Science.gov

Sample records for quantitative basicity studies

  1. Rote Learning in the Age of Technology: A Quantitative Study of a Career and Technical High School and the Practical Use of Basic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotreau Berube, Elyse A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to investigate the use of rote learning in basic skills of mathematics and spelling of 12 high school students, from a career and technical high school, in an effort to learn if the pedagogy of rote fits in the frameworks of today's education. The study compared the accuracy of…

  2. Basic Skills in Asian Studies: India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    Designed for an Asian studies program at the secondary level and using learning activities centering on India, the guide develops four basic skills: reading, applying critical thinking, interpreting the geography, and understanding history. Five learning activities are provided for each basic skill and each unit is introduced with a description…

  3. Basic Facts on Study Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on International Educational Exchange, New York, NY.

    This guide for students interested in studying abroad gives an overview of the factors to be considered and the choices to be made and provides references to sources of further information. The following topics are addressed: (1) planning (academic objectives, location, the third world, language proficiency, special laws, the disabled); (2)…

  4. Basic studies of baroclinic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Tim L.; Chou, S.-H.; Leslie, Fred W.; Lu, H.-I.; Butler, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computations were completed of transition curves in the conventional annulus, including hysteresis effect. The model GEOSIM was used to compute the transition between axisymmetric flow and baroclinic wave flow in the conventional annulus experiments. Thorough testing and documentation of the GEOSIM code were also completed. The Spacelab 3 results from the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) were reviewed and numerical modeling was performed of many of the cases with horizontal temperature gradients as well as heating from below, with different rates of rotation. A numerical study of the lower transition to axisymmetric flow in the baroclinic annulus was performed using GEOSIM.

  5. Relating clinical study design to basic research.

    PubMed

    Choh, V; Priolo, S

    1999-07-01

    Devising any research study involves careful attention to its design, as well as the development of an appropriate research question and hypothesis. Together, these attributes ensure the validity of the study in question. In most clinical or epidemiological studies, the types of research designs are often explicitly noted, whereas in papers describing basic or biological research, they are couched in different terms or, more often, are ignored, thus potentially hindering communication between basic and clinical researchers. However, given that the framework for all valid scientific research is based on sound logic, it is proposed that for each study design, a direct homology exists between clinical and basic research paradigms, despite the problem of relating epidemiological vernacular to basic research. By applying examples of basic research protocols to traditional clinical study designs, this paper shows that parallels can be drawn between the two strategies, suggesting that in the absence of a conventional nomenclature to describe basic research study designs, the use of traditional clinical design jargon is valid in describing basic research protocols. PMID:10445637

  6. Adult Basic Education Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Ruth

    The Gateway Technical Institute's followup study on former adult basic education (ABE) students is examined in this report, which focuses primarily on the process of the study. Since the Gateway study complemented objective measures of program effectiveness with a perspective that is often missing in program evaluations, namely, former…

  7. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    SciTech Connect

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  8. Basic Studies: A Description and Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles N.; And Others

    This is a description and a progress report of the Basic Studies Program at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas), a 1-year program in general education designed for students who rank in the lower quarter of their junior college class and who have experienced little academic success in the past. Communications, humanities, social science, natural…

  9. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1989-09-01

    The scientific direction of the work in this grant is unchanged and the 12 research projects in the three major categories represent only minor modification from the proposed work given at site visit. Adjustment was necessary in keeping with the award and to accommodate the resignation of Dr. S. John Gatley who took a position at the Brookhaven National Laboratories. Significant progress is being made in each scientific area with principal responsibility in radiochemistry now assumed by J. Mukherjee and S. Murphy, both of whom have contributed major advances in their areas of fluorination of receptor ligands for studies of the dopaminergic system and approaches to studies of the glutamate type II receptors, respectively. C.T. Chen's work in quantitative method approaches to image integration and analysis continues to receive national and international attention. Similar attention is being given to J. Metz and H. deWit with their work on the effects of drugs of dependency on mood and regional brain metabolism. Resource development in the overall program has been substantial. An equipment grant totaling $350,000 was awarded to the Frank Center for Image Analysis of the FMI by the W.M. Keck Foundation through The University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory Center for Imaging Science for purchasing computer systems for graphic display, visualization of 2D and 3D image data, and fast computation. We have purchased nine VAXstations, five DECstations, two SUN/SPARCstations, one AT T Pixel Machine system, and the associated communication links for networking. These systems are currently being installed and tested. This facility will provide added computation capabilities for and facilitate the development of the research projects. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Comprehensive Identification and Quantitation of Basic Building Blocks for Low-Molecular Weight Heparin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaojun; Sheng, Anran; Liu, Xinyue; Shi, Feng; Jin, Lan; Xie, Shaoshuai; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Chi, Lianli

    2016-08-01

    Low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are widely used anticoagulant drugs. They inherit the heterogeneous backbone sequences of the parent heparin, while the chemical depolymerization process modifies the nonreducing end (NRE) and reducing end (RE) of their sugar chains. Some side reactions may also occur and increase the structural complexity of LMWHs. It is important to precisely characterize the structures of LMWHs, especially their chemical modifications, to ensure drug quality and safety. Compositional analysis provides a powerful approach to reveal the building blocks that make up the LMWHs, which are the mutual consequence of the heparin starting materials and the manufacturing process. Here, we introduce a comprehensive analytical method to recover the most basic building blocks of LMWHs. A strategy of combining both enzymatic digestion and oxidative degradation of LMWH was used to make the NRE, RE, and backbone structures differentiable from one another. Satisfactory separation, identification, and quantitation were achieved by coupling hydrophilic interaction chromatography with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. After enzymatic digestion, over 30 species were detected, with both natural and chemically modified heparin basic building blocks. Two novel structures, including a trisaccharide containing two glucosamine residues and a tetrasaccharide containing a 3-O-sulfated uronic acid residue, were discovered. Reduced and oxidatively degraded samples were analyzed to provide the complementary information on both termini of LMWHs. The reproducibility of this method was evaluated, and enoxaparin injections were analyzed to demonstrate the application of this method for evaluating the sameness of LMWH products. PMID:27388010

  11. A hybrid approach to advancing quantitative prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs in human

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Patrick; Ekins, Sean; Theil, Frank-Peter

    2011-01-15

    A general toxicity of basic drugs is related to phospholipidosis in tissues. Therefore, it is essential to predict the tissue distribution of basic drugs to facilitate an initial estimate of that toxicity. The objective of the present study was to further assess the original prediction method that consisted of using the binding to red blood cells measured in vitro for the unbound drug (RBCu) as a surrogate for tissue distribution, by correlating it to unbound tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kpu) of several tissues, and finally to predict volume of distribution at steady-state (V{sub ss}) in humans under in vivo conditions. This correlation method demonstrated inaccurate predictions of V{sub ss} for particular basic drugs that did not follow the original correlation principle. Therefore, the novelty of this study is to provide clarity on the actual hypotheses to identify i) the impact of pharmacological mode of action on the generic correlation of RBCu-Kpu, ii) additional mechanisms of tissue distribution for the outlier drugs, iii) molecular features and properties that differentiate compounds as outliers in the original correlation analysis in order to facilitate its applicability domain alongside the properties already used so far, and finally iv) to present a novel and refined correlation method that is superior to what has been previously published for the prediction of human V{sub ss} of basic drugs. Applying a refined correlation method after identifying outliers would facilitate the prediction of more accurate distribution parameters as key inputs used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and phospholipidosis models.

  12. Basic Skills in Asian Studies: Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    This publication contains 20 learning activities for developing basic skills while teaching about Japan at the secondary level. The activities are self-contained and each consists of a short description, followed by a five-item true or false test and five open-ended questions for student practice. The learning activities are followed by a…

  13. Basic Weather Facts Study Texts for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This pamphlet offers information to teachers and students concerning basic facts about weather and how to construct simple weather measurement devices. Directions, necessary materials, procedures, and instructions for use are given for four weather predicting instruments: wind vane, rain gauge, barometer, anemometer. Information is provided on…

  14. Quantitative genetic studies of antisocial behaviour.

    PubMed

    Viding, Essi; Larsson, Henrik; Jones, Alice P

    2008-08-12

    This paper will broadly review the currently available twin and adoption data on antisocial behaviour (AB). It is argued that quantitative genetic research can make a significant contribution to further the understanding of how AB develops. Genetically informative study designs are particularly useful for investigating several important questions such as whether: the heritability estimates vary as a function of assessment method or gender; the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences varies for different types of AB; the environmental risk factors are truly environmental; and genetic vulnerability influences susceptibility to environmental risk. While the current data are not yet directly translatable for prevention and treatment programmes, quantitative genetic research has concrete translational potential. Quantitative genetic research can supplement neuroscience research in informing about different subtypes of AB, such as AB coupled with callous-unemotional traits. Quantitative genetic research is also important in advancing the understanding of the mechanisms by which environmental risk operates. PMID:18434281

  15. Social Indicators of Basic Needs: Quantitative Data for Human Rights Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Neufville, Judith Innes

    Developing social indicators of basic human needs involves (1) recognizing the problems in selection, (2) identifying the criteria for making selections, (3) choosing which basic needs to cover, and (4) selecting the indicators. The social indicators are to help formulate U.S. foreign policy and will be used by the State Department's Bureau of…

  16. Informetrics - A New Area of Quantitative Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormell, Irene

    2000-01-01

    Describes the merging field of informetrics in a historical perspective as a generalization of bibliometrics, combining advanced information retrieval theories and methodologies with the quantitative study of information flow. Explains programs at the Center for Information Studies at the Royal School of Library and Information Science in…

  17. How to Study: The Neglected Basic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Wayne C.; Wilson, Brent G.

    This paper examines knowledge of studying--knowing how and when to apply study strategies. Study strategies may be classified into three categories: memory strategies, comprehension strategies, and problem-solving strategies. Memory-study strategies help students remember what they study. Five attributes often characterize memory strategies:…

  18. Critical Quantitative Study of Immigrant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The author discusses the importance of critical quantitative research for studies of immigrant students, a large and growing group, whose higher education experience is crucial to the future of the United States. The author outlines some of the distinctions to be made among immigrant students and recommends areas of future inquiry.

  19. The Social Studies Basic Skills Connection: Practical Strategies for Teaching Basic Skills in Conjunction with Social Studies Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Education, Jefferson City.

    Arranged in two parts, this guide introduces elementary and secondary social studies teachers to a variety of methods for integrating social studies content and basic skills instruction. Chapter I defines basic skills as the skills an individual needs to become a self-directed learner, communicate clearly, and make reasoned decisions, and presents…

  20. Foreign Language Study: One of the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Kenneth D.

    1983-01-01

    Documenting the decline in foreign language literacy among Americans and the decrease in foreign language requirements in high schools and colleges, the author stresses the intrinsic value of learning languages. He makes recommendations for improving foreign language study and attitudes toward it. (SK)

  1. Whither Soviet Studies: Back to Basics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    1981-01-01

    The author traces changes in American social studies teaching about the Soviet Union over the past 30 years. He finds that these changes parallel shifts in the political mentality from the Cold War, through detente, to America's renewed suspicion following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. (SJL)

  2. Basic studies in microwave remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Adrian K.; Bredow, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Scattering models were developed in support of microwave remote sensing of earth terrains with particular emphasis on model applications to airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar measurements of forest. Practically useful surface scattering models based on a solution of a pair of integral equations including multiple scattering effects were developed. Comparisons of these models with controlled scattering measurements from statistically known random surfaces indicate that they are valid over a wide range of frequencies. Scattering models treating a forest environment as a two and three layered media were also developed. Extensive testing and comparisons were carried out with the two layered model. Further studies with the three layered model are being carried out. A volume scattering model valid for dense media such as a snow layer was also developed that shows the appropriate trend dependence with the volume fraction of scatterers.

  3. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The quantitative analysis of the vascularization following two basic auditory canal skin incisions.

    PubMed

    Cvjetković, Niko; Velepic, Mitja S; Velepic, Marko M; Komljenović, Dejan; Zauhar, Gordana

    2003-06-01

    Three groups of nine patients each were analyzed. The first two groups consisted of those that underwent tympanoplastic due to chronic inflammation of middle ear. Two different standard auditory canal skin incisions were applied, i.e. tympanomeatal flap (TMF) or vascular strip (VS). The third control group consisted of non-operated patients. All the operated patients were subjected to a quantitative analysis of the auditory canal revascularization by means of the Weibel stereological test method, i.e. the B 100 double network system. The density of capillaries, arterioles, venulolymphatic spaces and a total volume density of all vascular elements of the auditory canal skin were measured. The obtained results of vascularization were compared with those of the target control group. It was found out that there were no significant differences in vascularization of auditory canal skin between TMF and VS patients from one side and the control group on the other side. PMID:12974157

  5. Basic studies on intravascular low-intensity laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Duan, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Jin, Hua; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Intravascular low intensity laser therapy (ILILT) was originally put forward in USA in 1982, but popularized in Russia in 1980s and in China in 1990s, respectively. A randomized placebo-controlled study has shown ILILT clinical efficacy in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. As Chinese therapeutic applications of ILILT were the most widely in the world, its basic research, such as intracellular signal transduction research, blood research in vitro, animal blood research in vivo, human blood research in vivo and traditional Chinese medicine research, was also very progressive in China. Its basic studies will be reviewed in terms of the biological information model of photobiomodulation in this paper. ILILT might work in view of its basic studies, but the further randomized placebo-controlled trial and the further safety research should be done.

  6. Basic concepts in three-part quantitative assessments of undiscovered mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1975, mineral resource assessments have been made for over 27 areas covering 5??106 km2 at various scales using what is now called the three-part form of quantitative assessment. In these assessments, (1) areas are delineated according to the types of deposits permitted by the geology,(2) the amount of metal and some ore characteristics are estimated using grade and tonnage models, and (3) the number of undiscovered deposits of each type is estimated. Permissive boundaries are drawn for one or more deposit types such that the probability of a deposit lying outside the boundary is negligible, that is, less than 1 in 100,000 to 1,000,000. Grade and tonnage models combined with estimates of the number of deposits are the fundamental means of translating geologists' resource assessments into a language that economists can use. Estimates of the number of deposits explicitly represent the probability (or degree of belief) that some fixed but unknown number of undiscovered deposits exist in the delineated tracts. Estimates are by deposit type and must be consistent with the grade and tonnage model. Other guidelines for these estimates include (1) frequency of deposits from well-explored areas, (2) local deposit extrapolations, (3) counting and assigning probabilities to anomalies and occurrences, (4) process constraints, (5) relative frequencies of related deposit types, and (6) area spatial limits. In most cases, estimates are made subjectively, as they are in meteorology, gambling, and geologic interpretations. In three-part assessments, the estimates are internally consistent because delineated tracts are consistent with descriptive models, grade and tonnage models are consistent with descriptive models, as well as with known deposits in the area, and estimates of number of deposits are consistent with grade and tonnage models. All available information is used in the assessment, and uncertainty is explicitly represented. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN NEUROSURGERY: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Kwasnicki, Richard M; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    Object Technological innovation within healthcare may be defined as the introduction of a new technology that initiates a change in clinical practice. Neurosurgery is a particularly technologically intensive surgical discipline, and new technologies have preceded many of the major advances in operative neurosurgical technique. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery using patents and peer-reviewed publications as metrics of technology development and clinical translation respectively. Methods A patent database was searched between 1960 and 2010 using the search terms “neurosurgeon” OR “neurosurgical” OR “neurosurgery”. The top 50 performing patent codes were then grouped into technology clusters. Patent and publication growth curves were then generated for these technology clusters. A top performing technology cluster was then selected as an exemplar for more detailed analysis of individual patents. Results In all, 11,672 patents and 208,203 publications relating to neurosurgery were identified. The top performing technology clusters over the 50 years were: image guidance devices, clinical neurophysiology devices, neuromodulation devices, operating microscopes and endoscopes. Image guidance and neuromodulation devices demonstrated a highly correlated rapid rise in patents and publications, suggesting they are areas of technology expansion. In-depth analysis of neuromodulation patents revealed that the majority of high performing patents were related to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Conclusions Patent and publication data may be used to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery. PMID:25699414

  8. Ciclo Basico Polivalente (Basic Comprehensive Courses of Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boletin del Centro Nacional de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa, 1970

    1970-01-01

    This article discusses the creation of comprehensive secondary schools in Argentina to meet the diversified goals of the population in any given geographical region. The plan described here provides for the creation of several basic-study cycles within one school so that students may pursue courses in commercial, technical, and academic fields.…

  9. Integration of Basic Skills into Social Studies Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunstrum, John P.; Irvin, Judith L.

    1981-01-01

    A basic skills model is presented which stresses the skills of writing, reading, study, and research for elementary school pupils. The model focuses on lesson background, the purpose of the reading, independent reading, follow-up discussion, developing related skills, and extending and applying ideas. A lesson about the 1910 British expedition to…

  10. Representing the "Other": Basic Writers and the Teaching of Basic Writing. Refiguring English Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Bruce; Lu, Min-Zhan

    Intended for teachers of basic writing, this book contains a collection of new and updated essays addressing issues surrounding underprepared writers. It maps errors and expectations for basic writing and develops teaching approaches that will be effective in a social and political world. The book considers concepts such as the possibility of…

  11. A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a quantitative method to estimate chemical-specific pesticide exposures in a large prospective cohort study of over 58,000 pesticide applicators in North Carolina and Iowa. An enrollment questionnaire was administered to applicators to collect basic time- and inten...

  12. Study habits and attitude of medical students of basic sciences.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Kshitiz Upadhyay; Prajapati, Rajesh; Pramanik, Tapas; Ghosh, Arijit; Roychowdhury, Paresh

    2007-06-01

    Study habits and attitude for learning of Basic Medical Sciences amongst 133 students of first and second year MBBS course were analyzed (through questionnaires). The study revealed that the most of the students desired to be physicians to serve the patient/society. They preferred to learn more through self study (48.0%) and lecture classes (43.0%), less through group discussion (8.0%) and PBL (1.0%). Only 5.0% use to surf the internet regularly for their study matter and 79.0% students had never consulted any medical journals. PMID:17899965

  13. [Quantitative pharmaco-EEG study of nootropics].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T

    1990-01-01

    A treatment of geriatric disorders is one of the current major problems socially as well as medically. Thus nootropics have become one of the biggest topics in drug developments. Unfortunately, it is still very difficult to assess brain dysfunctions and therapeutic efficacies of these drugs objectively. Giurgea has proposed a new drug category, "nootropic", as those substances which possess an anti-dementia action, yet the general concept remains obscure. The present author expand the concept that those substances which improve the vigilance level to be included. The author has been engaged with computer assisted pharmaco-electroencephalography and research of nootropics for last several years. Based on the own experiences, the author presented the CNS effects of five different substances such as meclofenoxate, amantadine, piracetam, teniloxazine and WEB-1881, which were regarded as nootropics from various reasons. Single dose of each substances was administered in healthy young volunteers, and teniloxazine was given to geriatric patients. EEG changes induced by these substances in normal subjects were an increase of alpha activity, particularly in higher frequency range above 9.5 Hz, and an associated decrease of slow activity and of fast activity, which are different from those of the other psychotropic drugs. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) of EEG parameters has confirmed that the response of WEB-1881 was most manifest in frontal area. This suggests that WEB-1881 might activate linguistic learning and memory process. In the patient study, the induced EEG changes were an increase of alpha activity associated with a decrease of slow activity, while fast activity did not show any changes. However, the EEG changes in the patient study were quite similar to those of normal volunteer study for the most part. It is relevant to infer the efficacy of nootropics in geriatric patients from acute normal volunteer study. In physiological aging process, alpha

  14. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia and alcoholism. A methodological comparative study].

    PubMed

    Mass, R; Krausz, M; Gross, J

    1995-05-01

    The results of a study on the subjective basic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and drug abuse (especially alcoholism) are presented. A total of 242 psychiatric inpatients (74 with a dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and drug consumption, 81 schizophrenics, and 87 alcoholics) were included. The three groups did not differ with regard to the general score of subjective basic symptoms measured by the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (Frankfurter Beschwerde-Fragebogen, FBF). Further analyses showed that the FBF statements are only partly typical for schizophrenia; another part is connected with alcoholism. Two new scales ("FBF-S" and "FBF-A") were created from the schizophrenia-typical items and the alcoholism-typical items, respectively. In "FBF-S" schizophrenics (with and without alcoholism) had higher scores than patients suffering from alcoholism alone; in "FBF-A" alcoholics (with and without schizophrenia) reached higher scores than schizophrenic patients. Consistent correlations with independent parameters of psychosis and alcoholism confirm the validity of "FBF-S" and "FBF-A". It is concluded that the FBF's capacity to discriminate different diagnoses can be improved and that the model of basic disturbances must be re-evaluated. PMID:7609813

  15. Subjective Quantitative Studies of Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Amartya Sen's writings have articulated the importance of human agency, and identified the need for information on agency freedom to inform our evaluation of social arrangements. Many approaches to poverty reduction stress the need for empowerment. This paper reviews "subjective quantitative measures of human agency at the individual level." It…

  16. Nanostructured surfaces investigated by quantitative morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perani, Martina; Carapezzi, Stefania; Rani Mutta, Geeta; Cavalcoli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of different surfaces has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively analyzed in this paper. Two different tools have been employed to this scope: the analysis of the height-height correlation function and the determination of the mean grain size, which have been combined to obtain a complete characterization of the surfaces. Different materials have been analyzed: SiO x N y , InGaN/GaN quantum wells and Si nanowires, grown with different techniques. Notwithstanding the presence of grain-like structures on all the samples analyzed, they present very diverse surface design, underlying that this procedure can be of general use. Our results show that the quantitative analysis of nanostructured surfaces allows us to obtain interesting information, such as grain clustering, from the comparison of the lateral correlation length and the grain size.

  17. Nanostructured surfaces investigated by quantitative morphological studies.

    PubMed

    Perani, Martina; Carapezzi, Stefania; Mutta, Geeta Rani; Cavalcoli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of different surfaces has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively analyzed in this paper. Two different tools have been employed to this scope: the analysis of the height-height correlation function and the determination of the mean grain size, which have been combined to obtain a complete characterization of the surfaces. Different materials have been analyzed: SiO x N y , InGaN/GaN quantum wells and Si nanowires, grown with different techniques. Notwithstanding the presence of grain-like structures on all the samples analyzed, they present very diverse surface design, underlying that this procedure can be of general use. Our results show that the quantitative analysis of nanostructured surfaces allows us to obtain interesting information, such as grain clustering, from the comparison of the lateral correlation length and the grain size. PMID:27004458

  18. Motor Events during Healthy Sleep: A Quantitative Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Biermayr, Marlene; Bregler, Deborah; Ehrmann, Laura; Ulmer, Hanno; Högl, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Many sleep disorders are characterized by increased motor activity during sleep. In contrast, studies on motor activity during physiological sleep are largely lacking. We quantitatively investigated a large range of motor phenomena during polysomnography in physiological sleep. Design: Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Setting: Academic referral sleep laboratory. Participants: One hundred healthy sleepers age 19-77 y were strictly selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening procedure. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Polysomnography according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) standards was performed, and quantitative normative values were established for periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), high frequency leg movements (HFLM), fragmentary myoclonus (FM), neck myoclonus (NM), and rapid eye movement (REM)-related electromyographic (EMG) activity. Thirty-six subjects had a PLMS index > 5/h, 18 had a PLMS index > 15/h (90th percentile: 24.8/h). Thirty-three subjects had HFLM (90th percentile: four sequences/night). All subjects had FM (90th percentile 143.7/h sleep). Nine subjects fulfilled AASM criteria for excessive FM. Thirty-five subjects had NM (90th percentile: 8.8/h REM sleep). For REM sleep, different EMG activity measures for the mentalis and flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were calculated: the 90th percentile for phasic mentalis EMG activity for 30-sec epochs according to AASM recommendation was 15.6%, and for tonic mentalis EMG activity 2.6%. Twenty-five subjects exceeded the recently proposed phasic mentalis cutoff of 11%. None of the subjects exceeded the tonic mentalis cutoff of 9.6%. Conclusion: Quantification of motor phenomena is a basic prerequisite to develop normative values, and is a first step toward a more precise description of the various motor phenomena present during sleep. Because rates of motor events were unexpectedly high even in physiological

  19. 75 FR 9488 - Basel Comprehensive Quantitative Impact Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... on December 7, 2007 (72 FR 69288). In an effort to refine the Basel II Capital Accord, the Basel... Office of Thrift Supervision Basel Comprehensive Quantitative Impact Study AGENCY: Office of Thrift... collection. Title of Proposal: Basel Comprehensive Quantitative Impact Study. OMB Number: 1550-0NEW....

  20. Quantitative Articles: Developing Studies for Publication in Counseling Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusty, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This article is presented as a guide for developing quantitative studies and preparing quantitative manuscripts for publication in counseling journals. It is intended as an aid for aspiring authors in conceptualizing studies and formulating valid research designs. Material is presented on choosing variables and measures and on selecting…

  1. Basic Study on Engine with Scroll Compressor and Expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Etsuo; Kitora, Yoshihisa; Nishida, Mitsuhiro

    Scroll compressors are becoming popular in air conditioning and refrigeration. This is primarily due to their higher efficiency and low noise/vibration characteristics. The scroll principle can be applied also to the steam expander and the Brayton cycle engine,as shown in the past literature. The Otto cycle spark-ignition engine with a scroll compressor and expander is studied in this report. The principle and basic structure of the scroll engine are explained,and the engine characteristic are calculated based on the idealized cycles and processes. A prototype model has been proposed and constructed. The rotary type engine has always had a problem with sealing. The scroll engine might overcome this shortcoming with its much lower rubbing speed compared to its previous counterparts,and is therefore worth investigating.

  2. Quantitative Literacy Provision in the First Year of Medical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, V.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a description of and motivation for the quantitative literacy (numeracy) intervention in the first year of medical studies at a South African university. This intervention is a response to the articulation gap between the quantitative literacy of many first-year medical students and the demands of their curriculum.…

  3. A generalized approach and computer tool for quantitative genetics study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative genetics is one of the most important components to provide valuable genetic information for improving production and quality of plants and animals. The research history of quantitative genetics study could be traced back more than one hundred years. Since the Analysis of Variance (ANOV...

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism for controlling many aspects of cellular processes, as well as aspects of human health and diseases. Compared to phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is more tightly regulated, but often more challenging to characterize due to significantly lower level of tyrosine phosphorylation (a relative abundance of 1800:200:1 was estimated for pSer/pThr/pTyr in vertebrate cells[1]). In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and peptides using antibody-based technologies, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and various stable isotope labeling strategies, as well as non-MS-based methods such as protein or peptide array methods. These proteomic technological advances provide powerful tools for potentially understanding signal transduction at the system level and provide a basis for discovering novel drug targets for human diseases. [1] Hunter, T. (1998) The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 353, 583–605

  5. Quantitative microscopy of the lung: a problem-based approach. Part 1: basic principles of lung stereology.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The growing awareness of the importance of accurate morphometry in lung research has recently motivated the publication of guidelines set forth by a combined task force of the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society (20). This official ATS/ERS Research Policy Statement provides general recommendations on which stereological methods are to be used in quantitative microscopy of the lung. However, to integrate stereology into a particular experimental study design, investigators are left with the problem of how to implement this in practice. Specifically, different animal models of human lung disease require the use of different stereological techniques and may determine the mode of lung fixation, tissue processing, preparation of sections, and other things. Therefore, the present companion articles were designed to allow a short practically oriented introduction into the concepts of design-based stereology (Part 1) and to provide recommendations for choosing the most appropriate methods to investigate a number of important disease models (Part 2). Worked examples with illustrative images will facilitate the practical performance of equivalent analyses. Study algorithms provide comprehensive surveys to ensure that no essential step gets lost during the multistage workflow. Thus, with this review, we hope to close the gap between theory and practice and enhance the use of stereological techniques in pulmonary research. PMID:23624789

  6. A Quantitative Study of Oxygen as a Metabolic Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    1999-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen (O2) delivery to a tissue is generally associated with a decrease in phosphocreatine, increases in ADP, NADH/NAD, and inorganic phosphate, increased rates of glycolysis and lactate production, and reduced rates of pyruvate and fatty acid oxidation. However, given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system and its components, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). Of special interest is the determination of mechanisms relating tissue oxygenation to observed metabolic responses at the tissue, organ, and whole body levels and the quantification of how changes in tissue O2 availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study, we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of O2 as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and in parameters controlling the rate of cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The whole body is described as a bioenergetic system consisting of metabolically distinct tissue/organ subsystems that exchange materials with the blood. In order to study the dynamic response of each subsystem to stimuli, we solve the ordinary differential equations describing the temporal evolution of metabolite levels, given the initial concentrations. The solver used in the present study is the packaged code LSODE, as implemented in the NASA Lewis kinetics and sensitivity analysis code, LSENS. A major advantage of LSENS is the efficient procedures supporting systematic sensitivity analysis, which provides the basic methods for studying parameter sensitivities (i.e., changes in model behavior due to parameter variation

  7. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  8. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) a memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.

  9. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) amore » memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.« less

  10. Basic Studies of Non-Diffusive Transport in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, George J.; Maggs, James E.

    2014-10-25

    The project expanded and developed mathematical descriptions, and corresponding numerical modeling, of non-diffusive transport to incorporate new perspectives derived from basic transport experiments performed in the LAPD device at UCLA, and at fusion devices throughout the world. By non-diffusive it is meant that the transport of fundamental macroscopic parameters of a system, such as temperature and density, does not follow the standard diffusive behavior predicted by a classical Fokker-Planck equation. The appearance of non-diffusive behavior is often related to underlying microscopic processes that cause the value of a system parameter, at one spatial position, to be linked to distant events, i.e., non-locality. In the LAPD experiments the underlying process was traced to large amplitude, coherent drift-waves that give rise to chaotic trajectories. Significant advances were made in this project. The results have lead to a new perspective about the fundamentals of edge transport in magnetically confined plasmas; the insight has important consequences for worldwide studies in fusion devices. Progress was also made in advancing the mathematical techniques used to describe fractional diffusion.

  11. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels: In basic research and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Raymond M; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-15

    A variety of decellularized materials have been developed that have demonstrated potential for treating cardiovascular diseases and improving our understanding of cardiac development. Of these biomaterials, decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels have shown great promise for creating cellular microenvironments representative of the native cardiac tissue and treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels derived from porcine cardiac tissue form a nanofibrous hydrogel once thermally induced at physiological temperatures. Use of isolated cardiac extracellular matrix in 2D and 3D in vitro platforms has demonstrated the capability to provide tissue specific cues for cardiac cell growth and differentiation. Testing of the myocardial matrix hydrogel as a therapy after myocardial infarction in both small and large animal models has demonstrated improved left ventricular function, increased cardiac muscle, and cellular recruitment into the treated infarct. Based on these results, steps are currently being taken to translate these hydrogels into a clinically used injectable biomaterial therapy. In this review, we will focus on the basic science and preclinical studies that have accelerated the development of decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels into an emerging novel therapy for treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. PMID:26056717

  12. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  13. Research Review: Quantitative Magazine Studies, 1983-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovich, Mark N.

    1994-01-01

    Examines quantitative magazine research studies published in various journals during the period 1983-1993. Questions the heavy reliance on content analysis techniques to study the role of magazines in American society. Calls for a redirection in magazine research, combining media content studies with media effects studies. (SR)

  14. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    PubMed

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions. PMID:26036835

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches to Studying Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M; Young, Nicolas L; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) positively and negatively regulate gene expression, and are consequently a vital influence on the genomic profile of all eukaryotic species. The study of histone PTMs using classical methods in molecular biology, such as immunofluorescence and Western blotting, is challenging given the technical issues of the approaches, and chemical diversity and combinatorial patterns of the modifications. In light of these many technical limitations, mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as the most unbiased and rigorous experimental platform to identify and quantify histone PTMs in a high-throughput manner. This review covers the latest developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of histone PTMs, with the hope of inspiring the continued integration of proteomic, genomic and epigenetic research. PMID:21966350

  16. Basic studies of 3-V high efficiency cell components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, M. S.; Melloch, M. R.; Pierret, R. F.; Carpenter, M. S.; Chuang, H. L.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M. E.; Lush, G. B.; Morgan, J. M.; Stellwag, T. B.

    1990-07-01

    This project's objective is to improve our fundamental understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. We expect that the insight into III-V device physics occurring during the course of this work will help to identify paths toward higher efficiency III-V cells. This report describes our progress during the fourth year of the project. The past year's efforts centered on completing studies of heavy doping effects in p(sup +)-GaAs and assessing the importance of similar effects in n(sup +)-GaAs, and at continuing research on characterizing, controlling, and passivating perimeter recombination currents. We also initiated work to identify the dominant loss mechanism in Al(sub 0.2)Ga(sub 0.8) As solar cells and brought on-line a new MBE growth facility and demonstrated the high-quality of the films by fabricating, with assistance from Spire Corporation, 23.8 percent 1-sun solar cells.

  17. Basic models modeling resistance training: an update for basic scientists interested in study skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Jason; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; da Silva Teixeira, Tamiris; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, Xia; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Lodetti, Alice; Cardozo, Mayara Quadros; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-09-01

    Human muscle hypertrophy brought about by voluntary exercise in laboratorial conditions is the most common way to study resistance exercise training, especially because of its reliability, stimulus control and easy application to resistance training exercise sessions at fitness centers. However, because of the complexity of blood factors and organs involved, invasive data is difficult to obtain in human exercise training studies due to the integration of several organs, including adipose tissue, liver, brain and skeletal muscle. In contrast, studying skeletal muscle remodeling in animal models are easier to perform as the organs can be easily obtained after euthanasia; however, not all models of resistance training in animals displays a robust capacity to hypertrophy the desired muscle. Moreover, some models of resistance training rely on voluntary effort, which complicates the results observed when animal models are employed since voluntary capacity is something theoretically impossible to measure in rodents. With this information in mind, we will review the modalities used to simulate resistance training in animals in order to present to investigators the benefits and risks of different animal models capable to provoke skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Our second objective is to help investigators analyze and select the experimental resistance training model that best promotes the research question and desired endpoints. PMID:24375009

  18. [The basic and applied study on the epidermal growth factor].

    PubMed

    Huang, B R; Cai, L W; Xiang, X Z

    2001-04-01

    This article reviews the results of the basic research about epidermal growth factor and its receptor, and the development of the novel drug, EGF eyedrop, that containing chemically synthesized EGF gene, the construction of EGF expression vector, the transformation of the host cells, the purification of the recombinant protein EGF, the preparation of three batches of the EGF product and identification, the preclinical and clinical trials. Relevant studies show that recombinant EGF consisting of 51 amino acids can be secreted into the medium under the control of the alpha factor leading sequence in the yeast cells. The EGF can accelerate the growth of corneal-limbal epithelial cells and the healing of an alkali burned corneal. The EGF can be used in curing oral cavity ulcer and skin burned wound. And it has the preventive effects on experimental duodenal ulcer of rat. The antiserum was made for test of the concentration of blood EGF and urine EGF by RIA. Data from studies demonstrate the inhibition effect of EGF on the growth of tumor cells, such as A431 and BT325 cells in the presence of high EGF concentration (> 10 ng/ml). The expression of EGFR and DNA ploidy in renal carcinoma has clinical significance. Crystallization and preliminary x-ray diffraction studies of the EGF has been made. The MW of the EGF product is 6000, and the pI is about 4.6 and it has correct N-terminal amino acids sequences, immunogenicity and biological activity. There is no vestige of the DNA of the yeast cells. Animal experiments reveal that there is no cumulation of the EGF in the body, and EGF can promote corneal epithelial healing. There is no toxicological effect during cornea wound healing of rabbit. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center clinical trial was conducted in four hospitals to assess safety, ocular tolerance and efficacy of an ophthalmic solution of EGF for 200 cases of cornea transplantation and 247 cases of nebulae. Unequivocal results were obtained

  19. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H.; Lagreze, Wolf A.; Schuman, Joel S.; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J.; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. Conclusions: The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. PMID:27225223

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Asim; Atar, Necip

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73mgg(-1), respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents. PMID:18434000

  1. Microfluidics for High-Throughput Quantitative Studies of Early Development.

    PubMed

    Levario, Thomas J; Lim, Bomyi; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lu, Hang

    2016-07-11

    Developmental biology has traditionally relied on qualitative analyses; recently, however, as in other fields of biology, researchers have become increasingly interested in acquiring quantitative knowledge about embryogenesis. Advances in fluorescence microscopy are enabling high-content imaging in live specimens. At the same time, microfluidics and automation technologies are increasing experimental throughput for studies of multicellular models of development. Furthermore, computer vision methods for processing and analyzing bioimage data are now leading the way toward quantitative biology. Here, we review advances in the areas of fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, and data analysis that are instrumental to performing high-content, high-throughput studies in biology and specifically in development. We discuss a case study of how these techniques have allowed quantitative analysis and modeling of pattern formation in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:26928208

  2. Use of Sea Stars to Study Basic Reproductive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Gary M.; Reich, Adrian; Klatsky, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Echinoderms are closely related to chordates and comprise a major group of invertebrate deuterostomes. They are broadcast spawners and as such, each female accumulates millions of eggs and oocytes. These cells are readily isolated, and are often large, clear, and surrounded by accessory cells and extracellular coverings that do not prevent access to the oocyte. Sea stars are one type of echinoderm. Their oocytes are stored in prophase of meiosis, and since the natural meiotic stimulus has been identified as 1-methyladenine, these cells can be induced to complete meiotic maturation as individuals, or synchronously en masse. Microinjection and culture of these cells is feasible using quantitative or repetitive methods so that hundreds of oocytes and eggs can be modified each hour. Experimentation on this organism is extensive over a rich history of reproductive and developmental biology so that new investigators can easily incorporate this organism into their repertoire of research. This chapter will highlight the fundamental protocols to enable a new investigator to perform an array of approaches on this organism, including oocyte isolation, microinjection, and even single cell quantitative PCR. PMID:20536323

  3. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP){sub 3} reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import.

  4. Quantitative methods for studying hemostasis in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Rost, M S; Grzegorski, S J; Shavit, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hemostasis is a coordinated system through which blood is prevented from exiting a closed circulatory system. We have taken advantage of the zebrafish, an emerging model for the study of blood coagulation, and describe three techniques for quantitative analysis of primary and secondary hemostasis. Collectively, these three techniques comprise a toolset to aid in our understanding of hemostasis and pathological clotting. PMID:27312499

  5. Retention of Nontraditional Students: A Quantitative Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Shirley J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational research study was to investigate, describe, and measure factors influencing retention of nontraditional first and second year students at a university located in the Midwestern United States. Retention of adult students has become a major issue for many institutions of higher education and many…

  6. Metamorphism of eucrite meteorites studied quantitatively using induced thermoluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, J. David; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Induced thermoluminescence studies provide a new and quantitative means of determining relative metamorphic intensities for eucrite meteorites, the simplest and most ancient products of basaltic volcanism. Using this technique, it is shown that the eucrites constitute a continuous metamorphic series and not, as commonly assumed, two groups of metamorphosed and nonmetamorphosed meteorites. It is suggested that the method may have applications to other basalts.

  7. Employing quantitative and qualitative methods in one study.

    PubMed

    Mason, S A

    There is an apparent lack of epistemological rigour when quantitative and qualitative methods are combined in the same study, because they reflect opposing positivist and interpretive perspectives. When and how to use methodological pluralism is discussed in this article. PMID:8400784

  8. Comparative study of different venous reflux duplex quantitation parameters.

    PubMed

    Valentín, L I; Valentín, W H

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare different quantitation parameters of venous reflux by duplex scan in different venous disease manifestations. Duplex scan is a new modality to quantify venous reflux. Several studies propose different parameters. In addition, there is controversy about the importance of deep and superficial involvement in different disease manifestations. It is not clear whether there is an increased venous reflux associated with varied clinical stages. Venous conditions were classified in seven stages and their differences for several quantitation variables studied. Most quantitation variables, such as average and peak velocity, average and peak flow, and reflux volume disclosed significantly increased reflux from normal, pain only, and edema group to varicose vein, with or without edema, to lipodermatosclerosis and ulcer groups at every location in the lower extremity. Reflux time was not as consistent as other variables. Totalization of the results of every parameter for the whole extremity points to an increased reflux from pain only to edema and from lipodermatosclerosis to ulcer group. Chronic edema is not usually associated with increased venous reflux. The greater saphenous vein (superficial system) seems to be the main contributor to reflux in all stages of disease. Different quantitation methods of venous reflux are equivalent. Increased deep and superficial reflux and its totalization are associated with a more advanced disease stage. Reflux time may be the least useful variable. Chronic edema is frequently not associated with venous reflux. Greater saphenectomy may be the most useful intervention, even in the presence of deep vein reflux. PMID:10496498

  9. Study on the performance evaluation of quantitative precipitation estimation and quantitative precipitation forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Chang, K.; Suk, M.; cha, J.; Choi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Rainfall estimation and short-term (several hours) quantitative prediction of precipitation based on meteorological radar data is one of the intensely studied topics. The Korea Peninsula has the horizontally narrow land area and complex topography with many of mountains, and so it has the characteristics that the rainfall system changes in many cases. Quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) and quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) are the crucial information for severe weather or water management. We have been conducted the performance evaluation of QPE/QPF of Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA), which is the first step for optimizing QPE/QPF system in South Korea. The real-time adjusted RAR (Radar-AWS-Rainrate) system gives better agreement with the observed rain-rate than that of the fixed Z-R relation, and the additional bias correction of RAR yields the slightly better results. A correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.84 is obtained between the daily accumulated observed and RAR estimated rainfall. The RAR will be available for the hydrological applications such as the water budget. The VSRF (Very Short Range Forecast) shows better performance than the MAPLE (McGill Algorithm for Precipitation Nowcasting by Lagrangian) within 40 minutes, but the MAPLE better than the VSRF after 40 minutes. In case of hourly forecast, MAPLE shows better performance than the VSRF. QPE and QPF are thought to be meaningful for the nowcasting (1~2 hours) except the model forecast. The long-term forecast longer than 3 hours by meteorological model is especially meaningful for such as water management.

  10. Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. )

    1993-01-01

    This project's objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks'' such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we've teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p[sup +] and n[sup +] GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We've learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we've demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

  11. Basic studies on the viability of El Tor vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Miyaki, K.; Iwahara, S.; Sato, K.; Fujimoto, S.; Aibara, K.

    1967-01-01

    Quantitative data are presented on the viability of El Tor vibrios in various foodstuffs under different conditions. El Tor vibrios were found to have a very short life in water at -20°C, but in various nutrient media, such as skim milk, sugar solution or meat extract, they could live for more than a month at this temperature; the survival rate was always much higher when the vibrio suspension was cooled rapidly to -72°C and stored at this temperature. The optimum pH for the growth and survival of El Tor vibrios is 6-8, and the optimum osmotic pressure 250 mOsm—700 mOsm. The resistance of El Tor vibrios to disinfectants is lower than that of salmonellae and Escherichia coli. The El Tor vibrios are more resistant than classical cholera vibrios to such disinfectants as benzethonium chloride and o-dichlorobenzene. They are not resistant to sodium hypochlorite or bleaching powder at 6 ppm. The results of the investigation emphasize the necessity of immediate and proper disinfection of foodstuffs contaminated with El Tor vibrios, and indicate the possibility of survival of the organisms for long periods under favourable conditions. PMID:4870080

  12. A Feasibility Study of Computer Assisted Instruction in US Army Basic Electronics Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., Gaithersburg, MD. Federal Systems Div.

    A study of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for US Army basic electronics training at the US Army Signal Center and School establishes the feasibility of CAI as a training technique. Three aspects of CAI are considered: effectiveness, efficiency, and applicability of CAI to basic electronics training. The study explores the effectiveness of the…

  13. A Workforce Basic Skills Norming Study of Iowa's JTPA and PROMISE JOBS Target Populations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System, San Diego, CA.

    A study provided accurate and reliable norms that reflected the reading and math performance levels of Iowa's youth and adults engaged in work force preparation and employment training for basic skills. The study population included 819 participants from the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) and Iowa's Job Opportunities and Basic Skills programs…

  14. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science

    SciTech Connect

    Copper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1991-06-01

    During the past three years the program has undergone a substantial revitalization. There has been no significant change in the scientific direction of this grant, in which emphasis continues to be placed on developing new or improved methods of obtaining quantitative data from radiotracer imaging studies. However, considerable scientific progress has been made in the three areas of interest: Radiochemistry, Quantitative Methodologies, and Experimental Methods and Feasibility Studies, resulting in a sharper focus of perspective and improved integration of the overall scientific effort. Changes in Faculty and staff, including development of new collaborations, have contributed to this, as has acquisition of additional and new equipment and renovations and expansion of the core facilities. 121 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Basic "How To's" for Validating a Study Skills Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Virginia G.

    To find out what study skills were used by successful students at an urban commuter school whose primary degree program is business, the College Reading and Study Skills (CRSS) inventory was validated on 150 students. First the CRSS inventory was evaluated and revised slightly. The language of the statements was made positive and jargon free. The…

  16. Workplace Basic Skills. A Study of 10 Canadian Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice

    Presented in case study format, this report looks at different types of workplace literacy programs across Canada. It describes in some detail 10 particular work environments and the unique characteristics that have enabled each to offer quality worker education programs. Each case study provides information in these categories: profile (an…

  17. Study Design in fMRI: Basic Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Edson, Jr.; Barker, Gareth J.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide range of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study designs available for the neuroscientist who wants to investigate cognition. In this manuscript we review some aspects of fMRI study design, including cognitive comparison strategies (factorial, parametric designs), and stimulus presentation possibilities (block,…

  18. A Basic Bibliography on Canada for Social Studies Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a bibliography that provides materials on Canada available to social studies educators. Resources for teachers include teaching strategies, literature guides, and books on acid rain. Student resources include books that provide a perspective on Canadian life. (DB)

  19. Viewpoint: Back to the Basics in Social Studies? Personal Statements by Three Canadian Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Neil; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Neil Sutherland discusses the historical context of the back to basics movement in social studies. Ken Osborne points out that the movement is stifling innovation. Max van Manen addresses the question of what curricula should be considered basic. (Author/RM)

  20. Teaching Basic Production Economic Principles to Secondary School Students of Vocational Agriculture: An Evaluative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, James E.

    Four modules of instruction on basic production economic principles were developed, tried in high school classes of students preparing for on- and off-farm agricultural occupations, and evaluated for content and teaching. Basic principles studied were supply and demand, value theory, variable proportions, and marginal analysis. Total and part…

  1. Calibration assessment in quantitative electroencephalographic brainmapping and evoked potential studies.

    PubMed

    Richards, A K; Hamilton-Bruce, M A

    1994-09-01

    Acquisition of a Cadwell Spectrum 32 resulted in the introduction of quantitative electrophysiological brainmapping techniques in our neurophysiology laboratory. To ascertain the accuracy and consistency of our equipment, we performed the following tests: inputting a calibration signal and measuring the resultant amplitudes for quantitative electroencephalographs (qEEGs) and evoked potentials (EPs) in the mapping and standard montages, inputting a synchronous calibration signal and mapping it at varying times for qEEGs and EPs, as well as re-analysing the same electroencephalographic (EEG) epochs previously selected from 20 control subjects. QEEG amplitudes varied from -5.4% to +5.8% and EPs by 9.5% or less, and after an EP software upgrade, by 5.5% or less. QEEG voltage mapping showed variation of only one color increment across the map, which could, in our example, represent up to 25.2% of the scale used. Re-analysis of previously selected epochs yielded identical results. We have established some of the accuracy and consistency limits of the hard- and software of our system with respect to the quantitative and topographic data. We conclude that such systems need to be calibration-checked in the laboratories in which they are used, with an independent signal generator. Users also need to be aware that scaling of topographic maps could lead to erroneous conclusions, as perceived amplitude changes could affect the interpretation of both initial and serial studies. PMID:7980205

  2. Basic studies of microstructure of combusting turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle

    1991-03-01

    The goal is to develop a state-of-the-art measurement technique, Holographic Particle Displacement Velocimetry (HPV), which can provide instantaneous velocities everywhere in the flow field simultaneously. Another goal is to use the power of supercomputers to simulate 3D flows with heat release to study the physics of combusting turbulent flows. Computations suffer from limited flow times and Reynolds number but can provide flow properties in more detail than possible by any existing experimental techniques. Moreover, numerical simulations can provide quantities almost impossible to measure experimentally. This article discusses efforts to develop the holographic particle displacement velocimetry system and results of direct numerical numerical simulations of combusting flows.

  3. Basic Study on Sludge Concentration and Dehydration with Ultrasonic Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Yuta; Nagashima, Satoshi; Uchida, Takeyoshi; Kawashima, Norimichi; Takeuchi, Shinichi; Akita, Masashi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    We study the condensation of sludge and the improvement of the dehydration efficiency of sludge by acoustic cavitation for efficiency improvement and cost reduction in water treatment. An ultrasound wave was irradiated into activated sludge in the water tank of our ultrasound exposure system and a standing wave acoustic field was formed using a vibrating disk driven by a Langevin-type transducer. The vibrating disk was mounted on the bottom of the water tank. Acoustic cavitation was generated in the activated sludge suspension and the sludge was floated to the water surface by ultrasound exposure with this system. We observed B-mode ultrasound images of the activated sludge suspension before ultrasound exposure and that of the floated sludge and treated water after ultrasound exposure. The ultrasound diagnostic equipment was used for the observation of the B-mode ultrasound images of the sludge. It was found that the sludge floated to the water surface because of adhesion of microbubbles generated by acoustic cavitation to the sludge particles, which decreased the sludge density. It can be expected that the drifting sludge in water can be recovered by the flotation thickening method of sludge as an application of the results of this study. It is difficult to recover the drifting sludge in water by the conventional gravity thickening method.

  4. ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: BASIC STUDIES RESULTS FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.; Hay, M.

    2011-01-24

    In an effort to develop and optimize chemical cleaning methods for the removal of sludge heels from High Level Waste tanks, solubility tests have been conducted using nonradioactive, pure metal phases. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phase gibbsite and the iron phases hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, and wustite. Many of these mineral phases have been identified in radioactive, High Level Waste sludge at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids and a variety of other complexing organic acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that mixtures of oxalic acid with either nitric or sulfuric acid are the most effective cleaning solutions for the dissolution of the primary metal phases in sludge waste. Based on the results, optimized conditions for hematite dissolution in oxalic acid were selected using nitric or sulfuric acid as a supplemental proton source. Electrochemical corrosion studies were also conducted (reported separately; Wiersma, 2010) with oxalic/mineral acid mixtures to evaluate the effects of these solutions on waste tank integrity. The following specific conclusions can be drawn from the test results: (1) Oxalic acid was shown to be superior to all of the other organic acids evaluated in promoting the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. (2) All iron phases showed similar solubility trends in oxalic acid versus pH, with hematite exhibiting the lowest solubility and the slowest dissolution. (3) Greater than 90% hematite dissolution occurred in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures within one week for two hematite sources and within three weeks for a third hematite sample with a larger average particle size. This dissolution rate appears acceptable for waste tank cleaning applications. (4) Stoichiometric dissolution of iron phases in oxalic acid (based on the oxalate concentration) and the formation of the preferred 1:1 Fe to oxalate complex

  5. Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Basic Studies Results FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2010-05-05

    Due to the need to close waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the effective removal of the heels. Oxalic acid is the preferred cleaning reagent for sludge heel dissolution, particularly for iron-based sludge, due to the strong complexing strength of the oxalate. However, the large quantity of oxalate added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based chemical cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acid systems may be required for specific waste components with low solubility in oxalic acid and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Solubility tests were conducted using non-radioactive, pure metal phases known to be the primary phases present in High Level Waste sludge. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phases gibbsite and boehmite and the iron phases magnetite and hematite. Hematite and boehmite are expected to be the most difficult iron and aluminum phases to dissolve. These mineral phases have been identified in both SRS and Hanford High Level Waste sludge. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that oxalic and sulfuric acids are more effective for the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. For boehmite, elevated temperature will be required to promote effective phase dissolution in the acids studied. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control using a supplemental proton source (additional acid) is critical for minimization of oxalic acid usage during the dissolution of hematite. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing hematite dissolution in oxalic acid and may explain the somewhat

  6. Basic Study on Production Well Integrity for Methane Hydrate Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakumoto, M.; Yoneda, J.; Katagiri, J.; Tenma, N.; Aoki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Methane Hydrate (MH) exist as an ice-like crystal under low-temperature and high-pressure condition, and it has gathering attention as a non-conventional natural gas resource. Depressurization method is a method to reduce the bottom hole pressure by submersible pump lowering water level in the production well, and gas and water is recovered by MH dissociation at the in situ. During the depressurization operation, consolidation and deformation of sediment occurs because of increase of effective stress by depressurization and changes in the soil structure by MH dissociation. Then consolidation and deformation of sediment makes negative friction between the production well and sediment, and large stress is occur in casing. Therefore there is concern that it may cause compression failure and shear failure of the production well. For safe MH development, it is necessary to grasp the deformation and stress vicinity of the production well. At first, we conducted push-out test to get friction strength between the different materials simulated the well and sediment. And we have done numerical analysis for integrity using by these data. The results of numerical analysis showed that the large deformation of sediment occur around the depressurization zone, and for the well, the large tensile stress in the vertical direction occur the upper vicinity of the depressurization zone.This study was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). The authors thank the entire personnel related to MH21 Research Consortium.

  7. "Back to Basics": Rethinking What Is Basic to Education through an Interpretive Study of the Work of Teachers and Students in Elementary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardine, David W.; Clifford, Patricia; Friesen, Sharon; LaGrange, Annette

    2001-01-01

    An ongoing study has found that the "basics" in contemporary educational theory are actually the smallest, most easily isolated and most easily testable fragments of knowledge in a discipline--abstractions produced by complex analysis. The project is exploring an alternative version of "basicness" in which the complex, often ambiguous realm of a…

  8. A basic study of some normoxic polymer gel dosimeters.

    PubMed

    De Deene, Y; Hurley, C; Venning, A; Vergote, K; Mather, M; Healy, B J; Baldock, C

    2002-10-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters offer a wide range of potential applications in the three-dimensional verification of complex dose distribution such as in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Until now, however, polymer gel dosimeters have not been widely used in the clinic. One of the reasons is that they are difficult to manufacture. As the polymerization in polymer gels is inhibited by oxygen, all free oxygen has to be removed from the gels. For several years this was achieved by bubbling nitrogen through the gel solutions and by filling the phantoms in a glove box that is perfused with nitrogen. Recently another gel formulation was proposed in which oxygen is bound in a metallo-organic complex thus removing the problem of oxygen inhibition. The proposed gel consists of methacrylic acid, gelatin, ascorbic acid, hydroquinone and copper(II)sulphate and is given the acronym MAGIC gel dosimeter. These gels are fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and are therefore called 'normoxic' gel dosimeters. In this study, a chemical analysis on the MAGIC gel was performed. The composition of the gel was varied and its radiation response was evaluated. The role of different chemicals and the reaction kinetics are discussed. It was found that ascorbic acid alone was able to bind the oxygen and can thus be used as an anti-oxidant in a polymer gel dosimeter. It was also found that the anti-oxidants N-acetyl-cysteine and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium were effective in scavenging the oxygen. However, the rate of oxygen scavenging is dependent on the anti-oxidant and its concentration with tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium being the most reactive anti-oxidants. Potentiometric oxygen measurements in solution provide an easy way to get a first impression on the rate of oxygen scavenging. It is shown that cupper(II)sulphate operates as a catalyst in the oxidation of ascorbic acid. We, therefore, propose some new normoxic gel formulations that have a less complicated chemical

  9. Quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by quartz nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Astudillo, Luisana; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Wenzhi; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with a series of concentrations in the bath solution. Such current change is due to the adsorption of Cyt c to the inner surface of the nanopipette through specific interactions with hNgb. In contrast, a smaller current change with weak concentration dependence was observed when Cyt c was replaced with lysozyme, which does not specifically bind to hNgb. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the Cyt c-hNgb complex formation was derived and the value matched very well with the result from surface plasmon resonance measurement. This is the first quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by a conical-shaped nanopore based on charge sensing. Our results demonstrate that nanopipettes can potentially be used as a label-free analytical tool to quantitatively characterize protein-protein interactions.In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with

  10. Erosion of Terrestrial Rift Flank Topography: A Quantitative Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.

    1999-01-01

    Many rifted or passive continental margins feature a seaward-facing erosional escarpment which abruptly demarcates deeply weathered, low relief, interior uplands from a deeply incised, high relief coastal zone. It is generally accepted that these escarpments originate at the time of continental rifting and propagate inland through the elevated rift flank topography at rates on the order of 1 km/Myr over the course of a margin's history. Considering the length of passive margins worldwide and an average rift flank plateau height of several hundred meters, it is clear that sediment eroded from passive margins is an important component of the mass flux from continents to oceans through geologic time. The overall goal of the research reported here is to develop a quantitative understanding of the kinematics of escarpment propagation across passive margins and the underlying geological processes responsible for this behavior. Plateau-bounding escarpments in general exhibit two basic forms depending on the direction of surface water drainage on the plateau interior relative to the escarpment. Where surface water flows away from the escarpment, the escarpment takes the form of subdued embayments and promontories, such that its overall trend remains fairly straight as it evolves with time. Where upland streams flow across the escarpment, it takes the form of dramatic, narrow gorges whose heads appear to propagate up the plateau drainage systems as large-scale knickpoints. From work on the Colorado Plateau, Schmidt (1987) noted that the Colorado River is located much closer to the Grand Canyon's south rim, a drainage divide escarpment, than to the north rim, which is a gorge-like escarpment. The main implication is that the gorge-like form might be associated with higher long-term average erosion rates compared to the drainage divide escarpment type.

  11. Quantitative Courses in a Liberal Education Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wismath, Shelly L.; Mackay, D. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues for the importance of quantitative reasoning skills as part of a liberal education and describes the successful introduction of a mathematics-based quantitative skills course at a small Canadian university. Today's students need quantitative problem-solving skills, to function as adults, professionals, consumers, and citizens in…

  12. Private Sector Providers of Basic Skills Training in the Workplace. A Study of the General Training and Basic Skills Responses of Randomly Selected Companies Which Provide Basic Skills Training to Their Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Jorie Lester

    A questionnaire was distributed to 1,305 companies to study the basic skills training provided. Of 62 responses, 41 companies had basic skills training programs. Respondents represented these types of companies: communications and utilities, finance and insurance, manufacturing, wholesalers, retailers, health and hospitals, and mining, and had…

  13. A quantitative study of oxygen as a metabolic regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2003-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue is associated with metabolic changes aimed at maintaining ATP homeostasis. However, given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). In particular, we are interested in determining mechanisms relating cellular oxygen concentration to observed metabolic responses at the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole body levels and in quantifying how changes in tissue oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study, we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics, to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of oxygen as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement--sensitivity analysis--permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and parameters controlling cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The analysis can distinguish between parameters that must be determined accurately and those that require less precision, based on their effects on model predictions. This capability may prove to be important in optimizing experimental design, thus reducing use of animals.

  14. A Quantitative Study of Oxygen as a Metabolic Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; LaManna, Joseph C.; Cabera, Marco E.

    2000-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to a tissue is associated with metabolic changes aimed at maintaining ATP homeostasis. However, given the complexity of the human bio-energetic system, it is difficult to determine quantitatively how cellular metabolic processes interact to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). In particular, we are interested in determining mechanisms relating cellular oxygen concentration to observed metabolic responses at the cellular, tissue, organ, and whole body levels and in quantifying how changes in tissue oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and the metabolites that control these pathways. In this study; we extend a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics, to provide a physicochemical framework that permits quantitative understanding of oxygen as a metabolic regulator. Specifically, the enhancement - sensitivity analysis - permits studying the effects of variations in tissue oxygenation and parameters controlling cellular respiration on glycolysis, lactate production, and pyruvate oxidation. The analysis can distinguish between parameters that must be determined accurately and those that require less precision, based on their effects on model predictions. This capability may prove to be important in optimizing experimental design, thus reducing use of animals.

  15. Quantitative analysis of multiple sclerosis: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Li, Xiang; Wei, Xinzhou; Sturm, Deborah; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with a presumed immune-mediated etiology. For treatment of MS, the measurements of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are often used in conjunction with clinical evaluation to provide a more objective measure of MS burden. In this paper, we apply a new unifying automatic mixture-based algorithm for segmentation of brain tissues to quantitatively analyze MS. The method takes into account the following effects that commonly appear in MR imaging: 1) The MR data is modeled as a stochastic process with an inherent inhomogeneity effect of smoothly varying intensity; 2) A new partial volume (PV) model is built in establishing the maximum a posterior (MAP) segmentation scheme; 3) Noise artifacts are minimized by a priori Markov random field (MRF) penalty indicating neighborhood correlation from tissue mixture. The volumes of brain tissues (WM, GM) and CSF are extracted from the mixture-based segmentation. Experimental results of feasibility studies on quantitative analysis of MS are presented.

  16. Quantitative study on appearance of microvessels in spectral endoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Yasushi; Arai, Fumihito; Morimoto, Yoshinori; Yuasa, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Increase in abnormal microvessels in the superficial mucosa is often relevant to diagnostic findings of neoplasia in digestive endoscopy; hence, observation of superficial vasculature is crucial for cancer diagnosis. To enhance the appearance of such vessels, several spectral endoscopic imaging techniques have been developed, such as narrow-band imaging and blue laser imaging. Both techniques exploit narrow-band blue light for the enhancement. The emergence of such spectral imaging techniques has increased the importance of understanding the relation of the light wavelength to the appearance of superficial vasculature, and thus a new method is desired for quantitative analysis of vessel visibility in relation to the actual structure in the tissue. Here, we developed microvessel-simulating phantoms that allowed quantitative evaluation of the appearance of 15-μm-thick vessels. We investigated the relation between the vascular contrast and light wavelength by the phantom measurements and also verified it in experiments with swine, where the endoscopically observed vascular contrast was investigated together with its real vascular depth and diameter obtained by microscopic observation of fluorescence-labeled vessels. Our study indicates that changing the spectral property even in the wavelength range of blue light may allow selective enhancement of the vascular depth for clinical use.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity studies on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C L

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity studies were carried out on a series of N-isopropylaryl hydrazides which inhibits monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibitory potencies of these compounds of MAO were found to correlate with the electron-withdrawing capacity of the aryl ring substituents as estimated by both empirical Hammet sigma constants and electronic indices from molecular orbital calculations. Based on these correlations and previously published data on other classes of MAO inhibitors, a general model for the inhibitor pharmacophore is proposed: potent MAO of an aromatic ring; electron-withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring or replacing the phenyl ring with certain types of heterocyclic rings will tend to increase the potency. PMID:1271400

  18. Quantitative methods in the study of trypanosomes and their applications*

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, W. H. R.

    1963-01-01

    In the first part of this paper the author summarizes and discusses previous quantitative work on trypanosomes, with particular reference to biometrical studies, in vivo and in vitro studies on numbers of trypanosomes, studies on hosts infected with trypanosomes, and physiological studies. The second part discusses recent work done at the East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organization. A method for the measurement of the infectivity of trypanosome suspensions, based on serial dilution and inoculation into test animals, is outlined, and applications likely to improve diagnostic procedures are suggested for it. Such applications might include: the establishment of experimental procedures not significantly reducing the infectivity of trypanosomes under experiment; determination of the effects on the infectivity of preserved material of some of the factors in the process of preservation, important for the preparation of standard material; comparison of the efficiency of different culture media for the isolation of trypanosomes; study of the distribution of trypanosomes in the vertebrate host; and measurement of the susceptibility of trypanosomes to drugs. The author stresses the importance of relating future experimental work with trypanosomes to preserved material for which comprehensive documentation is available. PMID:20604152

  19. Integration of Basic Skills: The Great Deception in Elementary Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1982-01-01

    Teaching basic skills in elementary social studies courses does not promote more teaching of social studies; it decreases social studies teaching time. The adverse impact of overemphasizing the 3-Rs and auditory and abstract learning over visual and tactile-kinesthetic experiences is discussed. (AM)

  20. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Quality Control Study: Methodological Report, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Quality Control Study, Volume II focuses on study procedures used for the analytical report recorded in Volume I of the study. Copies of all data collection forms are included along with file layouts, field procedures and other general information letters. It is intended to provide a description of the…

  1. A study on the quantitative evaluation of skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomomi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Kido, Michiko; Yamada, Kenji; Oikaze, Hirotoshi; Takechi, Yohei; Furuta, Tomotaka; Ishii, Shoichi; Katayama, Haruna; Jeong, Hieyong; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose a quantitative evaluation method of skin barrier function using Optical Coherence Microscopy system (OCM system) with coherency of near-infrared light. There are a lot of skin problems such as itching, irritation and so on. It has been recognized skin problems are caused by impairment of skin barrier function, which prevents damage from various external stimuli and loss of water. To evaluate skin barrier function, it is a common strategy that they observe skin surface and ask patients about their skin condition. The methods are subjective judgements and they are influenced by difference of experience of persons. Furthermore, microscopy has been used to observe inner structure of the skin in detail, and in vitro measurements like microscopy requires tissue sampling. On the other hand, it is necessary to assess objectively skin barrier function by quantitative evaluation method. In addition, non-invasive and nondestructive measuring method and examination changes over time are needed. Therefore, in vivo measurements are crucial for evaluating skin barrier function. In this study, we evaluate changes of stratum corneum structure which is important for evaluating skin barrier function by comparing water-penetrated skin with normal skin using a system with coherency of near-infrared light. Proposed method can obtain in vivo 3D images of inner structure of body tissue, which is non-invasive and non-destructive measuring method. We formulate changes of skin ultrastructure after water penetration. Finally, we evaluate the limit of performance of the OCM system in this work in order to discuss how to improve the OCM system.

  2. Quantitative error analysis for computer assisted navigation: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Ö.; Perwög, M.; Kral, F.; Schwarm, F.; Bárdosi, Z. R.; Göbel, G.; Freysinger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The benefit of computer-assisted navigation depends on the registration process, at which patient features are correlated to some preoperative imagery. The operator-induced uncertainty in localizing patient features – the User Localization Error (ULE) - is unknown and most likely dominating the application accuracy. This initial feasibility study aims at providing first data for ULE with a research navigation system. Methods Active optical navigation was done in CT-images of a plastic skull, an anatomic specimen (both with implanted fiducials) and a volunteer with anatomical landmarks exclusively. Each object was registered ten times with 3, 5, 7, and 9 registration points. Measurements were taken at 10 (anatomic specimen and volunteer) and 11 targets (plastic skull). The active NDI Polaris system was used under ideal working conditions (tracking accuracy 0.23 mm root mean square, RMS; probe tip calibration was 0.18 mm RMS. Variances of tracking along the principal directions were measured as 0.18 mm2, 0.32 mm2, and 0.42 mm2. ULE was calculated from predicted application accuracy with isotropic and anisotropic models and from experimental variances, respectively. Results The ULE was determined from the variances as 0.45 mm (plastic skull), 0.60 mm (anatomic specimen), and 4.96 mm (volunteer). The predicted application accuracy did not yield consistent values for the ULE. Conclusions Quantitative data of application accuracy could be tested against prediction models with iso- and anisotropic noise models and revealed some discrepancies. This could potentially be due to the facts that navigation and one prediction model wrongly assume isotropic noise (tracking is anisotropic), while the anisotropic noise prediction model assumes an anisotropic registration strategy (registration is isotropic in typical navigation systems). The ULE data are presumably the first quantitative values for the precision of localizing anatomical landmarks and implanted fiducials

  3. ABRF-PRG07: Advanced Quantitative Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Falick, Arnold M.; Lane, William S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Phinney, Brett S.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Yates, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge for core facilities is determining quantitative protein differences across complex biological samples. Although there are numerous techniques in the literature for relative and absolute protein quantification, the majority is nonroutine and can be challenging to carry out effectively. There are few studies comparing these technologies in terms of their reproducibility, accuracy, and precision, and no studies to date deal with performance across multiple laboratories with varied levels of expertise. Here, we describe an Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Proteomics Research Group (PRG) study based on samples composed of a complex protein mixture into which 12 known proteins were added at varying but defined ratios. All of the proteins were present at the same concentration in each of three tubes that were provided. The primary goal of this study was to allow each laboratory to evaluate its capabilities and approaches with regard to: detection and identification of proteins spiked into samples that also contain complex mixtures of background proteins and determination of relative quantities of the spiked proteins. The results returned by 43 participants were compiled by the PRG, which also collected information about the strategies used to assess overall performance and as an aid to development of optimized protocols for the methodologies used. The most accurate results were generally reported by the most experienced laboratories. Among laboratories that used the same technique, values that were closer to the expected ratio were obtained by more experienced groups. PMID:21455478

  4. Basic Competence of Intensive Care Unit Nurses: Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Suominen, Tarja; Ritmala-Castrén, Marita; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Critical care patients benefit from the attention of nursing personnel with a high competence level. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate the self-assessed basic competence of intensive care unit nurses and related factors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A basic competence scale (Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Competence Scale version 1, Likert scale 1-5, 1 = poor and 5 = excellent) was employed among Finnish intensive care unit nurses (n = 431). Intensive care unit nurses' self-assessed basic competence was good (mean 4.19, SD 0.40). The attitude and value base of basic competence was excellent whereas experience base was the poorest compared to the knowledge base and skill base of intensive and critical care nursing. The strongest factor explaining nurses' basic competence was their experience of autonomy in nursing care (F value 60.85, β 0.11, SE 0.01, and P ≤ 0.0001). Clinical competence was self-rated as good. Nurses gave their highest competence self-ratings for ICU patient care according to the principles of nursing care. The ICU nurses also self-rated their professional competence as good. Collaboration was self-rated as the best competence. In basic and continuing education and professional self-development discussions it is meaningful to consider and find solutions for how to improve nurses' experienced autonomy in nursing. PMID:26557676

  5. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software. PMID:11831625

  6. Parent Perceptions of Social Studies: Do They Want Just the Basics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Charles S.; Weible, Thomas D.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of parents in urban and rural school districts showed a strong belief in the importance of elementary school social studies and more support for innovations such as the curriculum guidelines of the National Council for the Social Studies than publicity about demands to return to basics would suggest. (IS)

  7. A Study on Contribution of the Basic Training Course to the Professional Development of Probationary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, M. Cevat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make an evaluation on contribution of the basic training course to the professional development of probationary teachers. The study group consisted of 21 probationary teachers and 5 education supervisors in Sanliurfa province. The data were collected through semi-structured observation, focus group interview and…

  8. Freddie Fish. A Primary Environmental Study of Basic Numerals, Sets, Ordinals and Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraynak, Ola

    This teacher's guide and study guide are an environmental approach to mathematics education in the primary grades. The mathematical studies of the numerals 0-10, ordinals, number sets, and basic shapes - diamond, circle, square, rectangle, and triangle - are developed through the story of Freddie Fish and his search for clean water. The…

  9. A Basic Approach to Social Studies: An Overview for Teachers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Oliver T.; Hickson, Mark, III

    A program based upon the study of human history and culture has been developed for seventh grade students by social studies teachers in Montgomery, Alabama public schools. The major objective of the program is to help students understand how basic relationships between time, space, and the cosmos have operated throughout the history of…

  10. Revising Basic Mathematics in a Network Environment: An Empirical Study with Finnish Technology University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketamo, Harri; Alajaaski, Jarkko

    2008-01-01

    A revising/replenishment study course in basic mathematics is experienced as being almost a necessity at the beginning of technology studies at the Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland. This is to avoid early dropouts in actual engineering mathematics courses. Experimental research on factors explaining successful revision of…

  11. Quantitative study of prostate cancer using three dimensional fiber tractography

    PubMed Central

    Hedgire, Sandeep; Tonyushkin, Alexey; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Efstathiou, Jason A; Hahn, Peter F; Harisinghani, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate feasibility of a quantitative study of prostate cancer using three dimensional (3D) fiber tractography. METHODS: In this institutional review board approved retrospective study, 24 men with biopsy proven prostate cancer underwent prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal coil on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Single shot echo-planar diffusion weighted images were acquired with b = 0.600 s/mm2, six gradient directions. Open-source available software TrackVis and its Diffusion Toolkit were used to generate diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) map and 3D fiber tracts. Multiple 3D spherical regions of interest were drawn over the areas of tumor and healthy prostatic parenchyma to measure tract density, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA), which were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: DTI tractography showed rich fiber tract anatomy with tract heterogeneity. Mean tumor region and normal parenchymal tract densities were 2.53 and 3.37 respectively (P < 0.001). In the tumor, mean ADC was 0.0011 × 10-3 mm2/s vs 0.0014 × 10-3 mm2/s in the normal parenchyma (P < 0.001). The FA values for tumor and normal parenchyma were 0.2047 and 0.2259 respectively (P = 0.3819). CONCLUSION: DTI tractography of the prostate is feasible and depicts congregate fibers within the gland. Tract density may offer new biomarker to distinguish tumor from normal tissue. PMID:27158426

  12. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  13. Semiautomatic Software For Quantitative Analysis Of Cardiac Positron Tomography Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman; Bidaut, Luc; Nienaber, Christoph; Krivokapich, Janine; Schelbert, Heinrich R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1988-06-01

    In order to derive accurate values for true tissue radiotracers concentrations from gated positron emission tomography (PET) images of the heart, which are critical for quantifying noninvasively regional myocardial blood flow and metabolism, appropriate corrections for partial volume effect (PVE) and contamination from adjacent anatomical structures are required. We therefore developed an integrated software package for quantitative analysis of tomographic images which provides for such corrections. A semiautomatic edge detection technique outlines and partitions the myocardium into sectors. Myocardial wall thickness is measured on the images perpendicularly to the detected edges and used to correct for PVE. The programs automatically correct for radioactive decay, activity calibration and cross contaminations for both static and dynamic studies. Parameters derived with these programs include tracer concentrations and their changes over time. They are used for calculating regional metabolic rates and can be further displayed as color coded parametric images. The approach was validated for PET imaging in 11 dog experiments. 2D echocardiograms (Echo) were recorded simultaneously to validate the edge detection and wall thickness measurement techniques. After correction for PVE using automatic WT measurement, regional tissue tracer concentrations derived from PET images correlated well with true tissue concentrations as determined by well counting (r=0.98). These preliminary studies indicate that the developed automatic image analysis technique allows accurate and convenient evaluation of cardiac PET images for the measurement of both, regional tracer tissue concentrations as well as regional myocardial function.

  14. A quantitative Kirkpatrick Level 1 and 2 study of equipment specialist apprentice operations training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Dirk D.

    The primary purpose of the quantitative experimental study is to compare employee-learning outcomes for a course of study that is offered in two formats: explicit and tacit instructor led and explicit e-learning operations training. A Kirkpatrick Level 2 course examination is used to establish a pretest knowledge baseline and to measure posttest learning outcomes for each instructional format. A secondary purpose is to compare responses of the two groups using a Kirkpatrick Level 1 customer satisfaction index survey. Several authors reported the United States electric utility industry would have an employee attrition issue during the 2010 through 2015 period. This is at the same time the industry will be experiencing an increased demand for electricity. There now is a demand for highly training powerplant operators. A review of literature yielded few studies comparing instructor led training and e-based training. Though the Electric Power Research Institute stated the two training modes would be acceptable instruction, the organization did not develop a quantifiable justified recommendation as to the training. Subjects participated in a basic operations course and decided to take either the instructor led or e-based training course. Results of the study concluded that both instructor led and e-based training provided significant learning to the participants. The Kirkpatrick Level 1 results indicated significantly better results for instructor led training. There was not a significant difference in the Kirkpatrick Level 2 results between the two training modalities. Recommendation for future research include conducting a quantitative studies including a Phillips Level 5 study and qualitative studies including a more detailed examination of the customer satisfaction survey (Kirkpatrick Level 1).

  15. Basic study of monitoring on fibre reinforced polymers: theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglioli, B.; Strauss, A.; Pascale, G.; Bergmeister, K.

    2005-06-01

    Recent research activities, technological utilization and commercialization activities in sensors and acquisition systems for monitoring have strongly supported the introduction of these innovations and new concepts in civil structural engineering. The impact of monitoring and assessing the health state of infrastructures, as well as new and old constructions, has become important and it seems to be one of the largest industries in the world. With the aim of monitoring new or repaired structures various monitoring systems have been extensively employed in recent years. In particular, in this paper attention is focused on the procedures usually adopted for monitoring the strengthening systems based on fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) applied to civil structures. Electrical strain gauges are often used to detect strain variations, but on composite materials the measures can be affected by various factors, such as the characteristics of the resin coating, the type of glue and the gauge length. In this paper the measurement errors on FRP elements are studied, from a theoretical approach developed in previous work on a deterministic basis. This approach is extended to the probabilistic field, with the aim of performing a sensitivity analysis of the basic variables which can cause errors in strain measurements. Additionally, the previous approach is extended to study the effect of the deviation of the direction of the gauges from the longitudinal axis of the FRP sheets. Finally, a comparison with experimental data is performed.

  16. Learning and Motivation in Thailand: A Comparative Regional Study on Basic Education Ninth Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loima, Jyrki; Vibulphol, Jutarat

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research studied regional motivation and learning of the basic education 9th graders in Thailand. Second topic was the school size and its possible effect on motivation. Furthermore, the data gave an opportunity to discuss, whether international research on motivation and learning was valid in Thai classrooms. The informants were…

  17. Basic Aspects of Infant-Grandparent "Interaction": An Eight-Month Longitudinal and Naturalistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratikaki, Anastasia; Germanakis, Ioannis; Kokkinaki, Theano

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal and naturalistic study aims to describe basic aspects of early imitative exchanges in dyadic infant-grandfather and infant-grandmother free interactions, from the second to the 10th month of age. Sixteen infants were video-recorded at home in the course of spontaneous dyadic interactions with maternal grandfathers and…

  18. Basics of the "Learning Organization" at Jordanian Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Basem; Jaradat, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at identifying the extent to which the basics of the "learning organization" (LO) principles are available at Jordanian schools (Pilot TQA schools in Jersah); to this effect, a specially customized questionnaire was developed--it was made of 19 items across three areas: a leadership that supports learning, an environment that is…

  19. Exercise Self-Efficacy and Perceived Wellness among College Students in a Basic Studies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Cara L.; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Hritz, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    University basic studies courses provide a valuable opportunity for facilitating the knowledge, skills, and beliefs that develop healthy behaviors to last a lifetime. Belief in one's ability to participate in physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, is a psychological construct that has had a documented impact on physical activity. Although…

  20. Toward Refining the Assessment of the Basic Public Speaking Course: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, D. Gail

    A study on basic speech assessment replicated an earlier one except that in place of the CCAI and the Competent Speaker form, the Self-Perceived Public Speaking Competency Scale (SPPSC) was used. Also, 2 randomly selected control groups of students were added to the research design: one consisting of 62 students who had not taken speech and were…

  1. Long-Term Retention of Basic Science Knowledge: A Review Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custers, Eugene J. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a review of long-term retention of basic science knowledge is presented. First, it is argued that retention of this knowledge has been a long-standing problem in medical education. Next, three types of studies are described that are employed in the literature to investigate long-term retention of knowledge in general. Subsequently,…

  2. Student Debt, Problem-Solving, and Decision-Making of Adult Learners: A Basic Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A basic qualitative research study was conducted to develop insights into how adult learners employ problem-solving and decision-making (PSDM), when considering college financing, student loans, and student debt. Using the social media Website Facebook, eight qualified participants were recruited. Participants were interviewed via telephone, and…

  3. Cognitive Modifiability of Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Multicentre Study Using Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment-Basic Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozulin, A.; Lebeer, J.; Madella-Noja, A.; Gonzalez, F.; Jeffrey, I.; Rosenthal, N.; Koslowsky, M.

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of cognitive intervention with the new "Instrumental Enrichment Basic" program (IE-basic), based on Feuerstein's theory of structural cognitive modifiability that contends that a child's cognitive functioning can be significantly modified through mediated learning intervention. The IE-basic program is…

  4. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqin; Wang, James H-C

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP's anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy. PMID:27610386

  5. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP's anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy. PMID:27610386

  6. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-12-01

    This work supports development studies for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion. Laboratory and process development studies are aimed at providing needed information on limestone utilization, removal of particulates and alkali metal compounds from the flue gas, control of SO/sub 2/ and trace pollutants emissions, and other aspects of fluidized-bed combustion. This report presents information on: (1) the development of a limestone utilization predictive methodology, (2) studies of particle breakup and elutriation, (3) basic studies on limestone sulfation enhancement by hydration, (4) studies of the kinetics of the hydration process, and (5) an investigation of various hydration process concepts.

  7. Experimental bath engineering for quantitative studies of quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, A.; Ball, H.; Hayes, D.; Zhen, X.; Jarratt, M. C.; Sastrawan, J.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We develop and demonstrate a technique to engineer universal unitary baths in quantum systems. Using the correspondence between unitary decoherence due to ambient environmental noise and errors in a control system for quantum bits, we show how a wide variety of relevant classical error models may be realized through in-phase or in-quadrature modulation on a vector signal generator producing a resonant carrier signal. We demonstrate our approach through high-bandwidth modulation of the 12.6-GHz carrier appropriate for trapped Yb171+ ions. Experiments demonstrate the reduction of coherent lifetime in the system in the presence of both engineered dephasing noise during free evolution and engineered amplitude noise during driven operations. In both cases, the observed reduction of coherent lifetimes matches well with quantitative models described herein. These techniques form the basis of a toolkit for quantitative tests of quantum control protocols, helping experimentalists characterize the performance of their quantum coherent systems.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Eye Phenotypes for Functional Genetic Studies Using Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani; Wang, Qingyu; Le, Thanh; Pizzo, Lucilla; Grönke, Sebastian; Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Imai, Yuzuru; Srivastava, Ashutosh; Troisí, Beatriz Llamusí; Mardon, Graeme; Artero, Ruben; Jackson, George R.; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Partridge, Linda; Lu, Bingwei; Kumar, Justin P.; Girirajan, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    About two-thirds of the vital genes in the Drosophila genome are involved in eye development, making the fly eye an excellent genetic system to study cellular function and development, neurodevelopment/degeneration, and complex diseases such as cancer and diabetes. We developed a novel computational method, implemented as Flynotyper software (http://flynotyper.sourceforge.net), to quantitatively assess the morphological defects in the Drosophila eye resulting from genetic alterations affecting basic cellular and developmental processes. Flynotyper utilizes a series of image processing operations to automatically detect the fly eye and the individual ommatidium, and calculates a phenotypic score as a measure of the disorderliness of ommatidial arrangement in the fly eye. As a proof of principle, we tested our method by analyzing the defects due to eye-specific knockdown of Drosophila orthologs of 12 neurodevelopmental genes to accurately document differential sensitivities of these genes to dosage alteration. We also evaluated eye images from six independent studies assessing the effect of overexpression of repeats, candidates from peptide library screens, and modifiers of neurotoxicity and developmental processes on eye morphology, and show strong concordance with the original assessment. We further demonstrate the utility of this method by analyzing 16 modifiers of sine oculis obtained from two genome-wide deficiency screens of Drosophila and accurately quantifying the effect of its enhancers and suppressors during eye development. Our method will complement existing assays for eye phenotypes, and increase the accuracy of studies that use fly eyes for functional evaluation of genes and genetic interactions. PMID:26994292

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Eye Phenotypes for Functional Genetic Studies Using Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janani; Wang, Qingyu; Le, Thanh; Pizzo, Lucilla; Grönke, Sebastian; Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Imai, Yuzuru; Srivastava, Ashutosh; Troisí, Beatriz Llamusí; Mardon, Graeme; Artero, Ruben; Jackson, George R; Isaacs, Adrian M; Partridge, Linda; Lu, Bingwei; Kumar, Justin P; Girirajan, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    About two-thirds of the vital genes in the Drosophila genome are involved in eye development, making the fly eye an excellent genetic system to study cellular function and development, neurodevelopment/degeneration, and complex diseases such as cancer and diabetes. We developed a novel computational method, implemented as Flynotyper software (http://flynotyper.sourceforge.net), to quantitatively assess the morphological defects in the Drosophila eye resulting from genetic alterations affecting basic cellular and developmental processes. Flynotyper utilizes a series of image processing operations to automatically detect the fly eye and the individual ommatidium, and calculates a phenotypic score as a measure of the disorderliness of ommatidial arrangement in the fly eye. As a proof of principle, we tested our method by analyzing the defects due to eye-specific knockdown of Drosophila orthologs of 12 neurodevelopmental genes to accurately document differential sensitivities of these genes to dosage alteration. We also evaluated eye images from six independent studies assessing the effect of overexpression of repeats, candidates from peptide library screens, and modifiers of neurotoxicity and developmental processes on eye morphology, and show strong concordance with the original assessment. We further demonstrate the utility of this method by analyzing 16 modifiers of sine oculis obtained from two genome-wide deficiency screens of Drosophila and accurately quantifying the effect of its enhancers and suppressors during eye development. Our method will complement existing assays for eye phenotypes, and increase the accuracy of studies that use fly eyes for functional evaluation of genes and genetic interactions. PMID:26994292

  10. Experimental Study on Basic Performance of Electroosmotic Pump with Ion Exchanging Porous Glass Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho; Kim, Gyu Man; Lee, Choon Young; Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Dae Joong

    The basic concept and preliminary performance results of a miniaturized electroosmotic pump with diaphragms were included in the present study. The separation of an electroosmotic pumping liquid from a drug using diaphragms is mainly to have a freedom in choosing an electroosmotic pumping liquid and to achieve the optimal drug delivery with its preferable precise control. As a result, the maximum flow rate and current increased linearly according to the increment of applied voltage that is electric potential.

  11. A quantitative approach for estimating exposure to pesticides in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Dosemeci, Mustafa; Alavanja, Michael C R; Rowland, Andrew S; Mage, David; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lubin, Jay H; Hoppin, Jane A; Sandler, Dale P; Blair, Aaron

    2002-03-01

    We developed a quantitative method to estimate long-term chemical-specific pesticide exposures in a large prospective cohort study of more than 58000 pesticide applicators in North Carolina and Iowa. An enrollment questionnaire was administered to applicators to collect basic time- and intensity-related information on pesticide exposure such as mixing condition, duration and frequency of application, application methods and personal protective equipment used. In addition, a detailed take-home questionnaire was administered to collect further intensity-related exposure information such as maintenance or repair of mixing and application equipment, work practices and personal hygiene. More than 40% of the enrolled applicators responded to this detailed take-home questionnaire. Two algorithms were developed to identify applicators' exposure scenarios using information from the enrollment and take-home questionnaires separately in the calculation of subject-specific intensity of exposure score to individual pesticides. The 'general algorithm' used four basic variables (i.e. mixing status, application method, equipment repair status and personal protective equipment use) from the enrollment questionnaire and measurement data from the published pesticide exposure literature to calculate estimated intensity of exposure to individual pesticides for each applicator. The 'detailed' algorithm was based on variables in the general algorithm plus additional exposure information from the take-home questionnaire, including types of mixing system used (i.e. enclosed or open), having a tractor with enclosed cab and/or charcoal filter, frequency of washing equipment after application, frequency of replacing old gloves, personal hygiene and changing clothes after a spill. Weighting factors applied in both algorithms were estimated using measurement data from the published pesticide exposure literature and professional judgment. For each study subject, chemical-specific lifetime

  12. Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Virginia, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" is devoted to the arts in education as a concern that should be addressed in a time of new priorities for the curriculum. Five articles and a book review are included. The opening article, "The State of the Arts in Education: Envisioning Active Participation By All" (Virginia Robinson), emphasizes that the study of…

  13. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Lucky, Z.; Drandell, M.; Leneman, D.; Maggs, J.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Morales, G.; Carter, T. A.; Wang, Y.; DeHaas, T.

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  14. Targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    The report delineates the new progress made in the fifth and final year and discusses the major accomplishments of the full five year program both in the basic science and in the spin off to practical transducer applications. Possible new areas of study which are suggested by the present studies are briefly reported. Major achievements include the development of a physical approach to understanding active composites, leading to the development of several new families of PZT:polymer piezoelectric composites for hydrophone application. New advances in the phenomenology and microscopic theory of electrostriction, and the evolution of a new family of high strain ferroelectric relaxor materials for practical application. New basic understanding of the polarization mechanisms in ferroelectric relaxors has been aided by the study of order-disorder of the cation arrangement in lead scandium tantalate, and the results correlate well with studies of relaxor behavior, and of shape memory effects in PLZT ceramics. Low temperature studies on pure and doped PZTs have given the first clear indication of the intrinsic (averaged) single domain response and correlate exceedingly well with earlier phenomenological theory. Crystal growth and ceramic processing studies have developed hand-in-hand with program needs providing new forms of conventional materials, new grain oriented structures and single crystals.

  15. Barriers to successful implementation of care in home haemodialysis (BASIC-HHD):1. Study design, methods and rationale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ten years on from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence’ technology appraisal guideline on haemodialysis in 2002; the clinical community is yet to rise to the challenge of providing home haemodialysis (HHD) to 10-15% of the dialysis cohort. The renal registry report, suggests underutilization of a treatment type that has had a lot of research interest and several publications worldwide on its apparent benefit for both physical and mental health of patients. An understanding of the drivers to introducing and sustaining the modality, from organizational, economic, clinical and patient perspectives is fundamental to realizing the full benefits of the therapy with the potential to provide evidence base for effective care models. Through the BASIC-HHD study, we seek to understand the clinical, patient and carer related psychosocial, economic and organisational determinants of successful uptake and maintenance of home haemodialysis and thereby, engage all major stakeholders in the process. Design and methods We have adopted an integrated mixed methodology (convergent, parallel design) for this study. The study arms include a. patient; b. organization; c. carer and d. economic evaluation. The three patient study cohorts (n = 500) include pre-dialysis patients (200), hospital haemodialysis (200) and home haemodialysis patients (100) from geographically distinct NHS sites, across the country and with variable prevalence of home haemodialysis. The pre-dialysis patients will also be prospectively followed up for a period of 12 months from study entry to understand their journey to renal replacement therapy and subsequently, before and after studies will be carried out for a select few who do commence dialysis in the study period. The process will entail quantitative methods and ethnographic interviews of all groups in the study. Data collection will involve clinical and biomarkers, psychosocial quantitative assessments and neuropsychometric

  16. Research Report: The Holt Basic Reading System (HBRS) Field Study (1976-1977). Study Phase: Student Interest Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eileen

    Questionnaires were distributed to 6,354 elementary school students participating in the Holt Basic Reading System Field Study. Primary students reported that their favorite activity is watching television; intermediate students, playing sports. Approximately 25% of the students did not have a pet; 46% reported having a dog; 15%, a cat. Almost 48%…

  17. Quantitative studies on acetylcholinesterase in seven species of digenetic trematodes.

    PubMed

    Nizami, W A; Siddiqi, A H; Islam, M W

    1977-07-29

    Quantitative estimation of absolute levels and in vitro release of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in seven species of digenetic trematodes: Isoparorchis hypselobagri from the swim bladder of catfish, Wallago attu; Srivastavaia indica and Gastrothylax crumenifer from the rumen, and Gigantocotyle explanatum from the liver of the water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis; Fasciolopsis buski, Echinostoma malayanum from the small intestine and Gastrodiscoides hominis from the caecum of the pig, Sus scrofa revealed that the enzyme is present in remarkably high quantities in species which inhibit gastrointestinal tract compared with those that parasitize liver and swim bladder. The rate of in vitro release of AChE also varies with the species which supports the view that such differential secretion probably takes place in situ as well to counteract peristalsis and it is a biochemical adaptation on the part of these trematodes. PMID:562036

  18. A quantitative histochemical study of the microvasculature of irradiated skin

    SciTech Connect

    Schwint, A.E.; Itoiz, M.E.; Cabrini, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Short-term X-ray damage to the microvasculature of the skin of newborn rats has been quantitated using Horseradish Peroxidase as a tracer. Image analysis of thick sections on which peroxidase was demonstrated histochemically revealed a radioinduced increase in vascular volume coupled with a decrease in vascular length and an altered frequency distribution of blood vessel calibers which resulted in early telangiectasia. The results afforded by direct counting of peroxidase positive macrophagic cells and microphotometric evaluation of peroxidase present in the connective tissue indicate a progressive increase in capillary permeability as a function of dose and time post-irradiation. The accuracy with which the affected region of blood vessels coincided with the area exposed to the beam favours the hypothesis of direct damage to the vessel wall as a major cause of radioinduced lesion.

  19. A review of basic to clinical studies of irreversible electroporation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunlan; Davalos, Rafael V; Bischof, John C

    2015-01-01

    The use of irreversible electroporation (IRE) for cancer treatment has increased sharply over the past decade. As a nonthermal therapy, IRE offers several potential benefits over other focal therapies, which include 1) short treatment delivery time, 2) reduced collateral thermal injury, and 3) the ability to treat tumors adjacent to major blood vessels. These advantages have stimulated widespread interest in basic through clinical studies of IRE. For instance, many in vitro and in vivo studies now identify treatment planning protocols (IRE threshold, pulse parameters, etc.), electrode delivery (electrode design, placement, intraoperative imaging methods, etc.), injury evaluation (methods and timing), and treatment efficacy in different cancer models. Therefore, this study reviews the in vitro, translational, and clinical studies of IRE cancer therapy based on major experimental studies particularly within the past decade. Further, this study provides organized data and facts to assist further research, optimization, and clinical applications of IRE. PMID:25389236

  20. Targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    The work reported covers the fifth and final year of the program of targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications. Major achievements include: the development of a physical approach to understanding active composites, leading to the development of several new families of PZT, polymer piezoelectric composites for hydrophone application. These are new advances in the phenomenology and microscopic theory of electrostriction, and the evolution of a new family of high strain ferroelectric relaxor materials for practical application. New basic understanding of the polarization mechanisms in ferroelectric relaxors has been aided by the study of order disorder of the cation arrangement in lead scandium tantalate, and the results correlate well with studies of relaxor behavior, and of shape memory effects in PLZT ceramics. Low temperature studies on pure and doped PZTs have given the first clear indication of the intrinsic (averaged) single domain in response and correlate exceedingly well with earlier phenomenological theory. Crystal growth and ceramic processing studies have developed hand in hand with program needs providing new forms of conventional materials, new grain oriented structures and single crystals.

  1. Helping Students to Recognize and Evaluate an Assumption in Quantitative Reasoning: A Basic Critical-Thinking Activity with Marbles and Electronic Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; Cruz, Adrian Corona

    2013-01-01

    There is a general agreement that critical thinking is an important element of 21st century skills. Although critical thinking is a very complex and controversial conception, many would accept that recognition and evaluation of assumptions is a basic critical-thinking process. When students use simple mathematical model to reason quantitatively…

  2. Critical review of a quantitative study of a specialty in high energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    White, D H; Sullivan, D

    1980-01-01

    A review is made of the authors' series of quantitative, historical, and social studies of the weak interactions of elementary particles. A short intellectual history, the quantitative methodology, and a summary of the papers analyzing specific episodes in this field are presented. The social organization of the field is described, and an overall policy for resource management is discussed. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Use of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment to Improve Interpretation of a Recreational Water Epidemiological Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a supplemental water quality monitoring study and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to complement the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water study at Boq...

  4. Post-deposition bioink self-assembly: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Ashkan; McCune, Matthew; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    The outcome of a bioprinting process depends on both the deposition of the discrete bioink units and their ability to self-assemble into the desired structure following deposition. Post-printing structure formation is an autonomous process governed by fundamental biological organizing principles. As the quantitative formulation of such principles is notoriously difficult, bioprinting remains largely a trial and error approach. To address this problem, specifically in extrusion bioprinting, we have recently developed an effective computational method, the cellular particle dynamics (CPDs). We have demonstrated the predictive power of CPD in cases of simple printed constructs prepared with spherical multicellular bioink units. Here we generalize CPD to the important practical case of tubular grafts printed with cylindrical bioink units by taking into account the realistic experimental situation in which the length and the volume of the cylinders decrease post-printing. Based on our results, we provide a set of instructions for the use of CPD simulations to directly predict tubular graft formation without the need to carry out the corresponding complex and expensive control experiments. Using these instructions allows the efficient and timely biofabrication of tubular organ structures. A particularly instructive outcome of our analysis is that building tubular organ structures, such as vascular grafts by bioprinting can be done considerably faster by using cylindrical rather than spherical bionk units. PMID:26538193

  5. Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks: quantitative and qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, K.; MacKintosh, A. M.; Hastings, G.; Wheeler, C.; Watson, J.; Inglis, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the appeal of "designer drinks" to young people. DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative research comprising group discussions and questionnaire led interviews with young people accompanied by a self completion questionnaire. SETTINGS: Argyll and Clyde Health Board area, west Scotland. SUBJECTS: Eight groups aged 12-17 years; 824 aged 12-17 recruited by multistage cluster probability sample from the community health index. RESULTS: Young people were familiar with designer drinks, especially MD 20/20 and leading brands of strong white cider. Attitudes towards these drinks varied quite distinctly with age, clearly reflecting their attitudes towards and motivations for drinking in general. The brand imagery of designer drinks-in contrast with that of more mainstream drinks-matched many 14 and 15 year olds' perceptions and expectations of drinking. Popularity of designer drinks peaked between the ages of 13 and 16 while more conventional drinks showed a consistent increase in popularity with age. Consumption of designer drinks tended to be in less controlled circumstances and was associated with heavier alcohol intake and greater drunkenness. CONCLUSIONS: Designer drinks are a cause for concern. They appeal to young people, often more so than conventional drinks, and are particularly attractive to 14-16 year olds. Consumption of designer drinks is also associated with drinking in less controlled environments, heavier drinking, and greater drunkenness. There is a need for policy debate to assess the desirability of these drinks and the extent to which further controls on their marketing are required. PMID:9040387

  6. Sorption of basic dyes onto granulated pillared clays: thermodynamic and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cheknane, B; Zermane, F; Baudu, M; Bouras, O; Basly, J P

    2012-09-01

    Effect of the granulation process onto the thermodynamic and kinetic sorption parameters of two basic dyes (Basic Yellow 28-BY 28 and Basic Green 4-BG 4) was evaluated in the present work. The charge surface properties of the surfactant-modified aluminium-pillared clay (CTAB-Al-Mont-PILC) particles were not modified, and the isoelectric point remains constant after high shear wet granulation. The Gibbs free energy of both BY 28 and BG 4 sorption was negative and decreased with the granulation; the endothermic nature of the sorption process was confirmed by the positive values of ΔH°. Adsorption kinetics of the two dyes, studied at pH 6 and 150 mg L(-1), follow the pseudo-first order kinetic model with observed rate constants of 2.5-4.2×10(-2) min(-1). The intraparticle diffusion model, proposed by Weber and Morris, was applied, and the intraparticle plots revealed three distinct sections representing external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption/desorption equilibrium. Diffusion coefficients, calculated from the Boyd kinetic equation, increased with the granulation and the particle size. Pseudo-first order kinetic constants, intraparticle diffusion rate constants and diffusion coefficients were determined for two other initial concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)) and include in a statistical study to evaluate the impact of granulation and initial concentration on the kinetic parameters. Kruskal-Wallis tests, Spearman's rank order correlation and factor analysis revealed a correlation between (i) the diffusion coefficients and granulation, and between (ii) the intraparticle diffusion rate constants and initial concentration. PMID:22721789

  7. Study on Control of Inclusion Compositions in Tire Cord Steel by Low Basicity Top Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Cai-ping; Yue, Feng; Jiang, Chen-xu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    Top slag melting experiment was conducted in a silicon molybdenum furnace with tire cord steel billet. The influence of top slag composition on the plasticity of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusion and inclusion plasticization conditions was calculated by thermodynamic software FactSage. Use the thermodynamic calculation to guide the laboratory experiments to study slag compositions influence inclusions composition. Then industrial experiments were conducted based on the theoretical calculation and results of laboratory experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to determine the morphology and composition of inclusions in steel. All studies show that in the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-10% MgO diagram, when CaO = 8-48%, SiO2 = 35-75%, Al2O3 = 0-32%, inclusions are in the plastic area. When basicity of top slag is certain, Al2O3 content in inclusions increases with the increase of Al2O3 content in the slag, and the distribution of inclusions becomes scattered with the increase of Al2O3 content in slag. Inclusion plasticization can be achieved when the binary basicities of top slag are 0.6, 0.8-1.2, 1.4 and corresponding w(Al2O3)s are 2-15%, 2-10%, <2%. According to industrial experimental results, when top slag basicity decreases from 1.5 to 0.67-0.9 and Al2O3 content decreases below 10 wt%, the inclusion falls into plastic area. It is feasible in practice to control the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusions plastic through adjusting Al2O3 content in slag.

  8. Development, Demonstration, and Dissemination: Case Studies of Selected Specific Projects in Adult Basic Education. Occasional Paper No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Harold W.; Darkenwald, Gordon G.

    In an effort to determine the effectiveness of 309 (b) projects (experimental demonstration projects in Adult Basic Education funded through the Adult Education Act), selected projects were used as the basis for several case studies and evaluated. Project RFD was never intended to be utilized by Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs but instead…

  9. Real-time quantitative phase imaging for cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hoa Vinh

    Most biological cells are not clearly visible with a bright field microscope. Several methods have been developed to improve contrast in cell imaging, including use of exogenous contrast agents such as fluorescence microscopy, as well as utilizing properties of light-specimen interaction for optics design, to reveal the endogenous contrast, such as phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Although PCM and DIC methods significantly improve the image contrast without the need for staining agents, they only provide qualitative information about the phase change induced by the cells as light passes through them. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has recently emerged as an effective imaging tool which provides not only better image contrast but also cell-induced phase shifts in the optical pathlength, thus allowing nanometer-scale measurements of structures and dynamics of the cells. Other important aspects of an imaging system are its imaging speed and throughput. High-throughput, high-speed, real-time quantitative phase imaging with high spatial and temporal sensitivity is highly desirable in many applications including applied physics and biomedicine. In this dissertation, to address this need, I discuss the development of such an imaging system that includes the white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a new optical imaging method, and image reconstruction/analysis algorithms using graphics processing units (GPUs). wDPM can measure optical pathlength changes at nanometer scale both spatially and temporally with single-shot image acquisition, enabling very fast imaging. I also exploit the broadband spectrum of white light used as the light source in wDPM to develop a system called spectroscopic diffraction phase microscopy (sDPM). This sDPM system allows QPI measurements at several wavelengths, which solves the problem of thickness and refractive index coupling in the phase shifts induced by the cell, and which

  10. A pilot study examining if satisfaction of basic needs can ameliorate negative effects of shift work

    PubMed Central

    SAKSVIK-LEHOUILLIER, Ingvild; HETLAND, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if satisfaction of the basic needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness is related to shift work tolerance, specifically physical and mental fatigue, insomnia, and digestive troubles in a sample of shift workers. This is a cross-sectional pilot questionnaire study, including 252 shift workers employed in a municipality in Norway. Autonomy was negatively related to physical fatigue and digestive troubles, while competence was negatively related to mental fatigue. Relatedness showed significant correlations with insomnia and mental fatigue, but did not reach significance in the regression model controlling for the two other basic needs as well as work scheduling, night work exposure, and sleep medication. Sleep medication was significant in the final regression model for insomnia, but unrelated to fatigue and digestive troubles. The demographic variables, work hours per week, work schedule, and night work exposure were unrelated to all four measures of shift work tolerance. Autonomy and competence may be more important for fatigue and digestive troubles among shift workers than work arrangement variables, night work exposure, and sleep medication use. PMID:26423327

  11. Physical abuse in basic-education schools in Aden governorate, Yemen: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ba-Saddik, A S; Hattab, A S

    2013-04-01

    Physical abuse in school has lifelong consequences affecting child health and educational achievements. A study was designed to assess the prevalence of physical abuse experienced by pupils in basic-education schools in Aden, Yemen, and to examine the risk factors associated with it. A cross-sectional study covering 1066 pupils in 7th-9th grades from 8 schools in different districts of Aden governorate were randomly selected. Answering an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, 55.7% of pupils reported physical abuse at least once in their school lifetime (73.2% of males versus 26.6% of females). Teachers were the main perpetrators (45.4%). A statistically significant association was found between physical abuse and sex, age group, family type and father's education. Significant predictors of physical abuse on multivariate regression were male sex (OR=7.89) and extended family type (OR=1.36). Physical abuse in basic-education schools requires serious consideration by educational authorities, families and the community at large. PMID:23882958

  12. Attacking the Multi-tiered Proteolytic Pathology of COPD: New Insights from Basic and Translational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Djekic, Uros V; Gaggar, Amit; Weathington, Nathaniel M

    2015-01-01

    Protease activity in inflammation is complex. Proteases released by cells in response to infection, cytokines, or environmental triggers like cigarette smoking cause breakdown of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In chronic inflammatory diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), current findings indicate that pathology and morbidity are driven by dysregulation of protease activity, either through hyperactivity of proteases or deficiency or dysfunction their antiprotease regulators. Animal studies demonstrate the accuracy of this hypothesis through genetic and pharmacologic tools. New work shows that ECM destruction generates peptide fragments active on leukocytes via neutrophil or macrophage chemotaxis towards collagen and elastin derived peptides respectively. Such fragments now have been isolated and characterized in vivo in each case. Collectively, this describes a biochemical circuit in which protease activity leads to activation of local immunocytes, which in turn release cytokines and more proteases, leading to further leukocyte infiltration and cyclical disease progression that is chronic. This circuit concept is well known, and is intrinsic to the protease-antiprotease hypothesis; recently analytic techniques have become sensitive enough to establish fundamental mechanisms of this hypothesis, and basic and clinical data now implicate protease activity and peptide signaling as pathologically significant pharmacologic targets. This review discusses targeting protease activity for chronic inflammatory disease with special attention to COPD, covering important basic and clinical findings in the field; novel therapeutic strategies in animal or human studies; and a perspective on the successes and failures of agents with a focus on clinical potential in human disease. PMID:19026684

  13. On the Use of a Protic Ionic Liquid with a Novel Cation To Study Anion Basicity.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Mohammad; Yarger, Jeffery L; Angell, C Austen

    2016-09-01

    The need for reliable means of ordering and quantifying the Lewis basicity of anions is discussed and the currently available methods are reviewed. Concluding that there is need for a simple impurity-insensitive tool, we have sought, and here describe, a new method using NMR spectroscopy of a weak base, a substituted urea, 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), as it is protonated by Brønsted acids of different strengths and characters. In all cases studied the product of protonation is a liquid (hence a protic ionic liquid). NMR spectroscopy detects changes in the electronic structure of the base upon interaction with the proton donors. As the proton-donating ability, that is, acidity, increases, there is a smooth but distinct transition from a hydrogen-bonded system (with no net proton transfer) to full ionicity. The liquid state of the samples and high concentration of nitrogen atoms, despite the very low natural abundance of its preferred NMR-active isotope ((15) N), make possible the acquisition of (15) N spectra in a relatively short time. These (15) N, along with (13) C, chemical shifts of the carbonyl atom, and their relative responses to protonation of the carbonyl oxygen, can be used as a means, sensitive to anion basicity and relatively insensitive to impurities, to sort anions in order of increasing hydrogen bond basicity. The order is found to be as follows: SbF6 (-) ClO4 (-) >FSO3 (-)

  14. The emerging science of quantitative imaging biomarkers terminology and definitions for scientific studies and regulatory submissions.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Larry G; Barnhart, Huiman X; Buckler, Andrew J; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Kondratovich, Marina V; Toledano, Alicia; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Filice, Ross; Zhang, Zheng; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2015-02-01

    The development and implementation of quantitative imaging biomarkers has been hampered by the inconsistent and often incorrect use of terminology related to these markers. Sponsored by the Radiological Society of North America, an interdisciplinary group of radiologists, statisticians, physicists, and other researchers worked to develop a comprehensive terminology to serve as a foundation for quantitative imaging biomarker claims. Where possible, this working group adapted existing definitions derived from national or international standards bodies rather than invent new definitions for these terms. This terminology also serves as a foundation for the design of studies that evaluate the technical performance of quantitative imaging biomarkers and for studies of algorithms that generate the quantitative imaging biomarkers from clinical scans. This paper provides examples of research studies and quantitative imaging biomarker claims that use terminology consistent with these definitions as well as examples of the rampant confusion in this emerging field. We provide recommendations for appropriate use of quantitative imaging biomarker terminological concepts. It is hoped that this document will assist researchers and regulatory reviewers who examine quantitative imaging biomarkers and will also inform regulatory guidance. More consistent and correct use of terminology could advance regulatory science, improve clinical research, and provide better care for patients who undergo imaging studies. PMID:24919826

  15. A quantitative study of exocytosis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles from neural stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Wu, Qiuxia; Sui, Keke; Chen, Xin-Xin; Fang, Jie; Hu, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghong; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the first 24 h after removing TiO2NPs, from the culture medium, about 35.0%, 34.6% and 41.7% of NP1 (50 nm), NP2 (30 nm) and NTs (nanotubes, 100 nm × 4-6 nm) were released (exocytosed) from cells, respectively. The release decreased over time, and became negligible at 72 h. Exocytosis did not happen during cell division. In addition, our results suggested that both endocytosis and exocytosis of TiO2NPs were energy-dependent processes, and NPs uptake by cells was influenced by serum proteins. Furthermore, we achieved primary dynamic confocal imaging of the exocytosis, allowing tracking of TiO2 NPs from NSCs. These findings may benefit studies on nanotoxicology and nanomedicine of TiO2 NPs.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the

  16. Overloading study of basic compounds with a positively charged C18 column in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoran; Guo, Zhimou; Long, Zhen; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-03-15

    While tailing and overloading of basic compounds remain problematic on most RP columns, a new kind of positively charged RP column named XCharge C18 was found to be superior good for the separation of alkaloids in our practical use. In this work, the surface charge property of the XCharge C18 column was evaluated by the retention of NO(3)(-) under different pH values and buffer concentrations. A considerable and pH-dependent positive charge was confirmed on the column. Then overloading behaviors of bases were systematically studied using amitriptyline as a basic probe. Good peak shapes (Tf<1.5) and extra high loadability with a C(0.5) of about 30,000 mg/L were observed on the column, with commonly used 0.1% formic acid as mobile phase additive. However, increasing the ionic strength of buffer with phosphates led to tailing peaks at high sample amount and sharp decline in loadability (C(0.5) of 2000-3000 mg/L), although it brought higher column efficiency at low sample amount. Higher pH also induced worse performance and lower loadability. The overall results demonstrated the importance of an appropriate level of ionic repulsion for the XCharge C18 column to achieve the good performance for bases, which could be explained by the multiple-site adsorption theory as ionic repulsion would shield the solute from occupying high-energy sites deeper in C18 layer. PMID:23411141

  17. Coal-gasification basic research and costs studies. Quarterly report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-15

    Work was continued on basic research and cost studies supporting the Department of Energy's coal gasification program. Two major activities or tasks are being performed. The first activity is the development of a process or processes to produce agglomerates from coal fines suitable for use as a feed to fixed-bed gasifiers. During the Fourth Quarter approximately 70 double-roll briquetting runs and 97 pelletizing runs were performed to evaluate promising binder candidates and to investigate other briquetting and pelletizing variables. All agglomerates were tested for room temperature handling ease (measured by crush-strength and drop-shatter tests) and for stability and performance at gasifier temperatures. The best agglomerates were further evaluated in a modified Burghardt test and in a tumbler test. Ten agglomerate compositions, eight briquettes and two pellets, were run in a small gasifier at American Natural Resources. Most agglomerates performed well in this gasifier. In Task II, the design of a gasification plant with Rockwell Molten Salt gasifiers was completed, and estimates of capital and operating costs were developed. Work on all basic cases has now been completed and only the incorporation of a briquetting facility into the fixed-bed plant design remains to be done.

  18. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  19. Interactions among Online Learners: A Quantitative Interdisciplinary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Pawan; Jain, Sachin; Jain, Smita

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the design and development of online instruction and specifically targets interaction and communication between online learners. Facilitating appropriate and meaningful interactions in designing instruction is a major goal for anyone developing a course, especially an online class. The data for this study came from the online…

  20. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of (F18)fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), (F18)fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of (F18)-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

  1. Quantitative modeling and analysis in environmental studies. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaver, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    This paper reviews some of the many mathematical modeling and statistical data analysis problems that arise in environmental studies. It makes no claim to be comprehensive nor truly up-to-date. It will appear as a chapter in a book on ecotoxicology to be published by CRC Press, probably in 1995. Workshops leading to the book creation were sponsored by The Conte Foundation.

  2. Commercial Activities in Primary Schools: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Gary

    2007-01-01

    The commercialisation of schools is a controversial issue, but very little is known about the actual situation in UK schools. The aim of this study was to investigate, with particular reference to health education and health promotion, commercial activities and their regulation in primary schools in the Yorkshire and Humber region of the UK. A…

  3. Service Learning, Phonemic Perception, and Learner Motivation: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Almitra; Gordon, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    A nine-week empirical study of 25 adults in a second language (L2) Spanish phonetics course explored whether students' participation in service-learning language exchange sessions with native Spanish speakers outside of class influenced learners' (1) motivation for foreign language learning and (2) phonemic perception in Spanish. Divided…

  4. Genetic analysis carried out in population tails reveals diverse two-loci interactions as a basic factor of quantitative traits variation in rye.

    PubMed

    Masojć, Piotr; Bienias, Anna; Berdzik, Marcin; Kruszona, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Bidirectional selective genotyping carried out independently for five quantitative traits within a biparental population of recombinant inbred lines of rye has revealed dramatic changes in alleles distribution in the population tails. A given allele, predominant in the lower tail, is often neutral for reversely directed selection or associates with the upper tail following divergent selection for a related trait. Such radical changes in the alleles distribution cannot be explained by differences in genotypic values within a single locus. This paper presents the theoretical model of a genetic mechanism underlying observed responses of individual loci to divergent selection. The presented model refers to the specific interactions between alleles at two loci. Its wider application in genetic analysis will open up new possibilities for testing positions of genes in the hierarchical structure of interacting loci revealed under selection pressure. PMID:26450131

  5. Quantitative studies of Savannah River aquatic insects, 1959--1985

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, R.; Hart, D.; Nagy, T.

    1986-10-30

    As part of a long-term study of water quality patterns, scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences have collected aquatic insects from artificial substrates placed at several stations in Savannah River. This report presents the first detailed compilation and analysis of this substantial data base, and examines patterns of variations of insect distribution and abundance (both spatial and temporal) during the last quarter century. Data on the number of individuals of various taxa found in the insect traps were obtained from tables in the Academy`s cursory reports. Computer data files created from these records were subjected to extensive statistical analyses in order to examine variation among stations, seasons and years in the abundances of major taxa and various aggregate properties of the insect assemblage. Although a total of 83 taxa were collected over the 27-year study, 10 taxa accounted for nearly 80% of the individuals collected from the traps, hence there 10 taxa were analyzed more intensively.

  6. Quantitative studies of Savannah River aquatic insects, 1959--1985

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, R.; Hart, D.; Nagy, T.

    1986-10-30

    As part of a long-term study of water quality patterns, scientists from the Academy of Natural Sciences have collected aquatic insects from artificial substrates placed at several stations in Savannah River. This report presents the first detailed compilation and analysis of this substantial data base, and examines patterns of variations of insect distribution and abundance (both spatial and temporal) during the last quarter century. Data on the number of individuals of various taxa found in the insect traps were obtained from tables in the Academy's cursory reports. Computer data files created from these records were subjected to extensive statistical analyses in order to examine variation among stations, seasons and years in the abundances of major taxa and various aggregate properties of the insect assemblage. Although a total of 83 taxa were collected over the 27-year study, 10 taxa accounted for nearly 80% of the individuals collected from the traps, hence there 10 taxa were analyzed more intensively.

  7. [Experimental study of the heaptotoxic effect of toluol III. Quantitative morphological study].

    PubMed

    Aranka, H; Zsuzsa, B; Gábor, F; György, U

    1976-07-01

    Hepatotoxic effect of the analitically pure toluene used in the Chemical Factory "Tiszai" was investigated by the aid of quantitative morphological method on male rats of line CFY. Toluene was administered intraperitoneally and subcutaneously. It was established, that there exists a nearly lineal correlation between the logarithms of intraperitoneally administered doses of toluene, the number and area of mitochondria localized in the unite area of the hepatocyte, and between the increase of number of matrix-granules in the mitochondria. The average-area of the mitochondria remained unchanged. As an effect of large intraperitoneal doses of toluene increase of the density of nuclei and the nucleus-plasma proportion could be revealed. There exists a nearly lineal correlation between the logarithms of intraperitoneal and subcutaneous doses of toluene and the decrease of volume of the cell nuclei. Statistical curves of the nuclei-variation-study as an effect of large doses show two peaks. Authors stress the importance of quantitative morphological studies in the toxicology. Results of such investigations should be evaluated in connection with each other. PMID:940573

  8. A quantitative study of a physics-first pilot program

    SciTech Connect

    Pasero, Spencer Lee; /Northern Illinois U.

    2008-09-01

    Hundreds of high schools around the United States have inverted the traditional core sequence of high school science courses, putting physics first, followed by chemistry, and then biology. A quarter-century of theory, opinion, and anecdote are available, but the literature lacks empirical evidence of the effects of the program. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of the program on science achievement gain, growth in attitude toward science, and growth in understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge. One hundred eighty-five honor students participated in this quasi-experiment, self-selecting into either the traditional or inverted sequence. Students took the Explore test as freshmen, and the Plan test as sophomores. Gain scores were calculated for the composite scores and for the science and mathematics subscale scores. A two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) on course sequence and cohort showed significantly greater composite score gains by students taking the inverted sequence. Participants were administered surveys measuring attitude toward science and understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge twice per year. A multilevel growth model, compared across program groups, did not show any significant effect of the inverted sequence on either attitude or understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge. The sole significant parameter showed a decline in student attitude independent of course sequence toward science over the first two years of high school. The results of this study support the theory that moving physics to the front of the science sequence can improve achievement. The importance of the composite gain score on tests vertically aligned with the high-stakes ACT is discussed, and several ideas for extensions of the current study are offered.

  9. Quantitative study of long-term solar and climatic changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Long term variations in the diameter and the shape of the Sun were studied. Daily observations of the Sun's diameter made at the Greenwich Observatory between 1836 and 1953 were analysed and interpreted. The data was converted into digital form and then screened and processed. It was found that the horizontal diameter of the Sun measured at Greenwich appears to have decreased systematically between 1880 and 1953 at a rate of 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 minutes of arc per century.

  10. Quantitative studies of bird movement: a methodological review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Kaiser, A.

    1999-01-01

    The past several years have seen development of a number of statistical models and methods for drawing inferences about bird movement using data from marked individuals. It can be difficult to keep up with this rapid development of new methods, so our purpose here is to categorize and review methods for drawing inferences about avian movement. We also outline recommendations about future work dealing both with methods development and actual studies directed at hypotheses about bird movement of interest from conservation, management, or ecological perspectives.

  11. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  12. A Study of the Basic Skills Assessment Direct and Indirect Measures of Writing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson, Eleanor

    The Basic Skills Assessment (BSA) is a national secondary level testing program which provides secure tests in reading, writing, and mathematics. It is designed to identify students who need additional instruction in the basic skills so they may be helped to reach the school district's secondary school graduation requirements. One of the BSA's…

  13. Study on the Intramunicipal Inequality in Financing Basic Education in Shanghai (2001-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tingjin; Zhang, Shujian; Shi, Shuai

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analyses of basic education financing among districts and counties within Shanghai municipality show that basic education in the developed city is as fiscally unequal as it is in other provincial administrative areas. But the tendency to expand education disparities in Shanghai has been reversed since 2005 owing to the education…

  14. Basic Skills Proficiencies of Secondary Vocational Education Students. Vocational Education Study Publication No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Louise

    This paper surveys research in the field in an attempt to determine what level of mastery of basic skills is required to do a particular job, what level vocational education students generally attain, and which instructional techniques are effective in improving vocational education students' basic skills. In the first of three sections, claims…

  15. Rutile geochemistry and its potential use in quantitative provenance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zack, T.; von Eynatten, H.; Kronz, A.

    2004-10-01

    Rutile is among the most stable detrital minerals in sedimentary systems. Information contained in rutile is therefore of prime importance, especially in the study of mature sediments, where most diagnostic minerals are no longer stable. In contrast to zircon, rutile provides information about the last metamorphic cycle as rutile is not stable at greenschist facies conditions. Several known geochemical characteristics of rutile can be used to retrace provenance. The lithology of source rocks can be determined using Nb and Cr contents in rutile, because the most important source rocks for rutile, metapelites and metabasites, imprint a distinct Nb and Cr signature in rutiles. Since Zr in rutile, coexisting with zircon and quartz, is extremely temperature dependent, this relationship can be used as a geothermometer. Metapelites always contain zircon and quartz, thus the Nb and Cr signatures of metapelites indicate rutiles that can be used for thermometry. The result is effectively a single-mineral geothermometer, which is to our knowledge the first of its kind in provenance studies. Several other trace elements are variably enriched in rutile, but the processes creating these variations are so far not understood. In a case study, Al, Si, V, Cr, Fe, Zr, Nb and W contents in rutiles were obtained by electron microprobe from three sediment samples from Upstate New York. A Pleistocene glacial sand, whose source was granulite-facies rocks of the southern Adirondacks, has detrital rutile geochemical signatures which are consistent with the local Geology; a predominantly metapelitic source with a minor metabasitic contribution. Calculated temperatures for the metapelitic rutiles from the glacial sand are consistent with a predominantly granulite-facies source. The two other samples are from Paleozoic clastic wedges deposited in the foreland of the Taconian and Acadian orogenies. Here several geochemical patterns of detrital rutiles are comparable to rutiles derived from the

  16. Competencies for Adult Basic Education and Diploma Programs: A Summary of Studies and Cross-Reference of Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Joan Keller

    This report summarizes and cross-references the results of 12 studies dealing with competencies for Adult Basic Education (ABE) and diploma programs. Described in the report are the following studies/projects: (1) the Adult Performance Level (APL) Study; (2) five APL-based validation studies (the New Jersey ABE Study, the New Jersey English as a…

  17. Introducing a feminist perspective to nursing curricula: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Boughn, S; Wang, H

    1994-03-01

    Feminist concerns of the nursing profession are examined and it is argued that feminism provides the ideology and impetus for social change. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the attitudes and beliefs of nursing students who take a feminist-oriented women's health course. The course went beyond a scientific model of women's health and examined women's health issues as they are related to the concerns of women as consumers and providers. A questionnaire assessing the effects of the course was administered at the beginning and again at the end of the course. Results indicated that the course produced significant changes in the attitudes and beliefs of the experimental subjects in areas of professional activism; high regard for self, nurses, and women; and social activism against sexism in the media and violence against women. PMID:8046506

  18. A quantitative study on the trachea of the dog.

    PubMed

    Dabanoğlu, I; Ocal, M K; Kara, M E

    2001-02-01

    This study was carried out to record the detailed morphometric structure of the trachea in dogs using 15 female and four male healthy adult mongrel dogs. The diameter and thickness of each tracheal ring were measured, the number of tracheal rings varying from 36 to 45. All data were subjected to statistical analysis which was carried out on individual sections of the trachea, i.e. the cranial cervical, middle cervical, thoracic inlet and the intrathoracic tracheal regions, which consisted of 12, 12, nine and 12 tracheal rings, respectively. Fusion of the tracheal rings was especially obvious in the cranial cervical and thoracic inlet regions as a result of neck movements. The diameter and thickness of the tracheal rings are smallest at the thoracic inlet level because the direction of the trachea changes at this point where the thoracic inlet is relatively small and surrounded by bone. The ratios of inner transverse to inner vertical and outer transverse to outer vertical diameters were almost the same, between 1.14 and 1.25 in all regions, which indicated that the trachea is near-circular in shape in the dog. At the thoracic inlet level cross-sectional lumen areas are 7 and 6% smaller than those in the middle cervical and intrathoracic regions, respectively. The thinnest cartilage was seen at the thoracic inlet level where there is a risk of tracheal collapse. PMID:11284164

  19. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell.more » Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.« less

  20. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell. Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.

  1. Quantitative Studies on Fabrics as Disseminators of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sidwell, Robert W.; Dixon, Glen J.; Mcneil, Ethel

    1966-01-01

    The persistence of vaccinia virus on wool (blanket and gabardine) and cotton (sheeting, terry cloth, and knit jersey) fabrics was studied. The fabrics were exposed to the virus by three methods: direct contact, aerosol, and virus-containing dust having a high content of textile fibers. Fabrics exposed to virus by each method were held in 35 and 78% relative humidities at 25 C. Virus was recovered for up to 14 weeks from wool fabrics exposed to virus and held in the low humidity. In contrast, virus persisted for shorter periods of time on the cotton fabrics. No virus was detected on terry cloth as early as 3 days after exposure to virus. The virus appeared to be less stable in the high humidity, and the method of exposure of the fabrics to virus apparently had an effect upon the persistence of the agent. On all fabrics, viral persistence was of sufficient duration to be of epidemiological significance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:5953019

  2. Quantitative proteomic profiling studies of pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lan; Li, Chen; Shedden, Kerby A; Lee, Cheong J; Li, Chenwei; Quoc, HuyVuong; Simeone, Diane M; Lubman, David M

    2010-07-01

    Analyzing subpopulations of tumor cells in tissue is a challenging subject in proteomic studies. Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) are such a group of cells that only constitute 0.2-0.8% of the total tumor cells but have been found to be the origin of pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis. Global proteome profiling of pancreatic CSCs from xenograft tumors in mice is a promising way to unveil the molecular machinery underlying the signaling pathways. However, the extremely low availability of pancreatic tissue CSCs (around 10,000 cells per xenograft tumor or patient sample) has limited the utilization of currently standard proteomic approaches which do not work effectively with such a small amount of material. Herein, we describe the profiling of the proteome of pancreatic CSCs using a capillary scale shotgun technique by coupling offline capillary isoelectric focusing(cIEF) with nano reversed phase liquid chromatography(RPLC) followed by spectral counting peptide quantification. A whole cell lysate from 10,000 cells which corresponds to approximately 1 microg of protein material is equally divided for three repeated cIEF separations where around 300 ng of peptide material is used in each run. In comparison with a nontumorigenic tumor cell sample, among 1159 distinct proteins identified with FDR less than 0.2%, 169 differentially expressed proteins are identified after multiple testing corrections where 24% of the proteins are upregulated in the CSCs group. Ingenuity Pathway analysis of these differential expression signatures further suggests significant involvement of signaling pathways related to apoptosis, cell proliferation, inflammation, and metastasis. PMID:20486718

  3. Geometry of normal mammalian platelets by quantitative microscopic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Frojmovic, M M; Panjwani, R

    1976-01-01

    The shape distributions of normal and hardened human and rabbit erythrocytes and platelets were obtained for edge-on orientations of a few hundred freely rotating cells from analyses of microphotographs obtained similarly as by Ponder(1930, Q. J. Exp. Physiol. 20:29) by phase-contrast microscopy at 800 X magnification. Major average diameters (d) and thicknesses (t) were estimated for both normal and hardened cells, and were used to calculate an average geometric axis ratio, rp = t/d, which increases to unity as cells become more spherical. Our fixation procedure did not alter these shape parameters: rp was unchanged for erythrocytes, with d and t values similar to those reported by Ponder (1930); platelets had d X t = 3.6 +/- 0.7 mum X 0.9 +/- 0.3 mum and 3.1 +/- 0.4 mum X 0.6 +/- 0.3 mum, respectively, for human and rabbit cells, with rp = 0.26 and 0.20, respectively. Agreement in rp was found with data obtained by a novel rheo-optical method which allows for a direct statistical averaging for large populations (greater than 100 X 10(3) cells). Histograms and linear correlation studies were made of the above three parameters (d,t,rp), as well as volume (V), total surface area are (S), and sphericity index (S.I.) calculated for both "prolate ellipsoid" and "disc with rounded edges" models. Results indicate very high linear correlations between rp - t, rp - S. I., and d -S, with high correlations for t - V,d -V and S. Data are in agreement with the few reports in the literature determined by other methods, with the best model for platelets appearing to be an oblate spheroid. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:786400

  4. Genetics 100 for cardiologists: basics of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Joseph B; Hegele, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The spring of 2012 marked the fifth anniversary of the widespread appearance in the biomedical literature of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of diseases of adulthood. Articles reporting GWAS results now regularly appear in dozens of general medicine and cardiology journals. As of August 2012, more than 1700 published GWAS have reported findings across a range of human diseases. Many of these reported new genetic determinants of cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease and its risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Though GWAS reports follow a standard format, superficially they can appear intimidating to most nongeneticists, whom we suspect often skip over them. Considering the importance of GWAS in cardiovascular science and medicine, and because they show no signs of fading, it is important for cardiovascular medical personnel and scientists to understand GWAS fundamentals. In this article, we provide a roadmap for the nonexpert reader to navigate through GWAS of cardiovascular disease. We cover the basic essentials needed to understand GWAS: underlying theory, mechanics, analysis and display, interpretation, and relevance. Areas covered include the relationship between GWAS and standard epidemiologic study design, the concepts of DNA sequence variation and linkage disequilibrium, the particular statistical considerations in studies involving many independent variables and large sample sizes, the meaning and interpretation of Manhattan plots, and the biologic and clinical significance of GWAS-based discoveries. We conclude with comments about the limitations of GWAS and about what to look for in the "post-GWAS era." PMID:23200095

  5. Studies of Tonsils in Basic and Clinical Perspectives: From the Past to the Future.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Keiji; Ichimiya, Shingo; Kamekura, Ryuta; Nagaya, Tomonori; Jitsukawa, Sumito; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The tonsils are located at the entrance of the pharynx as a cardinal constituent of Waldeyer's ring, taking part not only in local immune responses, but also in systemic immunity. Functional deficits of tonsils primarily underlie the pathogenesis of various characteristic disorders, including tonsillar focal infections such as palmoplantar pustulosis and IgA nephropathy, in addition to the highly prevalent sleep disorder called obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unknown, the tonsils have long been postulated as a unique and enigmatic immune organ. Lymphoid cells and tissues from surgically resected tonsils are often employed to analyze the human immune response from a retrospective view. This approach has provided much new fundamental evidence for understanding innate and acquired immune responses, thereby facilitating further studies in the fields of mucosal immunity and specific humoral immunity originating in the germinal center. Future studies of the tonsils in basic and clinical research are expected to reveal the mechanisms of tonsil-related disorders as well as the nature of human immunity. In this review, which is primarily based on our original research over the past 3 decades, we summarize our findings and discuss the future prospects of studies focusing on the tonsils. PMID:27116026

  6. Quantitative Study of Vulnerability / Damage Curves in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pule, Tebogo

    2014-05-01

    Southern Africa is considered a stable continental region in spite of several cases of reported earthquakes, which caused considerable damage and casualties particularly in the mining industry. Most buildings and structures in South Africa are not designed to resist any intensity of earthquake and most architects, engineers and builders in the country do not consider seismic resistance as a design requirement. This is mainly because the region has not experienced any large and serious destructive earthquake in recent years. The most destructive earthquake recorded in South Africa is the Ceres earthquake of 1969. The earthquake with a magnitude of 6.3 occurred on September 29, 1969 in the Ceres-Tulbagh region of the Western Cape Province about 100 km northeast of Cape Town. Serious damage occurred to certain buildings in the area (amounting to a total of U.S. 24 million). The structural damage varied from almost total destruction of old and poorly constructed buildings to large cracks in the better-built ones, twelve people were killed and many more were injured. Another event that caused severe damage to infrastructure occurred on March 9, 2005 at Stilfontein near Klerksdorp. It is known that up to 40 or more tremors are recorded monthly in Southern Africa, the locations are predominantly in the places surrounding the gold mining areas with many events around the Carletonville and Klerksdorp areas. Recent years have seen at least four mining induced tremors causing significant damage (Welkom 1976, Klerksdorp 1977, Welkom 1989 and Carletonville 1992). Such events show that it is very necessary to take seismic events into account in the design of any infrastructure. Assessing and understanding the risk facing the South African cities as a result of major seismic activity has been paid little attention. The main focus of this study is to use results of a deterministic hazard assessment to develop the most suitable damage curves for twelve of the most common building

  7. Basic sciences agonize in Turkey!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Fatma; Araz, Asli; Akman, Ferdi; Durak, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, changes from past to present in the departments of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics, which are considered as the basic sciences in Turkey, are shown. The importance of basic science for the country emphasized and the status of our country was discussed with a critical perspective. The number of academic staff, the number of students, opened quotas according to years for these four departments at universities were calculated and analysis of the resulting changes were made. In examined graphics changes to these four departments were similar. Especially a significant change was observed in the physics department. Lack of jobs employing young people who have graduated from basic science is also an issue that must be discussed. There are also qualitative results of this study that we have discussed as quantitative. Psychological problems caused by unemployment have become a disease among young people. This study was focused on more quantitative results. We have tried to explain the causes of obtained results and propose solutions.

  8. Quantitative analysis of free and bonded forms of volatile sulfur compouds in wine. Basic methodologies and evidences showing the existence of reversible cation-complexed forms.

    PubMed

    Franco-Luesma, Ernesto; Ferreira, Vicente

    2014-09-12

    This paper examines first some basic aspects critical to the analysis of Volatile Sulfur Compounds (VSCs), such as the analytical characteristics of the GC-pFPD system and the stability of the different standard solutions required for a proper calibration. Following, a direct static headspace analytical method for the determination of exclusively free forms of VSCs has been developed. Method repeatability is better than 4%, detection limits for main analytes are below 0.5μgL(-1), and the method dynamic linear range (r(2)>0.99) is expanded by controlling the split ratio in the chromatographic inlet to cover the natural range of occurrence of these compounds in wines. The method gives reliable estimates of headspace concentrations but, as expected, suffers from strong matrix effects with recoveries ranging from 0 to 100% or from 60 to 100 in the cases of H2S and the other mercaptans, respectively. This demonstrates the existence of strong interactions of these compounds with different matrix components. The complexing ability of Cu(2+) and to a lower extent Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) has been experimentally checked. A previously developed method in which the wine is strongly diluted with brine and the volatiles are preconcentrated by HS-SPME, was found to give a reliable estimation of the total amount (free+complexed) of mercaptans, demonstrating that metal-mercaptan complexes are reversible. The comparative analysis of different wines by the two procedures reveals that in normal wines H2S and methanethiol can be complexed at levels above 99%, with averages around 97% for H2S and 75% for methanethiol, while thioethers such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are not complexed. Overall, the proposed strategy may be generalized to understand problems caused by VSCs in different matrices. PMID:25064535

  9. Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies. Quarterly report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-16

    Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies performed at Davy McKee Corporation supporting the Department of Energy's coal gasification program is on schedule through the Second Quarter. It is anticipated that work will continue on schedule for the remainder of the program. During the Second Quarter, efforts were concentrated on evaluations, laboratory studies and design activities. In Task I, information on how coals perform in and around fixed-bed gasifiers was reviewed and standards and tests to evaluate the expected performance of agglomerates were developed. The economics of coal agglomeration, the preferred size of agglomerates, and possible coal upgrading methods to enhance agglomerates were examined. Two topical reports describing the findings were prepared and were issued. Approximately 200 separate wafer briquetting runs and 29 double-roll briquetting runs were performed during the period to evaluate potential binders and to investigate different briquetting variables. In Task II, the design of a Winkler coal gasification plant to replace a two-stage gasifier plant in the original Erie Mining facility design was completed, and work on the design of a Combustion Engineering entrained-flow gasification plant replacement was initiated. 24 figures, 12 tables.

  10. [Basic principles of selection and use of diagnostic tests: analysis of the results of diagnostic studies].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A V

    2001-11-01

    In clinical practice, in order to design and implement a specific therapeutic plan, as well as communicating an appropriate prognosis, the doctor needs to establish a precise diagnosis of the condition. Sometimes all one needs is a clinical impression. More often, however, the definition of an accurate diagnosis will need the interpretation of specific diagnostic tests as well. The rational use of diagnostic tests in cardiology--whether laboratorial or imagiologic--should be based on three factors: 1) validity of the study results about the test; 2) diagnostic properties of the test and 3) applicability of the test in the clinical setting. The rational use and correct interpretation of diagnostic tests are based on these three factors. In this article we present the basic principles concerning the validity of the results from the study that defined the specific test, and what level of evidence that constitutes. Other articles will address diagnostic properties of tests (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios) as well as the applicability of the test in clinical practice. PMID:11826705

  11. Neural processing of basic tastes in healthy young and older adults - an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hoogeveen, Heleen R; Dalenberg, Jelle R; Renken, Remco J; ter Horst, Gert J; Lorist, Monicque M

    2015-10-01

    Ageing affects taste perception as shown in psychophysical studies, however, underlying structural and functional mechanisms of these changes are still largely unknown. To investigate the neurobiology of age-related differences associated with processing of basic tastes, we measured brain activation (i.e. fMRI-BOLD activity) during tasting of four increasing concentrations of sweet, sour, salty, and bitter tastes in young (average 23 years of age) and older (average 65 years of age) adults. The current study highlighted age-related differences in taste perception at the different higher order brain areas of the taste pathway. We found that the taste information delivered to the brain in young and older adults was not different, as illustrated by the absence of age effects in NTS and VPM activity. Our results indicate that multisensory integration changes with age; older adults showed less brain activation to integrate both taste and somatosensory information. Furthermore, older adults directed less attention to the taste stimulus; therefore attention had to be reallocated by the older individuals in order to perceive the tastes. In addition, we considered that the observed age-related differences in brain activation between taste concentrations in the amygdala reflect its involvement in processing both concentration and pleasantness of taste. Finally, we state the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in understanding the taste quality specificity in age related differences in taste perception. PMID:26072251

  12. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electronics School. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Modules 15-19: Basic Troubleshooting Skills. Study and Progress Check Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    These individualized learning modules on basic troubleshooting skills are one unit in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Five modules are…

  13. Perspectives on opioid tolerance from basic research: behavioural studies after spinal administration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C W

    1994-01-01

    antagonist would produce an animal strictly tolerant at delta receptors, as DADLE has been implicated to have some effects at mu receptors. In any event, consideration of the quantitative measures of cross-tolerance are extremely important to help shape a rationale treatment plan for patients who may become tolerant to a particular class of analgesics. In general, direct toleragen administration by constant dose, constant rate infusion into local central nervous system (CNS) regions will provide the most rigorous tolerance studies for examination of the pharmacodynamic theories of tolerance, as adaptations in processes affecting central bioavailability, such as dispositional changes in the blood-brain barrier or fibrous encapsulation of an implanted subcutaneous pellet, are circumvented. The above considerations also are relevant for studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance after intracerebroventricular administration or, in general, for tolerance studies after systemic administration. The possibility of probe administration to the same region of CNS that was rendered tolerant, as in the Y-catheter method, further enhances the focus on the pharmacodynamic mechanisms of tolerance without the ancillary and literally peripheral concerns of a dispositional nature. A posological approach to these studies cannot be overemphasized, as it is only through such time consuming and costly experiments that rigorous, quantitative data can be obtained. Such data may help to guide the hand of the physician towards rational therapeutic intervention in the treatment of patients with chronic pain and opioid tolerance. PMID:8564997

  14. Basic auditory processing is related to familial risk, not to reading fluency: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Hakvoort, Britt; van der Leij, Aryan; Maurits, Natasha; Maassen, Ben; van Zuijen, Titia L

    2015-02-01

    Less proficient basic auditory processing has been previously connected to dyslexia. However, it is unclear whether a low proficiency level is a correlate of having a familial risk for reading problems, or whether it causes dyslexia. In this study, children's processing of amplitude rise time (ART), intensity and frequency differences was measured with event-related potentials (ERPs). ERP components of interest are components reflective of auditory change detection; the mismatch negativity (MMN) and late discriminative negativity (LDN). All groups had an MMN to changes in ART and frequency, but not to intensity. Our results indicate that fluent readers at risk for dyslexia, poor readers at risk for dyslexia and fluent reading controls have an LDN to changes in ART and frequency, though the scalp activation of frequency processing was different for familial risk children. On intensity, only controls showed an LDN. Contrary to previous findings, our results suggest that neither ART nor frequency processing is related to reading fluency. Furthermore, our results imply that diminished sensitivity to changes in intensity and differential lateralization of frequency processing should be regarded as correlates of being at familial risk for dyslexia, that do not directly relate to reading fluency. PMID:25243992

  15. Numerical and Experimental Study on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Basic Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuya; Kawakita, Masatoshi; Iijima, Takayoshi; Koga, Mitsuhiro; Kihira, Mitsuhiko; Funaki, Jiro

    The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils have been researched in higher Reynolds-number ranges more than 106, in a historic context closely related with the developments of airplanes and fluid machineries in the last century. However, our knowledge is not enough at low and middle Reynolds-number ranges. So, in the present study, we investigate such basic airfoils as a NACA0015, a flat plate and the flat plates with modified fore-face and after-face geometries at Reynolds number Re < 1.0×105, using two- and three-dimensional computations together with wind-tunnel and water-tank experiments. As a result, we have revealed the effect of the Reynolds number Re upon the minimum drag coefficient CDmin. Besides, we have shown the effects of attack angle α upon various aerodynamic characteristics such as the lift coefficient CL, the drag coefficient CD and the lift-to-drag ratio CL/CD at Re = 1.0×102, discussing those effects on the basis of both near-flow-field information and surface-pressure profiles. Such results suggest the importance of sharp leading edges, which implies the possibility of an inversed NACA0015. Furthermore, concerning the flat-plate airfoil, we investigate the influences of fore-face and after-face geometries upon such effects.

  16. Radiation dose to positron emission tomography technologists during quantitative versus qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    McCormick, V A; Miklos, J A

    1993-05-01

    Positron emission tomography technologists were monitored with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during qualitative and quantitative studies. Doses to technologists during specific tasks were also measured. The technologists received at least twice as much radiation during the quantitative as the qualitative studies. The average dose per study for qualitative studies was 0.017 mSv (1.7 mrem) shallow and 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) deep. The average dose per study for the quantitative studies was 0.05 mSv (5 mrem) shallow and 0.04 mSv (4 mrem) deep. The average dose per study was based on the TLD dose accumulated over studies conducted over four 2-mo and one 1-mo intervals. The dose incurred by the technologists each time they drew a radioactive dose was 0.002 mSv (0.2 mrem) shallow and 0.001 mSv (0.1 mrem) deep. The doses received during injection were 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) shallow and 0.007 mSv (0.7 mrem) deep. Doses received during blood sampling were 0.016 mSv (1.6 mrem) shallow and 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) deep. During quantitative studies, the technologist received a much greater dose than during its qualitative counterpart due to the blood sampling process and increased time in the room with the radioactive patient. PMID:8478709

  17. An Analysis of Minimum Service Standards (MSS) in Basic Education: A Case Study at Magelang Municipality, Central Java, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haryati, Sri

    2014-01-01

    The study aims at analyzing the achievement of Minimum Service Standards (MSS) in Basic Education through a case study at Magelang Municipality. The findings shall be used as a starting point to predict the needs to meet MMS by 2015 and to provide strategies for achievement. Both primary and secondary data were used in the study investigating the…

  18. Adequacy of Material Resources Required for Effective Implementation of Upper Basic Education Business Studies Curriculum in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoli, B. E.; Okorie, Ogbonnaya

    2015-01-01

    This work is a descriptive survey of the adequacy of the material resources required for effective implementation of upper basic education business studies curriculum in Ebonyi State. Two research questions and two hypotheses guided the study. The entire population of two hundred and forty-one (241) business studies teachers were used for the…

  19. Changes in Study Strategies of Medical Students between Basic Science Courses and Clerkships Are Associated with Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensminger, David C.; Hoyt, Amy E.; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; McNulty, John A.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that medical students change their study strategies when transitioning from basic science courses to clerkships, and that their study practices are associated with performance scores. Factor scores for three approaches to studying (construction, rote, and review) generated from student (n = 150) responses to a…

  20. Quantitative Correlational Study: Emotional Intelligence and Project Outcomes among Hispanics in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trejo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The present quantitative correlational research study explored relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) competencies, such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management, and project management outcomes: scope creep, in-budget project cost, and project timeliness. The study was conducted within the…

  1. Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches to the Study of Poverty: Taming the Tensions and Appreciating the Complementarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balarabe Kura, Sulaiman Y.

    2012-01-01

    There is a germane relationship between qualitative and quantitative approaches to social science research. The relationship is empirically and theoretically demonstrated by poverty researchers. The study of poverty, as argued in this article, is a study of both numbers and contextualities. This article provides a general overview of qualitative…

  2. Leadership Trust in Virtual Teams Using Communication Tools: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to address leadership trust in virtual teams using communication tools in a small south-central, family-owned pharmaceutical organization, with multiple dispersed locations located in the United States. The results of the current research study could assist leaders to develop a communication…

  3. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Remedial Reading Courses at Community Colleges: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavonier, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of two instructional approaches for remedial reading courses at a community college. The instructional approaches were strategic reading and traditional, textbook-based instruction. The two research questions that guided the quantitative, quasi-experimental study were: (a) what is the effect of…

  4. A Quantitative Comparative Study Measuring Consumer Satisfaction Based on Health Record Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Vivianne E.

    2013-01-01

    This research study used a quantitative comparative method to investigate the relationship between consumer satisfaction and communication based on the format of health record. The central problem investigated in this research study related to the format of health record used and consumer satisfaction with care provided and effect on communication…

  5. SAT-M Performance of Women Intending Quantitative Fields of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethington, Corinna A.

    This study assessed patterns of differences in quantitative performance across groups of intended undergraduate majors consistent with those previously found for students who had completed their undergraduate study. Data were drawn from the College Board Admissions Testing Program's national sample of 10,000 college-bound high school seniors in…

  6. Reverse Brain Drain of South Asian IT Professionals: A Quantitative Repatriation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppiah, Nithiyananthan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present quantitative correlational study was to examine if a relationship existed between the RBD phenomenon and cultural, economic, or political factors of the native countries of South Asian IT professionals living in the United States. The study on reverse brain drain was conducted to explore a growing phenomenon in the…

  7. Syntactic Constraints on Code-Switching: A Quantitative Study of Spanish/English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Carol W.

    This paper reports on a preliminary quantitative study of syntactic constraints on code-switching within discourses in which no change in participants, setting or topic is evident. The goals of the study are to provide a syntactic description of the points at which switches from Spanish to English and English to Spanish are possible and to assess…

  8. A quantitative analysis of qualitative studies in clinical journals for the 2000 publishing year

    PubMed Central

    McKibbon, Kathleen Ann; Gadd, Cynthia S

    2004-01-01

    Background Quantitative studies are becoming more recognized as important to understanding health care with all of its richness and complexities. The purpose of this descriptive survey was to provide a quantitative evaluation of the qualitative studies published in 170 core clinical journals for 2000. Methods All identified studies that used qualitative methods were reviewed to ascertain which clinical journals publish qualitative studies and to extract research methods, content (persons and health care issues studied), and whether mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative methods) were used. Results 60 330 articles were reviewed. 355 reports of original qualitative studies and 12 systematic review articles were identified in 48 journals. Most of the journals were in the discipline of nursing. Only 4 of the most highly cited health care journals, based on ISI Science Citation Index (SCI) Impact Factors, published qualitative studies. 37 of the 355 original reports used both qualitative and quantitative (mixed) methods. Patients and non-health care settings were the most common groups of people studied. Diseases and conditions were cancer, mental health, pregnancy and childbirth, and cerebrovascular disease with many other diseases and conditions represented. Phenomenology and grounded theory were commonly used; substantial ethnography was also present. No substantial differences were noted for content or methods when articles published in all disciplines were compared with articles published in nursing titles or when studies with mixed methods were compared with studies that included only qualitative methods. Conclusions The clinical literature includes many qualitative studies although they are often published in nursing journals or journals with low SCI Impact Factor journals. Many qualitative studies incorporate both qualitative and quantitative methods. PMID:15271221

  9. A Thermodynamic and Structural Study of Myelin Basic Protein in Lipid Membrane Models

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, P.; Carzino, R.; Svaldo-Lanero, T.; Relini, A.; Cavalleri, O.; Fasano, A.; Liuzzi, G. M.; Carlone, G.; Riccio, P.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.

    2007-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a major protein of the myelin membrane in the central nervous system. It is believed to play a relevant role in the structure and function of the myelin sheath and is a candidate autoantigen in demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis. MBP has many features typical of soluble proteins but is capable of strongly interacting with lipids, probably via a conformation change. Its structure in the lipid membrane as well as the details of its interaction with the lipid membrane are still to be resolved. In this article we study the interaction of MBP with Langmuir films of anionic and neutral phospholipids, used as experimental models of the lipid membrane. By analyzing the equilibrium surface pressure/area isotherms of these films, we measured the protein partition coefficient between the aqueous solution and the lipid membrane, the mixing ratio between protein and lipid, and the area of the protein molecules inserted in the lipid film. The penetration depth of MBP in the lipid monolayer was evaluated by x-ray reflectivity measurements. The mixing ratio and the MBP molecular area decrease as the surface pressure increases, and at high surface pressure the protein is preferentially located at the lipid/water interface for both anionic and neutral lipids. The morphology of MBP adsorbed on lipid films was studied by atomic force microscopy. MBP forms bean-like structures and induces a lateral compaction of the lipid surface. Scattered MBP particles have also been observed. These particles, which are 2.35-nm high, 4.7-nm wide, and 13.3-nm long, could be formed by protein-lipid complexes. On the basis of their size, they could also be either single MBP molecules or pairs of c-shaped interpenetrating molecules. PMID:17513373

  10. X-ray scattering studies of a model complex of lipid and basic protein of myelin.

    PubMed

    Murthy, N S; Wood, D D; Moscarello, M A

    1984-01-25

    Low-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering data from phosphatidylglycerol complexed with myelin basic protein, poly(L-lysine) and calcium ions are analyzed. The results confirm our earlier report (Brady, G.W., Murthy, N.S., Fein, D.B., Wood, D.D. and Moscarello, M.A. (1981) Biophys. J. 34, 345-350) that the basic protein interacts primarily with the polar headgroups of the lipid; and that at high protein concentrations (greater than 35%) the bilayers aggregate to form multilayers with a repeat period of 68 A, the single bilayer to multilayer transition being a cooperative process. Polylysine and Ca2+ produce multilayers with a smaller repeat of approx. 55 A. Basic protein and polylysine do not change the fluid-like arrangement of the hydrocarbon chains (diffuse 4.6 A peak in the wide-angle pattern), whereas Ca2+ probably induces a two-dimensional order (4.3 A and 3.9 A peak in the wide-angle pattern). Electron density profiles of the lipid and lipid-basic protein vesicles indicate that the basic protein penetrates into the bilayer. PMID:6199042

  11. Quantitative and qualitative approaches in the study of poverty and adolescent development: separation or integration?

    PubMed

    Leung, Janet T Y; Shek, Daniel T L

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches to study the impact of economic disadvantage on family processes and adolescent development. Quantitative research has the merits of objectivity, good predictive and explanatory power, parsimony, precision and sophistication of analysis. Qualitative research, in contrast, provides a detailed, holistic, in-depth understanding of social reality and allows illumination of new insights. With the pragmatic considerations of methodological appropriateness, design flexibility, and situational responsiveness in responding to the research inquiry, a mixed methods approach could be a possibility of integrating quantitative and qualitative approaches and offers an alternative strategy to study the impact of economic disadvantage on family processes and adolescent development. PMID:21870673

  12. Study of the impacts of patient-educators on the course of basic sciences in dental studies.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Alliot-Licht, B; Gross, O; Roger-Leroi, V; Marchand, C

    2015-02-01

    Ever since 2006, Nantes University dental educators have started organising lectures led by the mother of a young patient suffering from ectodermic dysplasia (patient-educator) to help second-year students to better understand how important it is for their future dental work to better understand basic sciences. In this study, we have analysed this training experience on students' motivation. For this purpose, students were asked to complete questionnaires 10 days after the patient-educator's lecture (early assessment; n = 193) and 4 years later, during the last year of their dental studies (delayed assessment; n = 47). Moreover, 3 years after the first lecture, we analysed the ability of students to diagnose a mother carrying the ectodermic dysplasia genetic disorder, using a case-based learning exercise with a patient showing dental features similar to those exposed by the patient-educator (measure of knowledge; n = 42). Ten days after the lecture, the early assessment shows that all the students were interested in the lecture and 59% of the students declared being motivated to find out more about genetics whilst 54% declared the same thing about embryology courses. Moreover, 4 years later, 67% of the students remembered the patient-educator's lecture a little or very well. Three years after the course, 83% of the students diagnosed ectodermal dysplasia whilst studying the case-based example that listed typical dental phenotypes. In conclusion, this study shows that this original educational approach enhances dental students' motivation in learning basic sciences and that patient-educators could offer many benefits for students and patients. PMID:24628743

  13. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia, their clinical study and relevance in research].

    PubMed

    Miret, Salvador; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Peralta, Víctor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Basic symptoms consist of subtle sub-clinical disturbances subjectively experienced by schizophrenia patients. These are mainly related to drive, affect, thinking and language, perception, memory, motor action, central vegetative functions, control of cognitive processes, and stress tolerance. Initially described by Huber, from a phenomenological approach, basic symptoms are part of the earliest features of schizophrenia, and they can evolve along the course of the disorder. Their assessment during the prodromal phase of the disease (together with ultra-high risk criteria) is one of the 2 main approaches that allow the definition of states of clinical risk for the development of psychosis. The present review provides an updated view of the concept of basic symptoms, highlighting its potential value in establishing neurobiological correlates of interest in aetiopathogenic research. PMID:26774677

  14. Internal Interest or External Performing? A Qualitative Study on Motivation and Learning of 9th Graders in Thailand Basic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loima, Jyrki; Vibulphol, Jutarat

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research was the first academic attempt to study and discuss the internal and external motivation in learning of students in basic education schools in Thailand. The study addressed two research questions to analyze similarities and differences in learning motivation or interest and teachers' enhancement or discouragement. 1) What…

  15. The Basic Communication Course at U.S. Colleges and Universities in the 21st Century: Study VII

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreale, Sherwyn; Hugenberg, Lawrence; Worley, David

    2006-01-01

    This seventh in a series of investigations of the basic communication course at 2- and 4-year colleges and universities that began in 1968 has as its purpose to gather longitudinal data on the nature of the course. This latest study differs somewhat from past studies. The survey instrument from 1999 was revised to include timely concerns such as…

  16. Basic studies on laser-assisted phacoemulsification using diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausladen, Florian; Wurm, Holger; Stock, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of a novel diode-pumped Er:YAG laser for phacoemulsification in basic experimental investigations. An appropriate experimental setup was created, including a translation stage for sample movement, a sample holder, a water spray for sample humidification and a surgical microscope with a CCD camera for video documentation. The analysis of the laser cuts and histological sections was done by light microscopy. As samples porcine eye lenses hardened by formalin were used. In ablation experiments with different spot diameters and radiant powers and a constant repetition rate νr = 200 Hz the maximum ablation depths of (4.346 +/- 0.044) mm have reached at (Ø = 480 μm, Φ = 24.15 W) with a maximum extend of thermal damage of (0.165 +/- 0.030) mm. The average ablation efficiency is 0.241 mm3/J. With a spot diameter of 308 μm the maximum ablation depth is (4.238 +/- 0.040) mm at 24.65 W with a mean ablation efficiency of 0.293 mm3/J. The extend of the thermally damaged region is (0.171 +/- 0.024) mm at this laser power. Using a sapphire cylinder with a diameter of 412 μm (length 38.5 mm) in direct tissue contact with water spray for sample humidification the ablation depth reaches (1.017 +/- 0.074) mm at 4.93 W and (1.840 +/- 0.092) mm at 9.87 W with a mean efficiency of 0.261 mm3/J. A thermal damage zone of (0.064 +/-0.024) mm at 9.87 W was measured. Additionally, at this high power, a progressive contamination and destruction of the cylinder end facet was observed. In conclusion, the investigations show that the diode-pumped Er:YAG laser has considerable potential for cataract surgery.

  17. Basic design studies for a 600 MWe CFB boiler (270b, 2 x 600 C)

    SciTech Connect

    Bursi, J.M.; Lafanechere, L.; Jestin, L.

    1999-07-01

    Commercial CFB boilers are currently available in the 300 MWe equivalent range for use with international coal. Retrofitting of Provence 4 with a 250 MWe CFB boiler was an important step in CFB development. In light of the results obtained from two large French units--Emile Huchet 4 (125 MWe) and Provence 4 (250 MWe)--this paper focuses on the main technical points which are currently being studied in relation to the basic design of a 600 MWe CFB boiler, a project that has been undertaken by EDF. The general aim of this project is to demonstrate the competitiveness of a CFB boiler compared with a PF boiler. The main areas of focus in the design of this large CFB boiler with advanced steam conditions are described. These points are subjected to particular analysis from a design standpoint. The objective is to prepare the precise specifications needed to ensure a product which is optimized in terms of quality/cost or service/cost. Due to the present lack of theoretical understanding of the refined and complex two-phase flow, design is a challenge which has to be based on reliable and comprehensive data obtained from large plants in commercial operation. This will ensure that the advantages of CFB which arise from the hydrodynamics within the circulation loop are maintained. The major goals of maintaining good particle residence time and concentration in the furnace are described. Misunderstanding of CFB furnace bottom conditions is also pointed out, with cost reduction and better NO{sub x} capture certainly among the major new targets in relation to bottom furnace design. General problems associated with the heat exchanger arrangement, principally those linked to high steam conditions and, especially, the vaporization system, are discussed. Once again, comparison with PF in this area showed that CFB boilers appear more competitive. Finally, the main area in which there is a need for sharing of CFB experience among CFB users is pointed out.

  18. [Study on the Rapid Evaluation of Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen (TVB-N) of Mutton by Hyperspectral Imaging Technique].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong-guang; Yao, Xue-dong; Duan, Hong-wei; Ma, Ben-xue; Tang, Ming-xiang

    2016-03-01

    Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen (TVB-N) was usually taken as the physicochemical reference value to evaluate the mutton freshness. In order to explore the feasibility of hyperspectral (HSI) imaging technique to detect mutton freshness, 71 representative mutton samples were collected and scanned using a diffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system in the Visible-Near infrared (NIR) spectral region (400-1 000 nm), and the chemical values of TVB-N content were determined using the semimicro Kjeldahl method according to the modified Chinese national standard. The representative spectra of mutton samples were extracted and obtained after selection of the region of interests (ROIs). The samples of calibration set and prediction set were divided at the ratio of 3 : 1 according to the content gradient method. Optimum HSI calibration models of the mutton (TVB-N) were established and evaluated by comparing different spectral preprocessing methods and modeling methods, which included Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR), Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) and Principal Component Regression (PCR) methods. The results are that through the utilization of Multiplicative Scatter Correction (MSC), first derivative, Savitzky-Golay (S-G) smoothing and mean-centering together, both PLSR and PCR were able to achieve quantitative detection of mutton TVB-N. As for the PLSR model of mutton TVB-N established, the spectral pretreatment methods chosen included MSC, first derivative, S-G (15,2) smoothing and mean-centering, and the latent variables (LVs) number used was 11. As for the calibration set of PLSR model of mutton TVB-N, the correlation coefficient (r) and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) were 0.92 and 3.00 mg x (100 g)(-1), respectively. As for the prediction set of PLSR model of mutton TVB-N, the correlation coefficient (r), Root Mean Square Error of Prediction (RMSEP), and ratio of standard deviation to standard error of prediction (RPD) were 0

  19. Quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of mobile residues in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.L.; Oldfield, E.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have used quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the dynamic structure of the backbone of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R/sub 1/ and JW-3. NMR experiments were performed using an internal sucrose quantitation standard on purple membranes in which one of the following /sup 13/C'-labeled amino acids had been biosynthetically incorporated: glycine, isoleucine, lysine, phenylalanine, and valine. The results suggest that the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain backbone, and possibly one of the connecting loops, undergoes rapid, large angle fluctuations. The results are compared with previous NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic data obtained on bacteriorhodopsin.

  20. A study of the 42CrMo4 steel surface by quantitative XPS electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, M.; Gruzza, B.; Bideux, L.; Monier, G.; Robert-Goumet, C.

    2008-05-01

    Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the native oxide film formed on 42CrMo4 steel surface by air exposure in normal conditions. In order to determine the thickness and composition of the oxide layer we have used a stacking layer model together with experimental XPS sputtering depth profiling. At a nanoscale study, to obtain quantitative results one must take into account fundamental parameters like the attenuation depth of photoelectrons. We have found that both lepidocrocit (γ-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe 3O 4) were present and the total thickness of the oxide layer was 16 monolayers.

  1. The Speed-Power Study of the USES Basic Occupational Literacy Test (BOLT) Analysis and Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Dept. of Employment Security, Salt Lake City. Western Test Development Field Center.

    Research and analysis conducted to determine the effects of reducing the administration time for one or more levels of the Basic Occupational Literacy Test (BOLT) are described. The total usable sample consisted of 2,423 subjects. Data were collected from 23 states from 1978 to 1981. Data came from a variety of sources, including schools and…

  2. PEACETIME RADIATION HAZARDS IN THE FIRE SERVICE, BASIC COURSE, STUDY GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC.

    THE ASSIGNMENT SHEETS INCLUDED ARE CORRELATED WITH THE INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE (VT 002 117), THE RESOURCE MANUAL (VT 001 337), AND A SET OF TWENTY-TWO 20- BY 28-INCH CHARTS (OE 84002). THE MATERIAL IS DESIGNED TO BE PRESENTED TO FIREMEN IN A 15-HOUR COURSE AS A PART OF THEIR BASIC FIRE TRAINING AND IS CONCERNED WITH THE HAZARDS RESULTING FROM THE…

  3. Explaining After by Before: Basic Aspects of a Dynamic Systems Approach to the Study of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Geert, Paul; Steenbeek, Henderien

    2005-01-01

    The basic properties of a dynamic systems approach of development are illustrated by contrasting two simple equations. One equation is characteristic of dynamic systems models. The other refers to what, for the sake of simplicity, is referred to as the standard developmental approach. We give illustrations from cognitive, language and social…

  4. The basic benefit package: composition and exceptions to the rules. A case study.

    PubMed

    Kroneman, Madelon; de Jong, Judith D

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of the Health Insurance Act in 2006 in the Netherlands, the basic package of the former sickness funds became valid for all citizens. The basic benefit package has been subject to change, responding to increasing health care expenditures, medical innovations and the economic crisis. In this paper we address the decision criteria used to assess the package annually since 2006 and describe some developments that do not follow the criteria, leading to a yo-yo effect. We discuss the formation of the decision for in- or exclusion and why some treatments seem to follow an, at first sight, arbitrary in- and exclusion pathway. We first describe the official way of establishing the basic benefit package and than will describe why some treatments follow a deviated path. We conclude that political pressure and pressure from interest groups may lead to inclusion or postponement of exclusion. Reform of the organization of certain forms of health care (in our example mental care) may lead to seemingly inconsequent changes. The yo-yo effect of some treatments or pharmaceuticals may have negative effects on health care providers, insurers and patients. The seemingly well defined criteria available for defining the basic package appear to be broadly interpretable and other influences may determine the final decision of inclusion or exclusion. PMID:25680945

  5. Students' Levels of Explanations, Models, and Misconceptions in Basic Quantum Chemistry: A Phenomenographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefani, Christina; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    We investigated students' knowledge constructions of basic quantum chemistry concepts, namely atomic orbitals, the Schrodinger equation, molecular orbitals, hybridization, and chemical bonding. Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning provided the theoretical framework and phenomenography the method of analysis. The semi-structured interview with…

  6. Campus Planning Study for the Ohio State University. Phase I, Alternative Basic Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    This document identifies some of the problems encountered in developing a master plan for a state university. Basic policies are suggested for guiding the future development of the Ohio State University campus. Two alternative planning schemes are recommended. Future enrollment and space needs, various curriculum program organizations, traffic,…

  7. Study on Innovation of Teacher Training Model in Basic Education from the Perspective of "Blended Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bu, Huabai; Bu, Shizhen

    2012-01-01

    Gradual integration of synergetic technology, P2P technology and online learning community furnishes a new research field for innovation of teacher training model in a knowledge economy era. This article proposes the innovative model of "whole of three lines" in teacher training in basic education from the perspective of "blended…

  8. Teachers' Conceptions of Standards in South African Basic Education and Training: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosibo, Lungi; Nomlomo, Vuyokazi

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, the Department of Basic Education and Training (DBE) is responsible for primary and secondary education (Grades R-12). In an effort to improve educational standards in literacy, numeracy and mathematics, especially in the Foundation Phase (FP) levels of education, the DBE has developed several initiatives and campaigns. To monitor…

  9. Using Study Guides To Help Students Focus Their Reading in the Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeman, David A.; Young, Raymond W.

    One problem that surfaced with the speech communication basic course (COM 105) at Valdosta State University (Georgia) was that the actual content covered by individual instructors varied widely, so widely that two given sections taught by different instructors may bear little resemblance to one another. This problem was addressed first through a…

  10. Developmental Dyscalculia and Basic Numerical Capacities: A Study of 8--9-Year-Old Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Bevan, Anna; Butterworth, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one 8- and 9-year-old children selected for dyscalculia, reading difficulties or both, were compared to controls on a range of basic number processing tasks. Children with dyscalculia only had impaired performance on the tasks despite high-average performance on tests of IQ, vocabulary and working memory tasks. Children with reading…

  11. Basic Training Course/Emergency Medical Technician. (1977 Edition). Student Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Developed to aid students enrolled in an emergency medical technician (EMT) training course, this document accompanies a course guide and a set of instructor lesson plans which update a basic training program for EMTs. The course consists of twenty-five lessons involving a minimum of seventy-one hours of classroom and field training plus ten hours…

  12. Exploring the Perceptions of College Instructors towards Computer Simulation Software Programs: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the quantitative regression study was to explore and to identify relationships between attitudes toward use and perceptions of value of computer-based simulation programs, of college instructors, toward computer based simulation programs. A relationship has been reported between attitudes toward use and perceptions of the value of…

  13. A Quantitative Study Examining Teacher Stress, Burnout, and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Timar D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to examine the relationships between stress, burnout, and self-efficacy in public school teachers in the Turks and Caicos Islands. The Teacher Stress Inventory was used to collect data on teacher stress, the Maslach Burnout Inventory Educators Survey was used to obtain data on teacher…

  14. Productive Factors in School Learning: A Quantitative Synthesis of National Assessment Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borger, Jeanne B.; Walberg, Herbert J.

    To integrate findings concerning the influence of productive factors on student achievement and attitudes across various disciplines and ages, nine regression studies of National Assessment of Educational Progress samples containing a total of 15,802 students were quantitatively synthesized. Correlations and standardized regression weights for…

  15. Measuring the Beginning: A Quantitative Study of the Transition to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooman, Simon; Darwent, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study measures change in certain factors known to influence success of first-year students during the transition to higher education: self-efficacy, autonomous learning and social integration. A social integration scale was developed with three subscales: "sense of belonging", "relationship with staff" and…

  16. Leadership Styles at Middle- and Early-College Programs: A Quantitative Descriptive Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berksteiner, Earl J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlational study was to determine if associations existed between middle- and early-college (MEC) principals' leadership styles, teacher motivation, and teacher satisfaction. MEC programs were programs designed to assist high school students who were not served well in a traditional setting (Middle…

  17. Academic Advising and First-Generation College Students: A Quantitative Study on Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swecker, Hadyn K.; Fifolt, Matthew; Searby, Linda

    2014-01-01

    For this quantitative study, we used a multiple logistic regression technique to investigate the relationship between the number of meetings with an academic advisor and retention of first-generation students, as represented by enrollment status and academic standing at a large, public research institution in the Southeast. Consistent with…

  18. A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between Leadership Practice and Strategic Intentions to Use Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Alan F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational cross-sectional research study was to examine a theoretical model consisting of leadership practice, attitudes of business process outsourcing, and strategic intentions of leaders to use cloud computing and to examine the relationships between each of the variables respectively. This study…

  19. Serving Two Masters: A Study of Quantitative Literacy at Small Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jodie Ann

    2012-01-01

    The past twenty years have seen a growing interest in promoting quantitative literacy (QL) courses at the college level. At small institutions, financial realities impose limitations on faculty size and therefore the variety of courses that may be offered. This study examined course offerings below calculus at four hundred twenty-eight small…

  20. A Study to Formulate Quantitative Guidelines for the Audio-Visual Communications Field. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faris, Gene; Sherman, Mendel

    Quantitative guidelines for use in determining the audiovisual (AV) needs of educational institutions were developed by the Octobe r 14-16, 1965 Seminar of the NDEA (National Defense Education Act), Faris-Sherman study. The guidelines that emerged were based in part on a review of past efforts and existing standards but primarily reflected the…

  1. An Exploratory Study of "Quantitative Linguistic Feedback": Effect of LENA Feedback on Adult Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskind, Dana; Leffel, Kristin R.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Sapolich, Shannon G.; Suskind, Elizabeth; Kirkham, Erin; Meehan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A child's early language environment is critical to his or her life-course trajectory. Quantitative linguistic feedback utilizes the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) technology as a tool to analyze verbal interactions and reinforce behavior change. This exploratory pilot study evaluates the feasibility and efficacy of a novel…

  2. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  3. A Quantitative Study of the Effectiveness of Teacher Recruitment Strategies in a Rural Midwestern State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Rose Etta

    2010-01-01

    A problem in American education is that rural schools have difficulty recruiting licensed teachers. Teacher shortages in mathematics, science, foreign language, and special education are more acute in rural areas. The purpose of this quantitative descriptive survey study was to examine specific recruiting strategies and newly hired licensed…

  4. Basic Warehousing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on basic warehousing is designed to provide Marines with Military Occupation Speciality 3051 in the rank of private through corporal with instruction in those basic principles, methods, and procedures that can be applied to any warehousing or storage…

  5. BASIC Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  6. Process analytical technology case study part I: feasibility studies for quantitative near-infrared method development.

    PubMed

    Cogdill, Robert P; Anderson, Carl A; Delgado-Lopez, Miriam; Molseed, David; Chisholm, Robert; Bolton, Raymond; Herkert, Thorsten; Afnán, Ali M; Drennen, James K

    2005-01-01

    This article is the first of a series of articles detailing the development of near-infrared (NIR) methods for solid-dosage form analysis. Experiments were conducted at the Duquesne University Center for Pharmaceutical Technology to qualify the capabilities of instrumentation and sample handling systems, evaluate the potential effect of one source of a process signature on calibration development, and compare the utility of reflection and transmission data collection methods. A database of 572 production-scale sample spectra was used to evaluate the interbatch spectral variability of samples produced under routine manufacturing conditions. A second database of 540 spectra from samples produced under various compression conditions was analyzed to determine the feasibility of pooling spectral data acquired from samples produced at diverse scales. Instrument qualification tests were performed, and appropriate limits for instrument performance were established. To evaluate the repeatability of the sample positioning system, multiple measurements of a single tablet were collected. With the application of appropriate spectral preprocessing techniques, sample repositioning error was found to be insignificant with respect to NIR analyses of product quality attributes. Sample shielding was demonstrated to be unnecessary for transmission analyses. A process signature was identified in the reflection data. Additional tests demonstrated that the process signature was largely orthogonal to spectral variation because of hardness. Principal component analysis of the compression sample set data demonstrated the potential for quantitative model development. For the data sets studied, reflection analysis was demonstrated to be more robust than transmission analysis. PMID:16353986

  7. Strategies to recruit and retain older adults in intervention studies: a quantitative comparative study.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Mona; Lund, Anne; Sveen, Unni

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment and retention of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) drawn from the older population is challenging, and studies have shown that poor recruitment and retention may lead to biased samples and results. Several strategies to improve the participation of older adults in research are outlined in the literature. The objective was to identify factors associated with participation in an RCT aiming at preventing depressive symptoms and social isolation in a later phase following a stroke, in an older population living in their homes. Strategies to improve participation were applied in the RCT "Lifestyle intervention for older adults in rehabilitation after stroke: development, implementation and evaluation". Quantitative data collected on participants (n=99) and non-participants (n=56) in the trial were compared using statistical analyses. The findings are in line with earlier studies in that the participants were younger (p=0.01) and received less help in the home (p=0.01) than did non-participants. The results differ from earlier studies in that participants had a higher rate of depressive symptoms (participation rate was 57% with HAD depression scale score 0-2, 61% with score 3-4, 62% with score 5-6 and 79% with a score 7 or above). The findings also illustrate a poorer health-related quality of life among the participants in the role physical domain on Short Form-36 (p=0.01). The results indicate that the use of targeted strategies to enhance participation may lead to a less biased sample as well as the inclusion of more subjects who seem to meet the aims of the intervention. PMID:24698174

  8. The origin of the decreasing basicity from monofunctional alkoxysilane to tetrafunctional alkoxysilane: A combined IR and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Nana; Xu, Jinzhou; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Zheng

    2015-06-01

    By a combined IR and theoretical study, the oxygen basicity was found to be sharply decreased from mono- and di-functional alkoxysilanes to tri- and tetra-functional alkoxysilanes. An analysis of the natural bond orbital interactions in Me4-nSi(OMe)n (n = 1-4) and its 1:1 hydrogen bond complex with chloroform indicate that the basicity properties of Si-O-C unit may determined by the competitive hyper-conjugations from the adjacent silicon and carbon centre. The increased contribution from the delocalization of oxygen lone pair to the adjacent Si-R anti-bonding orbitals may be the main origin for decreasing basicity for Si(OEt)4 compared to Me3SiOEt.

  9. Validation of Student and Parent Report Data on the Basic Grant Application Form. Final Report. Volume I, Individual Validation Studies: Institution Referral Study, Pre-established Criteria Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ronald J.

    Errors made on applications to the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program were studied to determine the scope and nature of misreporting and misuse of the BEOG program. Characteristics of applicants who misreport personal and/or family financial circumstances were identified, and procedures were established to regularly screen and…

  10. Spatial memory and path integration studied by self-driven passive linear displacement. I. Basic properties.

    PubMed

    Israël, I; Grasso, R; Georges-Francois, P; Tsuzuku, T; Berthoz, A

    1997-06-01

    According to path integration, the brain is able to compute the distance of a traveled path. In this research we applied our previously reported method for studying memory of linear distance, a crucial mechanism in path integration; our method is based on the overt reconstruction of a passive transport. Passive transport is a special case of navigation in which no active control is performed. Blindfolded subjects were first asked to travel 2 m forward, in darkness, by driving with a joystick the robot on which they were seated. The results show that all subjects but two undershot this distance, i.e., overestimated their own displacement. Then, subjects were submitted to a passive linear forward displacement along 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 m, and had to reproduce the same distance, still blindfolded. The results show that the distance of the stimulus was accurately reproduced, as well as stimulus duration, peak velocity, and velocity profile. In this first condition, the imposed velocity profile was triangular and therefore stimulus distance and duration were correlated. In a second condition, it was shown that distance was correctly reproduced also when the information about stimulus duration was kept constant. Here, different velocity profiles were used as stimuli, and most subjects also reproduced the velocity profile. Statistical analyses indicated that distance was not reproduced as a consequence of duration, peak velocity, or velocity profile reproduction, but was uniquely correlated to stimulus distance. The previous hypothesis of a double integration of the otolith signal to provide a distance estimate can explain our results. There was a large discrepancy between the accuracy with which the subjects matched the velocity profiles and that of distance reproduction. It follows that, whereas the dynamics of passive motion are stored and available to further use, distance is independently estimated. It is concluded that vestibular and somatosensory signals excited by