (WUE) to relate to the balance between carbon uptake and water loss in this high elevation semiarid ecosystem. Our findings support the prediction that photosynthesis decreases under high temperatures (>30°C) among the three species we measured, regardless of soil moisture status. However, monsoon moisture reduced sensitivity to temperature extremes and fluctuations (Ω50), which substantially magnified total photosynthetic productivity. In particular, wet conditions enhanced Amax the most dramatically for P

  9. Carbonate hydroxyapatite functionalization: a comparative study towards (bio)molecules fixation

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Laura; Taraballi, Francesca; Lupo, Cristina; Poveda, Ana; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Sandri, Monica; Tampieri, Anna; Nicotra, Francesco; Cipolla, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Different methods for the functionalization of carbonate hydroxyapatite granules with free amine groups by reaction with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) have been compared in order to improve the potential for tethering of bioactive molecules to bioceramics. The combined use of tetraethoxyorthosilicate and APTES with acid catalysis resulted in an evident increase in amine surface grafting. PMID:24501671

  10. Soybean Photosynthetic Rate and Carbon Fixation at Early and Late Planting Dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early planting (late April to early May) is recommended for increasing soybean yield but a full understanding of the physiological response is lacking. This study was conducted to determine whether carbon dioxide exchange rate (CER) could explain this yield difference. A study with five (2007) and s...

  11. Quantifying immediate radiative forcing by black carbon and organic matter with the Specific Forcing Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, T. C.; Zarzycki, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Koch, D. M.

    2010-06-01

    We propose a measure to quantify climate warming or cooling by pollutants with atmospheric lifetimes of less than one year: the Specific Forcing Pulse (SFP). SFP is the amount of energy added to the Earth system per mass of pollutant emitted. Global average SFP for black carbon, including atmosphere and cryosphere, is 1.12 GJ g-1 and that for organic matter is -0.061 GJ g-1. We provide regional values for black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) emitted from 23 source-region combinations, divided between atmosphere and cryosphere impacts and identifying forcing by latitude. Regional SFP varies by about 40% for black carbon. This variation is relatively small because of compensating effects; particles from regions that affect ice albedo typically have shorter atmospheric lifetimes because of lower convection. The ratio between BC and OM SFP implies that, for direct forcing, an OM:BC mass ratio of 15 has a neutral effect on top-of-atmosphere direct forcing for any region, and any lower ratio induces direct warming. However, important processes, particularly cloud changes that tend toward cooling, have not been included here. We demonstrate ensemble adjustment, in which we produce a "best estimate" by combining a suite of diverse but simple models and enhanced models of greater complexity. Adjustments for black carbon internal mixing and for regional variability are discussed; regions with convection are implicated in greater model diversity. SFP expresses scientific uncertainty and separates it from policy uncertainty; the latter is caused by disagreements about the relevant time horizon, impact, or spatial scale of interest. However, metrics used in policy discussions, such as global warming potentials, are easily derived from SFP. Global-average SFP for biofuel and fossil fuel emissions translates to a 100-year GWP of about 760 for black carbon and -40 for organic matter when snow forcing is included. Ensemble-adjusted estimates of atmospheric radiative impact by

  12. Chemolithotrophic nitrite oxidation by Nitrobacter: coupling with carbon dioxide fixation for growth and influence of metal ions and inorganic compounds of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    The growth of Nitrobacter winogradskyi was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM persulfate, 0.5 mM tetrathionate, or by 5 mM each of dithionite, metabisulfite, or trithionate. The oxygen uptake activity of washed N. agilis cell suspensions was not influenced by persulfate or tetrathionate. Carbon dioxide fixation was insensitive to tetrathionate and in fact an enhancement by tetrathionate was observed. Persulfate inhibited the fixation of carbon dioxide only at a high concentration. The oxygen uptake activity of washed ell suspensions of N. agilis was tested in the presence of copper, nickel, aluminum, uranyl, and molybdate ions. Copper ion was slightly stimulatory at 0.17 M and strongly inhibitory at 17 mM. Molybdate ion showed either slight enhancement or no inhibition at all test concentrations. With the other test ions inhibition of oxygen uptake was observed.

  13. Biology of a widespread uncultivated archaeon that contributes to carbon fixation in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Weinmaier, Thomas; Raymann, Kasie; Perras, Alexandra; Emerson, Joanne B; Rattei, Thomas; Wanner, Gerhard; Klingl, Andreas; Berg, Ivan A; Yoshinaga, Marcos; Viehweger, Bernhard; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Thomas, Brian C; Meck, Sandra; Auerbach, Anna K; Heise, Matthias; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus; Wagner, Michael; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Banfield, Jillian F; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface microbial life contributes significantly to biogeochemical cycling, yet it remains largely uncharacterized, especially its archaeal members. This 'microbial dark matter' has been explored by recent studies that were, however, mostly based on DNA sequence information only. Here, we use diverse techniques including ultrastuctural analyses to link genomics to biology for the SM1 Euryarchaeon lineage, an uncultivated group of subsurface archaea. Phylogenomic analyses reveal this lineage to belong to a widespread group of archaea that we propose to classify as a new euryarchaeal order ('Candidatus Altiarchaeales'). The representative, double-membraned species 'Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum' has an autotrophic metabolism that uses a not-yet-reported Factor420-free reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, confirmed by stable carbon isotopic measurements of archaeal lipids. Our results indicate that this lineage has evolved specific metabolic and structural features like nano-grappling hooks empowering this widely distributed archaeon to predominate anaerobic groundwater, where it may represent an important carbon dioxide sink. PMID:25425419

  14. Assessing methanotrophy and carbon fixation for biofuel production by Methanosarcina acetivorans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Ferry, James G.; Wood, Thomas K.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-01-17

    Methanosarcina acetivorans is a model archaeon with renewed interest due to its unique reversible methane production pathways. However, the mechanism and relevant pathways implicated in (co)utilizing novel carbon substrates in this organism are still not fully understood. This paper provides a comprehensive inventory of thermodynamically feasible routes for anaerobic methane oxidation, co-reactant utilization, and maximum carbon yields of major biofuel candidates by M. acetivorans. Here, an updated genome-scale metabolic model of M. acetivorans is introduced (iMAC868 containing 868 genes, 845 reactions, and 718 metabolites) by integrating information from two previously reconstructed metabolic models (i.e., iVS941 and iMB745), modifying 17 reactions,more » adding 24 new reactions, and revising 64 gene-proteinreaction associations based on newly available information. The new model establishes improved predictions of growth yields on native substrates and is capable of correctly predicting the knockout outcomes for 27 out of 28 gene deletion mutants. By tracing a bifurcated electron flow mechanism, the iMAC868 model predicts thermodynamically feasible (co)utilization pathway of methane and bicarbonate using various terminal electron acceptors through the reversal of the aceticlastic pathway. In conclusion, this effort paves the way in informing the search for thermodynamically feasible ways of (co)utilizing novel carbon substrates in the domain Archaea.« less

  15. Improved analysis of C4 and C3 photosynthesis via refined in vitro assays of their carbon fixation biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Sonawane, Balasaheb V.; Ghannoum, Oula; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants operating C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways exhibit differences in leaf anatomy and photosynthetic carbon fixation biochemistry. Fully understanding this underpinning biochemical variation is requisite to identifying solutions for improving photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Here we refine assay methods for accurately measuring the carboxylase and decarboxylase activities in C3 and C4 plant soluble protein. We show that differences in plant extract preparation and assay conditions are required to measure NADP-malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pH 8, Mg2+, 22 °C) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pH 7, >2mM Mn2+, no Mg2+) maximal activities accurately. We validate how the omission of MgCl2 during leaf protein extraction, lengthy (>1min) centrifugation times, and the use of non-pure ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) significantly underestimate Rubisco activation status. We show how Rubisco activation status varies with leaf ontogeny and is generally lower in mature C4 monocot leaves (45–60% activation) relative to C3 monocots (55–90% activation). Consistent with their >3-fold lower Rubisco contents, full Rubisco activation in soluble protein from C4 leaves (<5min) was faster than in C3 plant samples (<10min), with addition of Rubisco activase not required for full activation. We conclude that Rubisco inactivation in illuminated leaves primarily stems from RuBP binding to non-carbamylated enzyme, a state readily reversible by dilution during cellular protein extraction. PMID:27122573

  16. Improved analysis of C4 and C3 photosynthesis via refined in vitro assays of their carbon fixation biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Sonawane, Balasaheb V; Ghannoum, Oula; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-05-01

    Plants operating C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways exhibit differences in leaf anatomy and photosynthetic carbon fixation biochemistry. Fully understanding this underpinning biochemical variation is requisite to identifying solutions for improving photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Here we refine assay methods for accurately measuring the carboxylase and decarboxylase activities in C3 and C4 plant soluble protein. We show that differences in plant extract preparation and assay conditions are required to measure NADP-malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pH 8, Mg(2+), 22 °C) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pH 7, >2mM Mn(2+), no Mg(2+)) maximal activities accurately. We validate how the omission of MgCl2 during leaf protein extraction, lengthy (>1min) centrifugation times, and the use of non-pure ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) significantly underestimate Rubisco activation status. We show how Rubisco activation status varies with leaf ontogeny and is generally lower in mature C4 monocot leaves (45-60% activation) relative to C3 monocots (55-90% activation). Consistent with their >3-fold lower Rubisco contents, full Rubisco activation in soluble protein from C4 leaves (<5min) was faster than in C3 plant samples (<10min), with addition of Rubisco activase not required for full activation. We conclude that Rubisco inactivation in illuminated leaves primarily stems from RuBP binding to non-carbamylated enzyme, a state readily reversible by dilution during cellular protein extraction. PMID:27122573

  17. Quantifying the emissions and air quality co-benefits of lower-carbon electricity production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinski, Steven D.; Holloway, Tracey; Meier, Paul J.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Rrushaj, Arber; Oberman, Jacob T.; Duran, Phillip L.; Voigt, Caitlin L.

    2014-09-01

    The impact of air emissions from electricity generation depends on the spatial distribution of power plants and electricity dispatch decisions. Thus, any realistic evaluation of the air quality impacts of lower-carbon electricity must account for the spatially heterogeneous changes in associated emissions. Here, we present an analysis of the changes in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) associated with current, expected, and proposed energy efficiency and renewable energy policies in Wisconsin. We simulate the state's electricity system and its potential response to policies using the MyPower electricity-sector model, which calculates plant-by-plant reductions in NOx and SO2 emissions. We find that increased efficiency and renewable generation in a 2024 policy scenario substantially reduce statewide emissions of NOx and SO2 (55% and 59% compared to 2008, 32% and 33% compared to 2024 business-as-usual, BAU). PM2.5 is quantified across the Great Lakes region using the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for some emissions scenarios. We find that summer mean surface concentrations of sulfate and PM2.5 are less sensitive to policy changes than emissions. In the 2024 policy scenario, sulfate aerosol decreases less than 3% over most of the region relative to BAU and 3-13% relative to 2008 over most of Wisconsin. The lower response of these secondary aerosols arises from chemical and meteorological processing of electricity emissions, and mixing with other emission sources. An analysis of model performance and response to emission reduction at five sites in Wisconsin shows good model agreement with observations and a high level of spatial and temporal variability in sulfate and PM2.5 reductions. In this case study, the marginal improvements in emissions and air quality associated with carbon policies were less than the technology, renewable, and conservation assumptions under a business-as-usual scenario. However, this analysis for Wisconsin shows how

  18. Mid-infrared spectroscopy as a tool to identify and quantify soil organic carbon size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noon, Carole; Stevens, Antoine; Van Oost, Kristof; Six, Johan; Barthès, Bernard; van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    of spectra to quantify organic carbon in each fraction. By preselecting variables, we are able to improve the performance of the models to predict C content in size fractions compare to a traditional PLS regression applied on the entire spectra in particular for the fine fraction (<53µm). Using a traditional PLS regression, we observed a RMSE of 1.21 gC/kg and a RPD < 2. In contrast, using the functional groups as described above we are able to model the C content in the fine fraction with a RMSE=1.1 gC/kg and RPD=2.35. We conclude that this new approach to quantify C content in size fraction represents an enhancement in the understanding of the functional organic groups that play a role in the different size fractions. Key words: mid infrared reflectance (MIR) spectroscopy, soil organic carbon, physical fractionation.

  19. Advanced remote sensing to quantify temperate peatland capacity for belowground carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, K. B.; Blanchard, S.; Schile, L. M.; Kolding, S.; Kelly, M.; Windham-Myers, L.; Miller, R.

    2011-12-01

    Temperate peatlands typically dominated by grasses and sedges generate among the greatest annual rates of net primary productivity (NPP, up to 4 kg C m-2) and soil carbon storage (up to 1 kg C m-2) for natural ecosystems. Belowground tissues represent 20-80% of total NPP, thus understanding the controls on belowground NPP (BNPP) in these wetland ecosystems is particularly important to quantifying peatland carbon balances. In addition, there is a growing need to quantify large-scale belowground C sequestration rates in wetlands to better understand marsh resilience to sea level rise and to help define eligibility for carbon offset credits. Since plant productivity influences wetland C budgets, combining field and remote sensing techniques for estimating above and belowground productivity of wetland vegetation over a large spatial extent will help to address these needs. We are working in a USGS long-term experimental wetland restoration site on drained peatland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Using the spatial variability in water depth and residence time across the 7 ha wetland, our goal is to develop practical methods to quantify and map BNPP of emergent marsh vegetation from remotely sensed estimates of aboveground plant characteristics and aboveground NPP. Field data collected on wetland plants hardstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus) and cattail (Typha spp.) were coupled with reflectance data from a field spectrometer (range 350-2500 nm) every two to three weeks during the summer of 2011. We are analyzing reflectance data to develop hyperspectral indices that predict the biophysical characteristics of wetland vegetation - biomass, leaf area index (LAI), and the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) - which may be used to infer belowground biomass and productivity. Soil cores and root in-growth bags were used to calculate root biomass and productivity rates. Existing allometric relationships were used to calculate

  20. Carbonate sediment production in the equatorial continental shelf of South America: Quantifying Halimeda incrassata (Chlorophyta) contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro Bastos de Macêdo; Morais, Jader Onofre de

    2016-12-01

    The middle and outer continental shelves of eastern equatorial South America (ESA) are characterized by intense production of carbonate sediments. Qualitative analyses of sediment deposits suggest that the calcareous green alga Halimeda incrassata is among the top CaCO3 producers. Nevertheless, no study so far has quantified its real contributions. To better understand the sediment dynamic in this area, we measured biomass, growth rates and calcium carbonate production by this alga. The species exhibited high growth rates (3.38 segments.individual-1.day-1), coverage (174 individuals.m-2) and biomass (214.02 g.m-2). Substitution of segments may allow a sedimentation rate of 1.53 mm.yr-1 and a complete turnover of the population every 60.2 days. The rapid growth indicates that this alga can produce as much CaCO3 (1.19 kg CaCO3.m-2.year-1) as other tropical organisms, such as corals and rhodoliths. In a conservative estimate, 773.500 tonnes of CaCO3 are produced per year in a 5000 km2 area off the northern coast of Brazil. Sedimentation rate seems to be higher than that promoted by continental inputs in middle and outer continental shelf. On the other hand, population turnover is twice as slow as in other H. incrassata assemblages, suggesting that South American populations are sensible to physical disturbances. New studies are necessary to accurately estimate H. incrassata coverage along the Brazilian coast and to integrate data on other CaCO3 producers, such as foraminifera and coralline algae. This would allow a better understanding of the role of South American continental shelf on the global carbon budget. Furthermore, analysis on the health of these organisms is urgent, since a decline in their populations could negatively affect ecosystems functioning and services.

  1. Tracing and quantifying magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwaters: Lessons learned from Mammoth Mountain, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; Sorey, M.L.; Cook, A.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Shuster, D.L.; Colvard, E.M.; White, L.D.; Huebner, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    A major campaign to quantify the magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwaters around Mammoth Mountain volcano in eastern California was carried out from 1996 to 1999. The total water flow from all sampled cold springs was ??? 1.8 ?? 107 m3/yr draining an area that receives an estimated 2.5 ?? 107 m3/yr of recharge, suggesting that sample coverage of the groundwater system was essentially complete. Some of the waters contain magmatic helium with 3He/4He ratios as high as 4.5 times the atmospheric ratio, and a magmatic component in the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can be identified in virtually every feature sampled. Many waters have a 14C of 0-5 pmC, a ??13C near -5???, and contain high concentrations (20-50 mmol/1) of CO2(aq); but are otherwise dilute (specific conductance = 100-300 ??S/cm) with low pH values between 5 and 6. Such waters have previously escaped notice at Mammoth Mountain, and possibly at many other volcanoes, because CO2 is rapidly lost to the air as the water flows away from the springs, leaving neutral pH waters containing only 1-3 mmol/1 HCO-3. The total discharge of magmatic carbon in the cold groundwater system at Mammoth Mountain is ~ 20 000 t/yr (as CO2), ranging seasonally from about 30 to 90 t/day. Several types of evidence show that this high discharge of magmatic DIC arose in part because of shallow dike intrusion in 1989, but also demonstrate that a long-term discharge possibly half this magnitude (~ 10 000 t/yr) predated that intrusion. To sustain a 10 000 t/yr DIC discharge would require a magma intrusion rate of 0.057 km3 per century, assuming complete degassing of magma with 0.65 wt% CO2 and a density of 2.7 t/m3. The geochemical data also identify a small ( < 1 t/day) discharge of magmatic DIC that can be traced to the Inyo Domes area north of Mammoth Mountain and outside the associated Long Valley caldera. This research, along with recent studies at Lassen Peak and other western USA volcanoes, suggests that the amount of

  2. Urea Uptake and Carbon Fixation by Marine Pelagic Bacteria and Archaea during the Arctic Summer and Winter Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Tara L.; Baer, Steven E.; Cooper, Joshua T.; Bronk, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    How Arctic climate change might translate into alterations of biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) with respect to inorganic and organic N utilization is not well understood. This study combined 15N uptake rate measurements for ammonium, nitrate, and urea with 15N- and 13C-based DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP). The objective was to identify active bacterial and archeal plankton and their role in N and C uptake during the Arctic summer and winter seasons. We hypothesized that bacteria and archaea would successfully compete for nitrate and urea during the Arctic winter but not during the summer, when phytoplankton dominate the uptake of these nitrogen sources. Samples were collected at a coastal station near Barrow, AK, during August and January. During both seasons, ammonium uptake rates were greater than those for nitrate or urea, and nitrate uptake rates remained lower than those for ammonium or urea. SIP experiments indicated a strong seasonal shift of bacterial and archaeal N utilization from ammonium during the summer to urea during the winter but did not support a similar seasonal pattern of nitrate utilization. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from each SIP fraction implicated marine group I Crenarchaeota (MGIC) as well as Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, SAR11, and SAR324 in N uptake from urea during the winter. Similarly, 13C SIP data suggested dark carbon fixation for MGIC, as well as for several proteobacterial lineages and the Firmicutes. These data are consistent with urea-fueled nitrification by polar archaea and bacteria, which may be advantageous under dark conditions. PMID:25063662

  3. Robust Control of PEP Formation Rate in the Carbon Fixation Pathway of C4 Plants by a Bi-functional Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background C4 plants such as corn and sugarcane assimilate atmospheric CO2 into biomass by means of the C4 carbon fixation pathway. We asked how PEP formation rate, a key step in the carbon fixation pathway, might work at a precise rate, regulated by light, despite fluctuations in substrate and enzyme levels constituting and regulating this process. Results We present a putative mechanism for robustness in C4 carbon fixation, involving a key enzyme in the pathway, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), which is regulated by a bifunctional enzyme, Regulatory Protein (RP). The robust mechanism is based on avidity of the bifunctional enzyme RP to its multimeric substrate PPDK, and on a product-inhibition feedback loop that couples the system output to the activity of the bifunctional regulator. The model provides an explanation for several unusual biochemical characteristics of the system and predicts that the system's output, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) formation rate, is insensitive to fluctuations in enzyme levels (PPDK and RP), substrate levels (ATP and pyruvate) and the catalytic rate of PPDK, while remaining sensitive to the system's input (light levels). Conclusions The presented PPDK mechanism is a new way to achieve robustness using product inhibition as a feedback loop on a bifunctional regulatory enzyme. This mechanism exhibits robustness to protein and metabolite levels as well as to catalytic rate changes. At the same time, the output of the system remains tuned to input levels. PMID:22024416

  4. Multigene manipulation of photosynthetic carbon assimilation increases CO2 fixation and biomass yield in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Andrew J; McAusland, Lorna; Headland, Lauren R; Lawson, Tracy; Raines, Christine A

    2015-07-01

    Over the next 40 years it has been estimated that a 50% increase in the yield of grain crops such as wheat and rice will be required to meet the food and fuel demands of the increasing world population. Transgenic tobacco plants have been generated with altered combinations of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and the cyanobacterial putative-inorganic carbon transporter B, ictB, of which have all been identified as targets to improve photosynthesis based on empirical studies. It is shown here that increasing the levels of the three proteins individually significantly increases the rate of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, leaf area, and biomass yield. Furthermore, the daily integrated measurements of photosynthesis showed that mature plants fixed between 12-19% more CO2 than the equivalent wild-type plants. Further enhancement of photosynthesis and yield was observed when sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and ictB were over-expressed together in the same plant. These results demonstrate the potential for the manipulation of photosynthesis, using multigene-stacking approaches, to increase crop yields. PMID:25956882

  5. Multigene manipulation of photosynthetic carbon assimilation increases CO2 fixation and biomass yield in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Andrew J.; McAusland, Lorna; Headland, Lauren R.; Lawson, Tracy; Raines, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next 40 years it has been estimated that a 50% increase in the yield of grain crops such as wheat and rice will be required to meet the food and fuel demands of the increasing world population. Transgenic tobacco plants have been generated with altered combinations of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and the cyanobacterial putative-inorganic carbon transporter B, ictB, of which have all been identified as targets to improve photosynthesis based on empirical studies. It is shown here that increasing the levels of the three proteins individually significantly increases the rate of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, leaf area, and biomass yield. Furthermore, the daily integrated measurements of photosynthesis showed that mature plants fixed between 12–19% more CO2 than the equivalent wild-type plants. Further enhancement of photosynthesis and yield was observed when sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and ictB were over-expressed together in the same plant. These results demonstrate the potential for the manipulation of photosynthesis, using multigene-stacking approaches, to increase crop yields. PMID:25956882

  6. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  7. Quantifying the effect size of changing environmental controls on carbon release from permafrost-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedel, C.; Bader, M. K. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Bracho, R. G.; Capek, P.; De Baets, S. L.; Diakova, K.; Ernakovich, J. G.; Hartley, I. P.; Iversen, C. M.; Kane, E. S.; Knoblauch, C.; Lupascu, M.; Natali, S.; Norby, R. J.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Santruckova, H.; Shaver, G. R.; Sloan, V. L.; Treat, C. C.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    High-latitude surface air temperatures are rising twice as fast as the global mean, causing permafrost to thaw and thereby exposing large quantities of previously frozen organic carbon (C) to microbial decomposition. Increasing temperatures in high latitude ecosystems not only increase C emissions from previously frozen C in permafrost but also indirectly affect the C cycle through changes in regional and local hydrology. Warmer temperatures increase thawing of ice-rich permafrost, causing land surface subsidence where soils become waterlogged, anoxic conditions prevail and C is released in form of anaerobic CO2 and CH4. Although substrate quality, physical protection, and nutrient availability affect C decomposition, increasing temperatures and changes in surface and sub-surface hydrology are likely the dominant factors affecting the rate and form of C release from permafrost; however, their effect size on C release is poorly quantified. We have compiled a database of 24 incubation studies with soils from active layer and permafrost from across the entire permafrost zone to quantify a) the effect size of increasing temperatures and b) the changes from aerobic to anaerobic environmental soil conditions on C release. Results from two different meta-analyses show that a 10°C increase in temperature increased C release by a factor of two in boreal forest, peatland and tundra ecosystems. Under aerobic incubation conditions, soils released on average three times more C than under anaerobic conditions with large variation among the different ecosystems. While peatlands showed similar amounts of C release under aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions, tundra and boreal forest ecosystems released up to 8 times more C under anoxic conditions. This pan-arctic synthesis shows that boreal forest and tundra soils will have a larger impact on climate change when newly thawed permafrost C decomposes in an aerobic environment compared to an anaerobic environment even when

  8. Quantifying the impacts of land use change on soil organic carbon losses in tropical peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J.; Smith, J.; Smith, P.; Matthews, R.

    2012-04-01

    The challenge of collecting field measurements of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux and soil carbon (C) in tropical peatlands creates an opportunity for the use of SOC models for predicting local and regional impacts of land use and climate change on these soils, offering a way of translating this limited data into tangible results. Previously, no soil C model existed for use in non-steady state sites such as those found on tropical peats- in particular peat swamp forests which accumulate C, and oil palm plantations which are grown for 20-25 years between re-plantings. A simple, user friendly model has been created for use by scientists, policy makers and plantation managers. This model uses only limited inputs to predict the changes to soil C from land use and climate change. The model runs on the assumption that plant inputs can be related to yield, and that this can be used to derive the decomposition of SOM. It uses a simple decomposition response to determine the changes to the soil C. The model can run in a basic form if data is very limited, or a more complex form with modifiers for temperature, pH, salinity and soil moisture if this data is available. Using measured CO2 efflux and soil C values from peat cores, combined with literature values, we demonstrate the efficacy of the model, showing how we have identified and addressed some of the issues related to modelling soil C losses from tropical peat soils under land use change. Key challenges addressed included quantifying the effects of drainage when peat swamp forests are converted to oil palm plantations, and comparing field results between sites because in oil palm plantations the original soil conditions prior to conversion from peat swamp forest were largely unknown.

  9. Will elevated carbon dioxide concentration amplify the benefits of nitrogen fixation in legumes?

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, A.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Leakey, A. D. B.

    2009-11-01

    Growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}] stimulates photosynthesis and increases carbon (C) supply in all C3 species. A sustained and maximal stimulation in productivity at elevated [CO{sub 2}] requires an enhanced nutrient supply to match the increase in C acquisition. The ability of legumes to exchange C for nitrogen (N) with their N{sub 2}-fixing symbionts has led to the hypothesis that legumes will have a competitive advantage over nonleguminous species when grown at elevated [CO{sub 2}]. On balance, evidence suggests that in managed systems, legumes are more responsive to elevated [CO{sub 2}] than other plants (e.g. Ainsworth and Long, 2005); however, in natural ecosystems, nutrient availability can limit the response of legumes to elevated [CO{sub 2}] (Hungate et al., 2004; van Groenigen et al., 2006). Here, we consider these observations, outline the mechanisms that underlie them, and examine recent work that advances our understanding of how legumes respond to growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}]. First we highlight the global importance of legumes and provide a brief overview of the symbiotic relationship.

  10. Kinetics and Apparent K(m) of Oxygen Cycle under Conditions of Limiting Carbon Dioxide Fixation.

    PubMed

    Radmer, R; Kok, B; Ollinger, O

    1978-06-01

    A mass spectrometer with a membrane inlet was used to monitor light-driven O(2) evolution, O(2) uptake, and CO(2) uptake in suspensions of algae (Scenedesmus obliquus). We observed the following. (a) The rate of O(2) uptake, which, in the presence of iodoacetamide, replaces the uptake of CO(2), showed a distinct plateau (V(max)) beyond approximately 30% O(2) and was half-maximal at approximately 8% O(2). We concluded that this light-driven O(2) uptake process, which does not involve carbon compounds, is saturated at lower O(2) concentrations than are photorespiration and glycolate formation. (b) In the absence of inhibitor, O(2) evolution was relatively unaffected by the presence or absence of CO(2). During the course of CO(2) depletion, electron flow to CO(2) was replaced by an equivalent flow to O(2). (c) There was a distinct delay between the cessation of CO(2) uptake and the increase in O(2) uptake. We ascribe this delay to the transient utilization of another electron acceptor-possibly bicarbonate or another bound form of CO(2). PMID:16660425

  11. How sensitive are estimates of carbon fixation in agricultural models to input data?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Process based vegetation models are central to understand the hydrological and carbon cycle. To achieve useful results at regional to global scales, such models require various input data from a wide range of earth observations. Since the geographical extent of these datasets varies from local to global scale, data quality and validity is of major interest when they are chosen for use. It is important to assess the effect of different input datasets in terms of quality to model outputs. In this article, we reflect on both: the uncertainty in input data and the reliability of model results. For our case study analysis we selected the Marchfeld region in Austria. We used independent meteorological datasets from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Land cover / land use information was taken from the GLC2000 and the CORINE 2000 products. Results For our case study analysis we selected two different process based models: the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) and the Biosphere Energy Transfer Hydrology (BETHY/DLR) model. Both process models show a congruent pattern to changes in input data. The annual variability of NPP reaches 36% for BETHY/DLR and 39% for EPIC when changing major input datasets. However, EPIC is less sensitive to meteorological input data than BETHY/DLR. The ECMWF maximum temperatures show a systematic pattern. Temperatures above 20°C are overestimated, whereas temperatures below 20°C are underestimated, resulting in an overall underestimation of NPP in both models. Besides, BETHY/DLR is sensitive to the choice and accuracy of the land cover product. Discussion This study shows that the impact of input data uncertainty on modelling results need to be assessed: whenever the models are applied under new conditions, local data should be used for both input and result comparison. PMID:22296931

  12. Temporal Shift of Circadian-Mediated Gene Expression and Carbon Fixation Contributes to Biomass Heterosis in Maize Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingxin; Juenger, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Heterosis has been widely used in agriculture, but the molecular mechanism for this remains largely elusive. In Arabidopsis hybrids and allopolyploids, increased photosynthetic and metabolic activities are linked to altered expression of circadian clock regulators, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1). It is unknown whether a similar mechanism mediates heterosis in maize hybrids. Here we report that higher levels of carbon fixation and starch accumulation in the maize hybrids are associated with altered temporal gene expression. Two maize CCA1 homologs, ZmCCA1a and ZmCCA1b, are diurnally up-regulated in the hybrids. Expressing ZmCCA1 complements the cca1 mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis, and overexpressing ZmCCA1b disrupts circadian rhythms and biomass heterosis. Furthermore, overexpressing ZmCCA1b in maize reduced chlorophyll content and plant height. Reduced height stems from reduced node elongation but not total node number in both greenhouse and field conditions. Phenotypes are less severe in the field than in the greenhouse, suggesting that enhanced light and/or metabolic activities in the field can compensate for altered circadian regulation in growth vigor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis reveals a temporal shift of ZmCCA1-binding targets to the early morning in the hybrids, suggesting that activation of morning-phased genes in the hybrids promotes photosynthesis and growth vigor. This temporal shift of ZmCCA1-binding targets correlated with nonadditive and additive gene expression in early and late stages of seedling development. These results could guide breeding better hybrid crops to meet the growing demand in food and bioenergy. PMID:27467757

  13. Temporal Shift of Circadian-Mediated Gene Expression and Carbon Fixation Contributes to Biomass Heterosis in Maize Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dae Kwan; Rohozinski, Dominica; Song, Qingxin; Taylor, Samuel H; Juenger, Thomas E; Harmon, Frank G; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Heterosis has been widely used in agriculture, but the molecular mechanism for this remains largely elusive. In Arabidopsis hybrids and allopolyploids, increased photosynthetic and metabolic activities are linked to altered expression of circadian clock regulators, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1). It is unknown whether a similar mechanism mediates heterosis in maize hybrids. Here we report that higher levels of carbon fixation and starch accumulation in the maize hybrids are associated with altered temporal gene expression. Two maize CCA1 homologs, ZmCCA1a and ZmCCA1b, are diurnally up-regulated in the hybrids. Expressing ZmCCA1 complements the cca1 mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis, and overexpressing ZmCCA1b disrupts circadian rhythms and biomass heterosis. Furthermore, overexpressing ZmCCA1b in maize reduced chlorophyll content and plant height. Reduced height stems from reduced node elongation but not total node number in both greenhouse and field conditions. Phenotypes are less severe in the field than in the greenhouse, suggesting that enhanced light and/or metabolic activities in the field can compensate for altered circadian regulation in growth vigor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis reveals a temporal shift of ZmCCA1-binding targets to the early morning in the hybrids, suggesting that activation of morning-phased genes in the hybrids promotes photosynthesis and growth vigor. This temporal shift of ZmCCA1-binding targets correlated with nonadditive and additive gene expression in early and late stages of seedling development. These results could guide breeding better hybrid crops to meet the growing demand in food and bioenergy. PMID:27467757

  14. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti alpha-type carbonic anhydrase and its role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Tsikou, Daniela; Lampiri, Vasiliki; Fotelli, Mariangela N; Rennenberg, Heinz; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Fasseas, Costas; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2009-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an alpha-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized, and it was proven to be an active alpha-CA. The biochemical and physiological roles of the CAA1 gene in free-living and symbiotic rhizobia were examined by using an M. loti R7A disruption mutant strain. Our analysis revealed that CAA1 is expressed in both nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and free-living bacteria during growth in batch cultures, where gene expression was induced by increased medium pH. L. japonicus plants inoculated with the CAA1 mutant strain showed no differences in top-plant traits and nutritional status but consistently formed a higher number of nodules exhibiting higher fresh weight, N content, nitrogenase activity, and delta(13)C abundance. Based on these results, we propose that although CAA1 is not essential for nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it may participate in an auxiliary mechanism that buffers the bacteroid periplasm, creating an environment favorable for NH(3) protonation, thus facilitating its diffusion and transport to the plant. In addition, changes in the nodule delta(13)C abundance suggest the recycling of at least part of the HCO(3)(-) produced by CAA1. PMID:19218391

  15. Insights into the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway of the archaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis: comprehensive analysis of the central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Ulrike; Huber, Harald; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hügler, Michael; Fuchs, Georg

    2007-06-01

    Ignicoccus hospitalis is an autotrophic hyperthermophilic archaeon that serves as a host for another parasitic/symbiotic archaeon, Nanoarchaeum equitans. In this study, the biosynthetic pathways of I. hospitalis were investigated by in vitro enzymatic analyses, in vivo (13)C-labeling experiments, and genomic analyses. Our results suggest the operation of a so far unknown pathway of autotrophic CO(2) fixation that starts from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). The cyclic regeneration of acetyl-CoA, the primary CO(2) acceptor molecule, has not been clarified yet. In essence, acetyl-CoA is converted into pyruvate via reductive carboxylation by pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Pyruvate-water dikinase converts pyruvate into phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), which is carboxylated to oxaloacetate by PEP carboxylase. An incomplete citric acid cycle is operating: citrate is synthesized from oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA by a (re)-specific citrate synthase, whereas a 2-oxoglutarate-oxidizing enzyme is lacking. Further investigations revealed that several special biosynthetic pathways that have recently been described for various archaea are operating. Isoleucine is synthesized via the uncommon citramalate pathway and lysine via the alpha-aminoadipate pathway. Gluconeogenesis is achieved via a reverse Embden-Meyerhof pathway using a novel type of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase. Pentosephosphates are formed from hexosephosphates via the suggested ribulose-monophosphate pathway, whereby formaldehyde is released from C-1 of hexose. The organism may not contain any sugar-metabolizing pathway. This comprehensive analysis of the central carbon metabolism of I. hospitalis revealed further evidence for the unexpected and unexplored diversity of metabolic pathways within the (hyperthermophilic) archaea. PMID:17400748

  16. Scatter in Carbon/Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Composites Quantified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC) composites processed by chemical vapor infiltration are candidate materials for aerospace thermal structures. Carbon fibers can retain properties at very high temperatures, but they are known to have poor oxidation resistance in adverse, high-temperature environments. Nevertheless, the combination of CVI-SiC matrix with higher stiffness and oxidation resistance, the interfacial coating, and additional surface-seal coating provides the necessary protection to the carbon fibers, and makes the material viable for high-temperature space applications operating under harsh environments. Furthermore, C/SiC composites, like other ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), exhibit graceful non-catastrophic failure because of various inherent energy dissipating mechanisms. The material exhibits nonlinearity in deformation even at very low stress levels. This is the result of the severe matrix microcracking present in the as processed composite because of large differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the fiber and the matrix. Utilization of these advanced composites in next generation space vehicles will require innovative structural configurations, updated materials, and refined analyses. Structural safety issues for these vehicles are in direct competition with performance and cost. One would have to quantify the uncertainties associated with the design using formal probabilistic methods. Specifically four fundamental aspects on which analyses are based-- (1) loading conditions, (2) material behavior, (3) geometrical configurations, and (4) structural connections between the composite components and baseline structure--are stochastic in nature. A direct way to formally account for uncertainties is to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods where all participating variables are described by appropriate probability density functions. The present work, however, focuses on analyzing the stochastic

  17. Quantifying and Monetizing Potential Climate Change Policy Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Storage and Wildfires in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper quantifies and monetizes climate change impacts on carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation and wildfire incidence in the contiguous United States to assess the benefits of alternative mitigation policies. The MC-1 dynamic global vegetation model was used to develop int...

  18. Quantifying and Mapping the Supply of and Demand for Carbon Storage and Sequestration Service from Urban Trees.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang; Sander, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Studies that assess the distribution of benefits provided by ecosystem services across urban areas are increasingly common. Nevertheless, current knowledge of both the supply and demand sides of ecosystem services remains limited, leaving a gap in our understanding of balance between ecosystem service supply and demand that restricts our ability to assess and manage these services. The present study seeks to fill this gap by developing and applying an integrated approach to quantifying the supply and demand of a key ecosystem service, carbon storage and sequestration, at the local level. This approach follows three basic steps: (1) quantifying and mapping service supply based upon Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) processing and allometric models, (2) quantifying and mapping demand for carbon sequestration using an indicator based on local anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and (3) mapping a supply-to-demand ratio. We illustrate this approach using a portion of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area of Minnesota, USA. Our results indicate that 1735.69 million kg carbon are stored by urban trees in our study area. Annually, 33.43 million kg carbon are sequestered by trees, whereas 3087.60 million kg carbon are emitted by human sources. Thus, carbon sequestration service provided by urban trees in the study location play a minor role in combating climate change, offsetting approximately 1% of local anthropogenic carbon emissions per year, although avoided emissions via storage in trees are substantial. Our supply-to-demand ratio map provides insight into the balance between carbon sequestration supply in urban trees and demand for such sequestration at the local level, pinpointing critical locations where higher levels of supply and demand exist. Such a ratio map could help planners and policy makers to assess and manage the supply of and demand for carbon sequestration. PMID:26317530

  19. Quantifying and Mapping the Supply of and Demand for Carbon Storage and Sequestration Service from Urban Trees

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chang; Sander, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies that assess the distribution of benefits provided by ecosystem services across urban areas are increasingly common. Nevertheless, current knowledge of both the supply and demand sides of ecosystem services remains limited, leaving a gap in our understanding of balance between ecosystem service supply and demand that restricts our ability to assess and manage these services. The present study seeks to fill this gap by developing and applying an integrated approach to quantifying the supply and demand of a key ecosystem service, carbon storage and sequestration, at the local level. This approach follows three basic steps: (1) quantifying and mapping service supply based upon Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) processing and allometric models, (2) quantifying and mapping demand for carbon sequestration using an indicator based on local anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and (3) mapping a supply-to-demand ratio. We illustrate this approach using a portion of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area of Minnesota, USA. Our results indicate that 1735.69 million kg carbon are stored by urban trees in our study area. Annually, 33.43 million kg carbon are sequestered by trees, whereas 3087.60 million kg carbon are emitted by human sources. Thus, carbon sequestration service provided by urban trees in the study location play a minor role in combating climate change, offsetting approximately 1% of local anthropogenic carbon emissions per year, although avoided emissions via storage in trees are substantial. Our supply-to-demand ratio map provides insight into the balance between carbon sequestration supply in urban trees and demand for such sequestration at the local level, pinpointing critical locations where higher levels of supply and demand exist. Such a ratio map could help planners and policy makers to assess and manage the supply of and demand for carbon sequestration. PMID:26317530

  20. Diurnal variations in pathways of photosynthetic carbon fixation in a freshwater cyanobacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiosa, R. G.; Arrigo, K. R.; Grossman, A.; Reddy, T. E.; Shrager, J.

    2003-04-01

    Understanding phytoplankton photosynthesis is critical to several fields including ecology and global biogeochemistry. The efficiency with which phytoplankton fix carbon depends upon the ambient light field, which is in turn dependent upon sun angle and the depth of mixing in the water column. In this pilot project, Synechocystis PCC 6803 was chosen as a model organism with which to study the molecular and physiological responses of phytoplankton to diurnal changes in light levels. Advantages of using this organism include that its genome has been sequenced, allowing the use of microarray technology, that it is readily grown as single colonies on plates and in liquid cultures, and that it is easy to manipulate genetically (generate and complement mutants). Axenic cultures of Synechocystis were grown under precisely controlled conditions in a "cyclodyne", a chemostat in which the light intensity cycles to mimic diurnal changes in light level, where the light consisted of sinusoidal daylight (400 μ mol photons m-2 s-1 at noon) followed by 12 hours of darkness for several weeks. After one week to allow the cells to acclimate to the light conditions, the cultures were sampled and extracted for RNA analysis every two hours over the course of several days. At these time points, absorption spectra, light scattering and chlorophyll a concentrations were determined. Initial results from Northern Blot hybridizations (examining RNA levels for individual genes) indicate that, the transcripts encoding photosynthetic proteins (i.e., PsbA2, PsaA and CpcB, in photosystem II, photosystem I, and phycobilisomes, respectively) are highest during the light. Initial results show that in the middle of the night, the psbA2 transcripts are 2-fold less while the psaA and cpcB are greater than 4-fold less than in the middle of the day. For the most part, the transcripts encoding photosynthetic proteins track the light cycle, although with different trends at daybreak and after night falls

  1. Stable carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon: extraction and implications for quantifying the contributions from silicate and carbonate weathering in the Krishna River system during peak discharge.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Amzad H; Gandhi, Naveen; Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Yadava, Madhusudan G; Ramesh, Rengaswamy; Mahajan, Ramakant R; Kumar, Dharmendra

    2014-06-01

    We present a comparative study of two offline methods, a newly developed method and an existing one, for the measurement of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; δ(13)CDIC) in natural waters. The measured δ(13)CDIC values of different water samples, prepared from laboratory Na2CO3, ground and oceanic waters, and a laboratory carbonate isotope standard, are found to be accurate and reproducible to within 0.5 ‰\\ (1σ). The extraction of CO2 from water samples by these methods does not require pre-treatment or sample poisoning and can be applied to a variety of natural waters to address carbon cycling in the hydrosphere. In addition, we present a simple method (based on a two-end-member mixing model) to estimate the silicate-weathering contribution to DIC in a river system by using the concentration of DIC and its δ(13)C. This approach is tested with data from the Krishna River system as a case study, thereby quantifying the contribution of silicate and carbonate weathering to DIC, particularly during peak discharge. PMID:24450598

  2. Chloride mass balance to quantify the wastewater impact on karstified carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Nuseibeh, M.; Geyer, T.; Abdelghafour, D.; Al-Naji, G.; Bsharat, J.; Sawalhi, B.; Guttman, J.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater resources are vulnerable to anthropogenic influences, like i.e. wastewater disposal in the environment. This is especially critical in karstified carbonate aquifers, because of the partially high flow velocities, resulting in an insufficient attenuation potential against pollutants. To assess the health risk associated with the pollution of the groundwater and for remediation measures planning, the wastewater impact on groundwater resources needs to be quantified. For this purpose the analysis of conservative tracer substances, abundant in the wastewater, is considered a suitable technique. Among the substances considered as tracers, chloride exhibits superior characteristics, the only drawback being the usually high natural background concentration in groundwater. As the chloride ion is not removed by common wastewater treatment processes, it is indicative of both treated and untreated wastewater. In this study, an example for a semi-arid karstified carbonate aquifer system is presented. The study area is located on the western margin of the Lower Jordan Valley (West Bank). The upper aquifer is discharged via several springs. For the springs in the study area, time series of chloride concentration in spring water from 1967-98 were interpreted. The study area displays a high population growth, which results in a steadily increasing wastewater discharge amount. The wastewater is mostly infiltrating into the karst system. First, the long-term average groundwater recharge rate of the local aquifers that fed the springs was quantified with the chloride mass balance method from groundwater data that are little influenced by anthropogenic impacts. The chloride concentration in the local precipitation is 9-10 mg/l and the average value in groundwater is 31 mg/l. This yields a mean recharge rate of around 30 percent. Second, the fraction of groundwater recharge, resulting from the infiltration of wastewater from leaky sewer systems and from wastewater disposal

  3. Quantifying uranium complexation by groundwater dissolved organic carbon using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranville, James F.; Hendry, M. Jim; Reszat, Thorsten N.; Xie, Qianli; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2007-05-01

    The long-term mobility of actinides in groundwaters is important for siting nuclear waste facilities and managing waste-rock piles at uranium mines. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may influence the mobility of uranium, but few field-based studies have been undertaken to examine this in typical groundwaters. In addition, few techniques are available to isolate DOC and directly quantify the metals complexed to it. Determination of U-organic matter association constants from analysis of field-collected samples compliments laboratory measurements, and these constants are needed for accurate transport calculations. The partitioning of U to DOC in a clay-rich aquitard was investigated in 10 groundwater samples collected between 2 and 30 m depths at one test site. A positive correlation was observed between the DOC (4-132 mg/L) and U concentrations (20-603 μg/L). The association of U and DOC was examined directly using on-line coupling of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV absorbance (UVA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) detectors. This method has the advantages of utilizing very small sample volumes (20-50 μL) as well as giving molecular weight information on U-organic matter complexes. AsFlFFF-UVA results showed that 47-98% of the DOC (4-136 mg C/L) was recovered in the AsFlFFF analysis, of which 25-64% occurred in the resolvable peak. This peak corresponded to a weight-average molecular weight of about 900-1400 Daltons (Da). In all cases, AsFlFFF-ICP-MS suggested that ≤ 2% of the U, likely present as U(VI), was complexed with the DOC. This result was in good agreement with the U speciation modeling performed on the sample taken from the 2.3 m depth, which predicted approximately 3% DOC-complexed U. This good agreement suggests that the AsFlFFF-ICP-MS method may be very useful for determining U-organic matter association in small volume samples. Because the pH (7.0-8.1) and carbonate concentrations of these waters

  4. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McCartt, A Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels. Sources of inaccuracies are presented and discussed, and the capability to measure carbon-14 in biological samples is demonstrated by comparing pharmacokinetics from carbon-14 dosed guinea pigs analyzed by both CRDS and accelerator mass spectrometry. The CRDS approach presented affords easy access to powerful carbon-14 tracer techniques that can characterize complex biochemical systems. PMID:27458740

  5. Relationship of photosynthetic carbon fixation with environmental changes in the Jiulong River estuary of the South China Sea, with special reference to the effects of solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Kunshan; Yuan, Dongxing; Zheng, Ying; Yang, Guiyuan

    2011-08-01

    Phytoplankton cells in estuary waters usually experience drastic changes in chemical and physical environments due to mixing of fresh and seawaters. In order to see their photosynthetic performance in such dynamic waters, we measured the photosynthetic carbon fixation by natural phytoplankton assemblages in the Jiulong River estuary of the South China Sea during April 24-26 and July 24-26 of 2008, and investigated its relationship with environmental changes in the presence or the absence of UV radiation. Phytoplankton biomass (Chl a) decreased sharply from the river-mouth to seawards (17.3-2.1 μg L(-1)), with the dominant species changed from chlorophytes to diatoms. The photosynthetic rate based on Chl a at noon time under PAR-alone increased from 1.9 μg C (μg Chl a)(-1) L(-1) in low salinity zone (SSS<10) to 12.4 μg C (μg Chl a)(-1) L(-1) in turbidity front (SSS within 10-20), and then decreased to 2.1 μg C (μg Chl a)(-1) L(-1) in mixohaline zone (SSS>20); accordingly, the carbon fixation per volume of seawater increased from 12.8 to 149 μg C L(-1) h(-1), and decreased to 14.3 μg C L(-1) h(-1). Solar UVR caused the inhibition of carbon fixation in surface water of all the investigated zones, by 39% in turbidity area and 7-10% in freshwater or mixohaline zones. In the turbidity zone, higher availability of CO2 could have enhanced the photosynthetic performance; while osmotic stress might be responsible for the higher sensitivity of phytoplankton assemblages to solar UV radiation. PMID:21714975

  6. Effects of femoral component material properties on cementless fixation in total hip arthroplasty. A comparison study between carbon composite, titanium alloy, and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Otani, T; Whiteside, L A; White, S E; McCarthy, D S

    1993-02-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-carbon composite material is an attractive implant material because its modulus of elasticity can be made similar to that of cortical bone. This study investigated the effect of femoral prosthesis elastic modulus on cementless implant fixation. Distal, as well as proximal, relative micromovements between implant and bone were measured in two testing protocols (axial-load and torsional-load), comparing identically shaped carbon composite (modulus of elasticity = 18.6 GPa), Ti6Al4V (100 GPa), and 630 stainless steel (200 GPa) prostheses. In the axial-load test, proximal mediolateral micromotions were significantly larger in the flexible composite stem than in the two metals. In the torsional-load test, rotational micromotions and "slop" displacements in the flexible stem were significantly larger proximally and significantly smaller distally than in the two metals. While these results suggest that proximal stress transfer may be improved by a flexible stem, they raise the possibility of increased proximal micromotion, and suggest that improved proximal fixation may be necessary to achieve clinical success with flexible composite femoral components. PMID:8436992

  7. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-01-07

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fatemore » of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% to

  8. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-06-08

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source-tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate ofmore » BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation in the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on season and location in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer, when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in the Himalayas and central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to the northeast plateau in all seasons and southeast plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching the northwest plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about

  9. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in

  10. Conversion of 4-Hydroxybutyrate to Acetyl Coenzyme A and Its Anapleurosis in the Metallosphaera sedula 3-Hydroxypropionate/4-Hydroxybutyrate Carbon Fixation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, AB; Adams, MWW; Kelly, RM

    2014-03-25

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula (optimum growth temperature, 73 degrees C, pH 2.0) grows chemolithoautotrophically on metal sulfides or molecular hydrogen by employing the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3HP/4HB) carbon fixation cycle. This cycle adds two CO2 molecules to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to generate 4HB, which is then rearranged and cleaved to form two acetyl-CoA molecules. Previous metabolic flux analysis showed that two-thirds of central carbon precursor molecules are derived from succinyl-CoA, which is oxidized to malate and oxaloacetate. The remaining one-third is apparently derived from acetyl-CoA. As such, the steps beyond succinyl-CoA are essential for completing the carbon fixation cycle and for anapleurosis of acetyl-CoA. Here, the final four enzymes of the 3HP/4HB cycle, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase (AMP forming) (Msed_0406), 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase (Msed_1321), crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (Msed_0399), and acetoacetyl-CoA beta-ketothiolase (Msed_0656), were produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli, combined in vitro, and shown to convert 4HB to acetyl-CoA. Metabolic pathways connecting CO2 fixation and central metabolism were examined using a gas-intensive bioreactor system in which M. sedula was grown under autotrophic (CO2-limited) and heterotrophic conditions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the importance of the 3HP/4HB pathway in supplying acetyl-CoA to anabolic pathways generating intermediates in M. sedula metabolism. The results indicated that flux between the succinate and acetyl-CoA branches in the 3HP/4HB pathway is governed by 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, possibly regulated posttranslationally by the protein acetyltransferase (Pat)/Sir2-dependent system. Taken together, this work confirms the final four steps of the 3HP/4HB pathway, thereby providing the framework for examining connections between CO2 fixation and central metabolism in M. sedula.

  11. Conversion of 4-Hydroxybutyrate to Acetyl Coenzyme A and Its Anapleurosis in the Metallosphaera sedula 3-Hydroxypropionate/4-Hydroxybutyrate Carbon Fixation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Aaron B.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula (optimum growth temperature, 73°C, pH 2.0) grows chemolithoautotrophically on metal sulfides or molecular hydrogen by employing the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3HP/4HB) carbon fixation cycle. This cycle adds two CO2 molecules to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to generate 4HB, which is then rearranged and cleaved to form two acetyl-CoA molecules. Previous metabolic flux analysis showed that two-thirds of central carbon precursor molecules are derived from succinyl-CoA, which is oxidized to malate and oxaloacetate. The remaining one-third is apparently derived from acetyl-CoA. As such, the steps beyond succinyl-CoA are essential for completing the carbon fixation cycle and for anapleurosis of acetyl-CoA. Here, the final four enzymes of the 3HP/4HB cycle, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase (AMP forming) (Msed_0406), 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase (Msed_1321), crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (Msed_0399), and acetoacetyl-CoA β-ketothiolase (Msed_0656), were produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli, combined in vitro, and shown to convert 4HB to acetyl-CoA. Metabolic pathways connecting CO2 fixation and central metabolism were examined using a gas-intensive bioreactor system in which M. sedula was grown under autotrophic (CO2-limited) and heterotrophic conditions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the importance of the 3HP/4HB pathway in supplying acetyl-CoA to anabolic pathways generating intermediates in M. sedula metabolism. The results indicated that flux between the succinate and acetyl-CoA branches in the 3HP/4HB pathway is governed by 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, possibly regulated posttranslationally by the protein acetyltransferase (Pat)/Sir2-dependent system. Taken together, this work confirms the final four steps of the 3HP/4HB pathway, thereby providing the framework for examining connections between CO2 fixation and central metabolism in M. sedula. PMID

  12. Induction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. PMID:25931521

  13. Induction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Godaux, Damien; Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. PMID:25931521

  14. Quantifying the metabolic contribution to δ13C of shell carbonate of Arctica islandica: an experimental calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirne, E. C.; Wanamaker, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC) can provide a powerful means to investigate atmospheric and oceanic carbon dynamics. Records of past δ13CDIC values of seawater, especially from the extratropical oceans, are needed to better understand how recent climate change and anthropogenic activity (namely fossil fuel emissions) have impacted the global carbon cycle. However, long-term reconstructions of marine δ13CDIC are limited (both spatially and temporally) by a lack of suitable proxy archives, which have undergone a rigorous calibration process. Marine mollusks represent a potential δ13CDIC archive given that the primary source of carbon to their shell material is ambient dissolved inorganic carbon. However, interpretation of this archive is confounded by the additional contribution of respired (or metabolic) carbon to the carbon isotope ratio of shell material (δ13Cshell). Although theoretical models predict that less than 10% of δ13Cshell of marine mollusks is attributable to metabolic carbon, several studies have reported significantly larger contributions of respired carbon (CM) to shell material depending upon the species in question, and in some cases, ontogenetic age. Therefore, species-specific calibrations must be conducted to establish metabolic contribution to δ13Cshell at different stages of ontogeny. The central objective of this study was to quantify the metabolic contribution to the shell carbonate of Arctica islandica L., juveniles and adults, to determine the viability of this species as a paleo-δ13CDIC archive. Results will be presented from an 8-month experimental calibration between δ13CDIC and δ13Cshell of the species Arctica islandica. Adults (25 to 55 years old) and juveniles (<3 years old) were collected and cultured in the Gulf of Maine, both in situ and in the laboratory environment. Relatively high growth rates in juveniles (>1mm/month) allowed for the measurement of three distinct

  15. Quantifying Sequestration of Carbon in the Ocean following Addition of Macronutrient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, D. P.; Lawrence, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    The effects of addition of limiting nutrients to the surface waters of the deep ocean has been investigated for the last twenty years, partly to explore ocean biogeochemical processes and partly because of the potential for sequestration of carbon in the deep ocean. Investigations have been performed for micronutrients (iron) and macronutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous). A methodology of estimating carbon stored is introduced here based on fertilization with nitrogen in those regions in which nitrogen is the limiting nutrient. The basis of the methodology is a combination of measurements in the photic zone and numerical modelling of the biogeochemical cycle. The calculation of the quantity of sequestered carbon is, after allowance for losses, equal to the carbon that is taken up by photosynthesis (new primary production equals export production) resulting from the added nitrogen. An essential feature of the biogeochemical process is that the added nitrogen is not lost from the upper waters by export to the deep ocean unless accompanied by carbon, in approximately the Redfield ratio. Determination of the quantity of carbon sequestered consists of three steps: (1.) Determination of the quantity of carbon converted by photosynthesis to biological form (new primary production). (2.) Allowance for factors potentially affecting carbon sequestration, such as: Loss of reactive nitrogen from the ocean; Greenhouse Gas (GHG) production by photosynthesis; GHG production by denitrification; GHG production following upwelling; Air-sea carbon transfer efficiency; Calcium carbonate production; Alkalinity change; and Respiration. (3.) Allowance for carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere during the manufacture and transport processes involved in providing added nutrients to the ocean. With these three steps, the net quantity of carbon sequestered by fertilisation may be determined.

  16. Quantifying the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon pool using Rock-Eval pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Chenu, Claire; Christensen, Bent T.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Plante, Alain F.; Savignac, Florence; Soucémarianadin, Laure; Barré, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    amount (5 to 95%) of CH, CO and CO2 gas had evolved during the RE6 pyrolysis and oxidation steps. These RE6 predictors were used in a random forest (RF) multivariate regression model to predict the proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool. Our RE6-RF model showed an excellent predictive performance: out-of-bag R²=0.93, out-of-bag error=6% of total SOC (n=86); validation R²=0.96, prediction error=5% of total SOC (n=20). We then applied our RE6-RF model on 50 cropland and forest topsoils (0-30cm) with contrasting geo-pedology (region of Grignon, FR). Despite its wide heterogeneity, this new sample set was within the prediction range of our RE6-RF model. The RE6-RF predicted proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool was consistently higher in cropland than in forest soils (p<0.001), while its concentration (gC.kg-1soil) was not affected by land-use. Conversely, the concentration of the pluri-centennial SOC pool was markedly dependent on soil type (p=0.01) and parent material (p=0.001), indicating a clear geochemical control on the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon reservoir. Our study positions RE6 pyrolysis as a meaningful tool to quantify the pluri-centennial SOC pool, with the ability of detecting its landscape-scale heterogeneities.

  17. Carbon dioxide fixation and photoevolution of hydrogen and oxygen in a mutant of Chlamydomonas lacking Photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-09-01

    Sustained photoassimilation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen has been observed in a Photosystem I deficient mutant B4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that contains only Photosystem II. The data indicate that Photosystem II alone is capable of spanning the potential difference between water oxidation/oxygen evolution and ferredoxin reduction. The rates of both CO{sub 2} fixation and hydrogen and oxygen evolution are similar in the mutant to that of the wild-type C. reinhardtii 137c containing both photosystems. The wild-type had stable photosynthetic activity, measured as CO{sub 2} fixation, under both air and anaerobic conditions, while the mutant was stable only under anaerobic conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the fundamental mechanisms and energetics of photosynthesis and possible implications for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  18. Quantifying and Reducing Climate-Carbon Cycle Feedback Uncertainties: Analysis of CMIP5 Earth System Model Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, resulting from anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle, are altering the Earth's climate. Climate change is expected to induce feedbacks on future CO2 concentrations and on the climate system itself. These feedbacks are highly uncertain, potentially large, and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). In order to reduce the range of uncertainty in climate predictions, model representation of feedbacks must be improved through comparisons with contemporary observations. In this study, we quantify the terrestrial and ocean carbon storage sensitivity to climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration of ESMs participating in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) following the methodology of Friedlingstein et al. (2006). In order to evaluate the models' abilities to capture the 21st century carbon cycle and to offer possible constraints on the modeled feedback strengths, comparisons with contemporary observations will be made over three different time scales: seasonal to annual, interannual to decadal, and decadal to centennial. A conceptual framework for evaluating climate-carbon cycle feedbacks in global models--employing best-available observational data--will be presented, along with results from application of this framework to CMIP5 model output. Included in the analysis will be prototype model evaluation benchmarks of the carbon cycle being designed for the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) Project.

  19. Quantifying ecosystem carbon losses and gains following development in New England: A combined field, modeling, and remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raciti, S. M.; Hutyra, L.; Briber, B. M.; Dunn, A. L.; Friedl, M. A.; Woodcock, C.; Zhu, Z.; Olofsson, P.

    2013-12-01

    If current trends continue, the world's urban population may double and urban land area may quadruple over the next 50 years. Despite the rapid expansion of urban areas, the trajectories of carbon losses and gains following development remain poorly quantified. We are using a combination of field measurements, modeling, and remote sensing to advance our ability to measure and monitor trajectories of ecosystem carbon over space and time. To characterize how carbon stocks change across urban-to-rural gradients, we previously established field plots to survey live and dead tree biomass, tree canopy, soil and foliar carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and a range of landscape characteristics (Raciti et al. 2012). In 2013, we extended our field sampling to focus specifically on places that experienced land use and land cover change over the past 35 years. This chronosequence approach was informed by Landsat time series (1982-present) and property records (before 1982). The Landsat time series approach differs from traditional remote-sensing-based land use change detection methods because it leverages the entire Landsat archive of imagery using a Fourier fitting approach (Zhu et al. 2012). The result is a temporally and spatially continuous map of land use and land cover change across the study region. We used these field and remote sensing data to inform a carbon bookkeeping model that estimates changes in past and potential future carbon stocks over time. Here we present preliminary results of this work for eastern Massachusetts.

  20. Crop produciton and soil carbon: Using satellites to quantify cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilization of remote sensing data from satellite platforms for multiple purposes was a hallmark of Paul Doraiswamy’s career. These efforts entailed the application of various satellite systems, e.g., Landsat, MODIS, AVRIS, to various areas around the world to quantify different components of croppi...

  1. Prairie restoration and carbon sequestration: difficulties quantifying C sources and sinks using a biometric approach.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Kucharik, Christopher J; Foley, Jonathan A

    2009-12-01

    We investigated carbon cycling and ecosystem characteristics among two prairie restoration treatments established in 1987 and adjacent cropland, all part of the Conservation Reserve Program in southwestern Wisconsin, USA. We hypothesized that different plant functional groups (cool-season C3 vs. warm-season C4 grasses) between the two prairie restoration treatments would lead to differences in soil and vegetation characteristics and amount of sequestered carbon, compared to the crop system. We found significant (P < 0.05) differences between the two prairie restoration treatments in soil CO2 respiration and above- and belowground productivity, but no significant differences in long-term (approximately 16-year) carbon sequestration. We used a biometric approach aggregating short-term observations of above- and belowground productivity and CO2 respiration to estimate total net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) using varied methods suggested in the literature. Net ecosystem production is important because it represents the ecosystem carbon sequestration, which is of interest to land managers and policymakers seeking or regulating credits for ecosystem carbon storage. Such a biometric approach would be attractive because it might offer the ability to rapidly assess the carbon source/sink status of an ecosystem. We concluded that large uncertainties in (1) estimating aboveground NPP, (2) determining belowground NPP, and (3) partitioning soil respiration into microbial and plant components strongly affect the magnitude, and even the sign, of NEP estimates made from aggregating its components. A comparison of these estimates across treatments could not distinguish differences in NEP, nor the absolute sign of the overall carbon balance. Longer-term quantification of carbon stocks in the soil, periodically linked to measurements of individual processes, may offer a more reliable measure of the carbon balance in grassland systems, suitable for

  2. Quantifying and characterizing dissolved carbon and nitrogen leaching from litter: a comparison of methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Litter decomposition has a fundamental role in ecosystem functioning. It recycles energy, carbon and nutrients, supporting ecosystem productivity and soil organic matter formation. Litter decomposition occurs through leaching, fragmentation, and catabolism. Leaching is, arguably, the least studie...

  3. Quantifying and timing of long-term carbonate mobilisation in a limestone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, J.; Gaupp, R.

    2012-04-01

    Carbonate dissolution during weathering, its intermediate storage by reprecipitation, and/or final export to the sea are major components in the global carbon cycle. The Thuringian Basin in the central part of Germany exposes deposits of the German Triassic Muschelkalk sequence consisting of limestone and dolostone beds. Partial dissolution, oxidation and iron redistribution is obvious in limestones along the slopes of the middle Saale river valley. These features are most prominent close to a Mid Quaternary valley floor (Elster terrace). They decrease down-section following fractures in homogeneous micritic limestones of the Lower Muschelkalk (Jena Formation), and reach a minimum close to the present groundwater table. It implies a discontinuous vertical migration of the groundwater table close to the valley slopes, spanning >700 ka of valley incision, and a coeval increase of oxidative weathering of sulfides and organic matter in the micritic carbonate. The recharging groundwater carries dissolved and particulate organic matter from the soil into fractures and pores. Microbial community oxidizes the organic material by using O2 that diffuses in from atmosphere. Due to the dissolved CO2 the water is undersaturated concerning carbonate minerals. The fissures enlarge by the water dissolving the limestones. The working hypothesis suggests the maximum of carbonate dissolution and descendant export within the vadose zone. Material export is supposed to occur dependant on climatic variations with microbial mediation in both dissolution and transient reprecipitation. Furthermore, the study area has the important advantage that the timing of the 100 m migration of the ground water table has a good age control due to topographic dating of terrace formation. Key aspects of this study are the quantification of long-term telodiagenetic transformations of the limestones, the timing of the involved processes and the analysis of current carbon fluxes both surface and subsurface

  4. Quantifying Fast and Slow Responses of Terrestrial Carbon Exchange across a Water Availability Gradient in North American Flux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, J. A.; Scott, R. L.; Goulden, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and severity of water limitation, altering terrestrial ecosystems and their carbon exchange with the atmosphere. Here we compare site-level temporal sensitivity of annual carbon fluxes to interannual variations in water availability against cross-site spatial patterns over a network of 19 eddy covariance flux sites. This network represents one order of magnitude in mean annual productivity and includes western North American desert shrublands and grasslands, savannahs, woodlands, and forests with continuous records of 4 to 12 years. Our analysis reveals site-specific patterns not identifiable in prior syntheses that pooled sites. We interpret temporal variability as an indicator of ecosystem response to annual water availability due to fast-changing factors such as leaf stomatal response and microbial activity, while cross-site spatial patterns are used to infer ecosystem adjustment to climatic water availability through slow-changing factors such as plant community and organic carbon pools. Using variance decomposition, we directly quantify how terrestrial carbon balance depends on slow- and fast-changing components of gross ecosystem production (GEP) and total ecosystem respiration (TER). Slow factors explain the majority of variance in annual net ecosystem production (NEP) across the dataset, and their relative importance is greater at wetter, forest sites than desert ecosystems. Site-specific offsets from spatial patterns of GEP and TER explain one third of NEP variance, likely due to slow-changing factors not directly linked to water, such as disturbance. TER and GEP are correlated across sites as previously shown, but our site-level analysis reveals surprisingly consistent linear relationships between these fluxes in deserts and savannahs, indicating fast coupling of TER and GEP in more arid ecosystems. Based on the uncertainty associated with slow and fast factors, we suggest a framework for improved

  5. Response of cbb gene transcription levels of four typical sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to the CO2 concentration and its effect on their carbon fixation efficiency during sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Lei; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Fu, Xiaohua; Hu, Jiajun; Li, Huan; Le, Yiquan

    2016-10-01

    The variability in carbon fixation capability of four sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505, Halothiobacillus neapolitanus DSM 15147, Starkeya novella DSM 506, and Thiomonas intermedia DSM 18155) during sulfur oxidation was studied at low and high concentrations of CO2. The mechanism underlying the variability in carbon fixation was clarified by analyzing the transcription of the cbb gene, which encodes the key enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. DSM 15147 and DSM 505 fixed carbon more efficiently during sulfur oxidation than DSM 506 and DSM 18155 at 0.5% and 10% CO2, which was mainly because their cbb gene transcription levels were much higher than those of DSM 506 and DSM 18155. A high CO2 concentration significantly stimulated the carbon fixation efficiency of DSM 505 by greatly increasing the cbb gene transcription efficiency. Moreover, the influence of the CO2 concentration on the carbon fixation efficiency of the four strains differed greatly during sulfur oxidation. PMID:27542742

  6. Quantifying the effects of soil drainage on carbon storage in boreal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruett, L. E.; Czimczik, C. I.; Harden, J. W.; Trumbore, S.

    2006-12-01

    The accumulation of terrestrial carbon in boreal soils happens predominately in the organic layers and is determined by biological processes. It is, however, strongly influenced by environmental conditions such as perennially cold temperatures and high moisture content. Net primary productivity (NPP) and decomposition, along with fire regimes and the chemical composition of the organic matter, also play a role in determining organic stocks. Carbon stocks in these organic soils usually increase as soil drainage capability lessens due to the suppression of decomposition caused by cool temperatures and a lack of oxygen, as well as a lower risk of loss from fire. Climate change can potentially alter all of these factors and so it is important to understand the current mechanisms for carbon storage in northern ecosystems and the vulnerability of these stores to an altered climate. In this study, we compared paired moderately well- and poorly-drained black spruce stands that burned in 1964, 1930, or 1850 to investigate whether site differences in drainage and temperature were largely responsible for higher carbon storage in the poorly-drained sites. These sites were located within the BOREAS Northern Study area near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. For all sites, the organic soil layers at the poorly drained stands were on average warmer (0.71 to 2.01 ° C) during the growing season (May September) than the moderately well-drained stands. The average temperature of the organic soil during the winter and the mineral soil (both seasons) showed no consistent trends. At all sites, the largest proportion of carbon was present in the organic layers overlying the mineral soil. In both poorly- and moderately well-drained sites, carbon stocks in the upper 20 cm of the soil increased with time since fire to a maximum of about 1.86 g C cm-2 at the 1850 burn. Organic layers were also thicker and carbon stocks were larger at the poorly-, versus moderately well-drained, sites. There was no

  7. Carbon storage in Organic Soils (COrS): Quantifying past variations in carbon accumulation in peatlands of South Wales, UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carless, Donna; Kulessa, Bernd; Street-Perrott, Alayne; Davies, Siwan; Sinnadurai, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Globally, peatlands comprise a vital terrestrial carbon sink, currently estimated to be around 500 PgC (Yu et al., 2011, Gorham, 1991). Within the UK, peatlands represent the single most important terrestrial carbon store (IUCN, 2011). In particular, blanket and raised bogs account for around 23,000 square kilometres or 9.5 percent of the UK land area, with current estimates indicating that they store approximately 3.2 PgC (IUCN, 2011). Recent studies suggest that carbon-sequestration rates have been highly variable during the Holocene (Frolking & Roulet, 2007). Reconstructing these past fluctuations is essential to assess how peatlands will respond to future climate change, particularly the possibility that large amounts of respired below-ground carbon will be released as a result of enhanced rates of decomposition, causing positive climate feedback. Quantitative estimates of past variations in carbon accumulation provide valuable insights into the factors controlling carbon budgets. Recent developments have illustrated how ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can improve constraints on peat thickness (Holden et al., 2002, Warner et al., 1990), facilitating site-specific peat-volume estimates for carbon quantification. We shall present initial results from the COrS project, which brings together a novel combination of geophysical and proxy techniques to reconstruct variations in long-term carbon accumulation in 6 ombrotrophic peat bogs, located across the Brecon Beacons National Park (BBNP), South Wales, UK (51°55'30" N, 3°29'18" W). Detailed GPR surveys are being used to provide comprehensive estimates of total peat extent and thickness at these sites. Combined with surface-elevation data from LiDAR imagery, 3D models are being created, from which total peat-volume estimates will be extracted. Carbon-accumulation rates will be inferred from these bog-volume estimates, coupled with total organic carbon (TOC) measurements and high-resolution radiocarbon dating. In

  8. Reduced Carbon Availability to Bacteroids and Elevated Ureides in Nodules, But Not in Shoots, Are Involved in the Nitrogen Fixation Response to Early Drought in Soybean1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Ladrera, Rubén; Marino, Daniel; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; González, Esther M.; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (NF) in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is highly sensitive to soil drying. This sensitivity has been related to an accumulation of nitrogen compounds, either in shoots or in nodules, and a nodular carbon flux shortage under drought. To assess the relative importance of carbon and nitrogen status on NF regulation, the responses to the early stages of drought were monitored with two soybean cultivars with known contrasting tolerance to drought. In the sensitive cultivar (‘Biloxi’), NF inhibition occurred earlier and was more dramatic than in the tolerant cultivar (‘Jackson’). The carbon flux to bacteroids was also more affected in ‘Biloxi’ than in ‘Jackson’, due to an earlier inhibition of sucrose synthase activity and a larger decrease of malate concentration in the former. Drought provoked ureide accumulation in nodules of both cultivars, but this accumulation was higher and occurred earlier in ‘Biloxi’. However, at this early stage of drought, there was no accumulation of ureides in the leaves of either cultivar. These results indicate that a combination of both reduced carbon flux and nitrogen accumulation in nodules, but not in shoots, is involved in the inhibition of NF in soybean under early drought. PMID:17720761

  9. Reduced carbon availability to bacteroids and elevated ureides in nodules, but not in shoots, are involved in the nitrogen fixation response to early drought in soybean.

    PubMed

    Ladrera, Rubén; Marino, Daniel; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; González, Esther M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2007-10-01

    Nitrogen fixation (NF) in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is highly sensitive to soil drying. This sensitivity has been related to an accumulation of nitrogen compounds, either in shoots or in nodules, and a nodular carbon flux shortage under drought. To assess the relative importance of carbon and nitrogen status on NF regulation, the responses to the early stages of drought were monitored with two soybean cultivars with known contrasting tolerance to drought. In the sensitive cultivar ('Biloxi'), NF inhibition occurred earlier and was more dramatic than in the tolerant cultivar ('Jackson'). The carbon flux to bacteroids was also more affected in 'Biloxi' than in 'Jackson', due to an earlier inhibition of sucrose synthase activity and a larger decrease of malate concentration in the former. Drought provoked ureide accumulation in nodules of both cultivars, but this accumulation was higher and occurred earlier in 'Biloxi'. However, at this early stage of drought, there was no accumulation of ureides in the leaves of either cultivar. These results indicate that a combination of both reduced carbon flux and nitrogen accumulation in nodules, but not in shoots, is involved in the inhibition of NF in soybean under early drought. PMID:17720761

  10. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  11. Silver nanoparticles embedded over porous metal organic frameworks for carbon dioxide fixation via carboxylation of terminal alkynes at ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Molla, Rostam Ali; Ghosh, Kajari; Banerjee, Biplab; Iqubal, Md Asif; Kundu, Sudipta K; Islam, Sk Manirul; Bhaumik, Asim

    2016-09-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) has been supported over a porous Co(II)-salicylate metal-organic framework to yield a new nanocatalyst AgNPs/Co-MOF and it has been thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and N2 adsorption/desorption analysis. The AgNPs/Co-MOF material showed high catalytic activity in the carboxylation of terminal alkynes via CO2 fixation reaction to yield alkynyl carboxylic acids under very mild conditions. Due to the presence of highly reactive AgNPs bound at the porous MOF framework the reaction proceeded smoothly at 1atm CO2 pressure. Moreover, the catalyst is very convenient to handle and it can be reused for several reaction cycles without appreciable loss of catalytic activity in this CO2 fixation reaction, which suggested a promising future of AgNPs/Co-MOF nanocatalyst. PMID:27309859

  12. Quantifying dissolved organic carbon concentrations in upland catchments using phenolic proxy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mike; Burden, Annette; Cooper, Mark; Dunn, Christian; Evans, Chris D.; Fenner, Nathalie; Freeman, Chris; Gough, Rachel; Hughes, David; Hughes, Steve; Jones, Tim; Lebron, Inma; West, Mike; Zieliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    SummaryConcentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil and stream waters in upland catchments are widely monitored, in part due to the potential of DOC to form harmful by-products when chlorinated during treatment of water for public supply. DOC can be measured directly, though this is expensive and time-consuming. Light absorbance in the UV-vis spectrum is often used as a surrogate measurement from which a colour-carbon relationship between absorbance and DOC can be derived, but this relationship can be confounded by numerous variables. Through the analysis of data from eight sites in England and Wales we investigate the possibility of using the concentration of phenolic compounds in water samples as a proxy for DOC concentration. A general model using data from all the sites allowed DOC to be calculated from phenolics at an accuracy of 81-86%. A detailed analysis at one site revealed that a site-specific calibration was more accurate than the general model, and that this compared favourably with a colour-carbon calibration. We therefore recommend this method for use where estimates of DOC concentration are needed, but where time and money are limiting factors, or as an additional method to calculate DOC alongside colour-carbon calibrations. Tests demonstrated only small amounts of phenolic degradation over time; a loss of 0.92 mg L-1 after 8 months in storage, and so this method can be used on older samples with limited loss of accuracy.

  13. QUANTIFYING THE ORGANIC CARBON HELD IN FORESTED SOILS OF THE UNITED STATES AND PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that soils are an important global reservoir of organic carbon (C). In fact, it has been estimated that at 1500 Pg (1Pg = 1015 g) world soils hold approximately three times the amount of C held in vegetation (~560 Pg) and two times that in the atmosphere (~735 P...

  14. METHOD TO QUANTIFY THE CARBON CYCLE OF FOREST BIOMES IN THE FORMER SOVIET UNION (EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activities have caused a measurable increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 which is predicted to cause the earth's temperatures to rise and accelerate rates of plant respiration and the decay of organic matter, disrupting the equilibrium of the terrestrial carbon ...

  15. Quantifying the effects of CO2-fertilized vegetation on future global climate and carbon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S L; Govindasamy, B; Mirin, A; Caldeira, K; Delire, C; Milovich, J; Wickett, M; Erickson, D

    2004-10-13

    Climate and the global carbon cycle are a tightly coupled system where changes in climate affect exchange of atmospheric CO{sup 2} with the land biosphere and the ocean, and vice-versa. In particular, the response of the land biosphere to the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO{sup 2} is not well understood. To evaluate the approximate upper and lower limits of land carbon uptake, we perform simulations using a comprehensive climate-carbon model. In one case the land biosphere is vigorously fertilized by added CO{sup 2} and sequesters carbon throughout the 21st century. In a second case, CO{sup 2} fertilization saturates in year 2000; here the land becomes an additional source of CO{sup 2} by 2050. The predicted atmospheric CO{sup 2} concentration at year 2100 differs by 40% between the two cases. We show that current uncertainties preclude determination of whether the land biosphere will amplify or damp atmospheric CO{sup 2} increases by the end of the century.

  16. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of an Aerial Microalga Trentepohlia jolithus: Pathway Description and Gene Discovery for Carbon Fixation and Carotenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianqian; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao; Liu, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Background Algae in the order Trentepohliales have a broad geographic distribution and are generally characterized by the presence of abundant β-carotene. The many monographs published to date have mainly focused on their morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny, distribution and reproduction; molecular studies of this order are still rare. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology provides a powerful and efficient method for transcript analysis and gene discovery in Trentepohlia jolithus. Methods/Principal Findings Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing generated 55,007,830 Illumina PE raw reads, which were assembled into 41,328 assembled unigenes. Based on NR annotation, 53.28% of the unigenes (22,018) could be assigned to gene ontology classes with 54 subcategories and 161,451 functional terms. A total of 26,217 (63.44%) assembled unigenes were mapped to 128 KEGG pathways. Furthermore, a set of 5,798 SSRs in 5,206 unigenes and 131,478 putative SNPs were identified. Moreover, the fact that all of the C4 photosynthesis genes exist in T. jolithus suggests a complex carbon acquisition and fixation system. Similarities and differences between T. jolithus and other algae in carotenoid biosynthesis are also described in depth. Conclusions/Significance This is the first broad transcriptome survey for T. jolithus, increasing the amount of molecular data available for the class Ulvophyceae. As well as providing resources for functional genomics studies, the functional genes and putative pathways identified here will contribute to a better understanding of carbon fixation and fatty acid and carotenoid biosynthesis in T. jolithus. PMID:25254555

  17. Preferential remineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus and non-Redfield DOM dynamics in the global ocean: Impacts on marine productivity, nitrogen fixation, and carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from the marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool has been reported in several regional studies. Because DOM is an important advective/mixing pathway of carbon (C) export from the ocean surface layer and its non-Redfieldian stoichiometry would affect estimates of marine export production per unit N and P, we investigated the stoichiometry of marine DOM and its remineralization globally using a compiled DOM data set. Marine DOM is enriched in C and N compared to Redfield stoichiometry, averaging 317:39:1 and 810:48:1 for C:N:P within the degradable and total bulk pools, respectively. Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) is found to be preferentially remineralized about twice as rapidly with respect to the enriched C:N stoichiometry of marine DOM. Biogeochemical simulations with the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling model using Redfield and variable DOM stoichiometry corroborate the need for non-Redfield dynamics to match the observed DOM stoichiometry. From our model simulations, preferential DOP remineralization is found to increase the strength of the biological pump by ~9% versus the case of Redfield DOM cycling. Global net primary productivity increases ~10% including an increase in marine nitrogen fixation of ~26% when preferential DOP remineralization and direct utilization of DOP by phytoplankton are included. The largest increases in marine nitrogen fixation, net primary productivity, and carbon export are observed within the western subtropical gyres, suggesting the lateral transfer of P in the form of DOP from the productive eastern and poleward gyre margins may be important for sustaining these processes downstream in the subtropical gyres.

  18. The Majority of Free-Living Autotrophic Bacteria use the Reductive TCA Cycle for Carbon Fixation at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, B. J.; Cary, C.

    2003-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents support large micro and macroscopic communities, without the input of photosynthesis. Autotrophic production at these vents is based on hydrothermal vent fluid chemistry. Primary production has been thought to occur mainly via hydrogen sulfide oxidation through the Calvin-Benson pathway, as measured by the presence of Rubisco in endosymbionts of several invertebrate hosts. Recently, we characterized two fosmids from a large insert library of the epsilon Proteobacterial episymbionts of Alvinella pompejana. Both contained sequences encoding ATP citrate lyase, a key enzyme in the reverse TCA cycle, an alternate carbon dioxide fixation pathway. Previous investigators have demonstrated the dominance of the epsilon subdivision in the free-living bacterial communities at hydrothermal vents. Based on these results, our working hypothesis is: The rTCA cycle is the dominant pathway for carbon fixation in the free-living bacterial communities at hydrothermal vents. A selection of free-living bacterial communities from various geographic locations (9N, East Pacific Rise and Guaymas Basin) were screened for the presence, diversity and expression (via RT-PCR) of Rubisco (forms I and II) and ATP citrate lyase. Our results indicate that the ATP citrate lyase gene is diverse and is consistently expressed in several types of vent communities. The two forms of Rubisco are not consistently present or expressed in the same environments. These results indicate that chemoautotrophic production in the free-living bacterial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents is dominated by bacteria that utilize the rTCA cycle, and parallels the phylogenetic dominance of members of the epsilon subdivision of Proteobacteria.

  19. A New XRD Method to Quantify Plate and Lath Martensites of Hardened Medium-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Quanshun

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces a new technique to separately measure the volume fraction and tetragonal ratio of co-existing lath and plate martensites in ultrahigh strength steel, and to calculate their different carbon contents. First, the two martensites are assumed to have body-centered tetragonal lattice structures of different tetragonal ratios. X-ray diffraction is then applied to obtain the overlapping {200} diffraction peak, which is subsequently separated as four sub-peaks using a self-made multiple Gaussian peak-fitting method to allow the measurement of the individual lattice parameters c and a. Finally, a modified equation is applied to calculate the carbon contents from the obtained tetragonal ratios. The new technique is then applied to investigate the effect of subsequent tempering on the decarbonization of the as-quenched martensites.

  20. A New XRD Method to Quantify Plate and Lath Martensites of Hardened Medium-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Quanshun

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new technique to separately measure the volume fraction and tetragonal ratio of co-existing lath and plate martensites in ultrahigh strength steel, and to calculate their different carbon contents. First, the two martensites are assumed to have body-centered tetragonal lattice structures of different tetragonal ratios. X-ray diffraction is then applied to obtain the overlapping {200} diffraction peak, which is subsequently separated as four sub-peaks using a self-made multiple Gaussian peak-fitting method to allow the measurement of the individual lattice parameters c and a. Finally, a modified equation is applied to calculate the carbon contents from the obtained tetragonal ratios. The new technique is then applied to investigate the effect of subsequent tempering on the decarbonization of the as-quenched martensites.

  1. Importance of In Situ Data in Reducing Uncertainty when Quantifying the African Carbon Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardö, J.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of in situ measurements of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes hamper calibration and validation of continental assessments of carbon budgets in Africa. It limits essential studies of ecosystem functioning and ecosystem processes. Wide reported ranges of estimated African net primary production (NPP) and gross primary production (GPP) is a function of the uncertainty originating from this scarcity of data. GPP estimates, based on vegetation models and remote sensing based models, range from ~17 to ~40 Pg C yr-1 and NPP estimates roughly range from ~7 to ~20 Pg C yr-1 for continental Africa. Differences in modeled carbon use efficiency (i.e. the NPP/GPP ratio) further enhance the uncertainty caused by low spatial resolution driver data sets when deriving NPP from GPP. Current substantial uncertainty in vegetation productivity estimates for Africa (both magnitudes and carbon use efficiency) may be reduced by increased abundance and availability of in situ collected field data including meteorology, radiation, spectral properties, GHG fluxes as well as long term ecological field experiments. Current measurements of GHGs fluxes in Africa are sparse and not well coordinated. The European Fluxes Database Cluster includes ~24 sites with flux data, most of them with a small amount of data in short time series. Large biomes such as the evergreen broad leafed forest are no well represented whereas savannas are slightly better represented. USA for example, with 171 flux site listed in FLUXNET has a flux site density of 17 sites per million km2, whereas Africa has density of 0.8 sites per million km2. Increased collection of data on fluxes of GHGs, ecosystem properties and processes, both through advanced micro meteorological and through cost effective straightforward field experiments can contribute to reduce the uncertainty in quantification of the African carbon budget. Adaptation of crucial resource production systems such as agriculture, pastoralism and forestry, to

  2. Quantifying the differences between Amazon forest biomass maps: uncertainty to be tackled in carbon emission estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ometto, J.; Soler, L.; Assis, T.; Lapola, D.; Aguiar, A. P.; Meir, P.

    2012-12-01

    The current methods adopted to estimate the spatial variation on above- and below-ground biomass in tropical forests, in particular the Brazilian Amazon, are usually based on remote sensing and coupled with scarce and, generally poorly distributed fieldwork measurements. There are notable differences between the resulting published biomass maps and this results in high uncertainty in calculated carbon emissions from deforestation, forest degradation and other changes in the land cover. These uncertainties are particularly critical when biomass maps are coded into biomass classes referring to a specific range of values. The Brazilian Amazon is the largest continuous tropical broadleaf forest in the globe, containing a substantial amount of carbon above and below the soil surface. Analysis of land use change has shown that deforestation in the region is a patchy process, comprising different intensities and dynamics in separate and adjacent areas, such that even if when characterized by broad patterns estimates of carbon emissions can become a complicated task unless spatially accurate biomass maps are available. In this paper we analyze the differences in recently published biomass maps of the Amazon region, considering as well the official information used by the Brazilian government for its communication to the United Framework on Climate Change Convention of the United Nations. From the average biomass at deforestation areas in two different periods (1997 and 2006), maps varied from +20% to -19% in the first period and from +20% to -15% in the later, highlighting the substantial differences in the overall biomass estimate, with clear reflect on carbon emissions in the region.

  3. Quantifying the impact of legal culture and institution on carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Wang, B.; Yu, C.; Deng, H.; Cai, W.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic carbon emissions has been believed to trigger more than half of the global warming over the past half a century. Climate change analysis based on human activities should not neglect the driving force of human society. Different countries or regions have different legal culture traditions and legal systems that can greatly influence regional carbon emissions. This will lead to differences in implementation way and implementation intensity of the law and policies. Without understanding the social and legal background, it is not enough to understand how the climate change rules work and what the effects enforce. Using the panel data of 71 countries from 1996-2010, this study analyzes the effects of macro channels influencing mitigation policies, which contains rules and regulations including value, religion, genealogy of law, public participation, regulatory, government effectiveness, corruption, rule of law, etc. The results show that the interaction between legal variables and economic variables is very important for carbon emissions reduction. The law affects the carbon emissions by adjusting the economic and other related variables, and vice verse, economic and other variables will also impact the level of the rule of law. The study also reveals that developing national economy is most countries' urgent current task, and there are not sound strategies or strong enforcement to guarantee the achievement of the emissions reduction commitment. It is not enough to make justice dominant by cultivating a fair attitude. Practical measures and institutional means for social justice must be promoted. These results will give insight to policy makers in creating feasible and practical climate polices.

  4. Combined geochemical and electrochemical methodology to quantify corrosion of carbon steel by bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Moreira, Rebeca; Bildstein, Olivier; Lartigue, Jean-Eric; Schlegel, Michel L; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent; Libert, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The availability of respiratory substrates, such as H2 and Fe(II,III) solid corrosion products within nuclear waste repository, will sustain the activities of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). This may have a direct effect on the rate of carbon steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of Shewanella oneidensis (an HOB and IRB model organism) on the corrosion rate by looking at carbon steel dissolution in the presence of H2 as the sole electron donor. Bacterial effect is evaluated by means of geochemical and electrochemical techniques. Both showed that the corrosion rate is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of bacteria. The geochemical experiments indicated that the composition and crystallinity of the solid corrosion products (magnetite and vivianite) are modified by bacteria. Moreover, the electrochemical experiments evidenced that the bacterial activity can be stimulated when H2 is generated in a small confinement volume. In this case, a higher corrosion rate and mineralization (vivianite) on the carbon steel surface were observed. The results suggest that the mechanism likely to influence the corrosion rate is the bioreduction of Fe(III) from magnetite coupled to the H2 oxidation. PMID:24064199

  5. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density

  6. Quantifying Carbon-Climate Processes at the Regional Scale Using Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Elliott; Berry, Joe; Torn, Margaret; David, Billesbach; Seibt, Ulrike

    2013-10-08

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) analysis has the potentially transformative capability for partitioning the regional carbon flux into respiration and photosynthesis components. This emerging approach is based on the observation that continental atmospheric CO2 gradients are dominated by net ecosystem fluxes while continental atmospheric COS gradients are dominated by photosynthesis-related plant uptake. Regional flux partitioning represents a critical knowledge gap due to a lack of robust methods for regional-scale flux partitioning and large uncertainties in forecasting carbon-climate feedbacks. Our completed project characterized the relationship between COS and CO2 surface fluxes using a novel measurement and modeling system in a winter wheat field at the U.S. Department of Energy?s Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement program Central Facility (DOE-ARM CF). The scope of this project included canopy flux measurements, soil flux measurements, regional atmospheric modeling, and analysis of COS and CO2 airborne observations at SGP. Three critical discoveries emerged from this investigation: (1) the new measurement system provided the first field evidence of a robust relationship between COS leaf fluxes and GPP; (2) a previously unknown seasonal soil source of COS was observed and characterized; (3) the regional atmospheric analysis of airborne measurements provided the first COS-based constraints on GPP parameterizations used in earth systems models. Dissemination of these results includes three publications [Billesbach et al., In Press; Campbell et al., In Preparation; Seibt et al., In Review], three presentations at the AGU Fall Meeting (2012), and four invited presentations to department seminars. We have leveraged this foundational project to continue our work on understanding carbon cycle processes at large scales through one funded project (DOE Lab Fee, 2012-2015) and one proposal that is under review (DOE/NASA/USDA/NOAA, 2014-2016).

  7. Quantifying the resilience of carbon dynamics in semi-arid biomes in the Southwestern U.S. to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Maurer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Semi-arid biomes in many parts of the Southwestern U.S. have experienced a range of precipitation over the last decade, ranging from wetter than average years 2006-2010 (relative to the 40-year PRISM mean), extreme drought years (2010-2011) and slightly dry-average precipitation years (2013-2015). While annual carbon uptake in semi-arid biomes of the Southwestern US is relatively low, compared to more temperate ecosystems, collectively these biomes store a significant amount of carbon on a regional scale. It is therefore of great interest to understand what impact this range in precipitation variability has on inter- and intra- annual variability in regional carbon dynamics. We use an 9 year record from 2007-2015 of continuous measurements of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re), made across a network of flux towers along an elevation/aridity gradient in New Mexico, the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG), to quantify biome-specific responses of carbon dynamics to climate variability over this time period. Biomes include a desert grassland, creosote shrubland, juniper savanna, piñon-juniper woodland, and ponderosa pine and subalpine mixed conifer forests. We compared daily, seasonal and annual NEP, GPP and Re means between pre-drought (2007-2010), drought (2011-2012), and post-drought years (2013-2015). All biomes sequestered less carbon in the drought years, compared to the pre-drought years (~30-40, 270 and 60 g C/m2 less in low and middle elevation biomes, ponderosa pine, and mixed conifer forest, respectively), as GPP in all biomes was more sensitive to the drought than Re. In the post-drought years, GPP was still only 80-90% what it was in the pre-drought years. Re, however, in all biomes except for the creosote shrubland, was 5-15% higher in the post-drought years compared to pre-drought. As a result, carbon sequestration in these biomes was 20-75% lower in the post

  8. Quantifying uncertainties in soil carbon responses to changes in global mean temperature and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishina, K.; Ito, A.; Beerling, D. J.; Cadule, P.; Ciais, P.; Clark, D. B.; Falloon, P.; Friend, A. D.; Kahana, R.; Kato, E.; Keribin, R.; Lucht, W.; Lomas, M.; Rademacher, T. T.; Pavlick, R.; Schaphoff, S.; Vuichard, N.; Warszawaski, L.; Yokohata, T.

    2014-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon pool in terrestrial ecosystems and may play a key role in biospheric feedbacks with elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in a warmer future world. We examined the simulation results of seven terrestrial biome models when forced with climate projections from four representative-concentration-pathways (RCPs)-based atmospheric concentration scenarios. The goal was to specify calculated uncertainty in global SOC stock projections from global and regional perspectives and give insight to the improvement of SOC-relevant processes in biome models. SOC stocks among the biome models varied from 1090 to 2650 Pg C even in historical periods (ca. 2000). In a higher forcing scenario (i.e., RCP8.5), inconsistent estimates of impact on the total SOC (2099-2000) were obtained from different biome model simulations, ranging from a net sink of 347 Pg C to a net source of 122 Pg C. In all models, the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration in the RCP8.5 scenario considerably contributed to carbon accumulation in SOC. However, magnitudes varied from 93 to 264 Pg C by the end of the 21st century across biome models. Using the time-series data of total global SOC simulated by each biome model, we analyzed the sensitivity of the global SOC stock to global mean temperature and global precipitation anomalies (ΔT and ΔP respectively) in each biome model using a state-space model. This analysis suggests that ΔT explained global SOC stock changes in most models with a resolution of 1-2 °C, and the magnitude of global SOC decomposition from a 2 °C rise ranged from almost 0 to 3.53 Pg C yr-1 among the biome models. However, ΔP had a negligible impact on change in the global SOC changes. Spatial heterogeneity was evident and inconsistent among the biome models, especially in boreal to arctic regions. Our study reveals considerable climate uncertainty in SOC decomposition responses to climate and CO2 change among biome models. Further

  9. Quantifying Typhoon Impact on Net Carbon Ecosystem Exchange in a Sub-tropical Mangrove Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Lu, W.; Yan, G.; Yang, S.; Lin, G.

    2011-12-01

    Although typhoon is a natural disturbance for mangrove forests, research of typhoon impact on net carbon ecosystem exchange (NEE) of mangrove wetlands has not reached final conclusion. In this study we investigated possible effects of typhoons with different forces on the NEE of a subtropical mangrove forest in Fujian, China (117°23'E, 23°55'N). In 2010, Typhoon Lionrock, Fanapi and Megi made landfall with a speed of 23, 35 and 38 m s-1 near our mangrove field station in Zhangjiang Estuary National Mangrove Nature Reserve on September 2, September 20 and October 23, respectively. In October 2009, total of 16 litter traps and an eddy covariance system were instated at this field station. Litter production was monitored at the biweekly intervals while the NEE was measured continuously. The litter production and NEE values were compared before and after each typhoon landed. Strong winds and torrential rains from these typhoons caused the amount of litter production more than double over the same period a year before when there was no typhoon landing. Moreover, about 5~25% green leaves and twigs were found in the litter traps after the typhoons, indicating significant defoliation by the typhoons. Typhoon Lionrock and Fanapi did not significantly reduce NEE, while Typhoo Fanapi reduced gross ecosystem production (GEP) by about 12%. However, NEE was increased by Typhoon Megi, which resulted from lower daily ecosystem respiration (Re) following the typhoon. Our results indicate that, although theses typhoons caused significant defoliation, they had little effect on ecosystem carbon exchange over the short periods following the typhoons.

  10. Quantifying the erosion effect on current carbon budget of European agricultural soils at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Emanuele; Paustian, Keith; Panagos, Panos; Jones, Arwyn; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    The idea of offsetting anthropogenic CO2 emissions by increasing global soil organic carbon (SOC), as recently proposed by French authorities ahead of COP21 in the 'four per mil' initiative, is notable. However, a high uncertainty still exits on land C balance components. In particular, the role of erosion in the global C cycle is not totally disentangled, leading to disagreement whether this process induces lands to be a source or sink of CO2. To investigate this issue, we coupled soil erosion into a biogeochemistry model, running at 1 km(2) resolution across the agricultural soils of the European Union (EU). Based on data-driven assumptions, the simulation took into account also soil deposition within grid cells and the potential C export to riverine systems, in a way to be conservative in a mass balance. We estimated that 143 of 187 Mha have C erosion rates <0.05 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1), although some hot-spot areas showed eroded SOC >0.45 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1). In comparison with a baseline without erosion, the model suggested an erosion-induced sink of atmospheric C consistent with previous empirical-based studies. Integrating all C fluxes for the EU agricultural soils, we estimated a net C loss or gain of -2.28 and +0.79 Tg yr(-1) of CO2 eq, respectively, depending on the value for the short-term enhancement of soil C mineralization due to soil disruption and displacement/transport with erosion. We concluded that erosion fluxes were in the same order of current carbon gains from improved management. Even if erosion could potentially induce a sink for atmospheric CO2, strong agricultural policies are needed to prevent or reduce soil erosion, in order to maintain soil health and productivity. PMID:26679897

  11. Torsional moment to failure for carbon fibre polysulphone expandable rivets as compared with stainless steel screws for carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy fracture plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Sell, P J; Prakash, R; Hastings, G W

    1989-04-01

    A method of securing carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates with carbon fibre polysulphone expanding rivets was investigated. Six carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates were secured to rods with carbon fibre polysulphone rivets and six were secured with standard cortical stainless steel screws. These constructions were then subjected to pure torsional load to failure. The carbon fibre expandable rivets failed at a greater torsional moment. PMID:2720038

  12. A framework to quantify the determinants of canopy photosynthesis and carbon uptake using time series of chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, J. R.; Cushman, K. C.; Kendrick, J. A.; Silva, C. E.; Wiseman, S. M.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainty over the sign and magnitude of environmental forcing agents on fluxes of tropical forest carbon could be reduced with measurements of canopy photosynthesis. But no existing method can quantify photosynthesis within individual plants at scales larger than a few cm. Portable leaf chambers can determine leaf-level gas exchange, and eddy-covariance instruments infer the net ecosystem-atmosphere carbon flux. These endpoints represent an axis of granularity and extent. Single leaf measurements are finely grained, but necessarily limited in extent, and gas exchange for whole landscapes cannot resolve the performance or contributions of individual plants. This limits the ability of scientists to test mechanistic demographic and physiological hypotheses about the drivers of photosynthesis in ecosystems, and therefore to understand the determinants of carbon fluxes between tropical ecosystems and the atmosphere. Here I describe a framework to overcome these challenges using a program of drone-enabled remote sensing measurements of solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) coupled with ground-based physiological studies to understand the determinants of photosynthesis within leaves, individual organisms and large landscapes. The Brown Platform for Autonomous Remote Sensing (BPAR) is a suite of sensors carried by a gas-powered helicopter drone. By conducting frequent, low-altitude flights BPAR can produce VNIR imaging spectroscopy time series with measurements separated by minutes to hours at ground sample distances of 1 cm. The talk will focus on how measurements of SIF at these spatial and temporal scales can be coupled with models to infer the rate of electron transport and carbon assimilation.

  13. Lidar based vegetation height models to quantify carbon stocks in Galveston saltmarshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulawardhana, R. W.; Popescu, S. C.; Feagin, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Concern over global climate change has stimulated much interest in identifying existing and potential carbon sinks. Wetland ecosystems are highly recognized for their high productivity and thus as major terrestrial carbon (C) sinks. The rapid decline in the extent and health of these wetland ecosystems has created a need for non-destructive methods for the study of their C dynamics. However, these biomass estimates are mostly based on vegetation structural properties, particularly based on vegetation height models. Hence, for better quantification of vegetation biomass and C estimates, the accuracy of vegetation height models derived using lidar data is of paramount importance. Yet, unlike in woody vegetation dominated ecosystems, the use of lidar in saltmarshes is limited due to several reasons: 1) relatively dense vegetation cover limits laser penetration affecting the accuracy of terrain and thus vegetation height estimates; and 2) relatively shorter vegetation demands high point density data with high vertical accuracy to capture relatively smaller differences between terrain and vegetation canopy surfaces. Thus, the use of lidar data to characterize saltmarsh vegetation community demands appropriate methodologies. Our overall objective in this study was to develop a methodology for deriving salt marsh vegetation height models using airborne lidar data. More specific objectives involved: (1) understanding the interaction between discrete-return airborne lidar data and marsh vegetation; (2) finding appropriate grid sizes for deriving terrain and vegetation height models; and (3) analyze lidar-derived surface accuracies by comparing estimates to field measurements. In this study, we used 1m point spacing airborne lidar data from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) program to derive vegetation height models (VHM) for Spartina alterniflora saltmarshes in Galveston, Texas. We first derived digital terrain models (DEMs) and verified their vertical accuracy

  14. Quantifying understorey vegetation in the US Lake States: a proposed framework to inform regional forest carbon stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Matthew B.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Schulz, Bethany K.; Woodall, Christopher W.; Domke, Grant M.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of understorey vegetation (UVEG) to forest ecosystem biomass and carbon (C) across diverse forest types has, to date, eluded quantification at regional and national scales. Efforts to quantify UVEG C have been limited to field-intensive studies or broad-scale modelling approaches lacking field measurements. Although large-scale inventories of UVEG C are not common, species- and community-level inventories of vegetation structure are available and may prove useful in quantifying UVEG C stocks. This analysis developed a general framework for estimating UVEG C stocks by employing per cent cover estimates of UVEG from a region-wide forest inventory coupled with an estimate of maximum UVEG C across the US Lake States (i.e. Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin). Estimates of UVEG C stocks from this approach reasonably align with expected C stocks in the study region, ranging from 0.86 ± 0.06 Mg ha-1 in red pine-dominated to 1.59 ± 0.06 Mg ha-1 for aspen/birch-dominated forest types. Although the data employed here were originally collected to assess broad-scale forest structure and diversity, this study proposes a framework for using UVEG inventories as a foundation for estimating C stocks in an often overlooked, yet important ecosystem C pool.

  15. Improved field methods to quantify methane oxidation in landfill cover materials using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Chanton, J P; Powelson, D K; Abichou, T; Hater, G

    2008-02-01

    Stable carbon isotopes provide a robust approach toward quantification of methanotrophic activity in landfill covers. The field method often applied to date has compared the delta13C of emitted to anaerobic zone CH4. Recent laboratory mass balance studies have indicated thatthis approach tends to underestimate CH4 oxidation. Therefore, we examined the CH4-delta13C at various soil depths in field settings and compared these values to emitted CH4. At 5-10 cm depth, we observed the most enrichment in CH4-delta13C (-46.0 to -32.1 per thousand). Emitted CH4-delta13C was more negative, ranging from -56.5 to -43.0 per thousand. The decrease in CH4-delta13C values from the shallow subsurface to the surface is the result of processes that result in selective emission of 12CH4 and selective retention of 13CH4 within the soil. Seasonal percent oxidation was calculated at seven sites representing four cover materials. Probe samples averaged greater (21 +/- 2%, p < 0.001, n = 7) oxidation than emitted CH4 data. We argue that calculations of fraction oxidized based on soil derived CH4 should yield upper limit values. When considered with emitted CH4 values, this combined approach will more realistically bracket the actual oxidation value. Following this guideline, we found the percent oxidation to be 23 +/- 3% and 38 +/- 16% for four soil and three compost covers, respectively. PMID:18323085

  16. Quantifying component diversities along temporal and geographic gradients in Cenozoic circumalpine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebelsick, James; Bassi, Davide; Nitsch, Florian; Grun, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the component relationships within indurated carbonates which can dominate sedimentary sequence. The data for the analysis is gained by point counting of numerous thin sections. Resolution of component identification is dependent on various factors including the presence and recognition of taxon specific character in the two dimensions available in thin sections; the microtaphofacies of the environment of deposition and component architectures determine fragmentation, abrasion, encrustation and bioerosion rates as well as diagenetic pathways. The highest taxonomic resolution is reached by coralline algae and larger foraminifera which are indentified using characters derived from thin sections. Multivariate analysis (MDS, Cluster analysis) is used to component distributions within and between facies as well as localities. Component relationships, in part directly deduced within encrustation sequences, are explored using bivariate analysis. Studied thin sections originate from detailed studies of localities both north (Southern Germany, Austria) and south (Northern Italy, Slovenia) and of the Alps. Detailed facies analysis, itself often based on statistical analysis of components, show variations in environmental factors at different scales including local shelf gradients and terrigenous influx, regional paleogeographic developments within the Mediterranean Tethys and Paratethys as well as global climatic change during the Oligocene and crossing into the Miocene. The localities differ in the diversity and abundance of a wide variety of components including coralline algae, smaller and larger benthic foraminifera, corals, bryozoans, barnacles and echinoderms among others. Generic and species identification of both coralline algae and larger foraminiferal taxa allow taxonomic gradients to be established.

  17. Toward Quantifying the Electrostatic Transduction Mechanism in Carbon Nanotube Biomolecular Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Kybert, Nicholas; Mendoza, Ryan; Dailey, Jennifer; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2013-03-01

    Despite the great promise of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) for applications in chemical and biochemical detection, a quantitative understanding of sensor responses is lacking. To explore the role of electrostatics in sensor transduction, experiments were conducted with a set of similar compounds designed to adsorb onto the CNT FET via a pyrene linker group and take on a set of known charge states under ambient conditions. Acidic and basic species were observed to induce threshold voltage shifts of opposite sign, consistent with gating of the CNT FET by local charges due to protonation or deprotonation of the pyrene compounds by interfacial water. The magnitude of the gate voltage shift was controlled by the distance between the charged group and the CNT. Additionally, functionalization with an uncharged pyrene compound showed a threshold shift ascribed to its molecular dipole moment. This work illustrates a method for producing CNT FETs with controlled values of the turnoff gate voltage, and more generally, these results will inform the development of quantitative models for the response of CNT FET chemical and biochemical sensors. As an example, the results of an experiment detecting biomarkers of Lyme disease will be discussed in the context of this model.

  18. [Quantifying rice (Oryza sativa L.) photo-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    PubMed

    Nie, San-An; Zhou, Ping; Ge, Ti-Da; Tong, Cheng-Li; Xiao, He-Ai; Wu, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Yang-Zhu

    2012-04-01

    The microcosm experiment was carried out to quantify the input and distribution of photo-assimilated C into soil C pools by using a 14C continuous labeling technique. Destructive samplings of rice (Oryza sativa) were conducted after labeling for 80 days. The allocation of 14C-labeled photosynthates in plants and soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) in rice-planted soil were examined over the 14C labeling span. The amounts of rice shoot and root biomass C was ranged from 1.86 to 5.60 g x pot(-1), 0.46 to 0.78 g x pot(-1) in different tested paddy soils after labeling for 80 days, respectively. The amount of 14C in the soil organic C (14C-SOC) was also dependent on the soils, ranged from 114.3 to 348.2 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 5.09% to 6.62% of the rice biomass 14C, respectively. The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C(14C-MBC), as proportions of 14C-SOC, were 2.21%-3.54% and 9.72% -17.2%, respectively. The 14C-DOC, 14C-MBC, and 14C-SOC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, and SOC, respectively, were 6.72% -14.64%, 1.70% -7.67%, and 0.73% -1.99%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of root-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than on the dynamics of SOC. Further studies are required to ascertain the functional significance of soil microorganisms (such as C-sequestering bacteria and photosynthetic bacteria) in the paddy system. PMID:22720588

  19. Quantifying the sampling error in tree census measurements by volunteers and its effect on carbon stock estimates.

    PubMed

    Butt, Nathalie; Slade, Eleanor; Thompson, Jill; Malhi, Yadvinder; Riutta, Terhi

    2013-06-01

    A typical way to quantify aboveground carbon in forests is to measure tree diameters and use species-specific allometric equations to estimate biomass and carbon stocks. Using "citizen scientists" to collect data that are usually time-consuming and labor-intensive can play a valuable role in ecological research. However, data validation, such as establishing the sampling error in volunteer measurements, is a crucial, but little studied, part of utilizing citizen science data. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the quality of tree diameter and height measurements carried out by volunteers compared to expert scientists and (2) estimate how sensitive carbon stock estimates are to these measurement sampling errors. Using all diameter data measured with a diameter tape, the volunteer mean sampling error (difference between repeated measurements of the same stem) was 9.9 mm, and the expert sampling error was 1.8 mm. Excluding those sampling errors > 1 cm, the mean sampling errors were 2.3 mm (volunteers) and 1.4 mm (experts) (this excluded 14% [volunteer] and 3% [expert] of the data). The sampling error in diameter measurements had a small effect on the biomass estimates of the plots: a volunteer (expert) diameter sampling error of 2.3 mm (1.4 mm) translated into 1.7% (0.9%) change in the biomass estimates calculated from species-specific allometric equations based upon diameter. Height sampling error had a dependent relationship with tree height. Including height measurements in biomass calculations compounded the sampling error markedly; the impact of volunteer sampling error on biomass estimates was +/- 15%, and the expert range was +/- 9%. Using dendrometer bands, used to measure growth rates, we calculated that the volunteer (vs. expert) sampling error was 0.6 mm (vs. 0.3 mm), which is equivalent to a difference in carbon storage of +/- 0.011 kg C/yr (vs. +/- 0.002 kg C/yr) per stem. Using a citizen science model for monitoring carbon stocks not only has

  20. Quantifying the effects of harvesting on carbon fluxes and stocks in northern temperate forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Xiao, J.; Ollinger, S. V.; Desai, A. R.; Chen, J.; Noormets, A.

    2014-12-01

    Harvest disturbance has substantial impacts on forest carbon (C) fluxes and stocks. The quantification of these effects is essential for the better understanding of forest C dynamics and informing forest management in the context of global change. We used a process-based forest ecosystem model, PnET-CN, to evaluate how, and by what mechanisms, clear-cuts alter ecosystem C fluxes, aboveground C stocks (AGC), and leaf area index (LAI) in northern temperate forests. We compared C fluxes and stocks predicted by the model and observed at two chronosequences of eddy covariance flux sites for deciduous broadleaf forests (DBF) and evergreen needleleaf forests (ENF) in the Upper Midwest region of northern Wisconsin and Michigan, USA. The average normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) and the Willmott index of agreement (d) for carbon fluxes, LAI, and AGC in the two chronosequences were 20% and 0.90, respectively. Simulated gross primary productivity (GPP) increased with stand age, reaching a maximum (1200-1500 g C m-2 yr-1) at 11-30 years of age, and leveled off thereafter (900-1000 g C m-2 yr-1). Simulated ecosystem respiration (ER) for both plant functional types (PFTs) was initially as high as 700-1000 g C m-2 yr-1 in the first or second year after harvesting, decreased with age (400-800 g C m-2 yr-1) before canopy closure at 10-25 years of age, and increased to 800-900 g C m-2 yr-1 with stand development after canopy recovery. Simulated net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for both PFTs was initially negative, with net C losses of 400-700 g C m-2 yr-1 for 6-17 years after clear-cuts, reaching peak values of 400-600 g C m-2 yr-1 at 14-29 years of age, and eventually stabilizing in mature forests (> 60 years old), with a weak C sink (100-200 g C m-2 yr-1). The decline of NEP with age was caused by the relative flattening of GPP and gradual increase of ER. ENF recovered more slowly from a net C source to a net sink, and lost more C than DBF. This suggests that in general

  1. Evaluation of Three Field-Based Methods for Quantifying Soil Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Charles W.; Wielopolski, Lucian; Ebinger, Michael H.; Reeves, James B.; Thomson, Allison M.; Francis, Barry; Mitra, Sudeep; Rappaport, Aaron G.; Etchevers, Jorge D.; Sayre, Kenneth D.; Govaerts, Bram; McCarty, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Three advanced technologies to measure soil carbon (C) density (g C m−2) are deployed in the field and the results compared against those obtained by the dry combustion (DC) method. The advanced methods are: a) Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), b) Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and c) Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The measurements and soil samples were acquired at Beltsville, MD, USA and at Centro International para el Mejoramiento del Maíz y el Trigo (CIMMYT) at El Batán, Mexico. At Beltsville, soil samples were extracted at three depth intervals (0–5, 5–15, and 15–30 cm) and processed for analysis in the field with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. The INS instrument determined soil C density to a depth of 30 cm via scanning and stationary measurements. Subsequently, soil core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for soil bulk density (kg m−3), C concentration (g kg−1) by DC, and results reported as soil C density (kg m−2). Results from each technique were derived independently and contributed to a blind test against results from the reference (DC) method. A similar procedure was employed at CIMMYT in Mexico employing but only with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. Following conversion to common units, we found that the LIBS, DRIFTS, and INS results can be compared directly with those obtained by the DC method. The first two methods and the standard DC require soil sampling and need soil bulk density information to convert soil C concentrations to soil C densities while the INS method does not require soil sampling. We conclude that, in comparison with the DC method, the three instruments (a) showed acceptable performances although further work is needed to improve calibration techniques and (b) demonstrated their portability and their capacity to perform under field conditions. PMID:23383225

  2. Radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements to quantify sources of atmospheric carbon monoxide in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klouda, George A.; Connolly, Michael V.

    Atmospheric air samples were collected during the winter of 1989-1990 in Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A., for radiocarbon ( 14C) analysis of carbon monoxide (CO). An experimental sample design was prepared to target periods when the concentration of CO exceeds the 9 μl l-1 (volume fraction), 8 h National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and during periods of attainment. Sampling sites, time of day, sampling duration, and meteorology were carefully considered so that source impacts be optimal. A balanced sampling factorial design was used to yield maximum information from the constraints imposed; the number of samples was limited by the number of sample canisters available, time and resources. Radiocarbon measurements of urban CO, " clean-air" CO background from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, average (wood) logs and oxygenated-gasolines were used in a three-source model to calculate the contribution of wood burning to the total atmospheric CO burden in Albuquerque. Results show that the estimated fractional contribution of residential wood combustion (Θ' Rwc) ranged from 0 to 0.30 of CO concentrations corrected for " clean-air" background. For these same samples, the respective CO concentrations attributed to wood burning range from 0 to 0.90 μmol mol -1 (mole fraction), well below the NAAQS. In all cases, fossil CO is the predominant source of ambient CO concentrations ranging from 0.96 to 6.34 μmol mol -1 A final comment is made on the potential of fossil CO measurements as an indirect tracer of atmospheric benzene, relevant to exposure risk estimates of motor vehicle emissions and occupational health and safety standards.

  3. Evaluation of Three Field-Based Methods for Quantifying Soil Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Charles W.; Wielopolski, Lucien; Ebinger, Michael H.; Reeves, James B.; Thomson, Allison M.; Harris, Ron; Francis, Barry; Mitra, S.; Rappaport, Aaron; Etchevers, Jorge; Sayre, Ken D.; Govaerts, Bram; McCarty, G. W.

    2013-01-31

    Three advanced technologies to measure soil carbon (C) density (g C m22) are deployed in the field and the results compared against those obtained by the dry combustion (DC) method. The advanced methods are: a) Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), b) Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and c) Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The measurements and soil samples were acquired at Beltsville, MD, USA and at Centro International para el Mejoramiento del Maiz y el Trigo (CIMMYT) at El Bata´n, Mexico. At Beltsville, soil samples were extracted at three depth intervals (0–5, 5–15, and 15–30 cm) and processed for analysis in the field with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. The INS instrument determined soil C density to a depth of 30 cm via scanning and stationary measurements. Subsequently, soil core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for soil bulk density (kg m23), C concentration (g kg21) by DC, and results reported as soil C density (kg m22). Results from each technique were derived independently and contributed to a blind test against results from the reference (DC) method. A similar procedure was employed at CIMMYT in Mexico employing but only with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. Following conversion to common units, we found that the LIBS, DRIFTS, and INS results can be compared directly with those obtained by the DC method. The first two methods and the standard DC require soil sampling and need soil bulk density information to convert soil C concentrations to soil C densities while the INS method does not require soil sampling. We conclude that, in comparison with the DC method, the three instruments (a) showed acceptable performances although further work is needed to improve calibration techniques and (b) demonstrated their portability and their capacity to perform under field conditions.

  4. Quantifying Grassland-to-Woodland Transitions and the Implications for Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in the Southwest United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessman, Carol A.; Archer, Steven R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Bateson, C. Ann

    2004-01-01

    Replacement of grasslands and savannas by shrublands and woodlands has been widely reported in tropical, temperate and high-latitude rangelands worldwide (Archer 1994). These changes in vegetation structure may reflect historical shifts in climate and land use; and are likely to influence biodiversity, productivity, above- and below ground carbon and nitrogen sequestration and biophysical aspects of land surface-atmosphere interactions. The goal of our proposed research is to investigate how changes in the relative abundance of herbaceous and woody vegetation affect carbon and nitrogen dynamics across heterogeneous savannas and shrub/woodlands. By linking actual land-cover composition (derived through spectral mixture analysis of AVIRIS, TM, and AVHRR imagery) with a process-based ecosystem model, we will generate explicit predictions of the C and N storage in plants and soils resulting from changes in vegetation structure. Our specific objectives will be to (1) continue development and test applications of spectral mixture analysis across grassland-to-woodland transitions; (2) quantify temporal changes in plant and soil C and N storage and turnover for remote sensing and process model parameterization and verification; and (3) couple landscape fraction maps to an ecosystem simulation model to observe biogeochemical dynamics under changing landscape structure and climatological forcings.

  5. Estimated stocks of circumpolar permafrost carbon with quantified uncertainty ranges and identified data gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugelius, G.; Strauss, J.; Zubrzycki, S.; Harden, J. W.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Ping, C.-L.; Schirrmeister, L.; Grosse, G.; Michaelson, G. J.; Koven, C. D.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Elberling, B.; Mishra, U.; Camill, P.; Yu, Z.; Palmtag, J.; Kuhry, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soils and other unconsolidated deposits in the northern circumpolar permafrost region store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). This SOC is potentially vulnerable to remobilization following soil warming and permafrost thaw, but SOC stock estimates were poorly constrained and quantitative error estimates were lacking. This study presents revised estimates of permafrost SOC stocks, including quantitative uncertainty estimates, in the 0-3 m depth range in soils as well as for sediments deeper than 3 m in deltaic deposits of major rivers and in the Yedoma region of Siberia and Alaska. Revised estimates are based on significantly larger databases compared to previous studies. Despite this there is evidence of significant remaining regional data gaps. Estimates remain particularly poorly constrained for soils in the High Arctic region and physiographic regions with thin sedimentary overburden (mountains, highlands and plateaus) as well as for deposits below 3 m depth in deltas and the Yedoma region. While some components of the revised SOC stocks are similar in magnitude to those previously reported for this region, there are substantial differences in other components, including the fraction of perennially frozen SOC. Upscaled based on regional soil maps, estimated permafrost region SOC stocks are 217 ± 12 and 472 ± 27 Pg for the 0-0.3 and 0-1 m soil depths, respectively (±95% confidence intervals). Storage of SOC in 0-3 m of soils is estimated to 1035 ± 150 Pg. Of this, 34 ± 16 Pg C is stored in poorly developed soils of the High Arctic. Based on generalized calculations, storage of SOC below 3 m of surface soils in deltaic alluvium of major Arctic rivers is estimated as 91 ± 52 Pg. In the Yedoma region, estimated SOC stocks below 3 m depth are 181 ± 54 Pg, of which 74 ± 20 Pg is stored in intact Yedoma (late Pleistocene ice- and organic-rich silty sediments) with the remainder in refrozen thermokarst deposits. Total estimated SOC storage for the

  6. Quantifying Black Carbon emissions in high northern latitudes using an Atmospheric Bayesian Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Thompson, Rona; Stohl, Andreas; Shevchenko, Vladimir P.

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the main light absorbing aerosol species and it has important impacts on air quality, weather and climate. The major source of BC is incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and the burning of biomass or bio-fuels (soot). Therefore, to understand to what extent BC affects climate change and pollutant dynamics, accurate knowledge of the emissions, distribution and variation of BC is required. Most commonly, BC emission inventory datasets are built by "bottom up" approaches based on activity data and emissions factors, but these methods are considered to have large uncertainty (Cao et al, 2006). In this study, we have used a Bayesian Inversion to estimate spatially resolved BC emissions. Emissions are estimated monthly for 2014 and over the domain from 180°W to 180°E and 50°N to 90°N. Atmospheric transport is modeled using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; 2005), and the inversion framework, FLEXINVERT, developed by Thompson and Stohl, (2014). The study domain is of particular interest concerning the identification and estimation of BC sources. In contrast to Europe and North America, where BC sources are comparatively well documented as a result of intense monitoring, only one station recording BC concentrations exists in the whole of Siberia. In addition, emissions from gas flaring by the oil industry have been geographically misplaced in most emission inventories and may be an important source of BC at high latitudes since a significant proportion of the total gas flared occurs at these high latitudes (Stohl et al., 2013). Our results show large differences with the existing BC inventories, whereas the estimated fluxes improve modeled BC concentrations with respect to observations. References Cao, G. et al. Atmos. Environ., 40, 6516-6527, 2006. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Environ., 32(24), 4245-4264, 1998. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5(9), 2461-2474, 2005. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13

  7. Latarjet Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  8. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br- afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  9. Quantifying pyroconvective injection heights using observations of fire energy: sensitivity of spaceborne observations of carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzi, S.; Palmer, P. I.; Paugam, R.; Wooster, M.; Deeter, M. N.

    2015-04-01

    We use observations of active fire area and fire radiative power (FRP) from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS), together with a parameterized plume rise model, to estimate biomass burning injection heights during 2006. We use these injection heights in the GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry) atmospheric chemistry transport model to vertically distribute biomass burning emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and to study the resulting atmospheric distribution. For 2006, we use over half a million FRP and fire area observations as input to the plume rise model. We find that convective heat fluxes and active fire area typically lie in the range of 1-100 kW m-2 and 0.001-100 ha, respectively, although in rare circumstances the convective heat flux can exceed 500 kW m-2. The resulting injection heights have a skewed probability distribution with approximately 80% of the injections remaining within the local boundary layer (BL), with occasional injection height exceeding 8 km. We do not find a strong correlation between the FRP-inferred surface convective heat flux and the resulting injection height, with environmental conditions often acting as a barrier to rapid vertical mixing even where the convective heat flux and active fire area are large. We also do not find a robust relationship between the underlying burnt vegetation type and the injection height. We find that CO columns calculated using the MODIS-inferred injection height (MODIS-INJ) are typically -9 to +6% different to the control calculation in which emissions are emitted into the BL, with differences typically largest over the point of emission. After applying MOPITT (Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere) v5 scene-dependent averaging kernels we find that we are much less sensitive to our choice of injection height profile. The differences between the MOPITT and the model CO columns (max bias ~ 50%), due largely to uncertainties in emission inventories, are

  10. High-Gravity Carbonation Process for Enhancing CO2 Fixation and Utilization Exemplified by the Steelmaking Industry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chen, Chun-Da; Shen, Ai-Lin; Lin, Michael; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-10-20

    The high-gravity carbonation process for CO2 mineralization and product utilization as a green cement was evaluated using field operation data from the steelmaking industry. The effect of key operating factors, including rotation speed, liquid-to-solid ratio, gas flow rate, and slurry flow rate, on CO2 removal efficiency was studied. The results indicated that a maximal CO2 removal of 97.3% was achieved using basic oxygen furnace slag at a gas-to-slurry ratio of 40, with a capture capacity of 165 kg of CO2 per day. In addition, the product with different carbonation conversions (i.e., 0%, 17%, and 48%) was used as supplementary cementitious materials in blended cement at various substitution ratios (i.e., 0%, 10%, and 20%). The performance of the blended cement mortar, including physicochemical properties, morphology, mineralogy, compressive strength, and autoclave soundness, was evaluated. The results indicated that the mortar with a high carbonation conversion of slag exhibited a higher mechanical strength in the early stage than pure portland cement mortar, suggesting its suitability for use as a high early strength cement. It also possessed superior soundness compared to the mortar using fresh slag. Furthermore, the optimal operating conditions of the high-gravity carbonation were determined by response surface models for maximizing CO2 removal efficiency and minimizing energy consumption. PMID:26397167

  11. Orthopedic prosthesis fixation.

    PubMed

    Park, J B

    1992-01-01

    The fixation of orthopedic implants has been one of the most difficult and challenging problems. The fixation can be achieved via: (a) direct mechanical fixation using screws, pins, wires, etc.; (b) passive or interference mechanical fixation where the implants are allowed to move or merely positioned onto the tissue surfaces; (c) bone cement fixation which is actually a grouting material; (d) biological fixation by allowing tissues to grow into the interstices of pores or textured surfaces of implants; (e) direct chemical bonding between implant and tissues; or (f) any combination of the above techniques. This article is concerned with various fixation techniques including the potential use of electrical, pulsed electromagnetic field, chemical stimulation using calcium phosphates for the enhancement of tissue ingrowth, direct bonding with bone by glass-ceramics and resorbable particle impregnated bone cement to take advantages of both the immediate fixation offered by the bone cement and long term fixation due to tissue ingrowth. PMID:1449228

  12. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br(-) afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity. PMID:27365001

  13. Biological carbon fixation: A study of Isochrysis sp. growth under actual coal-fired power plant's flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    >Liyana Yahya, Muhammad Nazry Chik, Mohd Asyraf Mohd Azmir Pang,

    2013-06-01

    Preliminary study on the growth of marine microalgae Isochrysis sp. was carried out using actual flue gas from a coal-fired power station. The species was cultured using a 2×10-L customized bubble column photobioreactor skid under specified culture conditions. With an initial culture density of 0.459 Abs (optical density at 560 nm wavelength), the species was found able to survive - observed by increases in optical densities, number of cells and weights - in the presence of actual coal-fired flue gas containing on average 4.08 % O2, 200.21 mg/m3 SO2, 212.29 mg/m3 NOx, 4.73 % CO2 and 50.72 mg/m3 CO. Results thus add value to the potential and capability of microalgae, especially for Isochrysis sp., to be the biological carbon fixer in neutralizing carbon emissions from power plants.

  14. Involvement of Photosynthetic Carbon Reduction Cycle Intermediates in CO2 Fixation and O2 Evolution by Isolated Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, Bernice; Eley, J. H.; Gibbs, Martin

    1971-01-01

    The photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle intermediates can be divided into three classes according to their effects on the rate of photosynthetic CO2 evolution by whole spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts and on their ability to affect reversal of certain inhibitors (nigericin, arsenate, arsenite, iodoacetate, antimycin A) of photosynthesis: class I (maximal): fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, ribose-5-phosphate; class 2 (slight): glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, ribulose-1, 5-diphosphate; class 3 (variable): glycerate 3-phosphate. While class 1 compounds influence the photosynthetic rate, they do not lower the Michaelis constant of the chloroplast for bicarbonate or affect strongly other photosynthetic properties such as the isotopic distribution pattern. It was concluded that the class 1 compounds influence the chloroplast by not only supplying components to the carbon cycle but also by activating or stabilizing a structural component of the chloroplast. PMID:16657865

  15. Diversity of freshwater Epsilonproteobacteria and dark inorganic carbon fixation in the sulphidic redoxcline of a meromictic karstic lake.

    PubMed

    Noguerola, Imma; Picazo, Antonio; Llirós, Marc; Camacho, Antonio; Borrego, Carles M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfidic redoxclines are a suitable niche for the growth and activity of different chemo- and photolithotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microbial groups such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). We have investigated the diversity, abundance and contribution to inorganic carbon uptake of Epsilonproteobacteria in a meromictic basin of Lake Banyoles. CARD-FISH counts revealed that Epsilonproteobacteria were prevalent at the redoxcline in winter (maximum abundance of 2 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), ≈60% of total cells) but they were nearly absent in summer, when GSB bloomed. This seasonal trend was supported by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag datasets, which revealed that the epsilonproteobacterial community was mainly composed of a member of the genus Arcobacter. In situ incubations using NaH(14)CO3 and MAR-CARD-FISH observations showed that this population assimilated CO2 in the dark, likely being mainly responsible for the autotrophic activity at the redoxcline in winter. Clone libraries targeting the aclB gene provided additional evidence of the potential capacity of these epsilonproteobacteria to fix carbon via rTCA cycle. Our data reinforce the key role of Epsilonproteobacteria in linking carbon and sulphur cycles, extend their influence to freshwater karstic lakes and raise questions about the actual contribution of chemolithotrophy at their redoxcline and euxinic water compartments. PMID:26195601

  16. NifA- and CooA-Coordinated cowN Expression Sustains Nitrogen Fixation by Rhodobacter capsulatus in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Pfänder, Yvonne; Fehringer, Maria; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus fixes atmospheric dinitrogen via two nitrogenases, Mo- and Fe-nitrogenase, which operate under different conditions. Here, we describe the functions in nitrogen fixation and regulation of the rcc00574 (cooA) and rcc00575 (cowN) genes, which are located upstream of the structural genes of Mo-nitrogenase, nifHDK. Disruption of cooA or cowN specifically impaired Mo-nitrogenase-dependent growth at carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations still tolerated by the wild type. The cooA gene was shown to belong to the Mo-nitrogenase regulon, which is exclusively expressed when ammonium is limiting. Its expression was activated by NifA1 and NifA2, the transcriptional activators of nifHDK. AnfA, the transcriptional activator of Fe-nitrogenase genes, repressed cooA, thereby counteracting NifA activation. CooA activated cowN expression in response to increasing CO concentrations. Base substitutions in the presumed CooA binding site located upstream of the cowN transcription start site abolished cowN expression, indicating that cowN regulation by CooA is direct. In conclusion, a transcription factor-based network controls cowN expression to protect Mo-nitrogenase (but not Fe-nitrogenase) under appropriate conditions. PMID:25070737

  17. If a Tree Dies in a Forest will it be Reflected in a Forest Carbon Inventory? Quantifying the Effect of Disturbance on U.S. Forest Carbon Stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, C. W.; Domke, G.; Westfall, J.; Perry, C.; Oswalt, C. M.; Smith, J.; Patel-Weynand, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service is charged with the responsibility of monitoring forest ecosystem attributes, such as carbon (C) stocks, across the U.S. Given the role of both natural and anthropocentric disturbance on forest C stocks across a range of spatial scales and intensity (e.g., stand-level canopy gaps to major hurricane), quantifying the statistical power of the FIA inventory to detect disturbance and resulting implications for climate change hypothesis testing and C cycle impacts is paramount. Our study evaluates the statistical power of the FIA inventory to detect C stock change, distribution of disturbance events over time, and implications for C accounting/dynamics.

  18. Icecolors`93: Biological weighting function for the ultraviolet inhibition of carbon fixation in a natural antarctic phytoplankton community

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, N.; Prezelin, B.B.; Evens, T.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the Icecolors 1993 expedition were (1) to develop a space/time climatology of incident and penetrating spectral irradiance for the southern oceans, (2) to quantify the ultraviolet (UV) dependency of primary production for pelagic and substrate-associated antarctic phytoplankton communities, and (3) to determine the UV inhibition effects on key target sites. The study was conducted at Palmer Station, Antarctica, prior to the opening of the ozone `hole` and during the onset of depletion of ozone, the most severe ever recorded over the Antarctic Peninsula. This paper discusses results from an experiment designed to estimate a biological weight function for primary production inhibition in Antarctic phytoplankton under natural irradiance. The newly derived function is presented and it is shown that the sensitivity of in situ phytoplankton to ambient UV-B at the end of winter was greater than that measured under artificial light conditions for temperate marine phytoplankton and terrestrial plants. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  19. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis Identifies an Unusual Route for Pyruvate Dissimilation in Mycobacteria which Requires Isocitrate Lyase and Carbon Dioxide Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany J. V.; Bonde, Bhushan; Hawkins, Nathaniel; Ward, Jane L.; Beale, Michael H.; Noack, Stephan; Nöh, Katharina; Kruger, Nicholas J.; Ratcliffe, R. George; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL) for growth and virulence in vivo. The demonstration that M. tuberculosis also requires ICL for survival during nutrient starvation and has a role during steady state growth in a glycerol limited chemostat indicates a function for this enzyme which extends beyond fat metabolism. As isocitrate lyase is a potential drug target elucidating the role of this enzyme is of importance; however, the role of isocitrate lyase has never been investigated at the level of in vivo fluxes. Here we show that deletion of one of the two icl genes impairs the replication of Mycobacterium bovis BCG at slow growth rate in a carbon limited chemostat. In order to further understand the role of isocitrate lyase in the central metabolism of mycobacteria the effect of growth rate on the in vivo fluxes was studied for the first time using 13C-metabolic flux analysis (MFA). Tracer experiments were performed with steady state chemostat cultures of BCG or M. tuberculosis supplied with 13C labeled glycerol or sodium bicarbonate. Through measurements of the 13C isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids and enzymatic activity assays we have identified the activity of a novel pathway for pyruvate dissimilation. We named this the GAS pathway because it utilizes the Glyoxylate shunt and Anapleurotic reactions for oxidation of pyruvate, and Succinyl CoA synthetase for the generation of succinyl CoA combined with a very low flux through the succinate – oxaloacetate segment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We confirm that M. tuberculosis can fix carbon from CO2 into biomass. As the human host is abundant in CO2 this finding requires further investigation in vivo as CO2 fixation may provide a point of vulnerability that could be targeted with novel drugs. This study also provides a platform for further studies into the metabolism of M. tuberculosis using 13C-MFA. PMID:21814509

  20. Inorganic carbon fixation by chemosynthetic ectosymbionts and nutritional transfers to the hydrothermal vent host-shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    PubMed Central

    Ponsard, Julie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Zbinden, Magali; Lepoint, Gilles; Joassin, André; Corbari, Laure; Shillito, Bruce; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Compère, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates several hydrothermal vent ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is thought to be a primary consumer harbouring a chemoautotrophic bacterial community in its gill chamber. The aim of the present study was to test current hypotheses concerning the epibiont's chemoautotrophy, and the mutualistic character of this association. In-vivo experiments were carried out in a pressurised aquarium with isotope-labelled inorganic carbon (NaH13CO3 and NaH14CO3) in the presence of two different electron donors (Na2S2O3 and Fe2+) and with radiolabelled organic compounds (14C-acetate and 3H-lysine) chosen as potential bacterial substrates and/or metabolic by-products in experiments mimicking transfer of small biomolecules from epibionts to host. The bacterial epibionts were found to assimilate inorganic carbon by chemoautotrophy, but many of them (thick filaments of epsilonproteobacteria) appeared versatile and able to switch between electron donors, including organic compounds (heterotrophic acetate and lysine uptake). At least some of them (thin filamentous gammaproteobacteria) also seem capable of internal energy storage that could supply chemosynthetic metabolism for hours under conditions of electron donor deprivation. As direct nutritional transfer from bacteria to host was detected, the association appears as true mutualism. Import of soluble bacterial products occurs by permeation across the gill chamber integument, rather than via the digestive tract. This first demonstration of such capabilities in a decapod crustacean supports the previously discarded hypothesis of transtegumental absorption of dissolved organic matter or carbon as a common nutritional pathway. PMID:22914596

  1. Inorganic carbon fixation by chemosynthetic ectosymbionts and nutritional transfers to the hydrothermal vent host-shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.

    PubMed

    Ponsard, Julie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Zbinden, Magali; Lepoint, Gilles; Joassin, André; Corbari, Laure; Shillito, Bruce; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Compère, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates several hydrothermal vent ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is thought to be a primary consumer harbouring a chemoautotrophic bacterial community in its gill chamber. The aim of the present study was to test current hypotheses concerning the epibiont's chemoautotrophy, and the mutualistic character of this association. In-vivo experiments were carried out in a pressurised aquarium with isotope-labelled inorganic carbon (NaH(13)CO(3) and NaH(14)CO(3)) in the presence of two different electron donors (Na(2)S(2)O(3) and Fe(2+)) and with radiolabelled organic compounds ((14)C-acetate and (3)H-lysine) chosen as potential bacterial substrates and/or metabolic by-products in experiments mimicking transfer of small biomolecules from epibionts to host. The bacterial epibionts were found to assimilate inorganic carbon by chemoautotrophy, but many of them (thick filaments of epsilonproteobacteria) appeared versatile and able to switch between electron donors, including organic compounds (heterotrophic acetate and lysine uptake). At least some of them (thin filamentous gammaproteobacteria) also seem capable of internal energy storage that could supply chemosynthetic metabolism for hours under conditions of electron donor deprivation. As direct nutritional transfer from bacteria to host was detected, the association appears as true mutualism. Import of soluble bacterial products occurs by permeation across the gill chamber integument, rather than via the digestive tract. This first demonstration of such capabilities in a decapod crustacean supports the previously discarded hypothesis of transtegumental absorption of dissolved organic matter or carbon as a common nutritional pathway. PMID:22914596

  2. Gene regulation of carbon fixation, storage, and utilization in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum acclimated to light/dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Chauton, Matilde Skogen; Winge, Per; Brembu, Tore; Vadstein, Olav; Bones, Atle M

    2013-02-01

    The regulation of carbon metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum at the cell, metabolite, and gene expression levels in exponential fed-batch cultures is reported. Transcriptional profiles and cell chemistry sampled simultaneously at all time points provide a comprehensive data set on carbon incorporation, fate, and regulation. An increase in Nile Red fluorescence (a proxy for cellular neutral lipids) was observed throughout the light period, and water-soluble glucans increased rapidly in the light period. A near-linear decline in both glucans and lipids was observed during the dark period, and transcription profile data indicated that this decline was associated with the onset of mitosis. More than 4,500 transcripts that were differentially regulated during the light/dark cycle are identified, many of which were associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Genes not previously described in algae and their regulation in response to light were integrated in this analysis together with proposed roles in metabolic processes. Some very fast light-responding genes in, for example, fatty acid biosynthesis were identified and allocated to biosynthetic processes. Transcripts and cell chemistry data reflect the link between light energy availability and light energy-consuming metabolic processes. Our data confirm the spatial localization of processes in carbon metabolism to either plastids or mitochondria or to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, which are localized to the cytosol, chloroplast, and mitochondria. Localization and diel expression pattern may be of help to determine the roles of different isoenzymes and the mining of genes involved in light responses and circadian rhythms. PMID:23209127

  3. Soil temperature and water content drive microbial carbon fixation in grassland of permafrost area on the Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, W.; Guo, G.; Liu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil microbial communities underpin terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and are greatly influenced by global warming and global-warming-induced dryness. However, the response of soil microbial community function to global change remains largely uncertain, particularly in the ecologically vulnerable Tibetan plateau permafrost area with large carbon storage. With the concept of space for time substitution, we investigated the responses of soil CO2-fixing microbial community and its enzyme activity to climate change along an elevation gradient (4400-5100 m) of alpine grassland on the central Tibetan plateau. The elevation gradient in a south-facing hill slope leads to variation in climate and soil physicochemical parameters. The autotrophic microbial communities were characterized by quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing targeting the CO2-fixing gene (RubisCO). The results demonstrated that the autotrophic microbial community abundance, structure and its enzyme activity were mainly driven by soil temperature and water content. Soil temperature increase and water decrease dramatically reduced the abundance of the outnumbered form IC RubisCO-containing microbes, and significantly changed the structure of form IC, IAB and ID RubisCO-containing microbial community. Structural equation model revealed that the RubisCO enzyme was directly derived from RubisCO-containing microbes and its activity was significantly reduced by soil temperature increase and water content decrease. Thus our results provide a novel positive feedback loop of climate warming and warming-induced dryness by that soil microbial carbon fixing potential will reduce by 3.77%-8.86% with the soil temperature increase of 1.94oC and water content decrease of 60%-70%. This positive feedback could be capable of amplifying the climate change given the significant contribution of soil microbial CO2-fixing up to 4.9% of total soil organic

  4. Leaf-level gas exchange and scaling-up of forest understory carbon fixation rates with a ``patch-scale'' canopy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedler, M.; Geyer, R.; Heindl, B.; Hahn, S.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    1996-03-01

    During the Hartheim experiment (HartX) 1992, conducted in the Upper Rhine Valley, Germany, we estimated water vapor flux from the understory by several methods as reported in Wedler et al. (this issue). We also examined the photosynthetic gas exchange of the dominant understory species Brachypodium pinnatum, Carex alba, and Carex flacca at the leaf level with an CO2/H2O porometer. A mechanisticallybased leaf gas exchange model was parameterized for these understory species and validated via the measured diurnal courses of carbon dioxide exchange. Leaf CO2 gas exchange was scaled-up to patch- and then to stand-level utilizing the leaf gas exchange model as a component of the canopy light interception/energy balance model GAS-FLUX, and by further considering variation in vegetation “patch-type” distribution, patch-specific spatial structure, patch-type leaf area index, and microclimate beneath the tree canopy. At patch-level, C. alba exhibited the lowest net CO2 uptake of ca. 75 mmol m-2 d-1 due to a low leaf-level photosynthetic capacity, whereas net CO2 fixation of B. pinnatum- and C. flacca-patches was approx. 178 and 184 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. Highest CO2 uptake was estimated for mixed patches where B. pinnatum grew together with the sedge species C. alba or C. flacca. Scaling-up of leaf gas exchange to stand level resulted in an estimated average rate of total CO2 fixation by the graminoid understory patches of approximately 93 mmol m-2 d-1 during the HartX period. The conservative gas exchange behavior of C. alba at Hartheim and its apparent success in space capture seems to affect overall functioning of this pine forest ecosystem by limiting understory CO2 uptake. The CO2 uptake by the understory is approximately 20% of stand total CO2 uptake. CO2 uptake fluxes mirror the relative differences in water loss from the understory and crown layer during the HartX period. Comparative measurements indicate that understory vegetation in spruce and pine

  5. Synthesis of [11C]Bexarotene by Cu-Mediated [11C]Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Preliminary PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bexarotene (Targretin) is a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist that has applications for treatment of T cell lymphoma and proposed mechanisms of action in Alzheimer’s disease that have been the subject of recent controversy. Carbon-11 labeled bexarotene ([11C-carbonyl]4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyltetralin-2-yl)ethenyl]benzoic acid) was synthesized using a Cu-mediated cross-coupling reaction employing an arylboronate precursor 1 and [11C]carbon dioxide under atmospheric pressure in 15 ± 2% uncorrected radiochemical yield (n = 3), based on [11C]CO2. Judicious choice of solvents, catalysts, and additives, as well as precursor concentration and purity of [11C]CO2, enabled the preparation of this 11C-labeled carboxylic acid. Formulated [11C]bexarotene was isolated (>37 mCi) with >99% radiochemical purity in 32 min. Preliminary positron emission tomography–magnetic resonance imaging revealed rapid brain uptake in nonhuman primate in the first 75 s following intravenous administration of the radiotracer (specific activity >0.3 Ci/μmol at time of injection), followed by slow clearance (Δ = −43%) over 60 min. Modest uptake (SUVmax = 0.8) was observed in whole brain and regions with high RXR expression. PMID:24944741

  6. A novel framework for quantifying past methane recycling by Sphagnum-methanotroph symbiosis using carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-05-01

    concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, "PRM." We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, δ13C of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  7. A Novel Framework for Quantifying past Methane Recycling by Sphagnum-Methanotroph Symbiosis Using Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, 'PRM.' We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, delta C-13 of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  8. Quantifying Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Space: Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System and Global Urban Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Song, Y.; Asefi-Najafabady, S.; Rayner, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS) quantifies fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for the planet at a scale of 10 km hourly for the time period 1997-2012. FFDAS is based on the Kaya identity constrained by multiple ground and space-based observations. Among these are the DMSP nightlights, Landscan population, and the Ventus power plant database. We have recently downscaled the FFDAS version 2.0 to 1 km x 1 km resolution using nighlights. The finer spatial resolution allows for the examination of urban emissions across the planet. We take two approaches to examination of urban FFCO2 emissions. The first, utilizes named administrative boundaries combined with manual GIS identification (supported by LandSat and ISA) to identify the top emitting urban areas of the planet. We also utilize an urban land mask, without governmental boundary identification, to analyze all urban area by country across the planet. We perform multiple regression to identify key drivers and patterns. The results demonstrate the change in urban emissions during the last decade and assess the question of whether urban areas exhibit scaling properties vis a vis FFCO2 emissions.

  9. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Methods Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. Results We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. Discussion This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity. PMID:26930079

  10. Application of stable isotope analysis to quantify the retention of eroded carbon in grass filters at the North Appalachian experimental watersheds.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The entrapment of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) in grass filters could affect watershed C export, but the magnitude of the process is poorly quantified. In order to assess the retention of eroded C in these settings, SOC stock was measured in grass buffers receiving runoff from cropped watersheds...