Science.gov

Sample records for quantitative basicity studies

  1. Rote Learning in the Age of Technology: A Quantitative Study of a Career and Technical High School and the Practical Use of Basic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotreau Berube, Elyse A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to investigate the use of rote learning in basic skills of mathematics and spelling of 12 high school students, from a career and technical high school, in an effort to learn if the pedagogy of rote fits in the frameworks of today's education. The study compared the accuracy of…

  2. Basic Facts on Study Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on International Educational Exchange, New York, NY.

    This guide for students interested in studying abroad gives an overview of the factors to be considered and the choices to be made and provides references to sources of further information. The following topics are addressed: (1) planning (academic objectives, location, the third world, language proficiency, special laws, the disabled); (2)…

  3. Basic Skills in Asian Studies: India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    Designed for an Asian studies program at the secondary level and using learning activities centering on India, the guide develops four basic skills: reading, applying critical thinking, interpreting the geography, and understanding history. Five learning activities are provided for each basic skill and each unit is introduced with a description…

  4. Basic studies of baroclinic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Tim L.; Chou, S.-H.; Leslie, Fred W.; Lu, H.-I.; Butler, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computations were completed of transition curves in the conventional annulus, including hysteresis effect. The model GEOSIM was used to compute the transition between axisymmetric flow and baroclinic wave flow in the conventional annulus experiments. Thorough testing and documentation of the GEOSIM code were also completed. The Spacelab 3 results from the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) were reviewed and numerical modeling was performed of many of the cases with horizontal temperature gradients as well as heating from below, with different rates of rotation. A numerical study of the lower transition to axisymmetric flow in the baroclinic annulus was performed using GEOSIM.

  5. Relating clinical study design to basic research.

    PubMed

    Choh, V; Priolo, S

    1999-07-01

    Devising any research study involves careful attention to its design, as well as the development of an appropriate research question and hypothesis. Together, these attributes ensure the validity of the study in question. In most clinical or epidemiological studies, the types of research designs are often explicitly noted, whereas in papers describing basic or biological research, they are couched in different terms or, more often, are ignored, thus potentially hindering communication between basic and clinical researchers. However, given that the framework for all valid scientific research is based on sound logic, it is proposed that for each study design, a direct homology exists between clinical and basic research paradigms, despite the problem of relating epidemiological vernacular to basic research. By applying examples of basic research protocols to traditional clinical study designs, this paper shows that parallels can be drawn between the two strategies, suggesting that in the absence of a conventional nomenclature to describe basic research study designs, the use of traditional clinical design jargon is valid in describing basic research protocols. PMID:10445637

  6. Adult Basic Education Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Ruth

    The Gateway Technical Institute's followup study on former adult basic education (ABE) students is examined in this report, which focuses primarily on the process of the study. Since the Gateway study complemented objective measures of program effectiveness with a perspective that is often missing in program evaluations, namely, former…

  7. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    SciTech Connect

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  8. Basic Studies: A Description and Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles N.; And Others

    This is a description and a progress report of the Basic Studies Program at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas), a 1-year program in general education designed for students who rank in the lower quarter of their junior college class and who have experienced little academic success in the past. Communications, humanities, social science, natural…

  9. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1989-09-01

    The scientific direction of the work in this grant is unchanged and the 12 research projects in the three major categories represent only minor modification from the proposed work given at site visit. Adjustment was necessary in keeping with the award and to accommodate the resignation of Dr. S. John Gatley who took a position at the Brookhaven National Laboratories. Significant progress is being made in each scientific area with principal responsibility in radiochemistry now assumed by J. Mukherjee and S. Murphy, both of whom have contributed major advances in their areas of fluorination of receptor ligands for studies of the dopaminergic system and approaches to studies of the glutamate type II receptors, respectively. C.T. Chen's work in quantitative method approaches to image integration and analysis continues to receive national and international attention. Similar attention is being given to J. Metz and H. deWit with their work on the effects of drugs of dependency on mood and regional brain metabolism. Resource development in the overall program has been substantial. An equipment grant totaling $350,000 was awarded to the Frank Center for Image Analysis of the FMI by the W.M. Keck Foundation through The University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory Center for Imaging Science for purchasing computer systems for graphic display, visualization of 2D and 3D image data, and fast computation. We have purchased nine VAXstations, five DECstations, two SUN/SPARCstations, one AT T Pixel Machine system, and the associated communication links for networking. These systems are currently being installed and tested. This facility will provide added computation capabilities for and facilitate the development of the research projects. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Comprehensive Identification and Quantitation of Basic Building Blocks for Low-Molecular Weight Heparin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaojun; Sheng, Anran; Liu, Xinyue; Shi, Feng; Jin, Lan; Xie, Shaoshuai; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Chi, Lianli

    2016-08-01

    Low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are widely used anticoagulant drugs. They inherit the heterogeneous backbone sequences of the parent heparin, while the chemical depolymerization process modifies the nonreducing end (NRE) and reducing end (RE) of their sugar chains. Some side reactions may also occur and increase the structural complexity of LMWHs. It is important to precisely characterize the structures of LMWHs, especially their chemical modifications, to ensure drug quality and safety. Compositional analysis provides a powerful approach to reveal the building blocks that make up the LMWHs, which are the mutual consequence of the heparin starting materials and the manufacturing process. Here, we introduce a comprehensive analytical method to recover the most basic building blocks of LMWHs. A strategy of combining both enzymatic digestion and oxidative degradation of LMWH was used to make the NRE, RE, and backbone structures differentiable from one another. Satisfactory separation, identification, and quantitation were achieved by coupling hydrophilic interaction chromatography with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. After enzymatic digestion, over 30 species were detected, with both natural and chemically modified heparin basic building blocks. Two novel structures, including a trisaccharide containing two glucosamine residues and a tetrasaccharide containing a 3-O-sulfated uronic acid residue, were discovered. Reduced and oxidatively degraded samples were analyzed to provide the complementary information on both termini of LMWHs. The reproducibility of this method was evaluated, and enoxaparin injections were analyzed to demonstrate the application of this method for evaluating the sameness of LMWH products. PMID:27388010

  11. A hybrid approach to advancing quantitative prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs in human

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Patrick; Ekins, Sean; Theil, Frank-Peter

    2011-01-15

    A general toxicity of basic drugs is related to phospholipidosis in tissues. Therefore, it is essential to predict the tissue distribution of basic drugs to facilitate an initial estimate of that toxicity. The objective of the present study was to further assess the original prediction method that consisted of using the binding to red blood cells measured in vitro for the unbound drug (RBCu) as a surrogate for tissue distribution, by correlating it to unbound tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kpu) of several tissues, and finally to predict volume of distribution at steady-state (V{sub ss}) in humans under in vivo conditions. This correlation method demonstrated inaccurate predictions of V{sub ss} for particular basic drugs that did not follow the original correlation principle. Therefore, the novelty of this study is to provide clarity on the actual hypotheses to identify i) the impact of pharmacological mode of action on the generic correlation of RBCu-Kpu, ii) additional mechanisms of tissue distribution for the outlier drugs, iii) molecular features and properties that differentiate compounds as outliers in the original correlation analysis in order to facilitate its applicability domain alongside the properties already used so far, and finally iv) to present a novel and refined correlation method that is superior to what has been previously published for the prediction of human V{sub ss} of basic drugs. Applying a refined correlation method after identifying outliers would facilitate the prediction of more accurate distribution parameters as key inputs used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and phospholipidosis models.

  12. Basic Skills in Asian Studies: Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    This publication contains 20 learning activities for developing basic skills while teaching about Japan at the secondary level. The activities are self-contained and each consists of a short description, followed by a five-item true or false test and five open-ended questions for student practice. The learning activities are followed by a…

  13. Basic Weather Facts Study Texts for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This pamphlet offers information to teachers and students concerning basic facts about weather and how to construct simple weather measurement devices. Directions, necessary materials, procedures, and instructions for use are given for four weather predicting instruments: wind vane, rain gauge, barometer, anemometer. Information is provided on…

  14. Quantitative genetic studies of antisocial behaviour.

    PubMed

    Viding, Essi; Larsson, Henrik; Jones, Alice P

    2008-08-12

    This paper will broadly review the currently available twin and adoption data on antisocial behaviour (AB). It is argued that quantitative genetic research can make a significant contribution to further the understanding of how AB develops. Genetically informative study designs are particularly useful for investigating several important questions such as whether: the heritability estimates vary as a function of assessment method or gender; the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences varies for different types of AB; the environmental risk factors are truly environmental; and genetic vulnerability influences susceptibility to environmental risk. While the current data are not yet directly translatable for prevention and treatment programmes, quantitative genetic research has concrete translational potential. Quantitative genetic research can supplement neuroscience research in informing about different subtypes of AB, such as AB coupled with callous-unemotional traits. Quantitative genetic research is also important in advancing the understanding of the mechanisms by which environmental risk operates. PMID:18434281

  15. Social Indicators of Basic Needs: Quantitative Data for Human Rights Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Neufville, Judith Innes

    Developing social indicators of basic human needs involves (1) recognizing the problems in selection, (2) identifying the criteria for making selections, (3) choosing which basic needs to cover, and (4) selecting the indicators. The social indicators are to help formulate U.S. foreign policy and will be used by the State Department's Bureau of…

  16. How to Study: The Neglected Basic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Wayne C.; Wilson, Brent G.

    This paper examines knowledge of studying--knowing how and when to apply study strategies. Study strategies may be classified into three categories: memory strategies, comprehension strategies, and problem-solving strategies. Memory-study strategies help students remember what they study. Five attributes often characterize memory strategies:…

  17. Informetrics - A New Area of Quantitative Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormell, Irene

    2000-01-01

    Describes the merging field of informetrics in a historical perspective as a generalization of bibliometrics, combining advanced information retrieval theories and methodologies with the quantitative study of information flow. Explains programs at the Center for Information Studies at the Royal School of Library and Information Science in…

  18. Critical Quantitative Study of Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The author discusses the importance of critical quantitative research for studies of immigrant students, a large and growing group, whose higher education experience is crucial to the future of the United States. The author outlines some of the distinctions to be made among immigrant students and recommends areas of future inquiry.

  19. The Social Studies Basic Skills Connection: Practical Strategies for Teaching Basic Skills in Conjunction with Social Studies Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Education, Jefferson City.

    Arranged in two parts, this guide introduces elementary and secondary social studies teachers to a variety of methods for integrating social studies content and basic skills instruction. Chapter I defines basic skills as the skills an individual needs to become a self-directed learner, communicate clearly, and make reasoned decisions, and presents…

  20. Whither Soviet Studies: Back to Basics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    1981-01-01

    The author traces changes in American social studies teaching about the Soviet Union over the past 30 years. He finds that these changes parallel shifts in the political mentality from the Cold War, through detente, to America's renewed suspicion following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. (SJL)

  1. Foreign Language Study: One of the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Kenneth D.

    1983-01-01

    Documenting the decline in foreign language literacy among Americans and the decrease in foreign language requirements in high schools and colleges, the author stresses the intrinsic value of learning languages. He makes recommendations for improving foreign language study and attitudes toward it. (SK)

  2. Basic studies in microwave remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Adrian K.; Bredow, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Scattering models were developed in support of microwave remote sensing of earth terrains with particular emphasis on model applications to airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar measurements of forest. Practically useful surface scattering models based on a solution of a pair of integral equations including multiple scattering effects were developed. Comparisons of these models with controlled scattering measurements from statistically known random surfaces indicate that they are valid over a wide range of frequencies. Scattering models treating a forest environment as a two and three layered media were also developed. Extensive testing and comparisons were carried out with the two layered model. Further studies with the three layered model are being carried out. A volume scattering model valid for dense media such as a snow layer was also developed that shows the appropriate trend dependence with the volume fraction of scatterers.

  3. The quantitative analysis of the vascularization following two basic auditory canal skin incisions.

    PubMed

    Cvjetković, Niko; Velepic, Mitja S; Velepic, Marko M; Komljenović, Dejan; Zauhar, Gordana

    2003-06-01

    Three groups of nine patients each were analyzed. The first two groups consisted of those that underwent tympanoplastic due to chronic inflammation of middle ear. Two different standard auditory canal skin incisions were applied, i.e. tympanomeatal flap (TMF) or vascular strip (VS). The third control group consisted of non-operated patients. All the operated patients were subjected to a quantitative analysis of the auditory canal revascularization by means of the Weibel stereological test method, i.e. the B 100 double network system. The density of capillaries, arterioles, venulolymphatic spaces and a total volume density of all vascular elements of the auditory canal skin were measured. The obtained results of vascularization were compared with those of the target control group. It was found out that there were no significant differences in vascularization of auditory canal skin between TMF and VS patients from one side and the control group on the other side. PMID:12974157

  4. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Basic studies on intravascular low-intensity laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Duan, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Jin, Hua; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Intravascular low intensity laser therapy (ILILT) was originally put forward in USA in 1982, but popularized in Russia in 1980s and in China in 1990s, respectively. A randomized placebo-controlled study has shown ILILT clinical efficacy in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. As Chinese therapeutic applications of ILILT were the most widely in the world, its basic research, such as intracellular signal transduction research, blood research in vitro, animal blood research in vivo, human blood research in vivo and traditional Chinese medicine research, was also very progressive in China. Its basic studies will be reviewed in terms of the biological information model of photobiomodulation in this paper. ILILT might work in view of its basic studies, but the further randomized placebo-controlled trial and the further safety research should be done.

  6. Basic concepts in three-part quantitative assessments of undiscovered mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1975, mineral resource assessments have been made for over 27 areas covering 5??106 km2 at various scales using what is now called the three-part form of quantitative assessment. In these assessments, (1) areas are delineated according to the types of deposits permitted by the geology,(2) the amount of metal and some ore characteristics are estimated using grade and tonnage models, and (3) the number of undiscovered deposits of each type is estimated. Permissive boundaries are drawn for one or more deposit types such that the probability of a deposit lying outside the boundary is negligible, that is, less than 1 in 100,000 to 1,000,000. Grade and tonnage models combined with estimates of the number of deposits are the fundamental means of translating geologists' resource assessments into a language that economists can use. Estimates of the number of deposits explicitly represent the probability (or degree of belief) that some fixed but unknown number of undiscovered deposits exist in the delineated tracts. Estimates are by deposit type and must be consistent with the grade and tonnage model. Other guidelines for these estimates include (1) frequency of deposits from well-explored areas, (2) local deposit extrapolations, (3) counting and assigning probabilities to anomalies and occurrences, (4) process constraints, (5) relative frequencies of related deposit types, and (6) area spatial limits. In most cases, estimates are made subjectively, as they are in meteorology, gambling, and geologic interpretations. In three-part assessments, the estimates are internally consistent because delineated tracts are consistent with descriptive models, grade and tonnage models are consistent with descriptive models, as well as with known deposits in the area, and estimates of number of deposits are consistent with grade and tonnage models. All available information is used in the assessment, and uncertainty is explicitly represented. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN NEUROSURGERY: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Kwasnicki, Richard M; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    Object Technological innovation within healthcare may be defined as the introduction of a new technology that initiates a change in clinical practice. Neurosurgery is a particularly technologically intensive surgical discipline, and new technologies have preceded many of the major advances in operative neurosurgical technique. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery using patents and peer-reviewed publications as metrics of technology development and clinical translation respectively. Methods A patent database was searched between 1960 and 2010 using the search terms “neurosurgeon” OR “neurosurgical” OR “neurosurgery”. The top 50 performing patent codes were then grouped into technology clusters. Patent and publication growth curves were then generated for these technology clusters. A top performing technology cluster was then selected as an exemplar for more detailed analysis of individual patents. Results In all, 11,672 patents and 208,203 publications relating to neurosurgery were identified. The top performing technology clusters over the 50 years were: image guidance devices, clinical neurophysiology devices, neuromodulation devices, operating microscopes and endoscopes. Image guidance and neuromodulation devices demonstrated a highly correlated rapid rise in patents and publications, suggesting they are areas of technology expansion. In-depth analysis of neuromodulation patents revealed that the majority of high performing patents were related to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Conclusions Patent and publication data may be used to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery. PMID:25699414

  8. Integration of Basic Skills into Social Studies Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunstrum, John P.; Irvin, Judith L.

    1981-01-01

    A basic skills model is presented which stresses the skills of writing, reading, study, and research for elementary school pupils. The model focuses on lesson background, the purpose of the reading, independent reading, follow-up discussion, developing related skills, and extending and applying ideas. A lesson about the 1910 British expedition to…

  9. Ciclo Basico Polivalente (Basic Comprehensive Courses of Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boletin del Centro Nacional de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa, 1970

    1970-01-01

    This article discusses the creation of comprehensive secondary schools in Argentina to meet the diversified goals of the population in any given geographical region. The plan described here provides for the creation of several basic-study cycles within one school so that students may pursue courses in commercial, technical, and academic fields.…

  10. Representing the "Other": Basic Writers and the Teaching of Basic Writing. Refiguring English Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Bruce; Lu, Min-Zhan

    Intended for teachers of basic writing, this book contains a collection of new and updated essays addressing issues surrounding underprepared writers. It maps errors and expectations for basic writing and develops teaching approaches that will be effective in a social and political world. The book considers concepts such as the possibility of…

  11. A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a quantitative method to estimate chemical-specific pesticide exposures in a large prospective cohort study of over 58,000 pesticide applicators in North Carolina and Iowa. An enrollment questionnaire was administered to applicators to collect basic time- and inten...

  12. Study habits and attitude of medical students of basic sciences.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Kshitiz Upadhyay; Prajapati, Rajesh; Pramanik, Tapas; Ghosh, Arijit; Roychowdhury, Paresh

    2007-06-01

    Study habits and attitude for learning of Basic Medical Sciences amongst 133 students of first and second year MBBS course were analyzed (through questionnaires). The study revealed that the most of the students desired to be physicians to serve the patient/society. They preferred to learn more through self study (48.0%) and lecture classes (43.0%), less through group discussion (8.0%) and PBL (1.0%). Only 5.0% use to surf the internet regularly for their study matter and 79.0% students had never consulted any medical journals. PMID:17899965

  13. [Quantitative pharmaco-EEG study of nootropics].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T

    1990-01-01

    A treatment of geriatric disorders is one of the current major problems socially as well as medically. Thus nootropics have become one of the biggest topics in drug developments. Unfortunately, it is still very difficult to assess brain dysfunctions and therapeutic efficacies of these drugs objectively. Giurgea has proposed a new drug category, "nootropic", as those substances which possess an anti-dementia action, yet the general concept remains obscure. The present author expand the concept that those substances which improve the vigilance level to be included. The author has been engaged with computer assisted pharmaco-electroencephalography and research of nootropics for last several years. Based on the own experiences, the author presented the CNS effects of five different substances such as meclofenoxate, amantadine, piracetam, teniloxazine and WEB-1881, which were regarded as nootropics from various reasons. Single dose of each substances was administered in healthy young volunteers, and teniloxazine was given to geriatric patients. EEG changes induced by these substances in normal subjects were an increase of alpha activity, particularly in higher frequency range above 9.5 Hz, and an associated decrease of slow activity and of fast activity, which are different from those of the other psychotropic drugs. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) of EEG parameters has confirmed that the response of WEB-1881 was most manifest in frontal area. This suggests that WEB-1881 might activate linguistic learning and memory process. In the patient study, the induced EEG changes were an increase of alpha activity associated with a decrease of slow activity, while fast activity did not show any changes. However, the EEG changes in the patient study were quite similar to those of normal volunteer study for the most part. It is relevant to infer the efficacy of nootropics in geriatric patients from acute normal volunteer study. In physiological aging process, alpha

  14. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia and alcoholism. A methodological comparative study].

    PubMed

    Mass, R; Krausz, M; Gross, J

    1995-05-01

    The results of a study on the subjective basic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and drug abuse (especially alcoholism) are presented. A total of 242 psychiatric inpatients (74 with a dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and drug consumption, 81 schizophrenics, and 87 alcoholics) were included. The three groups did not differ with regard to the general score of subjective basic symptoms measured by the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (Frankfurter Beschwerde-Fragebogen, FBF). Further analyses showed that the FBF statements are only partly typical for schizophrenia; another part is connected with alcoholism. Two new scales ("FBF-S" and "FBF-A") were created from the schizophrenia-typical items and the alcoholism-typical items, respectively. In "FBF-S" schizophrenics (with and without alcoholism) had higher scores than patients suffering from alcoholism alone; in "FBF-A" alcoholics (with and without schizophrenia) reached higher scores than schizophrenic patients. Consistent correlations with independent parameters of psychosis and alcoholism confirm the validity of "FBF-S" and "FBF-A". It is concluded that the FBF's capacity to discriminate different diagnoses can be improved and that the model of basic disturbances must be re-evaluated. PMID:7609813

  15. Subjective Quantitative Studies of Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Amartya Sen's writings have articulated the importance of human agency, and identified the need for information on agency freedom to inform our evaluation of social arrangements. Many approaches to poverty reduction stress the need for empowerment. This paper reviews "subjective quantitative measures of human agency at the individual level." It…

  16. Nanostructured surfaces investigated by quantitative morphological studies.

    PubMed

    Perani, Martina; Carapezzi, Stefania; Mutta, Geeta Rani; Cavalcoli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of different surfaces has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively analyzed in this paper. Two different tools have been employed to this scope: the analysis of the height-height correlation function and the determination of the mean grain size, which have been combined to obtain a complete characterization of the surfaces. Different materials have been analyzed: SiO x N y , InGaN/GaN quantum wells and Si nanowires, grown with different techniques. Notwithstanding the presence of grain-like structures on all the samples analyzed, they present very diverse surface design, underlying that this procedure can be of general use. Our results show that the quantitative analysis of nanostructured surfaces allows us to obtain interesting information, such as grain clustering, from the comparison of the lateral correlation length and the grain size. PMID:27004458

  17. Nanostructured surfaces investigated by quantitative morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perani, Martina; Carapezzi, Stefania; Rani Mutta, Geeta; Cavalcoli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of different surfaces has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively analyzed in this paper. Two different tools have been employed to this scope: the analysis of the height-height correlation function and the determination of the mean grain size, which have been combined to obtain a complete characterization of the surfaces. Different materials have been analyzed: SiO x N y , InGaN/GaN quantum wells and Si nanowires, grown with different techniques. Notwithstanding the presence of grain-like structures on all the samples analyzed, they present very diverse surface design, underlying that this procedure can be of general use. Our results show that the quantitative analysis of nanostructured surfaces allows us to obtain interesting information, such as grain clustering, from the comparison of the lateral correlation length and the grain size.

  18. Motor Events during Healthy Sleep: A Quantitative Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Biermayr, Marlene; Bregler, Deborah; Ehrmann, Laura; Ulmer, Hanno; Högl, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Many sleep disorders are characterized by increased motor activity during sleep. In contrast, studies on motor activity during physiological sleep are largely lacking. We quantitatively investigated a large range of motor phenomena during polysomnography in physiological sleep. Design: Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Setting: Academic referral sleep laboratory. Participants: One hundred healthy sleepers age 19-77 y were strictly selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening procedure. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Polysomnography according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) standards was performed, and quantitative normative values were established for periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), high frequency leg movements (HFLM), fragmentary myoclonus (FM), neck myoclonus (NM), and rapid eye movement (REM)-related electromyographic (EMG) activity. Thirty-six subjects had a PLMS index > 5/h, 18 had a PLMS index > 15/h (90th percentile: 24.8/h). Thirty-three subjects had HFLM (90th percentile: four sequences/night). All subjects had FM (90th percentile 143.7/h sleep). Nine subjects fulfilled AASM criteria for excessive FM. Thirty-five subjects had NM (90th percentile: 8.8/h REM sleep). For REM sleep, different EMG activity measures for the mentalis and flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were calculated: the 90th percentile for phasic mentalis EMG activity for 30-sec epochs according to AASM recommendation was 15.6%, and for tonic mentalis EMG activity 2.6%. Twenty-five subjects exceeded the recently proposed phasic mentalis cutoff of 11%. None of the subjects exceeded the tonic mentalis cutoff of 9.6%. Conclusion: Quantification of motor phenomena is a basic prerequisite to develop normative values, and is a first step toward a more precise description of the various motor phenomena present during sleep. Because rates of motor events were unexpectedly high even in physiological

  19. 75 FR 9488 - Basel Comprehensive Quantitative Impact Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... on December 7, 2007 (72 FR 69288). In an effort to refine the Basel II Capital Accord, the Basel... Office of Thrift Supervision Basel Comprehensive Quantitative Impact Study AGENCY: Office of Thrift... collection. Title of Proposal: Basel Comprehensive Quantitative Impact Study. OMB Number: 1550-0NEW....

  20. Quantitative Articles: Developing Studies for Publication in Counseling Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusty, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This article is presented as a guide for developing quantitative studies and preparing quantitative manuscripts for publication in counseling journals. It is intended as an aid for aspiring authors in conceptualizing studies and formulating valid research designs. Material is presented on choosing variables and measures and on selecting…

  1. Basic Study on Engine with Scroll Compressor and Expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Etsuo; Kitora, Yoshihisa; Nishida, Mitsuhiro

    Scroll compressors are becoming popular in air conditioning and refrigeration. This is primarily due to their higher efficiency and low noise/vibration characteristics. The scroll principle can be applied also to the steam expander and the Brayton cycle engine,as shown in the past literature. The Otto cycle spark-ignition engine with a scroll compressor and expander is studied in this report. The principle and basic structure of the scroll engine are explained,and the engine characteristic are calculated based on the idealized cycles and processes. A prototype model has been proposed and constructed. The rotary type engine has always had a problem with sealing. The scroll engine might overcome this shortcoming with its much lower rubbing speed compared to its previous counterparts,and is therefore worth investigating.

  2. A generalized approach and computer tool for quantitative genetics study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative genetics is one of the most important components to provide valuable genetic information for improving production and quality of plants and animals. The research history of quantitative genetics study could be traced back more than one hundred years. Since the Analysis of Variance (ANOV...

  3. Quantitative Literacy Provision in the First Year of Medical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, V.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a description of and motivation for the quantitative literacy (numeracy) intervention in the first year of medical studies at a South African university. This intervention is a response to the articulation gap between the quantitative literacy of many first-year medical students and the demands of their curriculum.…

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism for controlling many aspects of cellular processes, as well as aspects of human health and diseases. Compared to phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is more tightly regulated, but often more challenging to characterize due to significantly lower level of tyrosine phosphorylation (a relative abundance of 1800:200:1 was estimated for pSer/pThr/pTyr in vertebrate cells[1]). In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and peptides using antibody-based technologies, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and various stable isotope labeling strategies, as well as non-MS-based methods such as protein or peptide array methods. These proteomic technological advances provide powerful tools for potentially understanding signal transduction at the system level and provide a basis for discovering novel drug targets for human diseases. [1] Hunter, T. (1998) The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 353, 583–605

  5. Quantitative microscopy of the lung: a problem-based approach. Part 1: basic principles of lung stereology.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The growing awareness of the importance of accurate morphometry in lung research has recently motivated the publication of guidelines set forth by a combined task force of the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society (20). This official ATS/ERS Research Policy Statement provides general recommendations on which stereological methods are to be used in quantitative microscopy of the lung. However, to integrate stereology into a particular experimental study design, investigators are left with the problem of how to implement this in practice. Specifically, different animal models of human lung disease require the use of different stereological techniques and may determine the mode of lung fixation, tissue processing, preparation of sections, and other things. Therefore, the present companion articles were designed to allow a short practically oriented introduction into the concepts of design-based stereology (Part 1) and to provide recommendations for choosing the most appropriate methods to investigate a number of important disease models (Part 2). Worked examples with illustrative images will facilitate the practical performance of equivalent analyses. Study algorithms provide comprehensive surveys to ensure that no essential step gets lost during the multistage workflow. Thus, with this review, we hope to close the gap between theory and practice and enhance the use of stereological techniques in pulmonary research. PMID:23624789

  6. A Quantitative Study of Oxygen as a Metabolic Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    1999-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen (O2) delivery to a tissue is generally associated with a decrease in phosphocreatine, increases in ADP, NADH/NAD, and inorganic phosphate, increased rates of glycolysis and lactate production, and reduced rates of pyruvate and fatty acid oxidation. However, given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system and its components, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). Of special interest is the determination of mechanisms relating tissue oxygenation to observed metabolic responses at the tissue, organ, and whole body levels and the quantification of how changes in tissue O2 availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study, we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of O2 as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and in parameters controlling the rate of cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The whole body is described as a bioenergetic system consisting of metabolically distinct tissue/organ subsystems that exchange materials with the blood. In order to study the dynamic response of each subsystem to stimuli, we solve the ordinary differential equations describing the temporal evolution of metabolite levels, given the initial concentrations. The solver used in the present study is the packaged code LSODE, as implemented in the NASA Lewis kinetics and sensitivity analysis code, LSENS. A major advantage of LSENS is the efficient procedures supporting systematic sensitivity analysis, which provides the basic methods for studying parameter sensitivities (i.e., changes in model behavior due to parameter variation

  7. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) a memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.

  8. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) amore » memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.« less

  9. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  10. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels: In basic research and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Raymond M; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-15

    A variety of decellularized materials have been developed that have demonstrated potential for treating cardiovascular diseases and improving our understanding of cardiac development. Of these biomaterials, decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels have shown great promise for creating cellular microenvironments representative of the native cardiac tissue and treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels derived from porcine cardiac tissue form a nanofibrous hydrogel once thermally induced at physiological temperatures. Use of isolated cardiac extracellular matrix in 2D and 3D in vitro platforms has demonstrated the capability to provide tissue specific cues for cardiac cell growth and differentiation. Testing of the myocardial matrix hydrogel as a therapy after myocardial infarction in both small and large animal models has demonstrated improved left ventricular function, increased cardiac muscle, and cellular recruitment into the treated infarct. Based on these results, steps are currently being taken to translate these hydrogels into a clinically used injectable biomaterial therapy. In this review, we will focus on the basic science and preclinical studies that have accelerated the development of decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels into an emerging novel therapy for treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. PMID:26056717

  11. Basic Studies of Non-Diffusive Transport in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, George J.; Maggs, James E.

    2014-10-25

    The project expanded and developed mathematical descriptions, and corresponding numerical modeling, of non-diffusive transport to incorporate new perspectives derived from basic transport experiments performed in the LAPD device at UCLA, and at fusion devices throughout the world. By non-diffusive it is meant that the transport of fundamental macroscopic parameters of a system, such as temperature and density, does not follow the standard diffusive behavior predicted by a classical Fokker-Planck equation. The appearance of non-diffusive behavior is often related to underlying microscopic processes that cause the value of a system parameter, at one spatial position, to be linked to distant events, i.e., non-locality. In the LAPD experiments the underlying process was traced to large amplitude, coherent drift-waves that give rise to chaotic trajectories. Significant advances were made in this project. The results have lead to a new perspective about the fundamentals of edge transport in magnetically confined plasmas; the insight has important consequences for worldwide studies in fusion devices. Progress was also made in advancing the mathematical techniques used to describe fractional diffusion.

  12. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  13. Basic studies of 3-V high efficiency cell components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, M. S.; Melloch, M. R.; Pierret, R. F.; Carpenter, M. S.; Chuang, H. L.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M. E.; Lush, G. B.; Morgan, J. M.; Stellwag, T. B.

    1990-07-01

    This project's objective is to improve our fundamental understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. We expect that the insight into III-V device physics occurring during the course of this work will help to identify paths toward higher efficiency III-V cells. This report describes our progress during the fourth year of the project. The past year's efforts centered on completing studies of heavy doping effects in p(sup +)-GaAs and assessing the importance of similar effects in n(sup +)-GaAs, and at continuing research on characterizing, controlling, and passivating perimeter recombination currents. We also initiated work to identify the dominant loss mechanism in Al(sub 0.2)Ga(sub 0.8) As solar cells and brought on-line a new MBE growth facility and demonstrated the high-quality of the films by fabricating, with assistance from Spire Corporation, 23.8 percent 1-sun solar cells.

  14. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    PubMed

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions. PMID:26036835

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches to Studying Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M; Young, Nicolas L; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) positively and negatively regulate gene expression, and are consequently a vital influence on the genomic profile of all eukaryotic species. The study of histone PTMs using classical methods in molecular biology, such as immunofluorescence and Western blotting, is challenging given the technical issues of the approaches, and chemical diversity and combinatorial patterns of the modifications. In light of these many technical limitations, mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as the most unbiased and rigorous experimental platform to identify and quantify histone PTMs in a high-throughput manner. This review covers the latest developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of histone PTMs, with the hope of inspiring the continued integration of proteomic, genomic and epigenetic research. PMID:21966350

  16. Basic models modeling resistance training: an update for basic scientists interested in study skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Jason; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; da Silva Teixeira, Tamiris; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, Xia; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Lodetti, Alice; Cardozo, Mayara Quadros; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-09-01

    Human muscle hypertrophy brought about by voluntary exercise in laboratorial conditions is the most common way to study resistance exercise training, especially because of its reliability, stimulus control and easy application to resistance training exercise sessions at fitness centers. However, because of the complexity of blood factors and organs involved, invasive data is difficult to obtain in human exercise training studies due to the integration of several organs, including adipose tissue, liver, brain and skeletal muscle. In contrast, studying skeletal muscle remodeling in animal models are easier to perform as the organs can be easily obtained after euthanasia; however, not all models of resistance training in animals displays a robust capacity to hypertrophy the desired muscle. Moreover, some models of resistance training rely on voluntary effort, which complicates the results observed when animal models are employed since voluntary capacity is something theoretically impossible to measure in rodents. With this information in mind, we will review the modalities used to simulate resistance training in animals in order to present to investigators the benefits and risks of different animal models capable to provoke skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Our second objective is to help investigators analyze and select the experimental resistance training model that best promotes the research question and desired endpoints. PMID:24375009

  17. Research Review: Quantitative Magazine Studies, 1983-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovich, Mark N.

    1994-01-01

    Examines quantitative magazine research studies published in various journals during the period 1983-1993. Questions the heavy reliance on content analysis techniques to study the role of magazines in American society. Calls for a redirection in magazine research, combining media content studies with media effects studies. (SR)

  18. [The basic and applied study on the epidermal growth factor].

    PubMed

    Huang, B R; Cai, L W; Xiang, X Z

    2001-04-01

    This article reviews the results of the basic research about epidermal growth factor and its receptor, and the development of the novel drug, EGF eyedrop, that containing chemically synthesized EGF gene, the construction of EGF expression vector, the transformation of the host cells, the purification of the recombinant protein EGF, the preparation of three batches of the EGF product and identification, the preclinical and clinical trials. Relevant studies show that recombinant EGF consisting of 51 amino acids can be secreted into the medium under the control of the alpha factor leading sequence in the yeast cells. The EGF can accelerate the growth of corneal-limbal epithelial cells and the healing of an alkali burned corneal. The EGF can be used in curing oral cavity ulcer and skin burned wound. And it has the preventive effects on experimental duodenal ulcer of rat. The antiserum was made for test of the concentration of blood EGF and urine EGF by RIA. Data from studies demonstrate the inhibition effect of EGF on the growth of tumor cells, such as A431 and BT325 cells in the presence of high EGF concentration (> 10 ng/ml). The expression of EGFR and DNA ploidy in renal carcinoma has clinical significance. Crystallization and preliminary x-ray diffraction studies of the EGF has been made. The MW of the EGF product is 6000, and the pI is about 4.6 and it has correct N-terminal amino acids sequences, immunogenicity and biological activity. There is no vestige of the DNA of the yeast cells. Animal experiments reveal that there is no cumulation of the EGF in the body, and EGF can promote corneal epithelial healing. There is no toxicological effect during cornea wound healing of rabbit. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center clinical trial was conducted in four hospitals to assess safety, ocular tolerance and efficacy of an ophthalmic solution of EGF for 200 cases of cornea transplantation and 247 cases of nebulae. Unequivocal results were obtained

  19. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H.; Lagreze, Wolf A.; Schuman, Joel S.; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J.; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. Conclusions: The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. PMID:27225223

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Asim; Atar, Necip

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73mgg(-1), respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents. PMID:18434000

  1. Microfluidics for High-Throughput Quantitative Studies of Early Development.

    PubMed

    Levario, Thomas J; Lim, Bomyi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lu, Hang

    2016-07-11

    Developmental biology has traditionally relied on qualitative analyses; recently, however, as in other fields of biology, researchers have become increasingly interested in acquiring quantitative knowledge about embryogenesis. Advances in fluorescence microscopy are enabling high-content imaging in live specimens. At the same time, microfluidics and automation technologies are increasing experimental throughput for studies of multicellular models of development. Furthermore, computer vision methods for processing and analyzing bioimage data are now leading the way toward quantitative biology. Here, we review advances in the areas of fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, and data analysis that are instrumental to performing high-content, high-throughput studies in biology and specifically in development. We discuss a case study of how these techniques have allowed quantitative analysis and modeling of pattern formation in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:26928208

  2. Use of Sea Stars to Study Basic Reproductive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Gary M.; Reich, Adrian; Klatsky, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Echinoderms are closely related to chordates and comprise a major group of invertebrate deuterostomes. They are broadcast spawners and as such, each female accumulates millions of eggs and oocytes. These cells are readily isolated, and are often large, clear, and surrounded by accessory cells and extracellular coverings that do not prevent access to the oocyte. Sea stars are one type of echinoderm. Their oocytes are stored in prophase of meiosis, and since the natural meiotic stimulus has been identified as 1-methyladenine, these cells can be induced to complete meiotic maturation as individuals, or synchronously en masse. Microinjection and culture of these cells is feasible using quantitative or repetitive methods so that hundreds of oocytes and eggs can be modified each hour. Experimentation on this organism is extensive over a rich history of reproductive and developmental biology so that new investigators can easily incorporate this organism into their repertoire of research. This chapter will highlight the fundamental protocols to enable a new investigator to perform an array of approaches on this organism, including oocyte isolation, microinjection, and even single cell quantitative PCR. PMID:20536323

  3. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP){sub 3} reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import.

  4. Metamorphism of eucrite meteorites studied quantitatively using induced thermoluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, J. David; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Induced thermoluminescence studies provide a new and quantitative means of determining relative metamorphic intensities for eucrite meteorites, the simplest and most ancient products of basaltic volcanism. Using this technique, it is shown that the eucrites constitute a continuous metamorphic series and not, as commonly assumed, two groups of metamorphosed and nonmetamorphosed meteorites. It is suggested that the method may have applications to other basalts.

  5. Retention of Nontraditional Students: A Quantitative Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Shirley J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational research study was to investigate, describe, and measure factors influencing retention of nontraditional first and second year students at a university located in the Midwestern United States. Retention of adult students has become a major issue for many institutions of higher education and many…

  6. Employing quantitative and qualitative methods in one study.

    PubMed

    Mason, S A

    There is an apparent lack of epistemological rigour when quantitative and qualitative methods are combined in the same study, because they reflect opposing positivist and interpretive perspectives. When and how to use methodological pluralism is discussed in this article. PMID:8400784

  7. Quantitative methods for studying hemostasis in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Rost, M S; Grzegorski, S J; Shavit, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hemostasis is a coordinated system through which blood is prevented from exiting a closed circulatory system. We have taken advantage of the zebrafish, an emerging model for the study of blood coagulation, and describe three techniques for quantitative analysis of primary and secondary hemostasis. Collectively, these three techniques comprise a toolset to aid in our understanding of hemostasis and pathological clotting. PMID:27312499

  8. Comparative study of different venous reflux duplex quantitation parameters.

    PubMed

    Valentín, L I; Valentín, W H

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare different quantitation parameters of venous reflux by duplex scan in different venous disease manifestations. Duplex scan is a new modality to quantify venous reflux. Several studies propose different parameters. In addition, there is controversy about the importance of deep and superficial involvement in different disease manifestations. It is not clear whether there is an increased venous reflux associated with varied clinical stages. Venous conditions were classified in seven stages and their differences for several quantitation variables studied. Most quantitation variables, such as average and peak velocity, average and peak flow, and reflux volume disclosed significantly increased reflux from normal, pain only, and edema group to varicose vein, with or without edema, to lipodermatosclerosis and ulcer groups at every location in the lower extremity. Reflux time was not as consistent as other variables. Totalization of the results of every parameter for the whole extremity points to an increased reflux from pain only to edema and from lipodermatosclerosis to ulcer group. Chronic edema is not usually associated with increased venous reflux. The greater saphenous vein (superficial system) seems to be the main contributor to reflux in all stages of disease. Different quantitation methods of venous reflux are equivalent. Increased deep and superficial reflux and its totalization are associated with a more advanced disease stage. Reflux time may be the least useful variable. Chronic edema is frequently not associated with venous reflux. Greater saphenectomy may be the most useful intervention, even in the presence of deep vein reflux. PMID:10496498

  9. Study on the performance evaluation of quantitative precipitation estimation and quantitative precipitation forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Chang, K.; Suk, M.; cha, J.; Choi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Rainfall estimation and short-term (several hours) quantitative prediction of precipitation based on meteorological radar data is one of the intensely studied topics. The Korea Peninsula has the horizontally narrow land area and complex topography with many of mountains, and so it has the characteristics that the rainfall system changes in many cases. Quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) and quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) are the crucial information for severe weather or water management. We have been conducted the performance evaluation of QPE/QPF of Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA), which is the first step for optimizing QPE/QPF system in South Korea. The real-time adjusted RAR (Radar-AWS-Rainrate) system gives better agreement with the observed rain-rate than that of the fixed Z-R relation, and the additional bias correction of RAR yields the slightly better results. A correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.84 is obtained between the daily accumulated observed and RAR estimated rainfall. The RAR will be available for the hydrological applications such as the water budget. The VSRF (Very Short Range Forecast) shows better performance than the MAPLE (McGill Algorithm for Precipitation Nowcasting by Lagrangian) within 40 minutes, but the MAPLE better than the VSRF after 40 minutes. In case of hourly forecast, MAPLE shows better performance than the VSRF. QPE and QPF are thought to be meaningful for the nowcasting (1~2 hours) except the model forecast. The long-term forecast longer than 3 hours by meteorological model is especially meaningful for such as water management.

  10. Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. )

    1993-01-01

    This project's objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks'' such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we've teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p[sup +] and n[sup +] GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We've learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we've demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

  11. Basic studies on the viability of El Tor vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Miyaki, K.; Iwahara, S.; Sato, K.; Fujimoto, S.; Aibara, K.

    1967-01-01

    Quantitative data are presented on the viability of El Tor vibrios in various foodstuffs under different conditions. El Tor vibrios were found to have a very short life in water at -20°C, but in various nutrient media, such as skim milk, sugar solution or meat extract, they could live for more than a month at this temperature; the survival rate was always much higher when the vibrio suspension was cooled rapidly to -72°C and stored at this temperature. The optimum pH for the growth and survival of El Tor vibrios is 6-8, and the optimum osmotic pressure 250 mOsm—700 mOsm. The resistance of El Tor vibrios to disinfectants is lower than that of salmonellae and Escherichia coli. The El Tor vibrios are more resistant than classical cholera vibrios to such disinfectants as benzethonium chloride and o-dichlorobenzene. They are not resistant to sodium hypochlorite or bleaching powder at 6 ppm. The results of the investigation emphasize the necessity of immediate and proper disinfection of foodstuffs contaminated with El Tor vibrios, and indicate the possibility of survival of the organisms for long periods under favourable conditions. PMID:4870080

  12. A Workforce Basic Skills Norming Study of Iowa's JTPA and PROMISE JOBS Target Populations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System, San Diego, CA.

    A study provided accurate and reliable norms that reflected the reading and math performance levels of Iowa's youth and adults engaged in work force preparation and employment training for basic skills. The study population included 819 participants from the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) and Iowa's Job Opportunities and Basic Skills programs…

  13. A Feasibility Study of Computer Assisted Instruction in US Army Basic Electronics Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., Gaithersburg, MD. Federal Systems Div.

    A study of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for US Army basic electronics training at the US Army Signal Center and School establishes the feasibility of CAI as a training technique. Three aspects of CAI are considered: effectiveness, efficiency, and applicability of CAI to basic electronics training. The study explores the effectiveness of the…

  14. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science

    SciTech Connect

    Copper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1991-06-01

    During the past three years the program has undergone a substantial revitalization. There has been no significant change in the scientific direction of this grant, in which emphasis continues to be placed on developing new or improved methods of obtaining quantitative data from radiotracer imaging studies. However, considerable scientific progress has been made in the three areas of interest: Radiochemistry, Quantitative Methodologies, and Experimental Methods and Feasibility Studies, resulting in a sharper focus of perspective and improved integration of the overall scientific effort. Changes in Faculty and staff, including development of new collaborations, have contributed to this, as has acquisition of additional and new equipment and renovations and expansion of the core facilities. 121 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Workplace Basic Skills. A Study of 10 Canadian Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice

    Presented in case study format, this report looks at different types of workplace literacy programs across Canada. It describes in some detail 10 particular work environments and the unique characteristics that have enabled each to offer quality worker education programs. Each case study provides information in these categories: profile (an…

  16. Study Design in fMRI: Basic Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Edson, Jr.; Barker, Gareth J.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide range of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study designs available for the neuroscientist who wants to investigate cognition. In this manuscript we review some aspects of fMRI study design, including cognitive comparison strategies (factorial, parametric designs), and stimulus presentation possibilities (block,…

  17. The Basic "How To's" for Validating a Study Skills Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Virginia G.

    To find out what study skills were used by successful students at an urban commuter school whose primary degree program is business, the College Reading and Study Skills (CRSS) inventory was validated on 150 students. First the CRSS inventory was evaluated and revised slightly. The language of the statements was made positive and jargon free. The…

  18. A Basic Bibliography on Canada for Social Studies Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a bibliography that provides materials on Canada available to social studies educators. Resources for teachers include teaching strategies, literature guides, and books on acid rain. Student resources include books that provide a perspective on Canadian life. (DB)

  19. Viewpoint: Back to the Basics in Social Studies? Personal Statements by Three Canadian Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Neil; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Neil Sutherland discusses the historical context of the back to basics movement in social studies. Ken Osborne points out that the movement is stifling innovation. Max van Manen addresses the question of what curricula should be considered basic. (Author/RM)

  20. Teaching Basic Production Economic Principles to Secondary School Students of Vocational Agriculture: An Evaluative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, James E.

    Four modules of instruction on basic production economic principles were developed, tried in high school classes of students preparing for on- and off-farm agricultural occupations, and evaluated for content and teaching. Basic principles studied were supply and demand, value theory, variable proportions, and marginal analysis. Total and part…

  1. Basic studies of microstructure of combusting turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle

    1991-03-01

    The goal is to develop a state-of-the-art measurement technique, Holographic Particle Displacement Velocimetry (HPV), which can provide instantaneous velocities everywhere in the flow field simultaneously. Another goal is to use the power of supercomputers to simulate 3D flows with heat release to study the physics of combusting turbulent flows. Computations suffer from limited flow times and Reynolds number but can provide flow properties in more detail than possible by any existing experimental techniques. Moreover, numerical simulations can provide quantities almost impossible to measure experimentally. This article discusses efforts to develop the holographic particle displacement velocimetry system and results of direct numerical numerical simulations of combusting flows.

  2. Basic Study on Sludge Concentration and Dehydration with Ultrasonic Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Yuta; Nagashima, Satoshi; Uchida, Takeyoshi; Kawashima, Norimichi; Takeuchi, Shinichi; Akita, Masashi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    We study the condensation of sludge and the improvement of the dehydration efficiency of sludge by acoustic cavitation for efficiency improvement and cost reduction in water treatment. An ultrasound wave was irradiated into activated sludge in the water tank of our ultrasound exposure system and a standing wave acoustic field was formed using a vibrating disk driven by a Langevin-type transducer. The vibrating disk was mounted on the bottom of the water tank. Acoustic cavitation was generated in the activated sludge suspension and the sludge was floated to the water surface by ultrasound exposure with this system. We observed B-mode ultrasound images of the activated sludge suspension before ultrasound exposure and that of the floated sludge and treated water after ultrasound exposure. The ultrasound diagnostic equipment was used for the observation of the B-mode ultrasound images of the sludge. It was found that the sludge floated to the water surface because of adhesion of microbubbles generated by acoustic cavitation to the sludge particles, which decreased the sludge density. It can be expected that the drifting sludge in water can be recovered by the flotation thickening method of sludge as an application of the results of this study. It is difficult to recover the drifting sludge in water by the conventional gravity thickening method.

  3. Calibration assessment in quantitative electroencephalographic brainmapping and evoked potential studies.

    PubMed

    Richards, A K; Hamilton-Bruce, M A

    1994-09-01

    Acquisition of a Cadwell Spectrum 32 resulted in the introduction of quantitative electrophysiological brainmapping techniques in our neurophysiology laboratory. To ascertain the accuracy and consistency of our equipment, we performed the following tests: inputting a calibration signal and measuring the resultant amplitudes for quantitative electroencephalographs (qEEGs) and evoked potentials (EPs) in the mapping and standard montages, inputting a synchronous calibration signal and mapping it at varying times for qEEGs and EPs, as well as re-analysing the same electroencephalographic (EEG) epochs previously selected from 20 control subjects. QEEG amplitudes varied from -5.4% to +5.8% and EPs by 9.5% or less, and after an EP software upgrade, by 5.5% or less. QEEG voltage mapping showed variation of only one color increment across the map, which could, in our example, represent up to 25.2% of the scale used. Re-analysis of previously selected epochs yielded identical results. We have established some of the accuracy and consistency limits of the hard- and software of our system with respect to the quantitative and topographic data. We conclude that such systems need to be calibration-checked in the laboratories in which they are used, with an independent signal generator. Users also need to be aware that scaling of topographic maps could lead to erroneous conclusions, as perceived amplitude changes could affect the interpretation of both initial and serial studies. PMID:7980205

  4. ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: BASIC STUDIES RESULTS FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.; Hay, M.

    2011-01-24

    In an effort to develop and optimize chemical cleaning methods for the removal of sludge heels from High Level Waste tanks, solubility tests have been conducted using nonradioactive, pure metal phases. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phase gibbsite and the iron phases hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, and wustite. Many of these mineral phases have been identified in radioactive, High Level Waste sludge at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids and a variety of other complexing organic acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that mixtures of oxalic acid with either nitric or sulfuric acid are the most effective cleaning solutions for the dissolution of the primary metal phases in sludge waste. Based on the results, optimized conditions for hematite dissolution in oxalic acid were selected using nitric or sulfuric acid as a supplemental proton source. Electrochemical corrosion studies were also conducted (reported separately; Wiersma, 2010) with oxalic/mineral acid mixtures to evaluate the effects of these solutions on waste tank integrity. The following specific conclusions can be drawn from the test results: (1) Oxalic acid was shown to be superior to all of the other organic acids evaluated in promoting the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. (2) All iron phases showed similar solubility trends in oxalic acid versus pH, with hematite exhibiting the lowest solubility and the slowest dissolution. (3) Greater than 90% hematite dissolution occurred in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures within one week for two hematite sources and within three weeks for a third hematite sample with a larger average particle size. This dissolution rate appears acceptable for waste tank cleaning applications. (4) Stoichiometric dissolution of iron phases in oxalic acid (based on the oxalate concentration) and the formation of the preferred 1:1 Fe to oxalate complex

  5. Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Basic Studies Results FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2010-05-05

    Due to the need to close waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the effective removal of the heels. Oxalic acid is the preferred cleaning reagent for sludge heel dissolution, particularly for iron-based sludge, due to the strong complexing strength of the oxalate. However, the large quantity of oxalate added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based chemical cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acid systems may be required for specific waste components with low solubility in oxalic acid and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Solubility tests were conducted using non-radioactive, pure metal phases known to be the primary phases present in High Level Waste sludge. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phases gibbsite and boehmite and the iron phases magnetite and hematite. Hematite and boehmite are expected to be the most difficult iron and aluminum phases to dissolve. These mineral phases have been identified in both SRS and Hanford High Level Waste sludge. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that oxalic and sulfuric acids are more effective for the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. For boehmite, elevated temperature will be required to promote effective phase dissolution in the acids studied. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control using a supplemental proton source (additional acid) is critical for minimization of oxalic acid usage during the dissolution of hematite. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing hematite dissolution in oxalic acid and may explain the somewhat

  6. Basic Study on Production Well Integrity for Methane Hydrate Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakumoto, M.; Yoneda, J.; Katagiri, J.; Tenma, N.; Aoki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Methane Hydrate (MH) exist as an ice-like crystal under low-temperature and high-pressure condition, and it has gathering attention as a non-conventional natural gas resource. Depressurization method is a method to reduce the bottom hole pressure by submersible pump lowering water level in the production well, and gas and water is recovered by MH dissociation at the in situ. During the depressurization operation, consolidation and deformation of sediment occurs because of increase of effective stress by depressurization and changes in the soil structure by MH dissociation. Then consolidation and deformation of sediment makes negative friction between the production well and sediment, and large stress is occur in casing. Therefore there is concern that it may cause compression failure and shear failure of the production well. For safe MH development, it is necessary to grasp the deformation and stress vicinity of the production well. At first, we conducted push-out test to get friction strength between the different materials simulated the well and sediment. And we have done numerical analysis for integrity using by these data. The results of numerical analysis showed that the large deformation of sediment occur around the depressurization zone, and for the well, the large tensile stress in the vertical direction occur the upper vicinity of the depressurization zone.This study was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). The authors thank the entire personnel related to MH21 Research Consortium.

  7. "Back to Basics": Rethinking What Is Basic to Education through an Interpretive Study of the Work of Teachers and Students in Elementary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardine, David W.; Clifford, Patricia; Friesen, Sharon; LaGrange, Annette

    2001-01-01

    An ongoing study has found that the "basics" in contemporary educational theory are actually the smallest, most easily isolated and most easily testable fragments of knowledge in a discipline--abstractions produced by complex analysis. The project is exploring an alternative version of "basicness" in which the complex, often ambiguous realm of a…

  8. A basic study of some normoxic polymer gel dosimeters.

    PubMed

    De Deene, Y; Hurley, C; Venning, A; Vergote, K; Mather, M; Healy, B J; Baldock, C

    2002-10-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters offer a wide range of potential applications in the three-dimensional verification of complex dose distribution such as in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Until now, however, polymer gel dosimeters have not been widely used in the clinic. One of the reasons is that they are difficult to manufacture. As the polymerization in polymer gels is inhibited by oxygen, all free oxygen has to be removed from the gels. For several years this was achieved by bubbling nitrogen through the gel solutions and by filling the phantoms in a glove box that is perfused with nitrogen. Recently another gel formulation was proposed in which oxygen is bound in a metallo-organic complex thus removing the problem of oxygen inhibition. The proposed gel consists of methacrylic acid, gelatin, ascorbic acid, hydroquinone and copper(II)sulphate and is given the acronym MAGIC gel dosimeter. These gels are fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and are therefore called 'normoxic' gel dosimeters. In this study, a chemical analysis on the MAGIC gel was performed. The composition of the gel was varied and its radiation response was evaluated. The role of different chemicals and the reaction kinetics are discussed. It was found that ascorbic acid alone was able to bind the oxygen and can thus be used as an anti-oxidant in a polymer gel dosimeter. It was also found that the anti-oxidants N-acetyl-cysteine and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium were effective in scavenging the oxygen. However, the rate of oxygen scavenging is dependent on the anti-oxidant and its concentration with tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium being the most reactive anti-oxidants. Potentiometric oxygen measurements in solution provide an easy way to get a first impression on the rate of oxygen scavenging. It is shown that cupper(II)sulphate operates as a catalyst in the oxidation of ascorbic acid. We, therefore, propose some new normoxic gel formulations that have a less complicated chemical

  9. Quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by quartz nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Astudillo, Luisana; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Wenzhi; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with a series of concentrations in the bath solution. Such current change is due to the adsorption of Cyt c to the inner surface of the nanopipette through specific interactions with hNgb. In contrast, a smaller current change with weak concentration dependence was observed when Cyt c was replaced with lysozyme, which does not specifically bind to hNgb. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the Cyt c-hNgb complex formation was derived and the value matched very well with the result from surface plasmon resonance measurement. This is the first quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by a conical-shaped nanopore based on charge sensing. Our results demonstrate that nanopipettes can potentially be used as a label-free analytical tool to quantitatively characterize protein-protein interactions.In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with

  10. Erosion of Terrestrial Rift Flank Topography: A Quantitative Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.

    1999-01-01

    Many rifted or passive continental margins feature a seaward-facing erosional escarpment which abruptly demarcates deeply weathered, low relief, interior uplands from a deeply incised, high relief coastal zone. It is generally accepted that these escarpments originate at the time of continental rifting and propagate inland through the elevated rift flank topography at rates on the order of 1 km/Myr over the course of a margin's history. Considering the length of passive margins worldwide and an average rift flank plateau height of several hundred meters, it is clear that sediment eroded from passive margins is an important component of the mass flux from continents to oceans through geologic time. The overall goal of the research reported here is to develop a quantitative understanding of the kinematics of escarpment propagation across passive margins and the underlying geological processes responsible for this behavior. Plateau-bounding escarpments in general exhibit two basic forms depending on the direction of surface water drainage on the plateau interior relative to the escarpment. Where surface water flows away from the escarpment, the escarpment takes the form of subdued embayments and promontories, such that its overall trend remains fairly straight as it evolves with time. Where upland streams flow across the escarpment, it takes the form of dramatic, narrow gorges whose heads appear to propagate up the plateau drainage systems as large-scale knickpoints. From work on the Colorado Plateau, Schmidt (1987) noted that the Colorado River is located much closer to the Grand Canyon's south rim, a drainage divide escarpment, than to the north rim, which is a gorge-like escarpment. The main implication is that the gorge-like form might be associated with higher long-term average erosion rates compared to the drainage divide escarpment type.

  11. Private Sector Providers of Basic Skills Training in the Workplace. A Study of the General Training and Basic Skills Responses of Randomly Selected Companies Which Provide Basic Skills Training to Their Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Jorie Lester

    A questionnaire was distributed to 1,305 companies to study the basic skills training provided. Of 62 responses, 41 companies had basic skills training programs. Respondents represented these types of companies: communications and utilities, finance and insurance, manufacturing, wholesalers, retailers, health and hospitals, and mining, and had…

  12. Quantitative Courses in a Liberal Education Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wismath, Shelly L.; Mackay, D. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues for the importance of quantitative reasoning skills as part of a liberal education and describes the successful introduction of a mathematics-based quantitative skills course at a small Canadian university. Today's students need quantitative problem-solving skills, to function as adults, professionals, consumers, and citizens in…

  13. A quantitative study of oxygen as a metabolic regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2003-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue is associated with metabolic changes aimed at maintaining ATP homeostasis. However, given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). In particular, we are interested in determining mechanisms relating cellular oxygen concentration to observed metabolic responses at the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole body levels and in quantifying how changes in tissue oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study, we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics, to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of oxygen as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement--sensitivity analysis--permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and parameters controlling cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The analysis can distinguish between parameters that must be determined accurately and those that require less precision, based on their effects on model predictions. This capability may prove to be important in optimizing experimental design, thus reducing use of animals.

  14. A Quantitative Study of Oxygen as a Metabolic Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabera, Marco E.

    2000-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue is associated with metabolic changes aimed at maintaining ATP homeostasis. However, given the complexity of the human bio-energetic system, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). In particular, we are interested in determining mechanisms relating cellular oxygen concentration to observed metabolic responses at the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole body levels and in quantifying how changes in tissue oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study; we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics, to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of oxygen as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement - sensitivity analysis - permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and parameters controlling cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The analysis can distinguish between parameters that must be determined accurately and those that require less precision, based on their effects on model predictions. This capability may prove to be important in optimizing experimental design, thus reducing use of animals.

  15. Quantitative analysis of multiple sclerosis: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Li, Xiang; Wei, Xinzhou; Sturm, Deborah; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with a presumed immune-mediated etiology. For treatment of MS, the measurements of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are often used in conjunction with clinical evaluation to provide a more objective measure of MS burden. In this paper, we apply a new unifying automatic mixture-based algorithm for segmentation of brain tissues to quantitatively analyze MS. The method takes into account the following effects that commonly appear in MR imaging: 1) The MR data is modeled as a stochastic process with an inherent inhomogeneity effect of smoothly varying intensity; 2) A new partial volume (PV) model is built in establishing the maximum a posterior (MAP) segmentation scheme; 3) Noise artifacts are minimized by a priori Markov random field (MRF) penalty indicating neighborhood correlation from tissue mixture. The volumes of brain tissues (WM, GM) and CSF are extracted from the mixture-based segmentation. Experimental results of feasibility studies on quantitative analysis of MS are presented.

  16. Quantitative study on appearance of microvessels in spectral endoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Yasushi; Arai, Fumihito; Morimoto, Yoshinori; Yuasa, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Increase in abnormal microvessels in the superficial mucosa is often relevant to diagnostic findings of neoplasia in digestive endoscopy; hence, observation of superficial vasculature is crucial for cancer diagnosis. To enhance the appearance of such vessels, several spectral endoscopic imaging techniques have been developed, such as narrow-band imaging and blue laser imaging. Both techniques exploit narrow-band blue light for the enhancement. The emergence of such spectral imaging techniques has increased the importance of understanding the relation of the light wavelength to the appearance of superficial vasculature, and thus a new method is desired for quantitative analysis of vessel visibility in relation to the actual structure in the tissue. Here, we developed microvessel-simulating phantoms that allowed quantitative evaluation of the appearance of 15-μm-thick vessels. We investigated the relation between the vascular contrast and light wavelength by the phantom measurements and also verified it in experiments with swine, where the endoscopically observed vascular contrast was investigated together with its real vascular depth and diameter obtained by microscopic observation of fluorescence-labeled vessels. Our study indicates that changing the spectral property even in the wavelength range of blue light may allow selective enhancement of the vascular depth for clinical use.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity studies on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C L

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity studies were carried out on a series of N-isopropylaryl hydrazides which inhibits monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibitory potencies of these compounds of MAO were found to correlate with the electron-withdrawing capacity of the aryl ring substituents as estimated by both empirical Hammet sigma constants and electronic indices from molecular orbital calculations. Based on these correlations and previously published data on other classes of MAO inhibitors, a general model for the inhibitor pharmacophore is proposed: potent MAO of an aromatic ring; electron-withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring or replacing the phenyl ring with certain types of heterocyclic rings will tend to increase the potency. PMID:1271400

  18. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Quality Control Study: Methodological Report, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Quality Control Study, Volume II focuses on study procedures used for the analytical report recorded in Volume I of the study. Copies of all data collection forms are included along with file layouts, field procedures and other general information letters. It is intended to provide a description of the…

  19. Integration of Basic Skills: The Great Deception in Elementary Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1982-01-01

    Teaching basic skills in elementary social studies courses does not promote more teaching of social studies; it decreases social studies teaching time. The adverse impact of overemphasizing the 3-Rs and auditory and abstract learning over visual and tactile-kinesthetic experiences is discussed. (AM)

  20. Quantitative methods in the study of trypanosomes and their applications*

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, W. H. R.

    1963-01-01

    In the first part of this paper the author summarizes and discusses previous quantitative work on trypanosomes, with particular reference to biometrical studies, in vivo and in vitro studies on numbers of trypanosomes, studies on hosts infected with trypanosomes, and physiological studies. The second part discusses recent work done at the East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organization. A method for the measurement of the infectivity of trypanosome suspensions, based on serial dilution and inoculation into test animals, is outlined, and applications likely to improve diagnostic procedures are suggested for it. Such applications might include: the establishment of experimental procedures not significantly reducing the infectivity of trypanosomes under experiment; determination of the effects on the infectivity of preserved material of some of the factors in the process of preservation, important for the preparation of standard material; comparison of the efficiency of different culture media for the isolation of trypanosomes; study of the distribution of trypanosomes in the vertebrate host; and measurement of the susceptibility of trypanosomes to drugs. The author stresses the importance of relating future experimental work with trypanosomes to preserved material for which comprehensive documentation is available. PMID:20604152

  1. A study on the quantitative evaluation of skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomomi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Kido, Michiko; Yamada, Kenji; Oikaze, Hirotoshi; Takechi, Yohei; Furuta, Tomotaka; Ishii, Shoichi; Katayama, Haruna; Jeong, Hieyong; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose a quantitative evaluation method of skin barrier function using Optical Coherence Microscopy system (OCM system) with coherency of near-infrared light. There are a lot of skin problems such as itching, irritation and so on. It has been recognized skin problems are caused by impairment of skin barrier function, which prevents damage from various external stimuli and loss of water. To evaluate skin barrier function, it is a common strategy that they observe skin surface and ask patients about their skin condition. The methods are subjective judgements and they are influenced by difference of experience of persons. Furthermore, microscopy has been used to observe inner structure of the skin in detail, and in vitro measurements like microscopy requires tissue sampling. On the other hand, it is necessary to assess objectively skin barrier function by quantitative evaluation method. In addition, non-invasive and nondestructive measuring method and examination changes over time are needed. Therefore, in vivo measurements are crucial for evaluating skin barrier function. In this study, we evaluate changes of stratum corneum structure which is important for evaluating skin barrier function by comparing water-penetrated skin with normal skin using a system with coherency of near-infrared light. Proposed method can obtain in vivo 3D images of inner structure of body tissue, which is non-invasive and non-destructive measuring method. We formulate changes of skin ultrastructure after water penetration. Finally, we evaluate the limit of performance of the OCM system in this work in order to discuss how to improve the OCM system.

  2. Quantitative error analysis for computer assisted navigation: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Ö.; Perwög, M.; Kral, F.; Schwarm, F.; Bárdosi, Z. R.; Göbel, G.; Freysinger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The benefit of computer-assisted navigation depends on the registration process, at which patient features are correlated to some preoperative imagery. The operator-induced uncertainty in localizing patient features – the User Localization Error (ULE) - is unknown and most likely dominating the application accuracy. This initial feasibility study aims at providing first data for ULE with a research navigation system. Methods Active optical navigation was done in CT-images of a plastic skull, an anatomic specimen (both with implanted fiducials) and a volunteer with anatomical landmarks exclusively. Each object was registered ten times with 3, 5, 7, and 9 registration points. Measurements were taken at 10 (anatomic specimen and volunteer) and 11 targets (plastic skull). The active NDI Polaris system was used under ideal working conditions (tracking accuracy 0.23 mm root mean square, RMS; probe tip calibration was 0.18 mm RMS. Variances of tracking along the principal directions were measured as 0.18 mm2, 0.32 mm2, and 0.42 mm2. ULE was calculated from predicted application accuracy with isotropic and anisotropic models and from experimental variances, respectively. Results The ULE was determined from the variances as 0.45 mm (plastic skull), 0.60 mm (anatomic specimen), and 4.96 mm (volunteer). The predicted application accuracy did not yield consistent values for the ULE. Conclusions Quantitative data of application accuracy could be tested against prediction models with iso- and anisotropic noise models and revealed some discrepancies. This could potentially be due to the facts that navigation and one prediction model wrongly assume isotropic noise (tracking is anisotropic), while the anisotropic noise prediction model assumes an anisotropic registration strategy (registration is isotropic in typical navigation systems). The ULE data are presumably the first quantitative values for the precision of localizing anatomical landmarks and implanted fiducials

  3. ABRF-PRG07: Advanced Quantitative Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Falick, Arnold M.; Lane, William S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Phinney, Brett S.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Yates, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge for core facilities is determining quantitative protein differences across complex biological samples. Although there are numerous techniques in the literature for relative and absolute protein quantification, the majority is nonroutine and can be challenging to carry out effectively. There are few studies comparing these technologies in terms of their reproducibility, accuracy, and precision, and no studies to date deal with performance across multiple laboratories with varied levels of expertise. Here, we describe an Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Proteomics Research Group (PRG) study based on samples composed of a complex protein mixture into which 12 known proteins were added at varying but defined ratios. All of the proteins were present at the same concentration in each of three tubes that were provided. The primary goal of this study was to allow each laboratory to evaluate its capabilities and approaches with regard to: detection and identification of proteins spiked into samples that also contain complex mixtures of background proteins and determination of relative quantities of the spiked proteins. The results returned by 43 participants were compiled by the PRG, which also collected information about the strategies used to assess overall performance and as an aid to development of optimized protocols for the methodologies used. The most accurate results were generally reported by the most experienced laboratories. Among laboratories that used the same technique, values that were closer to the expected ratio were obtained by more experienced groups. PMID:21455478

  4. Basic Competence of Intensive Care Unit Nurses: Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Suominen, Tarja; Ritmala-Castrén, Marita; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Critical care patients benefit from the attention of nursing personnel with a high competence level. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate the self-assessed basic competence of intensive care unit nurses and related factors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A basic competence scale (Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Competence Scale version 1, Likert scale 1-5, 1 = poor and 5 = excellent) was employed among Finnish intensive care unit nurses (n = 431). Intensive care unit nurses' self-assessed basic competence was good (mean 4.19, SD 0.40). The attitude and value base of basic competence was excellent whereas experience base was the poorest compared to the knowledge base and skill base of intensive and critical care nursing. The strongest factor explaining nurses' basic competence was their experience of autonomy in nursing care (F value 60.85, β 0.11, SE 0.01, and P ≤ 0.0001). Clinical competence was self-rated as good. Nurses gave their highest competence self-ratings for ICU patient care according to the principles of nursing care. The ICU nurses also self-rated their professional competence as good. Collaboration was self-rated as the best competence. In basic and continuing education and professional self-development discussions it is meaningful to consider and find solutions for how to improve nurses' experienced autonomy in nursing. PMID:26557676

  5. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software. PMID:11831625

  6. Freddie Fish. A Primary Environmental Study of Basic Numerals, Sets, Ordinals and Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraynak, Ola

    This teacher's guide and study guide are an environmental approach to mathematics education in the primary grades. The mathematical studies of the numerals 0-10, ordinals, number sets, and basic shapes - diamond, circle, square, rectangle, and triangle - are developed through the story of Freddie Fish and his search for clean water. The…

  7. A Basic Approach to Social Studies: An Overview for Teachers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Oliver T.; Hickson, Mark, III

    A program based upon the study of human history and culture has been developed for seventh grade students by social studies teachers in Montgomery, Alabama public schools. The major objective of the program is to help students understand how basic relationships between time, space, and the cosmos have operated throughout the history of…

  8. A Study on Contribution of the Basic Training Course to the Professional Development of Probationary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, M. Cevat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make an evaluation on contribution of the basic training course to the professional development of probationary teachers. The study group consisted of 21 probationary teachers and 5 education supervisors in Sanliurfa province. The data were collected through semi-structured observation, focus group interview and…

  9. Parent Perceptions of Social Studies: Do They Want Just the Basics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Charles S.; Weible, Thomas D.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of parents in urban and rural school districts showed a strong belief in the importance of elementary school social studies and more support for innovations such as the curriculum guidelines of the National Council for the Social Studies than publicity about demands to return to basics would suggest. (IS)

  10. Revising Basic Mathematics in a Network Environment: An Empirical Study with Finnish Technology University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketamo, Harri; Alajaaski, Jarkko

    2008-01-01

    A revising/replenishment study course in basic mathematics is experienced as being almost a necessity at the beginning of technology studies at the Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland. This is to avoid early dropouts in actual engineering mathematics courses. Experimental research on factors explaining successful revision of…

  11. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  12. Quantitative study of prostate cancer using three dimensional fiber tractography

    PubMed Central

    Hedgire, Sandeep; Tonyushkin, Alexey; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Efstathiou, Jason A; Hahn, Peter F; Harisinghani, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate feasibility of a quantitative study of prostate cancer using three dimensional (3D) fiber tractography. METHODS: In this institutional review board approved retrospective study, 24 men with biopsy proven prostate cancer underwent prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal coil on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Single shot echo-planar diffusion weighted images were acquired with b = 0.600 s/mm2, six gradient directions. Open-source available software TrackVis and its Diffusion Toolkit were used to generate diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) map and 3D fiber tracts. Multiple 3D spherical regions of interest were drawn over the areas of tumor and healthy prostatic parenchyma to measure tract density, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA), which were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: DTI tractography showed rich fiber tract anatomy with tract heterogeneity. Mean tumor region and normal parenchymal tract densities were 2.53 and 3.37 respectively (P < 0.001). In the tumor, mean ADC was 0.0011 × 10-3 mm2/s vs 0.0014 × 10-3 mm2/s in the normal parenchyma (P < 0.001). The FA values for tumor and normal parenchyma were 0.2047 and 0.2259 respectively (P = 0.3819). CONCLUSION: DTI tractography of the prostate is feasible and depicts congregate fibers within the gland. Tract density may offer new biomarker to distinguish tumor from normal tissue. PMID:27158426

  13. Semiautomatic Software For Quantitative Analysis Of Cardiac Positron Tomography Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman; Bidaut, Luc; Nienaber, Christoph; Krivokapich, Janine; Schelbert, Heinrich R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1988-06-01

    In order to derive accurate values for true tissue radiotracers concentrations from gated positron emission tomography (PET) images of the heart, which are critical for quantifying noninvasively regional myocardial blood flow and metabolism, appropriate corrections for partial volume effect (PVE) and contamination from adjacent anatomical structures are required. We therefore developed an integrated software package for quantitative analysis of tomographic images which provides for such corrections. A semiautomatic edge detection technique outlines and partitions the myocardium into sectors. Myocardial wall thickness is measured on the images perpendicularly to the detected edges and used to correct for PVE. The programs automatically correct for radioactive decay, activity calibration and cross contaminations for both static and dynamic studies. Parameters derived with these programs include tracer concentrations and their changes over time. They are used for calculating regional metabolic rates and can be further displayed as color coded parametric images. The approach was validated for PET imaging in 11 dog experiments. 2D echocardiograms (Echo) were recorded simultaneously to validate the edge detection and wall thickness measurement techniques. After correction for PVE using automatic WT measurement, regional tissue tracer concentrations derived from PET images correlated well with true tissue concentrations as determined by well counting (r=0.98). These preliminary studies indicate that the developed automatic image analysis technique allows accurate and convenient evaluation of cardiac PET images for the measurement of both, regional tracer tissue concentrations as well as regional myocardial function.

  14. A quantitative Kirkpatrick Level 1 and 2 study of equipment specialist apprentice operations training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Dirk D.

    The primary purpose of the quantitative experimental study is to compare employee-learning outcomes for a course of study that is offered in two formats: explicit and tacit instructor led and explicit e-learning operations training. A Kirkpatrick Level 2 course examination is used to establish a pretest knowledge baseline and to measure posttest learning outcomes for each instructional format. A secondary purpose is to compare responses of the two groups using a Kirkpatrick Level 1 customer satisfaction index survey. Several authors reported the United States electric utility industry would have an employee attrition issue during the 2010 through 2015 period. This is at the same time the industry will be experiencing an increased demand for electricity. There now is a demand for highly training powerplant operators. A review of literature yielded few studies comparing instructor led training and e-based training. Though the Electric Power Research Institute stated the two training modes would be acceptable instruction, the organization did not develop a quantifiable justified recommendation as to the training. Subjects participated in a basic operations course and decided to take either the instructor led or e-based training course. Results of the study concluded that both instructor led and e-based training provided significant learning to the participants. The Kirkpatrick Level 1 results indicated significantly better results for instructor led training. There was not a significant difference in the Kirkpatrick Level 2 results between the two training modalities. Recommendation for future research include conducting a quantitative studies including a Phillips Level 5 study and qualitative studies including a more detailed examination of the customer satisfaction survey (Kirkpatrick Level 1).

  15. Basic study of monitoring on fibre reinforced polymers: theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglioli, B.; Strauss, A.; Pascale, G.; Bergmeister, K.

    2005-06-01

    Recent research activities, technological utilization and commercialization activities in sensors and acquisition systems for monitoring have strongly supported the introduction of these innovations and new concepts in civil structural engineering. The impact of monitoring and assessing the health state of infrastructures, as well as new and old constructions, has become important and it seems to be one of the largest industries in the world. With the aim of monitoring new or repaired structures various monitoring systems have been extensively employed in recent years. In particular, in this paper attention is focused on the procedures usually adopted for monitoring the strengthening systems based on fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) applied to civil structures. Electrical strain gauges are often used to detect strain variations, but on composite materials the measures can be affected by various factors, such as the characteristics of the resin coating, the type of glue and the gauge length. In this paper the measurement errors on FRP elements are studied, from a theoretical approach developed in previous work on a deterministic basis. This approach is extended to the probabilistic field, with the aim of performing a sensitivity analysis of the basic variables which can cause errors in strain measurements. Additionally, the previous approach is extended to study the effect of the deviation of the direction of the gauges from the longitudinal axis of the FRP sheets. Finally, a comparison with experimental data is performed.

  16. Exercise Self-Efficacy and Perceived Wellness among College Students in a Basic Studies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Cara L.; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Hritz, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    University basic studies courses provide a valuable opportunity for facilitating the knowledge, skills, and beliefs that develop healthy behaviors to last a lifetime. Belief in one's ability to participate in physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, is a psychological construct that has had a documented impact on physical activity. Although…

  17. Toward Refining the Assessment of the Basic Public Speaking Course: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, D. Gail

    A study on basic speech assessment replicated an earlier one except that in place of the CCAI and the Competent Speaker form, the Self-Perceived Public Speaking Competency Scale (SPPSC) was used. Also, 2 randomly selected control groups of students were added to the research design: one consisting of 62 students who had not taken speech and were…

  18. Long-Term Retention of Basic Science Knowledge: A Review Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custers, Eugene J. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a review of long-term retention of basic science knowledge is presented. First, it is argued that retention of this knowledge has been a long-standing problem in medical education. Next, three types of studies are described that are employed in the literature to investigate long-term retention of knowledge in general. Subsequently,…

  19. Basic Aspects of Infant-Grandparent "Interaction": An Eight-Month Longitudinal and Naturalistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratikaki, Anastasia; Germanakis, Ioannis; Kokkinaki, Theano

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal and naturalistic study aims to describe basic aspects of early imitative exchanges in dyadic infant-grandfather and infant-grandmother free interactions, from the second to the 10th month of age. Sixteen infants were video-recorded at home in the course of spontaneous dyadic interactions with maternal grandfathers and…

  20. Basics of the "Learning Organization" at Jordanian Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Basem; Jaradat, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the extent to which the basics of the "learning organization" (LO) principles are available at Jordanian schools (Pilot TQA schools in Jersah); to this effect, a specially customized questionnaire was developed--it was made of 19 items across three areas: a leadership that supports learning, an environment that is…

  1. Learning and Motivation in Thailand: A Comparative Regional Study on Basic Education Ninth Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loima, Jyrki; Vibulphol, Jutarat

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research studied regional motivation and learning of the basic education 9th graders in Thailand. Second topic was the school size and its possible effect on motivation. Furthermore, the data gave an opportunity to discuss, whether international research on motivation and learning was valid in Thai classrooms. The informants were…

  2. Student Debt, Problem-Solving, and Decision-Making of Adult Learners: A Basic Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A basic qualitative research study was conducted to develop insights into how adult learners employ problem-solving and decision-making (PSDM), when considering college financing, student loans, and student debt. Using the social media Website Facebook, eight qualified participants were recruited. Participants were interviewed via telephone, and…

  3. Cognitive Modifiability of Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Multicentre Study Using Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment-Basic Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozulin, A.; Lebeer, J.; Madella-Noja, A.; Gonzalez, F.; Jeffrey, I.; Rosenthal, N.; Koslowsky, M.

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of cognitive intervention with the new "Instrumental Enrichment Basic" program (IE-basic), based on Feuerstein's theory of structural cognitive modifiability that contends that a child's cognitive functioning can be significantly modified through mediated learning intervention. The IE-basic program is…

  4. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqin; Wang, James H-C

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP's anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy. PMID:27610386

  5. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP's anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy. PMID:27610386

  6. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-12-01

    This work supports development studies for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion. Laboratory and process development studies are aimed at providing needed information on limestone utilization, removal of particulates and alkali metal compounds from the flue gas, control of SO/sub 2/ and trace pollutants emissions, and other aspects of fluidized-bed combustion. This report presents information on: (1) the development of a limestone utilization predictive methodology, (2) studies of particle breakup and elutriation, (3) basic studies on limestone sulfation enhancement by hydration, (4) studies of the kinetics of the hydration process, and (5) an investigation of various hydration process concepts.

  7. Experimental bath engineering for quantitative studies of quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, A.; Ball, H.; Hayes, D.; Zhen, X.; Jarratt, M. C.; Sastrawan, J.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We develop and demonstrate a technique to engineer universal unitary baths in quantum systems. Using the correspondence between unitary decoherence due to ambient environmental noise and errors in a control system for quantum bits, we show how a wide variety of relevant classical error models may be realized through in-phase or in-quadrature modulation on a vector signal generator producing a resonant carrier signal. We demonstrate our approach through high-bandwidth modulation of the 12.6-GHz carrier appropriate for trapped Yb171+ ions. Experiments demonstrate the reduction of coherent lifetime in the system in the presence of both engineered dephasing noise during free evolution and engineered amplitude noise during driven operations. In both cases, the observed reduction of coherent lifetimes matches well with quantitative models described herein. These techniques form the basis of a toolkit for quantitative tests of quantum control protocols, helping experimentalists characterize the performance of their quantum coherent systems.

  8. Experimental Study on Basic Performance of Electroosmotic Pump with Ion Exchanging Porous Glass Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho; Kim, Gyu Man; Lee, Choon Young; Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Dae Joong

    The basic concept and preliminary performance results of a miniaturized electroosmotic pump with diaphragms were included in the present study. The separation of an electroosmotic pumping liquid from a drug using diaphragms is mainly to have a freedom in choosing an electroosmotic pumping liquid and to achieve the optimal drug delivery with its preferable precise control. As a result, the maximum flow rate and current increased linearly according to the increment of applied voltage that is electric potential.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Eye Phenotypes for Functional Genetic Studies Using Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janani; Wang, Qingyu; Le, Thanh; Pizzo, Lucilla; Grönke, Sebastian; Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Imai, Yuzuru; Srivastava, Ashutosh; Troisí, Beatriz Llamusí; Mardon, Graeme; Artero, Ruben; Jackson, George R; Isaacs, Adrian M; Partridge, Linda; Lu, Bingwei; Kumar, Justin P; Girirajan, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    About two-thirds of the vital genes in the Drosophila genome are involved in eye development, making the fly eye an excellent genetic system to study cellular function and development, neurodevelopment/degeneration, and complex diseases such as cancer and diabetes. We developed a novel computational method, implemented as Flynotyper software (http://flynotyper.sourceforge.net), to quantitatively assess the morphological defects in the Drosophila eye resulting from genetic alterations affecting basic cellular and developmental processes. Flynotyper utilizes a series of image processing operations to automatically detect the fly eye and the individual ommatidium, and calculates a phenotypic score as a measure of the disorderliness of ommatidial arrangement in the fly eye. As a proof of principle, we tested our method by analyzing the defects due to eye-specific knockdown of Drosophila orthologs of 12 neurodevelopmental genes to accurately document differential sensitivities of these genes to dosage alteration. We also evaluated eye images from six independent studies assessing the effect of overexpression of repeats, candidates from peptide library screens, and modifiers of neurotoxicity and developmental processes on eye morphology, and show strong concordance with the original assessment. We further demonstrate the utility of this method by analyzing 16 modifiers of sine oculis obtained from two genome-wide deficiency screens of Drosophila and accurately quantifying the effect of its enhancers and suppressors during eye development. Our method will complement existing assays for eye phenotypes, and increase the accuracy of studies that use fly eyes for functional evaluation of genes and genetic interactions. PMID:26994292

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Eye Phenotypes for Functional Genetic Studies Using Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani; Wang, Qingyu; Le, Thanh; Pizzo, Lucilla; Grönke, Sebastian; Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Imai, Yuzuru; Srivastava, Ashutosh; Troisí, Beatriz Llamusí; Mardon, Graeme; Artero, Ruben; Jackson, George R.; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Partridge, Linda; Lu, Bingwei; Kumar, Justin P.; Girirajan, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    About two-thirds of the vital genes in the Drosophila genome are involved in eye development, making the fly eye an excellent genetic system to study cellular function and development, neurodevelopment/degeneration, and complex diseases such as cancer and diabetes. We developed a novel computational method, implemented as Flynotyper software (http://flynotyper.sourceforge.net), to quantitatively assess the morphological defects in the Drosophila eye resulting from genetic alterations affecting basic cellular and developmental processes. Flynotyper utilizes a series of image processing operations to automatically detect the fly eye and the individual ommatidium, and calculates a phenotypic score as a measure of the disorderliness of ommatidial arrangement in the fly eye. As a proof of principle, we tested our method by analyzing the defects due to eye-specific knockdown of Drosophila orthologs of 12 neurodevelopmental genes to accurately document differential sensitivities of these genes to dosage alteration. We also evaluated eye images from six independent studies assessing the effect of overexpression of repeats, candidates from peptide library screens, and modifiers of neurotoxicity and developmental processes on eye morphology, and show strong concordance with the original assessment. We further demonstrate the utility of this method by analyzing 16 modifiers of sine oculis obtained from two genome-wide deficiency screens of Drosophila and accurately quantifying the effect of its enhancers and suppressors during eye development. Our method will complement existing assays for eye phenotypes, and increase the accuracy of studies that use fly eyes for functional evaluation of genes and genetic interactions. PMID:26994292

  11. A quantitative approach for estimating exposure to pesticides in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Dosemeci, Mustafa; Alavanja, Michael C R; Rowland, Andrew S; Mage, David; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lubin, Jay H; Hoppin, Jane A; Sandler, Dale P; Blair, Aaron

    2002-03-01

    We developed a quantitative method to estimate long-term chemical-specific pesticide exposures in a large prospective cohort study of more than 58000 pesticide applicators in North Carolina and Iowa. An enrollment questionnaire was administered to applicators to collect basic time- and intensity-related information on pesticide exposure such as mixing condition, duration and frequency of application, application methods and personal protective equipment used. In addition, a detailed take-home questionnaire was administered to collect further intensity-related exposure information such as maintenance or repair of mixing and application equipment, work practices and personal hygiene. More than 40% of the enrolled applicators responded to this detailed take-home questionnaire. Two algorithms were developed to identify applicators' exposure scenarios using information from the enrollment and take-home questionnaires separately in the calculation of subject-specific intensity of exposure score to individual pesticides. The 'general algorithm' used four basic variables (i.e. mixing status, application method, equipment repair status and personal protective equipment use) from the enrollment questionnaire and measurement data from the published pesticide exposure literature to calculate estimated intensity of exposure to individual pesticides for each applicator. The 'detailed' algorithm was based on variables in the general algorithm plus additional exposure information from the take-home questionnaire, including types of mixing system used (i.e. enclosed or open), having a tractor with enclosed cab and/or charcoal filter, frequency of washing equipment after application, frequency of replacing old gloves, personal hygiene and changing clothes after a spill. Weighting factors applied in both algorithms were estimated using measurement data from the published pesticide exposure literature and professional judgment. For each study subject, chemical-specific lifetime

  12. Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Virginia, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" is devoted to the arts in education as a concern that should be addressed in a time of new priorities for the curriculum. Five articles and a book review are included. The opening article, "The State of the Arts in Education: Envisioning Active Participation By All" (Virginia Robinson), emphasizes that the study of…

  13. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Lucky, Z.; Drandell, M.; Leneman, D.; Maggs, J.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Morales, G.; Carter, T. A.; Wang, Y.; DeHaas, T.

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  14. Targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    The report delineates the new progress made in the fifth and final year and discusses the major accomplishments of the full five year program both in the basic science and in the spin off to practical transducer applications. Possible new areas of study which are suggested by the present studies are briefly reported. Major achievements include the development of a physical approach to understanding active composites, leading to the development of several new families of PZT:polymer piezoelectric composites for hydrophone application. New advances in the phenomenology and microscopic theory of electrostriction, and the evolution of a new family of high strain ferroelectric relaxor materials for practical application. New basic understanding of the polarization mechanisms in ferroelectric relaxors has been aided by the study of order-disorder of the cation arrangement in lead scandium tantalate, and the results correlate well with studies of relaxor behavior, and of shape memory effects in PLZT ceramics. Low temperature studies on pure and doped PZTs have given the first clear indication of the intrinsic (averaged) single domain response and correlate exceedingly well with earlier phenomenological theory. Crystal growth and ceramic processing studies have developed hand-in-hand with program needs providing new forms of conventional materials, new grain oriented structures and single crystals.

  15. Research Report: The Holt Basic Reading System (HBRS) Field Study (1976-1977). Study Phase: Student Interest Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eileen

    Questionnaires were distributed to 6,354 elementary school students participating in the Holt Basic Reading System Field Study. Primary students reported that their favorite activity is watching television; intermediate students, playing sports. Approximately 25% of the students did not have a pet; 46% reported having a dog; 15%, a cat. Almost 48%…

  16. Barriers to successful implementation of care in home haemodialysis (BASIC-HHD):1. Study design, methods and rationale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ten years on from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence’ technology appraisal guideline on haemodialysis in 2002; the clinical community is yet to rise to the challenge of providing home haemodialysis (HHD) to 10-15% of the dialysis cohort. The renal registry report, suggests underutilization of a treatment type that has had a lot of research interest and several publications worldwide on its apparent benefit for both physical and mental health of patients. An understanding of the drivers to introducing and sustaining the modality, from organizational, economic, clinical and patient perspectives is fundamental to realizing the full benefits of the therapy with the potential to provide evidence base for effective care models. Through the BASIC-HHD study, we seek to understand the clinical, patient and carer related psychosocial, economic and organisational determinants of successful uptake and maintenance of home haemodialysis and thereby, engage all major stakeholders in the process. Design and methods We have adopted an integrated mixed methodology (convergent, parallel design) for this study. The study arms include a. patient; b. organization; c. carer and d. economic evaluation. The three patient study cohorts (n = 500) include pre-dialysis patients (200), hospital haemodialysis (200) and home haemodialysis patients (100) from geographically distinct NHS sites, across the country and with variable prevalence of home haemodialysis. The pre-dialysis patients will also be prospectively followed up for a period of 12 months from study entry to understand their journey to renal replacement therapy and subsequently, before and after studies will be carried out for a select few who do commence dialysis in the study period. The process will entail quantitative methods and ethnographic interviews of all groups in the study. Data collection will involve clinical and biomarkers, psychosocial quantitative assessments and neuropsychometric

  17. A review of basic to clinical studies of irreversible electroporation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunlan; Davalos, Rafael V; Bischof, John C

    2015-01-01

    The use of irreversible electroporation (IRE) for cancer treatment has increased sharply over the past decade. As a nonthermal therapy, IRE offers several potential benefits over other focal therapies, which include 1) short treatment delivery time, 2) reduced collateral thermal injury, and 3) the ability to treat tumors adjacent to major blood vessels. These advantages have stimulated widespread interest in basic through clinical studies of IRE. For instance, many in vitro and in vivo studies now identify treatment planning protocols (IRE threshold, pulse parameters, etc.), electrode delivery (electrode design, placement, intraoperative imaging methods, etc.), injury evaluation (methods and timing), and treatment efficacy in different cancer models. Therefore, this study reviews the in vitro, translational, and clinical studies of IRE cancer therapy based on major experimental studies particularly within the past decade. Further, this study provides organized data and facts to assist further research, optimization, and clinical applications of IRE. PMID:25389236

  18. Quantitative studies on acetylcholinesterase in seven species of digenetic trematodes.

    PubMed

    Nizami, W A; Siddiqi, A H; Islam, M W

    1977-07-29

    Quantitative estimation of absolute levels and in vitro release of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in seven species of digenetic trematodes: Isoparorchis hypselobagri from the swim bladder of catfish, Wallago attu; Srivastavaia indica and Gastrothylax crumenifer from the rumen, and Gigantocotyle explanatum from the liver of the water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis; Fasciolopsis buski, Echinostoma malayanum from the small intestine and Gastrodiscoides hominis from the caecum of the pig, Sus scrofa revealed that the enzyme is present in remarkably high quantities in species which inhibit gastrointestinal tract compared with those that parasitize liver and swim bladder. The rate of in vitro release of AChE also varies with the species which supports the view that such differential secretion probably takes place in situ as well to counteract peristalsis and it is a biochemical adaptation on the part of these trematodes. PMID:562036

  19. A quantitative histochemical study of the microvasculature of irradiated skin

    SciTech Connect

    Schwint, A.E.; Itoiz, M.E.; Cabrini, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Short-term X-ray damage to the microvasculature of the skin of newborn rats has been quantitated using Horseradish Peroxidase as a tracer. Image analysis of thick sections on which peroxidase was demonstrated histochemically revealed a radioinduced increase in vascular volume coupled with a decrease in vascular length and an altered frequency distribution of blood vessel calibers which resulted in early telangiectasia. The results afforded by direct counting of peroxidase positive macrophagic cells and microphotometric evaluation of peroxidase present in the connective tissue indicate a progressive increase in capillary permeability as a function of dose and time post-irradiation. The accuracy with which the affected region of blood vessels coincided with the area exposed to the beam favours the hypothesis of direct damage to the vessel wall as a major cause of radioinduced lesion.

  20. Targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    The work reported covers the fifth and final year of the program of targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications. Major achievements include: the development of a physical approach to understanding active composites, leading to the development of several new families of PZT, polymer piezoelectric composites for hydrophone application. These are new advances in the phenomenology and microscopic theory of electrostriction, and the evolution of a new family of high strain ferroelectric relaxor materials for practical application. New basic understanding of the polarization mechanisms in ferroelectric relaxors has been aided by the study of order disorder of the cation arrangement in lead scandium tantalate, and the results correlate well with studies of relaxor behavior, and of shape memory effects in PLZT ceramics. Low temperature studies on pure and doped PZTs have given the first clear indication of the intrinsic (averaged) single domain in response and correlate exceedingly well with earlier phenomenological theory. Crystal growth and ceramic processing studies have developed hand in hand with program needs providing new forms of conventional materials, new grain oriented structures and single crystals.

  1. Helping Students to Recognize and Evaluate an Assumption in Quantitative Reasoning: A Basic Critical-Thinking Activity with Marbles and Electronic Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; Cruz, Adrian Corona

    2013-01-01

    There is a general agreement that critical thinking is an important element of 21st century skills. Although critical thinking is a very complex and controversial conception, many would accept that recognition and evaluation of assumptions is a basic critical-thinking process. When students use simple mathematical model to reason quantitatively…

  2. Critical review of a quantitative study of a specialty in high energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    White, D H; Sullivan, D

    1980-01-01

    A review is made of the authors' series of quantitative, historical, and social studies of the weak interactions of elementary particles. A short intellectual history, the quantitative methodology, and a summary of the papers analyzing specific episodes in this field are presented. The social organization of the field is described, and an overall policy for resource management is discussed. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Use of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment to Improve Interpretation of a Recreational Water Epidemiological Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a supplemental water quality monitoring study and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to complement the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water study at Boq...

  4. Sorption of basic dyes onto granulated pillared clays: thermodynamic and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cheknane, B; Zermane, F; Baudu, M; Bouras, O; Basly, J P

    2012-09-01

    Effect of the granulation process onto the thermodynamic and kinetic sorption parameters of two basic dyes (Basic Yellow 28-BY 28 and Basic Green 4-BG 4) was evaluated in the present work. The charge surface properties of the surfactant-modified aluminium-pillared clay (CTAB-Al-Mont-PILC) particles were not modified, and the isoelectric point remains constant after high shear wet granulation. The Gibbs free energy of both BY 28 and BG 4 sorption was negative and decreased with the granulation; the endothermic nature of the sorption process was confirmed by the positive values of ΔH°. Adsorption kinetics of the two dyes, studied at pH 6 and 150 mg L(-1), follow the pseudo-first order kinetic model with observed rate constants of 2.5-4.2×10(-2) min(-1). The intraparticle diffusion model, proposed by Weber and Morris, was applied, and the intraparticle plots revealed three distinct sections representing external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption/desorption equilibrium. Diffusion coefficients, calculated from the Boyd kinetic equation, increased with the granulation and the particle size. Pseudo-first order kinetic constants, intraparticle diffusion rate constants and diffusion coefficients were determined for two other initial concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)) and include in a statistical study to evaluate the impact of granulation and initial concentration on the kinetic parameters. Kruskal-Wallis tests, Spearman's rank order correlation and factor analysis revealed a correlation between (i) the diffusion coefficients and granulation, and between (ii) the intraparticle diffusion rate constants and initial concentration. PMID:22721789

  5. Study on Control of Inclusion Compositions in Tire Cord Steel by Low Basicity Top Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Cai-ping; Yue, Feng; Jiang, Chen-xu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    Top slag melting experiment was conducted in a silicon molybdenum furnace with tire cord steel billet. The influence of top slag composition on the plasticity of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusion and inclusion plasticization conditions was calculated by thermodynamic software FactSage. Use the thermodynamic calculation to guide the laboratory experiments to study slag compositions influence inclusions composition. Then industrial experiments were conducted based on the theoretical calculation and results of laboratory experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to determine the morphology and composition of inclusions in steel. All studies show that in the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-10% MgO diagram, when CaO = 8-48%, SiO2 = 35-75%, Al2O3 = 0-32%, inclusions are in the plastic area. When basicity of top slag is certain, Al2O3 content in inclusions increases with the increase of Al2O3 content in the slag, and the distribution of inclusions becomes scattered with the increase of Al2O3 content in slag. Inclusion plasticization can be achieved when the binary basicities of top slag are 0.6, 0.8-1.2, 1.4 and corresponding w(Al2O3)s are 2-15%, 2-10%, <2%. According to industrial experimental results, when top slag basicity decreases from 1.5 to 0.67-0.9 and Al2O3 content decreases below 10 wt%, the inclusion falls into plastic area. It is feasible in practice to control the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusions plastic through adjusting Al2O3 content in slag.

  6. Post-deposition bioink self-assembly: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Ashkan; McCune, Matthew; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    The outcome of a bioprinting process depends on both the deposition of the discrete bioink units and their ability to self-assemble into the desired structure following deposition. Post-printing structure formation is an autonomous process governed by fundamental biological organizing principles. As the quantitative formulation of such principles is notoriously difficult, bioprinting remains largely a trial and error approach. To address this problem, specifically in extrusion bioprinting, we have recently developed an effective computational method, the cellular particle dynamics (CPDs). We have demonstrated the predictive power of CPD in cases of simple printed constructs prepared with spherical multicellular bioink units. Here we generalize CPD to the important practical case of tubular grafts printed with cylindrical bioink units by taking into account the realistic experimental situation in which the length and the volume of the cylinders decrease post-printing. Based on our results, we provide a set of instructions for the use of CPD simulations to directly predict tubular graft formation without the need to carry out the corresponding complex and expensive control experiments. Using these instructions allows the efficient and timely biofabrication of tubular organ structures. A particularly instructive outcome of our analysis is that building tubular organ structures, such as vascular grafts by bioprinting can be done considerably faster by using cylindrical rather than spherical bionk units. PMID:26538193

  7. Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks: quantitative and qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, K.; MacKintosh, A. M.; Hastings, G.; Wheeler, C.; Watson, J.; Inglis, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the appeal of "designer drinks" to young people. DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative research comprising group discussions and questionnaire led interviews with young people accompanied by a self completion questionnaire. SETTINGS: Argyll and Clyde Health Board area, west Scotland. SUBJECTS: Eight groups aged 12-17 years; 824 aged 12-17 recruited by multistage cluster probability sample from the community health index. RESULTS: Young people were familiar with designer drinks, especially MD 20/20 and leading brands of strong white cider. Attitudes towards these drinks varied quite distinctly with age, clearly reflecting their attitudes towards and motivations for drinking in general. The brand imagery of designer drinks-in contrast with that of more mainstream drinks-matched many 14 and 15 year olds' perceptions and expectations of drinking. Popularity of designer drinks peaked between the ages of 13 and 16 while more conventional drinks showed a consistent increase in popularity with age. Consumption of designer drinks tended to be in less controlled circumstances and was associated with heavier alcohol intake and greater drunkenness. CONCLUSIONS: Designer drinks are a cause for concern. They appeal to young people, often more so than conventional drinks, and are particularly attractive to 14-16 year olds. Consumption of designer drinks is also associated with drinking in less controlled environments, heavier drinking, and greater drunkenness. There is a need for policy debate to assess the desirability of these drinks and the extent to which further controls on their marketing are required. PMID:9040387

  8. Development, Demonstration, and Dissemination: Case Studies of Selected Specific Projects in Adult Basic Education. Occasional Paper No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Harold W.; Darkenwald, Gordon G.

    In an effort to determine the effectiveness of 309 (b) projects (experimental demonstration projects in Adult Basic Education funded through the Adult Education Act), selected projects were used as the basis for several case studies and evaluated. Project RFD was never intended to be utilized by Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs but instead…

  9. Physical abuse in basic-education schools in Aden governorate, Yemen: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ba-Saddik, A S; Hattab, A S

    2013-04-01

    Physical abuse in school has lifelong consequences affecting child health and educational achievements. A study was designed to assess the prevalence of physical abuse experienced by pupils in basic-education schools in Aden, Yemen, and to examine the risk factors associated with it. A cross-sectional study covering 1066 pupils in 7th-9th grades from 8 schools in different districts of Aden governorate were randomly selected. Answering an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, 55.7% of pupils reported physical abuse at least once in their school lifetime (73.2% of males versus 26.6% of females). Teachers were the main perpetrators (45.4%). A statistically significant association was found between physical abuse and sex, age group, family type and father's education. Significant predictors of physical abuse on multivariate regression were male sex (OR=7.89) and extended family type (OR=1.36). Physical abuse in basic-education schools requires serious consideration by educational authorities, families and the community at large. PMID:23882958

  10. A pilot study examining if satisfaction of basic needs can ameliorate negative effects of shift work

    PubMed Central

    SAKSVIK-LEHOUILLIER, Ingvild; HETLAND, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if satisfaction of the basic needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness is related to shift work tolerance, specifically physical and mental fatigue, insomnia, and digestive troubles in a sample of shift workers. This is a cross-sectional pilot questionnaire study, including 252 shift workers employed in a municipality in Norway. Autonomy was negatively related to physical fatigue and digestive troubles, while competence was negatively related to mental fatigue. Relatedness showed significant correlations with insomnia and mental fatigue, but did not reach significance in the regression model controlling for the two other basic needs as well as work scheduling, night work exposure, and sleep medication. Sleep medication was significant in the final regression model for insomnia, but unrelated to fatigue and digestive troubles. The demographic variables, work hours per week, work schedule, and night work exposure were unrelated to all four measures of shift work tolerance. Autonomy and competence may be more important for fatigue and digestive troubles among shift workers than work arrangement variables, night work exposure, and sleep medication use. PMID:26423327

  11. Attacking the Multi-tiered Proteolytic Pathology of COPD: New Insights from Basic and Translational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Djekic, Uros V; Gaggar, Amit; Weathington, Nathaniel M

    2015-01-01

    Protease activity in inflammation is complex. Proteases released by cells in response to infection, cytokines, or environmental triggers like cigarette smoking cause breakdown of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In chronic inflammatory diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), current findings indicate that pathology and morbidity are driven by dysregulation of protease activity, either through hyperactivity of proteases or deficiency or dysfunction their antiprotease regulators. Animal studies demonstrate the accuracy of this hypothesis through genetic and pharmacologic tools. New work shows that ECM destruction generates peptide fragments active on leukocytes via neutrophil or macrophage chemotaxis towards collagen and elastin derived peptides respectively. Such fragments now have been isolated and characterized in vivo in each case. Collectively, this describes a biochemical circuit in which protease activity leads to activation of local immunocytes, which in turn release cytokines and more proteases, leading to further leukocyte infiltration and cyclical disease progression that is chronic. This circuit concept is well known, and is intrinsic to the protease-antiprotease hypothesis; recently analytic techniques have become sensitive enough to establish fundamental mechanisms of this hypothesis, and basic and clinical data now implicate protease activity and peptide signaling as pathologically significant pharmacologic targets. This review discusses targeting protease activity for chronic inflammatory disease with special attention to COPD, covering important basic and clinical findings in the field; novel therapeutic strategies in animal or human studies; and a perspective on the successes and failures of agents with a focus on clinical potential in human disease. PMID:19026684

  12. On the Use of a Protic Ionic Liquid with a Novel Cation To Study Anion Basicity.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Mohammad; Yarger, Jeffery L; Angell, C Austen

    2016-09-01

    The need for reliable means of ordering and quantifying the Lewis basicity of anions is discussed and the currently available methods are reviewed. Concluding that there is need for a simple impurity-insensitive tool, we have sought, and here describe, a new method using NMR spectroscopy of a weak base, a substituted urea, 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), as it is protonated by Brønsted acids of different strengths and characters. In all cases studied the product of protonation is a liquid (hence a protic ionic liquid). NMR spectroscopy detects changes in the electronic structure of the base upon interaction with the proton donors. As the proton-donating ability, that is, acidity, increases, there is a smooth but distinct transition from a hydrogen-bonded system (with no net proton transfer) to full ionicity. The liquid state of the samples and high concentration of nitrogen atoms, despite the very low natural abundance of its preferred NMR-active isotope ((15) N), make possible the acquisition of (15) N spectra in a relatively short time. These (15) N, along with (13) C, chemical shifts of the carbonyl atom, and their relative responses to protonation of the carbonyl oxygen, can be used as a means, sensitive to anion basicity and relatively insensitive to impurities, to sort anions in order of increasing hydrogen bond basicity. The order is found to be as follows: SbF6 (-) ClO4 (-) >FSO3 (-)

  13. Real-time quantitative phase imaging for cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hoa Vinh

    Most biological cells are not clearly visible with a bright field microscope. Several methods have been developed to improve contrast in cell imaging, including use of exogenous contrast agents such as fluorescence microscopy, as well as utilizing properties of light-specimen interaction for optics design, to reveal the endogenous contrast, such as phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Although PCM and DIC methods significantly improve the image contrast without the need for staining agents, they only provide qualitative information about the phase change induced by the cells as light passes through them. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has recently emerged as an effective imaging tool which provides not only better image contrast but also cell-induced phase shifts in the optical pathlength, thus allowing nanometer-scale measurements of structures and dynamics of the cells. Other important aspects of an imaging system are its imaging speed and throughput. High-throughput, high-speed, real-time quantitative phase imaging with high spatial and temporal sensitivity is highly desirable in many applications including applied physics and biomedicine. In this dissertation, to address this need, I discuss the development of such an imaging system that includes the white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a new optical imaging method, and image reconstruction/analysis algorithms using graphics processing units (GPUs). wDPM can measure optical pathlength changes at nanometer scale both spatially and temporally with single-shot image acquisition, enabling very fast imaging. I also exploit the broadband spectrum of white light used as the light source in wDPM to develop a system called spectroscopic diffraction phase microscopy (sDPM). This sDPM system allows QPI measurements at several wavelengths, which solves the problem of thickness and refractive index coupling in the phase shifts induced by the cell, and which

  14. Coal-gasification basic research and costs studies. Quarterly report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-15

    Work was continued on basic research and cost studies supporting the Department of Energy's coal gasification program. Two major activities or tasks are being performed. The first activity is the development of a process or processes to produce agglomerates from coal fines suitable for use as a feed to fixed-bed gasifiers. During the Fourth Quarter approximately 70 double-roll briquetting runs and 97 pelletizing runs were performed to evaluate promising binder candidates and to investigate other briquetting and pelletizing variables. All agglomerates were tested for room temperature handling ease (measured by crush-strength and drop-shatter tests) and for stability and performance at gasifier temperatures. The best agglomerates were further evaluated in a modified Burghardt test and in a tumbler test. Ten agglomerate compositions, eight briquettes and two pellets, were run in a small gasifier at American Natural Resources. Most agglomerates performed well in this gasifier. In Task II, the design of a gasification plant with Rockwell Molten Salt gasifiers was completed, and estimates of capital and operating costs were developed. Work on all basic cases has now been completed and only the incorporation of a briquetting facility into the fixed-bed plant design remains to be done.

  15. Overloading study of basic compounds with a positively charged C18 column in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoran; Guo, Zhimou; Long, Zhen; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-03-15

    While tailing and overloading of basic compounds remain problematic on most RP columns, a new kind of positively charged RP column named XCharge C18 was found to be superior good for the separation of alkaloids in our practical use. In this work, the surface charge property of the XCharge C18 column was evaluated by the retention of NO(3)(-) under different pH values and buffer concentrations. A considerable and pH-dependent positive charge was confirmed on the column. Then overloading behaviors of bases were systematically studied using amitriptyline as a basic probe. Good peak shapes (Tf<1.5) and extra high loadability with a C(0.5) of about 30,000 mg/L were observed on the column, with commonly used 0.1% formic acid as mobile phase additive. However, increasing the ionic strength of buffer with phosphates led to tailing peaks at high sample amount and sharp decline in loadability (C(0.5) of 2000-3000 mg/L), although it brought higher column efficiency at low sample amount. Higher pH also induced worse performance and lower loadability. The overall results demonstrated the importance of an appropriate level of ionic repulsion for the XCharge C18 column to achieve the good performance for bases, which could be explained by the multiple-site adsorption theory as ionic repulsion would shield the solute from occupying high-energy sites deeper in C18 layer. PMID:23411141

  16. The emerging science of quantitative imaging biomarkers terminology and definitions for scientific studies and regulatory submissions.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Larry G; Barnhart, Huiman X; Buckler, Andrew J; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Kondratovich, Marina V; Toledano, Alicia; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Filice, Ross; Zhang, Zheng; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2015-02-01

    The development and implementation of quantitative imaging biomarkers has been hampered by the inconsistent and often incorrect use of terminology related to these markers. Sponsored by the Radiological Society of North America, an interdisciplinary group of radiologists, statisticians, physicists, and other researchers worked to develop a comprehensive terminology to serve as a foundation for quantitative imaging biomarker claims. Where possible, this working group adapted existing definitions derived from national or international standards bodies rather than invent new definitions for these terms. This terminology also serves as a foundation for the design of studies that evaluate the technical performance of quantitative imaging biomarkers and for studies of algorithms that generate the quantitative imaging biomarkers from clinical scans. This paper provides examples of research studies and quantitative imaging biomarker claims that use terminology consistent with these definitions as well as examples of the rampant confusion in this emerging field. We provide recommendations for appropriate use of quantitative imaging biomarker terminological concepts. It is hoped that this document will assist researchers and regulatory reviewers who examine quantitative imaging biomarkers and will also inform regulatory guidance. More consistent and correct use of terminology could advance regulatory science, improve clinical research, and provide better care for patients who undergo imaging studies. PMID:24919826

  17. A quantitative study of exocytosis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles from neural stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Wu, Qiuxia; Sui, Keke; Chen, Xin-Xin; Fang, Jie; Hu, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghong; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the first 24 h after removing TiO2NPs, from the culture medium, about 35.0%, 34.6% and 41.7% of NP1 (50 nm), NP2 (30 nm) and NTs (nanotubes, 100 nm × 4-6 nm) were released (exocytosed) from cells, respectively. The release decreased over time, and became negligible at 72 h. Exocytosis did not happen during cell division. In addition, our results suggested that both endocytosis and exocytosis of TiO2NPs were energy-dependent processes, and NPs uptake by cells was influenced by serum proteins. Furthermore, we achieved primary dynamic confocal imaging of the exocytosis, allowing tracking of TiO2 NPs from NSCs. These findings may benefit studies on nanotoxicology and nanomedicine of TiO2 NPs.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the

  18. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  19. Interactions among Online Learners: A Quantitative Interdisciplinary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Pawan; Jain, Sachin; Jain, Smita

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the design and development of online instruction and specifically targets interaction and communication between online learners. Facilitating appropriate and meaningful interactions in designing instruction is a major goal for anyone developing a course, especially an online class. The data for this study came from the online…

  20. Genetic analysis carried out in population tails reveals diverse two-loci interactions as a basic factor of quantitative traits variation in rye.

    PubMed

    Masojć, Piotr; Bienias, Anna; Berdzik, Marcin; Kruszona, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Bidirectional selective genotyping carried out independently for five quantitative traits within a biparental population of recombinant inbred lines of rye has revealed dramatic changes in alleles distribution in the population tails. A given allele, predominant in the lower tail, is often neutral for reversely directed selection or associates with the upper tail following divergent selection for a related trait. Such radical changes in the alleles distribution cannot be explained by differences in genotypic values within a single locus. This paper presents the theoretical model of a genetic mechanism underlying observed responses of individual loci to divergent selection. The presented model refers to the specific interactions between alleles at two loci. Its wider application in genetic analysis will open up new possibilities for testing positions of genes in the hierarchical structure of interacting loci revealed under selection pressure. PMID:26450131

  1. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of (F18)fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), (F18)fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of (F18)-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

  2. Commercial Activities in Primary Schools: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Gary

    2007-01-01

    The commercialisation of schools is a controversial issue, but very little is known about the actual situation in UK schools. The aim of this study was to investigate, with particular reference to health education and health promotion, commercial activities and their regulation in primary schools in the Yorkshire and Humber region of the UK. A…

  3. Service Learning, Phonemic Perception, and Learner Motivation: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Almitra; Gordon, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    A nine-week empirical study of 25 adults in a second language (L2) Spanish phonetics course explored whether students' participation in service-learning language exchange sessions with native Spanish speakers outside of class influenced learners' (1) motivation for foreign language learning and (2) phonemic perception in Spanish. Divided…

  4. Quantitative modeling and analysis in environmental studies. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaver, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    This paper reviews some of the many mathematical modeling and statistical data analysis problems that arise in environmental studies. It makes no claim to be comprehensive nor truly up-to-date. It will appear as a chapter in a book on ecotoxicology to be published by CRC Press, probably in 1995. Workshops leading to the book creation were sponsored by The Conte Foundation.

  5. Quantitative studies of Savannah River aquatic insects, 1959--1985

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, R.; Hart, D.; Nagy, T.

    1986-10-30

    As part of a long-term study of water quality patterns, scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences have collected aquatic insects from artificial substrates placed at several stations in Savannah River. This report presents the first detailed compilation and analysis of this substantial data base, and examines patterns of variations of insect distribution and abundance (both spatial and temporal) during the last quarter century. Data on the number of individuals of various taxa found in the insect traps were obtained from tables in the Academy`s cursory reports. Computer data files created from these records were subjected to extensive statistical analyses in order to examine variation among stations, seasons and years in the abundances of major taxa and various aggregate properties of the insect assemblage. Although a total of 83 taxa were collected over the 27-year study, 10 taxa accounted for nearly 80% of the individuals collected from the traps, hence there 10 taxa were analyzed more intensively.

  6. Quantitative studies of Savannah River aquatic insects, 1959--1985

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, R.; Hart, D.; Nagy, T.

    1986-10-30

    As part of a long-term study of water quality patterns, scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences have collected aquatic insects from artificial substrates placed at several stations in Savannah River. This report presents the first detailed compilation and analysis of this substantial data base, and examines patterns of variations of insect distribution and abundance (both spatial and temporal) during the last quarter century. Data on the number of individuals of various taxa found in the insect traps were obtained from tables in the Academy's cursory reports. Computer data files created from these records were subjected to extensive statistical analyses in order to examine variation among stations, seasons and years in the abundances of major taxa and various aggregate properties of the insect assemblage. Although a total of 83 taxa were collected over the 27-year study, 10 taxa accounted for nearly 80% of the individuals collected from the traps, hence there 10 taxa were analyzed more intensively.

  7. Study on the Intramunicipal Inequality in Financing Basic Education in Shanghai (2001-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tingjin; Zhang, Shujian; Shi, Shuai

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analyses of basic education financing among districts and counties within Shanghai municipality show that basic education in the developed city is as fiscally unequal as it is in other provincial administrative areas. But the tendency to expand education disparities in Shanghai has been reversed since 2005 owing to the education…

  8. Basic Skills Proficiencies of Secondary Vocational Education Students. Vocational Education Study Publication No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Louise

    This paper surveys research in the field in an attempt to determine what level of mastery of basic skills is required to do a particular job, what level vocational education students generally attain, and which instructional techniques are effective in improving vocational education students' basic skills. In the first of three sections, claims…

  9. A Study of the Basic Skills Assessment Direct and Indirect Measures of Writing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson, Eleanor

    The Basic Skills Assessment (BSA) is a national secondary level testing program which provides secure tests in reading, writing, and mathematics. It is designed to identify students who need additional instruction in the basic skills so they may be helped to reach the school district's secondary school graduation requirements. One of the BSA's…

  10. [Experimental study of the heaptotoxic effect of toluol III. Quantitative morphological study].

    PubMed

    Aranka, H; Zsuzsa, B; Gábor, F; György, U

    1976-07-01

    Hepatotoxic effect of the analitically pure toluene used in the Chemical Factory "Tiszai" was investigated by the aid of quantitative morphological method on male rats of line CFY. Toluene was administered intraperitoneally and subcutaneously. It was established, that there exists a nearly lineal correlation between the logarithms of intraperitoneally administered doses of toluene, the number and area of mitochondria localized in the unite area of the hepatocyte, and between the increase of number of matrix-granules in the mitochondria. The average-area of the mitochondria remained unchanged. As an effect of large intraperitoneal doses of toluene increase of the density of nuclei and the nucleus-plasma proportion could be revealed. There exists a nearly lineal correlation between the logarithms of intraperitoneal and subcutaneous doses of toluene and the decrease of volume of the cell nuclei. Statistical curves of the nuclei-variation-study as an effect of large doses show two peaks. Authors stress the importance of quantitative morphological studies in the toxicology. Results of such investigations should be evaluated in connection with each other. PMID:940573

  11. A quantitative study of a physics-first pilot program

    SciTech Connect

    Pasero, Spencer Lee; /Northern Illinois U.

    2008-09-01

    Hundreds of high schools around the United States have inverted the traditional core sequence of high school science courses, putting physics first, followed by chemistry, and then biology. A quarter-century of theory, opinion, and anecdote are available, but the literature lacks empirical evidence of the effects of the program. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of the program on science achievement gain, growth in attitude toward science, and growth in understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge. One hundred eighty-five honor students participated in this quasi-experiment, self-selecting into either the traditional or inverted sequence. Students took the Explore test as freshmen, and the Plan test as sophomores. Gain scores were calculated for the composite scores and for the science and mathematics subscale scores. A two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) on course sequence and cohort showed significantly greater composite score gains by students taking the inverted sequence. Participants were administered surveys measuring attitude toward science and understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge twice per year. A multilevel growth model, compared across program groups, did not show any significant effect of the inverted sequence on either attitude or understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge. The sole significant parameter showed a decline in student attitude independent of course sequence toward science over the first two years of high school. The results of this study support the theory that moving physics to the front of the science sequence can improve achievement. The importance of the composite gain score on tests vertically aligned with the high-stakes ACT is discussed, and several ideas for extensions of the current study are offered.

  12. Quantitative study of long-term solar and climatic changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Long term variations in the diameter and the shape of the Sun were studied. Daily observations of the Sun's diameter made at the Greenwich Observatory between 1836 and 1953 were analysed and interpreted. The data was converted into digital form and then screened and processed. It was found that the horizontal diameter of the Sun measured at Greenwich appears to have decreased systematically between 1880 and 1953 at a rate of 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 minutes of arc per century.

  13. Quantitative studies of bird movement: a methodological review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Kaiser, A.

    1999-01-01

    The past several years have seen development of a number of statistical models and methods for drawing inferences about bird movement using data from marked individuals. It can be difficult to keep up with this rapid development of new methods, so our purpose here is to categorize and review methods for drawing inferences about avian movement. We also outline recommendations about future work dealing both with methods development and actual studies directed at hypotheses about bird movement of interest from conservation, management, or ecological perspectives.

  14. Competencies for Adult Basic Education and Diploma Programs: A Summary of Studies and Cross-Reference of Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Joan Keller

    This report summarizes and cross-references the results of 12 studies dealing with competencies for Adult Basic Education (ABE) and diploma programs. Described in the report are the following studies/projects: (1) the Adult Performance Level (APL) Study; (2) five APL-based validation studies (the New Jersey ABE Study, the New Jersey English as a…

  15. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  16. Rutile geochemistry and its potential use in quantitative provenance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zack, T.; von Eynatten, H.; Kronz, A.

    2004-10-01

    Rutile is among the most stable detrital minerals in sedimentary systems. Information contained in rutile is therefore of prime importance, especially in the study of mature sediments, where most diagnostic minerals are no longer stable. In contrast to zircon, rutile provides information about the last metamorphic cycle as rutile is not stable at greenschist facies conditions. Several known geochemical characteristics of rutile can be used to retrace provenance. The lithology of source rocks can be determined using Nb and Cr contents in rutile, because the most important source rocks for rutile, metapelites and metabasites, imprint a distinct Nb and Cr signature in rutiles. Since Zr in rutile, coexisting with zircon and quartz, is extremely temperature dependent, this relationship can be used as a geothermometer. Metapelites always contain zircon and quartz, thus the Nb and Cr signatures of metapelites indicate rutiles that can be used for thermometry. The result is effectively a single-mineral geothermometer, which is to our knowledge the first of its kind in provenance studies. Several other trace elements are variably enriched in rutile, but the processes creating these variations are so far not understood. In a case study, Al, Si, V, Cr, Fe, Zr, Nb and W contents in rutiles were obtained by electron microprobe from three sediment samples from Upstate New York. A Pleistocene glacial sand, whose source was granulite-facies rocks of the southern Adirondacks, has detrital rutile geochemical signatures which are consistent with the local Geology; a predominantly metapelitic source with a minor metabasitic contribution. Calculated temperatures for the metapelitic rutiles from the glacial sand are consistent with a predominantly granulite-facies source. The two other samples are from Paleozoic clastic wedges deposited in the foreland of the Taconian and Acadian orogenies. Here several geochemical patterns of detrital rutiles are comparable to rutiles derived from the

  17. Introducing a feminist perspective to nursing curricula: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Boughn, S; Wang, H

    1994-03-01

    Feminist concerns of the nursing profession are examined and it is argued that feminism provides the ideology and impetus for social change. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the attitudes and beliefs of nursing students who take a feminist-oriented women's health course. The course went beyond a scientific model of women's health and examined women's health issues as they are related to the concerns of women as consumers and providers. A questionnaire assessing the effects of the course was administered at the beginning and again at the end of the course. Results indicated that the course produced significant changes in the attitudes and beliefs of the experimental subjects in areas of professional activism; high regard for self, nurses, and women; and social activism against sexism in the media and violence against women. PMID:8046506

  18. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell. Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.

  19. A quantitative study on the trachea of the dog.

    PubMed

    Dabanoğlu, I; Ocal, M K; Kara, M E

    2001-02-01

    This study was carried out to record the detailed morphometric structure of the trachea in dogs using 15 female and four male healthy adult mongrel dogs. The diameter and thickness of each tracheal ring were measured, the number of tracheal rings varying from 36 to 45. All data were subjected to statistical analysis which was carried out on individual sections of the trachea, i.e. the cranial cervical, middle cervical, thoracic inlet and the intrathoracic tracheal regions, which consisted of 12, 12, nine and 12 tracheal rings, respectively. Fusion of the tracheal rings was especially obvious in the cranial cervical and thoracic inlet regions as a result of neck movements. The diameter and thickness of the tracheal rings are smallest at the thoracic inlet level because the direction of the trachea changes at this point where the thoracic inlet is relatively small and surrounded by bone. The ratios of inner transverse to inner vertical and outer transverse to outer vertical diameters were almost the same, between 1.14 and 1.25 in all regions, which indicated that the trachea is near-circular in shape in the dog. At the thoracic inlet level cross-sectional lumen areas are 7 and 6% smaller than those in the middle cervical and intrathoracic regions, respectively. The thinnest cartilage was seen at the thoracic inlet level where there is a risk of tracheal collapse. PMID:11284164

  20. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell.more » Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.« less

  1. Quantitative Studies on Fabrics as Disseminators of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sidwell, Robert W.; Dixon, Glen J.; Mcneil, Ethel

    1966-01-01

    The persistence of vaccinia virus on wool (blanket and gabardine) and cotton (sheeting, terry cloth, and knit jersey) fabrics was studied. The fabrics were exposed to the virus by three methods: direct contact, aerosol, and virus-containing dust having a high content of textile fibers. Fabrics exposed to virus by each method were held in 35 and 78% relative humidities at 25 C. Virus was recovered for up to 14 weeks from wool fabrics exposed to virus and held in the low humidity. In contrast, virus persisted for shorter periods of time on the cotton fabrics. No virus was detected on terry cloth as early as 3 days after exposure to virus. The virus appeared to be less stable in the high humidity, and the method of exposure of the fabrics to virus apparently had an effect upon the persistence of the agent. On all fabrics, viral persistence was of sufficient duration to be of epidemiological significance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:5953019

  2. Studies of Tonsils in Basic and Clinical Perspectives: From the Past to the Future.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Keiji; Ichimiya, Shingo; Kamekura, Ryuta; Nagaya, Tomonori; Jitsukawa, Sumito; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The tonsils are located at the entrance of the pharynx as a cardinal constituent of Waldeyer's ring, taking part not only in local immune responses, but also in systemic immunity. Functional deficits of tonsils primarily underlie the pathogenesis of various characteristic disorders, including tonsillar focal infections such as palmoplantar pustulosis and IgA nephropathy, in addition to the highly prevalent sleep disorder called obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unknown, the tonsils have long been postulated as a unique and enigmatic immune organ. Lymphoid cells and tissues from surgically resected tonsils are often employed to analyze the human immune response from a retrospective view. This approach has provided much new fundamental evidence for understanding innate and acquired immune responses, thereby facilitating further studies in the fields of mucosal immunity and specific humoral immunity originating in the germinal center. Future studies of the tonsils in basic and clinical research are expected to reveal the mechanisms of tonsil-related disorders as well as the nature of human immunity. In this review, which is primarily based on our original research over the past 3 decades, we summarize our findings and discuss the future prospects of studies focusing on the tonsils. PMID:27116026

  3. Genetics 100 for cardiologists: basics of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Joseph B; Hegele, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The spring of 2012 marked the fifth anniversary of the widespread appearance in the biomedical literature of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of diseases of adulthood. Articles reporting GWAS results now regularly appear in dozens of general medicine and cardiology journals. As of August 2012, more than 1700 published GWAS have reported findings across a range of human diseases. Many of these reported new genetic determinants of cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease and its risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Though GWAS reports follow a standard format, superficially they can appear intimidating to most nongeneticists, whom we suspect often skip over them. Considering the importance of GWAS in cardiovascular science and medicine, and because they show no signs of fading, it is important for cardiovascular medical personnel and scientists to understand GWAS fundamentals. In this article, we provide a roadmap for the nonexpert reader to navigate through GWAS of cardiovascular disease. We cover the basic essentials needed to understand GWAS: underlying theory, mechanics, analysis and display, interpretation, and relevance. Areas covered include the relationship between GWAS and standard epidemiologic study design, the concepts of DNA sequence variation and linkage disequilibrium, the particular statistical considerations in studies involving many independent variables and large sample sizes, the meaning and interpretation of Manhattan plots, and the biologic and clinical significance of GWAS-based discoveries. We conclude with comments about the limitations of GWAS and about what to look for in the "post-GWAS era." PMID:23200095

  4. Geometry of normal mammalian platelets by quantitative microscopic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Frojmovic, M M; Panjwani, R

    1976-01-01

    The shape distributions of normal and hardened human and rabbit erythrocytes and platelets were obtained for edge-on orientations of a few hundred freely rotating cells from analyses of microphotographs obtained similarly as by Ponder(1930, Q. J. Exp. Physiol. 20:29) by phase-contrast microscopy at 800 X magnification. Major average diameters (d) and thicknesses (t) were estimated for both normal and hardened cells, and were used to calculate an average geometric axis ratio, rp = t/d, which increases to unity as cells become more spherical. Our fixation procedure did not alter these shape parameters: rp was unchanged for erythrocytes, with d and t values similar to those reported by Ponder (1930); platelets had d X t = 3.6 +/- 0.7 mum X 0.9 +/- 0.3 mum and 3.1 +/- 0.4 mum X 0.6 +/- 0.3 mum, respectively, for human and rabbit cells, with rp = 0.26 and 0.20, respectively. Agreement in rp was found with data obtained by a novel rheo-optical method which allows for a direct statistical averaging for large populations (greater than 100 X 10(3) cells). Histograms and linear correlation studies were made of the above three parameters (d,t,rp), as well as volume (V), total surface area are (S), and sphericity index (S.I.) calculated for both "prolate ellipsoid" and "disc with rounded edges" models. Results indicate very high linear correlations between rp - t, rp - S. I., and d -S, with high correlations for t - V,d -V and S. Data are in agreement with the few reports in the literature determined by other methods, with the best model for platelets appearing to be an oblate spheroid. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:786400

  5. Quantitative proteomic profiling studies of pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lan; Li, Chen; Shedden, Kerby A; Lee, Cheong J; Li, Chenwei; Quoc, HuyVuong; Simeone, Diane M; Lubman, David M

    2010-07-01

    Analyzing subpopulations of tumor cells in tissue is a challenging subject in proteomic studies. Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) are such a group of cells that only constitute 0.2-0.8% of the total tumor cells but have been found to be the origin of pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis. Global proteome profiling of pancreatic CSCs from xenograft tumors in mice is a promising way to unveil the molecular machinery underlying the signaling pathways. However, the extremely low availability of pancreatic tissue CSCs (around 10,000 cells per xenograft tumor or patient sample) has limited the utilization of currently standard proteomic approaches which do not work effectively with such a small amount of material. Herein, we describe the profiling of the proteome of pancreatic CSCs using a capillary scale shotgun technique by coupling offline capillary isoelectric focusing(cIEF) with nano reversed phase liquid chromatography(RPLC) followed by spectral counting peptide quantification. A whole cell lysate from 10,000 cells which corresponds to approximately 1 microg of protein material is equally divided for three repeated cIEF separations where around 300 ng of peptide material is used in each run. In comparison with a nontumorigenic tumor cell sample, among 1159 distinct proteins identified with FDR less than 0.2%, 169 differentially expressed proteins are identified after multiple testing corrections where 24% of the proteins are upregulated in the CSCs group. Ingenuity Pathway analysis of these differential expression signatures further suggests significant involvement of signaling pathways related to apoptosis, cell proliferation, inflammation, and metastasis. PMID:20486718

  6. Quantitative Study of Vulnerability / Damage Curves in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pule, Tebogo

    2014-05-01

    Southern Africa is considered a stable continental region in spite of several cases of reported earthquakes, which caused considerable damage and casualties particularly in the mining industry. Most buildings and structures in South Africa are not designed to resist any intensity of earthquake and most architects, engineers and builders in the country do not consider seismic resistance as a design requirement. This is mainly because the region has not experienced any large and serious destructive earthquake in recent years. The most destructive earthquake recorded in South Africa is the Ceres earthquake of 1969. The earthquake with a magnitude of 6.3 occurred on September 29, 1969 in the Ceres-Tulbagh region of the Western Cape Province about 100 km northeast of Cape Town. Serious damage occurred to certain buildings in the area (amounting to a total of U.S. 24 million). The structural damage varied from almost total destruction of old and poorly constructed buildings to large cracks in the better-built ones, twelve people were killed and many more were injured. Another event that caused severe damage to infrastructure occurred on March 9, 2005 at Stilfontein near Klerksdorp. It is known that up to 40 or more tremors are recorded monthly in Southern Africa, the locations are predominantly in the places surrounding the gold mining areas with many events around the Carletonville and Klerksdorp areas. Recent years have seen at least four mining induced tremors causing significant damage (Welkom 1976, Klerksdorp 1977, Welkom 1989 and Carletonville 1992). Such events show that it is very necessary to take seismic events into account in the design of any infrastructure. Assessing and understanding the risk facing the South African cities as a result of major seismic activity has been paid little attention. The main focus of this study is to use results of a deterministic hazard assessment to develop the most suitable damage curves for twelve of the most common building

  7. Basic sciences agonize in Turkey!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Fatma; Araz, Asli; Akman, Ferdi; Durak, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, changes from past to present in the departments of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics, which are considered as the basic sciences in Turkey, are shown. The importance of basic science for the country emphasized and the status of our country was discussed with a critical perspective. The number of academic staff, the number of students, opened quotas according to years for these four departments at universities were calculated and analysis of the resulting changes were made. In examined graphics changes to these four departments were similar. Especially a significant change was observed in the physics department. Lack of jobs employing young people who have graduated from basic science is also an issue that must be discussed. There are also qualitative results of this study that we have discussed as quantitative. Psychological problems caused by unemployment have become a disease among young people. This study was focused on more quantitative results. We have tried to explain the causes of obtained results and propose solutions.

  8. Quantitative analysis of free and bonded forms of volatile sulfur compouds in wine. Basic methodologies and evidences showing the existence of reversible cation-complexed forms.

    PubMed

    Franco-Luesma, Ernesto; Ferreira, Vicente

    2014-09-12

    This paper examines first some basic aspects critical to the analysis of Volatile Sulfur Compounds (VSCs), such as the analytical characteristics of the GC-pFPD system and the stability of the different standard solutions required for a proper calibration. Following, a direct static headspace analytical method for the determination of exclusively free forms of VSCs has been developed. Method repeatability is better than 4%, detection limits for main analytes are below 0.5μgL(-1), and the method dynamic linear range (r(2)>0.99) is expanded by controlling the split ratio in the chromatographic inlet to cover the natural range of occurrence of these compounds in wines. The method gives reliable estimates of headspace concentrations but, as expected, suffers from strong matrix effects with recoveries ranging from 0 to 100% or from 60 to 100 in the cases of H2S and the other mercaptans, respectively. This demonstrates the existence of strong interactions of these compounds with different matrix components. The complexing ability of Cu(2+) and to a lower extent Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) has been experimentally checked. A previously developed method in which the wine is strongly diluted with brine and the volatiles are preconcentrated by HS-SPME, was found to give a reliable estimation of the total amount (free+complexed) of mercaptans, demonstrating that metal-mercaptan complexes are reversible. The comparative analysis of different wines by the two procedures reveals that in normal wines H2S and methanethiol can be complexed at levels above 99%, with averages around 97% for H2S and 75% for methanethiol, while thioethers such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are not complexed. Overall, the proposed strategy may be generalized to understand problems caused by VSCs in different matrices. PMID:25064535

  9. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electronics School. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Modules 15-19: Basic Troubleshooting Skills. Study and Progress Check Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    These individualized learning modules on basic troubleshooting skills are one unit in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Five modules are…

  10. Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies. Quarterly report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-16

    Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies performed at Davy McKee Corporation supporting the Department of Energy's coal gasification program is on schedule through the Second Quarter. It is anticipated that work will continue on schedule for the remainder of the program. During the Second Quarter, efforts were concentrated on evaluations, laboratory studies and design activities. In Task I, information on how coals perform in and around fixed-bed gasifiers was reviewed and standards and tests to evaluate the expected performance of agglomerates were developed. The economics of coal agglomeration, the preferred size of agglomerates, and possible coal upgrading methods to enhance agglomerates were examined. Two topical reports describing the findings were prepared and were issued. Approximately 200 separate wafer briquetting runs and 29 double-roll briquetting runs were performed during the period to evaluate potential binders and to investigate different briquetting variables. In Task II, the design of a Winkler coal gasification plant to replace a two-stage gasifier plant in the original Erie Mining facility design was completed, and work on the design of a Combustion Engineering entrained-flow gasification plant replacement was initiated. 24 figures, 12 tables.

  11. [Basic principles of selection and use of diagnostic tests: analysis of the results of diagnostic studies].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A V

    2001-11-01

    In clinical practice, in order to design and implement a specific therapeutic plan, as well as communicating an appropriate prognosis, the doctor needs to establish a precise diagnosis of the condition. Sometimes all one needs is a clinical impression. More often, however, the definition of an accurate diagnosis will need the interpretation of specific diagnostic tests as well. The rational use of diagnostic tests in cardiology--whether laboratorial or imagiologic--should be based on three factors: 1) validity of the study results about the test; 2) diagnostic properties of the test and 3) applicability of the test in the clinical setting. The rational use and correct interpretation of diagnostic tests are based on these three factors. In this article we present the basic principles concerning the validity of the results from the study that defined the specific test, and what level of evidence that constitutes. Other articles will address diagnostic properties of tests (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios) as well as the applicability of the test in clinical practice. PMID:11826705

  12. Neural processing of basic tastes in healthy young and older adults - an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hoogeveen, Heleen R; Dalenberg, Jelle R; Renken, Remco J; ter Horst, Gert J; Lorist, Monicque M

    2015-10-01

    Ageing affects taste perception as shown in psychophysical studies, however, underlying structural and functional mechanisms of these changes are still largely unknown. To investigate the neurobiology of age-related differences associated with processing of basic tastes, we measured brain activation (i.e. fMRI-BOLD activity) during tasting of four increasing concentrations of sweet, sour, salty, and bitter tastes in young (average 23 years of age) and older (average 65 years of age) adults. The current study highlighted age-related differences in taste perception at the different higher order brain areas of the taste pathway. We found that the taste information delivered to the brain in young and older adults was not different, as illustrated by the absence of age effects in NTS and VPM activity. Our results indicate that multisensory integration changes with age; older adults showed less brain activation to integrate both taste and somatosensory information. Furthermore, older adults directed less attention to the taste stimulus; therefore attention had to be reallocated by the older individuals in order to perceive the tastes. In addition, we considered that the observed age-related differences in brain activation between taste concentrations in the amygdala reflect its involvement in processing both concentration and pleasantness of taste. Finally, we state the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in understanding the taste quality specificity in age related differences in taste perception. PMID:26072251

  13. Perspectives on opioid tolerance from basic research: behavioural studies after spinal administration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C W

    1994-01-01

    antagonist would produce an animal strictly tolerant at delta receptors, as DADLE has been implicated to have some effects at mu receptors. In any event, consideration of the quantitative measures of cross-tolerance are extremely important to help shape a rationale treatment plan for patients who may become tolerant to a particular class of analgesics. In general, direct toleragen administration by constant dose, constant rate infusion into local central nervous system (CNS) regions will provide the most rigorous tolerance studies for examination of the pharmacodynamic theories of tolerance, as adaptations in processes affecting central bioavailability, such as dispositional changes in the blood-brain barrier or fibrous encapsulation of an implanted subcutaneous pellet, are circumvented. The above considerations also are relevant for studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance after intracerebroventricular administration or, in general, for tolerance studies after systemic administration. The possibility of probe administration to the same region of CNS that was rendered tolerant, as in the Y-catheter method, further enhances the focus on the pharmacodynamic mechanisms of tolerance without the ancillary and literally peripheral concerns of a dispositional nature. A posological approach to these studies cannot be overemphasized, as it is only through such time consuming and costly experiments that rigorous, quantitative data can be obtained. Such data may help to guide the hand of the physician towards rational therapeutic intervention in the treatment of patients with chronic pain and opioid tolerance. PMID:8564997

  14. Numerical and Experimental Study on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Basic Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuya; Kawakita, Masatoshi; Iijima, Takayoshi; Koga, Mitsuhiro; Kihira, Mitsuhiko; Funaki, Jiro

    The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils have been researched in higher Reynolds-number ranges more than 106, in a historic context closely related with the developments of airplanes and fluid machineries in the last century. However, our knowledge is not enough at low and middle Reynolds-number ranges. So, in the present study, we investigate such basic airfoils as a NACA0015, a flat plate and the flat plates with modified fore-face and after-face geometries at Reynolds number Re < 1.0×105, using two- and three-dimensional computations together with wind-tunnel and water-tank experiments. As a result, we have revealed the effect of the Reynolds number Re upon the minimum drag coefficient CDmin. Besides, we have shown the effects of attack angle α upon various aerodynamic characteristics such as the lift coefficient CL, the drag coefficient CD and the lift-to-drag ratio CL/CD at Re = 1.0×102, discussing those effects on the basis of both near-flow-field information and surface-pressure profiles. Such results suggest the importance of sharp leading edges, which implies the possibility of an inversed NACA0015. Furthermore, concerning the flat-plate airfoil, we investigate the influences of fore-face and after-face geometries upon such effects.

  15. Basic auditory processing is related to familial risk, not to reading fluency: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Hakvoort, Britt; van der Leij, Aryan; Maurits, Natasha; Maassen, Ben; van Zuijen, Titia L

    2015-02-01

    Less proficient basic auditory processing has been previously connected to dyslexia. However, it is unclear whether a low proficiency level is a correlate of having a familial risk for reading problems, or whether it causes dyslexia. In this study, children's processing of amplitude rise time (ART), intensity and frequency differences was measured with event-related potentials (ERPs). ERP components of interest are components reflective of auditory change detection; the mismatch negativity (MMN) and late discriminative negativity (LDN). All groups had an MMN to changes in ART and frequency, but not to intensity. Our results indicate that fluent readers at risk for dyslexia, poor readers at risk for dyslexia and fluent reading controls have an LDN to changes in ART and frequency, though the scalp activation of frequency processing was different for familial risk children. On intensity, only controls showed an LDN. Contrary to previous findings, our results suggest that neither ART nor frequency processing is related to reading fluency. Furthermore, our results imply that diminished sensitivity to changes in intensity and differential lateralization of frequency processing should be regarded as correlates of being at familial risk for dyslexia, that do not directly relate to reading fluency. PMID:25243992

  16. Changes in Study Strategies of Medical Students between Basic Science Courses and Clerkships Are Associated with Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensminger, David C.; Hoyt, Amy E.; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; McNulty, John A.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that medical students change their study strategies when transitioning from basic science courses to clerkships, and that their study practices are associated with performance scores. Factor scores for three approaches to studying (construction, rote, and review) generated from student (n = 150) responses to a…

  17. Adequacy of Material Resources Required for Effective Implementation of Upper Basic Education Business Studies Curriculum in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoli, B. E.; Okorie, Ogbonnaya

    2015-01-01

    This work is a descriptive survey of the adequacy of the material resources required for effective implementation of upper basic education business studies curriculum in Ebonyi State. Two research questions and two hypotheses guided the study. The entire population of two hundred and forty-one (241) business studies teachers were used for the…

  18. An Analysis of Minimum Service Standards (MSS) in Basic Education: A Case Study at Magelang Municipality, Central Java, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haryati, Sri

    2014-01-01

    The study aims at analyzing the achievement of Minimum Service Standards (MSS) in Basic Education through a case study at Magelang Municipality. The findings shall be used as a starting point to predict the needs to meet MMS by 2015 and to provide strategies for achievement. Both primary and secondary data were used in the study investigating the…

  19. Radiation dose to positron emission tomography technologists during quantitative versus qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    McCormick, V A; Miklos, J A

    1993-05-01

    Positron emission tomography technologists were monitored with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during qualitative and quantitative studies. Doses to technologists during specific tasks were also measured. The technologists received at least twice as much radiation during the quantitative as the qualitative studies. The average dose per study for qualitative studies was 0.017 mSv (1.7 mrem) shallow and 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) deep. The average dose per study for the quantitative studies was 0.05 mSv (5 mrem) shallow and 0.04 mSv (4 mrem) deep. The average dose per study was based on the TLD dose accumulated over studies conducted over four 2-mo and one 1-mo intervals. The dose incurred by the technologists each time they drew a radioactive dose was 0.002 mSv (0.2 mrem) shallow and 0.001 mSv (0.1 mrem) deep. The doses received during injection were 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) shallow and 0.007 mSv (0.7 mrem) deep. Doses received during blood sampling were 0.016 mSv (1.6 mrem) shallow and 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) deep. During quantitative studies, the technologist received a much greater dose than during its qualitative counterpart due to the blood sampling process and increased time in the room with the radioactive patient. PMID:8478709

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches to the Study of Poverty: Taming the Tensions and Appreciating the Complementarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balarabe Kura, Sulaiman Y.

    2012-01-01

    There is a germane relationship between qualitative and quantitative approaches to social science research. The relationship is empirically and theoretically demonstrated by poverty researchers. The study of poverty, as argued in this article, is a study of both numbers and contextualities. This article provides a general overview of qualitative…

  1. Leadership Trust in Virtual Teams Using Communication Tools: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to address leadership trust in virtual teams using communication tools in a small south-central, family-owned pharmaceutical organization, with multiple dispersed locations located in the United States. The results of the current research study could assist leaders to develop a communication…

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Remedial Reading Courses at Community Colleges: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavonier, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of two instructional approaches for remedial reading courses at a community college. The instructional approaches were strategic reading and traditional, textbook-based instruction. The two research questions that guided the quantitative, quasi-experimental study were: (a) what is the effect of…

  3. SAT-M Performance of Women Intending Quantitative Fields of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethington, Corinna A.

    This study assessed patterns of differences in quantitative performance across groups of intended undergraduate majors consistent with those previously found for students who had completed their undergraduate study. Data were drawn from the College Board Admissions Testing Program's national sample of 10,000 college-bound high school seniors in…

  4. Reverse Brain Drain of South Asian IT Professionals: A Quantitative Repatriation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppiah, Nithiyananthan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present quantitative correlational study was to examine if a relationship existed between the RBD phenomenon and cultural, economic, or political factors of the native countries of South Asian IT professionals living in the United States. The study on reverse brain drain was conducted to explore a growing phenomenon in the…

  5. A Quantitative Comparative Study Measuring Consumer Satisfaction Based on Health Record Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Vivianne E.

    2013-01-01

    This research study used a quantitative comparative method to investigate the relationship between consumer satisfaction and communication based on the format of health record. The central problem investigated in this research study related to the format of health record used and consumer satisfaction with care provided and effect on communication…

  6. Quantitative Correlational Study: Emotional Intelligence and Project Outcomes among Hispanics in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trejo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The present quantitative correlational research study explored relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) competencies, such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management, and project management outcomes: scope creep, in-budget project cost, and project timeliness. The study was conducted within the…

  7. Syntactic Constraints on Code-Switching: A Quantitative Study of Spanish/English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Carol W.

    This paper reports on a preliminary quantitative study of syntactic constraints on code-switching within discourses in which no change in participants, setting or topic is evident. The goals of the study are to provide a syntactic description of the points at which switches from Spanish to English and English to Spanish are possible and to assess…

  8. A quantitative analysis of qualitative studies in clinical journals for the 2000 publishing year

    PubMed Central

    McKibbon, Kathleen Ann; Gadd, Cynthia S

    2004-01-01

    Background Quantitative studies are becoming more recognized as important to understanding health care with all of its richness and complexities. The purpose of this descriptive survey was to provide a quantitative evaluation of the qualitative studies published in 170 core clinical journals for 2000. Methods All identified studies that used qualitative methods were reviewed to ascertain which clinical journals publish qualitative studies and to extract research methods, content (persons and health care issues studied), and whether mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative methods) were used. Results 60 330 articles were reviewed. 355 reports of original qualitative studies and 12 systematic review articles were identified in 48 journals. Most of the journals were in the discipline of nursing. Only 4 of the most highly cited health care journals, based on ISI Science Citation Index (SCI) Impact Factors, published qualitative studies. 37 of the 355 original reports used both qualitative and quantitative (mixed) methods. Patients and non-health care settings were the most common groups of people studied. Diseases and conditions were cancer, mental health, pregnancy and childbirth, and cerebrovascular disease with many other diseases and conditions represented. Phenomenology and grounded theory were commonly used; substantial ethnography was also present. No substantial differences were noted for content or methods when articles published in all disciplines were compared with articles published in nursing titles or when studies with mixed methods were compared with studies that included only qualitative methods. Conclusions The clinical literature includes many qualitative studies although they are often published in nursing journals or journals with low SCI Impact Factor journals. Many qualitative studies incorporate both qualitative and quantitative methods. PMID:15271221

  9. A Thermodynamic and Structural Study of Myelin Basic Protein in Lipid Membrane Models

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, P.; Carzino, R.; Svaldo-Lanero, T.; Relini, A.; Cavalleri, O.; Fasano, A.; Liuzzi, G. M.; Carlone, G.; Riccio, P.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.

    2007-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a major protein of the myelin membrane in the central nervous system. It is believed to play a relevant role in the structure and function of the myelin sheath and is a candidate autoantigen in demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis. MBP has many features typical of soluble proteins but is capable of strongly interacting with lipids, probably via a conformation change. Its structure in the lipid membrane as well as the details of its interaction with the lipid membrane are still to be resolved. In this article we study the interaction of MBP with Langmuir films of anionic and neutral phospholipids, used as experimental models of the lipid membrane. By analyzing the equilibrium surface pressure/area isotherms of these films, we measured the protein partition coefficient between the aqueous solution and the lipid membrane, the mixing ratio between protein and lipid, and the area of the protein molecules inserted in the lipid film. The penetration depth of MBP in the lipid monolayer was evaluated by x-ray reflectivity measurements. The mixing ratio and the MBP molecular area decrease as the surface pressure increases, and at high surface pressure the protein is preferentially located at the lipid/water interface for both anionic and neutral lipids. The morphology of MBP adsorbed on lipid films was studied by atomic force microscopy. MBP forms bean-like structures and induces a lateral compaction of the lipid surface. Scattered MBP particles have also been observed. These particles, which are 2.35-nm high, 4.7-nm wide, and 13.3-nm long, could be formed by protein-lipid complexes. On the basis of their size, they could also be either single MBP molecules or pairs of c-shaped interpenetrating molecules. PMID:17513373

  10. X-ray scattering studies of a model complex of lipid and basic protein of myelin.

    PubMed

    Murthy, N S; Wood, D D; Moscarello, M A

    1984-01-25

    Low-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering data from phosphatidylglycerol complexed with myelin basic protein, poly(L-lysine) and calcium ions are analyzed. The results confirm our earlier report (Brady, G.W., Murthy, N.S., Fein, D.B., Wood, D.D. and Moscarello, M.A. (1981) Biophys. J. 34, 345-350) that the basic protein interacts primarily with the polar headgroups of the lipid; and that at high protein concentrations (greater than 35%) the bilayers aggregate to form multilayers with a repeat period of 68 A, the single bilayer to multilayer transition being a cooperative process. Polylysine and Ca2+ produce multilayers with a smaller repeat of approx. 55 A. Basic protein and polylysine do not change the fluid-like arrangement of the hydrocarbon chains (diffuse 4.6 A peak in the wide-angle pattern), whereas Ca2+ probably induces a two-dimensional order (4.3 A and 3.9 A peak in the wide-angle pattern). Electron density profiles of the lipid and lipid-basic protein vesicles indicate that the basic protein penetrates into the bilayer. PMID:6199042

  11. Quantitative and qualitative approaches in the study of poverty and adolescent development: separation or integration?

    PubMed

    Leung, Janet T Y; Shek, Daniel T L

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches to study the impact of economic disadvantage on family processes and adolescent development. Quantitative research has the merits of objectivity, good predictive and explanatory power, parsimony, precision and sophistication of analysis. Qualitative research, in contrast, provides a detailed, holistic, in-depth understanding of social reality and allows illumination of new insights. With the pragmatic considerations of methodological appropriateness, design flexibility, and situational responsiveness in responding to the research inquiry, a mixed methods approach could be a possibility of integrating quantitative and qualitative approaches and offers an alternative strategy to study the impact of economic disadvantage on family processes and adolescent development. PMID:21870673

  12. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia, their clinical study and relevance in research].

    PubMed

    Miret, Salvador; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Peralta, Víctor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Basic symptoms consist of subtle sub-clinical disturbances subjectively experienced by schizophrenia patients. These are mainly related to drive, affect, thinking and language, perception, memory, motor action, central vegetative functions, control of cognitive processes, and stress tolerance. Initially described by Huber, from a phenomenological approach, basic symptoms are part of the earliest features of schizophrenia, and they can evolve along the course of the disorder. Their assessment during the prodromal phase of the disease (together with ultra-high risk criteria) is one of the 2 main approaches that allow the definition of states of clinical risk for the development of psychosis. The present review provides an updated view of the concept of basic symptoms, highlighting its potential value in establishing neurobiological correlates of interest in aetiopathogenic research. PMID:26774677

  13. Study of the impacts of patient-educators on the course of basic sciences in dental studies.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Alliot-Licht, B; Gross, O; Roger-Leroi, V; Marchand, C

    2015-02-01

    Ever since 2006, Nantes University dental educators have started organising lectures led by the mother of a young patient suffering from ectodermic dysplasia (patient-educator) to help second-year students to better understand how important it is for their future dental work to better understand basic sciences. In this study, we have analysed this training experience on students' motivation. For this purpose, students were asked to complete questionnaires 10 days after the patient-educator's lecture (early assessment; n = 193) and 4 years later, during the last year of their dental studies (delayed assessment; n = 47). Moreover, 3 years after the first lecture, we analysed the ability of students to diagnose a mother carrying the ectodermic dysplasia genetic disorder, using a case-based learning exercise with a patient showing dental features similar to those exposed by the patient-educator (measure of knowledge; n = 42). Ten days after the lecture, the early assessment shows that all the students were interested in the lecture and 59% of the students declared being motivated to find out more about genetics whilst 54% declared the same thing about embryology courses. Moreover, 4 years later, 67% of the students remembered the patient-educator's lecture a little or very well. Three years after the course, 83% of the students diagnosed ectodermal dysplasia whilst studying the case-based example that listed typical dental phenotypes. In conclusion, this study shows that this original educational approach enhances dental students' motivation in learning basic sciences and that patient-educators could offer many benefits for students and patients. PMID:24628743

  14. The Basic Communication Course at U.S. Colleges and Universities in the 21st Century: Study VII

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreale, Sherwyn; Hugenberg, Lawrence; Worley, David

    2006-01-01

    This seventh in a series of investigations of the basic communication course at 2- and 4-year colleges and universities that began in 1968 has as its purpose to gather longitudinal data on the nature of the course. This latest study differs somewhat from past studies. The survey instrument from 1999 was revised to include timely concerns such as…

  15. Internal Interest or External Performing? A Qualitative Study on Motivation and Learning of 9th Graders in Thailand Basic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loima, Jyrki; Vibulphol, Jutarat

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research was the first academic attempt to study and discuss the internal and external motivation in learning of students in basic education schools in Thailand. The study addressed two research questions to analyze similarities and differences in learning motivation or interest and teachers' enhancement or discouragement. 1) What…

  16. Basic studies on laser-assisted phacoemulsification using diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausladen, Florian; Wurm, Holger; Stock, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of a novel diode-pumped Er:YAG laser for phacoemulsification in basic experimental investigations. An appropriate experimental setup was created, including a translation stage for sample movement, a sample holder, a water spray for sample humidification and a surgical microscope with a CCD camera for video documentation. The analysis of the laser cuts and histological sections was done by light microscopy. As samples porcine eye lenses hardened by formalin were used. In ablation experiments with different spot diameters and radiant powers and a constant repetition rate νr = 200 Hz the maximum ablation depths of (4.346 +/- 0.044) mm have reached at (Ø = 480 μm, Φ = 24.15 W) with a maximum extend of thermal damage of (0.165 +/- 0.030) mm. The average ablation efficiency is 0.241 mm3/J. With a spot diameter of 308 μm the maximum ablation depth is (4.238 +/- 0.040) mm at 24.65 W with a mean ablation efficiency of 0.293 mm3/J. The extend of the thermally damaged region is (0.171 +/- 0.024) mm at this laser power. Using a sapphire cylinder with a diameter of 412 μm (length 38.5 mm) in direct tissue contact with water spray for sample humidification the ablation depth reaches (1.017 +/- 0.074) mm at 4.93 W and (1.840 +/- 0.092) mm at 9.87 W with a mean efficiency of 0.261 mm3/J. A thermal damage zone of (0.064 +/-0.024) mm at 9.87 W was measured. Additionally, at this high power, a progressive contamination and destruction of the cylinder end facet was observed. In conclusion, the investigations show that the diode-pumped Er:YAG laser has considerable potential for cataract surgery.

  17. Basic design studies for a 600 MWe CFB boiler (270b, 2 x 600 C)

    SciTech Connect

    Bursi, J.M.; Lafanechere, L.; Jestin, L.

    1999-07-01

    Commercial CFB boilers are currently available in the 300 MWe equivalent range for use with international coal. Retrofitting of Provence 4 with a 250 MWe CFB boiler was an important step in CFB development. In light of the results obtained from two large French units--Emile Huchet 4 (125 MWe) and Provence 4 (250 MWe)--this paper focuses on the main technical points which are currently being studied in relation to the basic design of a 600 MWe CFB boiler, a project that has been undertaken by EDF. The general aim of this project is to demonstrate the competitiveness of a CFB boiler compared with a PF boiler. The main areas of focus in the design of this large CFB boiler with advanced steam conditions are described. These points are subjected to particular analysis from a design standpoint. The objective is to prepare the precise specifications needed to ensure a product which is optimized in terms of quality/cost or service/cost. Due to the present lack of theoretical understanding of the refined and complex two-phase flow, design is a challenge which has to be based on reliable and comprehensive data obtained from large plants in commercial operation. This will ensure that the advantages of CFB which arise from the hydrodynamics within the circulation loop are maintained. The major goals of maintaining good particle residence time and concentration in the furnace are described. Misunderstanding of CFB furnace bottom conditions is also pointed out, with cost reduction and better NO{sub x} capture certainly among the major new targets in relation to bottom furnace design. General problems associated with the heat exchanger arrangement, principally those linked to high steam conditions and, especially, the vaporization system, are discussed. Once again, comparison with PF in this area showed that CFB boilers appear more competitive. Finally, the main area in which there is a need for sharing of CFB experience among CFB users is pointed out.

  18. [Study on the Rapid Evaluation of Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen (TVB-N) of Mutton by Hyperspectral Imaging Technique].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong-guang; Yao, Xue-dong; Duan, Hong-wei; Ma, Ben-xue; Tang, Ming-xiang

    2016-03-01

    Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen (TVB-N) was usually taken as the physicochemical reference value to evaluate the mutton freshness. In order to explore the feasibility of hyperspectral (HSI) imaging technique to detect mutton freshness, 71 representative mutton samples were collected and scanned using a diffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system in the Visible-Near infrared (NIR) spectral region (400-1 000 nm), and the chemical values of TVB-N content were determined using the semimicro Kjeldahl method according to the modified Chinese national standard. The representative spectra of mutton samples were extracted and obtained after selection of the region of interests (ROIs). The samples of calibration set and prediction set were divided at the ratio of 3 : 1 according to the content gradient method. Optimum HSI calibration models of the mutton (TVB-N) were established and evaluated by comparing different spectral preprocessing methods and modeling methods, which included Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR), Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) and Principal Component Regression (PCR) methods. The results are that through the utilization of Multiplicative Scatter Correction (MSC), first derivative, Savitzky-Golay (S-G) smoothing and mean-centering together, both PLSR and PCR were able to achieve quantitative detection of mutton TVB-N. As for the PLSR model of mutton TVB-N established, the spectral pretreatment methods chosen included MSC, first derivative, S-G (15,2) smoothing and mean-centering, and the latent variables (LVs) number used was 11. As for the calibration set of PLSR model of mutton TVB-N, the correlation coefficient (r) and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) were 0.92 and 3.00 mg x (100 g)(-1), respectively. As for the prediction set of PLSR model of mutton TVB-N, the correlation coefficient (r), Root Mean Square Error of Prediction (RMSEP), and ratio of standard deviation to standard error of prediction (RPD) were 0

  19. Campus Planning Study for the Ohio State University. Phase I, Alternative Basic Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    This document identifies some of the problems encountered in developing a master plan for a state university. Basic policies are suggested for guiding the future development of the Ohio State University campus. Two alternative planning schemes are recommended. Future enrollment and space needs, various curriculum program organizations, traffic,…

  20. The basic benefit package: composition and exceptions to the rules. A case study.

    PubMed

    Kroneman, Madelon; de Jong, Judith D

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of the Health Insurance Act in 2006 in the Netherlands, the basic package of the former sickness funds became valid for all citizens. The basic benefit package has been subject to change, responding to increasing health care expenditures, medical innovations and the economic crisis. In this paper we address the decision criteria used to assess the package annually since 2006 and describe some developments that do not follow the criteria, leading to a yo-yo effect. We discuss the formation of the decision for in- or exclusion and why some treatments seem to follow an, at first sight, arbitrary in- and exclusion pathway. We first describe the official way of establishing the basic benefit package and than will describe why some treatments follow a deviated path. We conclude that political pressure and pressure from interest groups may lead to inclusion or postponement of exclusion. Reform of the organization of certain forms of health care (in our example mental care) may lead to seemingly inconsequent changes. The yo-yo effect of some treatments or pharmaceuticals may have negative effects on health care providers, insurers and patients. The seemingly well defined criteria available for defining the basic package appear to be broadly interpretable and other influences may determine the final decision of inclusion or exclusion. PMID:25680945

  1. Students' Levels of Explanations, Models, and Misconceptions in Basic Quantum Chemistry: A Phenomenographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefani, Christina; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    We investigated students' knowledge constructions of basic quantum chemistry concepts, namely atomic orbitals, the Schrodinger equation, molecular orbitals, hybridization, and chemical bonding. Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning provided the theoretical framework and phenomenography the method of analysis. The semi-structured interview with…

  2. Developmental Dyscalculia and Basic Numerical Capacities: A Study of 8--9-Year-Old Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Bevan, Anna; Butterworth, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one 8- and 9-year-old children selected for dyscalculia, reading difficulties or both, were compared to controls on a range of basic number processing tasks. Children with dyscalculia only had impaired performance on the tasks despite high-average performance on tests of IQ, vocabulary and working memory tasks. Children with reading…

  3. Teachers' Conceptions of Standards in South African Basic Education and Training: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosibo, Lungi; Nomlomo, Vuyokazi

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, the Department of Basic Education and Training (DBE) is responsible for primary and secondary education (Grades R-12). In an effort to improve educational standards in literacy, numeracy and mathematics, especially in the Foundation Phase (FP) levels of education, the DBE has developed several initiatives and campaigns. To monitor…

  4. Using Study Guides To Help Students Focus Their Reading in the Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeman, David A.; Young, Raymond W.

    One problem that surfaced with the speech communication basic course (COM 105) at Valdosta State University (Georgia) was that the actual content covered by individual instructors varied widely, so widely that two given sections taught by different instructors may bear little resemblance to one another. This problem was addressed first through a…

  5. PEACETIME RADIATION HAZARDS IN THE FIRE SERVICE, BASIC COURSE, STUDY GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC.

    THE ASSIGNMENT SHEETS INCLUDED ARE CORRELATED WITH THE INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE (VT 002 117), THE RESOURCE MANUAL (VT 001 337), AND A SET OF TWENTY-TWO 20- BY 28-INCH CHARTS (OE 84002). THE MATERIAL IS DESIGNED TO BE PRESENTED TO FIREMEN IN A 15-HOUR COURSE AS A PART OF THEIR BASIC FIRE TRAINING AND IS CONCERNED WITH THE HAZARDS RESULTING FROM THE…

  6. Explaining After by Before: Basic Aspects of a Dynamic Systems Approach to the Study of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Geert, Paul; Steenbeek, Henderien

    2005-01-01

    The basic properties of a dynamic systems approach of development are illustrated by contrasting two simple equations. One equation is characteristic of dynamic systems models. The other refers to what, for the sake of simplicity, is referred to as the standard developmental approach. We give illustrations from cognitive, language and social…

  7. Study on Innovation of Teacher Training Model in Basic Education from the Perspective of "Blended Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bu, Huabai; Bu, Shizhen

    2012-01-01

    Gradual integration of synergetic technology, P2P technology and online learning community furnishes a new research field for innovation of teacher training model in a knowledge economy era. This article proposes the innovative model of "whole of three lines" in teacher training in basic education from the perspective of "blended…

  8. The Speed-Power Study of the USES Basic Occupational Literacy Test (BOLT) Analysis and Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Dept. of Employment Security, Salt Lake City. Western Test Development Field Center.

    Research and analysis conducted to determine the effects of reducing the administration time for one or more levels of the Basic Occupational Literacy Test (BOLT) are described. The total usable sample consisted of 2,423 subjects. Data were collected from 23 states from 1978 to 1981. Data came from a variety of sources, including schools and…

  9. Basic Training Course/Emergency Medical Technician. (1977 Edition). Student Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Developed to aid students enrolled in an emergency medical technician (EMT) training course, this document accompanies a course guide and a set of instructor lesson plans which update a basic training program for EMTs. The course consists of twenty-five lessons involving a minimum of seventy-one hours of classroom and field training plus ten hours…

  10. BASIC Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  11. Basic Warehousing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on basic warehousing is designed to provide Marines with Military Occupation Speciality 3051 in the rank of private through corporal with instruction in those basic principles, methods, and procedures that can be applied to any warehousing or storage…

  12. Quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of mobile residues in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.L.; Oldfield, E.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have used quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the dynamic structure of the backbone of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R/sub 1/ and JW-3. NMR experiments were performed using an internal sucrose quantitation standard on purple membranes in which one of the following /sup 13/C'-labeled amino acids had been biosynthetically incorporated: glycine, isoleucine, lysine, phenylalanine, and valine. The results suggest that the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain backbone, and possibly one of the connecting loops, undergoes rapid, large angle fluctuations. The results are compared with previous NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic data obtained on bacteriorhodopsin.

  13. A study of the 42CrMo4 steel surface by quantitative XPS electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, M.; Gruzza, B.; Bideux, L.; Monier, G.; Robert-Goumet, C.

    2008-05-01

    Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the native oxide film formed on 42CrMo4 steel surface by air exposure in normal conditions. In order to determine the thickness and composition of the oxide layer we have used a stacking layer model together with experimental XPS sputtering depth profiling. At a nanoscale study, to obtain quantitative results one must take into account fundamental parameters like the attenuation depth of photoelectrons. We have found that both lepidocrocit (γ-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe 3O 4) were present and the total thickness of the oxide layer was 16 monolayers.

  14. Productive Factors in School Learning: A Quantitative Synthesis of National Assessment Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borger, Jeanne B.; Walberg, Herbert J.

    To integrate findings concerning the influence of productive factors on student achievement and attitudes across various disciplines and ages, nine regression studies of National Assessment of Educational Progress samples containing a total of 15,802 students were quantitatively synthesized. Correlations and standardized regression weights for…

  15. Measuring the Beginning: A Quantitative Study of the Transition to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooman, Simon; Darwent, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study measures change in certain factors known to influence success of first-year students during the transition to higher education: self-efficacy, autonomous learning and social integration. A social integration scale was developed with three subscales: "sense of belonging", "relationship with staff" and…

  16. Leadership Styles at Middle- and Early-College Programs: A Quantitative Descriptive Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berksteiner, Earl J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlational study was to determine if associations existed between middle- and early-college (MEC) principals' leadership styles, teacher motivation, and teacher satisfaction. MEC programs were programs designed to assist high school students who were not served well in a traditional setting (Middle…

  17. Academic Advising and First-Generation College Students: A Quantitative Study on Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swecker, Hadyn K.; Fifolt, Matthew; Searby, Linda

    2014-01-01

    For this quantitative study, we used a multiple logistic regression technique to investigate the relationship between the number of meetings with an academic advisor and retention of first-generation students, as represented by enrollment status and academic standing at a large, public research institution in the Southeast. Consistent with…

  18. A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between Leadership Practice and Strategic Intentions to Use Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Alan F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational cross-sectional research study was to examine a theoretical model consisting of leadership practice, attitudes of business process outsourcing, and strategic intentions of leaders to use cloud computing and to examine the relationships between each of the variables respectively. This study…

  19. Serving Two Masters: A Study of Quantitative Literacy at Small Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jodie Ann

    2012-01-01

    The past twenty years have seen a growing interest in promoting quantitative literacy (QL) courses at the college level. At small institutions, financial realities impose limitations on faculty size and therefore the variety of courses that may be offered. This study examined course offerings below calculus at four hundred twenty-eight small…

  20. Exploring the Perceptions of College Instructors towards Computer Simulation Software Programs: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the quantitative regression study was to explore and to identify relationships between attitudes toward use and perceptions of value of computer-based simulation programs, of college instructors, toward computer based simulation programs. A relationship has been reported between attitudes toward use and perceptions of the value of…

  1. A Quantitative Study Examining Teacher Stress, Burnout, and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Timar D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to examine the relationships between stress, burnout, and self-efficacy in public school teachers in the Turks and Caicos Islands. The Teacher Stress Inventory was used to collect data on teacher stress, the Maslach Burnout Inventory Educators Survey was used to obtain data on teacher…

  2. A Quantitative Study of the Effectiveness of Teacher Recruitment Strategies in a Rural Midwestern State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Rose Etta

    2010-01-01

    A problem in American education is that rural schools have difficulty recruiting licensed teachers. Teacher shortages in mathematics, science, foreign language, and special education are more acute in rural areas. The purpose of this quantitative descriptive survey study was to examine specific recruiting strategies and newly hired licensed…

  3. An Exploratory Study of "Quantitative Linguistic Feedback": Effect of LENA Feedback on Adult Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskind, Dana; Leffel, Kristin R.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Sapolich, Shannon G.; Suskind, Elizabeth; Kirkham, Erin; Meehan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A child's early language environment is critical to his or her life-course trajectory. Quantitative linguistic feedback utilizes the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) technology as a tool to analyze verbal interactions and reinforce behavior change. This exploratory pilot study evaluates the feasibility and efficacy of a novel…

  4. A Study to Formulate Quantitative Guidelines for the Audio-Visual Communications Field. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faris, Gene; Sherman, Mendel

    Quantitative guidelines for use in determining the audiovisual (AV) needs of educational institutions were developed by the Octobe r 14-16, 1965 Seminar of the NDEA (National Defense Education Act), Faris-Sherman study. The guidelines that emerged were based in part on a review of past efforts and existing standards but primarily reflected the…

  5. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  6. Process analytical technology case study part I: feasibility studies for quantitative near-infrared method development.

    PubMed

    Cogdill, Robert P; Anderson, Carl A; Delgado-Lopez, Miriam; Molseed, David; Chisholm, Robert; Bolton, Raymond; Herkert, Thorsten; Afnán, Ali M; Drennen, James K

    2005-01-01

    This article is the first of a series of articles detailing the development of near-infrared (NIR) methods for solid-dosage form analysis. Experiments were conducted at the Duquesne University Center for Pharmaceutical Technology to qualify the capabilities of instrumentation and sample handling systems, evaluate the potential effect of one source of a process signature on calibration development, and compare the utility of reflection and transmission data collection methods. A database of 572 production-scale sample spectra was used to evaluate the interbatch spectral variability of samples produced under routine manufacturing conditions. A second database of 540 spectra from samples produced under various compression conditions was analyzed to determine the feasibility of pooling spectral data acquired from samples produced at diverse scales. Instrument qualification tests were performed, and appropriate limits for instrument performance were established. To evaluate the repeatability of the sample positioning system, multiple measurements of a single tablet were collected. With the application of appropriate spectral preprocessing techniques, sample repositioning error was found to be insignificant with respect to NIR analyses of product quality attributes. Sample shielding was demonstrated to be unnecessary for transmission analyses. A process signature was identified in the reflection data. Additional tests demonstrated that the process signature was largely orthogonal to spectral variation because of hardness. Principal component analysis of the compression sample set data demonstrated the potential for quantitative model development. For the data sets studied, reflection analysis was demonstrated to be more robust than transmission analysis. PMID:16353986

  7. The origin of the decreasing basicity from monofunctional alkoxysilane to tetrafunctional alkoxysilane: A combined IR and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Nana; Xu, Jinzhou; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Zheng

    2015-06-01

    By a combined IR and theoretical study, the oxygen basicity was found to be sharply decreased from mono- and di-functional alkoxysilanes to tri- and tetra-functional alkoxysilanes. An analysis of the natural bond orbital interactions in Me4-nSi(OMe)n (n = 1-4) and its 1:1 hydrogen bond complex with chloroform indicate that the basicity properties of Si-O-C unit may determined by the competitive hyper-conjugations from the adjacent silicon and carbon centre. The increased contribution from the delocalization of oxygen lone pair to the adjacent Si-R anti-bonding orbitals may be the main origin for decreasing basicity for Si(OEt)4 compared to Me3SiOEt.

  8. Strategies to recruit and retain older adults in intervention studies: a quantitative comparative study.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Mona; Lund, Anne; Sveen, Unni

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment and retention of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) drawn from the older population is challenging, and studies have shown that poor recruitment and retention may lead to biased samples and results. Several strategies to improve the participation of older adults in research are outlined in the literature. The objective was to identify factors associated with participation in an RCT aiming at preventing depressive symptoms and social isolation in a later phase following a stroke, in an older population living in their homes. Strategies to improve participation were applied in the RCT "Lifestyle intervention for older adults in rehabilitation after stroke: development, implementation and evaluation". Quantitative data collected on participants (n=99) and non-participants (n=56) in the trial were compared using statistical analyses. The findings are in line with earlier studies in that the participants were younger (p=0.01) and received less help in the home (p=0.01) than did non-participants. The results differ from earlier studies in that participants had a higher rate of depressive symptoms (participation rate was 57% with HAD depression scale score 0-2, 61% with score 3-4, 62% with score 5-6 and 79% with a score 7 or above). The findings also illustrate a poorer health-related quality of life among the participants in the role physical domain on Short Form-36 (p=0.01). The results indicate that the use of targeted strategies to enhance participation may lead to a less biased sample as well as the inclusion of more subjects who seem to meet the aims of the intervention. PMID:24698174

  9. Spatial memory and path integration studied by self-driven passive linear displacement. I. Basic properties.

    PubMed

    Israël, I; Grasso, R; Georges-Francois, P; Tsuzuku, T; Berthoz, A

    1997-06-01

    According to path integration, the brain is able to compute the distance of a traveled path. In this research we applied our previously reported method for studying memory of linear distance, a crucial mechanism in path integration; our method is based on the overt reconstruction of a passive transport. Passive transport is a special case of navigation in which no active control is performed. Blindfolded subjects were first asked to travel 2 m forward, in darkness, by driving with a joystick the robot on which they were seated. The results show that all subjects but two undershot this distance, i.e., overestimated their own displacement. Then, subjects were submitted to a passive linear forward displacement along 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 m, and had to reproduce the same distance, still blindfolded. The results show that the distance of the stimulus was accurately reproduced, as well as stimulus duration, peak velocity, and velocity profile. In this first condition, the imposed velocity profile was triangular and therefore stimulus distance and duration were correlated. In a second condition, it was shown that distance was correctly reproduced also when the information about stimulus duration was kept constant. Here, different velocity profiles were used as stimuli, and most subjects also reproduced the velocity profile. Statistical analyses indicated that distance was not reproduced as a consequence of duration, peak velocity, or velocity profile reproduction, but was uniquely correlated to stimulus distance. The previous hypothesis of a double integration of the otolith signal to provide a distance estimate can explain our results. There was a large discrepancy between the accuracy with which the subjects matched the velocity profiles and that of distance reproduction. It follows that, whereas the dynamics of passive motion are stored and available to further use, distance is independently estimated. It is concluded that vestibular and somatosensory signals excited by

  10. Application Essays as an Effective Tool for Assessing Instruction in the Basic Communication Course: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazer, Joseph P.; Simonds, Cheri J.; Hunt, Stephen K.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of student learning in general education courses is of critical importance in higher education. This study examines the utility of a writing assignment (application essays) in a basic communication course as an effective assessment tool. The authors conducted a content analysis of student portfolios to determine the extent to which…

  11. A Study of the Content in Selected Textbooks for the Commonly Offered Basic Business Courses in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, L. Eugene

    The problem was a study of the content found in five commonly offered basic business courses in secondary schools to determine whether the subject matter in each course is sufficiently unique to justify the continued offering of the current series of courses or whether the content is so repetitious that further consideration of the consolidation…

  12. A STUDY OF STUDENTS WHO DISCONTINUED ATTENDANCE IN THE E.S.E.A. III ADULT BASIC EDUCATION PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSS, DORIS; RICHARDSON, ROBERT

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF STUDENTS WHO DISCONTINUED ATTENDANCE IN THE ADULT BASIC EDUCATION COURSES PROVIDED BY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN THE BRONX, MANHATTAN, BROOKLYN, AND QUEENS. DATA WERE GATHERED BY INTERVIEW OR SCHOOL FILES ON 306 PERSONS--167 NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING, PRIMARILY PUERTO RICANS, AND 139 NATIVE BORN, LARGELY NEGRO. MOST OF THE DROPOUTS WERE…

  13. The Effectiveness of the Rocket Math Program for Improving Basic Multiplication Fact Fluency in Fifth Grade Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rave, Kristen; Golightly, Amy F.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a commercially available math fluency intervention program on the basic multiplication fluency of three classrooms of fifth grade students. Baseline assessment and progress monitoring of thirty-three regular- and eleven special education students occurred over nine weeks. Within-group analyses revealed significant…

  14. Evaluation of a Numeracy Intervention Program Focusing on Basic Numerical Knowledge and Conceptual Knowledge: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Liane; Handl, Pia; Thony, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    In this study, six elementary grade children with developmental dyscalculia were trained individually and in small group settings with a one-semester program stressing basic numerical knowledge and conceptual knowledge. All the children showed considerable and partly significant performance increases on all calculation components. Results suggest…

  15. Validation of Student and Parent Report Data on the Basic Grant Application Form. Final Report. Volume I, Individual Validation Studies: Institution Referral Study, Pre-established Criteria Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ronald J.

    Errors made on applications to the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program were studied to determine the scope and nature of misreporting and misuse of the BEOG program. Characteristics of applicants who misreport personal and/or family financial circumstances were identified, and procedures were established to regularly screen and…

  16. French Basic Course: Basic Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This volume of the French Basic Course contains ten situations from daily life, each divided into five sub-situations. The material for each situation consists of cartoons and lists of selected words. The purpose of the volume is to provide a vehicle for reviewing the grammar and vocabulary of lessons 1-85 of the Basic Course and adding new words…

  17. Schizophrenia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... I know with schizophrenia? For More Information Share Schizophrenia Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects ...

  18. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  19. Basic Finance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  20. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  1. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina; And Others

    1976-01-01

    These articles are presented as an aide in teaching basic subjects. This issue examines reading diagnosis, food preservation, prime numbers, electromagnets, acting out in language arts, self-directed spelling activities, and resources for environmental education. (Editor/RK)

  2. Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KyeoReh; Kim, Kyoohyun; Jung, Jaehwang; Heo, JiHan; Cho, Sangyeon; Lee, Sangyun; Chang, Gyuyoung; Jo, YoungJu; Park, Hyunjoo; Park, YongKeun

    2013-01-01

    A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases. Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases. To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:23539026

  3. Study on basic problems in real-time 3D holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian; Pan, Yijie; Li, Xin

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, real-time three-dimensional (3D) holographic display has attracted more and more attentions. Since a holographic display can entirely reconstruct the wavefront of an actual 3D scene, it can provide all the depth cues for human eye's observation and perception, and it is believed to be the most promising technology for future 3D display. However, there are several unsolved basic problems for realizing large-size real-time 3D holographic display with a wide field of view. For examples, commercial pixelated spatial light modulators (SLM) always lead to zero-order intensity distortion; 3D holographic display needs a huge number of sampling points for the actual objects or scenes, resulting in enormous computational time; The size and the viewing zone of the reconstructed 3D optical image are limited by the space bandwidth product of the SLM; Noise from the coherent light source as well as from the system severely degrades the quality of the 3D image; and so on. Our work is focused on these basic problems, and some initial results are presented, including a technique derived theoretically and verified experimentally to eliminate the zero-order beam caused by a pixelated phase-only SLM; a method to enlarge the reconstructed 3D image and shorten the reconstruction distance using a concave reflecting mirror; and several algorithms to speed up the calculation of computer generated holograms (CGH) for the display.

  4. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Steffensen, Annette B; Acha, Moshe Rav; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lynch, Stacey N; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Brunak, Søren; Ellinor, Patrick T; Jukema, J Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Stricker, Bruno H; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics. PMID:24952909

  5. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Rav Acha, Moshe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lynch, Stacey N.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Brunak, Søren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated wtih complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics. PMID:24952909

  6. Making Sense of Qualitative and Quantitative Findings in Mixed Research Synthesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    VOILS, CORRINE I.; SANDELOWSKI, MARGARETE; BARROSO, JULIE; HASSELBLAD, VICTOR

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of qualitative and quantitative research findings is increasingly promoted, but many of the conceptual and methodological issues it raises have yet to be fully understood and resolved. In this article, we describe how we handled issues encountered in efforts to synthesize the findings in forty-two reports of studies of antiretroviral adherence in HIV-positive women in the course of an ongoing study to develop methods to synthesize qualitative and quantitative research findings in common domains of health-related research. Working with these reports underscored the importance of looking past method claims and ideals and directly at the findings themselves, differentiating between aggregative syntheses in which findings are assimilated and interpretive syntheses in which they are configured, and understanding the judgments involved in designating relationships between findings as confirmatory, divergent, or complementary. PMID:18677415

  7. Development of Study Habit of Students by their Self-inspection of the Study of Basic Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takuri; Takahara, Kenji; Ikeda, Kazuo; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    The Department of Engineering of Fukuoka Institute of Technology introduced special courses for improvement of basic mathematic abilities of new students focusing on their smooth transition to specialized learning courses of Engineering. Self-inspection sheet was developed for inspection of their own learning process to give them a clue for planning to next stage. In order to let students to have effective learning process, students had a small test to fill out self-inspection sheet in every stage. To estimate efficacy of the courses, average score of each stage was calculated. Also, analysis of each student's tendency of learning and psychological situation showed that the average score were improved concerning three of the four subjects. On the other hand, the inspection made clear that more students had tendency to request some supports for better understanding of the topics. The self-inspection is effective for students to develop their study habit and improve their abilities, but some students need another way of support for better understanding of the topics.

  8. Quantitative observation and study on rhythmic abnormalities of activities in animals prior to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chungao; Jiang, Jinchang

    1992-11-01

    In this paper, the normal daily activities and abnormal activities related to earthquake premonitory information are given by a quantitative observation and analysis of activities in the sparrow (SR, Passer montanus), budgerigar (BG, Melopsittacus undulatus) and rat (RT, Rattus norvegicus). The results show that the quantitative observation of habitual abnormalities in animals may provide some cues for the short-term earthquake prediction. The normal activity rhythms for the SR and BG are similar, and both present M mode. The high activities occurs during 07h 10h and 15h 16h, respectively, the low activities occurs during 12h 13h, and at night both birds are basically silent. For the RT, the normal rhythmic activity has the middle magnitude during 07h 10h and 17h 18h, the low and high magnitudes occur during 11h 16h and from 19h to 06h at the next day. For the SR, BG and RT, observable abnormal changes of the normal activity rhythm were found before earthquakes. The night activities of the SR and BG were increased noticeably. For the RT the activities during the low magnitude of activities at the day time were also increased. They both are about 300 times greater than the normal activity value. Moreover, the total activity values per day were increased, and were about 2 times of the normal value. The x 2-test shows that the abnormalities of the daily activity rhythm and following increase of the daily activity events are significantly correlated with earthquakes of magnitude over 4.3 in Tangshan seismic area within the region of 200 km distance from the observation station.

  9. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, April-June 1980. [Limestone and dolomite; USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-12-01

    This work supports the development studies for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion. Laboratory and process development studies are aimed at providing needed information on limestone utilization, removal of particles and alkali metal compounds from the flue gas, control of SO/sub 2/ and trace pollutant emissions, and other aspects of fluidized-bed coal combustion. This report presents information on: (1) the development of a sorbent utilization prediction methodology, (2) studies of factors which affect limestone breakup and elutriation, (3) basic studies of limestone sulfation under combustion conditions, and (4) studies of the kinetics of the hydration of spent limestone.

  10. Computational Study of Acidic and Basic Functionalized Crystalline Silica Surfaces as a Model for Biomaterial Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Corno, Marta; Delle Piane, Massimo; Monti, Susanna; Moreno-Couranjou, Maryline; Choquet, Patrick; Ugliengo, Piero

    2015-06-16

    In silico modeling of acidic (CH2COOH) or basic (CH2NH2) functionalized silica surfaces has been carried out by means of a density functional approach based on a gradient-corrected functional to provide insight into the characterization of experimentally functionalized surfaces via a plasma method. Hydroxylated surfaces of crystalline cristobalite (sporting 4.8 OH/nm(2)) mimic an amorphous silica interface as unsubstituted material. To functionalize the silica surface we transformed the surface Si-OH groups into Si-CH2COOH and Si-CH2NH2 moieties to represent acidic/basic chemical character for the substitution. Structures, energetics, electronic, and vibrational properties were computed and compared as a function of the increasing loading of the functional groups (from 1 to 4 per surface unit cell). Classical molecular dynamics simulations of selected cases have been performed through a Reax-FF reactive force field to assess the mobility of the surface added chains. Both DFT and force field calculations identify the CH2NH2 moderate surface loading (1 group per unit cell) as the most stable functionalization, at variance with the case of the CH2COOH group, where higher loadings are preferred (2 groups per unit cell). The vibrational fingerprints of the surface functionalities, which are the ν(C═O) stretching and δ(NH2) bending modes for acidic/basic cases, have been characterized as a function of substitution percentage in order to guide the assignment of the experimental data. The final results highlighted the different behavior of the two types of functionalization. On the one hand, the frequency associated with the ν(C═O) mode shifts to lower wavenumbers as a function of the H-bond strength between the surface functionalities (both COOH and SiOH groups), and on the other hand, the δ(NH2) frequency shift seems to be caused by a subtle balance between the H-bond donor and acceptor abilities of the NH2 moiety. Both sets of data are in general agreement with

  11. Basic Science Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brummel, Clete

    These six learning modules were developed for Lake Michigan College's Basic Science Training Program, a workshop to develop good study skills while reviewing basic science. The first module, which was designed to provide students with the necessary skills to study efficiently, covers the following topics: time management; an overview of a study…

  12. DOS basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    DOS is an acronym for Disk Operating System. It is actually a set of programs that allows you to control your personal computer. DOS offers the capabilities to create and manage files; organize and maintain information placed on disks; use application programs such as WordPerfect, Lotus 123, Excel, Windows, etc. In addition, DOS provides the basic utilities needed to copy files from one area to another, delete files and list files. The latest version of DOS also offers more advanced features that include hard disk compression and memory management. Basic DOS commands are discussed.

  13. Defining Success in Adult Basic Education Settings: Multiple Stakeholders, Multiple Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tighe, Elizabeth L.; Barnes, Adrienne E.; Connor, Carol M.; Steadman, Sharilyn C.

    2013-01-01

    This study employed quantitative and qualitative research approaches to investigate what constitutes success in adult basic education (ABE) programs from the perspectives of multiple educational stakeholders: the state funding agency, the teachers, and the students. Success was defined in multiple ways. In the quantitative section of the study, we…

  14. Cultural Specific Effects on the Recognition of Basic Emotions: A Study on Italian Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Anna; Riviello, Maria Teresa; Bourbakis, Nikolaos

    The present work reports the results of perceptual experiments aimed to investigate if some of the basic emotions are perceptually privileged and if the cultural environment and the perceptual mode play a role in this preference. To this aim, Italian subjects were requested to assess emotional stimuli extracted from Italian and American English movies in the single (either video or audio alone) and the combined audio/video mode. Results showed that anger, fear, and sadness are better perceived than surprise, happiness in both the cultural environments (irony instead strongly depend on the language), that emotional information is affected by the communication mode and that language plays a role in assessing emotional information. Implications for the implementation of emotionally colored interactive systems are discussed.

  15. Exploring metabolism flexibility in complex organisms through quantitative study of precursor sets for system outputs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When studying metabolism at the organ level, a major challenge is to understand the matter exchanges between the input and output components of the system. For example, in nutrition, biochemical models have been developed to study the metabolism of the mammary gland in relation to the synthesis of milk components. These models were designed to account for the quantitative constraints observed on inputs and outputs of the system. In these models, a compatible flux distribution is first selected. Alternatively, an infinite family of compatible set of flux rates may have to be studied when the constraints raised by observations are insufficient to identify a single flux distribution. The precursors of output nutrients are traced back with analyses similar to the computation of yield rates. However, the computation of the quantitative contributions of precursors may lack precision, mainly because some precursors are involved in the composition of several nutrients and because some metabolites are cycled in loops. Results We formally modeled the quantitative allocation of input nutrients among the branches of the metabolic network (AIO). It corresponds to yield information which, if standardized across all the outputs of the system, allows a precise quantitative understanding of their precursors. By solving nonlinear optimization problems, we introduced a method to study the variability of AIO coefficients when parsing the space of flux distributions that are compatible with both model stoichiometry and experimental data. Applied to a model of the metabolism of the mammary gland, our method made it possible to distinguish the effects of different nutritional treatments, although it cannot be proved that the mammary gland optimizes a specific linear combination of flux variables, including those based on energy. Altogether, our study indicated that the mammary gland possesses considerable metabolic flexibility. Conclusion Our method enables to study the

  16. Quantitative trait analysis in sequencing studies under trait-dependent sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan-Yu; Zeng, Donglin; Tang, Zheng-Zheng

    2013-07-23

    It is not economically feasible to sequence all study subjects in a large cohort. A cost-effective strategy is to sequence only the subjects with the extreme values of a quantitative trait. In the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project, subjects with the highest or lowest values of body mass index, LDL, or blood pressure were selected for whole-exome sequencing. Failure to account for such trait-dependent sampling can cause severe inflation of type I error and substantial loss of power in quantitative trait analysis, especially when combining results from multiple studies with different selection criteria. We present valid and efficient statistical methods for association analysis of sequencing data under trait-dependent sampling. We pay special attention to gene-based analysis of rare variants. Our methods can be used to perform quantitative trait analysis not only for the trait that is used to select subjects for sequencing but for any other traits that are measured. For a particular trait of interest, our approach properly combines the association results from all studies with measurements of that trait. This meta-analysis is substantially more powerful than the analysis of any single study. By contrast, meta-analysis of standard linear regression results (ignoring trait-dependent sampling) can be less powerful than the analysis of a single study. The advantages of the proposed methods are demonstrated through simulation studies and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project data. The methods are applicable to other types of genetic association studies and nongenetic studies. PMID:23847208

  17. Quantitative three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography of the finger joints: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-11-01

    We present for the first time in vivo full three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of the distal interphalangeal joint in a human subject. Both absorbed energy density and absorption coefficient images of the joint are quantitatively obtained using our finite-element-based photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithm coupled with the photon diffusion equation. The results show that major anatomical features in the joint along with the side arteries can be imaged with a 1-MHz transducer in a spherical scanning geometry. In addition, the cartilages associated with the joint can be quantitatively differentiated from the phalanx. This in vivo study suggests that the 3-D PAT method described has the potential to be used for early diagnosis of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Quantitative comparison between type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garavini, G.; Folatelli, G.; Nobili, S.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Bronder, T.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S. E.; Doi, M.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kashikawa, N.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B. C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Pain, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanishev, V.; Thomas, R. C.; Walton, N. A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.

    2007-08-01

    We develop a method to measure the strength of the absorption features in type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectra and use it to make a quantitative comparisons between the spectra of type Ia supernovae at low and high redshifts. In this case study, we apply the method to 12 high-redshift (0.212 ≤ z ≤ 0.912) SNe Ia observed by the Supernova Cosmology Project. Through measurements of the strengths of these features and of the blueshift of the absorption minimum in Ca ii H&K, we show that the spectra of the high-redshift SNe Ia are quantitatively similar to spectra of nearby SNe Ia (z < 0.15). One supernova in our high redshift sample, SN 2002fd at z = 0.279, is found to have spectral characteristics that are associated with peculiar SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae.

  19. Quantitative comparison between Type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Supernova Cosmology Project; Nugent, Peter E; Garavini, G.; Folatelli, G.; Nobili, S.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Bronder, J.; Burns, M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S. E.; Doi, M.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kashikawa, N.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B. C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Pain, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanishev, V.; Thomas, R. C.; Walton, N. A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.

    2008-03-24

    We develop a method to measure the strength of the absorption features in type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectra and use it to make a quantitative comparisons between the spectra of type Ia supernovae at low and high redshifts. In this case study, we apply the method to 12 high-redshift (0.212 = z = 0.912) SNe Ia observed by the Supernova Cosmology Project. Through measurements of the strengths of these features and of the blueshift of theabsorption minimum in Ca ii H&K, we show that the spectra of the high-redshift SNe Ia are quantitatively similar to spectra of nearby SNe Ia (z< 0.15). One supernova in our high redshift sample, SN 2002fd at z = 0.279, is found to have spectral characteristics that are associated with peculiar SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae.

  20. Using quantitative risk information in decisions about statins: a qualitative study in a community setting

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Louisa; Green, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background A large literature informs guidance for GPs about communicating quantitative risk information so as to facilitate shared decision making. However, relatively little has been written about how patients utilise such information in practice. Aim To understand the role of quantitative risk information in patients’ accounts of decisions about taking statins. Design and setting This was a qualitative study, with participants recruited and interviewed in community settings. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 participants aged >50 years, all of whom had been offered statins. Data were analysed thematically, using elements of the constant comparative method. Results Interviewees drew frequently on numerical test results to explain their decisions about preventive medication. In contrast, they seldom mentioned quantitative risk information, and never offered it as a rationale for action. Test results were spoken of as objects of concern despite an often-explicit absence of understanding, so lack of understanding seems unlikely to explain the non-use of risk estimates. Preventive medication was seen as ‘necessary’ either to treat test results, or because of personalised, unequivocal advice from a doctor. Conclusion This study’s findings call into question the assumption that people will heed and use numerical risk information once they understand it; these data highlight the need to consider the ways in which different kinds of knowledge are used in practice in everyday contexts. There was little evidence from this study that understanding probabilistic risk information was a necessary or valued condition for making decisions about statin use. PMID:25824187

  1. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  2. Basic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    Instructional materials are provided for a course that covers basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Designed for use in a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners, the course describes applications of these concepts to real-life situations, with an emphasis on applications of…

  3. Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luparelli, Augustus N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These four articles focus on developing basic reading, science, and job search skills: "Reading Program for Vocational Classes" by Augustus Luparelli; "Why Teach Employability Skills?" by Larry Siefferman; "Improving Vocabulary and Reading Skills" by Edythe Conway; and "Science in Everyday Life" by Virginia Eleazer and George Carney. (SK)

  4. Body Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  5. Basic Backwardness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Charles

    This paper argues that the "back to basics" movement is regressive and that regression is the characteristic mode of fear-ridden personalities. It is argued that many people in American society today have lost their ability to laugh and do not have the sense of humor which is crucial to a healthy mental state. Such topics as necrophilia, mental…

  6. Armchair BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Annie; Fox, David

    1983-01-01

    A first lesson in learning the computer programing language BASIC, this article explains how to give instructions to the computer; the commands PRINT, NEW, LIST, and RUN; and how to do simple line editing. There is a short quiz at the end. (EAO)

  7. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  8. Shortage of Mathematics Teachers in Thai Basic Education Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puncreobutr, Vichian; Rattanatumma, Tawachai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the reasons for shortage of Mathematics teachers at Thai Basic Education level. This research is both quantitative and qualitative in nature. For the purpose of study, survey was conducted with senior high school students, in order to find out their willingness to pursue mathematics in Bachelor of…

  9. Experimental study of the quantitative precision for valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Siegler, W Christopher; Fitz, Brian D; Hoggard, Jamin C; Synovec, Robert E

    2011-07-01

    For complex sample analysis, there is a need for multidimensional chromatographic instrumentation to be able to separate more compounds, often in shorter time frames. This has led to the development of comprehensive two-dimensional chromatographic instrumentation, such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC). Lately, much of the focus in this field has been on decreasing peak widths and, therefore, increasing peak capacity and peak capacity production. All of these advancements make it possible to analyze more compounds in a shorter amount of time, but the data still need to remain quantitative to address the needs of most applications. In this report, the relationship among the modulation ratio (M(R)), peak sampling phase (φ), retention time variation (Δt(R)), and how these parameters relate to quantitative analysis precision via the relative standard deviation (RSD) was studied experimentally using a valve-based GC × GC instrument. A wide range of the number of modulations across the first dimension peak width, that is, a M(R) range from ~1 to 10, was examined through maintaining an average first dimension peak width at the base, (1)w(b) of ~3 s and varying the second dimension separation run time from 300 to 2900 ms. An average RSD of 2.1% was experimentally observed at an average M(R) of 2, with a corresponding peak capacity production of ~1200 peaks/min possible. Below this M(R) the RSD quickly increased. In a long-term study of the quantitative precision at a M(R) of 2.5, using 126 replicate injections of a test mixture spanning ~35 h, the RSD averaged 3.0%. The findings have significant implications for optimizing peak capacity production by allowing the use of the longest second dimension run time, while maintaining quantitative precision. PMID:21627311

  10. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  11. Genome-Wide Pathway Association Studies of Multiple Correlated Quantitative Phenotypes Using Principle Component Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Guo, Xiong; Wu, Shixun; Han, Jing; Liu, Yongjun; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide pathway association studies provide novel insight into the biological mechanism underlying complex diseases. Current pathway association studies primarily focus on single important disease phenotype, which is sometimes insufficient to characterize the clinical manifestations of complex diseases. We present a multi-phenotypes pathway association study(MPPAS) approach using principle component analysis(PCA). In our approach, PCA is first applied to multiple correlated quantitative phenotypes for extracting a set of orthogonal phenotypic components. The extracted phenotypic components are then used for pathway association analysis instead of original quantitative phenotypes. Four statistics were proposed for PCA-based MPPAS in this study. Simulations using the real data from the HapMap project were conducted to evaluate the power and type I error rates of PCA-based MPPAS under various scenarios considering sample sizes, additive and interactive genetic effects. A real genome-wide association study data set of bone mineral density (BMD) at hip and spine were also analyzed by PCA-based MPPAS. Simulation studies illustrated the performance of PCA-based MPPAS for identifying the causal pathways underlying complex diseases. Genome-wide MPPAS of BMD detected associations between BMD and KENNY_CTNNB1_TARGETS_UP as well as LONGEVITYPATHWAY pathways in this study. We aim to provide a applicable MPPAS approach, which may help to gain deep understanding the potential biological mechanism of association results for complex diseases. PMID:23285279

  12. A Study on Factors Influencing Toughness of Basic Flux-Cored Weld of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Kamaraj, M.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is relatively a new process for joining of modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steel. In this study, effect of shielding gas composition, inclusion content, gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) surface remelting, and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on toughness were investigated. The high amount of silicon resulted in the formation of δ-ferrite in basic flux-cored weld. A mixture of 80% argon + 20% (80A) carbon dioxide shielding gas during welding resulted in the required toughness of 47 J at room temperature. The 95% argon + 5% carbon dioxide (95A) gas-shielded welds have lower toughness due to higher amount of δ-ferrite (4%) than 80% argon + 20% carbon dioxide welds (2%). In essence, most desirable shielding gas medium to achieve optimum toughness was 80% argon + 20% carbon dioxide in basic flux-cored arc welding.

  13. Characterization of the epithelial permeation enhancing effect of basic butylated methacrylate copolymer--in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Grube, Stefan; Wolfrum, Uwe; Langguth, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Membrane destabilizing properties and increased efflux of doxorubicin from liposomes caused by basic butylated methacrylate copolymer (BBMC), better known under its commercial trade name EUDRAGIT E, have been described in the scientific literature. Here, we investigated the effect of BBMC on suspended and filter-grown Caco2 cells with respect to apical-to-basal transport and membrane permeabilization using transport assays, trypan blue exclusion assay, measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), confocal laser scanning microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by okadaic acid was investigated by measuring TEER, but a link between PP2A and the observed effects could not be established. Overall, membrane permeabilization of Caco2 cells by BBMC was demonstrated, which went along with increased apical-to-basal transport of the model compounds mannitol, talinolol, and trospium. The effect was concentration- and time-dependent, and reversible. Enhancement occurred at polymer concentrations as low as 20 microg/mL. PMID:18407686

  14. An Analysis of the Educational Effects of Studying Basic Life Support.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Itoh, Kunio; Yonezawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    We set students' learning goal of basic life support (BLS) education at "being able to describe all the steps of BLS in an appropriate order", and objectively analyzed the appropriateness of the learning goal we set and educational effects of lecture contents. Before delivering a lecture, we provided students with an assignment which asked them to "Describe the steps of BLS in an appropriate order", and investigated students' levels of acquiring knowledge on BLS. As the results, the majority of students failed to perform this assignment. Since many students did not understand the process of BLS correctly, the learning goal was considered appropriate in the sense of promoting students' understanding of BLS. We also investigated whether the contents of BLS education was effective to achieve the learning goal. We provided students with the same assignment after the lecture, and the results showed that most students successfully performed the assignment. Furthermore, the time required for students to recall the whole process of BLS was significantly reduced after receiving the lecture, showing that the BLS lecture was effective in improving students' "ability to act to save lives". PMID:27592835

  15. Confocal reflectance quantitative phase microscopy system for cell biology studies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), used to measure the refractive index, provides the optical path delay measurement at each point of the specimen under study and becomes an active field in biological science. In this work we present development of confocal reflection phase microscopy system to provide depth resolved quantitative phase information for investigation of intracellular structures and other biological specimen. The system hardware development is mainly divided into two major parts. First, creates a pinhole array for parallel confocal imaging of specimen at multiple locations simultaneously. Here a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is used to generate pinhole array by turning on a subset micro-mirrors arranged on a grid. Second is the detection of phase information of confocal imaging foci by using a common path interferometer. With this novel approach, it is possible to measure the nuclei membrane fluctuations and distinguish them from the plasma membrane fluctuations. Further, depth resolved quantitative phase can be correlated to the intracellular contents and 3D map of refractive index measurements.

  16. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marvin E.; Aalderink, Bernard J.; Padoan, Roberto; de Bruin, Gerrit; Steemers, Ted A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared). By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands) to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  17. The Basic Science of Continuous Passive Motion in Promoting Knee Health: A Systematic Review of Studies in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Derrick M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Pangrazzi, Garett; Griesser, Michael J.; Siston, Robert A.; Agarwal, Sudha; Flanigan, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the basic science evidence supports the use of continuous passive motion (CPM) after articular cartilage injury in the knee. Methods A systematic review was performed identifying and evaluating studies in animal models that focused on the basic science of CPM of the knee. Databases included in this review were PubMed, Biosis Previews, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, and EMBASE. All functional, gross anatomic, histologic, and histochemical outcomes were extracted and analyzed. Results Primary outcomes of CPM analyzed in rabbit animal models (19 studies) included histologic changes in articular cartilage (13 studies), biomechanical changes and nutrition of intra-articular tissue (3 studies), and anti-inflammatory biochemical changes (3 studies). Nine studies specifically examined osteochondral defects, 6 of which used autogenous periosteal grafts. Other pathologies included were antigen-induced arthritis, septic arthritis, medial collateral ligament reconstruction, hemarthrosis, and chymopapain-induced proteoglycan destruction. In comparison to immobilized knees, CPM therapy led to decreased joint stiffness and complications related to adhesions while promoting improved neochondrogenesis with formation and preservation of normal articular cartilage. CPM was also shown to create a strong anti-inflammatory environment by effectively clearing harmful, inflammatory particles from within the knee. Conclusions Current basic science evidence from rabbit studies has shown that CPM for the knee significantly improves motion and biological properties of articular cartilage. This may be translated to potentially improved outcomes in the management of articular cartilage pathology of the knee. Clinical Relevance If the rabbit model is relevant to humans, CPM may contribute to improved knee health by preventing joint stiffness, preserving normal articular tissue with better histologic and biologic properties, and improving range of motion as compared with joint

  18. Basic Skills--Basic Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conference Board of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The experience of eight prominent Canadian business organizations was examined in terms of how basic skills deficits are identified in their work force, the impact of those deficiencies on organizational competitiveness, and why corporate programs are developed in response to the issue. Some of the key findings were as follows: (1) employee…

  19. A Method to Prioritize Quantitative Traits and Individuals for Sequencing in Family-Based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kaanan P.; Douglas, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to recent advances in DNA sequencing, it is now technically feasible to evaluate the contribution of rare variation to complex traits and diseases. However, it is still cost prohibitive to sequence the whole genome (or exome) of all individuals in each study. For quantitative traits, one strategy to reduce cost is to sequence individuals in the tails of the trait distribution. However, the next challenge becomes how to prioritize traits and individuals for sequencing since individuals are often characterized for dozens of medically relevant traits. In this article, we describe a new method, the Rare Variant Kinship Test (RVKT), which leverages relationship information in family-based studies to identify quantitative traits that are likely influenced by rare variants. Conditional on nuclear families and extended pedigrees, we evaluate the power of the RVKT via simulation. Not unexpectedly, the power of our method depends strongly on effect size, and to a lesser extent, on the frequency of the rare variant and the number and type of relationships in the sample. As an illustration, we also apply our method to data from two genetic studies in the Old Order Amish, a founder population with extensive genealogical records. Remarkably, we implicate the presence of a rare variant that lowers fasting triglyceride levels in the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart study (p = 0.044), consistent with the presence of a previously identified null mutation in the APOC3 gene that lowers fasting triglyceride levels in HAPI Heart study participants. PMID:23626830

  20. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  1. Basic study on hot-wire flow meter in forced flow of liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oura, Y.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Murakami, K.; Tatsumoto, H.; Naruo, Y.; Nonaka, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.; Narita, N.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is a key issue in a carbon-free energy infrastructure at the energy storage and transportation stage. The typical features of LH2 are low viscosity, large latent heat and small density, compared with other general liquids. It is necessary to measure a mass flow of liquid hydrogen with a simple and compact method, especially in a two phase separate flow condition. We have proposed applying a hot-wire type flow meter, which is usually used a for gas flow meter, to LH2 flow due to the quite low viscosity and density. A test model of a compact LH2 hot-wire flow meter to measure local flow velocities near and around an inside perimeter of a horizontal tube by resistance thermometry was designed and made. The model flow meter consists of two thin heater wires made of manganin fixed in a 10 mm-diameter and 40 mm-length tube flow path made of GFRP. Each rigid heater wire was set twisted by 90 degrees from the inlet to the outlet along the inner wall. In other words, the wires were aslant with regard to the LH2 stream line. The heated wire was cooled by flowing LH2, and the flow velocity was obtained by means of the difference of the cooling characteristic in response to the flow velocity. In this report, we show results on the basic experiments with the model LH2 hot-wire flow meter. First, the heat transfer characteristics of the two heater wires for several LH2 flow velocities were measured. Second, the heating current was controlled to keep the wire temperature constant for various flow velocities. The relations between the flow velocity and the heating current were measured. The feasibility of the proposed model was confirmed.

  2. Basic results of medical studies during prolonged manned flights on-board the Salyut-7/Soyuz-T orbital complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    From 1982 through 1986 six extended flights (from 65 to 237 days) were carried out in the Salyut-7/Soyuz-T orbital complex by the principal crews, and five short-term flights (8 to 12 days) by visiting crews. During these flights, a broad series of medical studies was performed, their greatest extent during the longest flight (237 days), with the participation of a cosmonaut-doctor. The medical studies were aimed at obtaining additional information and new data on the reactions of the body's basic systems during a prolonged state of weightlessness.

  3. Validation of Student and Parent Report Data on the Basic Grant Application Form: Institution Referral Study, Pre-established Criteria Study, Overpayment Recovery. Final Report, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ronald J.; And Others

    The types and ranges of errors made on applications to the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program were studied, along with procedures used in recovering overpayments. The objective was to assess the scope and nature of misreporting and misuse of the BEOG program. A 1975-1976 study reviewed cases referred to the U.S. Office of Education…

  4. A new method for quantitating total lesion glucose metabolic changes in serial tumor FDG PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.M.; Hoh, C.K.; Huang, S.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate quantitative FDG PET studies have the potential for important applications in clinical oncology for monitoring therapy induced changes in tumor glycolytic rates. Due to a number of technical problems that complicate the use of quantitative PET tumor imaging, methods which can maximize the accuracy and precision of such measurements are advantageous. In this study, we developed and evaluated a method for reducing the errors caused by the conventional single plane, single ROI analysis in parametric images generated from pixel by pixel Patlak graphic analysis (PGA) in FDG PET studies of melanoma patients. We compared this new method to the conventional ROI method. The new processing method involves (1) generating the correlation coefficient (r) constrained Patlak parametric images from dynamic PET data; (2) summing up all the planes which cover the lesion; (3) defining a single ROI which covers the whole lesion in the summing image and determining the total lesion glucose metabolic index (K{sub T}, ml/min/lesion). Although only a single ROI was defined on the summing image, the glucose metabolic index obtained showed negligible difference (<1%) compared to those obtained from multiple ROIs on multiple planes of unconstrained parametric images. When the dynamic PET images were rotated and translated to simulate different patient positionings between scans at different times, the results obtained from the new method showed negligible difference (<2%). In summary, we present a simple but reliable method to quantitatively monitor the total lesion glucose metabolic changes during tumor growth. The method has several advantages over the conventional single ROI, single plane evaluation: (1) less sensitive to the ROI definition; (2) smaller intra- and inter-observer variations and (3) not requiring image registrations of serial scan data.

  5. Quantitative Study Of Guide Field Effects on Hall Reconnection In A Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tharp, T. D.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Lawrence, E.; Dorfman, S.; Myers, C.; Yoo, J.

    2012-04-17

    The effect of guide field on magnetic reconnection is quantitatively studied by systematically varying an applied guide field in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The quadrupole field, a signature of two-fluid reconnection at zero guide field, is significantly altered by a finite guide field. It is shown that the reconnection rate is significantly reduced with increasing guide field, and this dependence is explained by a combination of local and global physics: locally, the in-plane Hall currents are reduced, while globally guide field compression produces an increased pressure both within and downstream of the reconnection region. __________________________________________________

  6. SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation Concludes Equivocal Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Studies to Increase Diagnostic Benefits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ing-Jou; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2016-01-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT/CT has been reported to enhance the detection of coronary artery disease in human. This advance has created important clinical applications to coronary artery disease diagnosis and management for areas where myocardial perfusion PET tracers are not available. We present 2 clinical cases that undergone a combined test of 1-day rest/dipyridamole-stress dynamic SPECT and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT scans using an integrated imaging protocol and demonstrate that flow parameters are capable to conclude equivocal myocardial perfusion SPECT studies, therefore increasing diagnostic benefits to add value in making clinical decisions. PMID:26053731

  7. Application of multispectral imaging in quantitative immunohistochemistry study of breast cancer: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Lou; Wang, Lin-Wei; Chen, Jia-Mei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Qing-Ming; Yang, Gui-Fang; Qu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) based on imaging and spectroscopy, as relatively novel to the field of histopathology, has been used in biomedical multidisciplinary researches. We analyzed and compared the utility of multispectral (MS) versus conventional red-green-blue (RGB) images for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining to explore the advantages of MSI in clinical-pathological diagnosis. The MS images acquired of IHC-stained membranous marker human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytoplasmic marker cytokeratin5/6 (CK5/6), and nuclear marker estrogen receptor (ER) have higher resolution, stronger contrast, and more accurate segmentation than the RGB images. The total signal optical density (OD) values for each biomarker were higher in MS images than in RGB images (all P < 0.05). Moreover, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that a greater area under the curve (AUC), higher sensitivity, and specificity in evaluation of HER2 gene were achieved by MS images (AUC = 0.91, 89.1 %, 83.2 %) than RGB images (AUC = 0.87, 84.5, and 81.8 %). There was no significant difference between quantitative results of RGB images and clinico-pathological characteristics (P > 0.05). However, by quantifying MS images, the total signal OD values of HER2 positive expression were correlated with lymph node status and histological grades (P = 0.02 and 0.04). Additionally, the consistency test results indicated the inter-observer agreement was more robust in MS images for HER2 (inter-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.95, r s = 0.94), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.88), and ER (ICC = 0.94, r s = 0.94) (all P < 0.001) than that in RGB images for HER2 (ICC = 0.91, r s = 0.89), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.85, r s = 0.84), and ER (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.89) (all P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the application of MS images in quantitative IHC analysis could obtain higher accuracy, reliability, and more

  8. A Robust Distribution-Free Test for Genetic Association Studies of Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kozlitina, Julia; Schucany, William R.

    2016-01-01

    In association studies of quantitative traits, the association of each genetic marker with the trait of interest is typically tested using the F-test assuming an additive genetic model. In practice, the true model is rarely known, and specifying an incorrect model can lead to a loss of power. For case-control studies, the maximum of test statistics optimal for additive, dominant, and recessive models has been shown to be robust to model mis-specification. The approach has later been extended to quantitative traits. However, the existing procedures assume that the trait is normally distributed and may not maintain correct type-I error rates and can also have reduced power when the assumption of normality is violated. Here, we introduce a maximum (MAX3) test that is based on ranks and is therefore distribution-free. We examine the behavior of the proposed method using a Monte-Carlo simulation with both normal and non-normal data and compare the results to the usual parametric procedures and other nonparametric alternatives. We show that the rank-based maximum test has favorable properties relative to other tests, especially in the case of symmetric distributions with heavy tails. We illustrate the method with data from a real association study of symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA). PMID:26426896

  9. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica - A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Doring, Thomas Martin; Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman's rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p<0.01; d>0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region) with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1). Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding. PMID:27171423

  10. Neurobiological origin of spurious brain morphological changes: A quantitative MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Lorio, Sara; Kherif, Ferath; Ruef, Anne; Melie‐Garcia, Lester; Frackowiak, Richard; Ashburner, John; Helms, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The high gray‐white matter contrast and spatial resolution provided by T1‐weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has made it a widely used imaging protocol for computational anatomy studies of the brain. While the image intensity in T1‐weighted images is predominantly driven by T1, other MRI parameters affect the image contrast, and hence brain morphological measures derived from the data. Because MRI parameters are correlates of different histological properties of brain tissue, this mixed contribution hampers the neurobiological interpretation of morphometry findings, an issue which remains largely ignored in the community. We acquired quantitative maps of the MRI parameters that determine signal intensities in T1‐weighted images (R 1 (=1/T1), R 2*, and PD) in a large cohort of healthy subjects (n = 120, aged 18–87 years). Synthetic T1‐weighted images were calculated from these quantitative maps and used to extract morphometry features—gray matter volume and cortical thickness. We observed significant variations in morphometry measures obtained from synthetic images derived from different subsets of MRI parameters. We also detected a modulation of these variations by age. Our findings highlight the impact of microstructural properties of brain tissue—myelination, iron, and water content—on automated measures of brain morphology and show that microstructural tissue changes might lead to the detection of spurious morphological changes in computational anatomy studies. They motivate a review of previous morphological results obtained from standard anatomical MRI images and highlight the value of quantitative MRI data for the inference of microscopic tissue changes in the healthy and diseased brain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1801–1815, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876452

  11. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman’s rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p<0.01; d>0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region) with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1). Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding. PMID:27171423

  12. Neurobiological origin of spurious brain morphological changes: A quantitative MRI study.

    PubMed

    Lorio, Sara; Kherif, Ferath; Ruef, Anne; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Frackowiak, Richard; Ashburner, John; Helms, Gunther; Lutti, Antoine; Draganski, Bodgan

    2016-05-01

    The high gray-white matter contrast and spatial resolution provided by T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has made it a widely used imaging protocol for computational anatomy studies of the brain. While the image intensity in T1-weighted images is predominantly driven by T1, other MRI parameters affect the image contrast, and hence brain morphological measures derived from the data. Because MRI parameters are correlates of different histological properties of brain tissue, this mixed contribution hampers the neurobiological interpretation of morphometry findings, an issue which remains largely ignored in the community. We acquired quantitative maps of the MRI parameters that determine signal intensities in T1-weighted images (R1 (=1/T1), R2 *, and PD) in a large cohort of healthy subjects (n = 120, aged 18-87 years). Synthetic T1-weighted images were calculated from these quantitative maps and used to extract morphometry features-gray matter volume and cortical thickness. We observed significant variations in morphometry measures obtained from synthetic images derived from different subsets of MRI parameters. We also detected a modulation of these variations by age. Our findings highlight the impact of microstructural properties of brain tissue-myelination, iron, and water content-on automated measures of brain morphology and show that microstructural tissue changes might lead to the detection of spurious morphological changes in computational anatomy studies. They motivate a review of previous morphological results obtained from standard anatomical MRI images and highlight the value of quantitative MRI data for the inference of microscopic tissue changes in the healthy and diseased brain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1801-1815, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876452

  13. The renal quantitative scintillation camera study for determination of renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I.M. Jr.; Boineau, F.G.; Evans, B.B.; Schlegel, J.U.

    1983-03-01

    The renal quantitative scintillation camera study assesses glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow based upon renal uptake of 99mtechnetium-iron ascorbate and 131iodine-hippuran, respectively. The method was compared to inulin, para-aminohippuric acid and creatinine clearance studies in 7 normal subjects and 9 patients with various degrees of reduced renal function. The reproducibility of the technique was determined in 15 randomly selected pediatric patients. The values of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow were not significantly different from those of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. The reproducibility of the technique was comparable to that of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. Patient acceptance of the technique is excellent and the cost is minimal. Renal morphology and excretory dynamics also are demonstrated. The technique is advocated as a clinical measure of renal function.

  14. Quantitative study of temperature-dependent order in thin films of cylindrical morphology block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vindhya; Kramer, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Disordering and defect generation in block copolymer systems at high temperatures is of significance to get a better understanding of the physics governing these systems, which can also direct efforts to minimize them. We have studied the smectic-nematic-isotropic transition in confined monolayers and bilayers of cylindrical morphology poly (styrene-b-2vinyl pyridine) diblock copolymer. Previous studies of melting phenomena in block copolymer thin films have relied on quantitative AFM studies alone. We have supplemented AFM studies with grazing incidence small angle X-ray diffraction lineshape analysis to quantify the decay of translational and orientational order with increasing temperature. The results have been interpreted in the context of the Toner-Nelson theory of melting for layered systems.

  15. A Framework for Mixing Methods in Quantitative Measurement Development, Validation, and Revision: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyt, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A framework for quantitative measurement development, validation, and revision that incorporates both qualitative and quantitative methods is introduced. It extends and adapts Adcock and Collier's work, and thus, facilitates understanding of quantitative measurement development, validation, and revision as an integrated and cyclical set of…

  16. A Study of the Relationship of Selected Variables to Achievement in a Basic Communication Skills Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warming, Virginia Oliver

    One hundred twenty college freshmen in the lowest 20% of their classes participated in a study of the relationships between scores on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test and the Cooperative English Test and varying levels of standing on ACT English and Social Studies and SAT Verbal Tests, by race and gender, controlling for high school grade-point…

  17. A Comparative Study on Basic Emotion Conceptual Metaphors in English and Persian Literary Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashak, Shahrzad Pirzad; Pazhakh, Abdolreza; Hayati, Abdolmajid

    2012-01-01

    Metaphor becomes the subject of interest for many researchers in recent decades. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the universality of emotion metaphorical conceptualization and the dominant pattern in English and Persian based on Kovecses's (2003) model for Linguistic expression of Metaphor. The emotions under study were…

  18. Electronic Components, Transducers, and Basic Circuits. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Donald R.

    This study guide is part of a program of studies entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum developed for the purpose of training technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their applications. The program integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and…

  19. A review of published quantitative experimental studies on factors affecting laboratory fume hood performance.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwangseog; Woskie, Susan; DiBerardinis, Louis; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2008-11-01

    This study attempted to identify the important factors that affect the performance of a laboratory fume hood and the relationship between the factors and hood performance under various conditions by analyzing and generalizing the results from other studies that quantitatively investigated fume hood performance. A literature search identified 43 studies that were published from 1966 to 2006. For each of those studies, information on the type of test methods used, the factors investigated, and the findings were recorded and summarized. Among the 43 quantitative experimental studies, 21 comparable studies were selected, and then a meta-analysis of the comparable studies was conducted. The exposure concentration variable from the resulting 617 independent test conditions was dichotomized into acceptable or unacceptable using the control level of 0.1 ppm tracer gas. Regression analysis using Cox proportional hazards models provided hood failure ratios for potential exposure determinants. The variables that were found to be statistically significant were the presence of a mannequin/human subject, the distance between a source and breathing zone, and the height of sash opening. In summary, performance of laboratory fume hoods was affected mainly by the presence of a mannequin/human subject, distance between a source and breathing zone, and height of sash opening. Presence of a mannequin/human subject in front of the hood adversely affects hood performance. Worker exposures to air contaminants can be greatly reduced by increasing the distance between the contaminant source and breathing zone and by reducing the height of sash opening. Many other factors can also affect hood performance. Checking face velocity by itself is unlikely to be sufficient in evaluating hood performance properly. An evaluation of the performance of a laboratory fume hood should be performed with a human subject or a mannequin in front of the hood and should address the effects of the activities

  20. A Quantitative Study on the Trachea of the Red Sokoto (Maradi) Goat (Capra hircus)

    PubMed Central

    Byanet, O.; Bosha, J. A.; Onoja, B. O.

    2014-01-01

    The trachea forms the part of the conducting system which transports air from the external environment to the lungs. The aim of this study was to provide quantitative dimensions of the trachea of Red Sokoto goat (Capra hircus). Quantitative analysis was conducted on nine tracheas from goats (ages were ranged between eight months and three years) without sex variation in this study. The results showed that tracheas were extended from the cricoid cartilage of larynx to the hilus of the lungs, where they were divided into the right and left bronchi. They were structurally composed of the cartilaginous rings that were incomplete dorsally but bridged by tracheal muscles at the ends of the tracheal cartilages. The mean length of the trachea from the first to the last ring was 257 ± 7.11 mm and the number of tracheal rings varied from 35 to 57, with a mean value of 49.33 ± 2.78. The left bronchial mean length (19.78 ± 2.66 mm) was significantly longer than the right (10.44 ± 1.79 mm). The cross-sectional area (CSA) was wider at the intrathoracic area (221.5 ± 0.2 mm2) than cervical area (176 ± 0.1 mm2). PMID:24616822

  1. Quantitative imaging of the human upper airway: instrument design and clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, M. S.; Armstrong, J. J.; Paduch, A.; Sampson, D. D.; Walsh, J. H.; Hillman, D. R.; Eastwood, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    Imaging of the human upper airway is widely used in medicine, in both clinical practice and research. Common imaging modalities include video endoscopy, X-ray CT, and MRI. However, no current modality is both quantitative and safe to use for extended periods of time. Such a capability would be particularly valuable for sleep research, which is inherently reliant on long observation sessions. We have developed an instrument capable of quantitative imaging of the human upper airway, based on endoscopic optical coherence tomography. There are no dose limits for optical techniques, and the minimally invasive imaging probe is safe for use in overnight studies. We report on the design of the instrument and its use in preliminary clinical studies, and we present results from a range of initial experiments. The experiments show that the instrument is capable of imaging during sleep, and that it can record dynamic changes in airway size and shape. This information is useful for research into sleep disorders, and potentially for clinical diagnosis and therapies.

  2. A relative quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion by first-pass technique: animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Xuefang; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively assess the myocardial perfusion by first-pass technique in swine model. Numerous techniques based on the analysis of Computed Tomography (CT) Hounsfield Unit (HU) density have emerged. Although these methods proposed to be able to assess haemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis, their limitations are noticed. There are still needs to develop some new techniques. Experiments were performed upon five (5) closed-chest swine. Balloon catheters were placed into the coronary artery to simulate different degrees of luminal stenosis. Myocardial Blood Flow (MBF) was measured using color microsphere technique. Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) was measured using pressure wire. CT examinations were performed twice during First-pass phase under adenosine-stress condition. CT HU Density (HUDCT) and CT HU Density Ratio (HUDRCT) were calculated using the acquired CT images. Our study presents that HUDRCT shows a good (y=0.07245+0.09963x, r2=0.898) correlation with MBF and FFR. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses, HUDRCT provides excellent diagnostic performance for the detection of significant ischemia during adenosine-stress as defined by FFR indicated by the value of Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.927. HUDRCT has the potential to be developed as a useful indicator of quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion.

  3. Marriage Patterns and Childbearing: Results From a Quantitative Study in North of Iran.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Ziba; Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Social changes have rapidly removed arranged marriages and it seems the change in marriage pattern has played a role in childbearing. On the other hand, there is a great reduction in population in many countries which requires a comprehensive policy to manage the considerable drop in population. To achieve this goal, initially, the factors affecting fertility must be precisely identified. This study aims to examine the role of marriage patterns in childbearing. In this cross-sectional quantitative study, 880 married women 15-49 years old, living in the north of Iran were studied using a cluster sampling strategy. The results showed that there are no significant differences in reproductive behaviors of three patterns of marriage in Bobol city of Iran. It seems there is a convergence in childbearing due to the different patterns of marriage and Policymakers should pay attention to other determinants of reproductive behaviors in demographic planning. PMID:26493414

  4. Green initiative impact on stock prices: A quantitative study of the clean energy industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurisich, John M.

    The purpose of this quantitative ex post facto research study was to explore the relationship between green initiative expense disclosures and stock prices of 46 NASDAQ listed Clean Edge Green Energy global companies from 2007 to 2010. The independent variables were sales and marketing, environmental, customer and supplier, community, and corporate governance practices that were correlated with the dependent variable in the study of stock prices. Expense disclosures were examined in an effort to measure the impact of green initiative programs and to expose the interrelationships between green initiative expense disclosures and fluctuations of stock prices. The data for the research was secondary data from existing annual reports. A statistically significant relationship was revealed between environmental practices and changes in stock prices. The study results also provided substantial evidence for leadership and managerial decision making to reduce or increase green initiative practices to maximize shareholder wealth of their respective organizations.

  5. Marriage Patterns and Childbearing: Results From a Quantitative Study in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeh, Ziba; Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Social changes have rapidly removed arranged marriages and it seems the change in marriage pattern has played a role in childbearing. On the other hand, there is a great reduction in population in many countries which requires a comprehensive policy to manage the considerable drop in population. To achieve this goal, initially, the factors affecting fertility must be precisely identified. This study aims to examine the role of marriage patterns in childbearing. In this cross-sectional quantitative study, 880 married women 15-49 years old, living in the north of Iran were studied using a cluster sampling strategy. The results showed that there are no significant differences in reproductive behaviors of three patterns of marriage in Bobol city of Iran. It seems there is a convergence in childbearing due to the different patterns of marriage and Policymakers should pay attention to other determinants of reproductive behaviors in demographic planning. PMID:26493414

  6. Quantitative Study of Energization of Plasma Particles in the Magnetic Reconnection Layer of a Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Swanson, C.; Jara Almonte, J.; Ji, H.; Myers, C. E.; Chen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative study of the energization of plasma particles in the magnetic reconnection layer has been carried out by monitoring the behavior of electrons and ions in MRX (1, 2). The measured profiles of plasma parameters are quantitatively analyzed with symmetric as well as asymmetric upstream conditions in the context of the two-fluid reconnection physics (1) and compared with the recent numerical simulation results. The electron heating is observed to extend beyond the electron diffusion region and considered to be due to energization by magnetic instabilities of incoming electrons trapped in the magnetic mirror. This energization often occurs impulsively. Ions are accelerated by an electrostatic field across the separatrices to the plasma exhaust region of the reconnection layer and become thermalized through re-magnetization by the exiting magnetic fields. In this paper, the acceleration and heating of ions and electrons which extents much wider than the length scale of the ion skin depth, is addressed quantitatively for the first time in a laboratory reconnection layer. A total energy inventory is calculated based on analysis of the Poynting, enthalpy, flow energy, and heat flux in the measured diffusion layer (3). More than half of the incoming magnetic energy is converted to particle energy during collisionless reconnection. The results will bring a new insight into the conversion mechanism of magnetic energy to that of plasma particles during magnetic reconnection. (1) M. Yamada, R. Kulsrud, H. Ji, Rev. Mod. Phys. v.82, 602 (2010) (2) J. Yoo et al, Phys. Rev. Letts. 110, 215007 (2013) (3) J. Eastwood et al., PRL 110, 225001 (2013) Fig. 1. Measured in-plane ion flow vectors along with the measured 2-D profile of the in-plane plasma potential Φp in the half reconnection plane of MRX. The thin black lines are measured contours of poloidal flux ψp. While ions flow across the separatrices, they turn in-plane electric field Ein.

  7. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-11-01

    These laboratory- and process-development-scale studies support the Fossil Energy development program for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. The objective of the current program is to investigate methods for improving the utilization of limestone for SO/sub 2/ emission control in FBCs and to develop a method for predicting the performance in AFBC's and PFBC's of limestones from different sources. This report presents results from (1) an investigation of the use of water treatment of spent partially sulfated limestone to enhance its SO/sub 2/ capture capacity, (2) studies of the kinetics of the hydration of spent limestone, and (3) studies of the attrition and elutriation of limestones in fluidized beds. Results of studies of the particle-removal efficiency of the TAN-JET cyclone are also reported.

  8. TOTAL HUMAN EXPOSURE, BASIC CONCEPTS, EPA FIELD STUDIES, AND FUTURE RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, environmental regulatory programs designed to protect public health have monitored pollutants only in geophysical carrier media (for example, outdoor air, streams, soil). ield studies have identified a gap between the levels observed in geophysical carrier media and...

  9. Adolescent Heavy Drinking Does Not Affect Maturation of Basic Executive Functioning: Longitudinal Findings from the TRAILS Study

    PubMed Central

    Boelema, Sarai R.; Harakeh, Zeena; van Zandvoort, Martine J. E.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Excessive alcohol use is assumed to affect maturation of cognitive functioning in adolescence. However, most existing studies that have tested this hypothesis are seriously flawed due to the use of selective groups and/or cross-sectional designs, which limits the ability to draw firm conclusions. This longitudinal study investigated whether patterns of alcohol use predicted differences in maturation of executive functioning in adolescence. Additionally, gender was tested as a possible moderator. Methods We used data from the Tracking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), which comprises a cohort of 2,230 Dutch adolescents. Maturation of executive functioning was measured by assessing the standardized improvement on each of four basic executive functions (i.e., inhibition, working memory, and shift- and sustained attention) between ages 11 and 19. Participants were assigned to one of six (heavy) drinking groups (i.e., non-drinkers, light drinkers, infrequent heavy drinkers, increased heavy drinkers, decreased heavy drinkers, and chronic heavy drinkers). We conducted linear regression analyses, and adjusted for relevant confounders. Results The six drinking groups did not reveal significant differences in maturation between drinking groups. E.g., maturation executive functioning of chronic heavy drinkers in comparison to non-drinkers; inhibition: B = -0.14, 95% CI [-0.41 to 0.14], working memory: B = -0.03, 95% CI [-0.26 to 0.21], shift attention: B = 0.13, 95% CI [-0.17 to 0.41], sustained attention: B = 0.12, 95% CI [-0.60 to 0.36]. Furthermore, gender was not found to be a significant moderator. Conclusions Four years of weekly heavy drinking (i.e., chronic heavy drinkers) did not result in measurable impairments in four basic executive functions. Thus, regular heavy drinking in adolescence does not seem to affect these basic behavioural measures of executive functioning. PMID:26489080

  10. Basic facts about Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the disturbing influence of the earth's atmosphere on terrestrial and airborne telescopy, radiometry, thermal mapping, spectroscopy, polarimetry and radar astronomy of Venus, major improvements in the body of theory concerning that planet, began with the Mariner 2 planetary exploration program in 1962. The effect of spacecraft exploration culminated with the influx of data yielded by the Pioneer Venus and Venera 11 and 12 missions of 1978. Attention is presently given to the quantitative enhancement of widely accepted, basic facts about Venus that has resulted from the analysis of space probe data, together with an overview of the major features of past and planned planetary missions.

  11. Basic study on the influence of inhibition induced by the magnetic stimulation on the peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the inhibition mechanism of magnetic stimulation on motor function. A magnetic stimulator with a flat figure-eight coil was used to stimulate the peripheral nerve of the antebrachium. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 0.8 T, and the stimulation frequency was 1 Hz. The amplitudes of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and first dorsal interosseous muscle were used to evaluate the effects of magnetic stimulation. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the MEP amplitude before and after magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex. The results showed that MEP amplitude after magnetic stimulation compared with before magnetic stimulation decreased. Because there were individual differences in MEP amplitude induced by magnetic stimulation, the MEP amplitude after stimulation was normalized by the amplitude of each participant before stimulation. The MEP amplitude after stimulation decreased by approximately 58% (p < 0.01) on average compared with before stimulation. Previous studies suggested that magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex induced an increase or a decrease in MEP amplitude. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that the alteration in MEP amplitude was induced by cortical excitability based on magnetic stimulation. The results of this study showed that MEP amplitude decreased following magnetic stimulation to the peripheral nerve. We suggest that the decrease in MEP amplitude found in this study was obtained via the feedback from a peripheral nerve through an afferent nerve to the brain. This study suggests that peripheral excitement by magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerve may control the central nervous system via afferent feedback.

  12. Sunspace basics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Anyone who lives in a home with a sunspace will tell you that the sunspace is the most enjoyable room in the house. Many times the homeowner`s only regret is that the sunspace is not larger. Although aesthetics often drive the decision to add a sunspace or include one in a new home design, sunspaces can also provide supplemental space heating and a healthy environment for plants and people. In fact, a well-designed sunspace can provide up to 60% of a home`s winter heating requirements. This publication addresses basic elements of sunspace design; design considerations for supplemental space heating, growing plants, and use as a living space; design guidelines including siting, heat distribution, and glazing angles; and major sunspace components including glazing options, thermal mass, insulation, and climate controls. A list of sources for more information is also provided.

  13. The Basic Skills of Young Adults. Some Findings from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinsmyth, Carol; Bynner, John

    A representative sample of 1,650 members of the 1970 British Cohort Study were surveyed at the age of 21 (in 1992) to gather information on their education, training, and employment experiences after the age of 16 and their self-assessed literacy and numeracy. Respondents also completed a half-hour assessment of their literacy and numeracy skills.…

  14. Computer-Based Basic Skills Instruction in a CETA Funded Project: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Robert M.; Hedl, John J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a study that (1) examined the effectiveness of computer-based education in developing literacy and mathematics skills in young adults to enable them to secure unsubsidized employment and (2) compared motivation of CETA-funded students with those who sought training voluntarily. Discusses failures of CETA training projects and makes…

  15. An Activity-Based Study on Providing Basic Knowledge and Skills of Measurement in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maral, Sahide; Oguz-Unver, Ayse; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Even though one of the prerequisites of inquiry-based science classes is acquiring measuring skills, there is not enough emphasis in the schools today on developing these skills. The current study, which has been designed with the thought that this situation may be caused by the fact that teachers do not have a sufficient level of measurement…

  16. Application of the Convergence Technique to Basic Studies of the Reading Process. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gephart, William J.

    This study covers a program of research on problems in the area of reading undertaken and supported by the U. S. Office of Education. Due to the effectiveness of the Convergence Technique in the planning and management of complex programs of bio-medical research, this project is undertaken to develop plans for the application of this technique in…

  17. Understanding the Basic Bargain: A Study of Charter School Accountability in Massachusetts and Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herdman, Paul A.

    This paper examines the balance between autonomy and accountability in education from the perspective of Massachusetts and Texas charter schools and their state authorizers. By analyzing national survey data, interviews with key policymakers, and case studies of six low, medium, and high performing schools, the paper examines the organizational…

  18. Basic Training and Professional Qualifications of Teachers in Bulgaria and Turkey: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evgenieva, Emilia; Arslan, Serife

    2012-01-01

    The professional qualification of teachers is a derivative of the career development system, the lifelong study model, the expected efficiency of the learning process and others. Motivating a teacher with regard to the need for continuous development depends on the order of the profession with respect to other professions, the remuneration, the…

  19. BASIC Simulation Programs; Volumes V and VI. Social Studies, Teacher Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    Five computer programs which teach concepts and processes related to social studies (in the main, economics) are presented. The subjects of the programs are the distinction between balance of trade and balance of payments; installment buying, loan payments, and savings accounts; flow of goods, services, and money between business and the consumer;…

  20. Cognitive Processes and Math Performance: A Study with Children at Third Grade of Basic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Isabel S.; Almeida, Leandro S.; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Martinez, Luis F.; Ramalho, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between cognitive factors and mathematical achievement in primary education. Participants were 103 Portuguese third grade students, aged 8 and 9. All participants completed a battery for working memory (WMTB-C), a test of general intelligence (Raven's Progressive Color Matrices), a selective…

  1. Cultural Analysis and Personal Identification: A Basic Skill in Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searles, John E.

    Teachers and curriculum developers should organize cultural materials within a conceptual framework which explains how to classify the behavior of any cultural group. This would help elementary and secondary students in social studies classes learn about their own and other cultures. This conceptual framework must represent all major realms of…

  2. How Human Information Behaviour Researchers Use Each Other's Work: A Basic Citation Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKechnie, Lynne E. F.; Goodall, George R.; Lajoie-Paquette, Darian; Julien, Heidi

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine if and how human information behaviour (HIB) research is used by others. Method: Using ISI Web of Knowledge, a citation analysis was conducted on 155 English-language HIB articles published from 1993 to 2000 in six prominent LIS journals. The bibliometric core of 12 papers was identified.…

  3. Basic Education for Girls in Yemen: Country Case Study and Analysis. Mid-Decade Review of Progress towards Education for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Sharon

    In 1995, the International Consultative Forum on Education for All (EFA) commissioned case studies in developing countries as part of a mid-decade review of progress in expanding access to basic education. This paper examines provision of basic education (grades 1-9) in Yemen, focusing on obstacles to girls' education in rural areas. The report…

  4. Regional Office Procedures. Stage I Final Report for the Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. (Volume III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.

    Volume III of a study of program management procedures in the campus-based and Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) programs provides a description of procedures employed within the U.S. Office of Education regional offices to administer the Basic Grant and campus-based student financial assistance programs. The objective of the report is to…

  5. Using Social Modeling to Inform Community College Student Behavior: A Case Study Examining Embedded Interventions in a Basic Skills Math Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito-Noy, Celia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of students enrolled in a basic skills math class at a California community college and the role of the peer model in informing their college-going behaviors. There is significant interest in increasing the number of students who complete basic skills courses and make progress towards a…

  6. Quantitative assessment of barriers to the clinical development and adoption of cellular therapies: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rikabi, Sarah; French, Anna; Pinedo-Villanueva, Rafael; Morrey, Mark E; Wartolowska, Karolina; Judge, Andrew; MacLaren, Robert E; Mathur, Anthony; Williams, David J; Wall, Ivan; Birchall, Martin; Reeve, Brock; Atala, Anthony; Barker, Richard W; Cui, Zhanfeng; Furniss, Dominic; Bure, Kim; Snyder, Evan Y; Karp, Jeffrey M; Price, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Brindley, David A

    2014-01-01

    There has been a large increase in basic science activity in cell therapy and a growing portfolio of cell therapy trials. However, the number of industry products available for widespread clinical use does not match this magnitude of activity. We hypothesize that the paucity of engagement with the clinical community is a key contributor to the lack of commercially successful cell therapy products. To investigate this, we launched a pilot study to survey clinicians from five specialities and to determine what they believe to be the most significant barriers to cellular therapy clinical development and adoption. Our study shows that the main concerns among this group are cost-effectiveness, efficacy, reimbursement, and regulation. Addressing these concerns can best be achieved by ensuring that future clinical trials are conducted to adequately answer the questions of both regulators and the broader clinical community. PMID:25383173

  7. Correlation Between the Severity of Diabetic Peripheral Polyneuropathy and Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Jae; Jang, Sol; Lee, Seung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy and their correlation with the quantified severity of nerve dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods A total of 187 diabetic patients with clinically suspected polyneuropathy (PN) were subclassified into 2 groups according to electrodiagnostic testing: a DM-PN group of 153 diabetic patients without electrophysiological abnormality and a DM+PN group of 34 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy. For all patients, age, sex, height, weight, duration of DM, and plasma glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level were comparatively investigated. A composite score was introduced to quantitatively analyze the results of the nerve conduction studies. Logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate correlations between significant risk factors and severity of diabetic polyneuropathy. Results The DM+PN group showed a significantly higher HbA1c level and composite score, as compared with the DM-PN group. Increased HbA1c level and old age were significant predictive factors for polyneuropathy in diabetic patients (odds ratio=5.233 and 4.745, respectively). In the multiple linear regression model, HbA1c and age showed a significant positive association with composite score, in order (β=1.560 and 0.253, respectively). Conclusion Increased HbA1c level indicative of a state of chronic hyperglycemia was a risk factor for polyneuropathy in diabetic patients and a quantitative measure of its severity. PMID:27152276

  8. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research. PMID:27150137

  9. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research. PMID:27150137

  10. Clinical study of quantitative diagnosis of early cervical cancer based on the classification of acetowhitening kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So-Fan; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-03-01

    A quantitative colposcopic imaging system for the diagnosis of early cervical cancer is evaluated in a clinical study. This imaging technology based on 3-D active stereo vision and motion tracking extracts diagnostic information from the kinetics of acetowhitening process measured from the cervix of human subjects in vivo. Acetowhitening kinetics measured from 137 cervical sites of 57 subjects are analyzed and classified using multivariate statistical algorithms. Cross-validation methods are used to evaluate the performance of the diagnostic algorithms. The results show that an algorithm for screening precancer produced 95% sensitivity (SE) and 96% specificity (SP) for discriminating normal and human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected tissues from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions. For a diagnostic algorithm, 91% SE and 90% SP are achieved for discriminating normal tissue, HPV infected tissue, and low-grade CIN lesions from high-grade CIN lesions. The results demonstrate that the quantitative colposcopic imaging system could provide objective screening and diagnostic information for early detection of cervical cancer.

  11. Quantitative numerical and experimental studies of the shock accelerated heterogeneous bubbles motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layes, G.; Le Métayer, O.

    2007-04-01

    This work deals with quantitative comparisons between experimental and numerical results for shock-bubbles interactions. The bubbles are filled with three different gases (nitrogen, krypton and helium) surrounded by air in order to investigate all kind of density jumps across the interface. For each case, three incident shock wave intensities are also studied. The experiments are led by using a shock tube coupled with a visualization diagnostic device: the T80 shock tube [G. Jourdan, L. Houas, L. Schwaederlé, G. Layes, R. Carrey, and F. Diaz, "A new variable inclination shock tube for multiple investigations," Shock Waves 13, 501 (2004)]. Considering the same initial and geometrical conditions, the numerical results are obtained with the help of a recent numerical method: the discrete equations method [R. Abgrall and R. Saurel, "Discrete equations for physical and numerical compressible multiphase mixtures," J. Comput. Phys. 186, 361 (2003); R. Saurel, S. Gavrilyuk, and F. Renaud, "A multiphase model with internal degrees of freedom: Application to shock-bubble interaction," J. Fluid Mech. 495, 283 (2003); A. Chinnayya, E. Daniel, and R. Saurel, "Modelling detonation waves in heterogeneous energetic materials," J. Comput. Phys. 196, 490 (2004); O. Le Métayer, J. Massoni, and R. Saurel, "Modelling evaporation fronts with reactive Riemann solvers," J. Comput. Phys. 205, 567 (2005)], devoted to the computation of interface problems as well as multiphase mixtures. For each configuration, the quantitative comparisons are in good agreement showing the capability of both methods (numerical and experimental) to describe complex physical flows.

  12. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  13. In-vivo Tumor detection using diffusion reflection measurements of targeted gold nanorods - a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Ankri, Rinat; Duadi, Hamootal; Motiei, Menachem; Fixler, Dror

    2012-03-01

    The ability to quantitatively and non-invasively detect nanoparticles has important implications on their development as an in-vivo cancer diagnostic tool. The Diffusion Reflection (DR) method is a simple, non-invasive imaging technique which has been proven useful for the investigation of tissue's optical parameters. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, tissue-like phantom experiments and in-vivo measurements of the reflected light intensity from tumor bearing mice are presented. Following intravenous injection of antibody conjugated poly (ethylene glycol)-coated (PEGylated) gold nanorods (GNR) to tumor-bearing mice, accumulation of GNR in the tumor was clearly detected by the DR profile of the tumor. The ability of DR measurements to quantitate in-vivo the concentration of the GNR in the tumor was demonstrated and validated with Flame Atomic Absorption spectroscopy results. With GNR as absorbing contrast agents, DR has important potential applications in the image guided therapy of superficial tumors such as head and neck cancer, breast cancer and melanoma. PMID:22234916

  14. Quantitative and empirical demonstration of the Matthew effect in a study of career longevity

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Jung, Woo-Sung; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The Matthew effect refers to the adage written some two-thousand years ago in the Gospel of St. Matthew: “For to all those who have, more will be given.” Even two millennia later, this idiom is used by sociologists to qualitatively describe the dynamics of individual progress and the interplay between status and reward. Quantitative studies of professional careers are traditionally limited by the difficulty in measuring progress and the lack of data on individual careers. However, in some professions, there are well-defined metrics that quantify career longevity, success, and prowess, which together contribute to the overall success rating for an individual employee. Here we demonstrate testable evidence of the age-old Matthew “rich get richer” effect, wherein the longevity and past success of an individual lead to a cumulative advantage in further developing his or her career. We develop an exactly solvable stochastic career progress model that quantitatively incorporates the Matthew effect and validate our model predictions for several competitive professions. We test our model on the careers of 400,000 scientists using data from six high-impact journals and further confirm our findings by testing the model on the careers of more than 20,000 athletes in four sports leagues. Our model highlights the importance of early career development, showing that many careers are stunted by the relative disadvantage associated with inexperience. PMID:21173276

  15. A quantitative study of aromatic amine permeation through protective gloves using amine adsorptive pads.

    PubMed

    Vo, E; Berardinelli, S P; Hall, R C; El Ayouby, N

    2000-01-01

    A quantitative study of aromatic amine permeation through a glove material using Permea-Tec aromatic amine pads, used for the detection of chemical breakthrough of protective clothing, was performed for aniline following the microwave extraction process and gas chromatographic analysis. Aniline exhibited >99% adsorption on the pads at a spiking level of 1.94 mg (1.9 microL). Aniline showed recoveries from 65 to 89% (RSD < or =5.6%) over the range 1.1-1.9 microL (1.12-1.94 mg) of aniline applied to pads. The modified ASTM F739 and direct permeability testing procedures were used to determine breakthrough times for five protective glove materials using aniline as a challenge chemical. Breakthrough times for six protective gloves were determined, ranging from 182 sec to 82 min. The quantitative concentration of aniline on the pads following permeation through the gloves also was determined, ranging from 0.53 to 0.55 mg/cm2 (1.79-1.88 mg/pad). PMID:11192217

  16. Quantitative correlation of rainfall and earth surface displacements for slope stability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Apostolou, Evangelia; Papavgeri, Georgia; Tripolitsiotis, Achilleas

    2015-06-01

    It is common sense that the possibility of a rockfall increases after an intense rainfall and it is well documented that rainfalls accelerate earth surface displacements such as landslides and rockfalls. This qualitative correlation is highly affected by the geology and climate condition of the area under consideration. The research project entitled "Development of an integrated system for rockfall identification in highways", funded by the Operational Program Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship (co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)) aims to develop an operational system for early warning of rockfalls that occur along transportation corridors. To accomplish this goal the influence and the time gap between triggering mechanisms and rockfall incidents is investigated. In this work, previous studies towards quantitative correlation of rainfall magnitude and earth surface displacements are briefly presented. Based on these works, and taking into account that rockfall incidents, in the majority of Mediterranean countries, are not well-documented, data obtained by a slope stability monitoring network are used to quantitatively determine the magnitude of the rainfall that caused the slope's movement.

  17. Basic mechanisms study for MIS solar cell structures on GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The solar cell structure examined is the MIS configuration on (n) GaAs. The metal room temperature oxide/(n) GaAs materials system was studied. Metals with electronegativities varying from 2.4 (Au) to 1.5 (Al) were used as the upper electrode. The thinnest metallization that did not interfere with the measurement techniques (by introducing essentially transmission line series resistance problems across a device) was used. Photovoltaic response was not optimized.

  18. Study on the Establishment of Heilongjiang Provinces Animal Husbandry Basic Data Platform Based on Data Warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ping; Su, Zhongbin; Zhang, Jicheng

    The paper establishes animal husbandry information service platform, and the public data platform of animal husbandry is based on data warehouse platform. It aims at the absence of effective use of data resources issues in the process of animal husbandry information. Then it studies on the key technology for the animal husbandry. It will be of the theoretical basis for information integration, storing, sharing and analysis decision-making.

  19. Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies. Quarterly report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-16

    Two major activities or tasks are being performed. The first activity (Task I) is the development of a process or processes to produce agglomerates from coal fines suitable for use as a feed to fixed-bed gasifiers. Seven US coals are being investigated. The second activity (Task II) is a design and cost study to examine the effects of gasifier selection on overall plant costs for a commercial-scale coal gasification facility. Task I work during the Third Quarter involved laboratory experimentation and some limited cost studies. Twenty-four different materials and many material combinations were evaluated as potential binders for coal briquettes. Potential binder materials were initially prescreened in wafer briquette tests. Of the materials tested,approximately a dozen showed good promise as a suitable binder. The most promising candidates were then used to produce larger briquetts on a double-roll press. Binderless briquetting was also investigated. In addition, work was initiated during the period in developing suitable pelletizing processes for coal fines and a tour was made of commercial briquetting plants in Europe. The results to date indicate that there is a good probability that a suitable process that will result in agglomerates that will stand up in a fixed-bed gasifier will be techincally possible for each of the seven coals being studied. The econonics of these processes, however, are uncertain at this time and are being studied. Task II work during the Third Quarter centered on (1) completing the capital and operating cost estimates for a large coal gasification plant based on Winkler gasifiers and (2) initiating the design of a similar plant based on Molten Salt gasifiers. Capital and operating costs for the Molten Salt gasification plant and for a fixed-bed gasification plant incorporating agglomeration facilities will be developed during the next Quarter.

  20. Quantitative assessment of pupillary light reflex in normal and anesthetized dogs: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jury; Heo, Jiseong; Ji, Dongbeom; Kim, Min-Su

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the pupillary light reflex (PLR) in normal and anesthetized dogs using a pupillometer. Eleven dogs (20 eyes) of various breeds were included. PLRs were measured with a handheld pupillometer in dim light before and during anesthesia. Anesthesia was conducted with atropine, xylazine and ketamine. Parameters of pupillometry included neurological pupil index (NPi), pupil size, percent of change (%CH), latency (LAT), constriction velocity (CV), maximum constriction velocity (MCV) and dilation velocity (DV). NPi,%CH, CV and MCV were significantly decreased during anesthesia compared with the pre-anesthesia data. The results suggest that atropine-xylazine-ketamine combination anesthesia depresses the PLR. Additionally, this study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of a pupillometer in dogs. PMID:25648149

  1. Early detection of cervical cancer among Native American women: a qualitative supplement to a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Messer, L; Steckler, A; Dignan, M

    1999-08-01

    The North Carolina Native American Cervical Cancer Prevention Project was a 5-year (1989-1995) National Cancer Institute-funded, community-based, early detection of cervical cancer intervention implemented among two Native American tribes in North Carolina: the eastern band of the Cherokee Indians and the Lumbee. The initial quantitative analysis of the intervention showed modest effects and found that the intervention had different effects in the two communities. Due to the equivocal findings, a retrospective qualitative study was conducted. The qualitative study found that two types of factors influenced the intervention's results. The first were project and intervention characteristics, and the second were community and cultural factors over which the project had no control. The community and cultural factors took two forms: enhancers, which contributed to greater intervention effect, and attenuators, which created barriers to success. Examples of each factor are presented, and implications for cervical cancer detection among Native American women are discussed. PMID:10435237

  2. A quantitative study of chemical kinetics for the synthesis of doped oxide nanocrystals using FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of Mg-doped ZnO nanocrystals was employed as a model system to quantitatively study the chemical kinetics of the precursor conversion reactions at synthetic conditions and the correlations with the formation of doped nanocrystals. An accurate method using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was developed to explore the alcoholysis reactions of the cationic precursors. Our study showed that three independent factors, molar ratio of dopant precursor, reaction temperature and coordination ligands of cationic precursors influenced the relative reactivity of magnesium to zinc precursor, and in turn the formation of Mg-doped ZnO nanocrystals with defined shapes and properties. This understanding underpins the advancement of the syntheses of doped nanocrystals and should be useful for future rational design of new synthetic systems. PMID:24619066

  3. The Basic Immune Simulator: An agent-based model to study the interactions between innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Folcik, Virginia A; An, Gary C; Orosz, Charles G

    2007-01-01

    Background We introduce the Basic Immune Simulator (BIS), an agent-based model created to study the interactions between the cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. Innate immunity, the initial host response to a pathogen, generally precedes adaptive immunity, which generates immune memory for an antigen. The BIS simulates basic cell types, mediators and antibodies, and consists of three virtual spaces representing parenchymal tissue, secondary lymphoid tissue and the lymphatic/humoral circulation. The BIS includes a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to facilitate its use as an educational and research tool. Results The BIS was used to qualitatively examine the innate and adaptive interactions of the immune response to a viral infection. Calibration was accomplished via a parameter sweep of initial agent population size, and comparison of simulation patterns to those reported in the basic science literature. The BIS demonstrated that the degree of the initial innate response was a crucial determinant for an appropriate adaptive response. Deficiency or excess in innate immunity resulted in excessive proliferation of adaptive immune cells. Deficiency in any of the immune system components increased the probability of failure to clear the simulated viral infection. Conclusion The behavior of the BIS matches both normal and pathological behavior patterns in a generic viral infection scenario. Thus, the BIS effectively translates mechanistic cellular and molecular knowledge regarding the innate and adaptive immune response and reproduces the immune system's complex behavioral patterns. The BIS can be used both as an educational tool to demonstrate the emergence of these patterns and as a research tool to systematically identify potential targets for more effective treatment strategies for diseases processes including hypersensitivity reactions (allergies, asthma), autoimmunity and cancer. We believe that the BIS can be a useful addition to the growing suite of in

  4. Basic study of heat flow in fusion welding. Progress report, March 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1981-01-01

    During the past year the study of electroslag welding was essentially completed with good agreement between the experimental and the theoretical results. It is concluded that the ESW process has certain inherent limitations which were not appreciated previously. The study has expanded into a more complete analysis of heat and fluid flow in arc welding. It has been shown that the heat affected zone and fusion zone sizes are not simple functions of the net heat input as predicted by all current theories. This will affect the choice of welding parameters. For example, in single pass arc welds, the smallest HAZ is usually desirable, while in multipass welding large HAZ's may be desirable to provide tempering of the previous weld beads. It may be possible to achieve both these goals at equivalent heat input by proper adjustment of the welding parameters (such as voltage, current and travel speed). Goal of the current study is to predict which combinations of parameters maximize or minimize the size of the heat affected zone and fusion zone at equal heat input.

  5. Quantitative muscle strength assessment in duchenne muscular dystrophy: longitudinal study and correlation with functional measures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to perform a longitudinal assessment using Quantitative Muscle Testing (QMT) in a cohort of ambulant boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to correlate the results of QMT with functional measures. This study is to date the most thorough long-term evaluation of QMT in a cohort of DMD patients correlated with other measures, such as the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) or thee 6-min walk test (6MWT). Methods This is a single centre, prospective, non-randomised, study assessing QMT using the Kin Com® 125 machine in a study cohort of 28 ambulant DMD boys, aged 5 to 12 years. This cohort was assessed longitudinally over a 12 months period of time with 3 monthly assessments for QMT and with assessment of functional abilities, using the NSAA and the 6MWT at baseline and at 12 months only. QMT was also used in a control group of 13 healthy age-matched boys examined at baseline and at 12 months. Results There was an increase in QMT over 12 months in boys below the age of 7.5 years while in boys above the age of 7.5 years, QMT showed a significant decrease. All the average one-year changes were significantly different than those experienced by healthy controls. We also found a good correlation between quantitative tests and the other measures that was more obvious in the stronger children. Conclusion Our longitudinal data using QMT in a cohort of DMD patients suggest that this could be used as an additional tool to monitor changes, providing additional information on segmental strength. PMID:22974002

  6. A Basic Study of Wind Generator Stabilization with Doubly-Fed Asynchronous Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Takahashi, Rion; Nakagawa, Masaki; Murata, Toshiaki; Tamura, Junji

    This paper investigates the function of DASM (Doubly-fed ASynchronous Machine) with emphasis placed on its ability to the stabilization of the power system including wind generators. P (active power) and Q (reactive power) compensation from DASM can be regulated independently through secondary-excitation controlling. Simulation results by PSCAD show that DASM can restore the wind-generator system to a normal operating condition rapidly even following severe transmission-line failures. Comparison studies have also been performed between wind turbine pitch control and proposed method.

  7. A Basic Study Toward Optimization of LFC Resources in Future Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Yoshihiko; Masuda, Ryoichi; Sugita, Shinya

    Load frequency control (LFC) in future power systems, in which a large amount of solar photovoltaic generation is introduced, is studied. The constraints in LFC resources are classified as rate, simple, and energy limits. First the nonlinear transfer functions of the limiters are modeled using random noise input. Second the transfer functions of limiters are characterized by coefficients of necessary facilities (CoNF). Third the appropriateness of concept and identified value of CoNF is demonstrated through numerical simulations using a simple power system model. Also a way to control the contribution of existing and introducing resources to regulation of frequency fluctuation is proposed and demonstrated.

  8. How fast is fisheries-induced evolution? Quantitative analysis of modelling and empirical studies

    PubMed Central

    Audzijonyte, Asta; Kuparinen, Anna; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    A number of theoretical models, experimental studies and time-series studies of wild fish have explored the presence and magnitude of fisheries-induced evolution (FIE). While most studies agree that FIE is likely to be happening in many fished stocks, there are disagreements about its rates and implications for stock viability. To address these disagreements in a quantitative manner, we conducted a meta-analysis of FIE rates reported in theoretical and empirical studies. We discovered that rates of phenotypic change observed in wild fish are about four times higher than the evolutionary rates reported in modelling studies, but correlation between the rate of change and instantaneous fishing mortality (F) was very similar in the two types of studies. Mixed-model analyses showed that in the modelling studies traits associated with reproductive investment and growth evolved slower than rates related to maturation. In empirical observations age-at-maturation was changing faster than other life-history traits. We also found that, despite different assumption and modelling approaches, rates of evolution for a given F value reported in 10 of 13 modelling studies were not significantly different. PMID:23789026

  9. Study of the dehydrochlorination of DDT in basic media in sulfobetaine aqueous micellar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A.; Mar Graciani, M. del; Guinda, A.; Munoz, M.; Moya, M.L.

    2000-04-04

    The reaction of dehydrochlorination of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane, DDT, with hydroxide ions has been studied in aqueous micellar solutions of N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammino-1-propane-sulfonate, SB3-14, and N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate, SB3-16. A simple expression for the observed rate constant, k{sub obs}, based on the pseudophase model, could explain the influence of changes in the surfactant concentration on k{sub obs}. The kinetic effects of added electrolytes (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaNO{sub 3}) on the reaction rate in SB3-14 micellar media have also been studied. They were rationalized by considering the binding of the anions, which come from the added salt, to the sulfobetaine micelles and their competition with the reactive hydroxide ions for the micellar surface. Conductivity measurements have been a helpful tool in the discussion of the kinetic effects of added salts and permitted the estimation of equilibrium constants for the distribution of the anions between the zwitterionic micelles and the aqueous phase.

  10. Separating morphologically similar pollen types using basic shape features from digital images: A preliminary study1

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Katherine A.; Bebbington, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: One of the many advantages offered by automated palynology systems is the ability to vastly increase the number of observations made on a particular sample or samples. This is of particular benefit when attempting to fully quantify the degree of variation within or between closely related pollen types. • Methods: An automated palynology system (Classifynder) has been used to further investigate the variation in pollen morphology between two New Zealand species of Myrtaceae (Leptospermum scoparium and Kunzea ericoides) that are of significance in the New Zealand honey industry. Seven geometric features extracted from automatically gathered digital images were used to characterize the range of shape and size of the two taxa, and to examine the extent of previously reported overlap in these variables. • Results: Our results indicate a degree of overlap in all cases. The narrowest overlap was in measurements of maximum Feret diameter (MFD) in grains oriented in polar view. Multivariate statistical analysis using all seven factors provided the most robust discrimination between the two types. • Discussion: Further work is required before this approach could be routinely applied to separating the two pollen types used in this study, most notably the development of comprehensive reference distributions for the types in question. PMID:25202650

  11. Basic Study for Ultrasound-Based Navigation for Pedicle Screw Insertion Using Transmission and Backscattered Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziqiang; Wu, Bing; Zhai, Xiao; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Luo, Beier; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xu, Kailiang; Liu, Chengcheng; Wang, Chuanfeng; Zhao, Yingchuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Chen, Kai; Yang, Wu; Ta, Dean; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the acoustic properties of human vertebral cancellous bone and to study the feasibility of ultrasound-based navigation for posterior pedicle screw fixation in spinal fusion surgery. Fourteen human vertebral specimens were disarticulated from seven un-embalmed cadavers (four males, three females, 73.14 ± 9.87 years, two specimens from each cadaver). Seven specimens were used to measure the transmission, including tests of attenuation and phase velocity, while the other seven specimens were used for backscattered measurements to inspect the depth of penetration and A-Mode signals. Five pairs of unfocused broadband ultrasonic transducers were used for the detection, with center frequencies of 0.5 MHz, 1 MHz, 1.5 MHz, 2.25 MHz, and 3.5 MHz. As a result, good and stable results were documented. With increased frequency, the attenuation increased (P<0.05), stability of the speed of sound improved (P<0.05), and penetration distance decreased (P>0.05). At about 0.6 cm away from the cortical bone, warning signals were easily observed from the backscattered measurements. In conclusion, the ultrasonic system proved to be an effective, moveable, and real-time imaging navigation system. However, how ultrasonic navigation will benefit pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery needs to be determined. Therefore, ultrasound-guided pedicle screw implantation is theoretically effective and promising. PMID:25861053

  12. Case-Based Lessons: A Quantitative Study of How Case Studies Impact Teacher Efficacy for the Application of Principles of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Kathrine Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to provide a response to the following question: Does the use of video case studies focused on motivation increase undergraduates' sense of efficacy for applying principles of motivation? I examined the proposed research question using quantitative methods over the course of two 10-week quarters.…

  13. Bioresearch Module Design Definition and Space Shuttle Vehicle Integration Study. Volume 1: Basic Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, A. L., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Preliminary designs of the Bioexplorer spacecraft, developed in an earlier study program, are analyzed and updated to conform to a new specification which includes use of both the Scout and the space shuttle vehicle for launch. The updated spacecraft is referred to as bioresearch module. It is capable of supporting a variety of small biological experiments in near-earth and highly elliptical earth orbits. The baseline spacecraft design is compatible with the Scout launch vehicle. Inboard profile drawings, weight statements, interface drawings, and spacecraft parts and aerospace ground equipment lists are provided to document the design. The baseline design was analyzed to determine the design and cost impact of a set of optional features. These include reduced experiment power and thermal load, addition of an experiment television monitor, and replacement of VHF with S-band communications. The impact of these options on power required, weight change and cost is defined.

  14. Study of basic electrostatic radiation shield characteristics on board the Cosmos 605 satellite.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, E E; Riabova, T Y

    1976-01-01

    Direct measurement of conduction currents in the electrostatic radiation shield model carried out on board the Cosmos 605 satellite yielded additional information on the dose, weight and size characteristics and helped to evaluate the power requirements for a real electrostatic radiation shield. It was found that the electrostatic shield power requirements (at an electric field strength of 10(7)V m-1 and total shielded surface of 10(2) m2) did not exceed 10 watts, i.e. it was at least one order of magnitude lower than had been assumed from data obtained in ground-based studies. These results show the feasibility of protective electric fields of the required strength, with the space vacuum around the vehicle being used as an insulating medium. PMID:12678110

  15. Lifelong bound feet in China: a quantitative ultrasound and lifestyle questionnaire study in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ling; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Ming; Xu, Mian; Lao, Hanchang; O'Laughlin, Michael C; Tong, Shan; Zhao, Yanling; Hung, VWY; Cheng, JCY; Guo, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective The phenomenon of foot binding, also known as ‘lotus feet’, has an enduring and influential history in China. To achieve a man-made smaller foot size, lifelong foot binding may have had adverse effects on the skeleton. We investigated bone properties in postmenopausal women with bound feet, which may provide new information for developing countermeasures for prevention of fragility fractures. Design Population-based cohort study. Participants This study involved 254 postmenopausal women aged 65–80, including 172 with bound feet and 82 age- and gender-matched control subjects, living in a remote region of China. Outcomes Anthropometric, SF-36 Lifestyle Questionnaire and heel quantitative ultrasound (QUS) data were collected for the whole study population. A small subset of two cases was also invited for assessment of bone mineral density and microarchitecture at the distal tibia using high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT) and gait and balance tests. Results Women with bound feet had significantly lower QUS values than age-matched women with normal feet; this was supported by HR-pQCT data. However, SF-36 Questionnaire results did not reveal any statistically significant differences in any categorical responses, including physical functioning, general health vitality and physical component summary score, and number of previous fractures. No impairment of body balance was found in the small subset. Conclusions The man-made changes caused by foot binding led to reduced physical activity, making the subjects prone to osteoporosis. Women with bound feet and osteoporosis did not have a higher incidence of fragility fractures than controls. This might be explained by compensation in physical activity to improve body balance, implying the importance of improving or maintaining body balance in overall prevention strategies against fragility fractures. PMID:25783423

  16. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  17. Inflation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    2014-03-01

    metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  18. Magnetoreological Fluid Template for Basic Studies of Mechanical-Chemical Effects During Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Bristol, K. M.; Marino, A.E.; Shafrir, S.N.; DeGroote, J.E.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-01-07

    We developed a new magnetorheological (MR) fluid for studying the relative contributions of mechanics and chemistry in polishing hard materials. The base carrier fluid is a mixture of two non-aqueous liquids. At conventional carbonyl iron (CI) magnetic particle concentrations, removal rates with this formulation were unacceptably low for the polycrystalline optical ceramic aluminum oxynitride (ALON). We overcame this problem by creating a high magnetic solids concentration suspension consisting of blend of large and small CI particles. Our test bed for experiments was a magnetorheological finishing (MRF) spot-taking machine (STM) that can only polish spots into a non-rotating part. We demonstrated that, using this new MR fluid formation, we could substantially increase peak removal rates on ALON with small additions of nonmagnetic, nanodiamond abrasives. Material removal with this fluid was assumed to be predominately driven by mechanics. With the addition of small amounts of DI water to the base fluid containing nanodiamonds, the peak removal rate showed an additional increase, presumably due to the altered fluid rheology and possibly chemical interactions. In this paper we describe the difficult fluid viscosity issues that were addressed in creating a viable, high removal rate, non-aqueous MR fluid template that could be pumped in the STM for several days of experiments.

  19. Petrograhpic and Geochemical Study of the basic and Ultrabasic Xenolithis rocks at Tell Habran (southwest Syria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Safarjalani, Abdulrahman; Al-Hawas, Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    The petrographic and Geochemical study for the Xenoliths associated with the quaternary alkali bases at Tell Habran showed large petrographic differences that reflect various balance conditions, origin and different formation phases being derived either from the lower crustal or the upper mantle origin. Most Quaternary lavas in Syria contain a wide variety of mafic and ultramafic Xenoliths of the lower crustal and the upper mantle origin. Thehost rocks, however are mainly alkali olivine basalt and basanite. The Xenoliths suite have been classified into three main group based on their quantities, texture, mineral component and chemical composition. The first is Cr-diopside Group is the dominant group (65%). It is characterized by protogranular or equigranular texture and subdivided to Spinel. Lherzolite, Hazburgite, Dunites and Wehrilites. Secondly, augite group represent 25% and mostly characterized by fine to medium grained igneous and/ or mosaic texture and subdivided to Websterite. Pyroxenite, Pyroxenite, Kaersutite and Kaersutite Megacrysts. Finally, the Mafic lower crustal xenliths Group represent only 10% and characterized by fine to medium grained, igneous cumulate texture and subdivided to Pyroxen, Granulite, Spinel and Gabbro and Gabbro. The content, location and composition of the minor and major chemical element for the Xenoliths of the upper crustal proved thues were formed as a result of of partially crystallization after the formation of basalts- Xenoliths indicate similar composition to broadly gabbroic (tholeiitic) and its enrichment in rare element (REE) was attributed mostly to the effect of retained solution and the metasomatism that occurred without direct tectonic relation.

  20. Experimental sea slicks: Their practical applications and utilization for basic studies of air-sea interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Garrett, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Practical applications of organic surface films added to the sea surface date back to ancient times. Aristotle, Plutarch, and Pliny the Elder describe the seaman's practice of calming waves in a storm by pouring oil onto the sea [Scott, 1977]. It was also noted that divers released oil beneath the water surface so that it could rise and spread over the sea surface, thereby suppressing the irritating flicker associated with the passage of light through a rippled surface. From a scientific point of view, Benjamin Franklin was the first to perform experiments with oils on natural waters. His experiment with a `teaspoonful of oil' on Clapham pond in 1773 inspired many investigators to consider sea surface phenomena or to conduct experiments with oil films. This early research has been reviewed by Giles [1969], Giles and Forrester [1970], and Scott [1977]. Franklin's studies with experimental slicks can be regarded as the beginning of surface film chemistry. His speculations on the wave damping influence of oil induced him to perform the first qualitative experiment with artificial sea slicks at Portsmouth (England) in October of 1773. Although the sea was calmed and very few white caps appeared in the oil-covered area, the swell continued through the oiled area to Franklin's great disappointment.

  1. Rho-Isp Revisited and Basic Stage Mass Estimating for Launch Vehicle Conceptual Sizing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    The ideal rocket equation is manipulated to demonstrate the essential link between propellant density and specific impulse as the two primary stage performance drivers for a launch vehicle. This is illustrated by examining volume-limited stages such as first stages and boosters. This proves to be a good approximation for first-order or Phase A vehicle design studies for solid rocket motors and for liquid stages, except when comparing to hydrogen-fueled stages. A next-order mass model is developed that is able to model the mass differences between hydrogen-fueled and other stages. Propellants considered range in density from liquid methane to inhibited red fuming nitric acid. Calculated comparisons are shown for solid rocket boosters, liquid first stages, liquid upper stages, and a balloon-deployed single-stage-to-orbit concept. The derived relationships are ripe for inclusion in a multi-stage design space exploration and optimization algorithm, as well as for single-parameter comparisons such as those shown herein.

  2. [Chemotherapy for tuberculosis; yesterday, today, and tomorrow--basic and clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T

    1998-07-01

    The discovery of streptomycin in 1944 had given rise to great flowering of chemotherapy for tuberculosis. The times which triple treatment of SM.PAS.INH after the temporal time of SM.PAS had been standard regimens on initial treatment had continued for more than twenty years. The shortening of duration for chemotherapy had become possible by the introduction of RFP, and the duration had reduced to one fourth compared with that of the regimens till then by the addition of PZA for two months at the beginning of treatment on the initial treatment cases. In this paper, historical aspects of early and present-day chemotherapy of tuberculosis and the reports of main studies have been summarized, and pharmacokinetics of INH, action of antituberculous drugs in short-course chemotherapy, MDR-TB and biological response modifiers for treatment of tuberculosis, etc. has been reviewed. It is urgently awaited that more new drugs without cross resistance to previous drugs will be developed for the more shortening of the duration and the improvement of the treatment for MDR-TB. PMID:9739578

  3. [Basic Studies on the Stability of Flavored Oral Solutions of Rebamipide].

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ryo; Imaoka, Futa; Wako, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Yuko; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Kizu, Junko; Katayama, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Stomatitis frequently occurs during chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer. Because of its pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory activity and stimulatory effects on endogenous prostaglandin synthesis, rebamipide has been suggested as a potentially effective treatment against stomatitis. In the present study we tested the stability of oral rebamipide solutions prepared in our hospital pharmacy using sodium alginate as a thickener to increase retention of this agent in the oral cavity, and the addition of different flavoring mixtures intended for use in enteral diets to reduce the bitterness of rebamipide and sodium alginate. Samples of oral rebamipide solution prepared with 13 kinds of flavoring and sodium alginate were evaluated in terms of their appearance, redispersibility, pH, viscosity, and rebamipide content immediately after preparation and 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after storage at room temperature under ambient light or in a cool, dark place. After 10 days of storage, favorable stability was observed in four sample solutions supplemented with green apple, pineapple, yogurt, and tomato flavoring mixtures intended for use in Elental(®) diets. These oral solutions may have potential clinical application. PMID:26632156

  4. Predicting all-cause mortality from basic physiology in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William B; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-02-01

    Using longitudinal data from a cohort of 1349 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, we show that as early as 28-38 years of age, almost 10% of variation in future lifespan can be predicted from simple clinical parameters. Specifically, we found diastolic and systolic blood pressure, blood glucose, weight, and body mass index (BMI) to be relevant to lifespan. These and similar parameters have been well-characterized as risk factors in the relatively narrow context of cardiovascular disease and mortality in middle to old age. In contrast, we demonstrate here that such measures can be used to predict all-cause mortality from mid-adulthood onward. Further, we find that different clinical measurements are predictive of lifespan in different age regimes. Specifically, blood pressure and BMI are predictive of all-cause mortality from ages 35 to 60, while blood glucose is predictive from ages 57 to 73. Moreover, we find that several of these parameters are best considered as measures of a rate of 'damage accrual', such that total historical exposure, rather than current measurement values, is the most relevant risk factor (as with pack-years of cigarette smoking). In short, we show that simple physiological measurements have broader lifespan-predictive value than indicated by previous work and that incorporating information from multiple time points can significantly increase that predictive capacity. In general, our results apply equally to both men and women, although some differences exist. PMID:26446764

  5. Quantitative cardiac SPECT in three dimensions: validation by experimental phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z.; Ye, J.; Cheng, J.; Li, J.; Harrington, D.

    1998-04-01

    A mathematical framework for quantitative SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) reconstruction of the heart is presented. An efficient simultaneous compensation approach to the reconstruction task is described. The implementation of the approach on a digital computer is delineated. The approach was validated by experimental data acquired from chest phantoms. The phantoms consisted of a cylindrical elliptical tank of Plexiglass, a cardiac insert made of Plexiglass, a spine insert of packed bone meal and lung inserts made of styrofoam beads alone. Water bags were added to simulate different body characteristics. Comparison between the quantitative reconstruction and the conventional FBP (filtered backprojection) method was performed. The FBP reconstruction had a poor quantitative accuracy and varied for different body configurations. Significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy by the quantitative approach was demonstrated with a moderate computing time on a currently available desktop computer. Furthermore, the quantitative reconstruction was robust for different body characteristics. Therefore, the quantitative approach has the potential for clinical use.

  6. Implementation of basic studies in the ecological restoration of surface-mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Tischew, S.; Kirmer, A.

    2007-06-15

    This paper focuses on attempts to encourage a new state of the art in the ecological restoration of surface-mined land in Germany. On most of these sites, the application of traditional recultivation methods often destroys valuable ecological potential by leveling of the surface, ameliorating of nutrient-poor substrates, and seeding or planting of species not suited to the present habitat conditions. Many studies have shown that even highly disturbed ecosystems, such as large mining areas, can regenerate spontaneously over long-term periods. Colonization processes were influenced by the availability of diaspore sources as well as the suitability of sites for establishment. The predictability of succession could be improved by the identification of switch points in successional pathways depending on age and conditions of the sites. Based on the developmental potential, orientation by nature and biodiversity are selected as main targets for priority areas for nature conservation in mining sites. On priority areas restoration measures must be restricted to the use of near-natural methods (e.g., application of fresh, diaspore-rich plant clipping material, dumping of overburden with seed bank and vegetative propagules, seeding of site-specific, local seed mixtures) that are very successful in preventing erosion and accelerating vegetation development. Despite the success of these methods, the transfer of knowledge between scientists, practitioners, and administrative organizations has proved to be insufficient. Therefore, one of the main tasks in ecological restoration must be the inclusion of all stakeholders involved in decision-making processes and the establishment of a network of excellence to enhance the exchange of knowledge.

  7. Quantitative candidate gene association studies of metabolic traits in Han Chinese type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, F J; Cai, C Y; Yu, P; Lv, J; Ling, C; Shi, W T; Jiao, H X; Chang, B C; Yang, F H; Tian, Y; Li, M S; Wang, Y H; Zou, L; Shi, J M; Chen, L M; Li, W D

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many loci associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hyperuricemia, and obesity in various ethnic populations. However, quantitative traits have been less well investigated in Han Chinese T2DM populations. We investigated the association between candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolic syndrome-related quantitative traits in Han Chinese T2DM subjects. Unrelated Han Chinese T2DM patients (1975) were recruited. Eighty-six SNPs were genotyped and tested for association with quantitative traits including lipid profiles, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), serum uric acid (SUA), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma glucose [fasting plasma glucose (FPG)], plasma glucose 120 min post-OGTT (P2PG; OGTT = oral glucose tolerance test), and insulin resistance-related traits. We found that CAMTA1, ABI2, VHL, KAT2B, PKHD1, ESR1, TOX, SLC30A8, SFI1, and MYH9 polymorphisms were associated with HbA1c, FPG, and/or P2PG; GCK, HHEX, TCF7L2, KCNQ1, and TBX5 polymorphisms were associated with insulin resistance-related traits; ABCG2, SLC2A9, and PKHD1 polymorphisms were associated with SUA; CAMTA1, VHL, KAT2B, PON1, NUB1, SLITRK5, SMAD3, FTO, FANCA, and PCSK2 polymorphisms were associated with blood lipid traits; CAMTA1, SPAG16, TOX, KCNQ1, ACACB, and MYH9 polymorphisms were associated with blood pressure; and UBE2E3, SPAG16, SLC2A9, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, TCF7L2, SMAD3, and PNPLA3 polymorphisms were associated with BMI (all P values <0.05). Some of the candidate genes were associated with metabolic and anthropometric traits in T2DM in Han Chinese. Although none of these associations reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 x 10(-8)), genes and loci identified in this study are worthy of further replication and investigation. PMID:26634513

  8. Combined Ex Vivo 9.4T MRI and Quantitative Histopathological Study in Normal and Pathological Neocortical Resections in Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Cheryl; Tachrount, Mohamed; Thomas, David; Michalak, Zuzanna; Liu, Joan; Ellis, Matthew; Diehl, Beate; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Eriksson, Sofia; Yousry, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High‐resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may improve the preoperative diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in epilepsy. Quantitative 9.4T MRI was carried out (T1, T2, T2* and magnetization transfer ratio) on 13 cortical resections, representing pathologically confirmed FCD (five cases) and normal cortex. Quantitative immunohistochemistry for myelination (myelin basic protein/SMI94), neuronal populations [microtubule‐associated protein 2 (MAP2), neurofilament (SMI31, SMI32), synaptophysin, NeuN, calbindin], reactive glia (GFAP), microglia (CD68) and blood–brain barrier permeability (albumin) was carried out in 43 regions of interest (ROI) from normal and abnormal white matter and cortex. MRI was spatially aligned and quantitative analysis carried out on corresponding ROI. Line profile analysis (LPA) of intensity gradients through the cortex was carried out on MRI and immunostained sections. An inverse correlation was noted between myelin/SMI94 and T1, T2 (P < 0.005) and T2* (P < 0.05; Spearman's correlation) and a positive correlation between neuronal MAP2 and T1 (P < 0.005) and T2* (P < 0.05) over all ROI. Similar pathology–MRI correlations were observed for histologically unremarkable white matter ROI only. LPA showed altered gradient contours in regions of FCD, reflecting abnormal cortical lamination and myelo‐architecture, including a preoperatively undetected FCD case. This study demonstrates the ability of quantitative 9.4T MRI to detect subtle differences in neuronal numbers and myelination in histologically normal appearing white matter and LPA in the evaluation of cortical dyslamination. These methods may be translatable to the in vivo detection of mild cortical malformations. PMID:26268959

  9. Combined Ex Vivo 9.4T MRI and Quantitative Histopathological Study in Normal and Pathological Neocortical Resections in Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Cheryl; Tachrount, Mohamed; Thomas, David; Michalak, Zuzanna; Liu, Joan; Ellis, Matthew; Diehl, Beate; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew W; Eriksson, Sofia; Yousry, Tarek; Thom, Maria

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may improve the preoperative diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in epilepsy. Quantitative 9.4T MRI was carried out (T1, T2, T2* and magnetization transfer ratio) on 13 cortical resections, representing pathologically confirmed FCD (five cases) and normal cortex. Quantitative immunohistochemistry for myelination (myelin basic protein/SMI94), neuronal populations [microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), neurofilament (SMI31, SMI32), synaptophysin, NeuN, calbindin], reactive glia (GFAP), microglia (CD68) and blood-brain barrier permeability (albumin) was carried out in 43 regions of interest (ROI) from normal and abnormal white matter and cortex. MRI was spatially aligned and quantitative analysis carried out on corresponding ROI. Line profile analysis (LPA) of intensity gradients through the cortex was carried out on MRI and immunostained sections. An inverse correlation was noted between myelin/SMI94 and T1, T2 (P < 0.005) and T2* (P < 0.05; Spearman's correlation) and a positive correlation between neuronal MAP2 and T1 (P < 0.005) and T2* (P < 0.05) over all ROI. Similar pathology-MRI correlations were observed for histologically unremarkable white matter ROI only. LPA showed altered gradient contours in regions of FCD, reflecting abnormal cortical lamination and myelo-architecture, including a preoperatively undetected FCD case. This study demonstrates the ability of quantitative 9.4T MRI to detect subtle differences in neuronal numbers and myelination in histologically normal appearing white matter and LPA in the evaluation of cortical dyslamination. These methods may be translatable to the in vivo detection of mild cortical malformations. PMID:26268959

  10. Determining the basic characteristics of aerosols suitable for studies of deposition in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Legáth, L; Naus, A; Halík, J

    1988-01-01

    Studies of aerosol particle deposition in the respiratory tract requires experimental inhalation of artificial model aerosols. The paper formulates some of the most important requirements for the properties of such aerosols. Several suitable fractions were prepared as part of a research project dealing with the use of microporous polymers for diagnostic purposes. 5 fractions of the polymer designated G-gel 60 with the particle size as stated by the manufacturer, ranging from 3 to 7 micron were evaluated using a 16-channel particle dispersity analyzer HIAC/ROYCO MT 3210 with the sensor 1200 and operated by a microprocessor, the equipment being coupled to an APPLE IIe computer. G-gel 60 particles introduced into the aerosol were characterized by the parameters CMAD, MMAD and sg both numerically and graphically. The measurement procedure was found to be very sensitive with respect to all fractions in evaluating the subtile differences between different lot numbers of the aerosol. G-gel 60 fractions characterized both numerically and graphically were compared with the known aerosols from paraffin oil and atmospheric air. The equipment MT 3210 enables prompt determination of the percentages of aerosol particles distribution by size class. The authors conclude that the procedure, both in its numerical and graphical versions, is particularly suitable for the diagnosis of aerosol particles deposition in the respiratory tract, offering a new application for HIAC/ROYCO in the field of medicine. In evaluating atmospheric aerosol in exhaled air, the number of particles was found to be below that in inhaled air, the difference being dependent on the choice of investigation methods. Percentual distribution of deposited particles following one minute ventilation proved to be at its maximum, as regards atmospheric aerosol, in the 0.30-0.50 micron range. The deposition curve was similar to already published curves, being characterized by an S-shaped pattern with maximum deposition

  11. A quantitative μNRA study of helium intergranular and volume diffusion in sintered UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Desgardin, P.; Sauvage, T.; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Khodja, H.; Barthe, M. F.

    2006-08-01

    To understand the mechanisms related to helium migration in nuclear oxide fuels, 3He was implanted at 2 × 1016 at. cm-2 in UO2 sintered disks. The samples were then annealed at temperatures ranging between 800 °C and 1300 °C. Changes in helium concentrations were investigated using two nuclear reaction analysis techniques based on the 3He(d, α)1H reaction. The first technique uses a macrobeam in order to measure helium depth profiles averaged over a 500 × 500 μm2 area. The second technique uses a microbeam and provides a quantitative two-dimensional helium concentration cartography, for which each pixel corresponds to a depth integrated helium signal. The analysed zones were optically characterised which enabled a detailed analysis of the impact of the material microstructure on helium release from the samples, with an emphasis on the study of grain boundary effects.

  12. Quantitative structure retention relationship studies for predicting relative retention times of chlorinated phenols on gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yin; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Xu, Shi-Fen; Yao, Shu-Chun; Wang, Lian-Sheng

    2002-07-01

    A new method of quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) studies was reported for predicting gas chromatography (GC) relative retention times (RRTs) of chlorinated phenols (CPs) using a DB-5 column. Chemical descriptors were calculated from the molecular structure of CPs and related to their gas chromatographic RRTs by using multiple linear regression analysis. The proposed model had a multiple square correlation coefficient R2 = 0.970, standard error SE = 0.0472, and significant level P = 0.0000. The QSRR model also reveals that the gas chromatographic relative retention times of CPs are associated with physicochemical property interactions with the stationary phase, and influenced by the number of chlorine and oxygen in the CP mOlecules. PMID:12211996

  13. Quantitative medical imaging: Initial studies of noncontact ultrasound applied to cortical bone phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halcrow, Peter William

    The purpose of this study was to take the initial steps towards applying Noncontact Ultrasound (NCU) to the in vivo monitoring of osteoporosis and to skeletal quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) using cortical bone phantoms. This project sought additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing third-degree burns. With this noncontact ultrasound imaging system, noncontact transducers and cortical bone phantoms with known bone mineral density (BMD) were used to determine speed of sound (SOS), integrated acoustical response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were used to collect data. Significant correlations between BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained. These NCU results were shown to be in agreement with results from contact ultrasound within 1-2%, which suggests that NCU might find additional applications in a clinical setting in the future in medical imaging.

  14. Quantitative sputum cell counts to monitor bronchitis: A qualitative study of physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    D’silva, Liesel; Neighbour, Helen; Gafni, Amiram; Radford, Katherine; Hargreave, Frederick E; Nair, Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    Many common diseases affecting the airways are characterized by airway inflammation. The measurement of this inflammation has a significant role in the management of these diseases. Quantitative sputum cell counts provide a measurement of the type and severity of inflammation present. Sputum cell counts are used in routine clinical practice in some centres but their use is not widespread. The present study used a standardized questionnaire to determine both patients’ and physicians’ attitudes toward the use of sputum cell counts. The use of sputum cell counts was well accepted by patients and physicians. Ninety per cent of patients were satisfied with the test. Sixty per cent of family physicians were satisfied with the test and 80% were in favour of it being funded by the government. The authors recommend more widespread use of sputum cell counts to guide the management of airway diseases. PMID:23457675

  15. CNS effects of citalopram, a new serotonin inhibitor antidepressant (a quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalography study).

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Bozak, M M; Itil, K Z

    1984-01-01

    Citalopram, a new phthalane derivative and a specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitor in animal pharmacological tests, was evaluated in a double-blind, crossover, quantitative pharmaco-EEG (QPEEGTM) study in healthy human volunteers. The CNS effects of citalopram are linear, dose- and time-related, can statistically be differentiated from placebo, and indicate a rapid onset of effects with short duration. According to the Computer Data Bank, citalopram has a mode of action similar to mood elevators (antidepressants) with fewer sedative properties. Thus the therapeutic action of citalopram is predicted to be similar to desipramine and protriptyline from the tricyclics, and fluvoxamine from non-tricyclics. According to data bank assessment, it is hypothesized that the single antidepressant dose of citalopram is to be more than 25 mg, which should be given t.i.d. in clinical trials. PMID:6592676

  16. Characterization of the key aroma compounds in Shiraz wine by quantitation, aroma reconstitution, and omission studies.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Christine M; Geue, Jason P; Holt, Helen E; Pearson, Wes P; Jeffery, David W; Francis, I Leigh

    2014-05-21

    The key aroma compounds of premium Australian Shiraz wines from the warm Barossa Valley and cooler Margaret River regions were characterized. GC-Olfactometry was conducted to determine the most important volatile compounds, which were then quantitated. The wine from the Barossa Valley had higher concentrations of ethyl propanoate, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and oak-derived compounds, whereas the Margaret River wine contained above threshold concentrations of the 'cheesy' compounds 2- and 3-methylbutanoic acid, as well as rotundone, the 'pepper'-smelling compound. The aromas were reconstituted by combining 44 aroma compounds, and sensory descriptive analysis was used to investigate the importance of the omission of several compounds, including DMS, rotundone, fatty acids, and β-damascenone, and the influence of nonvolatiles was also assessed. The study showed that the aroma of the Shiraz wines could be reconstituted in both cases, with the changes in the nonvolatile fraction having a large influence. PMID:24745791

  17. [Basic and clinical studies on tazobactam/piperacillin in pediatric field].

    PubMed

    Motohiro, T; Nagai, K; Yamada, T; Oki, S; Yamada, T; Yoshinaga, Y; Tsumura, N; Oda, K; Sakata, Y; Kato, H; Imai, S; Morita, J; Matsuo, Y; Ikezawa, S; Takahgashi, K; Fukuda, T; Yamashita, Y; Aramaki, M; Hayashi, M; Yamakawa, R; Ono-E; Tananari, Y; Tsutsumi, T; Hoshuyama, A; Aida, K

    1998-06-01

    former value was similar to those of PIPC, DMPPC, CTM, and CTX, and the latter was similar to those of PIPC, DMPPC, CTX, and SBT/CPZ. Of 4 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2 strains were inhibited at 0.05 microgram/ml, and the others at 1.56 micrograms/ml; both values were similar to those of PIPC, SBT/CPZ. As for Gram-negative bacilli, 6 of 7 strains of H. influenzae did not produce beta-lactamase and 1 strain was a high producer. The MICs of TAZ/PIPC against beta-lactamase nonproducing strains were < or = 0.025 microgram/ml in 5 strains and 0.39 microgram/ml in 1 strain, and the values were similar to those of PIPC and SBT/CPZ. While the MIC of TAZ/PIPC against the high beta-lactamase producing strain was 0.78 microgram/ml; similar to that of SBT/CPZ and smaller than that of PIPC. 2. The results of clinical effects on 7 diseases in 33 cases were as follows: TAZ/PIPC was clinically judged "excellent" in 17 (51.5%); good in 14 (42.4%); fair in 2 (6.1%). No case with no response was seen in this study, and the total efficacy rate of "excellent" and "good" was 93.9%. 3. Bacteriological effects were evaluated in 17 strains of 4 species, and all of them were eradicated. 4. Adverse reactions were judged in 35, which consisted of 33 in which the clinical effects were evaluated and 2 dropped from this study. Of these cases, diarrhea was observed in 4 (11.4%). 5. Laboratory tests revealed an increase in platelets in 1 of 32 cases (3.1%), and eosinophilia in 2 of 29 cases (6.9%). Biochemical profile showed an increase in GPT alone and abnormal increases in both GOT and GPT in 1 each out of 21 cases. PMID:9755831

  18. Inferring Quantitative Trait Pathways Associated with Bull Fertility from a Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Weigel, Kent A.; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome association studies typically focus on genetic markers with the strongest evidence of association. However, single markers often explain only a small component of the genetic variance and hence offer a limited understanding of the trait under study. As such, the objective of this study was to perform a pathway-based association analysis in Holstein dairy cattle in order to identify relevant pathways involved in bull fertility. The results of a single-marker association analysis, using 1,755 bulls with sire conception rate data and genotypes for 38,650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were used in this study. A total of 16,819 annotated genes, including 2,767 significantly associated with bull fertility, were used to interrogate a total of 662 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 248 InterPro (IP) entries using a test of proportions based on the cumulative hypergeometric distribution. After multiple-testing correction, 20 GO categories and one IP entry showed significant overrepresentation of genes statistically associated with bull fertility. Several of these functional categories such as small GTPases mediated signal transduction, neurogenesis, calcium ion binding, and cytoskeleton are known to be involved in biological processes closely related to male fertility. These results could provide insight into the genetic architecture of this complex trait in dairy cattle. In addition, this study shows that quantitative trait pathways inferred from single-marker analyses could enhance our interpretations of the results of genome-wide association studies. PMID:23335935

  19. Involution of human fetal Leydig cells. An immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and quantitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Codesal, J; Regadera, J; Nistal, M; Regadera-Sejas, J; Paniagua, R

    1990-01-01

    The testes of stillborn fetuses (from 13 to 28 weeks of gestational age), fetuses born alive (from 29 weeks of gestational age) who died a few days later, and infants dying 1 to 8 months after birth were processed for light and electron microscopy. Paraffin-embedded material was stained with the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex (ABC) method for immunohistochemical detection of testosterone (T) in order to quantify the age-related changes in the number of T-positive interstitial cells. This number decreased progressively from the 24th week of gestation up to birth and remained unchanged up to the second month of postnatal life. During the third month of age, the number of T-positive cells rose markedly but fell again from the fourth month to the end of the study. The ultrastructural study revealed the following types of interstitial cells at all ages studied: fibroblast-like cells, myofibroblast-like cells, developed fetal Leydig cells, degenerating fetal Leydig cells and infantile Leydig cells with a multilobed nucleus and focal cytoplasmic accumulations of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplets. Quantitative ultrastructural studies revealed that the changes in the number of fetal Leydig cells with age were similar to those found in the number of T-positive cells although, for each age studied, absolute values were higher in the ultrastructural study. The number of infantile Leydig cells increased with age. Images Figs. 1-4 Figs. 5-9 Figs. 10-11 PMID:2272896

  20. Quantitative study of effects of free cationic chains on gene transfection in different intracellular stages.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinge; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Yanjing; Jin, Zhenyu; Jin, Fan; Wu, Chi

    2016-09-28

    Previously, we revealed that in the application of using cationic polymer chains, polyethylenimine (PEI), to condense anionic plasmid DNA chains (pDNA) to form the DNA/polymer polyplexes, after all the pDNAs are complexed with PEI, further added PEIs exist individual chains and free in the solution mixture. It is those uncomplexed polycation chains that dramatically promote the gene transfection. In the current study, we studied how those free cationic chains with different lengths and topologies affect the intracellular trafficking of the polyplexes, the translocation of pDNA through the nuclear membrane, the transcription of pDNA to mRNA and the translocation of mRNA from nucleus to cytosol in HepG2 cells by using a combination of the three-dimensional confocal microscope and TaqMan real-time PCR. We found that free branched PEI chains with a molar mass of 25,000g/mol and a total concentration of 1.8×10(-6)g/mL promote the overall gene transfection efficiency by a factor of ~500 times. Our results quantitatively reveal that free chains help little in the cellular uptake, but clearly reduce the lysosomal entrapment of those internalized polyplexes (2-3 folds); assist the translocation of pDNA through nuclear membrane after it is released from the polyplexes in the cytosol (~5 folds); enhance the pDNA-to-mRNA transcription efficiency (~4 folds); and facilitate the nucleus-to-cytosol translocation of mRNA (7-8 folds). The total enhancement of those steps agrees well with the overall efficiency, demonstrating, for the first time, how free cationic polymer chains quantitatively promote the gene transfection in each step in the intracellular space. PMID:27448443

  1. Quantitative electron microscopic study of the intracellular localization of wheat germ agglutinin in retinal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.H.; Stieber, A.; Gonatas, N.K.

    1986-12-15

    Previous work has established that, following endocytosis, wheat germ agglutinin, like a number of other plasma membrane bound ligands, is transported to the Golgi apparatus-complex. Previous studies that provided qualitative information about the intracellular distribution of internalized wheat germ agglutinin used techniques that precluded any quantitative conclusions about the relative magnitude of the labeling of endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus-complex. Using quantitative ultrastructural autoradiography, this study compares the time course and relative magnitude of labeling of various intracellular compartments to the labeling in the Golgi area. Fifteen minutes after intraocular injection, wheat germ agglutinin is confined to the inner surface of the retina and the immediate subsurface neuropil with little labeling of the retinal ganglion cell perikarya. Thirty minutes after injection, the plasma membrane (6.97 +/- 1.17), endosomes (10.27 +/- 3.98), smooth vesicles and tubules (1.94 +/- 1.66), and lysosomes (2.42 +/- 1.21) of the retinal ganglion cells are labeled, while the Golgi apparatus-complex is not labeled (0.29 +/- 0.25). The relative labeling density of the plasma membrane and endosomes decreases somewhat during the next 90 minutes (plasma membrane, 4.76 +/- 0.67; endosomes, 7.23 +/- 2.02), while the labeling density of smooth vesicles and tubules and of lysosomes rises (smooth vesicles and tubules, 5.56 +/- 0.94; lysosomes, 7.76 +/- 1.56). The Golgi apparatus-complex, which is unlabeled at 30 minutes, is weakly labeled at 2 hours (1.26 +/- 0.28).

  2. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kolasinski, James; Chance, Steven A.; DeLuca, Gabriele C.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Chang, Eun-Hyuk; Palace, Jacqueline A.; McNab, Jennifer A.; Jenkinson, Mark; Miller, Karla L.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional

  3. The basics of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    To what extent can we distinguish one probability distribution from another? Are there quantitative measures of distinguishability? The goal of this tutorial is to approach such questions by introducing the notion of the "distance" between two probability distributions and exploring some basic ideas of such an "information geometry".

  4. A Quantitative Study Investigating Supervisory Style, Satisfaction with Supervision and Self-Efficacy among Female Clinical Training Supervisees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terranova-Nirenberg, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    This non-experimental quantitative study investigated the relationship between supervisory style, satisfaction with supervision, and the level of self-efficacy reported by the study participants. The study was based on counselor supervision theories found in the literature. The study investigated whether there was a difference between traditional…

  5. Perception of mobbing during the study: results of a national quantitative research among Slovenian midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Došler, Anita Jug; Skubic, Metka; Mivšek, Ana Polona

    2014-09-01

    Mobbing, defined as sustained harassment among workers, in particular towards subordinates, merits investigation. This study aims to investigate Slovenian midwifery students' (2nd and 3rd year students of midwifery at the Faculty for Health Studies Ljubljana; the single educational institution for midwives in Slovenia) perception of mobbing, since management of acceptable behavioural interrelationships in midwifery profession forms already during the study, through professional socialization. Descriptive and causal-nonexperimental method with questionnaire was used. Basic descriptive statistics and measures for calculating statistical significance were carried out with SPSS 20.0 software version. All necessary ethical measures were taken into the consideration during the study to protect participants. The re- sults revealed that several participants experienced mobbing during the study (82.3%); 58.8% of them during their practical training and 23.5% from midwifery teachers. Students are often anxious and nervous in face of clinical settings (60.8%) or before faculty commitments (exams, presentations etc.) (41.2%). A lot of them (40.4%) estimate that mobbing affected their health. They did not show effective strategies to solve relationship problems. According to the findings, everyone involved in midwifery education, but above all students, should be provided with more knowledge and skills on successful management of conflict situations. PMID:25507371

  6. Perception of mobbing during the study: results of a national quantitative research among Slovenian midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Došler, Anita Jug; Skubic, Metka; Mivšek, Ana Polona

    2014-09-01

    Mobbing, defined as sustained harassment among workers, in particular towards subordinates, merits investigation. This study aims to investigate Slovenian midwifery students' (2nd and 3rd year students of midwifery at the Faculty for Health Studies Ljubljana; the single educational institution for midwives in Slovenia) perception of mobbing, since management of acceptable behavioural interrelationships in midwifery profession forms already during the study, through professional socialization. Descriptive and causal-nonexperimental method with questionnaire was used. Basic descriptive statistics and measures for calculating statistical significance were carried out with SPSS 20.0 software version. All necessary ethical measures were taken into the consideration during the study to protect participants. The re- sults revealed that several participants experienced mobbing during the study (82.3%); 58.8% of them during their practical training and 23.5% from midwifery teachers. Students are often anxious and nervous in face of clinical settings (60.8%) or before faculty commitments (exams, presentations etc.) (41.2%). A lot of them (40.4%) estimate that mobbing affected their health. They did not show effective strategies to solve relationship problems. According to the findings, everyone involved in midwifery education, but above all students, should be provided with more knowledge and skills on successful management of conflict situations. PMID:25420387

  7. Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Robert A; Lai, Barry; Holmes, William R; Lee, Daewoo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how single cell quantitative and subcellular metallomics inform us about both the spatial distribution and cellular mechanisms of metal buffering and homeostasis in primary cultured neurons from embryonic rat brain, which are often used as models of human disease involving metal dyshomeostasis. The present studies utilized synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and focused primarily on zinc and iron, two abundant metals in neurons that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Total single cell contents for calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and nickel were determined. Resting steady state zinc showed a diffuse distribution in both soma and processes, best defined by the mass profile of the neuron with an enrichment in the nucleus compared with the cytoplasm. Zinc buffering and homeostasis was studied using two modes of cellular zinc loading - transporter and ionophore (pyrithione) mediated. Single neuron zinc contents were shown to statistically significantly increase by either loading method - ionophore: 160 million to 7 billion; transporter 160 million to 280 million atoms per neuronal soma. The newly acquired and buffered zinc still showed a diffuse distribution. Soma and processes have about equal abilities to take up zinc via transporter mediated pathways. Copper levels are distributed diffusely as well, but are relatively higher in the processes relative to zinc levels. Prior studies have observed iron puncta in certain cell types, but others have not. In the present study, iron puncta were characterized in several primary neuronal types. The results show that iron puncta could be found in all neuronal types studied and can account for up to 50% of the total steady state content of iron in neuronal soma. Although other metals can be present in iron puncta, they are predominantly iron containing and do not appear to be

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of Macrophage Expression Using CD68 in Oral Submucous Fibrosis: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, T; Naik, S; Tamgadge, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Macrophages are important cells for the innate immunity. Circulating monocytes are attracted to tissues by chemotactic factors and become macrophages under the influence of their microenvironment. Several studies suggested that local and systemic upregulation of fibrogenic cytokines and downregulation of antifibrotic cytokine are central to the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF). Currently, there have been no attempts made to elucidate the presence and role of macrophages in OSMF. Aim: Our aim was to study the expression of CD68 in OSMF patients and to investigate the possible correlation of macrophages using CD68 in various histopathological grades of OSMF. Subjects and Methods: A prospective case–control study which included 40 patients was conducted after obtaining informed consent and Ethical Committee clearance. Ten cases were normal control and thirty cases had OSMF. Biopsy was performed and a quantitative study of macrophages was done using CD68 antigen and was immunohistochemically localized. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17.0 version (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: OSMF was observed in male patients of a younger age group. The macrophage number in the patients of intermediate and advanced stage of OSMF was higher than that of the controls which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that CD68 plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of OSMF and can be regarded as a useful marker for assessing the progress of the disease. PMID:27057383

  9. What Are We Doing When We Translate from Quantitative Models?

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, Thomas S; Reed, Derek D

    2009-01-01

    Although quantitative analysis (in which behavior principles are defined in terms of equations) has become common in basic behavior analysis, translational efforts often examine everyday events through the lens of narrative versions of laboratory-derived principles. This approach to translation, although useful, is incomplete because equations may convey concepts that are difficult to capture in words. To support this point, we provide a nontechnical introduction to selected aspects of quantitative analysis; consider some issues that translational investigators (and, potentially, practitioners) confront when attempting to translate from quantitative models; and discuss examples of relevant translational studies. We conclude that, where behavior-science translation is concerned, the quantitative features of quantitative models cannot be ignored without sacrificing conceptual precision, scientific and practical insights, and the capacity of the basic and applied wings of behavior analysis to communicate effectively. PMID:22478533

  10. The Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Inflammatory Processes in Atherosclerosis: Evidence from Basic Research and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Pende, Aldo; Mach, François

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the renin-angiotensin system is a crucial player in atherosclerotic processes. The regulation of arterial blood pressure was considered from its first description of the main mechanism involved. Vasoconstriction (mediated by angiotensin II) and salt and water retention (mainly due to aldosterone) were classically considered as pivotal proatherosclerotic activities. However, basic research and animal studies strongly support angiotensin II as a proinflammatory mediator, which directly induces atherosclerotic plaque development and heart remodeling. Furthermore, angiotensin II induces proatherosclerotic cytokine and chemokine secretion and increases endothelial dysfunction. Accordingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system improves prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease even in settings of normal baseline blood pressure. In the present review, we focused on angiotensin-convertingenzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and renin inhibitors to update the direct activities of the renin-angiotensin system in inflammatory processes governing atherosclerosis. PMID:19390623

  11. Histopathological and ultrastructural studies of synovium in Milwaukee shoulder syndrome--a basic calcium phosphate crystal arthropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Halverson, P B; Garancis, J C; McCarty, D J

    1984-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic study of synovial specimens from four patients with the Milwaukee shoulder syndrome disclosed vascular congestion, villous and focal synovial lining cell hyperplasia, occasional giant cells, and fibrin deposition both within and on the surface of the synovium. Although these changes are non-specific, the finding of basic calcium phosphate crystal aggregates in all four cases and the near total absence of an inflammatory reaction are helpful in distinguishing this condition from other types of arthritis. The focal areas of synovial cell hyperplasia may relate to the powerful mitogenic effect of both synthetic and naturally occurring calcium-containing crystals in concentrations found in the synovial fluid of these patients. Images PMID:6497465

  12. A Basic Study on Countermeasure Against Aerodynamic Force Acting on Train Running Inside Tunnel Using Air Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Nakade, Koji

    A basic study of flow controls using air blowing was conducted to reduce unsteady aerodynamic force acting on trains running in tunnels. An air blowing device is installed around a model car in a wind tunnel. Steady and periodic blowings are examined utilizing electromagnetic valves. Pressure fluctuations are measured and the aerodynamic force acting on the car is estimated. The results are as follows: a) The air blowing allows reducing the unsteady aerodynamic force. b) It is effective to blow air horizontally at the lower side of the car facing the tunnel wall. c) The reduction rate of the unsteady aerodynamic force relates to the rate of momentum of the blowing to that of the uniform flow. d) The periodic blowing with the same frequency as the unsteady aerodynamic force reduces the aerodynamic force in a manner similar to the steady blowing.

  13. Preparation of Zirconia Supported Basic Nanocatalyst: A Physicochemical and Kinetic Study of Biodiesel Production from Soybean Oil.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pramod; Pratap, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia supported cadmium oxide basic nanocatalyst was prepared by simple co-precipitation method using aq. ammonia as precipitating reagent. The catalyst was characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy technique (TEM), Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area measurement (BET), temperature program desorption (TPD-CO2) etc. The transesterificaton of soybean oil with methanol into biodiesel was catalysed by employing zirconia supported nanocatalyst. Kinetics of transesterificaton of oil was studied and obeyed the pseudo first order equation. While, the activation energy (Ea) for the transesterification of oil was found to be 41.18 kJ mol(-1). The 97% yield of biodiesel was observed using 7% catalyst loading (with respect of oil), 1:40 molar ratio of oil to methanol at 135°C. PMID:26972461

  14. Pedagogical implications of approaches to study in distance learning: developing models through qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Carnwell, R

    2000-05-01

    The need for flexibility in the delivery of nurse education has been identified by various initiatives including: widening the entry gate; continuous professional development; and the specialist practitioner. Access to degree level programmes is creating the need to acquire academic credit through flexible learning. The aim of this study was to further develop relationships between the need for guidance, materials design and learning styles and strategies and how these impact upon the construction of meaning. The study is based on interviews of 20 female community nurses purposively selected from the 96 respondents who had previously completed a survey questionnaire. The interviews were underpinned by theories relating to learning styles and approaches to study. Of particular concern was how these variables are mediated by student context, personal factors and materials design, to influence the need for support and guidance. The interview transcripts were first analysed using open and axial coding. Three approaches to study emerged from the data - systematic waders, speedy-focusers and global dippers - which were linked to other concepts and categories. Categories were then assigned numerical codes and subjected to logistical regression analysis. The attributes of the three approaches to study, arising from both qualitative and quantitative analysis, are explained in detail. The pedagogical implications of the three approaches to study are explained by their predicted relationships to other variables, such as support and guidance, organization of study, materials design and role of the tutor. The global dipper approach is discussed in more detail due to its association with a variety of predictor variables, not associated with the other two approaches to study. A feedback model is then developed to explore the impact of guidance on the global dipper approach. The paper makes recommendations for guidance to students using different approaches to study in distance

  15. Experimental study of flash boiling spray vaporization through quantitative vapor concentration and liquid temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaoming; Hung, David L. S.; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    Flash boiling sprays of liquid injection under superheated conditions provide the novel solutions of fast vaporization and better air-fuel mixture formation for internal combustion engines. However, the physical mechanisms of flash boiling spray vaporization are more complicated than the droplet surface vaporization due to the unique bubble generation and boiling process inside a superheated bulk liquid, which are not well understood. In this study, the vaporization of flash boiling sprays was investigated experimentally through the quantitative measurements of vapor concentration and liquid temperature. Specifically, the laser-induced exciplex fluorescence technique was applied to distinguish the liquid and vapor distributions. Quantitative vapor concentration was obtained by correlating the intensity of vapor-phase fluorescence with vapor concentration through systematic corrections and calibrations. The intensities of two wavelengths were captured simultaneously from the liquid-phase fluorescence spectra, and their intensity ratios were correlated with liquid temperature. The results show that both liquid and vapor phase of multi-hole sprays collapse toward the centerline of the spray with different mass distributions under the flash boiling conditions. Large amount of vapor aggregates along the centerline of the spray to form a "gas jet" structure, whereas the liquid distributes more uniformly with large vortexes formed in the vicinity of the spray tip. The vaporization process under the flash boiling condition is greatly enhanced due to the intense bubble generation and burst. The liquid temperature measurements show strong temperature variations inside the flash boiling sprays with hot zones present in the "gas jet" structure and vortex region. In addition, high vapor concentration and closed vortex motion seem to have inhibited the heat and mass transfer in these regions. In summary, the vapor concentration and liquid temperature provide detailed information

  16. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tian; Zhou Jun; Yoshida, Emi J.; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Schiff, Peter B.; Wang, Tony J.C.; Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza; Zhang Pengpeng; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

  17. Spectroscopic and Chemometric Analysis of Binary and Ternary Edible Oil Mixtures: Qualitative and Quantitative Study.

    PubMed

    Jović, Ozren; Smolić, Tomislav; Primožič, Ines; Hrenar, Tomica

    2016-04-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy coupled with the multivariate numerical methodology for qualitative and quantitative analysis of binary and ternary edible oil mixtures. Four pure oils (extra virgin olive oil, high oleic sunflower oil, rapeseed oil, and sunflower oil), as well as their 54 binary and 108 ternary mixtures, were analyzed using FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in combination with principal component and discriminant analysis, partial least-squares, and principal component regression. It was found that the composition of all 166 samples can be excellently represented using only the first three principal components describing 98.29% of total variance in the selected spectral range (3035-2989, 1170-1140, 1120-1100, 1093-1047, and 930-890 cm(-1)). Factor scores in 3D space spanned by these three principal components form a tetrahedral-like arrangement: pure oils being at the vertices, binary mixtures at the edges, and ternary mixtures on the faces of a tetrahedron. To confirm the validity of results, we applied several cross-validation methods. Quantitative analysis was performed by minimization of root-mean-square error of cross-validation values regarding the spectral range, derivative order, and choice of method (partial least-squares or principal component regression), which resulted in excellent predictions for test sets (R(2) > 0.99 in all cases). Additionally, experimentally more demanding gas chromatography analysis of fatty acid content was carried out for all specimens, confirming the results obtained by FTIR-ATR coupled with principal component analysis. However, FTIR-ATR provided a considerably better model for prediction of mixture composition than gas chromatography, especially for high oleic sunflower oil. PMID:26971405

  18. Intraoral somatosensory abnormalities in patients with atypical odontalgia – a controlled multicenter quantitative sensory testing study

    PubMed Central

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Pigg, Maria; Ivanovic, Susanne El’Masry; Faris, Hanan; List, Thomas; Drangsholt, Mark; Svensson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Intraoral somatosensory sensitivity in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) has not been investigated systematically according to the most recent guidelines. The aims of this study were to: 1. Examine intraoral somatosensory disturbances in AO patients using healthy subjects as reference and 2. Evaluate the percent agreement between intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) and qualitative sensory testing (QualST). Forty-seven AO patients and 69 healthy controls were included at Universities of Washington, Malmö and Aarhus. In AO patients, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed on the painful site, the corresponding contralateral site and at thenar. In healthy subjects, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed bilaterally on the upper premolar gingiva and at thenar. Thirteen QST and 3 QualST parameters were evaluated at each site, z-scores were computed for AO patients based on the healthy reference material and LossGain scores were created. 87.3% of AO patients had QST abnormalities compared with controls. The most frequent somatosensory abnormalities in AO patients were somatosensory gain with regard to painful mechanical and cold stimuli and somatosensory loss with regard to cold detection and mechanical detection. The most frequent LossGain code was L0G2 (no somatosensory loss with gain of mechanical somatosensory function)(31.9% of AO patients). Percent agreement between corresponding QST and QualST measures of thermal and mechanical sensitivity ranged between 55.6 and 70.4% in AO patients and between 71.1 and 92.1% in controls. In conclusion, intraoral somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in AO patients and agreement between quantitative and qualitative sensory testing was good to excellent. PMID:23725780

  19. Intraoral somatosensory abnormalities in patients with atypical odontalgia--a controlled multicenter quantitative sensory testing study.

    PubMed

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Pigg, Maria; Ivanovic, Susanne Eímasry; Faris, Hanan; List, Thomas; Drangsholt, Mark; Svensson, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Intraoral somatosensory sensitivity in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) has not been investigated systematically according to the most recent guidelines. The aims of this study were to examine intraoral somatosensory disturbances in AO patients using healthy subjects as reference, and to evaluate the percent agreement between intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST) and qualitative sensory testing (QualST). Forty-seven AO patients and 69 healthy control subjects were included at Universities of Washington, Malmö, and Aarhus. In AO patients, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed on the painful site, the corresponding contralateral site, and at thenar. In healthy subjects, intraoral somatosensory testing was performed bilaterally on the upper premolar gingiva and at thenar. Thirteen QST and 3 QualST parameters were evaluated at each site, z-scores were computed for AO patients based on the healthy reference material, and LossGain scores were created. Compared with control subjects, 87.3% of AO patients had QST abnormalities. The most frequent somatosensory abnormalities in AO patients were somatosensory gain with regard to painful mechanical and cold stimuli and somatosensory loss with regard to cold detection and mechanical detection. The most frequent LossGain code was L0G2 (no somatosensory loss with gain of mechanical somatosensory function) (31.9% of AO patients). Percent agreement between corresponding QST and QualST measures of thermal and mechanical sensitivity ranged between 55.6% and 70.4% in AO patients and between 71.1% and 92.1% in control subjects. In conclusion, intraoral somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in AO patients, and agreement between quantitative and qualitative sensory testing was good to excellent. PMID:23725780

  20. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  1. Hydroponic isotope labelling of entire plants (HILEP) for quantitative plant proteomics; an oxidative stress case study.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Palmblad, Magnus; Cramer, Rainer

    2008-07-01

    Hydroponic isotope labelling of entire plants (HILEP) is a cost-effective method enabling metabolic labelling of whole and mature plants with a stable isotope such as (15)N. By utilising hydroponic media that contain (15)N inorganic salts as the sole nitrogen source, near to 100% (15)N-labelling of proteins can be achieved. In this study, it is shown that HILEP, in combination with mass spectrometry, is suitable for relative protein quantitation of seven week-old Arabidopsis plants submitted to oxidative stress. Protein extracts from pooled (14)N- and (15)N-hydroponically grown plants were fractionated by SDS-PAGE, digested and analysed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Proteins were identified and the spectra of (14)N/(15)N peptide pairs were extracted using their m/z chromatographic retention time, isotopic distributions, and the m/z difference between the (14)N and (15)N peptides. Relative amounts were calculated as the ratio of the sum of the peak areas of the two distinct (14)N and (15)N peptide isotope envelopes. Using Mascot and the open source trans-proteomic pipeline (TPP), the data processing was automated for global proteome quantitation down to the isoform level by extracting isoform specific peptides. With this combination of metabolic labelling and mass spectrometry it was possible to show differential protein expression in the apoplast of plants submitted to oxidative stress. Moreover, it was possible to discriminate between differentially expressed isoforms belonging to the same protein family, such as isoforms of xylanases and pathogen-related glucanases (PR 2). PMID:18538804

  2. A quasi-experimental quantitative study of the effect of IB on science performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healer, Margaret Irene

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental quantitative research study was to investigate the effect of participation in the International Baccalaureate (IB) program on science performance. The findings of the 2x3 mixed ANOVA and Eta square analysis indicated a significant difference (in science CSAP mean scores between the treatment group: IB students ( n = 50) and the control group: non-IB students (n = 50) at the 5th through 10th grade level. The analysis of data concluded that although scores declined between 5th, 8th, and 10th grades with IB and non-IB students, a statistical difference was indicated at each level between the two groups: IB and non-IB in the area of science performance as measured by the CSAP assessment. Educational leaders can use the findings of this study to maximize student science achievement. Further research is recommended through a mixed study to determine the effectiveness of participation in the IB Program and a study of specificity of pedagogical strategies used with science performance with a larger sample size of IB and non-IB students longitudinally.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of reactive nitrogen emissions with urbanization: a case study in Beijing megacity, China.

    PubMed

    Xian, Chaofan; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Lu, Fei; Xiao, Yang; Li, Yanmin

    2016-09-01

    The rapid increase in anthropogenic nitrogen (N) load in urbanized environment threatens urban sustainability. In this study, we estimated the amount of reactive N (Nr) as an index of N pollution potential caused by human activities, using the megacity of Beijing as a case study. We investigated the temporal changes in Nr emissions in the environment from 2000 to 2012 using a multidisciplinary approach with quantitative evaluation. The Nr emissions presented slightly increasing during study period, and the annual emission was 0.19 Tg N, mainly resulting from fuel combustion. Nevertheless, the Nr output intensity resulting from inhabitants' livelihoods and material production had weakened over the study period. The evaluation results showed that the environmental measures to remove Nr in Beijing were efficient in most years, suggesting that progress in mitigating the growth of the Nr load in this urban environment was significant. Further measures based on N offset are suggested that could help alleviate the environmental pressure resulting from anthropogenic Nr emissions. These could provide theoretical support for the sustainable development of megacities. PMID:27240830

  4. The Quantitative Ethology of the Zebra Finch: A Study in Comparative Psychometrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueredo, Aurelio Jose; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative ethogram was developed for the zebra finch, using one-zero focal animal sampling on an ethologically comprehensive checklist of 52 behavioral items, and it was assessed for interobserver reliability and construct validity. Applying the quantitative methods of psychometrics allows verification of ethological theory and testing of…

  5. Effects of Quantitative Linguistic Feedback to Caregivers of Young Children: A Pilot Study in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yiwen; Xu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Fan; Gilkerson, Jill; Xu, Dongxin; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Harnsberger, James; Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in natural language environments of families receiving quantitative language feedback in Shanghai were investigated. Volunteer parents of 22 children aged 5 to 30 months were recruited from a hospital and a learning center. Quantitative measures of adult word count and conversational turns with children were collected regularly over 6…

  6. Quantitative cone-beam CT imaging in radiation therapy using planning CT as a prior: First patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Tianye; Al-Basheer, Ahmad; Zhu Lei

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Quantitative cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is on increasing demand for high-performance image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the current CBCT has poor image qualities mainly due to scatter contamination. Its current clinical application is therefore limited to patient setup based on only bony structures. To improve CBCT imaging for quantitative use, we recently proposed a correction method using planning CT (pCT) as the prior knowledge. Promising phantom results have been obtained on a tabletop CBCT system, using a correction scheme with rigid registration and without iterations. More challenges arise in clinical implementations of our method, especially because patients have large organ deformation in different scans. In this paper, we propose an improved framework to extend our method from bench to bedside by including several new components. Methods: The basic principle of our correction algorithm is to estimate the primary signals of CBCT projections via forward projection on the pCT image, and then to obtain the low-frequency errors in CBCT raw projections by subtracting the estimated primary signals and low-pass filtering. We improve the algorithm by using deformable registration to minimize the geometry difference between the pCT and the CBCT images. Since the registration performance relies on the accuracy of the CBCT image, we design an optional iterative scheme to update the CBCT image used in the registration. Large correction errors result from the mismatched objects in the pCT and the CBCT scans. Another optional step of gas pocket and couch matching is added into the framework to reduce these effects. Results: The proposed method is evaluated on four prostate patients, of which two cases are presented in detail to investigate the method performance for a large variety of patient geometry in clinical practice. The first patient has small anatomical changes from the planning to the treatment room. Our algorithm works well even without

  7. Basic Exploratory Research versus Guideline-Compliant Studies Used for Hazard Evaluation and Risk Assessment: Bisphenol A as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tyl, Rochelle W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Myers et al. [Environ Health Perspect 117:309–315 (2009)] argued that Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs) cannot be used as a criterion for selecting data for risk assessment, using bisphenol A (BPA) as a case study. They did not discuss the role(s) of guideline-compliant studies versus basic/exploratory research studies, and they criticized both GLPs and guideline-compliant studies and their roles in formal hazard evaluation and risk assessment. They also specifically criticized our published guideline-compliant dietary studies on BPA in rats and mice and 17β-estradiol (E2) in mice. Objectives As the study director/first author of the criticized E2 and BPA studies, I discuss the uses of basic research versus guideline-compliant studies, how testing guidelines are developed and revised, how new end points are validated, and the role of GLPs. I also provide an overview of the BPA guideline-compliant and exploratory research animal studies and describe BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans. I present responses to specific criticisms by Myers et al. Discussion and conclusions Weight-of-evidence evaluations have consistently concluded that low-level BPA oral exposures do not adversely affect human developmental or reproductive health, and I encourage increased validation efforts for “new” end points for inclusion in guideline studies, as well as performance of robust long-term studies to follow early effects (observed in small exploratory studies) to any adverse consequences. PMID:20049112

  8. Study Quality in SLA: An Assessment of Designs, Analyses, and Reporting Practices in Quantitative L2 Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonsky, Luke

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses research and reporting practices in quantitative second language (L2) research. A sample of 606 primary studies, published from 1990 to 2010 in "Language Learning and Studies in Second Language Acquisition," was collected and coded for designs, statistical analyses, reporting practices, and outcomes (i.e., effect…

  9. ICQ (I seek you) and adolescents: a quantitative study in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, W S; Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2007-02-01

    The Hong Kong Government and the education sector encourage the whole population-from toddlers to senior citizens-to utilize information technology, and many do. Yet there are no studies exploring the patterns of adolescents using ICQ (I seek you) in Asian countries. This study was done in Hong Kong, which has the greatest number of ICQ users. A quantitative approach was adopted by administering self-constructed questionnaires to the students of one high school. One hundred and forty-seven adolescents volunteered to participate. The key findings of the study are (1) most of the adolescents have been using ICQ for 1-4 years; (2) most fit one of two patterns of use: either 2 or 3 days per week, or more than 5 days per week; (3) they spend less than 3 h per day on ICQ; (4) the main reasons for using ICQ are entertainment, relaxation, and socializing; and (5) parents are concerned about possible negative impacts on their children's academic performance because of using ICQ. Two main implications are drawn: proper use of ICQ can minimize parental distress and encourage adolescents to be less sedentary. PMID:17305456

  10. ARGET–ATRP Synthesis and Characterization of PNIPAAm Brushes for Quantitative Cell Detachment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Ista, Linnea K.; Canavan, Heather E.; Lopez, Gabriel P.

    2012-01-01

    Stimuli responsive (or “smart”) polymer brushes represent a non-toxic approach for achieving release of biofouling layers. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) polymer brushes have been shown to modulate bacterial adhesion and release through transition between temperatures above and below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST ~32 °C) of PNIPAAm in water. In this article, we describe a convenient method to synthesize grafted PNIPAAm brushes over large areas for biological studies using a relatively simple and rapid method which allows atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) in presence of air using the activator regenerated electron transfer (ARGET) mechanism. PNIPAAm brushes were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurements. Our studies demonstrate that uniform, high purity PNIPAAm brushes with controlled and high molecular weight can be easily produced over large areas using ARGET–ATRP. We also report the use of a spinning disk apparatus to systematically and quantitatively study the detachment profiles of bacteria from PNIPAAm surfaces under a range (0–400 dyne/cm2) of shear stresses. PMID:22589075

  11. Quantitative studies of animal colour constancy: using the chicken as model.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Wilby, David; Kelber, Almut

    2016-05-11

    Colour constancy is the capacity of visual systems to keep colour perception constant despite changes in the illumination spectrum. Colour constancy has been tested extensively in humans and has also been described in many animals. In humans, colour constancy is often studied quantitatively, but besides humans, this has only been done for the goldfish and the honeybee. In this study, we quantified colour constancy in the chicken by training the birds in a colour discrimination task and testing them in changed illumination spectra to find the largest illumination change in which they were able to remain colour-constant. We used the receptor noise limited model for animal colour vision to quantify the illumination changes, and found that colour constancy performance depended on the difference between the colours used in the discrimination task, the training procedure and the time the chickens were allowed to adapt to a new illumination before making a choice. We analysed literature data on goldfish and honeybee colour constancy with the same method and found that chickens can compensate for larger illumination changes than both. We suggest that future studies on colour constancy in non-human animals could use a similar approach to allow for comparison between species and populations. PMID:27170714

  12. Validation of reference genes for real-time quantitative RT-PCR studies in Talaromyces marneffei.

    PubMed

    Dankai, Wiyada; Pongpom, Monsicha; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2015-11-01

    Talaromyces marneffei (or Penicillium marneffei) is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause disseminated disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, especially in Southeast Asia. T. marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus. Typically, T. marneffei has an adaptive morphology. It grows in a filamentous form (mould) at 25°C and can differentiate to produce asexual spores (conidia). In contrast, at 37°C, it grows as yeast cells that divide by fission. This study aimed to validate a quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for gene expression analysis in T. marneffei. Analysis of relative gene expression by qRT-PCR requires normalization of data using a proper reference gene. However, suitable reference genes have not been identified in gene expression studies across different cell types or under different experimental conditions in T. marneffei. In this study, four housekeeping genes were selected for analysis: β-actin (act); glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh); β-tubulin (benA) and 18S rRNA. Two analysis programs; BestKeeper and geNorm software tools were used to validate the expression of the candidate normalized genes. The results indicated that the actin gene was the one which was most stably expressed and was recommended for use as the endogenous control for gene expression analysis of all growth forms in T. marneffei by qRT-PCR under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26327538

  13. Biopharmaceutical characterization of oral theophylline and aminophylline tablets. Quantitative correlation between dissolution and bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, J; Ghafghazi, T; Raisi, A; Falamarzian, M

    2000-09-01

    Considering the narrow therapeutic index of theophylline and the low range between the safe and toxic serum concentrations of this drug, the study of its pharmacokinetic properties is necessary. However, considering the time consuming and expensive in vivo tests, quantitative correlation between in vivo bioavailability and in vitro dissolution tests can be used routinely in quality control tests of these drug products to predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters. For this reason healthy human volunteers were used for in vivo studies and serum samples were analyzed by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay analysis (FPIA) method. The results showed that an open one compartmental model could best describe the pharmacokinetic properties of orally administered theophylline and aminophylline tablets. Linear regression analysis by least-square method showed a good correlation between some in vivo and in vitro parameters obtained from dissolution studies by rotating basket and paddle methods. D(30)% (percentage of drug dissolved in vitro after 30 min) and F(0.5)% (drug absorbed in vivo after half an hour calculated by Wagner-Nelson equation) showed best correlation (r=0. 99036). C(max) (maximum serum concentration) of this drug also correlates well with t(25%) (time required to dissolve 25% of the drug). The calculated correlation coefficients could best predict the actual values of some pharmacokinetic parameters; AUC(0-->infinity), AUC(0-->1), F(0.5)% and C(max). PMID:10962242

  14. Validation of Reference Genes for Relative Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Meizhen; Hu, Wenbin; Xia, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Xincheng; Wang, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, also referred to as quantitative RT-PCR or RT-qPCR) is a highly sensitive and high-throughput method used to study gene expression. Despite the numerous advantages of RT-qPCR, its accuracy is strongly influenced by the stability of internal reference genes used for normalizations. To date, few studies on the identification of reference genes have been performed on cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Therefore, we selected 26 candidate reference genes mainly via the three following channels: reference genes used in previous studies on cassava, the orthologs of the most stable Arabidopsis genes, and the sequences obtained from 32 cassava transcriptome sequence data. Then, we employed ABI 7900 HT and SYBR Green PCR mix to assess the expression of these genes in 21 materials obtained from various cassava samples under different developmental and environmental conditions. The stability of gene expression was analyzed using two statistical algorithms, namely geNorm and NormFinder. geNorm software suggests the combination of cassava4.1_017977 and cassava4.1_006391 as sufficient reference genes for major cassava samples, the union of cassava4.1_014335 and cassava4.1_006884 as best choice for drought stressed samples, and the association of cassava4.1_012496 and cassava4.1_006391 as optimal choice for normally grown samples. NormFinder software recommends cassava4.1_006884 or cassava4.1_006776 as superior reference for qPCR analysis of different materials and organs of drought stressed or normally grown cassava, respectively. Results provide an important resource for cassava reference genes under specific conditions. The limitations of these findings were also discussed. Furthermore, we suggested some strategies that may be used to select candidate reference genes. PMID:27242878

  15. Validation of Reference Genes for Relative Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meizhen; Hu, Wenbin; Xia, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Xincheng; Wang, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, also referred to as quantitative RT-PCR or RT-qPCR) is a highly sensitive and high-throughput method used to study gene expression. Despite the numerous advantages of RT-qPCR, its accuracy is strongly influenced by the stability of internal reference genes used for normalizations. To date, few studies on the identification of reference genes have been performed on cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Therefore, we selected 26 candidate reference genes mainly via the three following channels: reference genes used in previous studies on cassava, the orthologs of the most stable Arabidopsis genes, and the sequences obtained from 32 cassava transcriptome sequence data. Then, we employed ABI 7900 HT and SYBR Green PCR mix to assess the expression of these genes in 21 materials obtained from various cassava samples under different developmental and environmental conditions. The stability of gene expression was analyzed using two statistical algorithms, namely geNorm and NormFinder. geNorm software suggests the combination of cassava4.1_017977 and cassava4.1_006391 as sufficient reference genes for major cassava samples, the union of cassava4.1_014335 and cassava4.1_006884 as best choice for drought stressed samples, and the association of cassava4.1_012496 and cassava4.1_006391 as optimal choice for normally grown samples. NormFinder software recommends cassava4.1_006884 or cassava4.1_006776 as superior reference for qPCR analysis of different materials and organs of drought stressed or normally grown cassava, respectively. Results provide an important resource for cassava reference genes under specific conditions. The limitations of these findings were also discussed. Furthermore, we suggested some strategies that may be used to select candidate reference genes. PMID:27242878

  16. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the association of basic proteins with multilayers of diacyl phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Cornell, B A; Keniry, M A; Separovic, F

    1983-08-10

    Lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine), myelin basic protein and ribonuclease were used to form multilayer dispersions containing about 50% protein (by weight) with bovine brain diacyl phosphatidylserine (PS). 31P nuclear magnetic resonance shift anisotropies, spin-spin (T2) and spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times for the lipid headgroup phosphorus were measured at 36.44 MHz. At pH 7.5, lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine) and ribonuclease were shown to increase the chemical shift anisotropy of PS by between 12-20%. Myelin basic protein altered the shape of the phosphate resonance, suggesting the presence of two lipid components, one of which had a modified headgroup conformation. The presence of cytochrome c led to the formation of a narrow spike at the isotropic shift position of the spectrum. Of the various proteins or peptides we have studied, only poly(L-lysine) and cytochrome c had any effect on the T1 of PS (1050 ms). Both caused a 20-30% decrease in T1 of the lamellar-phase phosphate peak. The narrow peak in the presence of cytochrome c had a very short T1 of 156 ms. The possibility is considered that the cytochrome Fe3+ contributes to the phosphate relaxation in this case. The effect of all proteins on the T2 of the phosphorus resonance was to cause an increase from the value for pure PS (1.6 ms) to between 2 and 5 ms. The results obtained with proteins are compared with the effects of small ions and intrinsic membrane proteins on the order and motion of the headgroups of lipids in bilayers. PMID:6191774

  17. Manual for Project Management. MEC-ETS Standard Setting Studies Conducted as a Part of MEC's Improving Basic Skills Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Wellesley Hills, MA.

    This document is designed to assist school districts to implement the Massachusetts State Board of Education regulations requiring the setting of performance standards in basic skills at three grade levels. The appropriate procedures are described in the manual: (1) setting of basic skills objectives, at three grade levels; (2) the selection of…

  18. How I-BEST Works: Findings from a Field Study of Washington State's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachen, John; Jenkins, Davis; Van Noy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) is an innovative program and strategy developed by the Washington (WA) State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) in conjunction with the state's 29 community colleges and five technical colleges. Its goal is to increase the rate at which adult basic education and…

  19. Integrating Basic Skills and Career-Technical Instruction: Findings from a Field Study of Washington State's I-BEST Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachen, John; Jenkins, Davis; Van Noy, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The federal government and private foundations for education have established postsecondary credential completion as a national imperative. Washington State's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) model was developed to increase the rate at which basic skills students advance to and succeed in college-level occupational programs,…

  20. Quantitative In Situ TEM Studies of Small-Scale Plasticity in Irradiated and Unirradiated Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Claire

    mechanical data, as the two defect conditions exhibit similar yield strengths, ultimate tensile strengths, and number and size of load-drops. This similarity implies that, even if materials contain dissimilar individual defects, the collective defect behavior can result in similar mechanical properties. Thus, the origin of mechanical properties can be ambiguous and caution should be taken when extrapolating to different size scales. Furthermore, such similarities highlight the importance of in-situ observation during deformation. These experiments provide a key test of theory, by providing a local test of behavior, which is much more stringent than testing behaviors averaged over many regions. Advanced electron microscopy imaging techniques and quantitative in-situ TEM tensile tests are performed with Au thin-film as a model FCC structural material. These investigations highlight the various hurdles experimental studies must overcome in order to probe defect behavior at a fundamental level. Two novelly-applied strain mapping techniques are performed to directly measure the matrix strain around helium bubbles in He1+ implanted Au thin-film. Dark-field inline holography (DFIH) is applied here for the first time to a metal, and nano-beam electron diffraction (NBED) transient strain mapping is shown to be experimentally feasible using the high frame rate Gatan K2 camera. The K2 camera reduces scan times from ˜18 minutes to 82 seconds for a 128x256 pixel scan at 400 fps. Both methods measure a peak strain around 10 nm bubbles of 0.7%, correlating to an internal pressure of 580 MPa, or a vacancy to helium ion ratio of 1V:2.4He. Previous studies have relied on determining the appropriate equation of state to relate measured or approximated helium density to internal bubble pressure and thus strain. Direct measurement of the surrounding matrix strain through DFIH and NBED methods effectively bypasses this step, allowing for easier defect interaction modeling as the bubble can be

  1. Reference gene selection for gene expression studies in lily using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M F; Liu, Q; Jia, G X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is an important technology used to analyze gene-expression levels. Reference genes, which are assumed to be expressed consistently across various developmental stages and in different tissues, were selected for expression level analysis. Using digital gene expression technology, we selected nine reference genes (18S, EF, CYCOL, SAND, GAPDH, ACTIN, BHLH, TIP, and Clathrin) as candidate reference genes for further study. Using three different analysis methods (GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper), a total of 144 lily (Lilium x formolongi "Raizan 3") samples were analyzed. The samples were collected from four different tissues under various developmental stages. In addition, leaves treated with different plant hormones were collected and analyzed. The data showed that the stability of the nine reference genes differed among samples, but TIP, EF, Clathrin, and BHLH could be identified as the most stable genes overall. In addition, the relative expression level of LfFT in different lily tissues with the competence to flower was also analyzed to verify the selected reference genes. This study constitutes an important source for selecting reference genes when analyzing the expression patterns of flowering time and floral development regulation genes in lily cultivars. PMID:27173307

  2. Quantitative study of impacts of climate change and human activities on runoff in Beiluohe River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, A.; Huang, Q.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In the Beiluohe River basin (BRB) runoff has been experiencing a significant reduction induced by climate change and human activities. This paper considers the impacts of climate change and human activities on runoff reduction. An improved empirical method for climate factors and runoff was developed to study the impacts quantitatively. Meanwhile climate elasticity of runoff, based on the Budyko hypothesis, was also adopted to study the impacts. Using runoff change points, series were divided into natural period (1960-1969) and impacted periods (1970-1994, 1995-2010). Results show that the methods used to quantify the contributions obtained different but close conclusions to one another. For 1970-1994, climate was the primary factor impacting runoff, compared with that for 1960-1969, with the contribution reaching around 70.84-83.42%, which was greater than human activities (16.58-29.16%). For 1995-2010, the role of human activities strengthened with the contribution around 62.58-65.07%, greater than climate changes, around 34.93-37.42%.

  3. A Review of the Statistical and Quantitative Methods Used to Study Alcohol-Attributable Crime

    PubMed Central

    Fitterer, Jessica L.; Nelson, Trisalyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling the relationship between alcohol consumption and crime generates new knowledge for crime prevention strategies. Advances in data, particularly data with spatial and temporal attributes, have led to a growing suite of applied methods for modelling. In support of alcohol and crime researchers we synthesized and critiqued existing methods of spatially and quantitatively modelling the effects of alcohol exposure on crime to aid method selection, and identify new opportunities for analysis strategies. We searched the alcohol-crime literature from 1950 to January 2014. Analyses that statistically evaluated or mapped the association between alcohol and crime were included. For modelling purposes, crime data were most often derived from generalized police reports, aggregated to large spatial units such as census tracts or postal codes, and standardized by residential population data. Sixty-eight of the 90 selected studies included geospatial data of which 48 used cross-sectional datasets. Regression was the prominent modelling choice (n = 78) though dependent on data many variations existed. There are opportunities to improve information for alcohol-attributable crime prevention by using alternative population data to standardize crime rates, sourcing crime information from non-traditional platforms (social media), increasing the number of panel studies, and conducting analysis at the local level (neighbourhood, block, or point). Due to the spatio-temporal advances in crime data, we expect a continued uptake of flexible Bayesian hierarchical modelling, a greater inclusion of spatial-temporal point pattern analysis, and shift toward prospective (forecast) modelling over small areas (e.g., blocks). PMID:26418016

  4. Rationing of nursing care and nurse-patient outcomes: a systematic review of quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Andreou, Panayiota; Efstathiou, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Bedside rationing in nursing care refers to withholding or failure to carry out certain aspects of care because of limited resources such as time, staffing or skill mix. The absence of previous systematic reviews on nursing care rationing leads to a gap of synthesized knowledge on the factors and processes related to rationing and the potential negative consequences on both patients and nurses. The aim of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the factors and processes related to nursing care rationing. Selected papers were methodologically assessed based on their design, sampling, measurement and statistical analysis. Seventeen quantitative studies were reviewed, and findings were categorized into four themes: elements of nursing care being rationed, causes of rationing, nurse outcomes and patient outcomes. Results revealed that communication with patients and families, patient ambulation, and mouth care were common elements of rationed care. Nurse-patient workload and communication barriers were reported as potential causes of rationing. Patient-related outcomes included patient falls, nosocomial infections and low patient satisfaction levels. Nurse-related outcomes included low job and occupational satisfaction. In addition, rationing appears to be an important organizational variable linked with patient safety and quality of care. This review increases understanding of what is actually occurring at the point of care delivery so that managers will be able to improve processes that lead to high quality of care and better patient and nurse outcomes. PMID:23296644

  5. Quantitation and pharmacokinetic modeling of therapeutic antibody quality attributes in human studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinyin; Monine, Michael; Huang, Yu; Swann, Patrick; Nestorov, Ivan; Lyubarskaya, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of drug metabolism and disposition can aid in the assessment of efficacy and safety. However, analytical methods used in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies of protein therapeutics are usually based on ELISA, and therefore can provide a limited perspective on the quality of the drug in concentration measurements. Individual post-translational modifications (PTMs) of protein therapeutics are rarely considered for PK analysis, partly because it is technically difficult to recover and quantify individual protein variants from biological fluids. Meanwhile, PTMs may be directly linked to variations in drug efficacy and safety, and therefore understanding of clearance and metabolism of biopharmaceutical protein variants during clinical studies is an important consideration. To address such challenges, we developed an affinity-purification procedure followed by peptide mapping with mass spectrometric detection, which can profile multiple quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies recovered from patient sera. The obtained data enable quantitative modeling, which allows for simulation of the PK of different individual PTMs or attribute levels in vivo and thus facilitate the assessment of quality attributes impact in vivo. Such information can contribute to the product quality attribute risk assessment during manufacturing process development and inform appropriate process control strategy. PMID:27216574

  6. Extracting Quantitative Measures from EAP: A Small Clinical Study using BFOR

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Wu, Yu-Chien; Fleming, John O.; Field, Aaron S.; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    The ensemble average propagator (EAP) describes the 3D average diffusion process of water molecules, capturing both its radial and angular contents, and hence providing rich information about complex tissue microstructure properties. Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR) is one of several analytical, non-Cartesian EAP reconstruction schemes employing multiple shell acquisitions that have recently been proposed. Such modeling bases have not yet been fully exploited in the extraction of rotationally invariant q-space indices that describe the degree of diffusion anisotropy/restrictivity. Such quantitative measures include the zero-displacement probability (Po), mean squared displacement (MSD), q-space inverse variance (QIV), and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA), and all are simply scalar features of the EAP. In this study, a general relationship between MSD and q-space diffusion signal is derived and an EAP-based definition of GFA is introduced. A significant part of the paper is dedicated to utilizing BFOR in a clinical dataset, comprised of 5 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 4 healthy controls, to estimate Po, MSD, QIV, and GFA of corpus callosum, and specifically, to see if such indices can detect changes between normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and healthy white matter (WM). Although the sample size is small, this study is a proof of concept that can be extended to larger sample sizes in the future. PMID:23286059

  7. Quantitative study on characteristic parameters of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars ( Melopsittacus undula fus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Chang; Chen, Hao; Xu, Mu-Ling; Zhang, Hong

    1994-08-01

    On the bases of the studies of acoustic behavior and pattern recognition of budgerigar calls, the quantitative study on characteristic parameters of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars is further given in this paper. These results open up a new knowledge for comprehensive analyses of abnormalities of acoustic behavior habits in budgerigars prior to earthquakes. Under indoor lighting, the song calls in budgerigars are possessed of the beginning and ending singing time with the natural characteristics, and of the rhythmic habit of daylight singings and night rests. In daily daylight and night calls, single calls, vari-toned calls, mono-syllabic and multi-syllabic protest calls are respectively possessed of the occupation habit corresponding to behavior activities, and have close acrophases and regular following properties corresponding to half-value phases, and the acrophases delay half-value phases by about half an hour on an average. After reversing lighting, the acrophases of budgerigar calls delay those of the normal lighting by about 12 hours on an average, and the following properties corresponding to half-value phases are irregular.

  8. Quantitative analysis and efficiency study of PSD methods for a LaBr3:Ce detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Cang, Jirong; Zeng, Zhi; Yue, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Jianping; Liu, Yinong; Ma, Hao; Li, Junli

    2016-03-01

    The LaBr3:Ce scintillator has been widely studied for nuclear spectroscopy because of its optimal energy resolution (<3%@ 662 keV) and time resolution (~300 ps). Despite these promising properties, the intrinsic radiation background of LaBr3:Ce is a critical issue, and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been shown to be an efficient potential method to suppress the alpha background from the 227Ac. In this paper, the charge comparison method (CCM) for alpha and gamma discrimination in LaBr3:Ce is quantitatively analysed and compared with two other typical PSD methods using digital pulse processing. The algorithm parameters and discrimination efficiency are calculated for each method. Moreover, for the CCM, the correlation between the CCM feature value distribution and the total charge (energy) is studied, and a fitting equation for the correlation is inferred and experimentally verified. Using the equations, an energy-dependent threshold can be chosen to optimize the discrimination efficiency. Additionally, the experimental results show a potential application in low-activity high-energy γ measurement by suppressing the alpha background.

  9. Photobacterium profundum under Pressure: A MS-Based Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Bihan, Thierry; Rayner, Joe; Roy, Marcia M.; Spagnolo, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium profundum SS9 is a Gram-negative bacterium, originally collected from the Sulu Sea. Its genome consists of two chromosomes and a 80 kb plasmid. Although it can grow under a wide range of pressures, P. profundum grows optimally at 28 MPa and 15°C. Its ability to grow at atmospheric pressure allows for both easy genetic manipulation and culture, making it a model organism to study piezophily. Here, we report a shotgun proteomic analysis of P. profundum grown at atmospheric compared to high pressure using label-free quantitation and mass spectrometry analysis. We have identified differentially expressed proteins involved in high pressure adaptation, which have been previously reported using other methods. Proteins involved in key metabolic pathways were also identified as being differentially expressed. Proteins involved in the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway were up-regulated at high pressure. Conversely, several proteins involved in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway were up-regulated at atmospheric pressure. Some of the proteins that were differentially identified are regulated directly in response to the physical impact of pressure. The expression of some proteins involved in nutrient transport or assimilation, are likely to be directly regulated by pressure. In a natural environment, different hydrostatic pressures represent distinct ecosystems with their own particular nutrient limitations and abundances. However, the only variable considered in this study was atmospheric pressure. PMID:23741291

  10. Career interest, self-efficacy, and perception in undecided and nursing undergraduate students: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Fillman, Valentina M

    2015-01-01

    Career choice variables of career interest, self-efficacy, and perception were chosen based upon Social Cognitive Career Theory concepts for study between nursing and undecided undergraduate student groups. Components of the Career Search Questionnaire and Perceptions of Professional Nursing instruments were combined and adapted to form the Career Choice Survey for use in this research. This web-based survey totaling 40 questions was sent to 577 undergraduate students with a 12% response rate (N=68). Due to the need to increase nursing recruitment and retention, hypotheses were developed that distinguish if any relationship existed between groups. Findings of this quantitative study resulted in statistically significant results on two of the three variable hypotheses (p=.006 for career interest, p=.002 for self-efficacy, p=.395 for perception), aligning with previous research and provide insight into the change in nursing perception. Overall, scores for each subscale were encouraging to current nurses and expected from undecided students. Implications for practice include increases in accurate nursing portrayal in the media and early career counseling to younger populations. Nurse educators can further research in career choice with focus on continuing education for current nurses and recruitment of young nursing hopefuls. PMID:25218036

  11. Quantitation and pharmacokinetic modeling of therapeutic antibody quality attributes in human studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinyin; Monine, Michael; Huang, Yu; Swann, Patrick; Nestorov, Ivan; Lyubarskaya, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A thorough understanding of drug metabolism and disposition can aid in the assessment of efficacy and safety. However, analytical methods used in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies of protein therapeutics are usually based on ELISA, and therefore can provide a limited perspective on the quality of the drug in concentration measurements. Individual post-translational modifications (PTMs) of protein therapeutics are rarely considered for PK analysis, partly because it is technically difficult to recover and quantify individual protein variants from biological fluids. Meanwhile, PTMs may be directly linked to variations in drug efficacy and safety, and therefore understanding of clearance and metabolism of biopharmaceutical protein variants during clinical studies is an important consideration. To address such challenges, we developed an affinity-purification procedure followed by peptide mapping with mass spectrometric detection, which can profile multiple quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies recovered from patient sera. The obtained data enable quantitative modeling, which allows for simulation of the PK of different individual PTMs or attribute levels in vivo and thus facilitate the assessment of quality attributes impact in vivo. Such information can contribute to the product quality attribute risk assessment during manufacturing process development and inform appropriate process control strategy. PMID:27216574

  12. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  13. Quantitative methods for reconstructing tissue biomechanical properties in optical coherence elastography: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Sudheendran, Narendran; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the accuracy of five different methods for extracting the biomechanical properties of soft samples using optical coherence elastography (OCE). OCE is an emerging noninvasive technique, which allows assessing biomechanical properties of tissues with a micrometer spatial resolution. However, in order to accurately extract biomechanical properties from OCE measurements, application of proper mechanical model is required. In this study, we utilize tissue-mimicking phantoms with controlled elastic properties and investigate the feasibilities of four available methods for reconstructing elasticity (Young’s modulus) based on OCE measurements of an air-pulse induced elastic wave. The approaches are based on the shear wave equation (SWE), the surface wave equation (SuWE), Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE), and finite element method (FEM), Elasticity values were compared with uniaxial mechanical testing. The results show that the RLFE and the FEM are more robust in quantitatively assessing elasticity than the other simplified models. This study provides a foundation and reference for reconstructing the biomechanical properties of tissues from OCE data, which is important for the further development of noninvasive elastography methods. PMID:25860076

  14. Quantitative neuroproteomics: classical and novel tools for studying neural differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Farina, Annarita; Vissers, Johannes P C; Chambery, Angela

    2011-03-01

    Mechanisms underlying neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation play a critical role in the formation and wiring of neuronal connections. This process involves the activation of multiple serial events, which guide the undifferentiated cells to different lineages via distinctive developmental programs, forming neuronal circuits and thus shaping the adult nervous system. Furthermore, alterations within these strictly regulated pathways can lead to severe neurological and psychiatric diseases. In this framework, the investigation of the high dynamic protein expression changes and other factors affecting protein functions, for example post-translational modifications, the alterations of protein interaction networks, is of pivotal importance for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell differentiation. More recently, proteomic studies in neuroscience ("neuroproteomics") are receiving increased interest for the primary understanding of the regulatory networks underlying neuronal differentiation processes. Besides the classical two-dimensional-based proteomic strategies, the emerging platforms for LC-MS shotgun proteomic analysis hold great promise in unraveling the molecular basis of neural stem cell differentiation. In this review, recent advancements in label-free LC-MS quantitative neuroproteomics are highlighted as a new tool for the study of neural differentiation and functions, in comparison to mass spectrometry-based labeling approaches. The more commonly used protein profiling strategies and model systems for the analysis of neural differentiation are also discussed, along with the challenging proteomic approaches aimed to analyze the nervous system-specific organelles, the neural cells secretome and the specific protein interaction networks. PMID:20352529

  15. A Comparative Study on Tobacco Cessation Methods: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Gholamreza; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Ahmady, Arezoo Ebn; Leischow, Scott J.; Lando, Harry A.; Shadmehr, Mohammad Behgam; Fadaizadeh, Lida

    2014-01-01

    Background: During recent years, there have been many advances in different types of pharmacological and non-pharmacological tobacco control treatments. In this study, we aimed to identify the most effective smoking cessation methods used in quit based upon a review of the literature. Methods: We did a search of PubMed, limited to English publications from 2000 to 2012. Two trained reviewers independently assessed titles, abstracts and full texts of articles after a pilot inter-rater reliability assessment which was conducted by the author (GH). The total number of papers and their conclusions including recommendation of that method (positive) or not supporting (negative) was computed for each method. The number of negative papers was subtracted from the number of positive ones for each method. In cases of inconsistency between the two reviewers, these were adjudicated by author. Results: Of the 932 articles that were critically assessed, 780 studies supported quit smoking methods. In 90 studies, the methods were not supported or rejected and in 62 cases the methods were not supported. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), Champix and Zyban with 352, 117 and 71 studies respectively were the most supported methods and e-cigarettes and non-Nicotine medications with one case were the least supported methods. Finally, NRT with 39 and Champix and education with 36 scores were the most supported methods. Conclusions: Results of this review indicate that the scientific papers in the most recent decade recommend the use of NRT and Champix in combination with educational interventions. Additional research is needed to compare qualitative and quantitative studies for smoking cessation. PMID:25013685

  16. Chronic spinal compression model in minipigs: a systematic behavioral, qualitative, and quantitative neuropathological study.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Roman; Juhas, Stefan; Keshavarzi, Sassan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Johe, Karl; Marsala, Silvia; Scadeng, Miriam; Lazar, Peter; Tomori, Zoltan; Schulteis, Gery; Beattie, Michael; Ciacci, Joseph D; Marsala, Martin

    2012-02-10

    The goal of the present study was to develop a porcine spinal cord injury (SCI) model, and to describe the neurological outcome and characterize the corresponding quantitative and qualitative histological changes at 4-9 months after injury. Adult Gottingen-Minnesota minipigs were anesthetized and placed in a spine immobilization frame. The exposed T12 spinal segment was compressed in a dorso-ventral direction using a 5-mm-diameter circular bar with a progressively increasing peak force (1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 kg) at a velocity of 3 cm/sec. During recovery, motor and sensory function were periodically monitored. After survival, the animals were perfusion fixed and the extent of local SCI was analyzed by (1) post-mortem MRI analysis of dissected spinal cords, (2) qualitative and quantitative analysis of axonal survival at the epicenter of injury, and (3) defining the presence of local inflammatory changes, astrocytosis, and schwannosis. Following 2.5-kg spinal cord compression the animals demonstrated a near complete loss of motor and sensory function with no recovery over the next 4-9 months. Those that underwent spinal cord compression with 2 kg force developed an incomplete injury with progressive partial neurological recovery characterized by a restricted ability to stand and walk. Animals injured with a spinal compression force of 1.5 kg showed near normal ambulation 10 days after injury. In fully paralyzed animals (2.5 kg), MRI analysis demonstrated a loss of spinal white matter integrity and extensive septal cavitations. A significant correlation between the magnitude of loss of small and medium-sized myelinated axons in the ventral funiculus and neurological deficits was identified. These data, demonstrating stable neurological deficits in severely injured animals, similarities of spinal pathology to humans, and relatively good post-injury tolerance of this strain of minipigs to spinal trauma, suggest that this model can successfully be used to study

  17. QUANTITATIVE COMPARISON OF MOLECULAR ELECTROSTATIC POTENTIALS FOR STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Further development of an approach for representing, efficiently calculating and comparing discreet 3-dimensional molecular electrostatic potentials using a quantitative similarity index (MEP-SI) based on the Carbo formalism is presented. adial-type (MACRA) grid representation is...

  18. Compatibility of Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Studying Child Sexual Abuse in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Patricia

    1987-01-01

    Illustrates how the combined use of qualitative and quantitative methods were necessary in obtaining a clearer understanding of the process of incest in American society. Argues that the exclusive use of one methodology would have obscured important information. (FMW)

  19. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús Aguiar, Pablo; Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor; Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel; Pombar, Miguel; Ruibal, Álvaro

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  20. Genetic Studies of Quantitative MCI and AD Phenotypes in ADNI: Progress, Opportunities, and Plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Yao, Xiaohui; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Risacher, Shannon L.; Ramanan, Vijay K.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Faber, Kelly M.; Sarwar, Nadeem; Munsie, Leanne M.; Hu, Xiaolan; Soares, Holly D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Thompson, Paul M.; Kauwe, John S.K.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Green, Robert C.; Toga, Arthur W.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Genetic data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been crucial in advancing the understanding of AD pathophysiology. Here we provide an update on sample collection, scientific progress and opportunities, conceptual issues, and future plans. METHODS Lymphoblastoid cell lines and DNA and RNA samples from blood have been collected and banked, and data and biosamples have been widely disseminated. To date, APOE genotyping, genome-wide association study (GWAS), and whole exome and whole genome sequencing (WES, WGS) data have been obtained and disseminated. RESULTS ADNI genetic data have been downloaded thousands of times and over 300 publications have resulted, including reports of large scale GWAS by consortia to which ADNI contributed. Many of the first applications of quantitative endophenotype association studies employed ADNI data, including some of the earliest GWAS and pathway-based studies of biospecimen and imaging biomarkers, as well as memory and other clinical/cognitive variables. Other contributions include some of the first WES and WGS data sets and reports in healthy controls, MCI, and AD. DISCUSSION Numerous genetic susceptibility and protective markers for AD and disease biomarkers have been identified and replicated using ADNI data, and have heavily implicated immune, mitochondrial, cell cycle/fate, and other biological processes. Early sequencing studies suggest that rare and structural variants are likely to account for significant additional phenotypic variation. Longitudinal analyses of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and epigenomic changes will also further elucidate dynamic processes underlying preclinical and prodromal stages of disease. Integration of this unique collection of multi-omics data within a systems biology framework will help to separate truly informative markers of early disease mechanisms and potential novel therapeutic targets from the vast background of less relevant biological

  1. A Quantitative Study of Teacher Readiness to Teach School-Based HIV/AIDS Education in Kenyan Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang'at, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' self-perceived readiness to teach school-based HIV/AIDS Awareness and Prevention education in Kenyan primary schools based on their knowledge, attitudes and instructional confidence. This research utilized a non-experimental quantitative approach with a…

  2. Is It Science? A Study of the Attitudes of Medical Trainees and Physicians toward Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goguen, Jeannette; Knight, Melanie; Tiberius, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the degree of acceptance of qualitative research by medical trainees and physicians, and explored the causes for any differences in their support of qualitative versus quantitative research. Thirty-two individuals at four levels of medical training were studied. Eight philosophers of science served for construct validation.…

  3. The Relationship between Shyness and Internet Addiction: A Quantitative Study on Middle and Post Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, W. Craig

    2005-01-01

    This small scale quantitative study looks into the relationship between shyness and internet addiction in middle school students. This study has been conducted on the belief that shyness is a possible predictor of Internet Addiction. To prove this hypothesis a questionnaire was created and distributed to 53 middle school students and 159 post…

  4. Basic Mycology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Lilla M.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses activities that can be carried out on a field trip study of mushrooms; follow-up activities in the classroom are suggested. Mushrooms are selected as an introduction to mycology mainly because of their large size and prominent reproductive structures. (BR)

  5. The Challenges of Social Studies Educators for Effective Teacher Preparation and Implementation of the Universal Basic Education Programme in Nigerian Junior Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meziobi, D. I.; Oyeoku, E. K.; Ezegbe, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    The UBE (universal basic education) is one of the laudable reforms in education in Nigeria, which is implemented through social studies instruction. This study investigated social studies teachers' capability for effective implementation of the UBE in junior secondary schools in Orlu education zone of Imo State of Nigeria. The study is a survey…

  6. Effects of Anti-Human Neutrophil Antibodies In Vitro. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Laurence A.; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1974-01-01

    Opsonic, antiphagocytic, cytotoxic, and metabolic effects of homologous and heterologous antibodies against human neutrophils were analyzed by means of quantitative assays to facilitate detection of antibody activity, and to probe membrane function of these cells. Normal human neutrophils were purified by gradient centrifugation, sensitized with heat-inactivated antineutrophil antisera, and incubated with rabbit alveolar macrophages in balanced salt solution containing nitroblue tetrazolium. The macrophages engulfed sensitized neutrophils and reduced nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan in phagocytic vacuoles. The initial rate of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by macrophages ingesting the neutrophils was measured spectrophotometrically. Neutrophils treated with rabbit anti-human leukocyte antiserum or IgG, with sera from mothers of infants with neonatal isoimmune neutropenia, and with 27% of sera from frequently transfused patients promoted rapid rates of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by alveolar macrophages. This indicates that antineutrophil antibodies without added complement opsonized neutrophils for ingestion by the macrophages. Some sera from frequently transfused patients with opsonic activity for certain donors' neutrophils did not agglutinate these neutrophils (44%), did not lyse them in the presence of fresh plasma (47%), and did not inhibit phagocytosis of particles by the neutrophils (26%). The reverse was not observed. The opsonic activity of antineutrophil antiserum appears to be the most sensitive and a quantitative means of detecting antibody activity in vitro. Low concentrations of rabbit anti-human leukocyte antisera or IgG stimulated the ingestion rate of unopsonized or opsonized particles by human neutrophils, and, as previously reported by others, enhanced rates of oxidation of [1-14C]glucose by the cells. High concentrations of the antisera or IgG inhibited ingestion. All concentrations of homologous antineutrophil antisera tested only

  7. The quantitative analysis of OH in vesuvianite: a polarized FTIR and SIMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellatreccia, Fabio; della Ventura, Giancarlo; Ottolini, Luisa; Libowitzky, Eugen; Beran, Anton

    2005-05-01

    A well-characterized suite of vesuvianite samples from the volcanic ejecta (skarn or syenites) from Latium (Italy) was studied by single-crystal, polarized radiation, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS). OH-stretching FTIR spectra consist of a rather well-defined triplet of broad bands at higher-frequency (3,700 3,300 cm-1) and a very broad composite absorption below 3,300 cm-1. Measurements with E//c or E⊥c show that all bands are strongly polarized with maximum absorption for E//c. They are in agreement with previous band assignments (Groat et al. Can Mineral 33:609, 1995) to the two O(11) H(1) and O(10) H(2) groups in the structure. Pleochroic measurements with changing direction of the E vector of the incident radiation show that the orientation of the O(11) H(1) dipole is OH∧c~35°, in excellent agreement with the neutron data of Lager et al. (Can Mineral 37:763, 1999). A SIMS-based calibration curve at ~10% rel. accuracy has been worked out and used as reference for the quantitative analysis of H2O in vesuvianite by FTIR. Based on previous SIMS results for silicate minerals (Ottolini and Hawthorne in J Anal At Spectrom 16:1266, 2001; Ottolini et al. in Am Mineral 87:1477, 2002) the SiO2 and FeO content of the matrix were assumed as the major factors to be considered at a first approximation in the selection of the standards for H. The lack of vesuvianite standards for quantitative SIMS analysis of H2O has been here overcome by selecting low-silica elbaite crystals (Ottolini et al. in Am Mineral 87:1477, 2002). The resulting integrated molar absorption FTIR coefficient for vesuvianite is ɛi=100.000±2.000 l mol-1 cm-2. SIMS data for Li, B, F, Sr, Y, Be, Ba REE, U and Th are also provided in the paper.

  8. Keratin intermediate filament structure. Crosslinking studies yield quantitative information on molecular dimensions and mechanism of assembly.

    PubMed

    Steinert, P M; Marekov, L N; Fraser, R D; Parry, D A

    1993-03-20

    One of the major obstacles to solving the full three-dimensional structure of keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) is the determination of the exact mode(s) of alignment of nearest-neighbor molecules; this in turn requires precise information of the lengths of the non-alpha-helical linker segments within the coiled-coil alpha-helical heterodimer molecule. In this study, we have induced lysine-lysine and cysteine-cysteine crosslinks between keratin intermediate filament molecules in small assembly-competent oligomers, isolated them and then characterized the natures and locations of the crosslinks. Of more than 100 found, 21 quantitatively major crosslinks were used to obtain the relative axial alignments of rod domain segments by least-squares fitting methods. Three dominant modes of alignment were found. In each case the molecules are antiparallel with the first involving molecules in approximate register (stagger = -0.2 nm), the second involving molecules staggered so as to bring the 1B segments into approximate alignment (stagger = -16.1 nm), and the third involving molecules staggered so as to bring the 2B segments into approximate alignment (stagger = 28.2 nm). In addition, the data enable quantitative estimates to be made for the first time of the lengths of the non-coiled-coil segments (L1 = 2.5 nm, L12 = 1.6 nm, L2 = 0.8 nm), and the total length of the rod domain (46.0 nm). Alignment of molecules according to these parameters permits construction of a two-dimensional surface lattice which displays a 1.6 nm (10 or 11 residue) overlap between similarly directed molecules. Together, the data predict six important overlapping sequence regions that recur about 16 times per 46 nm of filament length. Interestingly, synthetic peptides corresponding to these sequences, singly or in combination, significantly interfere with keratin filament structural integrity. These results thus represent the most significant set of structural constraints for KIF yet available and

  9. Quantitative study on experimentally observed poroelastic behavior of Berea sandstone in two-phase fluid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hiroki; Aichi, Masaatsu; Tokunaga, Tomochika; Yamamoto, Hajime; Ogawa, Toyokazu; Aoki, Tomoyuki

    2014-08-01

    Coupled two-phase fluid flow and poroelastic deformation of Berea sandstone is studied through laboratory experiment and numerical simulation. In the experiment, compressed air was infiltrated from the bottom of a water-saturated cylindrical Berea sandstone sample under hydrostatic external stress condition. Both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample showed sudden extension and monotonic and gradual extension afterward. Numerical simulation based on thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations was conducted in order to quantitatively analyze the experimental results. In a simulation assuming isotropy of material properties, the volumetric discharge rate of water at the outlet and one of the axial, circumferential, and volumetric strains at half the height of the sample were reproduced well by each parameter set, while the other two strains were not. When introducing transverse isotropy, all the experimental data were reproduced well. In addition, the effect of saturation dependency of Bishop's effective stress coefficient on the deformation behavior of porous media was discussed, and it was found that strains, both axial and circumferential, are sensitive to the coefficient.

  10. Qualitative, quantitative and temporal study of cutting agents for cocaine and heroin over 9 years.

    PubMed

    Broséus, Julian; Gentile, Natacha; Bonadio Pont, Federica; Garcia Gongora, Juan Manuel; Gasté, Laëtitia; Esseiva, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Forensic laboratories mainly focus on the qualification and the quantitation of the illicit drug under analysis as both aspects are used for judiciary purposes. Therefore, information related to cutting agents (adulterants and diluents) detected in illicit drugs is limited in the forensic literature. This article discusses the type and frequency of adulterants and diluents detected in more than 6000 cocaine specimens and 3000 heroin specimens, confiscated in western Switzerland from 2006 to 2014. The results show a homogeneous and quite unchanging adulteration for heroin, while for cocaine it could be characterised as heterogeneous and relatively dynamic. Furthermore, the results indicate that dilution affects more cocaine than heroin. Therefore, the results provided by this study tend to reveal differences between the respective structures of production or distribution of cocaine and heroin. This research seeks to promote the systematic analysis of cutting agents by forensic laboratories. Collecting and processing data related to the presence of cutting agents in illicit drug specimens produces relevant information to understand and to compare the structure of illicit drug markets. PMID:26448535

  11. Quantitative study of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucus by competitive PCR using synthetic DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, T; Kaneko, E; Suzuki, M; Arai, H; Futami, H

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is closely related to upper gastrointestinal diseases, and the precise evaluation of H. pylori infection is necessary for the treatment of these diseases. The aim of the present study was to establish a method for the quantitative detection of H. pylori. We applied a competitive PCR method using various amounts of synthetic DNA fragments containing the same primer-binding and a subset of the same template sequences as the target competing for primer binding and amplification in order to quantify H. pylori in gastric mucus. The results obtained by this method were compared with the results of histological examination, the rapid urease test, bacterial culture, the [13C]urea breath test, and urea and ammonia measurements in gastric juice. As the quantity of H. pylori in gastric mucus increased, the rates of positivity of histological examination, the rapid urease test, and bacterial culture increased. The quantity of H. pylori in gastric mucus was also significantly correlated with the results of the [13C]urea breath test and was negatively correlated with the urea/ammonia ratio in gastric juice. The competitive PCR method provides an objective measure of the quantity of H. pylori and makes it possible to distinguish true negatives from false negatives due to incomplete PCR and true positives from false positives due to contamination. This method is very useful for the precise evaluation of gastric H. pylori infection. PMID:8880492

  12. Contribution of insula in Parkinson's disease: A quantitative meta-analysis study.

    PubMed

    Criaud, Marion; Christopher, Leigh; Boulinguez, Philippe; Ballanger, Benedicte; Lang, Anthony E; Cho, Sang S; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2016-04-01

    The insula region is known to be an integrating hub interacting with multiple brain networks involved in cognitive, affective, sensory, and autonomic processes. There is growing evidence suggesting that this region may have an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, to investigate the functional organization of the insular cortex and its potential role in parkinsonian features, we used a coordinate-based quantitative meta-analysis approach, the activation likelihood estimation. A total of 132 insular foci were selected from 96 published experiments comprising the five functional categories: cognition, affective/behavioral symptoms, bodily awareness/autonomic function, sensorimotor function, and nonspecific resting functional changes associated with the disease. We found a significant convergence of activation maxima related to PD in different insular regions including anterior and posterior regions bilaterally. This study provides evidence of an important functional distribution of different domains within the insular cortex in PD, particularly in relation to nonmotor aspects, with an influence of medication effect. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1375-1392, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800238

  13. A comparative study of quantitative stains for DNA in image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mikel, U V; Becker, R L

    1991-08-01

    In this study we examined the reproducibility of several stains used to measure nuclear DNA by image cytometry. The specimens were touch preparations of liver and testis from mouse and liver, intestine and brain from rat, fixed in either neutral formalin or Carnoy's solution. The tested stains included four Feulgen methods (pararosaniline, azure-A, thionin and acriflavine), the gallocyanine-chromalum stain and two fluorescent stains (acridine orange and propidium iodide). Absorbance measurements employed a video image analysis system; fluorescence measurements were from a scanning microspectrophotometer. The acriflavine-Feulgen stain was analyzed for both absorbance and fluorescence. All seven stains were quantitative for DNA and gave reproducible results. The absorbance measurements had a lower coefficient of variation (CV) than the fluorescence values. In a nested analysis of variance of the pararosaniline Feulgen stains, cell-to-cell variability accounted for 67% of the total variance; slide-to-slide, 9%; and batch-to-batch, 24%. These values did not change significantly when the staining was performed in an automatic staining machine. For DNA analysis using image cytometry, we conclude that the Feulgen staining technique is the most useful. In particular, acriflavine-Feulgen-stained cells fixed in Carnoy's fluid give the least variation between measurement values and the most accurate ratios between the separate ploidy groups. For fluorescence cytometry we recommend Carnoy's fixation and the acriflavine-Feulgen stain because of its narrow CV as compared to acridine orange and propidium iodide. PMID:1718295

  14. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  15. Dietary lipids and blood cholesterol: quantitative meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R.; Frost, C.; Collins, R.; Appleby, P.; Peto, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the quantitative importance of dietary fatty acids and dietary cholesterol to blood concentrations of total, low density lipoprotein, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies of solid food diets in healthy volunteers. SUBJECTS: 395 dietary experiments (median duration 1 month) among 129 groups of individuals. RESULTS: Isocaloric replacement of saturated fats by complex carbohydrates for 10% of dietary calories resulted in blood total cholesterol falling by 0.52 (SE 0.03) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.36 (0.05) mmol/l. Isocaloric replacement of complex carbohydrates by polyunsaturated fats for 5% of dietary calories resulted in total cholesterol falling by a further 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.11 (0.02) mmol/l. Similar replacement of carbohydrates by monounsaturated fats produced no significant effect on total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Avoiding 200 mg/day dietary cholesterol further decreased blood total cholesterol by 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 0.10 (0.02) mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: In typical British diets replacing 60% of saturated fats by other fats and avoiding 60% of dietary cholesterol would reduce blood total cholesterol by about 0.8 mmol/l (that is, by 10-15%), with four fifths of this reduction being in low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:9006469

  16. Quantitative ARG microimaging studies of two muscarinic antagonist isomers: Blocking and the effects of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J.; Oster, Z.H.

    1994-05-01

    The distribution of the racemic mixture of IQNP(1-Azabicyclo [2-2-2] oct-3-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate), a muscarinic antagonist was described earlier. Recently, the radioiodinated Z and E-(R,R) IQNP isomers have been prepared. Quantitative ARG studies using the Z and E isomers were performed in control rats and after pretreatment with ({plus_minus}) QNB or cocaine. High uptake of (Z)-IQNP was seen in the heart and brain with GI and urinary excretion. Lung uptake was lower than with the racemic IQNP. (Z)-IQNP uptake was maximal at 15 min p.i. with homogeneous distribution in the heart. In the brain, highest uptake was in the caudate, cortex, hippocampus, pons and thalamus. (Z)-IQNP showed higher cerebellar uptake and lower cortical uptake compared to (E)-IQNP. Clearance from brain was slower than bean. Heart and brain uptake of (E)-IQNP were markedly lower than the Z isomer. After QNB pretreatment, almost complete blocking of (Z)-IQNP uptake in heart and brain occurred. Cocaine did not significantly affect the distribution of IQNP. These data indicate that (Z)-IQNP has high affinity for the M2 muscarinic receptor with potential for brain and heart imaging. Cocaine appears to have little effect on the muscarinic-cholinergic receptors in the brain and heart.

  17. Extension trial of qigong for fibromyalgia: a quantitative and qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana; Lynch, Mary; Marcon, Dana

    2013-01-01

    This extension trial is an open-label observational trial of 20 subjects with fibromyalgia who undertook level 2 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong (CFQ) training following an earlier controlled trial of level 1 CFQ. Subjects practiced 60 min/day for 8 weeks and continued some daily practice for 6 months. Quantitative measures, assessed at baseline, 8 weeks, 4 and 6 months, were of pain, impact, sleep, physical and mental functions, and practice time. Qualitative comments also were recorded. Compared to baselines, CFQ practice led to significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, and physical function in the 13 subjects (65%) who completed the trial; changes were present at 8 weeks and were maintained for the 6-month trial duration. A highly motivated subgroup of N = 5, who practiced the most, had the best outcomes in terms of end symptomology, and qualitative comments indicated health benefits in other domains as well. Qualitative comments by the remaining N = 8 trial completers and N = 7 withdrawals indicate different experiences with the practice. This extension trial indicates that diligent CFQ practice over time produces significant health gains in fibromyalgia in a subset of individuals. Future studies will need to address factors that might predispose to favourable outcomes. PMID:24069054

  18. Enhancing local action planning through quantitative flood risk analysis: a case study in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Jesica Tamara; Escuder-Bueno, Ignacio; Perales-Momparler, Sara; Ramón Porta-Sancho, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a method to incorporate and promote quantitative risk analysis to support local action planning against flooding. The proposed approach aims to provide a framework for local flood risk analysis, combining hazard mapping with vulnerability data to quantify risk in terms of expected annual affected population, potential injuries, number of fatalities, and economic damages. Flood risk is estimated combining GIS data of loads, system response, and consequences and using event tree modelling for risk calculation. The study area is the city of Oliva, located on the eastern coast of Spain. Results from risk modelling have been used to inform local action planning and to assess the benefits of structural and non-structural risk reduction measures. Results show the potential impact on risk reduction of flood defences and improved warning communication schemes through local action planning: societal flood risk (in terms of annual expected affected population) would be reduced up to 51 % by combining both structural and non-structural measures. In addition, the effect of seasonal population variability is analysed (annual expected affected population ranges from 82 to 107 %, compared with the current situation, depending on occupancy rates in hotels and campsites). Results highlight the need for robust and standardized methods for urban flood risk analysis replicability at regional and national scale.

  19. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  20. A quantitative study relating observed shear in photospheric magnetic fields to repeated flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. B.

    1984-03-01

    In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the shear in the magnetic field along the neutral line in an active region during an epoch of flare activity is presented. Shear is defined as the angular difference in the photosphere between the potential magnetic field, which fits the boundary conditions imposed by the observed line-of-sight field, and the observed magnetic field. For the active region studied, this angular difference (shear) is non-uniform along the neutral line with maxima occurring at the locations of repeated flare onsets. It is suggested that continued magnetic evolution causes the field's maximum shear to exceed a critical value of shear, resulting in a flare around the site of maximum shear. Evidently, the field at the site of the flare must relax to a state of shear somewhat below the critical value (but still far from potential), with subsequent evolution returning the field to the critical threshold. This inference is drawn because several flares occured at sites of maximum photospheric shear which were persistent in location.

  1. A quantitative study relating observed shear in photospheric magnetic fields to repeated flaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the shear in the magnetic field along the neutral line in an active region during an epoch of flare activity is presented. Shear is defined as the angular difference in the photosphere between the potential magnetic field, which fits the boundary conditions imposed by the observed line-of-sight field, and the observed magnetic field. For the active region studied, this angular difference (shear) is non-uniform along the neutral line with maxima occurring at the locations of repeated flare onsets. It is suggested that continued magnetic evolution causes the field's maximum shear to exceed a critical value of shear, resulting in a flare around the site of maximum shear. Evidently, the field at the site of the flare must relax to a state of shear somewhat below the critical value (but still far from potential), with subsequent evolution returning the field to the critical threshold. This inference is drawn because several flares occured at sites of maximum photospheric shear which were persistent in location.

  2. Quantitative Proteomics Study of Larval Settlement in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wong, Yue Him; Ravasi, Timothy; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Barnacles are major sessile components of the intertidal areas worldwide, and also one of the most dominant fouling organisms in fouling communities. Larval settlement has a crucial ecological effect not only on the distribution of the barnacle population but also intertidal community structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stage remain largely unclear. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomic profiles of stage II nauplii, stage VI nauplii, cyprids, and juveniles of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite using label-free quantitative proteomics, followed by the measurement of the gene expression levels of candidate proteins. More than 700 proteins were identified at each stage; 80 were significantly up-regulated in cyprids and 95 in juveniles vs other stages. Specifically, proteins involved in energy and metabolism, the nervous system and signal transduction were significantly up-regulated in cyprids, whereas proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and differentiation, and biomineralization were up-regulated in juveniles, consistent with changes associated with larval metamorphosis and tissue remodeling in juveniles. These findings provided molecular evidence for the morphological, physiological and biological changes that occur during the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stages in B. amphitrite. PMID:24551147

  3. Prospective image registration for automated scan prescription of follow-up knee images in quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Goldenstein, Janet; Schooler, Joseph; Crane, Jason C; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-06-01

    Consistent scan prescription for MRI of the knee is very important for accurate comparison of images in a longitudinal study. However, consistent scan region selection is difficult due to the complexity of the knee joint. We propose a novel method for registering knee images using a mutual information registration algorithm to align images in a baseline and follow-up exam. The output of the registration algorithm, three translations and three Euler angles, is then used to redefine the region to be imaged and acquire an identical oblique imaging volume in the follow-up exam as in the baseline. This algorithm is robust to articulation of the knee and anatomical abnormalities due to disease (e.g., osteophytes). The registration method is performed only on the distal femur and is not affected by the proximal tibia or soft tissues. We have incorporated this approach in a clinical MR system and have demonstrated its utility in automatically obtaining consistent scan regions between baseline and follow-up examinations, thus improving the precision of quantitative evaluation of cartilage. Results show an improvement with prospective registration in the coefficient of variation for cartilage thickness, cartilage volume and T2 relaxation measurements. PMID:21546186

  4. Quantitative study of ruthenium cross-over in direct methanol fuel cells during early operation hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoekel, A.; Melke, J.; Bruns, M.; Wippermann, K.; Kuppler, F.; Roth, C.

    2016-01-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), ruthenium cross-over is an important degradation phenomenon. The loss of ruthenium from the anode, its transport through the membrane and its deposition onto the cathode are detrimental to the fuel cell performance and limit the fuel cell's lifetime. Here we present a quantitative study on the fraction of ruthenium being transferred from the anode to the cathode during early operation hours (0-100 h) of a DMFC. Already during fabrication of the MEA ruthenium is transferred to the cathode. In our pristine MEAs about 0.024 wt% Ru could be found in the cathode catalyst. The cell potential during operation seems to have only a minor influence on the dissolution process. In contrast, the operation time appears to be much more important. Our data hint at two dissolution processes: a fast process dominating the first hours of operation and a slower process, which is responsible for the ongoing ruthenium transfer during the fuel cell lifetime. After 2 h held at open circuit conditions the Ru content of the cathode side was 10 times higher than in the pristine MEA. In contrast, the slower process increased that amount only by a factor of two over the course of another 100 h.

  5. Functional Connectivity and Quantitative EEG in Women with Alcohol Use Disorders: A Resting-State Study.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Díaz, Adianes; Mendoza-Quiñones, Raúl; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo; Sanabria-Diaz, Gretel; Romero-Quintana, Yuniel; Salazar-Guerra, Iraklys; Carballoso-Acosta, Mario; Caballero-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the electroencephalographic features associated with alcohol use disorders (AUD) during a resting-state condition, by using quantitative EEG and Functional Connectivity analyses. In addition, we explored whether EEG functional connectivity is associated with trait impulsivity. Absolute and relative powers and Synchronization Likelihood (SL) as a measure of functional connectivity were analyzed in 15 AUD women and fifteen controls matched in age, gender and education. Correlation analysis between self-report impulsivity as measured by the Barratt impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and SL values of AUD patients were performed. Our results showed increased absolute and relative beta power in AUD patients compared to matched controls, and reduced functional connectivity in AUD patients predominantly in the beta and alpha bands. Impaired connectivity was distributed at fronto-central and occipito-parietal regions in the alpha band, and over the entire scalp in the beta band. We also found that impaired functional connectivity particularly in alpha band at fronto-central areas was negative correlated with non-planning dimension of impulsivity. These findings suggest that functional brain abnormalities are present in AUD patients and a disruption of resting-state EEG functional connectivity is associated with psychopathological traits of addictive behavior. PMID:26660886

  6. A genome-wide linkage scan for iron phenotype quantitative trait loci: the HEIRS Family Study.

    PubMed

    Acton, R T; Snively, B M; Barton, J C; McLaren, C E; Adams, P C; Rich, S S; Eckfeldt, J H; Press, R D; Sholinsky, P; Leiendecker-Foster, C; McLaren, G D; Speechley, M R; Harris, E L; Dawkins, F W; Gordeuk, V R

    2007-06-01

    Iron overload phenotypes in persons with and without hemochromatosis are variable. To investigate this further, probands with hemochromatosis or evidence of elevated iron stores and their family members were recruited for a genome-wide linkage scan to identify potential quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to variation in transferrin saturation (TS), unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC), and serum ferritin (SF). Genotyping utilized 402 microsatellite markers with average spacing of 9 cM. A total of 943 individuals, 64% Caucasian, were evaluated from 174 families. After adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, there was evidence for linkage of UIBC to chromosome 4q logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 2.08, p = 0.001) and of UIBC (LOD = 9.52), TS (LOD = 4.78), and SF (LOD = 2.75) to the chromosome 6p region containing HFE (each p < 0.0001). After adjustments for HFE genotype and other covariates, there was evidence of linkage of SF to chromosome 16p (LOD = 2.63, p = 0.0007) and of UIBC to chromosome 5q (LOD = 2.12, p = 0.002) and to chromosome 17q (LOD = 2.19, p = 0.002). We conclude that these regions should be considered for fine mapping studies to identify QTL that contribute to variation in SF and UIBC. PMID:17539901

  7. A quantitative study on accumulation of age mass around stagnation points in nested flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Ge, Shemin; Cao, Guo-Liang; Hou, Guang-Cai; Hu, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong; Liang, Si-Hai

    2012-12-01

    The stagnant zones in nested flow systems have been assumed to be critical to accumulation of transported matter, such as metallic ions and hydrocarbons in drainage basins. However, little quantitative research has been devoted to prove this assumption. In this paper, the transport of age mass is used as an example to demonstrate that transported matter could accumulate around stagnation points. The spatial distribution of model age is analyzed in a series of drainage basins of different depths. We found that groundwater age has a local or regional maximum value around each stagnation point, which proves the accumulation of age mass. In basins where local, intermediate and regional flow systems are all well developed, the regional maximum groundwater age occurs at the regional stagnation point below the basin valley. This can be attributed to the long travel distances of regional flow systems as well as stagnancy of the water. However, when local flow systems dominate, the maximum groundwater age in the basin can be located around the local stagnation points due to stagnancy, which are far away from the basin valley. A case study is presented to illustrate groundwater flow and age in the Ordos Plateau, northwestern China. The accumulation of age mass around stagnation points is confirmed by tracer age determined by 14C dating in two boreholes and simulated age near local stagnation points under different dispersivities. The results will help shed light on the relationship between groundwater flow and distributions of groundwater age, hydrochemistry, mineral resources, and hydrocarbons in drainage basins.

  8. Multiplexed and quantitative study of biomarker expression in tumor specimens using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Aileen; True, Lawrence; Gao, Xiaohu

    2006-02-01

    When conjugated with targeting molecules, quantum dots (QD) can be used as powerful cancer diagnostic tools providing the molecular profiles of cancer cases based on common clinical biopsies. Such personalized analyses will enable doctors to treat and manage the patients' diseases more effectively. The unique optical properties (e.g., size-tunable emission, simultaneous excitation, high brightness and photostability) of these nanoparticles make them superior to conventionally popular organic fluorophores 1-2. Polymer-encapsulated, antibody-tagged QDs were prepared and used to successfully stain both fixed and live cells as well as clinical formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. In the tissue staining study, QD bioconjugates targeting mutated p53 and early growth response protein (egr-1) were used to examine prostate cancer tissues. The tissue slides were then analyzed with a wavelength-resolved spectrometer to accurately quantify the protein expression levels. In comparison to traditional qualitatively based diagnostic procedures, quantum dot nanotechnology allows for a more quantitative, rigorous and objective analysis of tissue specimens in question. In addition, new developments in imaging instrumentation could automate spectroscopy measurements and data analysis.

  9. Ictal and interictal phonophobia in migraine—a quantitative controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, A.; Mushtaq, A.; Yang, I.; Oshinsky, ML.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate quantitatively ictal and interictal phonophobia in episodic migraine (EM). We included subjects with EM and age- and gender-matched controls. Sound stimuli were pure tones at frequencies of 1000, 4000 and 8000 Hz. Sound aversion thresholds (SATs) were determined as the minimal sound intensity perceived as unpleasant or painful. Migraineurs were examined both between and during attacks. We compared interictal SATs in migraineurs with those in controls. We also compared ictal and interictal SATs in migraineurs. Sixty migraineurs and 52 controls were included. Interictal mean SAT of migraineurs, averaged for the three frequencies, was significantly lower than that of controls [90.4 (0.8) dB vs. 105.9 (1.1) dB, respectively, P < 0.0001]. In migraineurs, mean ictal SAT, averaged for the three frequencies, was significantly lower than interictal SAT [76.0 (0.9) dB vs. 91.0 (0.8) dB, respectively, P < 0.0001]. Patients with EM exhibit increased sound aversion between attacks that is further augmented during an acute attack. PMID:19735532

  10. Quantitative study on dispersion relations of TIDs observed by an HF Doppler array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsutsui, M.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative study on the dispersion relation of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) was performed by using data obtained by an HF Doppler array. Observed data at three stations are digitized continuously with a sampling period of 10 sec. A schematic illustration of a running analysis method is given. Fourier components omega's and their wave vectors k's of the TIDs are calculated from these subset data from three stations by means of the cross-spectrum analysis. Diagrams of horizontal trace velocity V sub ph versus wave period T were also obtained. From these diagrams one can see clear cutoff periods of the internal mode of the atmospheric gravity waves. A morphological classification of the mode of the omega - k and V sub ph - T obtained through one year was performed. The estimation of the horizontal velocity vectors of the thermospheric wind form their dispersion relations was performed also. A key point of the method of obtaining the vectors is to estimate the tilt, in azimuthally different omega - k diagrams, of a resonant branch ascribed to the Brunt oscillations.

  11. Recommended Methods for Brain Processing and Quantitative Analysis in Rodent Developmental Neurotoxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    Garman, Robert H; Li, Abby A; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Auer, Roland N; Bolon, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathology methods in rodent developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) studies have evolved with experience and changing regulatory guidance. This article emphasizes principles and methods to promote more standardized DNT neuropathology evaluation, particularly procurement of highly homologous brain sections and collection of the most reproducible morphometric measurements. To minimize bias, brains from all animals at all dose levels should be processed from brain weighing through paraffin embedding at one time using a counterbalanced design. Morphometric measurements should be anchored by distinct neuroanatomic landmarks that can be identified reliably on the faced block or in unstained sections and which address the region-specific circuitry of the measured area. Common test article-related qualitative changes in the developing brain include abnormal cell numbers (yielding altered regional size), displaced cells (ectopia and heterotopia), and/or aberrant differentiation (indicated by defective myelination or synaptogenesis), but rarely glial or inflammatory reactions. Inclusion of digital images in the DNT pathology raw data provides confidence that the quantitative analysis was done on anatomically matched (i.e., highly homologous) sections. Interpreting DNT neuropathology data and their presumptive correlation with neurobehavioral data requires an integrative weight-of-evidence approach including consideration of maternal toxicity, body weight, brain weight, and the pattern of findings across brain regions, doses, sexes, and ages. PMID:26296631

  12. Linkage disequilibrium fine mapping of quantitative trait loci: A simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Jihad M; Goffinet, Bruno; Cierco-Ayrolles, Christine; Pérez-Enciso, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the use of linkage disequilibrium (LD) to locate genes which affect quantitative traits (QTL) has received an increasing interest, but the plausibility of fine mapping using linkage disequilibrium techniques for QTL has not been well studied. The main objectives of this work were to (1) measure the extent and pattern of LD between a putative QTL and nearby markers in finite populations and (2) investigate the usefulness of LD in fine mapping QTL in simulated populations using a dense map of multiallelic or biallelic marker loci. The test of association between a marker and QTL and the power of the test were calculated based on single-marker regression analysis. The results show the presence of substantial linkage disequilibrium with closely linked marker loci after 100 to 200 generations of random mating. Although the power to test the association with a frequent QTL of large effect was satisfactory, the power was low for the QTL with a small effect and/or low frequency. More powerful, multi-locus methods may be required to map low frequent QTL with small genetic effects, as well as combining both linkage and linkage disequilibrium information. The results also showed that multiallelic markers are more useful than biallelic markers to detect linkage disequilibrium and association at an equal distance. PMID:12939203

  13. Extension Trial of Qigong for Fibromyalgia: A Quantitative and Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Mary; Marcon, Dana

    2013-01-01

    This extension trial is an open-label observational trial of 20 subjects with fibromyalgia who undertook level 2 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong (CFQ) training following an earlier controlled trial of level 1 CFQ. Subjects practiced 60 min/day for 8 weeks and continued some daily practice for 6 months. Quantitative measures, assessed at baseline, 8 weeks, 4 and 6 months, were of pain, impact, sleep, physical and mental functions, and practice time. Qualitative comments also were recorded. Compared to baselines, CFQ practice led to significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, and physical function in the 13 subjects (65%) who completed the trial; changes were present at 8 weeks and were maintained for the 6-month trial duration. A highly motivated subgroup of N = 5, who practiced the most, had the best outcomes in terms of end symptomology, and qualitative comments indicated health benefits in other domains as well. Qualitative comments by the remaining N = 8 trial completers and N = 7 withdrawals indicate different experiences with the practice. This extension trial indicates that diligent CFQ practice over time produces significant health gains in fibromyalgia in a subset of individuals. Future studies will need to address factors that might predispose to favourable outcomes. PMID:24069054

  14. Wetlab-2 - Quantitative PCR Tools for Spaceflight Studies of Gene Expression Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Wetlab-2 is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the International Space Station. The system enables spaceflight genomic studies involving a wide variety of biospecimen types in the unique microgravity environment of space. Currently, gene expression analyses of space flown biospecimens must be conducted post flight after living cultures or frozen or chemically fixed samples are returned to Earth from the space station. Post-flight analysis is limited for several reasons. First, changes in gene expression can be transient, changing over a timescale of minutes. The delay between sampling on Earth can range from days to months, and RNA may degrade during this period of time, even in fixed or frozen samples. Second, living organisms that return to Earth may quickly re-adapt to terrestrial conditions. Third, forces exerted on samples during reentry and return to Earth may affect results. Lastly, follow up experiments designed in response to post-flight results must wait for a new flight opportunity to be tested.

  15. Myelin and iron concentration in the human brain: a quantitative study of MRI contrast.

    PubMed

    Stüber, Carsten; Morawski, Markus; Schäfer, Andreas; Labadie, Christian; Wähnert, Miriam; Leuze, Christoph; Streicher, Markus; Barapatre, Nirav; Reimann, Katja; Geyer, Stefan; Spemann, Daniel; Turner, Robert

    2014-06-01

    During the last five years ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled an unprecedented view of living human brain. Brain tissue contrast in most MRI sequences is known to reflect mainly the spatial distributions of myelin and iron. These distributions have been shown to overlap significantly in many brain regions, especially in the cortex. It is of increasing interest to distinguish and identify cortical areas by their appearance in MRI, which has been shown to be feasible in vivo. Parcellation can benefit greatly from quantification of the independent contributions of iron and myelin to MRI contrast. Recent studies using susceptibility mapping claim to allow such a separation of the effects of myelin and iron in MRI. We show, using post-mortem human brain tissue, that this goal can be achieved. After MRI scanning of the block with appropriate T1 mapping and T2* weighted sequences, we section the block and apply a novel technique, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), to spatially map iron, phosphorus and sulfur elemental concentrations, simultaneously with 1μm spatial resolution. Because most brain phosphorus is located in myelin phospholipids, a calibration step utilizing element maps of sulfur enables semi-quantitative ex vivo mapping of myelin concentration. Combining results for iron and myelin concentration in a linear model, we have accurately modeled MRI tissue contrasts. Conversely, iron and myelin concentrations can now be estimated from appropriate MRI measurements in post-mortem brain samples. PMID:24607447

  16. Chemometric study of Andalusian extra virgin olive oils Raman spectra: Qualitative and quantitative information.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, E; Sánchez-Rodríguez, M I; Marinas, A; Marinas, J M; Urbano, F J; Caridad, J M; Moalem, M

    2016-08-15

    Authentication of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is an important topic for olive oil industry. The fraudulent practices in this sector are a major problem affecting both producers and consumers. This study analyzes the capability of FT-Raman combined with chemometric treatments of prediction of the fatty acid contents (quantitative information), using gas chromatography as the reference technique, and classification of diverse EVOOs as a function of the harvest year, olive variety, geographical origin and Andalusian PDO (qualitative information). The optimal number of PLS components that summarizes the spectral information was introduced progressively. For the estimation of the fatty acid composition, the lowest error (both in fitting and prediction) corresponded to MUFA, followed by SAFA and PUFA though such errors were close to zero in all cases. As regards the qualitative variables, discriminant analysis allowed a correct classification of 94.3%, 84.0%, 89.0% and 86.6% of samples for harvest year, olive variety, geographical origin and PDO, respectively. PMID:27260451

  17. Study of Basic Coagulation Parameters among HIV Patients in Correlation to CD4 Counts and ART Status

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, D; Rachakatla, Praveen; Bharathi, K; Afroz, Tameem; Sagar, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is known to cause coagulation abnormalities by various mechanism, especially during its late course. Aim The objective of this study was to analyse platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time among HIV infected patients and to analyse these parameters with respect to their CD4 count and ART status. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted with 120 HIV infected patients and 40 normal individuals. The blood samples were collected after obtaining consent from the subjects. The blood samples were processed for platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time and CD4 count. The results were tabulated and analysed with statistical package. Results The platelet count was significantly decreased in HIV infected patients compared to controls. Though HIV patients with CD4 count less than 200cells/mm3 showed a decreased platelet count compared to those with CD4 count greater than 200cells/mm3, it was not statistically significant. Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) was significantly prolonged in HIV patients, but only aPTT showed significant inverse correlation with CD4 count. None of the parameters showed statistical significance on comparing HIV patients on ART with those not on ART. Conclusion Basic coagulation tests like platelet count, PT and especially aPTT can be used as prospective screening test to assess severity in HIV patients in resource limited settings where CD4 count is not available. PMID:27437222

  18. Basic science highlights.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The 14th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections generated a lot of excitement with the announcement of clinical studies employing the use of 2 new classes of antiretroviral drugs that target the viral integrase enzyme and the viral coreceptor CCR5. In addition, a number of presentations on cellular restriction factors provided surprises regarding the mechanism by which cellular restrictions antagonize viral infection. There was also much interest in studies presenting novel cellular cofactors of HIV-1 infection. The conference illustrated how basic science research is paying off. Essential steps in the viral life cycle, uncovered through basic research, are now being targeted by new classes of antiviral agents. In addition, basic science is unveiling potential new targets of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:17485783

  19. From the podium to the PC: a study on various modalities of lecture delivery within an undergraduate basic pharmacology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jason W.; McQueeney, Maureen L.

    2011-07-01

    Background. The need to evolve with our ever-changing student bodies has never been as great as it is today, particularly given the advanced technological aptitude of today's students. Purpose This retrospective study evaluates student outcomes as they relate to overall course score and composite quiz and examination scores from a basic pharmacology course taught over three separate semesters using three different lecture delivery modalities: traditional in-class; blended; and online-only. Sample A total of 48 students from a US university's health sciences bachelor degree programme enrolled in one of these three sections between 2009 and 2010. Design and methods A one-way analysis of variance test with Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc testing was utilized to determine if any statistical difference existed between the studied outcomes for each of the three teaching modalities. A p-value of less than or equal to 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The students enrolled in the online-only course scored statistically significantly higher than their counterparts enrolled on the traditional course for all studied outcomes, and higher than those enrolled on the blended course for most of the studied outcomes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that students enrolled in the online-only section achieved scores that were statistically significantly higher than their counterparts enrolled in the traditional and blended lecture settings. These findings reveal that students enrolled in an online course may in fact have improved performance compared with traditional lecture methods, given their generational preferences for learning.

  20. High Energy Density Plasmas (HEDP) for studies of basic nuclear science relevant to Stellar and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear processes have been explored traditionally by means of conventional accelerator experiments, which are difficult to execute at conditions relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis. Thus, nuclear reactions at stellar energies are often studied through extrapolations from higher-energy data or in low-background underground experiments. Even when measurements are possible using accelerators at relevant energies, thermonuclear reaction rates in stars are inherently different from those in accelerator experiments. The fusing nuclei are surrounded by bound electrons in accelerator experiments, whereas electrons occupy mainly continuum states in a stellar environment. Nuclear astrophysics research will therefore benefit from an enlarged toolkit for studies of nuclear reactions. In this presentation, we report on the first use of High Energy Density Plasmas for studies of nuclear reactions relevant to basic nuclear science, stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. These experiments were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility at University of Rochester and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in which spherical capsules were irradiated with powerful lasers to compress and heat the fuel to high enough temperatures and densities for nuclear reactions to occur. Four experiments will be highlighted in this presentation. In the first experiment, the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-T) scattering at 14.1 MeV was measured with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in accelerator experiments. In the second experiment, the T(t,2n)4He reaction, a mirror reaction to the 3He(3He,2p)4He reaction that plays an important role in the proton-proton chain that transforms hydrogen into ordinary 4He in stars like our Sun, was studied at energies in the range 15-40 keV. In the third experiment, the 3He+3He solar fusion reaction was studied directly, and in the fourth experiment, we