Science.gov

Sample records for quantitative biological spectroscopy

  1. Quantitative biological Raman spectroscopy for non-invasive blood analysis

    E-print Network

    Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2007-01-01

    The long term goal of this project is the measurement of clinically-relevant analytes in the blood tissue matrix of human subjects using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy, with the shorter term research directed towards ...

  2. Quantitative enantioselective Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, J

    2015-08-01

    Analytical methods for quantitative enantioselective measurements are highly desirable in the life sciences. Existing technologies have disadvantages such as limited temporal resolution, the need for molecular labeling, or high experimental complexity. To overcome these limitations, this work presents a method based on conventional Raman spectroscopy. A systematic investigation of the key parameters is carried out. It is demonstrated that their careful choice provides an opportunity for enantioselective and quantitative analysis of enantiopure systems as well as enantiomer mixtures. PMID:26066374

  3. Quantitative spectroscopy of Deneb

    E-print Network

    Schiller, Florian

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy of luminous BA-type supergiants offers a high potential for modern astrophysics. The degree to which we can rely on quantitative studies of this class of stars as a whole depends on the quality of the analyses for benchmark objects. We constrain the basic atmospheric parameters and fundamental stellar parameters as well as chemical abundances of the prototype A-type supergiant Deneb to unprecedented accuracy (Teff = 8525 +/- 75 K, log(g) = 1.10 +/- 0.05 dex, M_spec = 19 +/- 3 M_sun, L = 1.96 +/- 0.32 *10^5 L_sun, R = 203 +/- 17 R_sun, enrichment with CN-processed matter) by applying a sophisticated hybrid NLTE spectrum synthesis technique which has recently been developed and tested. The study is based on a high-resolution and high-S/N spectrum obtained with the Echelle spectrograph FOCES on the Calar Alto 2.2m telescope. Practically all inconsistencies reported in earlier studies are resolved. Multiple metal ionization equilibria and numerous hydrogen lines from the Balmer, Paschen,...

  4. Quantitative spectroscopy of Deneb

    E-print Network

    Florian Schiller; Norbert Przybilla

    2007-12-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy of luminous BA-type supergiants offers a high potential for modern astrophysics. The degree to which we can rely on quantitative studies of this class of stars as a whole depends on the quality of the analyses for benchmark objects. We constrain the basic atmospheric parameters and fundamental stellar parameters as well as chemical abundances of the prototype A-type supergiant Deneb to unprecedented accuracy (Teff = 8525 +/- 75 K, log(g) = 1.10 +/- 0.05 dex, M_spec = 19 +/- 3 M_sun, L = 1.96 +/- 0.32 *10^5 L_sun, R = 203 +/- 17 R_sun, enrichment with CN-processed matter) by applying a sophisticated hybrid NLTE spectrum synthesis technique which has recently been developed and tested. The study is based on a high-resolution and high-S/N spectrum obtained with the Echelle spectrograph FOCES on the Calar Alto 2.2m telescope. Practically all inconsistencies reported in earlier studies are resolved. Multiple metal ionization equilibria and numerous hydrogen lines from the Balmer, Paschen, Brackett and Pfund series are brought into match simultaneously for the stellar parameter determination. Stellar wind properties are derived from H_alpha line-profile fitting using line-blanketed hydrodynamic non-LTE models. A self-consistent view of Deneb is thus obtained, allowing us to discuss its evolutionary state in detail by comparison with the most recent generation of evolution models for massive stars. (abridged)

  5. Microfluidic impedance spectroscopy as a tool for quantitative biology and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Ahmet C.; Zhuang, Jie; Kolb, Juergen F.; Beskok, Ali

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidic device that is able to perform dielectric spectroscopy is developed. The device consists of a measurement chamber that is 250??m thick and 750??m in radius. Around 1000 cells fit inside the chamber assuming average quantities for cell radius and volume fraction. This number is about 1000 folds lower than the capacity of conventional fixtures. A T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat is tested using the microfluidic device. Measurements of deionized water and salt solutions are utilized to determine parasitic effects and geometric capacitance of the device. Physical models, including Maxwell-Wagner mixture and double shell models, are used to derive quantities for sub-cellular units. Clausius-Mossotti factor of Jurkat cells is extracted from the impedance spectrum. Effects of cellular heterogeneity are discussed and parameterized. Jurkat cells are also tested with a time domain reflectometry system for verification of the microfluidic device. Results indicate good agreement of values obtained with both techniques. The device can be used as a unique cell diagnostic tool to yield information on sub-cellular units. PMID:23853680

  6. Quantitative spectroscopy of Deneb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, F.; Przybilla, N.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Quantitative spectroscopy of luminous BA-type supergiants offers a high potential for modern astrophysics. Detailed studies allow the evolution of massive stars, galactochemical evolution, and the cosmic distance scale to be constrained observationally. Aims: A detailed and comprehensive understanding of the atmospheres of BA-type supergiants is required in order to use this potential properly. The degree to which we can rely on quantitative studies of this class of stars as a whole depends on the quality of the analyses for benchmark objects. We constrain the basic atmospheric parameters and fundamental stellar parameters, as well as chemical abundances of the prototype A-type supergiant Deneb to unprecedented accuracy by applying a sophisticated analysis methodology, which has recently been developed and tested. Methods: The analysis is based on high-S/N and high-resolution spectra in the visual and near-IR. Stellar parameters and abundances for numerous astrophysically interesting elements are derived from synthesis of the photospheric spectrum using a hybrid non-LTE technique, i.e. line-blanketed LTE model atmospheres and non-LTE line formation. Multiple metal ionisation equilibria and numerous hydrogen lines from the Balmer, Paschen, Brackett, and Pfund series are utilised simultaneously for the stellar parameter determination. The stellar wind properties are derived from H? line-profile fitting using line-blanketed hydrodynamic non-LTE models. Further constraints come from matching the photospheric spectral energy distribution from the UV to the near-IR L band. Results: The atmospheric parameters of Deneb are tightly constrained: effective temperature T_eff = 8525±75 K, surface gravity log g = 1.10±0.05, microturbulence ? = 8±1 km s-1, macroturbulence, and projected rotational velocity v sin i are both 20 ± 2 km s-1. The abundance analysis gives helium enrichment by 0.10 dex relative to solar and an N/C ratio of 4.44 ± 0.84 (mass fraction), implying strong mixing with CN-processed matter. The heavier elements are consistently underabundant by 0.20 dex compared to solar. Peculiar abundance patterns, which were suggested in previous analyses cannot be confirmed. Accounting for non-LTE effects is essential for removing systematic trends in the abundance determination, for minimising statistical 1?-uncertainties to ?10-20% and for establishing all ionisation equilibria at the same time. Conclusions: A luminosity of (1.96 ± 0.32)×105 L?, a radius of 203 ± 17 R_?, and a current mass of 19 ± 4 M? are derived. Comparison with stellar evolution predictions suggests that Deneb started as a fast-rotating late O-type star with M^ZAMS? 23 M_? on the main sequence and is currently evolving to the red supergiant stage. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC). Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  8. Quantitative Spectroscopy of Deneb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Florian; Przybilla, N.

    We use the visually brightest A-type supergiant Deneb (A2 Ia) as benchmark for testing a spectro- scopic analysis technique developed for quantitative studies of BA-type supergiants. Our NLTE spectrum synthesis technique allows us to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances with unprecedented accuracy. The study is based on a high-resolution and high-S/N spectrum obtained with the Echelle spectrograph FOCES on the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope. Practically all inconsistencies reported in earlier studies are resolved. A self-consistent view of Deneb is thus obtained, allowing us to discuss its evolutionary state in detail by comparison with the most recent generation of evolution models for massive stars. The basic atmospheric parameters Teff = 8525 ± 75 K and log g = 1.10 ± 0.05 dex (cgs) and the distance imply the following fundamental parameters for Deneb: M spec = 17 ± 3 M? , L = 1.77 ± 0.29 · 105 L? and R = 192 ± 16 R? . The derived He and CNO abundances indicate mixing with nuclear processed matter. The high N/C ratio of 4.64 ± 1.39 and a N/O ratio of 0.88 ± 0.07 (mass fractions) could in principle be explained by evolutionary models with initially very rapid rotation. A mass of ˜ 22 M? is implied for the progenitor on the zero-age main se- quence, i.e. it was a late O-type star. Significant mass-loss has occurred, probably enhanced by pronounced centrifugal forces. The observational constraints favour a scenario for the evolu- tion of Deneb where the effects of rotational mixing may be amplified by an interaction with a magnetic field. Analogous analyses of such highly luminous BA-type supergiants will allow for precision studies of different galaxies in the Local Group and beyond.

  9. Quantitative biology of single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, James; Lovatt, Ditte; Buckley, Peter; Dueck, Hannah; Francis, Chantal; Kim, Tae Kyung; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Miler; Miyashiro, Kevin; Morris, Jacqueline; Peritz, Tiina; Schochet, Terri; Spaethling, Jennifer; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Junhyong

    2012-01-01

    The building blocks of complex biological systems are single cells. Fundamental insights gained from single-cell analysis promise to provide the framework for understanding normal biological systems development as well as the limits on systems/cellular ability to respond to disease. The interplay of cells to create functional systems is not well understood. Until recently, the study of single cells has concentrated primarily on morphological and physiological characterization. With the application of new highly sensitive molecular and genomic technologies, the quantitative biochemistry of single cells is now accessible. PMID:22915636

  10. Mössbauer Spectroscopy of Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münck, Eckard; Bominaar, Emile L.

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy had an exceptional impact on the development of iron-based metallobiochemistry (we might call it 57Fe-based metallobiochemistry) and its offspring, bioinorganic chemistry. Right from the outset, the new technique has shed considerable light on the nature of various biological problems. In particular, the application of Mössbauer spectroscopy has led to the discovery of previously unknown clusters as well as cluster assemblies that has stimulated research into new biochemical avenues. Moreover, the application of Mössbauer spectroscopy has made possible the characterization of many intermediates in the catalytic cycle of enzymes that sustain life. Some of the intermediates studied have life times of only a few milliseconds and had to be trapped by rapid quench techniques. For these endeavors, the researchers could draw on parallel developments in biological electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and, as we shall see, EPR has been a productive complement to biological Mössbauer spectroscopy all the way.

  11. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  12. Quantitative tunneling spectroscopy of nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    First, Phillip N; Whetten, Robert L; Schaaff, T Gregory

    2007-05-25

    The proposed goals of this collaborative work were to systematically characterize the electronic structure and dynamics of 3-dimensional metal and semiconducting nanocrystals using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). This report describes progress in the spectroscopic work and in the development of methods for creating and characterizing gold nanocrystals. During the grant period, substantial effort also was devoted to the development of epitaxial graphene (EG), a very promising materials system with outstanding potential for nanometer-scale ballistic and coherent devices ("graphene" refers to one atomic layer of graphitic, sp2 -bonded carbon atoms [or more loosely, few layers]). Funding from this DOE grant was critical for the initial development of epitaxial graphene for nanoelectronics

  13. Teaching quantitative biology: goals, assessments, and resources

    PubMed Central

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    More than a decade has passed since the publication of BIO2010, calling for an increased emphasis on quantitative skills in the undergraduate biology curriculum. In that time, relatively few papers have been published that describe educational innovations in quantitative biology or provide evidence of their effects on students. Using a “backward design” framework, we lay out quantitative skill and attitude goals, assessment strategies, and teaching resources to help biologists teach more quantitatively. Collaborations between quantitative biologists and education researchers are necessary to develop a broader and more appropriate suite of assessment tools, and to provide much-needed evidence on how particular teaching strategies affect biology students' quantitative skill development and attitudes toward quantitative work. PMID:25368425

  14. Non-contact quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorgato, Veronica; Berger, Michel; Emain, Charlotte; Koenig, Anne; Roig, Blandine; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève; Planat-Chrétien, Anne

    2015-07-01

    We validate a non-contact Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) system as a first stage to approach quantitative multi-spectral imaging technique. The non-contact DRS system with separated illumination and detection paths was developed with different progressive set-ups which were all compared to a well-founded contact DRS system. While quantitation of the absorption coefficient is well achieved with the existing method, the calculation of the scattering coefficient is deteriorated by the non-contact architecture measurements. We have therefore developed an adaptive reference-based algorithm to compensate for this effect.

  15. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  16. Quantitative histochemical analysis of human artery using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, R; Baraga, J J; Feld, M S; Rava, R P

    1992-10-30

    We have developed a method for using near infrared Raman spectroscopy to quantitatively analyze the histochemical composition of human artery. The main contributors to bands observed in the Raman spectra of normal and atherosclerotic aorta are the proteins collagen and elastin, cholesterol lipids, and calcium hydroxyapatite. The Raman scattering cross-sections of different bands for these components have been determined in order to understand their relative contributions to the Raman spectra of biological tissue. The Raman signal is observed to behave linearly with the concentration of the components, even in a highly scattering medium such as a powder. Using these data, we have developed a linear model that can be used to extract the quantitative contribution of an individual component to the spectrum of a mixture. The model has been applied to several mixtures of known composition of tissue constituents in order to evaluate its precision and accuracy. The calculated fit coefficients from the spectra are in agreement with the measured values within experimental uncertainties. The spectra of different types of atherosclerotic aorta have also been modeled, and we have extracted quantitative information regarding the relative concentration of biological constituents in atherosclerotic aorta. PMID:1474427

  17. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  18. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Luiten, Andre N.; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.

    2011-03-15

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler broadening of atomic transitions in {sup 85}Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine k{sub B} with a relative uncertainty of 4.1x10{sup -4} and with a deviation of 2.7x10{sup -4} from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapor, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured k{sub B} value was less than 4x10{sup -6}. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for improvement. We also compare the line-broadening mechanisms, windows of operation and detection limits of some recent DBT experiments.

  19. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  20. Quantitative cell biology: the essential role of theory

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jonathon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative biology is a hot area, as evidenced by the recent establishment of institutes, graduate programs, and conferences with that name. But what is quantitative biology? What should it be? And how can it contribute to solving the big questions in biology? The past decade has seen very rapid development of quantitative experimental techniques, especially at the single-molecule and single-cell levels. In this essay, I argue that quantitative biology is much more than just the quantitation of these experimental results. Instead, it should be the application of the scientific method by which measurement is directed toward testing theories. In this view, quantitative biology is the recognition that theory and models play critical roles in biology, as they do in physics and engineering. By tying together experiment and theory, quantitative biology promises a deeper understanding of underlying mechanisms, when the theory works, or to new discoveries, when it does not. PMID:25368416

  1. Quantitative cell biology: the essential role of theory.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jonathon

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative biology is a hot area, as evidenced by the recent establishment of institutes, graduate programs, and conferences with that name. But what is quantitative biology? What should it be? And how can it contribute to solving the big questions in biology? The past decade has seen very rapid development of quantitative experimental techniques, especially at the single-molecule and single-cell levels. In this essay, I argue that quantitative biology is much more than just the quantitation of these experimental results. Instead, it should be the application of the scientific method by which measurement is directed toward testing theories. In this view, quantitative biology is the recognition that theory and models play critical roles in biology, as they do in physics and engineering. By tying together experiment and theory, quantitative biology promises a deeper understanding of underlying mechanisms, when the theory works, or to new discoveries, when it does not. PMID:25368416

  2. Cell Polarity: Quantitative Modeling as a Tool in Cell Biology

    E-print Network

    Allard, Jun

    REVIEW Cell Polarity: Quantitative Modeling as a Tool in Cell Biology Alex Mogilner,1 * Jun Allard,1 Roy Wollman2 Among a number of innovative approaches that have modernized cell biology, modeling characterized by varying levels of biological detail and mathematical complexity. We argue that a quantitative

  3. Photon-tissue interaction model for quantitative assessment of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; McKenna, Barbara; Simeone, Diane; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we describe a direct fit photon-tissue interaction model to quantitatively analyze reflectance spectra of biological tissue samples. The model rapidly extracts biologically-relevant parameters associated with tissue optical scattering and absorption. This model was employed to analyze reflectance spectra acquired from freshly excised human pancreatic pre-cancerous tissues (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), a common precursor lesion to pancreatic cancer). Compared to previously reported models, the direct fit model improved fit accuracy and speed. Thus, these results suggest that such models could serve as real-time, quantitative tools to characterize biological tissues assessed with reflectance spectroscopy.

  4. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: QA TESTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: QA tests, Quantitation and Spectroscopy.

    Robert M. Zucker 1 and Jeremy M. Lerner 2,
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research Development, U.S. Environmen...

  5. PoS(NIC-IX)174 Quantitative Spectroscopy of Deneb

    E-print Network

    Przybilla, Norbert

    PoS(NIC-IX)174 Quantitative Spectroscopy of Deneb F. Schiller and N. Przybilla Dr. Remeis@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de We use the visually brightest A-type supergiant Deneb (A2 Ia) as benchmark for testing a spectro studies are resolved. A self-consistent view of Deneb is thus obtained, allowing us to discuss its

  6. On the Edge of Mathematics and Biology Integration: Improving Quantitative Skills in Undergraduate Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feser, Jason; Vasaly, Helen; Herrera, Jose

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how two institutions are helping their undergraduate biology students build quantitative competencies. Incorporation of quantitative skills and reasoning in biology are framed through a discussion of two cases that both concern introductory biology courses, but differ in the complexity of the mathematics and the…

  7. RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center Cell Dynamics Research Core

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center Cell Dynamics Research Core Laboratory for Cell Dynamics Observation Laboratory for Single Cell Gene Dynamics Laboratory for Cell Field Structure Laboratory for Cell Signaling Dynamics Laboratory for Comprehensive Bioimaging Laboratory for Nano-Bio Probes Laboratory

  8. Photoacoustic resonance spectroscopy for biological tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    By "listening to photons," photoacoustics allows the probing of chromosomes in depth beyond the optical diffusion limit. Here we report the photoacoustic resonance effect induced by multiburst modulated laser illumination, which is theoretically modeled as a damped mass-string oscillator and a resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit. Through sweeping the frequency of multiburst modulated laser, the photoacoustic resonance effect is observed experimentally on phantoms and porcine tissues. Experimental results demonstrate different spectra for each phantom and tissue sample to show significant potential for spectroscopic analysis, fusing optical absorption and mechanical vibration properties. Unique RLC circuit parameters are extracted to quantitatively characterize phantom and biological tissues.

  9. Photoacoustic resonance spectroscopy for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    By "listening to photons," photoacoustics allows the probing of chromosomes in depth beyond the optical diffusion limit. Here we report the photoacoustic resonance effect induced by multiburst modulated laser illumination, which is theoretically modeled as a damped mass-string oscillator and a resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit. Through sweeping the frequency of multiburst modulated laser, the photoacoustic resonance effect is observed experimentally on phantoms and porcine tissues. Experimental results demonstrate different spectra for each phantom and tissue sample to show significant potential for spectroscopic analysis, fusing optical absorption and mechanical vibration properties. Unique RLC circuit parameters are extracted to quantitatively characterize phantom and biological tissues. PMID:24928154

  10. A Transformative Model for Undergraduate Quantitative Biology Education

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Tobin A.; Dhurjati, Prasad; Pelesko, John A.; Rossi, Louis F.; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Pusecker, Kathleen; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The BIO2010 report recommended that students in the life sciences receive a more rigorous education in mathematics and physical sciences. The University of Delaware approached this problem by (1) developing a bio-calculus section of a standard calculus course, (2) embedding quantitative activities into existing biology courses, and (3) creating a new interdisciplinary major, quantitative biology, designed for students interested in solving complex biological problems using advanced mathematical approaches. To develop the bio-calculus sections, the Department of Mathematical Sciences revised its three-semester calculus sequence to include differential equations in the first semester and, rather than using examples traditionally drawn from application domains that are most relevant to engineers, drew models and examples heavily from the life sciences. The curriculum of the B.S. degree in Quantitative Biology was designed to provide students with a solid foundation in biology, chemistry, and mathematics, with an emphasis on preparation for research careers in life sciences. Students in the program take core courses from biology, chemistry, and physics, though mathematics, as the cornerstone of all quantitative sciences, is given particular prominence. Seminars and a capstone course stress how the interplay of mathematics and biology can be used to explain complex biological systems. To initiate these academic changes required the identification of barriers and the implementation of solutions. PMID:20810949

  11. Quantitative Phase Microscopy of Live Biological Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Wax, Adam

    2010-04-01

    Interferometric phase microscopy of biological cell dynamics has the potential to provide a label-free quantitative tool for cell biology, as well as for medical diagnosis and monitoring. The current state of the art of this field, the open questions, and specific solutions developed in our laboratory will be presented.

  12. Quantitative transmission Raman spectroscopy of pharmaceutical tablets and capsules.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonas; Sparén, Anders; Svensson, Olof; Folestad, Staffan; Claybourn, Mike

    2007-11-01

    Quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations using the new approach of transmission Raman spectroscopy has been investigated. For comparison, measurements were also made in conventional backscatter mode. The experimental setup consisted of a Raman probe-based spectrometer with 785 nm excitation for measurements in backscatter mode. In transmission mode the same system was used to detect the Raman scattered light, while an external diode laser of the same type was used as excitation source. Quantitative partial least squares models were developed for both measurement modes. The results for tablets show that the prediction error for an independent test set was lower for the transmission measurements with a relative root mean square error of about 2.2% as compared with 2.9% for the backscatter mode. Furthermore, the models were simpler in the transmission case, for which only a single partial least squares (PLS) component was required to explain the variation. The main reason for the improvement using the transmission mode is a more representative sampling of the tablets compared with the backscatter mode. Capsules containing mixtures of pharmaceutical powders were also assessed by transmission only. The quantitative results for the capsules' contents were good, with a prediction error of 3.6% w/w for an independent test set. The advantage of transmission Raman over backscatter Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated for quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations, and the prospects for reliable, lean calibrations for pharmaceutical analysis is discussed. PMID:18028700

  13. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  14. Quantitative polarized Raman spectroscopy in highly turbid bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D.; Wilson, Robert H.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pleshko, Nancy; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy allows measurement of molecular orientation and composition and is widely used in the study of polymer systems. Here, we extend the technique to the extraction of quantitative orientation information from bone tissue, which is optically thick and highly turbid. We discuss multiple scattering effects in tissue and show that repeated measurements using a series of objectives of differing numerical apertures can be employed to assess the contributions of sample turbidity and depth of field on polarized Raman measurements. A high numerical aperture objective minimizes the systematic errors introduced by multiple scattering. We test and validate the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy using wild-type and genetically modified (oim?oim model of osteogenesis imperfecta) murine bones. Mineral orientation distribution functions show that mineral crystallites are not as well aligned (p<0.05) in oim?oim bones (28±3 deg) compared to wild-type bones (22±3 deg), in agreement with small-angle X-ray scattering results. In wild-type mice, backbone carbonyl orientation is 76±2 deg and in oim?oim mice, it is 72±4 deg (p>0.05). We provide evidence that simultaneous quantitative measurements of mineral and collagen orientations on intact bone specimens are possible using polarized Raman spectroscopy. PMID:20615030

  15. Reproducible quantitative proteotype data matrices for systems biology.

    PubMed

    Röst, Hannes L; Malmström, Lars; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-11-01

    Historically, many mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies have aimed at compiling an inventory of protein compounds present in a biological sample, with the long-term objective of creating a proteome map of a species. However, to answer fundamental questions about the behavior of biological systems at the protein level, accurate and unbiased quantitative data are required in addition to a list of all protein components. Fueled by advances in mass spectrometry, the proteomics field has thus recently shifted focus toward the reproducible quantification of proteins across a large number of biological samples. This provides the foundation to move away from pure enumeration of identified proteins toward quantitative matrices of many proteins measured across multiple samples. It is argued here that data matrices consisting of highly reproducible, quantitative, and unbiased proteomic measurements across a high number of conditions, referred to here as quantitative proteotype maps, will become the fundamental currency in the field and provide the starting point for downstream biological analysis. Such proteotype data matrices, for example, are generated by the measurement of large patient cohorts, time series, or multiple experimental perturbations. They are expected to have a large effect on systems biology and personalized medicine approaches that investigate the dynamic behavior of biological systems across multiple perturbations, time points, and individuals. PMID:26543201

  16. Quantitative Genetic Interactions Reveal Layers of Biological Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Beltrao, Pedro; Cagney, Gerard; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2010-01-01

    In the past, biomedical research has embraced a reductionist approach, primarily focused on characterizing the individual components that comprise a system of interest. Recent technical developments have significantly increased the size and scope of data describing biological systems. At the same time, advances in the field of systems biology have evoked a broader view of how the underlying components are interconnected. In this essay, we discuss how quantitative genetic interaction mapping has enhanced our view of biological systems, allowing a deeper functional interrogation at different biological scales. PMID:20510918

  17. Optical spectroscopy for quantitative sensing in human pancreatic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; Lloyd, William; Chen, Leng-Chun; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2011-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a five-year survival rate of only 6%, largely because current diagnostic methods cannot reliably detect the disease in its early stages. Reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies have the potential to provide quantitative, minimally-invasive means of distinguishing pancreatic adenocarcinoma from normal pancreatic tissue and chronic pancreatitis. The first collection of wavelength-resolved reflectance and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay curves from human pancreatic tissues was acquired with clinically-compatible instrumentation. Mathematical models of reflectance and fluorescence extracted parameters related to tissue morphology and biochemistry that were statistically significant for distinguishing between pancreatic tissue types. These results suggest that optical spectroscopy has the potential to detect pancreatic disease in a clinical setting.

  18. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  19. Integrating Quantitative Thinking into an Introductory Biology Course Improves Students’ Mathematical Reasoning in Biological Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Susan; Buxner, Sanlyn; Elfring, Lisa; Nagy, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls for improving undergraduate biology education have emphasized the importance of students learning to apply quantitative skills to biological problems. Motivated by students’ apparent inability to transfer their existing quantitative skills to biological contexts, we designed and taught an introductory molecular and cell biology course in which we integrated application of prerequisite mathematical skills with biology content and reasoning throughout all aspects of the course. In this paper, we describe the principles of our course design and present illustrative examples of course materials integrating mathematics and biology. We also designed an outcome assessment made up of items testing students’ understanding of biology concepts and their ability to apply mathematical skills in biological contexts and administered it as a pre/postcourse test to students in the experimental section and other sections of the same course. Precourse results confirmed students’ inability to spontaneously transfer their prerequisite mathematics skills to biological problems. Pre/postcourse outcome assessment comparisons showed that, compared with students in other sections, students in the experimental section made greater gains on integrated math/biology items. They also made comparable gains on biology items, indicating that integrating quantitative skills into an introductory biology course does not have a deleterious effect on students’ biology learning. PMID:24591504

  20. Quantum integrable systems. Quantitative methods in biology

    E-print Network

    Giovanni Feverati

    2011-01-19

    Quantum integrable systems have very strong mathematical properties that allow an exact description of their energetic spectrum. From the Bethe equations, I formulate the Baxter "T-Q" relation, that is the starting point of two complementary approaches based on nonlinear integral equations. The first one is known as thermodynamic Bethe ansatz, the second one as Kl\\"umper-Batchelor-Pearce-Destri- de Vega. I show the steps toward the derivation of the equations for some of the models concerned. I study the infrared and ultraviolet limits and discuss the numerical approach. Higher rank integrals of motion can be obtained, so gaining some control on the eigenvectors. After, I discuss the Hubbard model in relation to the N = 4 supersymmetric gauge theory. The Hubbard model describes hopping electrons on a lattice. In the second part, I present an evolutionary model based on Turing machines. The goal is to describe aspects of the real biological evolution, or Darwinism, by letting evolve populations of algorithms. Particularly, with this model one can study the mutual transformation of coding/non coding parts in a genome or the presence of an error threshold. The assembly of oligomeric proteins is an important phenomenon which interests the majority of proteins in a cell. I participated to the creation of the project "Gemini" which has for purpose the investigation of the structural data of the interfaces of such proteins. The objective is to differentiate the role of amino acids and determine the presence of patterns characterizing certain geometries.

  1. Toward Integration: From Quantitative Biology to Mathbio-Biomath?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsteller, Pat; de Pillis, Lisette; Findley, Ann; Joplin, Karl; Pelesko, John; Nelson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina; Usher, David; Watkins, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In response to the call of "BIO2010" for integrating quantitative skills into undergraduate biology education, 30 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Program Directors at the 2006 HHMI Program Directors Meeting established a consortium to investigate, implement, develop, and disseminate best practices resulting from the integration of math and…

  2. Infusing Quantitative Approaches throughout the Biological Sciences Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Cooke, Todd J.; Fagan, William F.; Gulick, Denny; Levy, Doron; Nelson, Kären C.; Redish, Edward F.; Smith, Robert F.; Presson, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    A major curriculum redesign effort at the University of Maryland is infusing all levels of our undergraduate biological sciences curriculum with increased emphasis on interdisciplinary connections and quantitative approaches. The curriculum development efforts have largely been guided by recommendations in the National Research Council's…

  3. Quantitation and detection of vanadium in biologic and pollution materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of special considerations and methodology for determining vanadium in biological and air pollution materials. In addition to descriptions of specific analysis procedures, general sections are included on quantitation of analysis procedures, sample preparation, blanks, and methods of detection of vanadium. Most of the information presented is applicable to the determination of other trace elements in addition to vanadium.

  4. A Transformative Model for Undergraduate Quantitative Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, David C.; Driscoll, Tobin A.; Dhurjati, Prasad; Pelesko, John A.; Rossi, Louis F.; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Pusecker, Kathleen; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The "BIO2010" report recommended that students in the life sciences receive a more rigorous education in mathematics and physical sciences. The University of Delaware approached this problem by (1) developing a bio-calculus section of a standard calculus course, (2) embedding quantitative activities into existing biology courses, and (3) creating…

  5. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazères, S.; Borrel, V.; Magenc, C.; Courrech, J. L.; Bazer-Bachi, R.

    2006-11-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salomé, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cézanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here.

  6. Validation of biological markers for quantitative risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P; Mazzuckelli, L F

    1991-01-01

    The evaluation of biological markers is recognized as necessary to the future of toxicology, epidemiology, and quantitative risk assessment. For biological markers to become widely accepted, their validity must be ascertained. This paper explores the range of considerations that compose the concept of validity as it applies to the evaluation of biological markers. Three broad categories of validity (measurement, internal study, and external) are discussed in the context of evaluating data for use in quantitative risk assessment. Particular attention is given to the importance of measurement validity in the consideration of whether to use biological markers in epidemiologic studies. The concepts developed in this presentation are applied to examples derived from the occupational environment. In the first example, measurement of bromine release as a marker of ethylene dibromide toxicity is shown to be of limited use in constructing an accurate quantitative assessment of the risk of developing cancer as a result of long-term, low-level exposure. This example is compared to data obtained from studies of ethylene oxide, in which hemoglobin alkylation is shown to be a valid marker of both exposure and effect. PMID:2050067

  7. Spectroscopy, colorimetry, and biological chemistry in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed Central

    Rinsler, M G

    1981-01-01

    The development of colorimetry and spectroscopy in the nineteenth century is described. An account is given of the application of their techniques to biological chemistry during that period. PMID:7014652

  8. Cell polarity: quantitative modeling as a tool in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Mogilner, Alex; Allard, Jun; Wollman, Roy

    2012-04-13

    Among a number of innovative approaches that have modernized cell biology, modeling has a prominent yet unusual place. One popular view is that we progress linearly, from conceptual to ever more detailed models. We review recent discoveries of cell polarity mechanisms, in which modeling played an important role, to demonstrate that the experiment-theory feedback loop requires diverse models characterized by varying levels of biological detail and mathematical complexity. We argue that a quantitative model is a tool that has to fit an experimental study, and the model's value should be judged not by how complex and detailed it is, but by what could be learned from it. PMID:22499937

  9. Integrating Quantitative Thinking into an Introductory Biology Course Improves Students' Mathematical Reasoning in Biological Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Susan; Buxner, Sanlyn; Elfring, Lisa; Nagy, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls for improving undergraduate biology education have emphasized the importance of students learning to apply quantitative skills to biological problems. Motivated by students' apparent inability to transfer their existing quantitative skills to biological contexts, we designed and taught an introductory molecular and cell biology…

  10. A Method for Quantitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    A Method for Quantitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy By Roger N. Clark (AVIRIS) Team, 2010, A method for quantitative mapping of thick oil spills using imaging spectroscopy: U ....................................................................................................................................................14 Figures 1. Image of oil emulsion from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off

  11. Quantum dot thermal spectroscopy for biological optical tweezer applications

    E-print Network

    Greenaway, Alan

    , mitochondrial activity and DNA integrity. The specific toxic effects of quantum dots has been shown to varyQuantum dot thermal spectroscopy for biological optical tweezer applications William T Ramsay1 useful thermal probes for biological materials. This particular application seeks to illustrate

  12. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  13. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  14. Toward Integration: From Quantitative Biology to Mathbio-Biomath?

    PubMed Central

    de Pillis, Lisette; Findley, Ann; Joplin, Karl; Pelesko, John; Nelson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina; Usher, David; Watkins, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In response to the call of BIO2010 for integrating quantitative skills into undergraduate biology education, 30 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Program Directors at the 2006 HHMI Program Directors Meeting established a consortium to investigate, implement, develop, and disseminate best practices resulting from the integration of math and biology. With the assistance of an HHMI-funded mini-grant, led by Karl Joplin of East Tennessee State University, and support in institutional HHMI grants at Emory and University of Delaware, these institutions held a series of summer institutes and workshops to document progress toward and address the challenges of implementing a more quantitative approach to undergraduate biology education. This report summarizes the results of the four summer institutes (2007–2010). The group developed four draft white papers, a wiki site, and a listserv. One major outcome of these meetings is this issue of CBE—Life Sciences Education, which resulted from proposals at our 2008 meeting and a January 2009 planning session. Many of the papers in this issue emerged from or were influenced by these meetings. PMID:20810946

  15. Toward integration: from quantitative biology to mathbio-biomath?

    PubMed

    Marsteller, Pat; de Pillis, Lisette; Findley, Ann; Joplin, Karl; Pelesko, John; Nelson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina; Usher, David; Watkins, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In response to the call of BIO2010 for integrating quantitative skills into undergraduate biology education, 30 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Program Directors at the 2006 HHMI Program Directors Meeting established a consortium to investigate, implement, develop, and disseminate best practices resulting from the integration of math and biology. With the assistance of an HHMI-funded mini-grant, led by Karl Joplin of East Tennessee State University, and support in institutional HHMI grants at Emory and University of Delaware, these institutions held a series of summer institutes and workshops to document progress toward and address the challenges of implementing a more quantitative approach to undergraduate biology education. This report summarizes the results of the four summer institutes (2007-2010). The group developed four draft white papers, a wiki site, and a listserv. One major outcome of these meetings is this issue of CBE-Life Sciences Education, which resulted from proposals at our 2008 meeting and a January 2009 planning session. Many of the papers in this issue emerged from or were influenced by these meetings. PMID:20810946

  16. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  17. Biological characteristics of crucian by quantitative inspection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Mengqi

    2015-04-01

    Biological characteristics of crucian by quantitative inspection method Through quantitative inspection method , the biological characteristics of crucian was preliminary researched. Crucian , Belongs to Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae, Carassius auratus, is a kind of main plant-eating omnivorous fish,like Gregarious, selection and ranking. Crucian are widely distributed, perennial water all over the country all have production. Determine the indicators of crucian in the experiment, to understand the growth, reproduction situation of crucian in this area . Using the measured data (such as the scale length ,scale size and wheel diameter and so on) and related functional to calculate growth of crucian in any one year.According to the egg shape, color, weight ,etc to determine its maturity, with the mean egg diameter per 20 eggs and the number of eggs per 0.5 grams, to calculate the relative and absolute fecundity of the fish .Measured crucian were female puberty. Based on the relation between the scale diameter and length and the information, linear relationship between crucian scale diameter and length: y=1.530+3.0649. From the data, the fertility and is closely relative to the increase of age. The older, the more mature gonad development. The more amount of eggs. In addition, absolute fecundity increases with the pituitary gland.Through quantitative check crucian bait food intake by the object, reveals the main food, secondary foods, and chance food of crucian ,and understand that crucian degree of be fond of of all kinds of bait organisms.Fish fertility with weight gain, it has the characteristics of species and populations, and at the same tmes influenced by the age of the individual, body length, body weight, environmental conditions (especially the nutrition conditions), and breeding habits, spawning times factors and the size of the egg. After a series of studies of crucian biological character, provide the ecological basis for local crucian's feeding, breeding, proliferation, fishing, resources protection and management of specific plans.

  18. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, M M; Shkurinov, A P; Kuleshov, E A; Tuchin, V V

    2008-07-31

    Terahertz absorption spectra and dispersion of biologically important substances such as sugar, water, hemoglobin, lipids and tissues are studied. The characteristic absorption lines in the frequency range of a terahertz spectrometer (0.1-3.5 THz) are found. The refraction indices and absorption coefficients of human tooth enamel and dentine are measured. The method of terahertz phase reflection spectroscopy is developed for strongly absorbing substances. Simple and reliable methods of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy are developed. (biophotonics)

  19. Quantitative measures of healthy aging and biological age

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangkyu; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2015-01-01

    Numerous genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to aging. To facilitate the study of these factors, various descriptors of biological aging, including ‘successful aging’ and ‘frailty’, have been put forth as integrative functional measures of aging. A separate but related quantitative approach is the ‘frailty index’, which has been operationalized and frequently used. Various frailty indices have been constructed. Although based on different numbers and types of health variables, frailty indices possess several common properties that make them useful across different studies. We have been using a frailty index termed FI34 based on 34 health variables. Like other frailty indices, FI34 increases non-linearly with advancing age and is a better indicator of biological aging than chronological age. FI34 has a substantial genetic basis. Using FI34, we found elevated levels of resting metabolic rate linked to declining health in nonagenarians. Using FI34 as a quantitative phenotype, we have also found a genomic region on chromosome 12 that is associated with healthy aging and longevity. PMID:26005669

  20. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  1. Coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: Quantitative analysis of protein secondary structure in solution

    E-print Network

    Baiz, Carlos R.

    We present a method to quantitatively determine the secondary structure composition of globular proteins using coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy of backbone amide I vibrations (1550–1720 cm?1). Sixteen ...

  2. Effect of photobleaching on calibration model development in biological Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Ishan; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Singh, Gajendra P.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in performing quantitative biological studies using Raman spectroscopy lies in overcoming the influence of the dominant sample fluorescence background. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of a calibration model can be severely compromised by the quenching of the endogenous fluorophores due to the introduction of spurious correlations between analyte concentrations and fluorescence levels. Apparently, functional models can be obtained from such correlated samples, which cannot be used successfully for prospective prediction. This work investigates the deleterious effects of photobleaching on prediction accuracy of implicit calibration algorithms, particularly for transcutaneous glucose detection using Raman spectroscopy. Using numerical simulations and experiments on physical tissue models, we show that the prospective prediction error can be substantially larger when the calibration model is developed on a photobleaching correlated dataset compared to an uncorrelated one. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the application of shifted subtracted Raman spectroscopy (SSRS) reduces the prediction errors obtained with photobleaching correlated calibration datasets compared to those obtained with uncorrelated ones.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of human skin: looking for a quantitative algorithm to reliably estimate human age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Boffelli, Marco; Miyamori, Daisuke; Uemura, Takeshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Zhu, Wenliang; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of examining soft tissues by Raman spectroscopy is challenged in an attempt to probe human age for the changes in biochemical composition of skin that accompany aging. We present a proof-of-concept report for explicating the biophysical links between vibrational characteristics and the specific compositional and chemical changes associated with aging. The actual existence of such links is then phenomenologically proved. In an attempt to foster the basics for a quantitative use of Raman spectroscopy in assessing aging from human skin samples, a precise spectral deconvolution is performed as a function of donors' ages on five cadaveric samples, which emphasizes the physical significance and the morphological modifications of the Raman bands. The outputs suggest the presence of spectral markers for age identification from skin samples. Some of them appeared as authentic "biological clocks" for the apparent exactness with which they are related to age. Our spectroscopic approach yields clear compositional information of protein folding and crystallization of lipid structures, which can lead to a precise identification of age from infants to adults. Once statistically validated, these parameters might be used to link vibrational aspects at the molecular scale for practical forensic purposes.

  4. Quantitative analysis of sulfur functional groups in natural organic matter by XANES spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Quantitative analysis of sulfur functional groups in natural organic matter by XANES spectroscopy sulfur functionalities in natural organic matter from S K-edge XANES spectroscopy are presented-induced errors, inherent to the choice of a particular curve, are typically lower than 5% of total sulfur

  5. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  6. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  7. Quantitative Measurement of Trans-Fats by Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Edward B.; Davies, Don R.; Campbell, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Trans-fat is a general term, which is mainly used to describe the various trans geometric isomers present in unsaturated fatty acids. Various techniques are now used for a quantitative measurement of the amount of trans-fats present in foods and cooking oil.

  8. Biological Evolution of Replicator Systems: Towards a Quantitative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Osmel; Horvath, J. E.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the features of a simple replicator chemical model of the relation between kinetic stability and entropy production under the action of external perturbations. We quantitatively explore the different paths leading to evolution in a toy model where two independent replicators compete for the same substrate. To do that, the same scenario described originally by Pross (J Phys Org Chem 17:312-316, 2004) is revised and new criteria to define the kinetic stability are proposed. Our results suggest that fast replicator populations are continually favored by the effects of strong stochastic environmental fluctuations capable to determine the global population, the former assumed to be the only acting evolution force. We demonstrate that the process is continually driven by strong perturbations only, and that population crashes may be useful proxies for these catastrophic environmental fluctuations. As expected, such behavior is particularly enhanced under very large scale perturbations, suggesting a likely dynamical footprint in the recovery patterns of new species after mass extinction events in the Earth's geological past. Furthermore, the hypothesis that natural selection always favors the faster processes may give theoretical support to different studies that claim the applicability of maximum principles like the Maximum Metabolic Flux (MMF) or Maximum Entropy Productions Principle (MEPP), seen as the main goal of biological evolution.

  9. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-12-23

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  10. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CALIBRATION, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  11. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR MEASUREMENTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  12. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY AND FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The reliability of the CLSM to obtain specific measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. For man...

  13. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 104 (2007) 384399

    E-print Network

    Pilon, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    : Transient radiative transfer; Method of characteristics; Scattering; Turbid media; Biological tissues-resolved hemispherical reflectance of absorbing and isotropically scattering media Kyle D. Smith, Kamal M. Katika, absorbing, and isotropically scattering medium exposed to a collimated Gaussian pulse. The front surface

  14. Broadband reflectance spectroscopy for establishing a quantitative metric of vascular leak using the Miles assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John; Reichner, Jonathan; Mathews, Zara; Markey, Mary; Intwala, Sunny; Crawford, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    Monitoring the physiological effects of biological mediators on vascular permeability is important for identifying potential targets for antivascular leak therapy. This therapy is relevant to treatments for pulmonary edema and other disorders. Current methods of quantifying vascular leak are in vitro and do not allow repeated measurement of the same animal. Using an in vivo diffuse reflectance optical method allows pharmacokinetic analysis of candidate antileak molecules. Here, vascular leak is assessed in mice and rats by using the Miles assay and introducing irritation both topically using mustard oil and intradermally using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The severity of the leak is assessed using broadband diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a fiber reflectance probe. Postprocessing techniques are applied to extract an artificial quantitative metric of leak from reflectance spectra at vascular leak sites on the skin of the animal. This leak metric is calculated with respect to elapsed time from irritation in both mustard oil and VEGF treatments on mice and VEGF treatments on rats, showing a repeatable increase in leak metric with leak severity. Furthermore, effects of pressure on the leak metric are observed to have minimal effect on the reflectance spectra, while spatial positioning showed spatially nonuniform leak sites.

  15. Biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy and metalloproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ascone, Isabella; Strange, Richard

    2009-05-01

    In the past seven years the size of the known protein sequence universe has been rapidly expanding. At present, more then five million entries are included in the UniProtKB/TrEMBL protein database. In this context, a retrospective evaluation of recent X-ray absorption studies is undertaken to assess its potential role in metalloproteomics. Metalloproteomics is the structural and functional characterization of metal-binding proteins. This is a new area of active research which has particular relevance to biology and for which X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideally suited. In the last three years, biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS) has been included among the techniques used in post-genomics initiatives for metalloprotein characterization. The emphasis of this review is on the progress in BioXAS that has emerged from recent meetings in 2007-2008. Developments required to enable BioXAS studies to better contribute to metalloproteomics throughput are also discussed. Overall, this paper suggests that X-ray absorption spectroscopy could have a higher impact on metalloproteomics, contributing significantly to the understanding of metal site structures and of reaction mechanisms for metalloproteins. PMID:19395808

  16. Machine learning methods for quantitative analysis of Raman spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Michael G.; Ryder, Alan G.

    2003-03-01

    The automated identification and quantification of illicit materials using Raman spectroscopy is of significant importance for law enforcement agencies. This paper explores the use of Machine Learning (ML) methods in comparison with standard statistical regression techniques for developing automated identification methods. In this work, the ML task is broken into two sub-tasks, data reduction and prediction. In well-conditioned data, the number of samples should be much larger than the number of attributes per sample, to limit the degrees of freedom in predictive models. In this spectroscopy data, the opposite is normally true. Predictive models based on such data have a high number of degrees of freedom, which increases the risk of models over-fitting to the sample data and having poor predictive power. In the work described here, an approach to data reduction based on Genetic Algorithms is described. For the prediction sub-task, the objective is to estimate the concentration of a component in a mixture, based on its Raman spectrum and the known concentrations of previously seen mixtures. Here, Neural Networks and k-Nearest Neighbours are used for prediction. Preliminary results are presented for the problem of estimating the concentration of cocaine in solid mixtures, and compared with previously published results in which statistical analysis of the same dataset was performed. Finally, this paper demonstrates how more accurate results may be achieved by using an ensemble of prediction techniques.

  17. Quantitative monitoring of yeast fermentation using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Jens A; Berg, Rolf W; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2014-08-01

    Compared to traditional IR methods, Raman spectroscopy has the advantage of only minimal interference from water when measuring aqueous samples, which makes this method potentially useful for in situ monitoring of important industrial bioprocesses. This study demonstrates real-time monitoring of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation process using a Raman spectroscopy instrument equipped with a robust sapphire ball probe. A method was developed to correct the Raman signal for the attenuation caused by light scattering cell particulate, hence enabling quantification of reaction components and possibly measurement of yeast cell concentrations. Extinction of Raman intensities to more than 50 % during fermentation was normalized with approximated extinction expressions using Raman signal of water around 1,627 cm(-1) as internal standard to correct for the effect of scattering. Complicated standard multi-variant chemometric techniques, such as PLS, were avoided in the quantification model, as an attempt to keep the monitoring method as simple as possible and still get satisfactory estimations. Instead, estimations were made with a two-step approach, where initial scattering correction of attenuated signals was followed by linear regression. In situ quantification measurements of the fermentation resulted in root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.357, 1.611, and 0.633 g/L for glucose, ethanol, and yeast concentrations, respectively. PMID:24996999

  18. Using Active Learning to Teach Concepts and Methods in Quantitative Biology.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Adolph, Stephen C; Diniz Behn, Cecilia G; Braley, Emily; Drew, Joshua A; Full, Robert J; Gross, Louis J; Jungck, John A; Kohler, Brynja; Prairie, Jennifer C; Shtylla, Blerta; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    This article provides a summary of the ideas discussed at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology society-wide symposium on Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning. It also includes a brief review of the recent advancements in incorporating active learning approaches into quantitative biology classrooms. We begin with an overview of recent literature that shows that active learning can improve students' outcomes in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education disciplines. We then discuss how this approach can be particularly useful when teaching topics in quantitative biology. Next, we describe some of the recent initiatives to develop hands-on activities in quantitative biology at both the graduate and the undergraduate levels. Throughout the article we provide resources for educators who wish to integrate active learning and technology into their classrooms. PMID:26269460

  19. Quantitative multiplex CARS spectroscopy in congested spectral regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Michiel; Rinia, Hilde A.; Bonn, Mischa; Vartiainen, Erik M.; Lisker, Melanie; van Bel, Aart

    2007-02-01

    A novel procedure is developed to describe and reproduce experimental coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) data, with particular emphasis on highly congested spectral regions. The approach - exemplified here with high-quality multiplex CARS data - makes use the maximum entropy method for phase retrieval. The retrieved imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility is shown to be equal to the spontaneous Raman spectrum. The phase retrieval procedure does not influence the noise contained in the spectra. The conversion of CARS to Raman data permits a quantitative interpretation of CARS spectra. This novel approach is demonstrated for highly congested multiplex CARS spectra of sucrose, fructose and glucose. This novel procedures enables extraction of vibrational information from multiplex CARS data without the use of a priori information of the sample.

  20. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  1. Enhanced resolution and quantitation from `ultrahigh' eld NMR spectroscopy of glasses

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Enhanced resolution and quantitation from `ultrahigh' ®eld NMR spectroscopy of glasses Scott for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (e.g., 14.1 and 18.8 T) can enhance both resolution and sensitivity-®eld NMR can yield structural information not always available from NMR experiments of glasses at lower

  2. Quantitative Multiple-Quantum Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Spectroscopy of Quadrupolar Nuclei in Solids

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Robert G.

    Quantitative Multiple-Quantum Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Spectroscopy of Quadrupolar Nuclei in Solids, 1996X Abstract: We describe a new approach for observation of multiple-quantum (MQ) NMR spectra populations from isotropic MQ NMR spectra. We illustrate the utility of the approach with 23Na (S ) 3/2) MQ

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Nail Polish Remover Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Markus M.; Caccamis, Joshua T.; Heitz, Mark P.; Schlecht, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Substantial modifications are presented for a previously described experiment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to quantitatively determine analytes in commercial nail polish remover. The revised experiment is intended for a second- or third-year laboratory course in analytical chemistry and can be conducted for larger laboratory…

  4. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Panax ginseng by FT-NIR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin-fang; Nie, Li-xing; Pan, Li-li; Hao, Bian; Yuan, Shao-xiong; Lin, Rui-chao; Bu, Hai-bo; Wang, Dan; Dong, Ling; Li, Xiang-ri

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a rapid and efficient tool, was used to determine the total amount of nine ginsenosides in Panax ginseng. In the study, the regression models were established using multivariate regression methods with the results from conventional chemical analytical methods as reference values. The multivariate regression methods, partial least squares regression (PLSR) and principal component regression (PCR), were discussed and the PLSR was more suitable. Multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), second derivative, and Savitzky-Golay smoothing were utilized together for the spectral preprocessing. When evaluating the final model, factors such as correlation coefficient (R2) and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were considered. The final optimal results of PLSR model showed that root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and correlation coefficients (R2) in the calibration set were 0.159 and 0.963, respectively. The results demonstrated that the NIRS as a new method can be applied to the quality control of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma. PMID:24883224

  6. Phosphorene: Synthesis, Scale-Up, and Quantitative Optical Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Woomer, Adam H; Farnsworth, Tyler W; Hu, Jun; Wells, Rebekah A; Donley, Carrie L; Warren, Scott C

    2015-09-22

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional (2D) monolayer of black phosphorus, has attracted considerable theoretical interest, although the experimental realization of monolayer, bilayer, and few-layer flakes has been a significant challenge. Here, we systematically survey conditions for liquid exfoliation to achieve the first large-scale production of monolayer, bilayer, and few-layer phosphorus, with exfoliation demonstrated at the 10 g scale. We describe a rapid approach for quantifying the thickness of 2D phosphorus and show that monolayer and few-layer flakes produced by our approach are crystalline and unoxidized, while air exposure leads to rapid oxidation and the production of acid. With large quantities of 2D phosphorus now available, we perform the first quantitative measurements of the material's absorption edge-which is nearly identical to the material's band gap under our experimental conditions-as a function of flake thickness. Our interpretation of the absorbance spectrum relies on an analytical method introduced in this work, allowing the accurate determination of the absorption edge in polydisperse samples of quantum-confined semiconductors. Using this method, we found that the band gap of black phosphorus increased from 0.33 ± 0.02 eV in bulk to 1.88 ± 0.24 eV in bilayers, a range that is larger than that of any other 2D material. In addition, we quantified a higher-energy optical transition (VB-1 to CB), which changes from 2.0 eV in bulk to 3.23 eV in bilayers. This work describes several methods for producing and analyzing 2D phosphorus while also yielding a class of 2D materials with unprecedented optoelectronic properties. PMID:26256770

  7. Quantitative Modeling and Estimation in Systems Biology using Fluorescent Reporter Systems 

    E-print Network

    Bansal, Loveleena

    2013-12-10

    Building quantitative models of biological systems is a challenging task as these models can consist of a very large number of components with complex interactions between them and the experimental data available for model ...

  8. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  9. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy of buddingtonite from the Cuprite mining district, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Felzer, B.; Hauff, P.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    1994-02-01

    Buddingtonite, an ammonium-bearing feldspar diagnostic of volcanic-hosted alteration, can be identified and, in some cases, quantitatively measured using short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectance spectroscopy. In this study over 200 samples from Cuprite, Nevada, were evaluated by X ray diffraction, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and SWIR reflectance spectroscopy with the objective of developing a quantitative remote-sensing technique for rapid determination of the amount of ammonium or buddingtonite present, and its distribution across the site. Based upon the Hapke theory of radiative transfer from particulate surfaces, spectra from quantitative, physical mixtures were compared with computed mixture spectra. We hypothesized that the concentration of ammonium in each sample is related to the size and shape of the ammonium absorption bands and tested this hypothesis for samples of relatively pure buddingtonite. We found that the band depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 feature is linearly related to the NH4 concentration for the Cuprite buddingtonite, and that the relationship is approximately exponential for a larger range of NH4 concentrations. Associated minerals such as smectite and jarosite suppress the depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 absorption band. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy is possible when the effects of these associated minerals are also considered.

  10. Application of image processing for terahertz time domain spectroscopy imaging quantitative detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-juan; Wang, Sheng; Ren, Jiao-jiao; Zhou, Ming-xing; Zhao, Duo

    2015-03-01

    According to nondestructive testing principle for the terahertz time domain spectroscopy Imaging, using digital image processing techniques, through Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system collected images and two-dimensional datas and using a range of processing methods, including selecting regions of interest, contrast enhancement, edge detection, and defects being detected. In the paper, Matlab programming is been use to defect recognition of Terahertz, by figuring out the pixels to determine defects defect area and border length, roundness, diameter size. Through the experiment of the qualitative analysis and quantitative calculation of Matlab image processing, this method of detection of defects of geometric dimension of the sample to get a better result.

  11. Electrical and optical spectroscopy for quantitative screening of hepatic steatosis in donor livers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. L.; Wells, A. C.; Virtue, S.; Vidal-Puig, A.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Watson, C. J. E.; Robertson, P. A.

    2010-11-01

    Macro-steatosis in deceased donor livers is increasingly prevalent and is associated with poor or non-function of the liver upon reperfusion. Current assessment of the extent of steatosis depends upon the macroscopic assessment of the liver by the surgeon and histological examination, if available. In this paper we demonstrate electrical and optical spectroscopy techniques which quantitatively characterize fatty infiltration in liver tissue. Optical spectroscopy showed a correlation coefficient of 0.85 in humans when referenced to clinical hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections in 20 human samples. With further development, an optical probe may provide a comprehensive measure of steatosis across the liver at the time of procurement.

  12. Online Interactive Teaching Modules Enhance Quantitative Proficiency of Introductory Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Nelson, Karen C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Keller, Michael; Fagan, William F.

    2010-01-01

    There is widespread agreement within the scientific and education communities that undergraduate biology curricula fall short in providing students with the quantitative and interdisciplinary problem-solving skills they need to obtain a deep understanding of biological phenomena and be prepared fully to contribute to future scientific inquiry.…

  13. A research associate level Computational/Developmental Biology Scientist to develop predictive quantitative simulations of

    E-print Network

    Menczer, Filippo

    the underlying biological models; to translate these biological models into mathematically rigorous form in image analysis also helpful. Scripting Language programming experience required (Python preferred quantitative simulations of developmental defects induced by toxicological exposure using the CompuCell3D

  14. Quantitative analysis of the mixtures of illicit drugs using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Zhao, Shusen; Shen, Jingling

    2008-03-01

    A method was proposed to quantitatively inspect the mixtures of illicit drugs with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy technique. The mass percentages of all components in a mixture can be obtained by linear regression analysis, on the assumption that all components in the mixture and their absorption features be known. For illicit drugs were scarce and expensive, firstly we used common chemicals, Benzophenone, Anthraquinone, Pyridoxine hydrochloride and L-Ascorbic acid in the experiment. Then illicit drugs and a common adulterant, methamphetamine and flour, were selected for our experiment. Experimental results were in significant agreement with actual content, which suggested that it could be an effective method for quantitative identification of illicit drugs.

  15. Light Scattering and Absorption Spectroscopy in Three Dimensions Using Quantitative Low Coherence Interferometry for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.

    The behavior of light after interacting with a biological medium reveals a wealth of information that may be used to distinguish between normal and disease states. This may be achieved by simply imaging the morphology of tissues or individual cells, and/or by more sophisticated methods that quantify specific surrogate biomarkers of disease. To this end, the work presented in this dissertation demonstrates novel tools derived from low coherence interferometry (LCI) that quantitatively measure wavelength-dependent scattering and absorption properties of biological samples, with high spectral resolution and micrometer spatial resolution, to provide insight into disease states. The presented work first describes a dual window (DW) method, which decomposes a signal sampled in a single domain (in this case the frequency domain) to a distribution that simultaneously contains information from both the original domain and the conjugate domain (here, the temporal or spatial domain). As the name suggests, the DW method utilizes two independently adjustable windows, each with different spatial and spectral properties to overcome limitations found in other processing methods that seek to obtain the same information. A theoretical treatment is provided, and the method is validated through simulations and experiments. With this tool, the spatially dependent spectral behavior of light after interacting with a biological medium may be analyzed to extract parameters of interest, such as the scattering and absorption properties. The DW method is employed to investigate scattering properties of samples using Fourier domain LCI (fLCI). In this method, induced temporal coherence effects provide insight into structural changes in dominant scatterers, such as cell nuclei within tissue, which can reveal the early stages of cancerous development. fLCI is demonstrated in complex, three-dimensional samples using a scattering phantom and an ex-vivo animal model. The results from the latter study show that fLCI is able to detect changes in the morphology of tissues undergoing precancerous development. The DW method is also employed to enable a novel form of optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging modality that uses coherence gating to obtain micrometer-scale, cross-sectional information of tissues. The novel method, named molecular imaging true color spectroscopic OCT (METRiCS OCT), analyses the depth dependent absorption of light to ascertain quantitative information of chromophore concentration, such as hemoglobin. The molecular information is also processed to yield a true color representation of the sample, a unique capability of this approach. A number of experiments, including hemoglobin absorbing phantoms and in-vivo imaging of a chick embryo model and dorsal skinfold window chamber model, demonstrate the power of the method. The final method presented in this dissertation, consists of a spectroscopic approach that interrogates the dispersive biochemical properties of samples to independently probe the scattering and absorption coefficients. To demonstrate this method, named non-linear phase dispersion spectroscopy (NLDS), a careful analysis of LCI signals is presented. The method is verified using measurements from samples that scatter and absorb light. Lastly, NLDS is combined with phase microscopy to achieve molecular imaging with sub-micron spatial resolution. Imaging of red blood cells (RBCs) shows that the method enables highly sensitive measurements that can quantify hemoglobin content from single RBCs.

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis of SF6 partial discharge decomposition components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jiangbo; Li, Jian; Li, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) internal SF6 gas produces specific decomposition components under partial discharge (PD). By detecting these characteristic decomposition components, such information as the type and level of GIS internal insulation deterioration can be obtained effectively, and the status of GIS internal insulation can be evaluated. SF6 was selected as the background gas for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) detection in this study. SOF2, SO2F2, SO2, and CO were selected as the characteristic decomposition components for system analysis. The standard infrared absorption spectroscopy of the four characteristic components was measured, the optimal absorption peaks were recorded and the corresponding absorption coefficient was calculated. Quantitative detection experiments on the four characteristic components were conducted. The volume fraction variation trend of four characteristic components at different PD time were analyzed. And under five different PD quantity, the quantitative relationships among gas production rate, PD time, and PD quantity were studied.

  17. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis of SF6 partial discharge decomposition components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jiangbo; Li, Jian; Li, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) internal SF6 gas produces specific decomposition components under partial discharge (PD). By detecting these characteristic decomposition components, such information as the type and level of GIS internal insulation deterioration can be obtained effectively, and the status of GIS internal insulation can be evaluated. SF6 was selected as the background gas for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) detection in this study. SOF2, SO2F2, SO2, and CO were selected as the characteristic decomposition components for system analysis. The standard infrared absorption spectroscopy of the four characteristic components was measured, the optimal absorption peaks were recorded and the corresponding absorption coefficient was calculated. Quantitative detection experiments on the four characteristic components were conducted. The volume fraction variation trend of four characteristic components at different PD time were analyzed. And under five different PD quantity, the quantitative relationships among gas production rate, PD time, and PD quantity were studied. PMID:25459612

  18. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples. PMID:26560783

  19. Quantitative Detection of Pharmaceuticals Using a Combination of Paper Microfluidics and Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Derek; Mazilu, Michael; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an indispensable technique for the identification of various types of analytes due to the fingerprint vibration spectrum obtained. Paper microfluidics has also emerged as a low cost, easy to fabricate and portable approach for point of care testing. However, due to inherent background fluorescence, combining Raman spectroscopy with paper microfluidics is to date an unmet challenge in the absence of using surface enhanced mechanisms. We describe the first use of wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy (WMRS) for analysis on a paper microfluidics platform. This study demonstrates the ability to suppress the background fluorescence of the paper using WMRS and the subsequent implementation of this technique for pharmaceutical analysis. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate between both paracetamol and ibuprofen, whilst, also being able to detect the presence of each analyte quantitatively at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:25938464

  20. G4120: Introduction to Computational & Quantitative Biology Columbia University

    E-print Network

    Schindler, Christian

    , web sites, software, hardware, algorithms and programming languages currently used to analyze will introduce graduate students to the concepts and methodology of bioinformatics, computational biology, next.M. Introduction to Programming Jovanovic November 17th , 2:00-3:30 P.M. Introduction to Python and Biopython

  1. Quantitative characterisation of historic paper using THz spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafela, Tanja; Mizuno, Maya; Fukunaga, Kaori; Strli?, Matija

    2013-04-01

    THz spectroscopy in the time domain was explored in combination with multivariate data analysis, for quantitative determination of chemical and mechanical properties of historic paper, such as lignin content, tensile strength, and ash content. Using partial least squares (PLS) regression, it was shown that quantitative prediction of the material properties is possible, which indicates the potential of THz spectroscopy for chemical characterisation of complex organic materials of natural origin. In addition, the results demonstrate that THz spectra and PLS loading weights for lignin content differ significantly, which leads to the conclusion that THz spectra of composite macromolecular materials do not represent sums of spectra of the individual components. This supports the premise that THz spectra reflect intermolecular interactions. The study was carried out using 250 historical paper samples from the sixteenth century to present. Although the measurements were performed in vacuum to improve the quality of spectra, THz spectroscopy is in principle non-destructive. This research therefore reinforces the role of THz spectroscopy in characterisation of valuable historic materials, where invasive analysis is often not possible.

  2. [A multivariate nonlinear model for quantitative analysis in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Long; Fu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jing-Ge; Ni, Zhi-Bo; He, Wen-Gan; Xu, Jun; Rao Rui-zhong; Dong, Rui-Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Most quantitative models used in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are based on the hypothesis that laser-induced plasma approaches the state of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). However, the local equilibrium is possible only at a specific time segment during the evolution. As the populations of each energy level does not follow Boltzmann distribution in non-LTE condition, those quantitative models using single spectral line would be inaccurate. A multivariate nonlinear model, in which the LTE is not required, was proposed in this article to reduce the signal fluctuation and improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis. This multivariate nonlinear model was compared with the internal calibration model which is based on the LTE condition. The content of Mn in steel samples was determined by using the two models, respectively. A minor error and a minor relative standard deviation (RSD) were observed in multivariate nonlinear model. This result demonstrates that multivariate nonlinear model can improve measurement accuracy and repeatability. PMID:25752066

  3. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing. PMID:24992094

  4. Sender–receiver systems and applying information theory for quantitative synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Barcena Menendez, Diego; Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Isalan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sender–receiver (S–R) systems abound in biology, with communication systems sending information in various forms. Information theory provides a quantitative basis for analysing these processes and is being applied to study natural genetic, enzymatic and neural networks. Recent advances in synthetic biology are providing us with a wealth of artificial S–R systems, giving us quantitative control over networks with a finite number of well-characterised components. Combining the two approaches can help to predict how to maximise signalling robustness, and will allow us to make increasingly complex biological computers. Ultimately, pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology will require moving beyond engineering the flow of information and towards building more sophisticated circuits that interpret biological meaning. PMID:25282688

  5. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of ethidium bromide increases by an order of magnitude upon binding to DNA. In this thesis, I demonstrated that the fluorescence photon migration model is capable of accurately determining the somatic cell count (SCC) in a milk sample. Although meant as a demonstration of fluorescence tissue spectroscopy, this specific problem has important implications for the dairy industry's warfare against subclinical mastitis (i.e., mammary gland inflammation), since the SCC is often used as an indication of bovine infection.

  6. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  7. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of urine component in the toilet set using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, So Hyun; Park, Kwang Suk; Choi, Jong Min; Lee, Won Jin

    2004-07-01

    As a part of non-invasive and unaware measurement of physiological signal in the house of live-alone person, Raman spectroscopy was applied for urine component analysis in the toilet set. 785nm, 250-300mW output solid state diode laser and 2048 element linear silicon TE cooled CCD array were incorporated for this system. Several tests were performed for setting up Raman spectroscopy in non-constrained situation: toilet set in the house. The effect of dark current, integration time, warming up time of laser, property of probe and interference of water in the toilet were tested and controlled for appropriate measurement in this environment. The spectra were obtained immediately when the subject uses the toilet set, and they can be transmitted to the server though Bluetooth. Those spectra were pre-processed for removing or correcting the effect of undesired light scattering, sample path-length difference and baseline-effect. The preprocessed data were enhanced for more exact result of multivariate analysis. The training data was prepared for predicting unknown component and its concentration by using multivariate methods. Several kinds of multivariate methods: PCA, PCR, PLS were performed to validate what is the fittest method in this environment. Through quantitative and qualitative analysis of Raman spectroscopy"s spectra obtained in the house's toilet set, we could know the component and its concentration of urine which can be index of disease.

  8. 13C NMR Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Determination of Compound Ratios and Polymer End Groups

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopic integration employing short relaxation delays was evaluated as a quantitative tool to obtain ratios of diastereomers, regioisomers, constitutional isomers, mixtures of unrelated compounds, peptoids, and sugars. The results were compared to established quantitative methods such as 1H NMR spectroscopic integration, gas chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography and were found to be within <3.4% of 1H NMR spectroscopic values (most examples give results within <2%). Acquisition of the spectra took 2–30 min on as little as 10 mg of sample, proving the general utility of the technique. The simple protocol was extended to include end group analysis of low molecular weight polymers, which afforded results in accordance with 1H NMR spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight spectrometry. PMID:24601654

  9. Quantitative Analysis for Monitoring Formulation of Lubricating Oil Using Terahertz Time-Domain Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lu; Zhao, Kun; Zhou, Qing-Li; Shi, Yu-Lei; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2012-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of zinc isopropyl-isooctyl-dithiophosphate (T204) mixed with lube base oil from Korea with viscosity index 70 (T204-Korea70) is presented by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Compared with the middle-infrared spectra of zinc n-butyl-isooctyl-dithiophosphate (T202) and T204, THz spectra of T202 and T204 show the weak broad absorption bands. Then, the absorption coefficients of the T204-Korea70 system follow Beer's law at the concentration from 0.124 to 4.024%. The experimental absorption spectra of T204-Korea70 agree with the calculated ones based on the standard absorption coefficients of T204 and Korea70. The quantitative analysis enables a strategy to monitor the formulation of lubricating oil in real time.

  10. [Study on the multicomponent quantitative analysis using near infrared spectroscopy based on building elman model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-ping; Qin, Hua-jun; Luo, Xiang; Cao, Shu-wen; Wang, Jun-de

    2007-12-01

    The present paper introduces an application of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) multi-component quantitative analysis by building a kind of recurrent network (Elman) model. Elman prediction model for phenylalanine (Phe), lysine (Lys), tyrosine (Tyr) and cystine (Cys) in 45 feedstuff samples was established with good veracity. Twelve peak value data from 3 principal components straight forward compressed from the original data by PLS were taken as inputs of Elman, while 4 predictive targets as outputs. Forty seven nerve cells were taken as hidden nodes with the lowest error compared with taking 43 and 45 nerve cells. Its training iteration times was supposed to be 1000. Predictive correlation coefficients by the model are 0.960, 0.981, 0.979 and 0.952. The results show that Elman using in NIRS is a rapid, effective means for measuring Phe, Lys, Tyr and Cys in feedstuff powder, and can also be used in quantitative analysis of other samples. PMID:18330284

  11. Quantitative determination of uranium and europium in glass matrix by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E. C.; Lee, D. H.; Yun, J.-I.; Kim, J. G.; Yeon, J. W.; Song, K.

    2011-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was applied to the quantitative determination of the elemental composition of glass samples containing U and Eu as a surrogate for highly radioactive glass waste. The emission intensities of both major and minor elements in the samples were measured simultaneously in the wavelength range from 200 to 780 nm by using an echelle spectrometer. Calibration curves for the concentration determination were obtained from the emission intensities at 358.488 nm for U I, and 459.403 nm for Eu I. Limits of detection for U and Eu were ~ 150 and ~ 4.2 parts per million, respectively.

  12. Quantitative analysis of urinary stone composition with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Yu; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chiang, Huihua Kenny; Chou, Y. H. Jet; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Chiu, Allen W.

    2010-02-01

    Urolithiasis is a common, disturbing disease with high recurrent rate (60% in five years). Accurate identification of urinary stone composition is important for treatment and prevention purpose. Our previous studies have demonstrated that micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS)-based approach successfully detects the composition of tiny stone powders after minimal invasive urological surgery. But quantitative analysis of urinary stones was not established yet. In this study, human urinary stone mixed with two compositions of COM, HAP, COD, and uric acid, were analyzed quantitatively by using a 632.98 nm Raman spectrometric system. This quantitative analysis was based on the construction of calibration curves of known mixtures of synthetically prepared pure COM, HAP, COD and uric acid. First, the various concentration (mole fraction) ratio of binary mixtures including COM and HAP, COM and COD, or COM and uric acid, were produced. Second, the intensities of the characteristic bands at 1462cm -1(IRCOM), 1477cm-1(IRCOD), 961cm-1(IRHAP) and 1402cm-1(IRuric acid), for COD, COM, HAP and uric acid were used respectively for intensity calculation. Various binary mixtures of known concentration ratio were recorded as the basis for the quantitative analysis. The ratios of the relative intensities of the Raman bands corresponding to binary mixtures of known composition on the inverse of the COM concentration yielded a linear dependence. Third, urinary stone fragments collected from patients after management were analyzed with the use of the calibration curve and the quantitative analysis of unknown samples was made by the interpolation analysis. We successfully developed a MRS-based quantitative analytical method for measuring two composition.

  13. Journal of Theoretical Biology 246 (2007) 260268 Quantitative analysis of the local structure of food webs

    E-print Network

    Stouffer, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Theoretical Biology 246 (2007) 260­268 Quantitative analysis of the local structure of food webs J. Camachoa,b,Ã, D.B. Stoufferb , L.A.N. Amaralb a Departament de Fi´sica (Fi´sica Estadi analyze the local structure of model and empirical food webs through the statistics of three

  14. Fuzzy Logic as a Computational Tool for Quantitative Modelling of Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Data.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Jure; Moskon, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Mraz, Miha

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative modelling of biological systems has become an indispensable computational approach in the design of novel and analysis of existing biological systems. However, kinetic data that describe the system's dynamics need to be known in order to obtain relevant results with the conventional modelling techniques. These data are often hard or even impossible to obtain. Here, we present a quantitative fuzzy logic modelling approach that is able to cope with unknown kinetic data and thus produce relevant results even though kinetic data are incomplete or only vaguely defined. Moreover, the approach can be used in the combination with the existing state-of-the-art quantitative modelling techniques only in certain parts of the system, i.e., where kinetic data are missing. The case study of the approach proposed here is performed on the model of three-gene repressilator. PMID:26451831

  15. H2o Quantitative Analysis of Transition Zone Minerals Wadsleyite and Ringwoodite By Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novella, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bureau, H.; Raepsaet, C.; Montagnac, G.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid H2O covers approximately 70% of the Earth's surface but it can also be incorporated as OH- groups in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) that constitute the Earth's mantle, as observed in peridotitic xenoliths. The presence of even trace amounts (ppm wt) of hydrogen in mantle minerals strongly affect the physical, chemical and rheological properties of the mantle. The Earth's transition zone (410 to 660 km depth) is particularly important in this regard since it can store large amounts of H2O (wt%) as shown by experiments and recently by a natural sample. Addressing the behavior of H2O at high depths and its potential concentration in mantle NAMs is therefore fundamental to fully comprehend global-scale processes such as plate tectonics and magmatism. We developed an innovative technique to measure the H2O content of main transition zone NAMs wadsleyite and ringwoodite by Raman spectroscopy. This technique allows to use a beam of 1-3 µm size to measure small samples that are typical for high pressure natural and synthetic specimens. High pressure polyphasic samples are indeed very challenging to be measured in terms of H2O content by the routinely used Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and ion probe mass spectroscopy analyses, making the Raman approach a valid alternative. High quality crystals of wadsleyite and ringwoodite were synthesized at high pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil press and analyzed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy as well as elastic recoil detection analyses (ERDA) which is an absolute, standard-free technique. We will present experimental data that allow to apply Raman spectroscopy to the determination of H2O content of the most abundant minerals in the transition zone. The data gathered in this study will also permit to investigate the absorption coefficients of wadsleyite and ringwoodite that are employed in FTIR quantitative analyses.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of calcium-based microfillers using terahertz spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Abina, Andreja; Puc, Uroš; Jegli?, Anton; Prah, Jana; Venckevi?ius, Rimvydas; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Valušis, Gintaras; Zidanšek, Aleksander

    2015-10-01

    In different industrial applications, several strictly defined parameters of calcium-based microfillers such as average particle size, particle size distribution, morphology, specific surface area, polymorphism and chemical purity, play a key role in the determination of its usefulness and effectiveness. Therefore, an analytical tool is required for rapid and non-destructive characterization of calcium-based microfillers during the synthesis process or before its use in a further manufacturing process. Since spectroscopic techniques are preferred over microscopy and thermogravimetry, particularly due to its non-destructive nature and short analysis time, we applied terahertz (THz) spectroscopy to analyse calcite microfillers concentration in polymer matrix, its granulation and chemical treatment. Based on the analysis of peak absorbance amplitude, peak frequency position, and the appearance of additional spectral features, quantitative and qualitative analysis was successfully achieved. In addition, THz imaging was also applied for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of calcium-based microfillers. By using spatial distribution map, the inhomogeneity in concentration of calcium carbonate in polymer matrix was characterized. Moreover, by THz spectroscopy and imaging different calcium compounds were detected in binary mixtures. Finally, we demonstrated that the applied spectroscopic technique offers valuable results and can be, in combination with other spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, converted to a powerful rapid analytical tool. PMID:26078145

  17. Quantitative analyses of tartaric acid based on terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Binghua; Fan, Mengbao

    2010-10-01

    Terahertz wave is the electromagnetic spectrum situated between microwave and infrared wave. Quantitative analysis based on terahertz spectroscopy is very important for the application of terahertz techniques. But how to realize it is still under study. L-tartaric acid is widely used as acidulant in beverage, and other food, such as soft drinks, wine, candy, bread and some colloidal sweetmeats. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to quantify the tartaric acid. Two methods are employed to process the terahertz spectra of different samples with different content of tartaric acid. The first one is linear regression combining correlation analysis. The second is partial least square (PLS), in which the absorption spectra in the 0.8-1.4THz region are used to quantify the tartaric acid. To compare the performance of these two principles, the relative error of the two methods is analyzed. For this experiment, the first method does better than the second one. But the first method is suitable for the quantitative analysis of materials which has obvious terahertz absorption peaks, while for material which has no obvious terahertz absorption peaks, the second one is more appropriate.

  18. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of ?- and ?-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the ?- and ?-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism. PMID:23403188

  19. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Smith, Bradley D.; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer.Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM imaging, calibration experiments for the SMS instrument with gold nanoparticles, SMS images of dye doped polymer beads from a commercial source, evidence for endosome uptake, and additional SMS images of dye-doped LPNPs in EMT-6 cells, and spectra of SRfluor680/croconaine doped lipid-polymer nanoparticles. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR01614B

  20. Feasibility of quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for targeted measurement of renal ischemia during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Utsav O.; Maddox, Michael M.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Dorsey, Philip J.; Wang, Mei; McCaslin, Ian Ross; Brown, J. Quincy; Lee, Benjamin R.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of warm ischemia time during partial nephrectomy (PN) is critical to minimizing ischemic damage and improving postoperative kidney function, while maintaining tumor resection efficacy. Recently, methods for localizing the effects of warm ischemia to the region of the tumor via selective clamping of higher-order segmental artery branches have been shown to have superior outcomes compared with clamping the main renal artery. However, artery identification can prolong operative time and increase the blood loss and reduce the positive effects of selective ischemia. Quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can provide a convenient, real-time means to aid in artery identification during laparoscopic PN. The feasibility of quantitative DRS for real-time longitudinal measurement of tissue perfusion and vascular oxygenation in laparoscopic nephrectomy was investigated in vivo in six Yorkshire swine kidneys (n=three animals). DRS allowed for rapid identification of ischemic areas after selective vessel occlusion. In addition, the rates of ischemia induction and recovery were compared for main renal artery versus tertiary segmental artery occlusion, and it was found that the tertiary segmental artery occlusion trends toward faster recovery after ischemia, which suggests a potential benefit of selective ischemia. Quantitative DRS could provide a convenient and fast tool for artery identification and evaluation of the depth, spatial extent, and duration of selective tissue ischemia in laparoscopic PN.

  1. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  2. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikoli?, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 ?s/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  3. Quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones in extract of Arnica montana L. by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Jordanka; Denkova, Pavletta; Todorova, Milka; Evstatieva, Ljuba

    2011-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used as a method for quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones present in a crude lactone fraction isolated from Arnica montana. Eight main components - tigloyl-, methacryloyl-, isobutyryl- and 2-methylbutyryl-esters of helenalin (H) and 11?,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) were identified in the studied sample. The method allows the determination of the total amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the quantity of both type helenalin and 11?,13-dihydrohelenalin esters separately. Furthermore, 6-O-tigloylhelenalin (HT, 1), 6-O-methacryloylhelenalin (HM, 2), 6-O-tigloyl-11?,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHT, 5), and 6-O-methacryloyl-11?,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHM, 6) were quantified as individual components. PMID:20837387

  4. Quantitative characterization of traumatic bruises by combined pulsed photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovi?, Luka; Milani?, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2015-02-01

    We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for characterization of the bruise evolution process. While DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths, the PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin). In this study, we simulate experimental DRS spectra and PPTR signals using the Monte Carlo technique and focus on characterization of a suitable fitting approach for their analysis. We find inverse Monte Carlo to be superior to the diffusion approximation approach for the inverse analysis of DRS spectra. The analysis is then augmented with information obtainable by the fitting of the PPTR signal. We show that both techniques can be coupled in a combined fitting approach. The combining of two complementary techniques improves the robustness and accuracy of the inverse analysis, enabling a comprehensive quantitative characterization of the bruise evolution dynamics.

  5. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of standard reference materials of various categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Jin; Lee, Kang-Jae; Yoh, Jack J.

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis was carried out with standard reference materials (SRM). In order to minimize errors due to the matrix effect, we used 21 SRM samples that belong to different categories of food, clay, sludge, steelmaking alloy, and geochemical and agricultural materials. The principal component analysis was used for rapid identification and discrimination of the samples. Nine elements (Al, Ca, Mg, Ti, Si, Fe, K, Na, and Mn) in each sample were analyzed. While each category of samples shows a specific tendency in the calibration curves of Na, Ti, Si, Al, Fe, and Mn, other elements (K, Ca, and Mg) do not pose any noticeable similarity. The present results establish benchmark calibration curves for characterizing various SRMs.

  6. Detection and quantitative analysis of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide: FY 93 Florida State University Raman spectroscopy report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, C.K.; Vickers, T.J.

    1994-10-11

    This report provides a summary of work to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with tank waste materials. It contains Raman spectra from organics, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetetraacteic acid (HEDTA), imino diacetic acid (IDA), kerosene, tributyl phosphate (TBP), acetone and butanol, anticipated to be present in tank wastes and spectra from T-107 real and BY-104 simulant materials. The results of investigating Raman for determining moisture content in tank materials are also presented. A description of software algorithms developed to process Raman spectra from a dispersive grating spectrometer system and an in initial design for a data base to support qualitative and quantitative application of remote Raman sensing with tank wastes.

  7. Functional genomics bridges the gap between quantitative genetics and molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Deep characterization of molecular function of genetic variants in the human genome is becoming increasingly important for understanding genetic associations to disease and for learning to read the regulatory code of the genome. In this paper, I discuss how recent advances in both quantitative genetics and molecular biology have contributed to understanding functional effects of genetic variants, lessons learned from eQTL studies, and future challenges in this field. PMID:26430152

  8. Functional genomics bridges the gap between quantitative genetics and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-10-01

    Deep characterization of molecular function of genetic variants in the human genome is becoming increasingly important for understanding genetic associations to disease and for learning to read the regulatory code of the genome. In this paper, I discuss how recent advances in both quantitative genetics and molecular biology have contributed to understanding functional effects of genetic variants, lessons learned from eQTL studies, and future challenges in this field. PMID:26430152

  9. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and quantitative analysis of metal gluconates.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxian; Yang, Jingqi; Zhao, Hongwei; Yang, Na; Jing, Dandan; Zhang, Jianbing; Li, Qingnuan; Han, Jiaguang

    2015-01-01

    A series of metal gluconates (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) were investigated by terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. The absorption coefficients and refractive indices of the samples were obtained in the frequency range of 0.5-2.6 THz. The gluconates showed distinct THz characteristic fingerprints, and the dissimilarities reflect their different structures, hydrogen-bond networks, and molecular interactions. In addition, some common features were observed among these gluconates, and the similarities probably come from the similar carbohydrate anion group. The X-ray powder diffraction measurements of these metal gluconates were performed, and the copper(II) gluconate was found to be amorphous, corresponding to the monotonic increase feature in the THz absorption spectrum. The results suggest that THz spectroscopy is sensitive to molecular structure and physical form. Binary and ternary mixtures of different gluconates were quantitatively analyzed based on the Beer-Lambert law. A chemical map of a tablet containing calcium D-gluconate monohydrate and ?-lactose in the polyethylene host was obtained by THz imaging. The study shows that THz technology is a useful tool in pharmaceutical research and quality control applications. PMID:25506686

  10. Characterization of geometrical factors for quantitative angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Eugenie; Herrera-Gomez, Alberto; Allain, Mickael; Renault, Olivier; Faure, Alain; Chabli, Amal; Bertin, Francois

    2012-07-15

    For conventional angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS), the area under the core-level peaks depends mainly on the in-depth distribution of chemical species at the top surface of a specimen. But the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) intensity is also affected by tool-related geometrical factors such as the shape of the x-ray beam, the spectrometer analysis volume, and the manipulator rotation axis. Data analysis is therefore typically based on normalization with respect to the signal from the substrate. Here, we present an original method to perform quantitative ARXPS without normalization, involving evaluation of these geometrical factors. The method is illustrated for a multiprobe XPS system using a methodology based on a specific software (XPSGeometry{sup Registered-Sign }), but is a general process that can be adapted to all types of XPS equipment, even those not specifically designed for ARXPS. In that case, this method enables bringing the sample as close as possible to the manipulator axis of rotation in order to perform automatic acquisitions.

  11. Quantitative depth profiling of layered samples using phase-modulation FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F. |

    1996-10-01

    In phase-modulation FT-IR spectroscopy, all wavelengths in a spectrum are modulated at the same frequency and in phase. This factor makes the use of photoacoustic phase data for depth profiling samples much easier in phase modulation than in rapid scan. A method to quantitatively measure layer thickness by using the phase of a substrate spectrum peak is demonstrated with a series of samples consisting of thin polymer films on substrates. Additions to the basic method are demonstrated that extend its application to cases where the substrate peak is overlapped by a spectrum peak of the surface film. A linear relationship between phase angle and layer thickness extending to thicknesses greater than twice the thermal diffusion length is demonstrated. Representations of phase modulation data as a family of angle-specific spectra, as magnitude vs. phase curves, and as a power spectrum and phase spectrum pair, each of which is useful for different aspects of depth profiling, are discussed. Calculating these representations from a single pair of orthogonal interferograms is described. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Mg in Pipeline Dirt Based on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaolong; Wang, Yangen; Chen, Shanjun; Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    In order to maintain the pipeline better and remove the dirt more effectively, it was necessary to analyze the contents of elements in dirt. Mg in soil outside of the pipe and the dirt inside of the pipe was quantitatively analyzed and compared by using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Firstly, Mg was quantitatively analyzed on the basis of Mg I 285.213 nm by calibration curve for integrated intensity and peak intensity of the spectrum before and after subtracting noise, respectively. Then calibration curves on the basis of Mg II 279.553 nm and Mg II 280.270 nm were analyzed. The results indicated that it is better to use integrated intensity after subtracting noise of the spectrum line with high relative intensity to make the calibration curve. supported partly by the Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province, China (No. 2012FFB00105) and partly by the Science Research Program of Education Department of Hubei Province, China (No. B2013288)

  13. Quantitative analysis of paracetamol polymorphs in powder mixtures by FT-Raman spectroscopy and PLS regression.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Braun, Doris E; Griesser, Ulrich J

    2007-01-17

    A fast and simple method for the quantitative analysis of monoclinic (form I) and orthorhombic (form II) paracetamol was developed, based on FT-Raman spectroscopy and PLS regression. Three different preprocessing algorithms, namely orthogonal signal correction (OSC), standard normal variate transformation (SNV) and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), were applied in order to eliminate effects caused by sample preparation and sample inhomogeneities. Subsequently, PLS regression models were fitted and their predictive performance was evaluated on the basis of the root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV) over the complete data set. Furthermore, the data were split into two equal-sized training and test subsets by the Kennard-Stone design and the errors of calibration (RMSEC) and prediction (RMSEP) were calculated. It was found that the OSC preprocessing contributes to a significant increase in the predictive performance of the PLS regression model (RMSECV=0.500%, RMSEC=0.842% and RMSEP=0.538%) in the overall concentration range of form I, compared to the SNV (RMSECV=2.398%, RMSEC=0.911% and RMSEP=7.177%) and MSC (RMSECV=2.7648%, RMSEC=1.572% and RMSEP=4.838%). In addition, the model developed on OSC preprocessed data is more parsimonious, requiring a single latent variable, compared to three latent variables required by the models fitted to the SNV and MSC preprocessed data. The proposed multivariate calibration presents a significant improvement over existing methods for the quantitation of paracetamol polymorphs. PMID:16935450

  14. [Multicomponent quantitative analysis using near infrared spectroscopy by building PLS-GRNN model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Ping; Qin, Hua-Jun; Luo, Xiang; Cao, Shu-Wen; Wang, Jun-De

    2007-11-01

    The present paper introduces an application of near infrared spectroscopy(NIRS) multi-component quantitative analysis by building partial least squares (PLS)-generalized regression neural networks (GRNN) model. The PLS-GRNN prediction model for chlorine, fibre and fat in 45 feedstuff samples was established with good veracity and recurrence. Eight peak values in principal components compressed from original data by PLS and four in original spectra were taken as inputs of GRNN while 4 predictive targets as outputs. 0.1 was chosen as smoothing factor for its good approximation and prediction with the lowest error compared with 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5. Predictive correlation coefficient and Standard error of the estimate of three components by the model are 0.984 0, 0.987 0 and 0.983 0, and 0.015 89, 0.154 1 and 0.115 1, while the Standard deviations of an unknown sample scanned 8 times are 0.003 26, 0.065 5 and 0.031 4. The results show that PLS-GRNN used in NIRS is a rapid, effective means for measuring chlorine, fibre in the fat in feedstuff powder, and can also be used in quantitative analysis of other samples. A settlement in the high error of prediction of other samples with lower contents was also shown. PMID:18260398

  15. Improving the Quantitative Skills of Future Benthologists: Better Integration of Mathematics into Undergraduate Biology Curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, R. P.; Marland, E. S.; Venable, M. E.; Arnholt, A. T.; Searcy, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Some of the assumptions biology faculty make about the mathematical background of their students are unwarranted. Through assessment, we have found that students know far less about subjects such as graphing, logarithms etc. than we think. This obviously affects how we teach our classes, how much time we devote to covering topics such as statistical analysis and the degree of quantitative analysis we expect. At ASU we have taken several steps to improve the mathematical background of our students. The Math Department now offers statistics and calculus courses designed for biology majors. These courses are taught in computerized classrooms and are focused on biological data and modeling. By requiring these courses as prerequisites, we hope to reduce the review of basic mathematics in our classes and focus on the "important" topics. In Biology we have expanded on the level of quantitative rigor expected in our classes. In addition, we are increasing the use of modeling and computational exercises in these classes. We will present the results of our ongoing assessment approach and discuss how we are implementing some of our initiatives. This work is based on the recommendations outlined in the NRC's Bio2010 and the MAA's Math and Bio 2010.

  16. [Qualitative-Quantitative Analysis of Rice Bran Oil Adulteration Based on Laser Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Song, Zhi-qiang; Zheng, Xiao; Zeng, Lu-lu; Yin, Cheng; He, Dong-ping; Qi, Pei-shi

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is mainly to have qualitative-quantitative analysis on the adulteration in rice bran oil by near-infrared spectroscopy analytical technology combined with chemo metrics methods. The author configured 189 adulterated oil samples according to the different mass ratios by selecting rice bran oil as base oil and choosing soybean oil, corn oil, colza oil, and waste oil of catering industry as adulterated oil. Then, the spectral data of samples was collected by using near-infrared spectrometer, and it was pre-processed through the following methods, including without processing, Multiplicative Scatter Correction(MSC), Orthogonal Signal Correction(OSC), Standard Normal Variate and Standard Normal Variate transformation DeTrending(SNV_DT). Furthermore, this article extracted characteristic wavelengths of the spectral datum from the pre-processed date by Successive Projections Algorithm(SPA), established qualitatively classified calibration methods of adulterated oil through classification method of Support Vector Machine(SVM), optimized model parameters(C, g) by Mesh Search Algorithm and determined the optimal process condition. In extracting characteristic wavelengths of the spectral datum from pretreatment by Backward interval Partial Least Squares(BiPLS) and SPA, quantitatively classified calibration models of adulterated oil through Partial Least Squares(PLS) and Support Vector Machine Regression(SVR) was established respectively. In the end, the author optimized the combination of model parameters(C, g) by Mesh Search Algorithm and determined the optimal parameter model. According to the analysis, the accuracy of prediction set and calibration set for SVC model reached 95% and 100% respectively. Compared with the prediction of the adulteration oil content of rice bran oil which was established by the PLS model, the SVR model is the better one, although both of them could implement the content prediction. Furthermore, the correlation coefficient R is above 0.99 and the Root Mean Square Error (MSE) is below 5.55 x 10(-4). The results show that the near-infrared spectroscopy technology is effective in qualitative-quantitative analysis on the adulteration of rice bran oil. And the method is applicable to analyze adulteration in other oils. PMID:26601363

  17. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  18. Quantitative characterization of the ,,D2O...3 torsional manifold by terahertz laser spectroscopy and theoretical analysis

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    of the trimer torsional and hydrogen bond stretch/bend vibrational modes which underlies the torsional model,16 All of these spectra have been observed in the ``torsional band'' or ``bending band'' region of liquidQuantitative characterization of the ,,D2O...3 torsional manifold by terahertz laser spectroscopy

  19. A Quantitative Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study: A Decrease in Cerebral Hemoglobin Oxygenation in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arai, Heii; Takano, Maki; Miyakawa, Koichi; Ota, Tsuneyoshi; Takahashi, Tadashi; Asaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Tsuneaki

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system was used to measure changes in cortical hemoglobin oxygenation during the Verbal Fluency Task in 32 healthy controls, 15 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 15 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amplitude of changes in the waveform, which was…

  20. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the amount of biological material that would have to be collected for analysis in a sensor that combined pyrolysis with SWIR CRDS. Using conservative estimates of pyrolysis yields and precursor species concentration we determined that it would be necessary to collect and pyrolyze biological aerosol samples in the 10’s of mg. This is a large amount and is far larger than required for current sensors. It is therefore concluded that while possible, the large amounts of material required preclude using SWIR CRDS for detecting biological agents at this time.

  1. The Lightning Rod Model: Quantitative Near-Field Spectroscopy for Extraction of Nano-Resolved Optical Constants

    E-print Network

    McLeod, Alexander S; Goldflam, M D; Gainsforth, Zack; Dominguez, Gerardo; Thiemens, Mark; Fogler, Michael M; Basov, D N

    2013-01-01

    Near-field infrared spectroscopy by elastic scattering of light from a probe tip resolves optical contrasts in materials at dramatically sub-wavelength scales across a broad energy range, with the potential for chemical identification at the nanoscale. However, current models of the probe-sample near-field interaction still cannot provide a sufficiently quantitatively interpretation of measured near-field contrasts, especially in the case of materials supporting strong surface phonons. We present a model of near-field spectroscopy derived from basic principles and verified by finite-element simulations, which demonstrates superb predictive agreement with newly presented infrared near-field measurements of both SiO2 thin films and SiC, measured by tunable quantum cascade laser and nanoscale Fourier transform infrared (nanoFTIR) spectroscopy. We discuss the role of probe geometry, field retardation, and surface mode dispersion in shaping the measured near-field response. This treatment offers a route to quantit...

  2. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  3. Metabolome 2.0: quantitative genetics and network biology of metabolic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The characterization of the metabolome has rapidly evolved over two decades, from early developments in analytical chemistry to systems biology. Metabolites and small molecules are not independent; they are organized in biochemical pathways and in a wider metabolic network, which is itself dependent on various genetic and signaling networks for its regulation. Recent advances in genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics have been matched by the development of publicly available repositories, which have helped shaping a new generation of integrative studies using metabolite measurements in molecular epidemiology and genetic studies. Although the environment influences metabolism, the identification of the genetic determinants of metabolic phenotypes (metabotypes) was made possible by the development of metabotype quantitative trait locus (mQTL) mapping and metabolomic genome-wide association studies (mGWAS) in a rigorous statistical genetics framework, deriving associations between metabolite concentrations and genetic polymorphisms. However, given the complexity of the biomolecular events involved in the regulation of metabolic patterns, alternative network biology approaches have also been recently introduced, such as integrated metabolome and interactome mapping (iMIM). This unprecedented convergence of metabolic biochemistry, quantitative genetics and network biology already has had a strong impact on the role of the metabolome in biomedical sciences, and this review gives a foretaste of its anticipated successes in eventually delivering personalized medicine. PMID:22868675

  4. [Quantitative analysis of thiram by surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy combined with feature extraction Algorithms].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-hua; Jiang, Yong-cheng; Sha, Wen; Zhang, Xian-yi; Cui, Zhi-feng

    2015-02-01

    Three feature extraction algorithms, such as the principal component analysis (PCA), the discrete cosine transform (DCT) and the non-negative factorization (NMF), were used to extract the main information of the spectral data in order to weaken the influence of the spectral fluctuation on the subsequent quantitative analysis results based on the SERS spectra of the pesticide thiram. Then the extracted components were respectively combined with the linear regression algorithm--the partial least square regression (PLSR) and the non-linear regression algorithm--the support vector machine regression (SVR) to develop the quantitative analysis models. Finally, the effect of the different feature extraction algorithms on the different kinds of the regression algorithms was evaluated by using 5-fold cross-validation method. The experiments demonstrate that the analysis results of SVR are better than PLSR for the non-linear relationship between the intensity of the SERS spectrum and the concentration of the analyte. Further, the feature extraction algorithms can significantly improve the analysis results regardless of the regression algorithms which mainly due to extracting the main information of the source spectral data and eliminating the fluctuation. Additionally, PCA performs best on the linear regression model and NMF is best on the non-linear model, and the predictive error can be reduced nearly three times in the best case. The root mean square error of cross-validation of the best regression model (NMF+SVR) is 0.0455 micormol x L(-1) (10(-6) mol x L(-1)), and it attains the national detection limit of thiram, so the method in this study provides a novel method for the fast detection of thiram. In conclusion, the study provides the experimental references the selecting the feature extraction algorithms on the analysis of the SERS spectrum, and some common findings of feature extraction can also help processing of other kinds of spectroscopy. PMID:25970898

  5. Quantitative elemental detection of size-segregated particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Taira, Takuya; Zhang, Xiao Bo; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to simulate coal combustion and develop optimal and stable boiler control systems in real power plants, it is imperative to obtain the detailed information in coal combustion processes as well as to measure species contents in fly ash, which should be controlled and analyzed for enhancing boiler efficiency and reducing environmental pollution. The fly ash consists of oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, and so on), unburned carbon, and other minor elements. Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to coal combustion and other industrial fields because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and non-contact features. In these applications it is important to measure controlling factors without any sample preparation to maintain the real-time measurement feature. The relation between particle content and particle diameter is also one of the vital researches, because compositions of particles are dependent on their diameter. In this study, we have detected the contents of size-segregated particles using LIBS. Particles were classified by an Anderson cascade impactor and their contents were measured using the output of 1064 nm YAG laser, a spectrograph and an ICCD camera. The plasma conditions such as plasma temperature are dependent on the size of particles and these effects must be corrected to obtain quantitative information. The plasma temperature was corrected by the emission intensity ratio from the same atom. Using this correction method, the contents of particles can be measured quantitatively in fixed experimental parameters. This method was applied to coal and fly ash from a coal-fired burner to measure unburned carbon and other contents according to the particle diameter. The acquired results demonstrate that the LIBS technique is applicable to measure size-segregated particle contents in real time and this method is useful for the analysis of coal combustion and its control because of its sensitive and fast analysis features.

  6. Accurate single-shot quantitative phase imaging of biological specimens with telecentric digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Doblas, Ana; Sánchez-Ortiga, Emilio; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Saavedra, Genaro; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    The advantages of using a telecentric imaging system in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to study biological specimens are highlighted. To this end, the performances of nontelecentric DHM and telecentric DHM are evaluated from the quantitative phase imaging (QPI) point of view. The evaluated stability of the microscope allows single-shot QPI in DHM by using telecentric imaging systems. Quantitative phase maps of a section of the head of the drosophila melanogaster fly and of red blood cells are obtained via single-shot DHM with no numerical postprocessing. With these maps we show that the use of telecentric DHM provides larger field of view for a given magnification and permits more accurate QPI measurements with less number of computational operations. PMID:24781590

  7. Development of a Univariate Membrane-Based Mid-Infrared Method for Protein Quantitation and Total Lipid Content Analysis of Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Cappione, Amedeo; Lento, Joseph; Chernokalskaya, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Biological samples present a range of complexities from homogeneous purified protein to multicomponent mixtures. Accurate qualification of such samples is paramount to downstream applications. We describe the development of an MIR spectroscopy-based analytical method offering simultaneous protein quantitation (0.25–5?mg/mL) and analysis of total lipid or detergent species, as well as the identification of other biomolecules present in biological samples. The method utilizes a hydrophilic PTFE membrane engineered for presentation of aqueous samples in a dried format compatible with fast infrared analysis. Unlike classical quantification techniques, the reported method is amino acid sequence independent and thus applicable to complex samples of unknown composition. By comparison to existing platforms, this MIR-based method enables direct quantification using minimal sample volume (2?µL); it is well-suited where repeat access and limited sample size are critical parameters. Further, accurate results can be derived without specialized training or knowledge of IR spectroscopy. Overall, the simplified application and analysis system provides a more cost-effective alternative to high-throughput IR systems for research laboratories with minimal throughput demands. In summary, the MIR-based system provides a viable alternative to current protein quantitation methods; it also uniquely offers simultaneous qualification of other components, notably lipids and detergents. PMID:25371845

  8. A method for operative quantitative interpretation of multispectral images of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    A method for operative retrieval of spatial distributions of biophysical parameters of a biological tissue by using a multispectral image of it has been developed. The method is based on multiple regressions between linearly independent components of the diffuse reflection spectrum of the tissue and unknown parameters. Possibilities of the method are illustrated by an example of determining biophysical parameters of the skin (concentrations of melanin, hemoglobin and bilirubin, blood oxygenation, and scattering coefficient of the tissue). Examples of quantitative interpretation of the experimental data are presented.

  9. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  11. Quantitative Characterization of Biological Liquids for Third-Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Débarre, Delphine; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides images of unstained biological samples based on spatial variations in third-order nonlinear susceptibility, refractive index, and dispersion. In this study, we establish quantitative values for the third-order nonlinear susceptibilities of several solvents (water, ethanol, glycerol), physiological aqueous (ions, amino acids, polypeptides, bovine serum albumin, glucose) and lipid (triglycerides, cholesterol) solutions as a function of solute concentration in the 1.05–1.25 ?m excitation range. We use these data in conjunction with imaging experiments to show that THG imaging with ?1.2 ?m excitation lacks specificity and sensitivity to detect physiological ion concentration changes, and that nonaqueous structures such as lipid bodies provide a more robust source of signal. Finally, we illustrate the impact of index-matching liquids in THG images. These data provide a basis for interpreting biological THG images and for developing additional applications. PMID:17085492

  12. Quantitative orientation measurements in thin lipid films by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F; Buffeteau, T; Desbat, B; Auger, M; Pézolet, M

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative orientation measurements by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy require the accurate knowledge of the dichroic ratio and of the mean-square electric fields along the three axes of the ATR crystal. In this paper, polarized ATR spectra of single supported bilayers of the phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidic acid covered by either air or water have been recorded and the dichroic ratio of the bands due to the methylene stretching vibrations has been calculated. The mean-square electric field amplitudes were calculated using three formalisms, namely the Harrick thin film approximation, the two-phase approximation, and the thickness- and absorption-dependent one. The results show that for dry bilayers, the acyl chain tilt angle varies with the formalism used, while no significant variations are observed for the hydrated bilayers. To test the validity of the different formalisms, s- and p-polarized ATR spectra of a 40-A lipid layer were simulated for different acyl chain tilt angles. The results show that the thickness- and absorption-dependent formalism using the mean values of the electric fields over the film thickness gives the most accurate values of acyl chain tilt angle in dry lipid films. However, for lipid monolayers or bilayers, the tilt angle can be determined with an acceptable accuracy using the Harrick thin film approximation. Finally, this study shows clearly that the uncertainty on the determination of the tilt angle comes mostly from the experimental error on the dichroic ratio and from the knowledge of the refractive index. PMID:9876167

  13. Fast quantitative determination of platinum in liquid samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barreda, Flory-Anne; Trichard, Florian; Barbier, Sophie; Gilon, Nicole; Saint-Jalmes, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    The potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the rapid determination of platinum in liquid silicone oils has been evaluated in the framework of on-line process control. A comparison of LIBS sensitivity between three setups designed for liquid analysis (static, liquid jet and flowing liquid) was performed using a 266 nm Nd/YAG laser irradiation. Best results were obtained using the flowing liquid setup and a similar limit of detection was obtained using the liquid jet. The effect of different buffer gases (Ar, He, N(2), etc.) on the signal sensitivity was studied in liquid jet analysis and best values were obtained with a nitrogen sheath gas. Detection limits were in the 100 mg/kg range for both setups. Quantitative determination of platinum in real liquid samples was also investigated using both liquid jet and flowing liquid setups. Calibration curves were plotted for Pt with the liquid jet and the flowing liquid setups under optimised temporal acquisition parameters (delay time and gate width). A normalisation using a silicon line was applied and recovery ranged from 3 to 15% for Pt in catalyst samples with both setups showing that LIBS is a sensitive and accurate method for on-line applications. PMID:22547353

  14. Quantitative estimation of carbonation and chloride penetration in reinforced concrete by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shuzo; Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Fujii, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2014-11-01

    The penetration profile of chlorine in a reinforced concrete (RC) specimen was determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The concrete core was prepared from RC beams with cracking damage induced by bending load and salt water spraying. LIBS was performed using a specimen that was obtained by splitting the concrete core, and the line scan of laser pulses gave the two-dimensional emission intensity profiles of 100 × 80 mm2 within one hour. The two-dimensional profile of the emission intensity suggests that the presence of the crack had less effect on the emission intensity when the measurement interval was larger than the crack width. The chlorine emission spectrum was measured without using the buffer gas, which is usually used for chlorine measurement, by collinear double-pulse LIBS. The apparent diffusion coefficient, which is one of the most important parameters for chloride penetration in concrete, was estimated using the depth profile of chlorine emission intensity and Fick's law. The carbonation depth was estimated on the basis of the relationship between carbon and calcium emission intensities. When the carbon emission intensity was statistically higher than the calcium emission intensity at the measurement point, we determined that the point was carbonated. The estimation results were consistent with the spraying test results using phenolphthalein solution. These results suggest that the quantitative estimation by LIBS of carbonation depth and chloride penetration can be performed simultaneously.

  15. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR. PMID:25437754

  16. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and quantitative multivariate analysis of paints and coating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Philippa Alice; Vahur, Signe; Leito, Ivo

    2014-12-01

    The applicability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with partial least squares (PLS) data analysis was evaluated for quantifying the components of mixtures of paint binding media and pigments, and alkyd resins. PLS methods were created using a number of standard mixtures. Validation and measurement uncertainty estimation was carried out. Binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of several common binding media and pigments were quantified, with standard measurement uncertainties in most cases below 3 g/100 g. Classes of components - aromatic anhydrides and alcohols - used in alkyd resin synthesis were also successfully quantified, with standard uncertainties in the range of 2-3 g/100 g. This is a more demanding application because in alkyd resins aromatic anhydrides and alcohols have reacted to form a polyester, and are not present in their original forms. Once a PLS method has been calibrated, analysis time and cost are significantly reduced from typical quantitative methods such as GC/MS. This is beneficial in the case of routine analysis where the components are known.

  17. Improved calculation of the backscattering factor for quantitative analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. J.; Tan, W. S.; Li, Y. G.

    2006-04-15

    Based on a Monte Carlo simulation method, an improved calculation of the backscattering factor in quantitative analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy has been performed by integrating several aspects of recent progresses in the related fields. The calculation used a general definition of backscattering factor, more accurate ionization cross section, up-to-date Monte Carlo model of electron inelastic scattering, and a large number of electron trajectories to ensure less statistical error. The results reveal several noticeable properties of backscattering factor, i.e., its slow variation with primary energy at higher overvoltage ratios, and dependence on the geometrical configuration of a detector. However, only for large emission angles of Auger signals a considerable angular dependence of backscattering factor is found. Specifically a calculation is carried out for detection in the solid angles of a cylindrical mirror analyzer. This backscattering factor can be less than unity for very low primary energies closing to ionization energy and/or for large incident angles. The physical cause has been detailed and analyzed.

  18. A calculation of backscattering factor database for quantitative analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, R. G.; Ding, Z. J.; Li, Y. G.; Mao, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    A systematic calculation of the backscattering factor in quantitative analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy has been performed for the primary electron beam of energy from the threshold energy of inner-shell ionization to 30 keV at the incident angle of 0 deg. - 89 deg. and for principal Auger transition and Auger electrons emitted from over 28 pure elements at an emission angle of 0 deg. - 89 deg. by using a Monte Carlo simulation method. The calculation employs a general definition of backscattering factor, Casnati's ionization cross section, up-to-date Monte Carlo model of electron scattering, and a large number of electron trajectories to ensure less statistical error. Both the configuration geometry of concentric hemispherical analyzer and the cylindrical mirror analyzer for Auger electron detection are considered in the calculation. The calculated backscattering factors are found to describe very well an experimental dependence of Auger electron intensity on primary energy and on incident angle for Si, Cu, Ag, and W in literature. The calculated numerical values of backscattering factor are stored in an open and online database at http://micro.ustc.edu.cn/BSFDataBase/BFAES.htm.

  19. Quantitative analysis of metformin in antidiabetic tablets by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, U.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; López-de-Alba, P. L.; López-Martínez, L.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays the production of counterfeit and low quality drugs affects human health and generates losses to pharmaceutical industries and tax revenue losses to government. Currently there are several methods for pharmaceutical product analysis; nevertheless, most of them depend on complex and time consuming steps such as sample preparation. In contrast to conventional methods, Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is evaluated as a potential analytical technique for the rapid screening and quality control of anti-diabetic solid formulations. In this paper authors propose a simple method to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) such as Metformin hydrochloride. The authors used ten nanosecond duration pulses (FWHM) from a Nd:YAG laser produces the induced breakdown for the analysis. Light is collected and focused into a Cerny-Turner spectrograph and dispersed into an ICCD camera for its detection. We used atomic emissions from Chlorine atoms present only in APIs as analyte signal. The analysis was improved using Bromine as internal standard. Linear calibration curves from synthetic samples were prepared achieving linearity higher than 99%. Our results were compared with HPLC results and validation was performed by statistical methods. The validation analysis suggests that both methods have no significant differences i.e., the proposed method can be implemented for monitoring the pharmaceutical production process in-situ in real time or for inspection and recognition of authenticity.

  20. Quantitative analysis and detection of adulteration in pork using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuxia; Cheng, Fang; Xie, Lijuan

    2010-04-01

    Authenticity is an important food quality criterion. Rapid methods for confirming authenticity or detecting adulteration are increasingly demanded by food processors and consumers. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been used to detect economic adulteration in pork . Pork samples were adulterated with liver and chicken in 10% increments. Prediction and quantitative analysis were done using raw data and pretreatment spectra. The optimal prediction result was achieved by partial least aquares(PLS) regression with standard normal variate(SNV) pretreatment for pork adulterated with liver samples, and the correlation coefficient(R value), the root mean square error of calibration(RMSEC) and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.97706, 0.0673 and 0.0732, respectively. The best model for pork meat adulterated with chicken samples was obtained by PLS with the raw spectra, and the correlation coefficient(R value), RMSEP and RMSEC were 0.98614, 0.0525, and 0.122, respectively. The result shows that NIR technology can be successfully used to detect adulteration in pork meat adulterated with liver and chicken.

  1. Life at the Common Denominator: Mechanistic and Quantitative Biology for the Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.

    2010-01-01

    The remarkable challenges and possibilities of the coming few decades will compel the biogeochemical and astrobiological sciences to characterize the interactions between biology and its environment in a fundamental, mechanistic, and quantitative fashion. The clear need for integrative and scalable biology-environment models is exemplified in the Earth sciences by the challenge of effectively addressing anthropogenic global change, and in the space sciences by the challenge of mounting a well-constrained yet sufficiently adaptive and inclusive search for life beyond Earth. Our understanding of the life-planet interaction is still, however, largely empirical. A variety of approaches seek to move from empirical to mechanistic descriptions. One approach focuses on the relationship between biology and energy, which is at once universal (all life requires energy), unique (life manages energy flow in a fashion not seen in abiotic systems), and amenable to characterization and quantification in thermodynamic terms. Simultaneously, a focus on energy flow addresses a critical point of interface between life and its geological, chemical, and physical environment. Characterizing and quantifying this relationship for life on Earth will support the development of integrative and predictive models for biology-environment dynamics. Understanding this relationship at its most fundamental level holds potential for developing concepts of habitability and biosignatures that can optimize astrobiological exploration strategies and are extensible to all life.

  2. Analysis of poly-?-hydroxyalkonates (PHA) during the enhanced biological phosphorus removal process using FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-hua; Mao, Qin-yan; Liu, Yi-xin; Sheng, Guo-ping; Yu, Han-qing; Huang, Xian-huai; Liu, Shao-geng; Ling, Qi; Yan, Guo-bing

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is the main phosphorus removal technique for wastewater treatment. During the anaerobic-aerobic alternative process, the activated sludge experienced the anaerobic storage of polyhydroxy-?-alkonates (PHA) and aerobic degradation, corresponding the infrared peak intensity of sludge at 1 740 cm(-1) increased in the aerobic phase and declined in the anaerobic phase. Compared with PHA standard, this peak was indentified to attribute the carbonyl of PHA. The overlapping peaks of PHA, protein I and II bands were separated using Gaussian peak fitting method. The infrared peak area ratios of PHA versus protein I had a good relationship with the PHA contents measured by gas chromatography, and the correlation coefficient was 0.873. Thus, the ratio of the peak area of PHA versus protein I can be considered as the indicator of the PHA content in the sludge. The infrared spectra of 1 480-1 780 cm(-1) was selected, normalized and transferred to the absorption data. Combined with the chromatography analysis of PHA content in the sludge sample, a model between the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ETIR) spectra of the sludge and PHA content was established, which could be used for the prediction of the PHA content in the unknown sample. The PHA content in the sludge sample could be acquired by the infrared spectra of the sludge sample and the established model, and the values fitted well with the results obtained from chromatograph. The results would provide a novel analysis method for the rapid characterization and quantitative determination of the intracellular PHA content in the activated sludge. PMID:25358156

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Naturally Colored Cotton and White Cotton Blends by UV-VIS Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Zhao, D.; Dong, S.; Zhou, W.; Tang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    A new method was discussed to quantitatively analyze the blend ratio of naturally colored cotton (NCC) and white cotton (WC) by UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS). Three kinds of spectroscopy parameters, diffuse reflectance, reflection absorbance, and the K-M function, were used to correlate them with the blend ratio of NCC/ WC fibers. The results showed that diffuse reflectance and blending ratio had the highest correlation coefficients. Therefore this method can be widely used to quantify the blending ratio of NCC/WC fibers as a result of its greater accuracy and simplicity compared to traditional detection methods.

  4. First quantitative measurements by IR spectroscopy of dioxins and furans by means of broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siciliani de Cumis, M.; D'Amato, F.; Viciani, S.; Patrizi, B.; Foggi, P.; Galea, C. L.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of a quantitative analysis of the concentration of several dioxins and furans, among the most toxic ones, by only using infrared absorption laser spectroscopy. Two broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers, emitting in the mid-infrared, have been used to measure the absorption spectra of dioxins and furans, dissolved in CCl4, in direct absorption mode. The minimum detectable concentrations are inferred by analyzing diluted samples. A comparison between this technique and standard Fourier transform spectroscopy has been carried out and an analysis of future perspectives is reported.

  5. Quantitative characterization of genetic parts and circuits for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Schaumberg, Katherine A; Antunes, Mauricio S; Kassaw, Tessema K; Xu, Wenlong; Zalewski, Christopher S; Medford, June I; Prasad, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Plant synthetic biology promises immense technological benefits, including the potential development of a sustainable bio-based economy through the predictive design of synthetic gene circuits. Such circuits are built from quantitatively characterized genetic parts; however, this characterization is a significant obstacle in work with plants because of the time required for stable transformation. We describe a method for rapid quantitative characterization of genetic plant parts using transient expression in protoplasts and dual luciferase outputs. We observed experimental variability in transient-expression assays and developed a mathematical model to describe, as well as statistical normalization methods to account for, this variability, which allowed us to extract quantitative parameters. We characterized >120 synthetic parts in Arabidopsis and validated our method by comparing transient expression with expression in stably transformed plants. We also tested >100 synthetic parts in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) protoplasts, and the results showed that our method works in diverse plant groups. Our approach enables the construction of tunable gene circuits in complex eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26569598

  6. Quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contamination in soil using reflectance spectroscopy: a "multipath" approach.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Guy; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2013-11-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are contaminants of great significance. The commonly used analytic method for assessing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil samples is based on extraction with 1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), a substance prohibited to use by the Environmental Protection Agency. During the past 20 years, a new quantitative methodology that uses the reflected radiation of solids has been widely adopted. By using this approach, the reflectance radiation across the visible, near infrared-shortwave infrared region (400-2500 nm) is modeled against constituents determined using traditional analytic chemistry methods and then used to predict unknown samples. This technology is environmentally friendly and permits rapid and cost-effective measurements of large numbers of samples. Thus, this method dramatically reduces chemical analytical costs and secondary pollution, enabling a new dimension of environmental monitoring. In this study we adapted this approach and developed effective steps in which hydrocarbon contamination in soils can be determined rapidly, accurately, and cost effectively solely from reflectance spectroscopy. Artificial contaminated samples were analyzed chemically and spectrally to form a database of five soils contaminated with three types of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), creating 15 datasets of 48 samples each at contamination levels of 50-5000 wt% ppm (parts per million). A brute force preprocessing approach was used by combining eight different preprocessing techniques with all possible datasets, resulting in 120 different mutations for each dataset. The brute force was done based on an innovative computing system developed for this study. A new parameter for evaluating model performance scoring (MPS) is proposed based on a combination of several common statistical parameters. The effect of dividing the data into training validation and test sets on modeling accuracy is also discussed. The results of this study clearly show that predicting TPH levels at low concentrations in selected soils at high precision levels is viable. Dividing a dataset into training, validation, and test groups affects the modeling process, and different preprocessing methods, alone or in combination, need to be selected based on soil type and PHC type. MPS was found to be a better parameter for selecting the best performing model than ratio of prediction to deviation, yielding models with the same performance but less complicated and more stable. The use of the "all possibilities" system proved to be mandatory for efficient optimal modeling of reflectance spectroscopy data. PMID:24160885

  7. Spectroscopy of Multilayered Biological Tissues for Diabetes Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry

    Neurological and vascular complications of diabetes mellitus are known to cause foot ulceration in diabetic patients. Present clinical screening techniques enable the diabetes care provider to triage treatment by identifying diabetic patients at risk of foot ulceration. However, these techniques cannot effectively identify specific areas of the foot at risk of ulceration. This study aims to develop non-invasive optical techniques for accurate assessment of tissue health and viability with spatial resolution on the order of 1 mm². The thesis can be divided into three parts: (1) the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry to detect microcirculatory changes prior to ulcer formation, (2) development of a two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm and its application to detection of callus formation or epidermal degradation prior to ulceration, and (3) multi-layered tissue fluorescence modeling for identification of bacterial growth in existing diabetic foot wounds. The first part of the dissertation describes a clinical study in which hyperspectral tissue oximetry was performed on multiple diabetic subjects at risk of ulceration. Tissue oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were estimated using the Modified Beer-Lambert law. Then, an ulcer prediction algorithm was developed based on retrospective analysis of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in sites that were known to ulcerate. The ulcer prediction algorithm exhibited a large sensitivity but low specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively. The second part of the dissertation revisited the hyperspectral data presented in part one with a new and novel two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm. This algorithm was able to detect not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, but also the thickness of the epidermis, and the tissue's scattering coefficient. Specifically, change in epidermal thickness provided insight into the formation of diabetic foot ulcers over time. Indeed, callus formation or the thickening of the epidermis which preempts ulcer formation was detectable prior to ulceration. This added dimension of information increased the specificity of the ulcer prediction algorithm by 7% without reducing the sensitivity. Finally, the third part of the dissertation describes the feasibility of detecting bacteria in open ulcers. First, a semi-empirical model of multi-layered tissue fluorescence was developed. Then, an inverse method was developed and applied to simulated fluorescence emission spectra of diabetic foot wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and stained with indocyanine green dye (ICG). The inverse method was able to detect the blood volume fraction, oxygen saturation, and the intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of the ICG dye from simulated fluorescence emission spectra.

  8. Ni speciation in a New Caledonian lateritic regolith: A quantitative X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublet, Gabrielle; Juillot, Farid; Morin, Guillaume; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Fandeur, Dik; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Brown, Gordon E.

    2012-10-01

    Changes in Ni speciation in a 64 m vertical profile of a New Caledonian saprolitic-lateritic regolith developed over ultramafic rocks under tropical weathering conditions were investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the EXAFS spectra by linear combination-least squares fitting (LC-LSF) using a large set of model compound spectra showed that Ni hosted in primary silicate minerals (olivine and serpentine) in the bedrock is incorporated in secondary phyllosilicates (serpentine) and Fe-oxides (goethite) in the saprolite unit and mainly in goethite in the laterite unit. A significant concentration of Ni (up to 30% of total Ni) is also hosted by Mn-oxides in the transition laterite (i.e. the lowest part of the laterite unit which contains large amounts of Mn-oxides). However, the amount of Ni associated with Mn-oxides does not exceed 20% of the total Ni in the overlying laterite unit. This sequence of Ni species from bedrock to laterite yields information about the behavior of Ni during tropical weathering of ultramafic rocks. The different Ni distributions in phyllosilicates in the bedrock (randomly distributed) and in the saprolite unit (clustered) indicate two generations of Ni-bearing phyllosilicates. The first, which formed at higher temperature, is related to serpentinization of oceanic crust, whereas the second one, which formed at lower temperature, is associated with post-obduction weathering of ultramafic rocks. In addition, the observed decrease in the proportion of Ni hosted by Mn-oxides from the transition laterite to the upper lateritic horizons indicates dissolution of Mn-oxides during the last stages of differentiation of the lateritic regolith (i.e. lateritization). Finally, the ubiquitous occurrence of Ni-bearing goethite emphasizes the major role of this phase in Ni speciation at the different weathering stages and suggests that goethite represents the major host for Ni in the final tropical weathering stages of New Caledonian ultramafic rocks.

  9. Cancer therapy prognosis using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy and a kernel-based metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Hashim, Amr; Giles, Anoja; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a kernel-based metric based on the Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC) is proposed in a computer-aided-prognosis system to monitor cancer therapy effects. In order to induce tumour cell death, sarcoma xenograft tumour-bearing mice were injected with microbubbles followed by ultrasound and X-ray radiation therapy successively as a new anti-vascular treatment. High frequency (central frequency 30 MHz) ultrasound imaging was performed before and at different times after treatment and using spectroscopy, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parametric maps were derived from the radiofrequency (RF) signals. The intensity histogram of midband fit parametric maps was computed to represent the pre- and post-treatment images. Subsequently, the HSIC-based metric between preand post-treatment samples were computed for each animal as a measure of distance between the two distributions. The HSIC-based metrics computes the distance between two distributions in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS), meaning that by using a kernel, the input vectors are non-linearly mapped into a different, possibly high dimensional feature space. Computing the population means in this new space, enhanced group separability (compared to, e.g., Euclidean distance in the original feature space) is ideally obtained. The pre- and post-treatment parametric maps for each animal were thus represented by a dissimilarity measure, in which a high value of this metric indicated more treatment effect on the animal. It was shown in this research that this metric has a high correlation with cell death and if it was used in supervised learning, a high accuracy classification was obtained using a k-nearest-neighbor (k-NN) classifier.

  10. Quantitative evaluations of mechanisms of radiofrequency interactions with biological molecules and processes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Asher R; Swicord, Mays L; Balzano, Quirino

    2008-10-01

    The complexity of interactions of electromagnetic fields up to 10(12) Hz with the ions, atoms, and molecules of biological systems has given rise to a large number of established and proposed biophysical mechanisms applicable over a wide range of time and distance scales, field amplitudes, frequencies, and waveforms. This review focuses on the physical principles that guide quantitative assessment of mechanisms applicable for exposures at or below the level of endogenous electric fields associated with development, wound healing, and excitation of muscles and the nervous system (generally, 1 to 10(2) V m(-1)), with emphasis on conditions where temperature increases are insignificant (<1 K). Experiment and theory demonstrate possible demodulation at membrane barriers for frequencies < or =10 MHz, but not at higher frequencies. Although signal levels somewhat below system noise can be detected, signal-to-noise ratios substantially less than 0.1 cannot be overcome by cooperativity, signal averaging, coherent detection, or by nonlinear dynamical systems. Sensory systems and possible effects on biological magnetite suggest paradigms for extreme sensitivity at lower frequencies, but there are no known radiofrequency (RF) analogues. At the molecular level, vibrational modes are so overdamped by water molecules that excitation of molecular modes below the far infrared cannot occur. Two RF mechanisms plausibly may affect biological matter under common exposure conditions. For frequencies below approximately 150 MHz, shifts in the rate of chemical reactions can be mediated by radical pairs and, at all frequencies, dielectric and resistive heating can raise temperature and increase the entropy of the affected biological system. PMID:18784511

  11. Learning quantitative sequence-function relationships from high-throughput biological data

    E-print Network

    Atwal, Gurinder S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the transcriptional regulatory code, as well as other types of information encoded within biomolecular sequences, will require learning biophysical models of sequence-function relationships from high-throughput data. Controlling and characterizing the noise in such experiments, however, is notoriously difficult. The unpredictability of such noise creates problems for standard likelihood-based methods in statistical learning, which require that the quantitative form of experimental noise be known precisely. However, when this unpredictability is properly accounted for, important theoretical aspects of statistical learning which remain hidden in standard treatments are revealed. Specifically, one finds a close relationship between the standard inference method, based on likelihood, and an alternative inference method based on mutual information. Here we review and extend this relationship. We also describe its implications for learning sequence-function relationships from real biological data. Fin...

  12. Biological capacitance studies of anodes in microbial fuel cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhihao; Girguis, Peter; Liang, Peng; Shi, Haifeng; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-07-01

    It is known that cell potential increases while anode resistance decreases during the start-up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Biological capacitance, defined as the apparent capacitance attributed to biological activity including biofilm production, plays a role in this phenomenon. In this research, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to study anode capacitance and resistance during the start-up period of MFCs so that the role of biological capacitance was revealed in electricity generation by MFCs. It was observed that the anode capacitance ranged from 3.29 to 120 mF which increased by 16.8% to 18-20 times over 10-12 days. Notably, lowering the temperature and arresting biological activity via fixation by 4% para formaldehyde resulted in the decrease of biological capacitance by 16.9 and 62.6%, indicating a negative correlation between anode capacitance and anode resistance of MFCs. Thus, biological capacitance of anode should play an important role in power generation by MFCs. We suggest that MFCs are not only biological reactors and/or electrochemical cells, but also biological capacitors, extending the vision on mechanism exploration of electron transfer, reactor structure design and electrode materials development of MFCs. PMID:25656699

  13. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  14. Quantitative utilization of prior biological knowledge in the Bayesian network modeling of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bayesian Network (BN) is a powerful approach to reconstructing genetic regulatory networks from gene expression data. However, expression data by itself suffers from high noise and lack of power. Incorporating prior biological knowledge can improve the performance. As each type of prior knowledge on its own may be incomplete or limited by quality issues, integrating multiple sources of prior knowledge to utilize their consensus is desirable. Results We introduce a new method to incorporate the quantitative information from multiple sources of prior knowledge. It first uses the Naïve Bayesian classifier to assess the likelihood of functional linkage between gene pairs based on prior knowledge. In this study we included cocitation in PubMed and schematic similarity in Gene Ontology annotation. A candidate network edge reservoir is then created in which the copy number of each edge is proportional to the estimated likelihood of linkage between the two corresponding genes. In network simulation the Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm is adopted, and samples from this reservoir at each iteration to generate new candidate networks. We evaluated the new algorithm using both simulated and real gene expression data including that from a yeast cell cycle and a mouse pancreas development/growth study. Incorporating prior knowledge led to a ~2 fold increase in the number of known transcription regulations recovered, without significant change in false positive rate. In contrast, without the prior knowledge BN modeling is not always better than a random selection, demonstrating the necessity in network modeling to supplement the gene expression data with additional information. Conclusion our new development provides a statistical means to utilize the quantitative information in prior biological knowledge in the BN modeling of gene expression data, which significantly improves the performance. PMID:21884587

  15. Microwave-accelerated bioassay technique for rapid and quantitative detection of biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-01-15

    Quantitative detection of molecules of interest from biological and environmental samples in a rapid manner, particularly with a relevant concentration range, is imperative to the timely assessment of human diseases and environmental issues. In this work, we employed the microwave-accelerated bioassay (MAB) technique, which is based on the combined use of circular bioassay platforms and microwave heating, for rapid and quantitative detection of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Shiga like toxin (STX 1). The proof-of-principle use of the MAB technique with the circular bioassay platforms for the rapid detection of GFAP in buffer based on colorimetric and fluorescence readouts was demonstrated with a 900W kitchen microwave. We also employed the MAB technique with a new microwave system (called the iCrystal system) for the detection of GFAP from mice with brain injuries and STX 1 from a city water stream. Control bioassays included the commercially available gold standard bioassay kits run at room temperature. Our results show that the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the colorimetric and fluorescence based bioassays for GFAP was decreased by ~1000 times using the MAB technique and our circular bioassay platforms as compared to the commercially available bioassay kits. The overall bioassay time for GFAP and STX 1 was reduced from 4h using commercially available bioassay kits to 10min using the MAB technique. PMID:26356762

  16. Application of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy combined with chemometrics to quantitative analysis of imidacloprid in rice samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zewei; Zhang, Zhuoyong; Zhu, Ruohua; Xiang, Yuhong; Yang, Yuping; Harrington, Peter B.

    2015-12-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has been utilized as an effective tool for quantitative analysis of imidacloprid in rice powder samples. Unlike previous studies, our method for sample preparation was mixing imidacloprid with rice powder instead of polyethylene. Then, terahertz time domain transmission spectra of these mixed samples were measured and the absorption coefficient spectra of the samples with frequency range extending from 0.3 to 1.7 THz were obtained. Asymmetric least square (AsLS) method was utilized to correct the slope baselines that are presented in THz absorption coefficient spectra and improve signal-to-noise ratio of THz spectra. Chemometrics methods, including partial least squares (PLS), support vector regression (SVR), interval partial least squares (iPLS), and backward interval partial least squares (biPLS), were used for quantitative model building and prediction. To achieve a reliable and unbiased estimation, bootstrapped Latin partition was chosen as an approach for statistical cross-validation. Results showed that the mean value of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for PLS (0.5%) is smaller than SVR (0.7%), these two methods were based on the whole absorption coefficient spectra. In addition, PLS performed a better performance with a lower RMSEP (0.3%) based on the THz absorption coefficient spectra after AsLS baseline correction. Alternatively, two methods for variable selection, namely iPLS and biPLS, yielded models with improved predictions. Comparing with conventional PLS and SVR, the mean values of RMSEP were 0.4% (iPLS) and 0.3% (biPLS) by selecting the informative frequency ranges. The results demonstrated that an accurate quantitative analysis of imidacloprid in rice powder samples could be achieved by terahertz time-domain transmission spectroscopy combined with chemometrics. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that THz time-domain spectroscopy can be used for quantitative determinations of other pesticides in other agricultural products.

  17. [Near infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis model based on incremental neural network with partial least squares].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Li, Da-Hang; Liu, Ling; Zhou, Yan

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes an near infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis model based on incremental neural network with partial least squares. The proposed model adopts the typical three-layer back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and the absorbance of different wavelengths and the component concentration are the inputs and the outputs, respectively. Partial least square (PLS) regression is performed on the history training samples firstly, and the obtained history loading matrices of the in- dependent variables and the dependent variables are used for determining the initial weights of the input layer and the output lay- er, respectively. The number of the hidden layer nodes is set as the number of the principal components of the independent varia- bles. After a set of new training samples is collected, PLS regression is performed on the combination dataset consisting of the new samples and the history loading matrices to calculate the new loading matrices. The history loading matrices and the new loading matrices are fused to obtain the new initial weights of the input layer and the output layer of the proposed model. Then the new samples are used for training the proposed mode to realize the incremental update. The proposed model is compared with PLS, BPNN, the BPNN based on PLS (PLS-BPNN) and the recursive PLS (RPLS) by using the spectra data of flue gas of nat- ural gas combustion. For the concentration prediction of the carbon dioxide in the flue gas, the root mean square error of predic- tion (RMSEP) of the proposed model are reduced by 27.27%, 58.12%, 19.24% and 14.26% than those of PLS, BPNN, PLS- BPNN and RPLS, respectively. For the concentration prediction of the carbon monoxide in the flue gas, the RMSEP of the pro- posed model are reduced by 20.65%, 24.69%, 18.54% and 19.42% than those of PLS, BPNN, PLS-BPNN and RPLS, re- spectively. For the concentration prediction of the methane in the flue gas, the RMSEP of the proposed model are reduced by 27.56%, 37.76%, 8.63% and 3.20% than those of PLS, BPNN, PLS-BPNN and RPLS, respectively. Experiments results show that the proposed model could optimize the construction and the initial weights of BPNN by PLS and has higher prediction effectiveness. Moreover, based on the information of the built model, the proposed model uses the new samples for incremental update without accessing the history samples. Hence, the proposed model has better robustness and generalization. PMID:25739228

  18. A quantitative study for determination of sugar concentration using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhandy, Diding; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Ogawa, Yuichi; Kondo, Naoshi; Ishihara, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yuichiro

    2011-06-01

    The objective of our research was to use ATR-THz spectroscopy together with chemometric for quantitative study in food analysis. Glucose, fructose and sucrose are main component of sugar both in fresh and processed fruits. The use of spectroscopic-based method for sugar determination is well reported especially using visible, near infrared (NIR) and middle infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. However, the use of terahertz spectroscopy for sugar determination in fruits has not yet been reported. In this work, a quantitative study for sugars determination using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy was conducted. Each samples of glucose, fructose and sucrose solution with different concentrations were prepared respectively and their absorbance spectra between wavenumber 20 and 450 cm-1 (between 0.6 THz and 13.5 THz) were acquired using a terahertz-based Fourier Transform spectrometer (FARIS-1S, JASCO Co., Japan). This spectrometer was equipped with a high pressure of mercury lamp as light source and a pyroelectric sensor made from deuterated L-alanine triglycine sulfate (DLTGS) as detector. Each spectrum was acquired using 16 cm-1 of resolution and 200 scans for averaging. The spectra of water and sugar solutions were compared and discussed. The results showed that increasing sugar concentration caused decreasing absorbance. The correlation between sugar concentration and its spectra was investigated using multivariate analysis. Calibration models for glucose, fructose and sucrose determination were developed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The calibration model was evaluated using some parameters such as coefficient of determination (R2), standard error of calibration (SEC), standard error of prediction (SEP), bias between actual and predicted sugar concentration value and ratio prediction to deviation (RPD) parameter. The cross validation method was used to validate each calibration model. It is showed that the use of ATR-THz spectroscopy combined with appropriate chemometric can be a potential for a rapid determination of sugar concentrations.

  19. Quantitative changes in sets of proteins as markers of biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Taylor, J.; Gemmell, M.A.; Tollaksen, S.L. ); Lalwani, N.D.; Reddy, J.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to either physical or chemical insults triggers a cascade of bio-chemical events within the target cell. This response requires adjustment within the protein population of the cell, some proteins becoming more abundant (those involved in the cellular response), others less abundant (those not required or counterproductive to the response). Thus, quantitative changes in the global protein population of an exposed biological system may well serve as an indicator of exposure, provided the alterations observed are selective and dose-dependent. In this paper we present results from a study in which liver protein changes induced by exposure of mice to chemicals known to cause peroxisome proliferation and subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma where monitored. Clofibrate, and its chemical analog ciprofibrate, are hypolipidemic drugs. Di-(ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer used widely in disposable containers for blood products. WY-14643 is a chemical shown to cause hypolipidemic and peroxisome proliferation, similar to clofibrate, ciprofibrate and DEHP, but structurally different from these three chemicals. Thus, two of the four chemicals are structurally similar while the remaining two are very distinct, although all four chemicals cause the same gross biological response. Our results show that although common protein effects are observed in mice exposed to these chemicals, each chemical also causes specific alterations in selective subsets of proteins that could serve as markers of a particular exposure. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A comparison of quantitative reconstruction techniques for PIXE-tomography analysis applied to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. G.; Alves, L. C.; Barberet, Ph.; Bourret, S.; Devès, G.; Gordillo, N.; Michelet, C.; Le Trequesser, Q.; Marques, A. C.; Seznec, H.; da Silva, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of biological specimens requires robust algorithms, able to deal with low density contrast and low element concentrations. At the IST/ITN microprobe facility new GPU-accelerated reconstruction software, JPIXET, has been developed, which can significantly increase the speed of quantitative reconstruction of Proton Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) data. It has a user-friendly graphical user interface for pre-processing, data analysis and reconstruction of PIXE-T and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T). The reconstruction of PIXE-T data is performed using either an algorithm based on a GPU-accelerated version of the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) method or a GPU-accelerated version of the Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm (DISRA) (Sakellariou (2001) [2]). The original DISRA, its accelerated version, and the MLEM algorithm, were compared for the reconstruction of a biological sample of Caenorhabditis elegans - a small worm. This sample was analysed at the microbeam line of the AIFIRA facility of CENBG, Bordeaux. A qualitative PIXE-T reconstruction was obtained using the CENBG software package TomoRebuild (Habchi et al. (2013) [6]). The effects of pre-processing and experimental conditions on the elemental concentrations are discussed.

  1. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging: non-destructive analysis of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Manley, Marena

    2014-12-21

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has come of age and is now prominent among major analytical technologies after the NIR region was discovered in 1800, revived and developed in the early 1950s and put into practice in the 1970s. Since its first use in the cereal industry, it has become the quality control method of choice for many more applications due to the advancement in instrumentation, computing power and multivariate data analysis. NIR spectroscopy is also increasingly used during basic research performed to better understand complex biological systems, e.g. by means of studying characteristic water absorption bands. The shorter NIR wavelengths (800-2500 nm), compared to those in the mid-infrared (MIR) range (2500-15?000 nm) enable increased penetration depth and subsequent non-destructive, non-invasive, chemical-free, rapid analysis possibilities for a wide range of biological materials. A disadvantage of NIR spectroscopy is its reliance on reference methods and model development using chemometrics. NIR measurements and predictions are, however, considered more reproducible than the usually more accurate and precise reference methods. The advantages of NIR spectroscopy contribute to it now often being favoured over other spectroscopic (colourimetry and MIR) and analytical methods, using chemicals and producing chemical waste, such as gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This tutorial review intends to provide a brief overview of the basic theoretical principles and most investigated applications of NIR spectroscopy. In addition, it considers the recent development, principles and applications of NIR hyperspectral imaging. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides NIR spectral data as a set of images, each representing a narrow wavelength range or spectral band. The advantage compared to NIR spectroscopy is that, due to the additional spatial dimension provided by this technology, the images can be analysed and visualised as chemical images providing identification as well as localisation of chemical compounds in non-homogenous samples. PMID:25156745

  2. Near- and Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for the Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several decades near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to determine the composition of a variety of agricultural products. More recently, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) has similarly been shown to be able to determine the co...

  3. Advanced calibration strategy for in situ quantitative monitoring of phase transition processes in suspensions using FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zeng-Ping; Fevotte, Gilles; Caillet, Alexandre; Littlejohn, David; Morris, Julian

    2008-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in using Raman spectroscopy to identify polymorphic forms and monitor phase changes in pharmaceutical products for quality control. Compared with other analytical techniques for the identification of polymorphs such as X-ray powder diffractometry and infrared spectroscopy, FT-Raman spectroscopy has the advantages of enabling fast, in situ, and nondestructive measurements of complex systems such as suspension samples. However, for suspension samples, Raman intensities depend on the analyte concentrations as well as the particle size, overall solid content, and homogeneity of the solid phase in the mixtures, which makes quantitative Raman analysis rather difficult. In this contribution, an advanced model has been derived to explicitly account for the confounding effects of a sample's physical properties on Raman intensities. On the basis of this model, a unique calibration strategy called multiplicative effects correction (MEC) was proposed to separate the Raman contributions due to changes in analyte concentration from those caused by the multiplicative confounding effects of the sample's physical properties. MEC has been applied to predict the anhydrate concentrations from in situ FT-Raman measurements made during the crystallization and phase transition processes of citric acid in water. The experimental results show that MEC can effectively correct for the confounding effects of the particle size and overall solid content of the solid phase on Raman intensities and, therefore, provide much more accurate in situ quantitative predictions of anhydrate concentration during crystallization and phase transition processes than traditional PLS calibration methods. PMID:18665607

  4. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars: accurate atomic data applied on a large scale as driver of recent breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Nieva, Maria-Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    OB-type stars present hotbeds for non-LTE physics because of their strong radiation fields that drive the atmospheric plasma out of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We report on recent breakthroughs in the quantitative analysis of the optical and UV-spectra of OB-type stars that were facilitated by application of accurate and precise atomic data on a large scale. An astophysicist's dream has come true, by bringing observed and model spectra into close match over wide parts of the observed wavelength ranges. This facilitates tight observational constraints to be derived from OB-type stars for wide applications in astrophysics. However, despite the progress made, many details of the modelling may be improved further. We discuss atomic data needs in terms of laboratory measurements and also ab-initio calculations. Particular emphasis is given to quantitative spectroscopy in the near-IR, which will be in focus in the era of the upcoming extremely large telescopes.

  5. Semi-quantitative surface analysis of Mt. St. Helens Ash by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. R.; Fyfe, W. S.; Bancroft, G. M.

    A sample of Mt. St. Helens tephra and USGS andesite rock standard (AGV-1) were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate major element surface analysis on powdered multicomponent samples (such as geological specimens) can be performed semi-quantitatively using an equation that relates XPS peak intensity with atomic surface density. The surface compositions found by XPS are in good agreement with bulk X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF). It is interesting to note that XPS analysis of this volcanic ash did not reveal a surface enrichment of chlorine or sulphur and only trace fluorine although these volatile elements are normally abundant in volcanic gases.

  6. Quantitative description of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectroscopy and its application to the GaAs(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnedler, M.; Portz, V.; Weidlich, P. H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2015-06-01

    A quantitative description of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectra is developed and applied to photoexcited spectra measured on p -doped nonpolar GaAs(110) surfaces. Under illumination, the experimental spectra exhibit an increase of the tunnel current at negative sample voltages only. In order to analyze the experimental data quantitatively, the potential and charge-carrier distributions of the photoexcited tip-vacuum-semiconductor system are calculated by solving the Poisson as well as the hole and electron continuity equations by a finite-difference algorithm. On this basis, the different contributions to the tunnel current are calculated using an extension of the model of Feenstra and Stroscio to include the light-excited carrier concentrations. The best fit of the calculated tunnel currents to the experimental data is obtained for a tip-induced band bending, which is limited by the partial occupation of the C3 surface state by light-excited electrons. The tunnel current at negative voltages is then composed of a valence band contribution and a photoinduced tunnel current of excited electrons in the conduction band. The quantitative description of the tunnel current developed here is generally applicable and provides a solid foundation for the quantitative interpretation of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  7. Quantitative analysis of routine chemical constituents in tobacco by near-infrared spectroscopy and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Cong, Qian; Xie, Yunfei; Yang, Jingxiu; Zhao, Bing

    2008-12-01

    It is important to monitor quality of tobacco during the production of cigarette. Therefore, in order to scientifically control the tobacco raw material and guarantee the cigarette quality, fast and accurate determination routine chemical of constituents of tobacco, including the total sugar, reducing sugar, Nicotine, the total nitrogen and so on, is needed. In this study, 50 samples of tobacco from different cultivation areas were surveyed by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, and the spectral differences provided enough quantitative analysis information for the tobacco. Partial least squares regression (PLSR), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM), were applied. The quantitative analysis models of 50 tobacco samples were studied comparatively in this experiment using PLSR, ANN, radial basis function (RBF) SVM regression, and the parameters of the models were also discussed. The spectrum variables of 50 samples had been compressed through the wavelet transformation technology before the models were established. The best experimental results were obtained using the (RBF) SVM regression with ? = 1.5, 1.3, 0.9, and 0.1, separately corresponds to total sugar, reducing sugar, Nicotine, and total nitrogen, respectively. Finally, compared with the back propagation (BP-ANN) and PLSR approach, SVM algorithm showed its excellent generalization for quantitative analysis results, while the number of samples for establishing the model is smaller. The overall results show that NIR spectroscopy combined with SVM can be efficiently utilized for rapid and accurate analysis of routine chemical compositions in tobacco. Simultaneously, the research can serve as the technical support and the foundation of quantitative analysis of other NIR applications.

  8. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 ?m-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 ?m-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to at least 65 MPa. No ethanol was detected at 100 MPa. From these data, the pressure at which ethanol fermentation stops in yeast was calculated to be 87±7 MPa. These results indicate that the activity of one or several enzymes of the glycolytic pathway is enhanced at low pressure. At higher pressure, they become progressively repressed, and are completely inhibited above 87 MPa. Our in situ monitoring constitutes a direct demonstration of yeast metabolism in situ under pressure up to 100 MPa. Our data agree with previous ex-situ data by Abe and Horikoshi (4). However, we observed that ethanol production is not completely inhibited around 50 MPa as predicted, but could be detected at significantly higher pressures (up to 87 MPa). QSR is a powerful method to monitor microbial activities, since almost any organic molecule with a carbon chain ranging from 1 to 6 carbon can be detected and quantified. The only limitation of QSR is that the Raman spectrum of the molecule exhibits at least one peak not masked by the spectrum of the growth medium. 1 Pelletier M J Appl Spectr 57:20A-42A, 2003 2 Daniel I, Oger P, Picard A, Cardon H and Chervin J-C (submitted to Rev Sci Instr) 3 Picard A, Daniel I, Montagnac G and Oger P (submitted to Extremophiles) 4 Abe F and Horikoshi K Extremophiles 1: 89-93, 1997

  9. Electric field standing wave artefacts in FTIR micro-spectroscopy of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Filik, Jacob; Frogley, Mark D; Pijanka, Jacek K; Wehbe, Katia; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2012-02-21

    FTIR absorption micro-spectroscopy is a widely used, powerful technique for analysing biological materials. In principle it is a straightforward linear absorption spectroscopy, but it can be affected by artefacts that complicate the interpretation of the data. In this article, artefacts produced by the electric-field standing-wave (EFSW) in micro-reflection-absorption (transflection) spectroscopy are investigated. An EFSW is present at reflective metallic surfaces due to the interference of incident and reflected light. The period of this standing wave is dependent on the wavelength of the radiation and can produce non-linear changes in absorbance with increasing sample thickness (non-Beer-Lambert like behaviour). A protein micro-structure was produced as a simple experimental model for a biological cell and used to evaluate the differences between FTIR spectra collected in transmission and transflection. By varying the thickness of the protein samples, the relationship between the absorbance and sample thickness in transflection was determined, and shown to be consistent with optical interference due to the EFSW coupled with internal reflection from the sample top surface. FTIR spectral image data from MCF 7 breast adenocarcinoma cells was then analysed to determine the severity of the EFSW artefact in data from a real sample. The results from these measurements confirmed that the EFSW artefact has a profound effect on transflection spectra, and in this case the main spectral variations were related to the sample thickness rather than any biochemical differences. PMID:22231204

  10. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  11. Fast Identification of Biological Pathways Associated with a Quantitative Trait Using Group Lasso with Overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Matt; Montana, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Where causal SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) tend to accumulate within biological pathways, the incorporation of prior pathways information into a statistical model is expected to increase the power to detect true associations in a genetic association study. Most existing pathways-based methods rely on marginal SNP statistics and do not fully exploit the dependence patterns among SNPs within pathways. We use a sparse regression model, with SNPs grouped into pathways, to identify causal pathways associated with a quantitative trait. Notable features of our “pathways group lasso with adaptive weights” (P-GLAW) algorithm include the incorporation of all pathways in a single regression model, an adaptive pathway weighting procedure that accounts for factors biasing pathway selection, and the use of a bootstrap sampling procedure for the ranking of important pathways. P-GLAW takes account of the presence of overlapping pathways and uses a novel combination of techniques to optimise model estimation, making it fast to run, even on whole genome datasets. In a comparison study with an alternative pathways method based on univariate SNP statistics, our method demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of important pathways, showing the greatest relative gains in performance where marginal SNP effect sizes are small. PMID:22499682

  12. Monitoring intracellular polyphosphate accumulation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems by quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Amaral, A Luís; Leal, Cristiano; Carvalheira, Mónica; Cunha, Jorge R; Oehmen, Adrian; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    A rapid methodology for intracellular storage polyphosphate (poly-P) identification and monitoring in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems is proposed based on quantitative image analysis (QIA). In EBPR systems, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) is usually combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to evaluate the microbial community. The proposed monitoring technique is based on a QIA procedure specifically developed for determining poly-P inclusions within a biomass suspension using solely DAPI by epifluorescence microscopy. Due to contradictory literature regarding DAPI concentrations used for poly-P detection, the present work assessed the optimal DAPI concentration for samples acquired at the end of the EBPR aerobic stage when the accumulation occurred. Digital images were then acquired and processed by means of image processing and analysis. A correlation was found between average poly-P intensity values and the analytical determination. The proposed methodology can be seen as a promising alternative procedure for quantifying intracellular poly-P accumulation in a faster and less labour-intensive way. PMID:24901627

  13. The Isolation and Quantitation of Fetuin-A-Containing Calciprotein Particles from Biological Fluids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    Multiple overlapping systemic and local inhibitory networks have evolved to prevent the unwanted deposition of mineral at ectopic sites. Fetuin-A is a liver-derived glycoprotein abundant in plasma that binds and stabilizes nascent mineral ion nuclei to form soluble colloidal high molecular weight complexes, called calciprotein particles (CPP). The binding of fetuin-A to mineral retards crystal ripening and precipitation from the aqueous phase, thereby facilitating the regulated clearance of mineral debris from the extracellular fluid. However, persistent disturbances in this humoral homeostatic system, as frequently seen in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease, may lead to the accumulation and aggregation of these nanoparticles in extraosseous tissues like the vasculature, driving inflammatory cascades, aberrant tissue remodeling, and functional impairment. Consistent with this conceptual framework, higher circulating CPP levels are associated with reduced renal function, increments in systemic inflammatory markers, derangements in bone morphogenetic cytokines, higher vascular calcification scores, aortic stiffening and an increased risk of death. This chapter describes optimized sample collection and preparative procedures for the isolation and enrichment of CPP from biological fluids. Methods for CPP quantitation are critically reviewed and detailed. PMID:26676136

  14. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional biological cells using interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Wax, Adam

    2011-06-01

    Live biological cells are three-dimensional microscopic objects that constantly adjust their sizes, shapes and other biophysical features. Wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) is a holographic technique that is able to record the complex wavefront of the light which has interacted with in-vitro cells in a single camera exposure, where no exogenous contrast agents are required. However, simple quasi-three-dimensional holographic visualization of the cell phase profiles need not be the end of the process. Quantitative analysis should permit extraction of numerical parameters which are useful for cytology or medical diagnosis. Using a transmission-mode setup, the phase profile represents the multiplication between the integral refractive index and the thickness of the sample. These coupled variables may not be distinct when acquiring the phase profiles of dynamic cells. Many morphological parameters which are useful for cell biologists are based on the cell thickness profile rather than on its phase profile. We first overview methods to decouple the cell thickness and its refractive index using the WFDI-based phase profile. Then, we present a whole-cell-imaging approach which is able to extract useful numerical parameters on the cells even in cases where decoupling of cell thickness and refractive index is not possible or desired.

  15. Real time quantitative Raman spectroscopy of supported metal oxide catalysts without the need of an internal standard.

    PubMed

    Tinnemans, S J; Kox, M H F; Nijhuis, T A; Visser, T; Weckhuysen, B M

    2005-01-01

    In continuation to the possibility of using a combined operando Raman/UV-Vis-NIR set-up for conducting qualitative Raman spectroscopy, the possibilities for quantitative Raman spectroscopic measurements of supported metal oxide catalysts under working conditions without the need of an internal standard have been explored. The dehydrogenation of propane over an industrial-like 13 wt% Cr/Al203 catalyst was used as a model system. During reaction, the catalytic solid was continuously monitored by both UV-Vis-NIR and Raman spectroscopy. As the dehydrogenation proceeds, the catalyst gradually darkens due to coke formation and consequently the UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance and Raman scattered signal progressively decrease in intensity. The formation of coke was confirmed with TEOM, TGA and Raman. The measured Raman spectra can be used as a quantitative measure of the amount of carbonaceous deposits at the catalyst surface provided that a correction factor G(R(infinity)) is applied. This factor can be directly calculated from the corresponding UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra. The validity of the approach is compared with one, in which an internal boron nitride standard is added to the catalytic solid. It will be shown that the proposed methodology allows measurement of the amount of carbonaceous deposits on a catalyst material inside a reactor as a function of reaction time and catalyst bed height. As a consequence, an elegant technique for on-line process control of e.g. an industrial propane dehydrogenation reactor emerges. PMID:19785192

  16. Using Neutron Spectroscopy to Study Collective Dynamics of Biological and Model Membrane Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2007-03-01

    Only recently, it has become possible to study collective dynamics of planar lipid bilayers using neutron spectroscopy techniques. By combining different neutron scattering techniques, namely three-axis, backscattering and spin-echo spectroscopy, we present measurements of short and long wavelength collective fluctuations in biomimetic and biological membranes in a large range in momentum and energy transfer, covering time scales from about 0.1ps to almost 1?s and length scales from 3å to about 0.1?m [1-4]. The measurements offer a large window of length and time scales to test and refine theoretical models of dynamics of biomimetic and biological membranes. The objective of this project is to establish dynamics-function relationships in artificial and biological membranes to relate in particular the collective dynamics, i.e., phonons, to key functions of the membranes, as, e.g., transport processes within and across the bilayers. M.C. Rheinst"adter, C. Ollinger, G. Fragneto, F. Demmel, T. Salditt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 108107 (2004).^2 Maikel C. Rheinst"adter, Tilo Seydel, Franz Demmel, Tim Salditt, Phys. Rev. E 71, 061908 (2005).^3 Maikel C. Rheinst"adter, Wolfgang H"außler, Tim Salditt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 048103 (2006).^4 Maikel C. Rheinst"adter, Tilo Seydel, Tim Salditt, submitted to PRE, cond-mat/0607514.

  17. Spectroscopy of scattered light for the characterization of micro and nanoscale objects in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Qiu, Le; Itzkan, Irving; Novikov, Andrei A; Kotelev, Mikhail S; Getmanskiy, Michael; Vinokurov, Vladimir A; Muradov, Alexander V; Perelman, Lev T

    2014-01-01

    The biomedical uses for the spectroscopy of scattered light by micro and nanoscale objects can broadly be classified into two areas. The first, often called light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), deals with light scattered by dielectric particles, such as cellular and sub-cellular organelles, and is employed to measure their size or other physical characteristics. Examples include the use of LSS to measure the size distributions of nuclei or mitochondria. The native contrast that is achieved with LSS can serve as a non-invasive diagnostic and scientific tool. The other area for the use of the spectroscopy of scattered light in biology and medicine involves using conducting metal nanoparticles to obtain either contrast or electric field enhancement through the effect of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Gold and silver metal nanoparticles are non-toxic, they do not photobleach, are relatively inexpensive, are wavelength-tunable, and can be labeled with antibodies. This makes them very promising candidates for spectrally encoded molecular imaging. Metal nanoparticles can also serve as electric field enhancers of Raman signals. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful method for detecting and identifying molecules down to single molecule concentrations. In this review, we will concentrate on the common physical principles, which allow one to understand these apparently different areas using similar physical and mathematical approaches. We will also describe the major advancements in each of these areas, as well as some of the exciting recent developments. PMID:24480270

  18. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy as a tool to study the kinetics and formation mechanism of carbonates.

    PubMed

    Bonales, L J; Muñoz-Iglesias, V; Santamaría-Pérez, D; Caceres, M; Fernandez-Remolar, D; Prieto-Ballesteros, O

    2013-12-01

    We have carried out a systematic study of abiotic precipitation at different temperatures of several Mg and Ca carbonates (calcite, nesquehonite, hydrocalcite) present in carbonaceous chondrites. This study highlights the capability of Raman spectroscopy as a primary tool for performing full mineralogical analysis. The precipitation reaction and the structure of the resulting carbonates were monitored and identified with Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy enabled us to confirm that the precipitation reaction is very fast (minutes) when Ca(II) is present in the solution, whereas for Mg(II) such reactions developed at rather slow rates (weeks). We also observed that both the composition and the reaction mechanisms depended on temperature, which might help to clarify several issues in the fields of planetology and geology, because of the environmental implications of these carbonates on both terrestrial and extraterrestrial objects. PMID:23896294

  19. [Study on the application of ridge regression to near-infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis and optimum wavelength selection].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Liu, Xu-Hua; He, Xiong-Kui; Zhang, Lu-Da; Zhao, Long-Lian; Li, Jun-Hui

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper, taking 66 wheat samples for testing materials, ridge regression technology in near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy quantitative analysis was researched. The NIR-ridge regression model for determination of protein content was established by NIR spectral data of 44 wheat samples to predict the protein content of the other 22 samples. The average relative error was 0.015 18 between the predictive results and Kjeldahl's values (chemical analysis values). And the predictive results were compared with those values derived through partial least squares (PLS) method, showing that ridge regression method was deserved to be chosen for NIR spectroscopy quantitative analysis. Furthermore, in order to reduce the disturbance to predictive capacity of the quantitative analysis model resulting from irrelevant information, one effective way is to screen the wavelength information. In order to select the spectral information with more content information and stronger relativity with the composition or the nature of the samples to improve the model's predictive accuracy, ridge regression was used to select wavelength information in this paper. The NIR-ridge regression model was established with the spectral information at 4 wavelength points, which were selected from 1 297 wavelength points, to predict the protein content of the 22 samples. The average relative error was 0.013 7 and the correlation coefficient reached 0.981 7 between the predictive results and Kjeldahl's values. The results showed that ridge regression was able to screen the essential wavelength information from a large amount of spectral information. It not only can simplify the model and effectively reduce the disturbance resulting from collinearity information, but also has practical significance for designing special NIR analysis instrument for analyzing specific component in some special samples. PMID:20672604

  20. QUANTITATIVE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY IN WEATHERING OF A MODEL POLYESTER-URETHANE COATING. (R828081E01)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spectroscopy was used to quantify the effects of ultraviolet light on a model polyester–urethane coating as it degraded in an accelerated exposure chamber. An explorative calculation of the effective dosage absorbed by the coatings was made and, depending on the quantum...

  1. Quantitative Orientation Measurements in Thin Lipid Films by Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Pezolet, Michel

    Spectroscopy Fre´ de´ ric Picard,* Thierry Buffeteau,# Bernard Desbat,# Miche` le Auger,* and Michel Pe´ zolet technique has been used extensively to study proteins (Goormaghtigh et al., 1990), phospholipid multilayers., 1988), lipid-protein complexes (Okamura et al., 1986; Brauner et al., 1987; Cornell et al., 1989; Frey

  2. Detection of biological contaminants on foods and food surfaces using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Multari, Rosalie A; Cremers, David A; Dupre, Jo Anne M; Gustafson, John E

    2013-09-11

    The rapid detection of biological contaminants, such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica , on foods and food-processing surfaces is important to ensure food safety and streamline the food-monitoring process. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal candidate technology for this application because sample preparation is minimal and results are available rapidly (seconds to minutes). Here, multivariate regression analysis of LIBS data is used to differentiate the live bacterial pathogens E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica on various foods (eggshell, milk, bologna, ground beef, chicken, and lettuce) and surfaces (metal drain strainer and cutting board). The type (E. coli or S. enterica) of bacteria could be differentiated in all cases studied along with the metabolic state (viable or heat killed). This study provides data showing the potential of LIBS for the rapid identification of biological contaminants using spectra collected directly from foods and surfaces. PMID:23941554

  3. Rapid Quantitative Determination of Squalene in Shark Liver Oils by Raman and IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hall, David W; Marshall, Susan N; Gordon, Keith C; Killeen, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Squalene is sourced predominantly from shark liver oils and to a lesser extent from plants such as olives. It is used for the production of surfactants, dyes, sunscreen, and cosmetics. The economic value of shark liver oil is directly related to the squalene content, which in turn is highly variable and species-dependent. Presented here is a validated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis method for the quantitation of squalene in shark liver oils, with an accuracy of 99.0 %, precision of 0.23 % (standard deviation), and linearity of >0.999. The method has been used to measure the squalene concentration of 16 commercial shark liver oils. These reference squalene concentrations were related to infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the same oils using partial least squares regression. The resultant models were suitable for the rapid quantitation of squalene in shark liver oils, with cross-validation r (2) values of >0.98 and root mean square errors of validation of ?4.3 % w/w. Independent test set validation of these models found mean absolute deviations of the 4.9 and 1.0 % w/w for the IR and Raman models, respectively. Both techniques were more accurate than results obtained by an industrial refractive index analysis method, which is used for rapid, cheap quantitation of squalene in shark liver oils. In particular, the Raman partial least squares regression was suited to quantitative squalene analysis. The intense and highly characteristic Raman bands of squalene made quantitative analysis possible irrespective of the lipid matrix. PMID:26620374

  4. Liquid-phase microextraction for rapid AP-MALDI and quantitation of nortriptyline in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Fen; Ku, Hsin-Yi; Yen, Jyh-Hao

    2008-07-01

    A liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method using a micropipette with disposable tips was demonstrated for coupling to atmospheric pressure MALDI-MS (AP-MALDI/MS) as a concentrating probe for rapid analysis and quantitative determination of nortriptyline drug from biological matrices including human urine and human plasma. This technique was named as micropipette extraction (MPE). The best optimized parameters of MPE coupled to AP-MALDI/MS experiments were extraction solvent, toluene; extraction time, 5 min; sample agitation rate, 480 rpm; sample pH, 7; salt concentration, 30%; hole size of micropipette tips, 0.61 mm (id); and matrix concentration, 1000 ppm using alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as a matrix. Three detection modes of AP-MALDI/MS analysis including full scan, selective ion monitor (SIM), and selective reaction monitor (SRM) of MS/MS were also compared for the MPE performance. The results clearly demonstrated that the MS/MS method provides a wider linear range and lower LODs but poor RSDs than the full scan and SIM methods. The LOD values for the MPE under SIM and MS/MS modes in water, urine, and plasma were 6.26, 47.5, and 94.9 nM, respectively. The enrichment factors (EFs) of this current approach were 36.5-43.0 fold in water. In addition, compared to single drop microextraction (SDME) and LPME using a dual gauge microsyringe with a hollow fiber (LPME-HF) technique, the LODs acquired by the MPE method under MS/MS modes were comparable to those of LPME-HF and SDME but it is more convenient than both methods. The advantages of this novel method are simple, easy to use, low cost, and no contamination between experiments since disposable tips were used for the micropipettes. The MPE has the potential to be widely used in the future because it only requires a simple micropipette to perform all extraction processes. We believe that this technique can be a powerful tool for MALDI/MS analysis of biological samples and clinical applications. PMID:18615829

  5. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  6. MSEA: a web-based tool to identify biologically meaningful patterns in quantitative metabolomic data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianguo; Wishart, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) is a widely used technique in transcriptomic data analysis that uses a database of predefined gene sets to rank lists of genes from microarray studies to identify significant and coordinated changes in gene expression data. While GSEA has been playing a significant role in understanding transcriptomic data, no similar tools are currently available for understanding metabolomic data. Here, we introduce a web-based server, called Metabolite Set Enrichment Analysis (MSEA), to help researchers identify and interpret patterns of human or mammalian metabolite concentration changes in a biologically meaningful context. Key to the development of MSEA has been the creation of a library of ?1000 predefined metabolite sets covering various metabolic pathways, disease states, biofluids, and tissue locations. MSEA also supports user-defined or custom metabolite sets for more specialized analysis. MSEA offers three different enrichment analyses for metabolomic studies including overrepresentation analysis (ORA), single sample profiling (SSP) and quantitative enrichment analysis (QEA). ORA requires only a list of compound names, while SSP and QEA require both compound names and compound concentrations. MSEA generates easily understood graphs or tables embedded with hyperlinks to relevant pathway images and disease descriptors. For non-mammalian or more specialized metabolomic studies, MSEA allows users to provide their own metabolite sets for enrichment analysis. The MSEA server also supports conversion between metabolite common names, synonyms, and major database identifiers. MSEA has the potential to help users identify obvious as well as ‘subtle but coordinated’ changes among a group of related metabolites that may go undetected with conventional approaches. MSEA is freely available at http://www.msea.ca. PMID:20457745

  7. Spectral simulation methods for enhancing qualitative and quantitative analyses based on infrared spectroscopy and quantitative calibration methods for passive infrared remote sensing of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulub, Yusuf Ismail

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR) has over the years found a myriad of applications including passive environmental remote sensing of toxic pollutants and the development of a blood glucose sensor. In this dissertation, capabilities of both these applications are further enhanced with data analysis strategies employing digital signal processing and novel simulation approaches. Both quantitative and qualitative determinations of volatile organic compounds are investigated in the passive IR remote sensing research described in this dissertation. In the quantitative work, partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis is used to generate multivariate calibration models for passive Fourier transform IR remote sensing measurements of open-air generated vapors of ethanol in the presence methanol as an interfering species. A step-wise co-addition scheme coupled with a digital filtering approach is used to attenuate the effects of variation in optical path length or plume width. For the qualitative study, an IR imaging line scanner is used to acquire remote sensing data in both spatial and spectral domains. This technology is capable of not only identifying but also specifying the location of the sample under investigation. Successful implementation of this methodology is hampered by the huge costs incurred to conduct these experiments and the impracticality of acquiring large amounts of representative training data. To address this problem, a novel simulation approach is developed that generates training data based on synthetic analyte-active and measured analyte-inactive data. Subsequently, automated pattern classifiers are generated using piecewise linear discriminant analysis to predict the presence of the analyte signature in measured imaging data acquired in remote sensing applications. Near infrared glucose determinations based on the region of 5000--4000 cm-1 is the focus of the research in the latter part of this dissertation. A six-component aqueous matrix of glucose in the presence of five other interferent species, all spanning physiological levels, is analyzed quantitatively. Multivariate PLS regression analysis in conjunction with samples designated into a calibration set is used to formulate models for predicting glucose concentrations. Variations in the instrumental response caused by drift and environmental factors are observed to degrade the performance of these models. As a remedy, a model updating approach based on spectral simulation is developed that is highly successful in eliminating the adverse effects of non-chemical variations.

  8. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  9. An improved method for quantitative determination of urinary porphyrins by use of second-derivative spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, A W; van Wijk, E M

    1990-09-01

    An improved assay for quantification of urinary porphyrins by use of second-derivative spectroscopy is described. A new method for calculation of the porphyrin concentration is developed and the whole procedure is computerized. Acidified urine samples can be assayed within a few minutes by using this method. Precision and recoveries for both uro- and coproporphyrin are good. The method is presented as a very fast and accurate assay for the screening and quantification of urinary porphyrins. PMID:2290079

  10. Explicit tracking of uncertainty increases the power of quantitative rule-of-thumb reasoning in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Iain G; Rickett, Benjamin C; Jones, Nick S

    2014-12-01

    Back-of-the-envelope or rule-of-thumb calculations involving rough estimates of quantities play a central scientific role in developing intuition about the structure and behavior of physical systems, for example in so-called Fermi problems in the physical sciences. Such calculations can be used to powerfully and quantitatively reason about biological systems, particularly at the interface between physics and biology. However, substantial uncertainties are often associated with values in cell biology, and performing calculations without taking this uncertainty into account may limit the extent to which results can be interpreted for a given problem. We present a means to facilitate such calculations where uncertainties are explicitly tracked through the line of reasoning, and introduce a probabilistic calculator called CALADIS, a free web tool, designed to perform this tracking. This approach allows users to perform more statistically robust calculations in cell biology despite having uncertain values, and to identify which quantities need to be measured more precisely to make confident statements, facilitating efficient experimental design. We illustrate the use of our tool for tracking uncertainty in several example biological calculations, showing that the results yield powerful and interpretable statistics on the quantities of interest. We also demonstrate that the outcomes of calculations may differ from point estimates when uncertainty is accurately tracked. An integral link between CALADIS and the BioNumbers repository of biological quantities further facilitates the straightforward location, selection, and use of a wealth of experimental data in cell biological calculations. PMID:25468340

  11. Explicit Tracking of Uncertainty Increases the Power of Quantitative Rule-of-Thumb Reasoning in Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Iain G.; Rickett, Benjamin C.; Jones, Nick S.

    2014-01-01

    Back-of-the-envelope or rule-of-thumb calculations involving rough estimates of quantities play a central scientific role in developing intuition about the structure and behavior of physical systems, for example in so-called Fermi problems in the physical sciences. Such calculations can be used to powerfully and quantitatively reason about biological systems, particularly at the interface between physics and biology. However, substantial uncertainties are often associated with values in cell biology, and performing calculations without taking this uncertainty into account may limit the extent to which results can be interpreted for a given problem. We present a means to facilitate such calculations where uncertainties are explicitly tracked through the line of reasoning, and introduce a probabilistic calculator called CALADIS, a free web tool, designed to perform this tracking. This approach allows users to perform more statistically robust calculations in cell biology despite having uncertain values, and to identify which quantities need to be measured more precisely to make confident statements, facilitating efficient experimental design. We illustrate the use of our tool for tracking uncertainty in several example biological calculations, showing that the results yield powerful and interpretable statistics on the quantities of interest. We also demonstrate that the outcomes of calculations may differ from point estimates when uncertainty is accurately tracked. An integral link between CALADIS and the BioNumbers repository of biological quantities further facilitates the straightforward location, selection, and use of a wealth of experimental data in cell biological calculations. PMID:25468340

  12. Explicit Tracking of Uncertainty Increases the Power of Quantitative Rule-of-Thumb Reasoning in Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Iain G.; Rickett, Benjamin C.; Jones, Nick S.

    2014-12-01

    "Back-of-the-envelope" or "rule-of-thumb" calculations involving rough estimates of quantities play a central scientific role in developing intuition about the structure and behaviour of physical systems, for example in so-called `Fermi problems' in the physical sciences. Such calculations can be used to powerfully and quantitatively reason about biological systems, particularly at the interface between physics and biology. However, substantial uncertainties are often associated with values in cell biology, and performing calculations without taking this uncertainty into account may limit the extent to which results can be interpreted for a given problem. We present a means to facilitate such calculations where uncertainties are explicitly tracked through the line of reasoning, and introduce a `probabilistic calculator' called Caladis, a web tool freely available at www.caladis.org, designed to perform this tracking. This approach allows users to perform more statistically robust calculations in cell biology despite having uncertain values, and to identify which quantities need to be measured more precisely in order to make confident statements, facilitating efficient experimental design. We illustrate the use of our tool for tracking uncertainty in several example biological calculations, showing that the results yield powerful and interpretable statistics on the quantities of interest. We also demonstrate that the outcomes of calculations may differ from point estimates when uncertainty is accurately tracked. An integral link between Caladis and the Bionumbers repository of biological quantities further facilitates the straightforward location, selection, and use of a wealth of experimental data in cell biological calculations.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrina, Yevgeniya; Isaksson, Hanna; Sinisaari, Miikka; Rieppo, Lassi; Brama, Pieter A.; van Weeren, René; Helminen, Heikki J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2010-11-01

    The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation.

  14. Accurate determination of reference materials and natural isolates by means of quantitative (1)h NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frank, Oliver; Kreissl, Johanna Karoline; Daschner, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-03-26

    A fast and precise proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) method for the quantitative determination of low molecular weight target molecules in reference materials and natural isolates has been validated using ERETIC 2 (Electronic REference To access In vivo Concentrations) based on the PULCON (PULse length based CONcentration determination) methodology and compared to the gravimetric results. Using an Avance III NMR spectrometer (400 MHz) equipped with a broad band observe (BBO) probe, the qHNMR method was validated by determining its linearity, range, precision, and accuracy as well as robustness and limit of quantitation. The linearity of the method was assessed by measuring samples of l-tyrosine, caffeine, or benzoic acid in a concentration range between 0.3 and 16.5 mmol/L (r(2) ? 0.99), whereas the interday and intraday precisions were found to be ?2%. The recovery of a range of reference compounds was ?98.5%, thus demonstrating the qHNMR method as a precise tool for the rapid quantitation (~15 min) of food-related target compounds in reference materials and natural isolates such as nucleotides, polyphenols, or cyclic peptides. PMID:24559241

  15. Quantitative redox biology: an approach to understand the role of reactive species in defining the cellular redox environment.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Garry R; Wagner, Brett A; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2013-11-01

    Systems biology is now recognized as a needed approach to understand the dynamics of inter- and intra-cellular processes. Redox processes are at the foundation of nearly all aspects of biology. Free radicals, related oxidants, and antioxidants are central to the basic functioning of cells and tissues. They set the cellular redox environment and, therefore, are the key to regulation of biochemical pathways and networks, thereby influencing organism health. To understand how short-lived, quasi-stable species, such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, connect to the metabolome, proteome, lipidome, and genome we need absolute quantitative information on all redox active compounds as well as thermodynamic and kinetic information on their reactions, i.e., knowledge of the complete redoxome. Central to the state of the redoxome are the interactive details of the superoxide/peroxide formation and removal systems. Quantitative information is essential to establish the dynamic mathematical models needed to reveal the temporal evolution of biochemical pathways and networks. This new field of Quantitative Redox Biology will allow researchers to identify new targets for intervention to advance our efforts to achieve optimal human health. PMID:22161621

  16. Distribution of Hydroxyl Groups in Kukersite Shale Oil: Quantitative Determination Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baird, Zachariah Steven; Oja, Vahur; Järvik, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the use of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to quantitatively measure the hydroxyl concentrations among narrow boiling shale oil cuts. Shale oil samples were from an industrial solid heat carrier retort. Reference values were measured by titration and were used to create a partial least squares regression model from FT-IR data. The model had a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.44 wt% OH. This method was then used to study the distribution of hydroxyl groups among more than 100 shale oil cuts, which showed that hydroxyl content increased with the average boiling point of the cut up to about 350 °C and then leveled off and decreased. PMID:25811170

  17. Quantitative analysis of bayberry juice acidity based on visible and near-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Yongni; He Yong; Mao Jingyuan

    2007-09-01

    Visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been investigated for its ability to nondestructively detect acidity in bayberry juice. What we believe to be a new, better mathematic model is put forward, which we have named principal component analysis-stepwise regression analysis-backpropagation neural network (PCA-SRA-BPNN), to build a correlation between the spectral reflectivity data and the acidity of bayberry juice. In this model, the optimum network parameters,such as the number of input nodes, hidden nodes, learning rate, and momentum, are chosen by the value of root-mean-square (rms) error. The results show that its prediction statistical parameters are correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9451 and root-mean-square error of prediction(RMSEP) of 0.1168. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression is also established to compare with this model. Before doing this, the influences of various spectral pretreatments (standard normal variate, multiplicative scatter correction, S. Golay first derivative, and wavelet package transform) are compared. The PLS approach with wavelet package transform preprocessing spectra is found to provide the best results, and its prediction statistical parameters are correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9061 and RMSEP of 0.1564. Hence, these two models are both desirable to analyze the data from Vis/NIR spectroscopy and to solve the problem of the acidity prediction of bayberry juice. This supplies basal research to ultimately realize the online measurements of the juice's internal quality through this Vis/NIR spectroscopy technique.

  18. Absolute Quantitation of Bacterial Biofilm Adhesion and Viscoelasticity by Microbead Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Peter C.Y.; Dutcher, John R.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the most prevalent mode of bacterial growth in nature. Adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play important roles at different stages of biofilm development. Following irreversible attachment of bacterial cells onto a surface, a biofilm can grow in which its matrix viscoelasticity helps to maintain structural integrity, determine stress resistance, and control ease of dispersion. In this study, a novel application of force spectroscopy was developed to characterize the surface adhesion and viscoelasticity of bacterial cells in biofilms. By performing microbead force spectroscopy with a closed-loop atomic force microscope, we accurately quantified these properties over a defined contact area. Using the model gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we observed that the adhesive and viscoelastic properties of an isogenic lipopolysaccharide mutant wapR biofilm were significantly different from those measured for the wild-type strain PAO1 biofilm. Moreover, biofilm maturation in either strain also led to prominent changes in adhesion and viscoelasticity. To minimize variability in force measurements resulting from experimental parameter changes, we developed standardized conditions for microbead force spectroscopy to enable meaningful comparison of data obtained in different experiments. Force plots measured under standard conditions showed that the adhesive pressures of PAO1 and wapR early biofilms were 34 ± 15 Pa and 332 ± 47 Pa, respectively, whereas those of PAO1 and wapR mature biofilms were 19 ± 7 Pa and 80 ± 22 Pa, respectively. Fitting of creep data to a Voigt Standard Linear Solid viscoelasticity model revealed that the instantaneous and delayed elastic moduli in P. aeruginosa were drastically reduced by lipopolysaccharide deficiency and biofilm maturation, whereas viscosity was decreased only for biofilm maturation. In conclusion, we have introduced a direct biophysical method for simultaneously quantifying adhesion and viscoelasticity in bacterial biofilms under native conditions. This method could prove valuable for elucidating the contribution of genetic backgrounds, growth conditions, and environmental stresses to microbial community physiology. PMID:19348775

  19. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section and length is developed for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Control of Carbonated Cola Beverages Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D2O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as “fingerprints” and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  1. Qualitative and quantitative study of polymorphic forms in drug formulations by near infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Martin E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.; Sawatzki, Juergen

    2003-12-01

    Near infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of polymorphic forms in a number of commercial drug products containing the polymorphic drug compounds sorbitol, mannitol, famotidine, acemetacin, carbamazepine, meprobamate and phenylbutazone. The crystal forms present in the drug products were identified based on the position, intensity and shape of characteristic bands. Quantitative analysis of a mixture of two crystal forms of mannitol in a drug product was carried out using a partial least-squares method. In drug products containing meprobamate, sorbitol, and carbamazepine, the thermodynamically stable form was found exclusively, whereas metastable polymorphs were found in solid dosage forms of acemetacin, phenylbutazone, famotidine and mannitol. A mixture of two polymorphic forms of mannitol in Lipobay tablets was determined to consist of 30.8±3.8% of the metastable modification I. The simple sample preparation, the occurrence of sharp bands in the spectra as well as the high reproducibility and accuracy qualifies FT-Raman spectroscopy for the identification and quantification of crystal forms in drug products. The method is perfectly suited to meet the regulatory requirements of monitoring crystal forms during processing and storage and often succeeds in detecting the present crystal form in drug products even when the used excipients are not known.

  2. Quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Erxleben, Andrea; Ryder, Alan G; McArdle, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    The simultaneous quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs (forms I, III and V) in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is reported. To reduce the effect of systematic variations, four different data pre-processing methods; multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variate (SNV), first and second derivatives, were applied and their performance was evaluated using their prediction errors. It was possible to derive a reliable calibration model for the three polymorphic forms, in powder ternary mixtures, using a partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with SNV pre-processing, which predicted the concentration of polymorphs I, III and V. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for ATR-IR spectra were 5.0%, 5.1% and 4.5% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively, while NIR spectra had a RMSEP of 2.0%, 2.9%, and 2.8% and Raman spectra had a RMSEP of 3.5%, 4.1%, and 3.6% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively. NIR spectroscopy exhibits the smallest analytical error, higher accuracy and robustness. When these advantages are combined with the greater convenience of NIR's "in glass bottle" sampling method both ATR-IR and Raman methods appear less attractive. PMID:20605386

  3. A Comparison of Multivariate and Pre-Processing Methods for Quantitative Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Geologic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Bell, J. F., III; Humphries, S. D.; Wiens, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument selected for the Curiosity rover is capable of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).[1] We used a remote LIBS instrument similar to ChemCam to analyze 197 geologic slab samples and 32 pressed-powder geostandards. The slab samples are well-characterized and have been used to validate the calibration of previous instruments on Mars missions, including CRISM [2], OMEGA [3], the MER Pancam [4], Mini-TES [5], and Moessbauer [6] instruments and the Phoenix SSI [7]. The resulting dataset was used to compare multivariate methods for quantitative LIBS and to determine the effect of grain size on calculations. Three multivariate methods - partial least squares (PLS), multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks (MLP ANNs) and cascade correlation (CC) ANNs - were used to generate models and extract the quantitative composition of unknown samples. PLS can be used to predict one element (PLS1) or multiple elements (PLS2) at a time, as can the neural network methods. Although MLP and CC ANNs were successful in some cases, PLS generally produced the most accurate and precise results.

  4. Quantitative analysis of D-(+)-glucose in fruit juices using diffusion ordered-1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruge; Komura, Fusae; Nonaka, Airi; Kato, Takeshi; Fukumashi, Junji; Matsui, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    This study works on D-(+)-glucose quantitative analysis using diffusion ordered-quantitative (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-qNMR), by which an analyte could be distinguished from interferences based upon a characteristic diffusion coefficient (D) in gradient magnetic fields. The D value of D-(+)-glucose in deuterium oxide at 30°C was 5.6 × 10(-10) m(2)/s at a field gradient pulse of between 5.0 × 10(-2) and 3.0 × 10(-1) T/m, distinguished from fructose, sucrose and starch. Good linearity (r(2) = 0.9998) was obtained between D-(+)-glucose (0.5-20.0 g/L) and the ratio of the resonance area of ?-C1 proton (5.21 ppm) in D-(+)-glucose to that of the ?-C1 proton (5.25 ppm) in D-glucuronic acid (50.0 g/L) as an internal standard. The DOSY-qNMR method was successfully applied to quantify D-(+)-glucose in orange juice (18.3 ± 1.0 g/L), apple juice (26.3 ± 0.4 g/L) and grape juice (45.6 ± 0.6 g/L); the values agreed well with a conventional F-kit glucose method. PMID:24614734

  5. Partial Least Squares and Neural Networks for Quantitative Calibration of Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBs) of Geologic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Morris, Richard V.; Clegg, S. M.; Humphries, S. D.; Wiens, R. C.; Bell, J. F., III; Mertzman, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument [1] on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover will be used to obtain the chemical composition of surface targets within 7 m of the rover using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). ChemCam analyzes atomic emission spectra (240-800 nm) from a plasma created by a pulsed Nd:KGW 1067 nm laser. The LIBS spectra can be used in a semiquantitative way to rapidly classify targets (e.g., basalt, andesite, carbonate, sulfate, etc.) and in a quantitative way to estimate their major and minor element chemical compositions. Quantitative chemical analysis from LIBS spectra is complicated by a number of factors, including chemical matrix effects [2]. Recent work has shown promising results using multivariate techniques such as partial least squares (PLS) regression and artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict elemental abundances in samples [e.g. 2-6]. To develop, refine, and evaluate analysis schemes for LIBS spectra of geologic materials, we collected spectra of a diverse set of well-characterized natural geologic samples and are comparing the predictive abilities of PLS, cascade correlation ANN (CC-ANN) and multilayer perceptron ANN (MLP-ANN) analysis procedures.

  6. Quantitative analysis of carbonaceous aerosols using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: A study on mass loading induced plasma matrix effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Dibyendu; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2008-01-01

    We present results indicating mass loading induced plasma matrix effects on the application of quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for estimation of carbon contents in aerosols. An in-house flow-controlled powder-dispersion system generated carbonaceous aerosols with varying bi-modal particle size distributions ({approx} 1 {micro}m and 10 {micro}m median diameters), thereby resulting in a wide mass loading range. For ease of chemical handling and to eliminate toxic effects, common talcum powder was used as our standard aerosol. Normalized atomic species concentrations of C, i.e., (C)/(Si) ratios, were calculated from atomic emission lines of C I (248 nm), Si I (252 nm), and plasma temperatures estimated from a series of Mg I lines. The results show a decrease in (C)/(Si) ratio to about 65% of the initial value as relative mass loadings increased (5.5-100%) due to the increase in number concentrations of larger sized particles ({approx}10 {micro}m median diameter). As a comparison, normalized ratio of (Mg)/(Si) did not exhibit any marked change with increased mass loading. The normalized total absorption of photon flux across the C I (248 nm) spectral line indicated a strong correlation to the percentage decrease in (C)/(Si) ratio. We used an impactor with a cut-off size of around 10 {micro}m diameter to generate mono-modal aerosolized powders ({approx}1 {micro}m median diameter) that had lower relative mass loadings (0.32-0.16%). Similar LIBS analysis on these did not indicate any of the matrix effects. We conclude that for aerosol systems with widely varying mass loadings, quantitative LIBS analysis can be significantly affected by plasma matrix effects, specifically for the C I (248 nm) emission line as noticed in this study. This bears significance for the application of quantitative LIBS in the chemical characterization of all forms of carbonaceous aerosols.

  7. Quantitative analysis of mebendazole polymorphs in pharmaceutical raw materials using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Vitor H; Gonçalves, Jacqueline L; Vasconcelos, Fernanda V C; Pimentel, M Fernanda; Pereira, Claudete F

    2015-11-10

    This work evaluates the feasibility of using NIR spectroscopy for quantification of three polymorphs of mebendazole (MBZ) in pharmaceutical raw materials. Thirty ternary mixtures of polymorphic forms of MBZ were prepared, varying the content of forms A and C from 0 to 100% (w/w), and for form B from 0 to 30% (w/w). Reflectance NIR spectra were used to develop partial least square (PLS) regression models using all spectral variables and the variables with significant regression coefficients selected by the Jack-Knife algorithm (PLS/JK). MBZ polymorphs were quantified with RMSEP values of 2.37% w/w, 1.23% w/w and 1.48% w/w for polymorphs A, B and C, respectively. This is an easy, fast and feasible method for monitoring the quality of raw pharmaceutical materials of MBZ according to polymorph purity. PMID:26320077

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Microbicide Concentrations in Fluids, Gels and Tissues Using Confocal Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chuchuen, Oranat; Henderson, Marcus H.; Sykes, Craig; Kim, Min Sung; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Katz, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Topical vaginal anti-HIV microbicides are an important focus in female-based strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Understanding microbicide pharmacokinetics is essential to development, characterization and implementation of efficacious microbicide drug delivery formulations. Current methods to measure drug concentrations in tissue (e.g., LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) are highly sensitive, but destructive and complex. This project explored the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy to detect microbicide drugs and to measure their local concentrations in fluids, drug delivery gels, and tissues. We evaluated three candidate microbicide drugs: tenofovir, Dapivirine and IQP-0528. Measurements were performed in freshly excised porcine buccal tissue specimens, gel vehicles and fluids using two Horiba Raman microscopes, one of which is confocal. Characteristic spectral peak calibrations for each drug were obtained using serial dilutions in the three matrices. These specific Raman bands demonstrated strong linear concentration dependences in the matrices and were characterized with respect to their unique vibrational signatures. At least one specific Raman feature was identified for each drug as a marker band for detection in tissue. Sensitivity of detection was evaluated in the three matrices. A specific peak was also identified for tenofovir diphosphate, the anti-HIV bioactive product of tenofovir after phosphorylation in host cells. Z-scans of drug concentrations vs. depth in excised tissue specimens, incubated under layers of tenofovir solution in a Transwell assay, showed decreasing concentration with depth from the surface into the tissue. Time-dependent concentration profiles were obtained from tissue samples incubated in the Transwell assay, for times ranging 30 minutes - 6 hours. Calibrations and measurements from tissue permeation studies for tenofovir showed good correlation with gold standard LC-MS/MS data. These results demonstrate that confocal Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a tool for practical, minimally invasive, label-free measurement of microbicide drug concentrations in fluids, gels and tissues. PMID:24386455

  9. Detection and quantitative determination of diethylene glycol in ethyl alcohol using gamma- ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Udagani, Chikkappa; Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the toxic diethylene glycol contamination in ethyl alcohol demands a rapid, accurate and reliable method. Diethylene glycol (DEG) ingestion, accidental or intentional, can lead to death. Clinical and analytical methods used to detect diethylene glycol in alcohol require several hours to days due to tedious instrument handling and measurements. Enzymatic assays face difficulty due to analytic problems. As an alternative method of data analysis, we have used ?-ray spectroscopic method to estimate the diethylene glycol contamination in alcohol by monitoring the variation in the linear and mass attenuation coefficients. This method is simple, robust, portable and can provide reliable and quantitative information about the ethyl alcohol adulterated with diethylene glycol which is of broader interest to society. PMID:26243958

  10. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G.

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  11. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (?=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (?=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process. PMID:25974673

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolic Mixtures by 2D 13C-Constant-Time TOCSY NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of organisms can be fully 13C-labeled, which has the advantage that their metabolomes can be studied by high-resolution 2D NMR 13C–13C constant-time (CT) TOCSY experiments. Individual metabolites can be identified via database searching or, in the case of novel compounds, through the reconstruction of their backbone-carbon topology. Determination of quantitative metabolite concentrations is another key task. Because significant peak overlaps in 1D NMR spectra prevents straightforward quantification through 1D peak integrals, we demonstrate here the direct use of 13C–13C CT-TOCSY spectra for metabolite quantification. This is accomplished through the quantum-mechanical treatment of the TOCSY magnetization transfer at short and long mixing times or by the use of analytical approximations, which are solely based on the knowledge of the carbon-backbone topologies. The methods are demonstrated for carbohydrate and amino-acid mixtures. PMID:23773204

  13. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy for quantitative biological studies

    E-print Network

    Joo, Chulmin, 1976-

    2008-01-01

    Conventional phase-contrast and differential interference contrast microscopy produce high contrast images of transparent specimens such as cells. However, they do not provide quantitative information or do not have enough ...

  14. The Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Cohorts' Early Enrollment in Physics: concurrent with enrollment in mathematics, biology and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Robert Bruce Rodes

    Cohorts of 48 entering biological science majors was recruited in the fall of 2007 and again in 2008 and 2009 for the Interdisciplinary Science Experience (ISE). These ISE students enrolled in their own sections of standard courses of physics, chemistry, and biology. In these courses average ISE student out-performed their non-cohort peers by up to a full letter grade. A qualitative analysis of ISE student interviews illuminates the student experience and shows how the ISE students perceived themselves to be different than their non-cohort peers. Quantitative modeling of student performance shows that higher grades are correlated with multiple factors. These factors includes admissions characteristics such as high school GPA, and SAT scores, as well as demographic information. These trends support and elaborate on the selection narratives told by participants. Additionally the quantitative model found that higher student performance is predicted by structural aspects of the ISE program, specifically the timing of course, enrolling as a freshmen in many of their courses, and the sequencing of physics and chemistry courses. There is a statistically significant benefit to student performance in general and organic chemistry courses associated with completing the first quarter of the Physics for Bio-Science majors prior to enrollment. Further the combination of quantitative and qualitative data suggest that there is a epistemological transfer of problem solving skills and outlook from the physics to the chemistry courses.

  15. Quantitative H and K band spectroscopy of Galactic OB-stars at medium resolution

    E-print Network

    T. Repolust; J. Puls; M. M. Hanson; R. -P. Kudritzki; M. R. Mokiem

    2005-06-07

    In this paper we have analyzed 25 Galactic O and early B-stars by means of H and K band spectroscopy, with the primary goal to investigate to what extent a lone near-IR spectroscopy is able to recover stellar and wind parameters derived in the optical. Most of the spectra have been taken with SUBARU IRCS, at a resolution of 12,000, and with a very high S/N (200 or better). In order to synthesize the strategic H/He lines, we have used our recent, line-blanketed version of FASTWIND. First we investigated the predicted behaviour of the strategic lines. In contradiction to what one expects from the optical in the O-star regime, almost all photospheric H/HeI/HeII H/K band lines become stronger if the gravity decreases. Concerning H and HeII, this finding is related to the behaviour of Stark broadening as a function of electron density, which in the line cores is different for members of lower (optical) and higher (IR) series. Regarding HeI, the predicted behaviour is due to some subtle NLTE effects resulting in a stronger overpopulation of the lower level when the gravity decreases. For most of our objects, we obtained good fits, except for the line cores of Br_gamma in early O-stars with significant mass-loss, where this discrepancy might be an indirect effect of clumping. After having derived the stellar and wind parameters from the IR, we have compared them to results from previous optical analyses. Overall, the IR results coincide in most cases with the optical ones within the typical errors usually quoted for the corresponding parameters, i.e, an uncertainty in Teff of 5%, in log g of 0.1 dex and in Mdot of 0.2 dex, with lower errors at higher wind densities. Outliers above the 1-sigma level where found in four cases with respect to log g and in two cases for Mdot.

  16. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  17. Quantitative analysis of mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids using Raman spectroscopy with partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gumin; Lee, Kwangchil; Park, Haesung; Lee, Jinho; Jung, Youngjean; Kim, Kyoungsik; Son, Boongho; Park, Hyoungkuk

    2010-06-15

    Mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids are widely used as a good etchant for the pickling process of stainless steels. The cost reduction and the procedure optimization in the manufacturing process can be facilitated by optically detecting the concentration of the mixed acids. In this work, we developed a novel method which allows us to obtain the concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) mixture samples with high accuracy. The experiments were carried out for the mixed acids which consist of the HF (0.5-3wt%) and the HNO(3) (2-12wt%) at room temperature. Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to measure the concentration of the mixed acids HF and HNO(3), because the mixture sample has several strong Raman bands caused by the vibrational mode of each acid in this spectrum. The calibration of spectral data has been performed using the partial least squares regression method which is ideal for local range data treatment. Several figures of merit (FOM) were calculated using the concept of net analyte signal (NAS) to evaluate performance of our methodology. PMID:20441916

  18. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, S.; Pozzi, D.; Candeloro De Sanctis, S.; Digman, M. A.; Gratton, E.; Caracciolo, G.

    2013-03-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP-DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol-DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3?-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ? 0.003 ?m2 s-1). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ? 0.03 ?m2 s-1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes.

  19. Quantitative analysis of WC stars Constraints on neon abundances from ISO/SWS spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Dessart, L; Hillier, D J; Willis, A J; Morris, P W; Van der Hucht, K A; Dessart, Luc; Crowther, Paul A.; Willis, Allan J.; Morris, Patrick W.; Hucht, Karel A. van der

    2000-01-01

    Neon abundances are derived in four Galactic WC stars -- gamma Vel (WR11, WC8+O7.5III), HD156385 (WR90, WC7), HD192103 (WR135, WC8), and WR146 (WC5+O8) - using mid-infrared fine structure lines obtained with ISO/SWS. Stellar parameters for each star are derived using a non-LTE model atmospheric code (Hillier & Miller 1998) together with ultraviolet (IUE), optical (INT, AAT) and infrared (UKIRT, ISO) spectroscopy. In the case of gamma Vel, we adopt results from De Marco et al. (2000), who followed an identical approach. ISO/SWS datasets reveal the [NeIII] 15.5um line in each of our targets, while [NeII] 12.8um, [SIV] 10.5um and [SIII] 18.7um are observed solely in gamma Vel. Using a method updated from Barlow et al. (1988) to account for clumped winds, we derive Ne/He=3-4x10^-3 by number, plus S/He=6x10^-5 for gamma Vel. Neon is highly enriched, such that Ne/S in gamma Vel is eight times higher than cosmic values. However, observed Ne/He ratios are a factor of two times lower than predictions of current ev...

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy and microspectroscopy analyzing qualitatively and quantitatively pharmaceutical hot melt extrudates.

    PubMed

    Netchacovitch, L; Thiry, J; De Bleye, C; Chavez, P-F; Krier, F; Sacré, P-Y; Evrard, B; Hubert, Ph; Ziemons, E

    2015-09-10

    Since the last decade, more and more Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) candidates have poor water solubility inducing low bioavailability. These molecules belong to the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) classes II and IV. Thanks to Hot-Melt Extrusion (HME), it is possible to incorporate these candidates in pharmaceutical solid forms. Indeed, HME increases the solubility and the bioavailability of these drugs by encompassing them in a polymeric carrier and by forming solid dispersions. Moreover, in 2004, the FDA's guidance initiative promoted the usefulness of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tools when developing a manufacturing process. Indeed, the main objective when developing a new pharmaceutical process is the product quality throughout the production chain. The trend is to follow this parameter in real-time in order to react immediately when there is a bias. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, NIR and Raman, are useful to analyze processes in-line. Moreover, off-line Raman microspectroscopy is more and more used when developing new pharmaceutical processes or when analyzing optimized ones by combining the advantages of Raman spectroscopy and imaging. It is an interesting tool for homogeneity and spatial distribution studies. This review treats about spectroscopic techniques analyzing a HME process, as well off-line as in-line, presenting their advantages and their complementarities. PMID:25704954

  1. Combining surface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to study biological interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Wu, Jing; Chen, Zhan

    2014-03-01

    A multimodal system combining surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for surface and interface study was developed. Interfacial molecular structural information can be detected using SFG spectroscopy while interfacial fluorescence signal can be visualized using TIRF microscopy from the same sample. As a proof of concept experiment, SFG spectra of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with different surface coverage were correlated with TIRF signal observed. Results showed that SFG signals from the ordered surfactant methyl groups were detected from the substrate surface, while signals from PS phenyl groups on the beads were not seen. Additionally, a lipid monolayer labeled using lipid-associated dye was deposited on a silica substrate and studied in different environments. The contact with water of this lipid monolayer caused SFG signal to disappear, indicating a possible lipid molecular disorder and the formation of lipid bilayers or liposomes in water. TIRF was able to visualize the presence of lipid molecules on the substrate, showing that the lipids were not removed from the substrate surface by water. The integration of the two surface sensitive techniques can simultaneously visualize interfacial molecular dynamics and characterize interfacial molecular structures in situ, which is important and is expected to find extensive applications in biological interface related research.

  2. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ˜1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ˜400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns.

  3. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers

    PubMed Central

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid, quantitative analysis of bitter acids in hops (Humulus lupulus).

    PubMed

    Killeen, Daniel P; Andersen, David H; Beatson, Ron A; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2014-12-31

    Hops, Humulus lupulus, are grown worldwide for use in the brewing industry to impart characteristic flavor and aroma to finished beer. Breeders produce many varietal crosses with the aim of improving and diversifying commercial hops varieties. The large number of crosses critical to a successful breeding program imposes high demands on the supporting chemical analytical laboratories. With the aim of reducing the analysis time associated with hops breeding, quantitative partial least-squares regression (PLS-R) models have been produced, relating reference data acquired by the industrial standard HPLC and UV methods, to vibrational spectra of the same, chemically diverse hops sample set. These models, produced from rapidly acquired infrared (IR), near-infrared (NIR), and Raman spectra, were appraised using standard statistical metrics. Results demonstrated that all three spectroscopic methods could be used for screening hops for ?-acid, total bitter acids, and cohumulone concentrations in powdered hops. Models generated from Raman and IR spectra also showed potential for use in screening hops varieties for xanthohumol concentrations. NIR analysis was performed using both a standard benchtop spectrometer and a portable NIR spectrometer, with comparable results obtained by both instruments. Finally, some important vibrational features of cohumulone, colupulone, and xanthohumol were assigned using DFT calculations, which allow more insightful interpretation of PLS-R latent variable plots. PMID:25485767

  5. Fiber optic based multiparametric spectroscopy in vivo: Toward a new quantitative tissue vitality index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutai-Asis, Hofit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Deutsch, Assaf; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2006-02-01

    In our previous publication (Mayevsky et al SPIE 5326: 98-105, 2004) we described a multiparametric fiber optic system enabling the evaluation of 4 physiological parameters as indicators of tissue vitality. Since the correlation between the various parameters may differ in various pathophysiological conditions there is a need for an objective quantitative index that will integrate the relative changes measured in real time by the multiparametric monitoring system into a single number-vitality index. Such an approach to calculate tissue vitality index is critical for the possibility to use such an instrument in clinical environments. In the current presentation we are reporting our preliminary results indicating that calculation of an objective tissue vitality index is feasible. We used an intuitive empirical approach based on the comparison between the calculated index by the computer and the subjective evaluation made by an expert in the field of physiological monitoring. We used the in vivo brain of rats as an animal model in our current studies. The rats were exposed to anoxia, ischemia and cortical spreading depression and the responses were recorded in real time. At the end of the monitoring session the results were analyzed and the tissue vitality index was calculated offline. Mitochondrial NADH, tissue blood flow and oxy-hemoglobin were used to calculate the vitality index of the brain in vivo, where each parameter received a different weight, in each experiment type based on their significance. It was found that the mitochondrial NADH response was the main factor affected the calculated vitality index.

  6. Use of 5-(4-dimethylaminobenzylidene)rhodanine in quantitating silver grains eluted from autoradiograms of biological material

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.W.; Guikema, J.A.; Consigli, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    5-(4-Dimethylaminobenzylidene)rhodanine, a silver-specific dye, was used in a colorimetric assay to quantitate the autoradiographic deposition of silver onto X-ray film after exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of radiolabeled biological material. Silver grains were eluted from autoradiograms with 5 N potassium hydroxide, dissolved in nitric acid, and neutralized with 1 M Trizma Base. The concentration of silver was measured spectrophotometrically owing to the chelation properties of the dye. After corrections for background exposure were made, the silver contents of excised bands were then determined by comparison to a standard curve generated with silver nitrate. We have used this silver assay to quantitate the relative amount of each polypeptide band comprising the polyomavirus structural protein VP2 doublet. The method reported here has proven useful when densitometry is inconvenient (i.e., short distance between bands, irregular shape of bands, very faint bands) in addition to being inexpensive and simple to perform.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative determination of human biomarkers by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Matei, C.; Cernat, R.; Popescu, A.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-07-01

    The hypothesis that blood, urine and other body fluids and tissues can be sampled and analyzed to produce clinical information for disease diagnosis or therapy monitoring is the basis of modern clinical diagnosis and medical practice. The analysis of breath air has major advantages because it is a non-invasive method, represents minimal risk to personnel collecting the samples and can be often sampled. Breath air samples from the human subjects were collected using aluminized bags from QuinTron and analyzed using the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) technique. LPAS is used to detect traces of ethylene in breath air resulting from lipid peroxidation in lung epithelium following the radiotherapy and also traces of ammonia from patients subjected to hemodialysis for treatment of renal failure. In the case of patients affected by cancer and treated by external radiotherapy, all measurements were done at 10P(14) CO2 laser line, where the ethylene absorption coefficient has the largest value (30.4 cm-1 atm-1), whereas for patients affected by renal failure and treated by standard dialysis, all measurements were performed at 9R(30) CO2 laser line, where the ammonia absorption coefficient has the maximum value of 57 cm-1 atm-1. The levels of ethylene and ammonia in exhaled air, from patients with cancer and renal failure, respectively, were measured and compared with breath air contents from healthy humans. Human gas biomarkers were measured at sub-ppb (parts per billion) concentration sensitivities. It has been demonstrated that LPAS technique will play an important role in the future of exhaled breath air analysis. The key attributes of this technique are sensitivity, selectivity, fast and real time response, as well as its simplicity.

  8. Measurement issues associated with quantitative molecular biology analysis of complex food matrices for the detection of food fraud.

    PubMed

    Burns, Malcolm; Wiseman, Gordon; Knight, Angus; Bramley, Peter; Foster, Lucy; Rollinson, Sophie; Damant, Andrew; Primrose, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Following a report on a significant amount of horse DNA being detected in a beef burger product on sale to the public at a UK supermarket in early 2013, the Elliott report was published in 2014 and contained a list of recommendations for helping ensure food integrity. One of the recommendations included improving laboratory testing capacity and capability to ensure a harmonised approach for testing for food authenticity. Molecular biologists have developed exquisitely sensitive methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or mass spectrometry for detecting the presence of particular nucleic acid or peptide/protein sequences. These methods have been shown to be specific and sensitive in terms of lower limits of applicability, but they are largely qualitative in nature. Historically, the conversion of these qualitative techniques into reliable quantitative methods has been beset with problems even when used on relatively simple sample matrices. When the methods are applied to complex sample matrices, as found in many foods, the problems are magnified resulting in a high measurement uncertainty associated with the result which may mean that the assay is not fit for purpose. However, recent advances in the technology and the understanding of molecular biology approaches have further given rise to the re-assessment of these methods for their quantitative potential. This review focuses on important issues for consideration when validating a molecular biology assay and the various factors that can impact on the measurement uncertainty of a result associated with molecular biology approaches used in detection of food fraud, with a particular focus on quantitative PCR-based and proteomics assays. PMID:26631264

  9. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    SciTech Connect

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert; Evans, Christopher J.; Pietrzy?ski, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Carraro, Giovanni E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at E-mail: chris.evans@stfc.ac.uk E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl

    2014-04-20

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (?4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T {sub eff} indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low ?/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  10. [Research on the Quantitative Analysis for In-Situ Detection of Acid Radical Ions Using Laser Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Ying; Du, Zeng-feng; Gu, Yan-hong; Guo, Jin-jia

    2015-09-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy as an in situ analytical technology can enable detailed investigation of the ocean environment. It is necessary to set up a quantitative analysis method based on laser Raman spectroscopy to understand the marine status in situ. In the laboratory investigations, varied concentration of HCO3(-), SO4(2-) and coastal waters of Qingdao are taken as the samples, operating 532 nm of laser, using fiber optic probes to simulate detection mode in situ. Raman spectra are analyzed using the method of internal standard normalization, multiple linear regression (MLR), general Partial Least Squares (PLS) and PLS based on dominant factor respectively in data processing. It was found that correlation coefficients of calibration curves are not high in internal standard normalization method and predicted relative errors on the prepared samples are much high, so internal standard normalization method cannot be effectively used in the quantitative analysis of HCO3(-), SO4(2-) in the water. And with the multiple linear regression, the analysis accuracy was improved effectively. The calibration curve of PLS based on dominant factor showed that the SO4(2-) and HCO3(-) of pre-made solution with correlation coefficient R2 of 0.990 and 0.916 respectively. The 30 mmol · L(-1) of SO4(2-) and 20 mmol · L(-1) of HCO3(-) in two target samples were determined with the relative errors lower than 3.262% and 5.267% respectively. SO4(2-) in the coastal waters as the research object was analyzed by above-mentioned methods, comparing with 28.01 mmol · L(-1) by ion chromatography. It was demonstrated that PLS based on dominant factor method is superior to the rest of the three analysis methods, which can be used in situ calibration, with the mean relative error about 1.128%. All the results show that analysis accuracy would be improved by the PLS based on dominant factor method to predict concentration of acid radical ions. PMID:26669165

  11. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  12. Quantitative analysis of chromium in potatoes by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy coupled with linear multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianbing; Huang, Lin; Yao, Mingyin; Hu, Huiqin; Wang, Caihong; Liu, Muhua

    2015-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) coupled with the linear multivariate regression method was utilized to analyze chromium (Cr) quantitatively in potatoes. The plasma was generated using a Nd:YAG laser, and the spectra were acquired by an Andor spectrometer integrated with an ICCD detector. The models between intensity of LIBS characteristic line(s) and concentration of Cr were constructed to predict quantitatively the content of target. The unary, binary, ternary, and quaternary variables were chosen for verifying the accuracy of linear regression calibration curves. The intensity of characteristic lines Cr (CrI: 425.43, 427.48, 428.97 nm) and Ca (CaI: 422.67, 428.30, 430.25, 430.77, 431.86 nm) were used as input data for the multivariate calculations. According to the results of linear regression, the model of quaternary linear regression was established better in comparing with the other three models. A good agreement was observed between the actual content provided by atomic absorption spectrometry and the predicted value obtained by the quaternary linear regression model. And the relative error was below 5.5% for validation samples S1 and S2. The result showed that the multivariate approach can obtain better predicted accuracy than the univariate ones. The result also suggested that the LIBS technique coupled with the linear multivariate calibration method could be a great tool to predict heavy metals in farm products in a rapid manner even though samples have similar elemental compositions. PMID:26368908

  13. Molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurement of biological molecule by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kei; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    Surface charge distributions on biological molecules in aqueous solutions are essential for the interactions between biomolecules, such as DNA condensation, antibody-antigen interactions, and enzyme reactions. There has been a significant demand for a molecular-scale charge density measurement technique for better understanding such interactions. In this paper, we present the local electric double layer (EDL) force measurements on DNA molecules in aqueous solutions using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a three-dimensional force mapping technique. The EDL forces measured in a 100 mM KCl solution well agreed with the theoretical EDL forces calculated using reasonable parameters, suggesting that FM-AFM can be used for molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurements on biological molecules especially in a highly concentrated electrolyte.

  14. Towards next-generation enzymatic generators of hydrogen peroxide in quantitative redox biology

    E-print Network

    Lim, Joseph Benigno

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) is a natural byproduct of cellular metabolism that has also been implicated in numerous biological processes, including the respiratory burst, proliferation, apoptosis, and cellular signaling. H?O? ...

  15. A quantitative framework For large-scale model estimation and discrimination In systems biology

    E-print Network

    Eydgahi, Hoda

    2013-01-01

    Using models to simulate and analyze biological networks requires principled approaches to parameter estimation and model discrimination. We use Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods to recover the full probability distributions ...

  16. Predicting Skin Permeability from Complex Chemical Mixtures: Dependency of Quantitative Structure Permeation Relationships on Biology of Skin Model Used

    PubMed Central

    Riviere, Jim E.; Brooks, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Dermal absorption of topically applied chemicals usually occurs from complex chemical mixtures; yet, most attempts to quantitate dermal permeability use data collected from single chemical exposure in aqueous solutions. The focus of this research was to develop quantitative structure permeation relationships (QSPR) for predicting chemical absorption from mixtures through skin using two levels of in vitro porcine skin biological systems. A total of 16 diverse chemicals were applied in 384 treatment mixture combinations in flow-through diffusion cells and 20 chemicals in 119 treatment combinations in isolated perfused porcine skin. Penetrating chemical flux into perfusate from diffusion cells was analyzed to estimate a normalized dermal absorptive flux, operationally an apparent permeability coefficient, and total perfusate area under the curve from perfused skin studies. These data were then fit to a modified dermal QSPR model of Abraham and Martin including a sixth term to account for mixture interactions based on physical chemical properties of the mixture components. Goodness of fit was assessed using correlation coefficients (r2), internal and external validation metrics (qLOO2, qL25%2, qEXT2), and applicable chemical domain determinations. The best QSPR equations selected for each experimental biological system had r2 values of 0.69–0.73, improving fits over the base equation without the mixture effects. Different mixture factors were needed for each model system. Significantly, the model of Abraham and Martin could also be reduced to four terms in each system; however, different terms could be deleted for each of the two biological systems. These findings suggest that a QSPR model for estimating percutaneous absorption as a function of chemical mixture composition is possible and that the nature of the QSPR model selected is dependent upon the biological level of the in vitro test system used, both findings having significant implications when dermal absorption data are used for in vivo risk assessments. PMID:20947718

  17. A method for quantitative mapping of thick oil spills using imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; Livo, K. Eric; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd; Lundeen, Sarah; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Pearson, Neil; Sarture, Charles; McCubbin, Ian; Roberts, Dar; Bradley, Eliza; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne; The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Team

    2010-01-01

    In response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a method of near-infrared imaging spectroscopic analysis was developed to map the locations of thick oil floating on water. Specifically, this method can be used to derive, in each image pixel, the oil-to-water ratio in oil emulsions, the sub-pixel areal fraction, and its thicknesses and volume within the limits of light penetration into the oil (up to a few millimeters). The method uses the shape of near-infrared (NIR) absorption features and the variations in the spectral continuum due to organic compounds found in oil to identify different oil chemistries, including its weathering state and thickness. The method is insensitive to complicating conditions such as moderate aerosol scattering and reflectance level changes from other conditions, including moderate sun glint. Data for this analysis were collected by the NASA Airborne Visual Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument, which was flown over the oil spill on May 17, 2010. Because of the large extent of the spill, AVIRIS flight lines could cover only a portion of the spill on this relatively calm, nearly cloud-free day. Derived lower limits for oil volumes within the top few millimeters of the ocean surface directly probed with the near-infrared light detected in the AVIRIS scenes were 19,000 (conservative assumptions) to 34,000 (aggressive assumptions) barrels of oil. AVIRIS covered about 30 percent of the core spill area, which consisted of emulsion plumes and oil sheens. Areas of oil sheen but lacking oil emulsion plumes outside of the core spill were not evaluated for oil volume in this study. If the core spill areas not covered by flight lines contained similar amounts of oil and oil-water emulsions, then extrapolation to the entire core spill area defined by a MODIS (Terra) image collected on the same day indicates a minimum of 66,000 to 120,000 barrels of oil was floating on the surface. These estimates are preliminary and subject to revision pending further analysis. Based on laboratory measurements, near-infrared (NIR) photons penetrate only a few millimeters into oil-water emulsions. As such, the oil volumes derived with this method are lower limits. Further, the detection is only of thick surface oil and does not include sheens, underwater oil, or oil that had already washed onto beaches and wetlands, oil that had been burned or evaporated as of May 17. Because NIR light penetration within emulsions is limited, and having made field observations that oil emulsions sometimes exceeded 20 millimeters in thickness, we estimate that the volume of oil, including oil thicker than can be probed in the AVIRIS imagery, is possibly as high as 150,000 barrels in the AVIRIS scenes. When this value is projected to the entire spill, it gives a volume of about 500,000 barrels for thick oil remaining on the sea surface as of May 17. AVIRIS data cannot be used to confirm this higher volume, and additional field work including more in-situ measurements of oil thickness would be required to confirm this higher oil volume. Both the directly detected minimum range of oil volume, and the higher possible volume projection for oil thicker than can be probed with NIR spectroscopy imply a significantly higher total volume of oil relative to that implied by the early NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) estimate of 5,000 barrels per day reported on their Web site.

  18. Stand-off Raman spectroscopy: a powerful technique for qualitative and quantitative analysis of inorganic and organic compounds including explosives.

    PubMed

    Zachhuber, Bernhard; Ramer, Georg; Hobro, Alison; Chrysostom, Engelene T H; Lendl, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    A pulsed stand-off Raman system has been built and optimised for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of inorganic and organic samples including explosives. The system consists of a frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 Hz, 4.4 ns pulse length), aligned coaxially with a 6? Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope for the collection of Raman scattered light. The telescope was coupled via a fibre optic bundle to an Acton standard series SP-2750 spectrograph with a PI-MAX 1024RB intensified CCD camera equipped with a 500-ps gating option for detection. Gating proved to be essential for achieving high signal-to-noise ratios in the recorded stand-off Raman spectra. In some cases, gating also allowed suppression of disturbing fluorescence signals. For the first time, quantitative analysis of stand-off Raman spectra was performed using both univariate and multivariate methods of data analysis. To correct for possible variation in instrumental parameters, the nitrogen band of ambient air was used as an internal standard. For the univariate method, stand-off Raman spectra obtained at a distance of 9 m on sodium chloride pellets containing varying amounts of ammonium nitrate (0-100%) were used. For the multivariate quantification of ternary xylene mixtures (0-100%), stand-off spectra at a distance of 5 m were used. The univariate calibration of ammonium nitrate yielded R (2) values of 0.992, and the multivariate quantitative analysis yielded root mean square errors of prediction of 2.26%, 1.97% and 1.07% for o-, m- and p-xylene, respectively. Stand-off Raman spectra obtained at a distance of 10 m yielded a detection limit of 174 ?g for NaClO(3). Furthermore, to assess the applicability of stand-off Raman spectroscopy for explosives detection in "real-world" scenarios, their detection on different background materials (nylon, polyethylene and part of a car body) and in the presence of interferents (motor oil, fuel oil and soap) at a distance of 20 m was also investigated. PMID:21336938

  19. Quantitation of Bacillus clausii in biological samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Mario; Mancini, Nicasio; Cavallero, Annalisa; Carletti, Silvia; Canducci, Filippo; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    A real-time PCR assay targeting the highly specific erm34 sequence of Bacillus clausii DNA was developed and optimized. The quantitative assay showed a sensitivity level of 10(2) CFU/microl of sample. The method may represent a useful tool for monitoring the role of B. clausii as probiotic in vivo. PMID:16318892

  20. [Application of interval selection methods in quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Li, Zhi; Mo, Wei; Hu, Fang-rong

    2014-12-01

    Interval selection methods combined with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) technique were used to perform quantitative analysis of component concentrations in multicomponent mixtures. The THz spectra of 100 quaternary pharmaceutical mixtures composed of lactose monohydrate, acetaminophen, microcrystalline cellulose and soluble starch were measured using THz-TDS system. Four spectral interval selection methods, including iPLS, mwPLS, siPLS and biPLS, were employed to select spectral intervals of THz absorbance spectra of multicomponent mixtures and correlate THz absorbance spectra with the concentrations of lactose monohydrate. The mwPLS method yielded the most accurate result as compared with the other three interval selection methods and full-spectrum PLS. The optimal mwPLS model was obtained with lower root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 0.9803, lower root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.1141, higher correlation coefficient for calibration (Rc) of 0.9960, and higher correlation coefficient for prediction (Rp) of 0.9951. Experimental results demonstrate that spectral interval selection combined with THz-TDS could be successfully applied as an accurate and rapid method to determine component concentrations in multicomponent mixtures. PMID:25881416

  1. Optical micro-spectroscopy of single metallic nanoparticles: quantitative extinction and transient resonant four-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Masia, Francesco; Arkill, Kenton P; Verkade, Paul; Rowles, Darren; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2015-12-12

    We report a wide-field imaging method to rapidly and quantitatively measure the optical extinction cross-section ?ext (also polarisation resolved) of a large number of individual gold nanoparticles, for statistically-relevant single particle analysis. We demonstrate a sensitivity of 5 nm(2) in ?ext, enabling detection of single 5 nm gold nanoparticles with total acquisition times in the 1 min range. Moreover, we have developed an analytical model of the polarisation resolved ?ext, which enabled us to extract geometrical particle aspect ratios from the measured ?ext. Using this method, we have characterized a large number of nominally-spherical gold nanoparticles in the 10-100 nm size range. Furthermore, the method provided measurements of in-house fabricated nanoparticle conjugates, allowing distinction of individual dimers from single particles and larger aggregates. The same particle conjugates were investigated correlatively by phase-resolved transient resonant four-wave mixing micro-spectroscopy. A direct comparison of the phase-resolved response between single gold nanoparticles and dimers highlighted the promise of the four-wave mixing technique for sensing applications with dimers as plasmon rulers. PMID:26416674

  2. Quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow in a juvenile porcine model by depth-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Diop, Mamadou; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lawrence, Keith St.

    2010-05-01

    Nearly half a million children and young adults are affected by traumatic brain injury each year in the United States. Although adequate cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential to recovery, complications that disrupt blood flow to the brain and exacerbate neurological injury often go undetected because no adequate bedside measure of CBF exists. In this study we validate a depth-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that provides quantitative CBF measurement despite significant signal contamination from skull and scalp tissue. The respiration rates of eight anesthetized pigs (weight: 16.2+/-0.5 kg, age: 1 to 2 months old) are modulated to achieve a range of CBF levels. Concomitant CBF measurements are performed with NIRS and CT perfusion. A significant correlation between CBF measurements from the two techniques is demonstrated (r2=0.714, slope=0.92, p<0.001), and the bias between the two techniques is -2.83 mL.min-1.100 g-1 (CI0.95: -19.63 mL.min-1.100 g-1-13.9 mL.min-1.100 g-1). This study demonstrates that accurate measurements of CBF can be achieved with depth-resolved NIRS despite significant signal contamination from scalp and skull. The ability to measure CBF at the bedside provides a means of detecting, and thereby preventing, secondary ischemia during neurointensive care.

  3. Remote Quantitative Analysis of Minerals Based on Multispectral Line-Calibrated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a feasible remote sensing technique used for mineral analysis in some unapproachable places where in situ probing is needed, such as analysis of radioactive elements in a nuclear leak or the detection of elemental compositions and contents of minerals on planetary and lunar surfaces. Here a compact custom 15 m focus optical component, combining a six times beam expander with a telescope, has been built, with which the laser beam of a 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser is focused on remote minerals. The excited LIBS signals that reveal the elemental compositions of minerals are collected by another compact single lens?based signal acquisition system. In our remote LIBS investigations, the LIBS spectra of an unknown ore have been detected, from which the metal compositions are obtained. In addition, a multi-spectral line calibration (MSLC) method is proposed for the quantitative analysis of elements. The feasibility of the MSLC and its superiority over a single-wavelength determination have been confirmed by comparison with traditional chemical analysis of the copper content in the ore. PMID:25198122

  4. Towards a non-invasive quantitative analysis of the organic components in museum objects varnishes by vibrational spectroscopies: methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Daher, Céline; Pimenta, Vanessa; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    The compositions of ancient varnishes are mainly determined destructively by separation methods coupled to mass spectrometry. In this study, a methodology for non-invasive quantitative analyses of varnishes by vibrational spectroscopies is proposed. For that, experimental simplified varnishes of colophony and linseed oil were prepared according to 18th century traditional recipes with an increasing mass concentration ratio of colophony/linseed oil. FT-Raman and IR analyses using ATR and non-invasive reflectance modes were done on the "pure" materials and on the different mixtures. Then, a new approach involving spectral decomposition calculation was developed considering the mixture spectra as a linear combination of the pure materials ones, and giving a relative amount of each component. Specific spectral regions were treated and the obtained results show a good accuracy between the prepared and calculated amounts of the two compounds. We were thus able to detect and quantify from 10% to 50% of colophony in linseed oil using non-invasive techniques that can also be conducted in situ with portable instruments when it comes to museum varnished objects and artifacts. PMID:25127604

  5. Systems Biology of Cancer: A Challenging Expedition for Clinical and Quantitative Biologists

    PubMed Central

    Korsunsky, Ilya; McGovern, Kathleen; LaGatta, Tom; Olde Loohuis, Loes; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Griffeth, Nancy; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    A systems-biology approach to complex disease (such as cancer) is now complementing traditional experience-based approaches, which have typically been invasive and expensive. The rapid progress in biomedical knowledge is enabling the targeting of disease with therapies that are precise, proactive, preventive, and personalized. In this paper, we summarize and classify models of systems biology and model checking tools, which have been used to great success in computational biology and related fields. We demonstrate how these models and tools have been used to study some of the twelve biochemical pathways implicated in but not unique to pancreatic cancer, and conclude that the resulting mechanistic models will need to be further enhanced by various abstraction techniques to interpret phenomenological models of cancer progression. PMID:25191654

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  7. Multispectral diode laser based shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for biological sample identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a well established analytical method with applications in many areas, e.g. analysis of biological samples. To overcome the problem of an undesired fluorescence background masking the Raman signals we present a multi-spectral approach using shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). For our investigations we applied microsystem diode lasers which realize two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths required to perform SERDS at 488 nm, 671 nm, and 785 nm. The emission at 488 nm with an optical power of up to 30 mW and a spectral shift of 0.3 nm (12 cm-1) is realized by frequency doubling of a 976 nm distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser. The 671 nm laser diode contains two separate laser cavities (spectral shift: 0.7 nm (13 cm-1)) each incorporating a volume Bragg grating as frequency selective element. In that case, optical powers up to 50 mW can be obtained. For investigations at 785 nm we used a DFB laser with a maximum optical power of 110 mW and a spectral shift of 0.5 nm (7 cm-1). Meat, fat tissue, connective tissue and bones from pork and beef were used as test samples to demonstrate the effective background removal using SERDS. For all three wavelengths integration times of only 5 - 10 seconds were necessary showing the possibility of SERDS for rapid sample identification. A comparison with conventional Raman spectra is given pointing out the improvement of spectral quality. The applicability of SERDS for other analytical applications, e.g. medical diagnosis will be discussed.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of bare and solvated ionic complexes of biological relevance.

    PubMed

    Polfer, Nick C; Oomens, Jos

    2009-01-01

    The low density of ions in mass spectrometers generally precludes direct infrared (IR) absorption measurements. The IR spectrum of an ion can nonetheless be obtained by inducing photodissociation of the ion using a high-intensity tunable laser. The emergence of free electron lasers (FELs) and recent breakthroughs in bench-top lasers based on nonlinear optics have now made it possible to routinely record IR spectra of gas-phase ions. As the energy of one IR photon is insufficient to cause dissociation of molecules and strongly bound complexes, two main experimental strategies have been developed to effect photodissociation. In infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IR-MPD) many photons are absorbed resonantly and their energy is stored in the bath of vibrational modes, leading to dissociation. In the "messenger" technique a weakly bound van der Waals atom is detached upon absorption of a single photon. Fundamental, historical, and practical aspects of these methods will be presented. Both of these approaches make use of very different methods of ion preparation and manipulation. While in IR-MPD ions are irradiated in trapping mass spectrometers, the "messenger" technique is generally carried out in molecular beam instruments. The main focus of this review is the application of IR spectroscopy to biologically relevant molecular systems (amino acids, peptides, proteins). Particular issues that will be addressed here include gas-phase zwitterions, the (chemical) structures of peptides and their collision-induced dissociation (CID) products, IR spectra of gas-phase proteins, and the chelation of metal-ligand complexes. Another growing area of research is IR spectroscopy on solvated clusters, which offer a bridge between the gas-phase and solution environments. The development of state-of-the-art computational approaches has gone hand-in-hand with advances in experimental techniques. The main advantage of gas-phase cluster research, as opposed to condensed-phase experiments, is that the systems of interest can be understood in detail and structural effects can be studied in isolation. It will be shown that IR spectroscopy of mass-selected (bio)molecular systems is now well-placed to address specific questions on the individual effect of charge carriers (protons and metal ions), as well as solvent molecules on the overall structure. PMID:19241457

  9. Theoretical Population Biology 59, 175 184 (2001) Quantitative Genetics in the Age of Genomics

    E-print Network

    Walsh, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    Drosophila Genome Project ... 81 Human Genome Project ... 810 Working knowledge of multivariate statistics impact on the field. Finally, a variety of other emerging biotechnologies in such areas as reproductive biology (whole organism cloning, embryo transplantation) and recombinant DNA (trans- genic organisms

  10. Quantitative estimation of biological cell surface receptors by segmenting conventional fluorescence

    E-print Network

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    , we are looking at the expression level of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) proteins on Caco-2 intestinal, Toll-like receptor 2, Image segmentation, Biosensor. I. INTRODUCTION The innate immune system. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are biological surface agents participating in this mechanism. They take

  11. Tracking Biological Organic Compounds In Atmospheric Deposition In Alpine Environments With Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, N.; Oldani, K. M.; Williams, M. W.; Schmidt, S. K.; Darcy, J.; Lemons, S.; Reche, I.

    2013-12-01

    Alpine environments, such as those of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Spain, contain undeveloped, barren soils that are carbon-limited. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of organic carbon (OC) represents a substantial fraction of the OC load available to alpine soils, and includes contributions from atmospheric pollutants, dust, and biological aerosols, such as bacteria, algae, fungi, and plant debris. To evaluate the seasonal variability and sources of atmospheric deposition at these alpine sites, we measured the chemical characteristics of weekly wet and dry deposition and snowpack samples, including characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and water soluble organic matter (WSOM) with fluorescence spectroscopy. The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra we acquired show the presence of recurring peaks at low excitation and emission wavelengths typically associated with highly biodegradable organic carbon, presumably derived from the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and tryptophan. Solar simulation experiments demonstrated that amino acid-like fluorescent components were more resistant to photo-degradation than humic- and fulvic-like fluorescent components. Our results also reveal the presence of a unique fluorophore, not previously described, that is found in both Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada snowpack, wet deposition, and dry deposition and may be attributed to fluorescent pigments in bacteria. Biological aerosols may represent a labile source of carbon for alpine soil microbes, and consequently their deposition has important consequences for biogeochemical processes occurring in barren, alpine soils. Excitation emission matrix image of 24 Aug 2010 wet deposition sample from the Soddie site at Niwot Ridge, Colorado showing a unique fluorescent component with dual excitation peaks (285 nm and 340 nm) at 410 nm emission.

  12. Quantitative Applications of Deep-Sea Raman Spectroscopy: Geochemistry of 1,4- thioxane in sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hester, K. C.; Walz, P. M.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed quantitative Raman spectroscopic techniques for the novel detection of dissolved species in sea water to determine their fundamental properties. In this example we use a field-deployable Raman system to determine the solubility of 1,4-thioxane (TO) in sea water as 0.65 to 0.63 mol/kg H2O between 4.5°C and 25.0°C (which varies greatly from an earlier report of 2.75 mol/kg H2O), and to assess the conditions under which it may form a hydrate. TO is of unusual environmental interest as a breakdown product of the chemical weapon mustard gas, and thus development of non-contact field- deployable sensing techniques is highly desirable. Raman spectroscopy has typically been considered as only a qualitative technique due to the complexity of the optical path and the substantial changes in components between different instruments. We show here that by self-referencing to the ubiquitous water peaks (the water ?2 mode from 1500 to 1800 cm-1) we can derive quantitative information with a precision of ± 4%, and provide essential new information. The long-term fate of large quantities of chemical weapons disposed of in the ocean some 50 years ago is poorly known. Part of this lacking knowledge can be attributed to the hazards associated with the direct study of these materials leaving ocean scientists vulnerable when sampling in inadequately marked sites. Mustard gas (1,1'-thiobis[2-chloroethane]) represents the largest tonnage of material disposed of until the 1972 London Convention banned such activities. Thus there is strong interest in determining the fate and lifetime of these materials, their decomposition products, and the extent of the affected zones. We have earlier shown that TO forms a hydrate with a help-gas, such as methane or hydrogen sulfide, and that the temperature, pressure and reducing conditions required for hydrate formation commonly occur at known disposal sites. In fact, a mixed TO hydrate is more stable than methane hydrate by almost 10°C. Here we show that in the presence of hydrate formation, as with other hydrate guest molecules, the TO solubility trend was reversed and solubility decreased in response to lower temperatures. The relatively low solubility in water coupled with the ability to form a hydrate within marine sediments can greatly decrease molecular mobility and increase chemical lifetime. Mixing will reduce concentrations of TO in the ocean water column below the detection limits established here. But the solubility data reveals the concentrations that will characterize marine pore waters at such sites, and these are readily detectable. Development of pore water Raman sensing techniques are underway.

  13. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  15. Technique for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the kubelka-munk function

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Yang, Yuanlong

    2003-09-02

    Method and apparatus for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function. In one aspect, the method is used to determine whether a tissue sample is cancerous or not and comprises the steps of (a) measuring the diffuse reflectance from the tissue sample at a first wavelength and at a second wavelength, wherein the first wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 255-265 nm and wherein the second wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 275-285 nm; (b) using the Kubelka-Munk function to transform the diffuse reflectance measurement obtained at the first and second wavelengths; and (c) comparing a ratio or a difference of the transformed Kubelka-Munk measurements at the first and second wavelengths to appropriate standards determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous. One can use the spectral profile of KMF between 250 nm to 300 nm to determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous or precancerous. According to the value at the first and second wavelengths determine whether or not the malignant tissue is invasive or mixed invasive and in situ or carcinoma in situ.

  16. Quantitative determination of competitive molecular adsorption on gold nanoparticles using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, De-Hao; Davila-Morris, Melissa; DelRio, Frank W; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R; Hackley, Vincent A

    2011-08-01

    Surface-sensitive quantitative studies of competitive molecular adsorption on nanoparticles were conducted using a modified attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy method. Adsorption isotherms for thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (SH-PEG) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a function of molecular mass (1, 5, and 20 kDa) were characterized. We find that surface density of SH-PEG on AuNPs is inversely proportional to the molecular mass (M(m)). Equilibrium binding constants for SH-PEG, obtained using the Langmuir adsorption model, show the binding affinity for SH-PEG is proportional to M(m). Simultaneous competitive adsorption between mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and 5 kDa SH-PEG (SH-PEG5K) was investigated, and we find that MPA concentration is the dominant factor influencing the surface density of both SH-PEG5K and MPA, whereas the concentration of SH-PEG5K affects only SH-PEG5K surface density. Electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) was employed as an orthogonal characterization technique. ES-DMA results are consistent with the results obtained by ATR-FTIR, confirming our conclusions about the adsorption process in this system. Ligand displacement competitive adsorption, where the displacing molecular species is added after completion of the ligand surface binding, was also interrogated by ATR-FTIR. Results indicate that for SH-PEG increasing M(m) yields greater stability on AuNPs when measured against displacement by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model serum protein. In addition, the binding affinity of BSA to AuNPs is inhibited for SH-PEG conjugated AuNPs, an effect that is enhanced at higher SH-PEG M(m) values. PMID:21726083

  17. Developments in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative in situ measurements of free radicals in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived free radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH. Chemical oxidation cycles, which also involve peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2), remove natural or anthropogenic emissions (for example methane) and generate a range of secondary products, for example ozone, nitrogen dioxide, acidic and multifunctional organic species, and secondary organic aerosol, which impact on human health and climate. Owing to their short lifetime in the atmosphere, the abundance of radicals is determined solely by their rate of chemical production and loss, and not by transport. Field measurements of the concentrations of radicals and comparison with calculations using a numerical model therefore constitutes one of the very best ways to test whether the chemistry in each of these locations is understood and accurately represented in the model. Validation of the chemistry is important, as the predictions of climate and air quality models containing this chemistry are used to drive the formulation of policy and legislation. However, in situ measurements of radical species, owing to their very low abundance (often sub part per trillion) and short lifetimes (< 1 second for OH), remain extremely challenging. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) has enjoyed considerable success worldwide for the quantitative detection of radicals in a range of environments. The radicals are either excited directly by the laser (e.g. OH, IO) or are first chemically converted to OH prior to detection (e.g. HO2, RO2). Recent developments in the LIF technique for radical detection, which uses a supersonic expansion with detection at low pressure and multi kHz pulse repetition rate tunable laser systems, will be discussed, together with calibration methods to make signals absolute, and identification of potential interferences. LIF instruments have been operated on ground, ship and aircraft platforms at a number of locations worldwide, and examples from recent fieldwork involving the Leeds instruments will be presented.

  18. Lab on chip optical imaging of biological sample by quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Gennari, O.; Mugnano, M.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative imaging and three dimensional (3D) morphometric analysis of flowing and not-adherent cells is an important aspect for diagnostic purposes at Lab on Chip scale. Diagnostics tools need to be quantitative, label-free and, as much as possible, accurate. In recent years digital holography (DH) has been improved to be considered as suitable diagnostic method in several research field. In this paper we demonstrate that DH can be used for retrieving 3D morphometric data for sorting and diagnosis aims. Several techniques exist for 3D morphological study as optical coherent tomography and confocal microscopy, but they are not the best choice in case of dynamic events as flowing samples. Recently, a DH approach, based on shape from silhouette algorithm (SFS), has been developed for 3D shape display and calculation of cells biovolume. Such approach, adopted in combination with holographic optical tweezers (HOT) was successfully applied to cells with convex shape. Unfortunately, it's limited to cells with convex surface as sperm cells or diatoms. Here, we demonstrate an improvement of such procedure. By decoupling thickness information from refractive index ones and combining this with SFS analysis, 3D shape of concave cells is obtained. Specifically, the topography contour map is computed and used to adjust the 3D shape retrieved by the SFS algorithm. We prove the new procedure for healthy red blood cells having a concave surface in their central region. Experimental results are compared with theoretical model.

  19. The road not taken: Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy and electronic structure theory to systems of materials and biological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Philip Joseph

    Applications of Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Theory to Systems of Materials and Biological Relevance. The photophysics of curcumin was studied in micelles and the solvation dynamics were probed. The high-energy ionic liquid HEATN was also studied using the fragment molecular orbital method. The solvation dynamics of the HEATN system were determined. This marks the first study of the solvation dynamics in a triazolium ionic liquid system.

  20. FIXED DOSE COMBINATIONS WITH SELECTIVE BETA-BLOCKERS: QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS.

    PubMed

    Mahu, ?tefania Corina; H?ncianu, Monica; Agoroaei, Lumini?a; Grigoriu, Ioana Cezara; Strugaru, Anca Monica; Butnaru, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common causes of death, a complex and incompletely controlled disease for millions of patients. Metoprolol, bisoprolol, nebivolol and atenolol are selective beta-blockers frequently used in the management of arterial hypertension, alone or in fixed combination with other substances. This study presents the most used analytical methods for simultaneous determination in biological fluids of fixed combinations containing selective beta-blockers. Articles in Pub-Med, Science Direct and Wiley Journals databases published between years 2004-2014 were reviewed. Methods such as liquid chromatography--mass spectrometry--mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or high performance liquid chromatography--mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) were used for determination of fixed combination with beta-blockers in human plasma, rat plasma and human breast milk. LC-MS/MS method was used for simultaneous determination of fixed combinations of metoprolol with simvastatin, hydrochlorothiazide or ramipril, combinations of nebivolol and valsartan, or atenolol and amlodipine. Biological samples were processed by protein precipitation techniques or by liquid-liquid extraction. For the determination of fixed dose combinations of felodipine and metoprolol in rat plasma liquid chromatography--electrospray ionization--mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied, using phenacetin as internal standard. HPLC-MS method was applied for the determination of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide in human plasma. For the determination of atenolol and chlorthalidone from human breast milk and human plasma the HPLC method was used. The analytical methods were validated according to the specialized guidelines, and were applied to biological samples, thing that confirms the permanent concern of researchers in this field. PMID:26204671

  1. Water Vapor Uptake of Ultrathin Films of Biologically Derived Nanocrystals: Quantitative Assessment with Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Niinivaara, Elina; Faustini, Marco; Tammelin, Tekla; Kontturi, Eero

    2015-11-10

    Despite the relevance of water interactions, explicit analysis of vapor adsorption on biologically derived surfaces is often difficult. Here, a system was introduced to study the vapor uptake on a native polysaccharide surface; namely, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) ultrathin films were examined with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A significant mass uptake of water vapor by the CNC films was detected using the QCM-D upon increasing relative humidity. In addition, thickness changes proportional to changes in relative humidity were detected using SE. Quantitative analysis of the results attained indicated that in preference to being soaked by water at the point of hydration each individual CNC in the film became enveloped by a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water vapor, resulting in the detected thickness response. PMID:26461931

  2. The Quantitative Methods Boot Camp: Teaching Quantitative Thinking and

    E-print Network

    Born, Richard

    biological systems. The boot camp teaches basic programming using biological examples from statistics, image processing, and data analysis. This integrative approach to teaching programming and quantitative reasoningEDUCATION The Quantitative Methods Boot Camp: Teaching Quantitative Thinking and Computing Skills

  3. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  4. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system

    PubMed Central

    Lumen, Annie; McNally, Kevin; George, Nysia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Loizou, George D.

    2015-01-01

    A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local sensitivity analysis. PMID:26074819

  5. An integrated quantitative proteomics and systems biology approach to explore synaptic protein profile changes during morphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Steven D; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2014-01-01

    Morphine is a classic analgesic for the treatment of chronic pain. However, its repeated use is known to produce tolerance, physical dependence, and addiction; these properties limit its long-term therapeutic use and this has led to a quest for therapeutics without these unwanted side effects. Understanding the molecular changes in response to long-term use of morphine is likely to aid in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. Studies examining the effects of chronic morphine administration have reported alterations in gene expression, synapse morphology, and synaptic transmission implying changes in synaptic protein profile. To fully understand the changes in protein profiles, proteomic techniques have been used. Studies using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of various brain regions combined with mass spectrometry have found alterations in the levels of a number of proteins. However, neither the changes in brain regions relevant to morphine effects nor changes in the abundance of synaptic proteins have been clearly delineated. Recent studies employing subcellular fractionation to isolate the striatal synapse, combined with quantitative proteomics and graph theory-inspired network analyses, have begun to quantify morphine-regulated changes in synaptic proteins and facilitate the generation of networks that could serve as targets for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of chronic pain. Thus, an integrated quantitative proteomics and systems biology approach can be useful to identify novel targets for the treatment of pain and other disorders of the brain. PMID:24045585

  6. Common biology of craving across legal and illegal drugs - a quantitative meta-analysis of cue-reactivity brain response.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The present quantitative meta-analysis set out to test whether cue-reactivity responses in humans differ across drugs of abuse and whether these responses constitute the biological basis of drug craving as a core psychopathology of addiction. By means of activation likelihood estimation, we investigated the concurrence of brain regions activated by cue-induced craving paradigms across studies on nicotine, alcohol and cocaine addicts. Furthermore, we analysed the concurrence of brain regions positively correlated with self-reported craving in nicotine and alcohol studies. We found direct overlap between nicotine, alcohol and cocaine cue reactivity in the ventral striatum. In addition, regions of close proximity were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; nicotine and cocaine) and amygdala (alcohol, nicotine and cocaine). Brain regions of concurrence in drug cue-reactivity paradigms that overlapped with brain regions of concurrence in self-reported craving correlations were found in the ACC, ventral striatum and right pallidum (for alcohol). This first quantitative meta-analysis on drug cue reactivity identifies brain regions underlying nicotine, alcohol and cocaine dependency, i.e. the ventral striatum. The ACC, right pallidum and ventral striatum were related to drug cue reactivity as well as self-reported craving, suggesting that this set of brain regions constitutes the core circuit of drug craving in nicotine and alcohol addiction. PMID:21261758

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (?,?) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue ?-amyloid (A?1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of A?1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ? and ? angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ? and ? uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of A?1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  8. Quantitative global and gene-specific promoter methylation in relation to biological properties of neuroblastomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study we aimed to quantify tumor suppressor gene (TSG) promoter methylation densities levels in primary neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. A subset of these TSGs is associated with a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in other tumor types. Methods The study panel consisted of 38 primary tumors, 7 established cell lines and 4 healthy references. Promoter methylation was determined by bisulphate Pyrosequencing for 14 TSGs; and LINE-1 repeat element methylation was used as an indicator of global methylation levels. Results Overall mean TSG Z-scores were significantly increased in cases with adverse outcome, but were unrelated to global LINE-1 methylation. CIMP with hypermethylation of three or more gene promoters was observed in 6/38 tumors and 7/7 cell lines. Hypermethylation of one or more TSG (comprising TSGs BLU, CASP8, DCR2, CDH1, RASSF1A and RASSF2) was evident in 30/38 tumors. By contrast only very low levels of promoter methylation were recorded for APC, DAPK1, NORE1A, P14, P16, TP73, PTEN and RARB. Similar involvements of methylation instability were revealed between cell line models and neuroblastoma tumors. Separate analysis of two proposed CASP8 regulatory regions revealed frequent and significant involvement of CpG sites between exon 4 and 5, but modest involvement of the exon 1 region. Conclusions/significance The results highlight the involvement of TSG methylation instability in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines using quantitative methods, support the use of DNA methylation analyses as a prognostic tool for this tumor type, and underscore the relevance of developing demethylating therapies for its treatment. PMID:22984959

  9. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Alexiou, Christoph; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration.

  10. Comparison of various assays to quantitate macrophage activation by biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.M.; Nanda, S.; Altom, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Macrophages treated with various compounds that enhance host antitumor resistance exhibit measurable changes in metabolism, function, and surface antigens. In this study, murine peptone-induced peritoneal macrophages were stimulated in vitro by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramyl dipeptide (MDP), and poly I.poly C. They were subsequently compared in their ability to release superoxide and act as tumoristatic and tumoricidal effector cells. Superoxide generation was assayed by the reduction of ferricytochrome C. All three compounds failed to induce significant O/sub 2/- release, unless the cells were also treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). MDP was most active in potentiating the PMA response. In the tumor growth inhibition assay, cytostatic activity was comparable for all three compounds and did not exceed 32 percent. The combination of subthreshold levels of these compounds and hybridoma-derived MAF acted synergistically to induce potent cytostatic activity. In the chromium release assay, LPS and poly I.poly C rendered macrophages cytolytic for P815 target cells at concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml. In contrast, significant cytolysis was observed with MDP only at 100 micrograms/ml. Defining precisely the effect of various biological response modifiers on several parameters of macrophage function may facilitate use of these agents in cancer therapy.

  11. Top-hat cw-laser-induced time-resolved mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of low-absorption materials.

    PubMed

    Astrath, Nelson G C; Astrath, Francine B G; Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Pedreira, Paulo R B; Malacarne, Luis C; Bento, Antonio C; Baesso, Mauro L

    2008-07-01

    Thermal lens spectroscopy is a highly sensitive and versatile photothermal technique for material analysis, providing optical and thermal properties. To use less expensive multimode non-Gaussian lasers for quantitative analysis of low-absorption materials, this Letter presents a theoretical model for time-resolved mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy induced by a cw laser with a top-hat profile. The temperature profile in a sample was calculated, and the intensity of the probe beam center at the detector plane was also derived using the Fresnel diffraction theory. Experimental validation was performed with glass samples, and the results were found well consistent with literature values of the thermo-optical properties of the samples. PMID:18594666

  12. Application of the quantitative detection of a change in concentration of magnesium stearate in a feeder tube of tableting manufacture by real-time near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, D; Nakayama, K; Chikuma, T

    2015-10-01

    Process analytical technology is important for the analysis and control of manufacturing processes. Near-infrared spectroscopy is widely used in various process analytical technologies for the analysis of the chemical componentsof solid dosage forms. Lubrication is an important process carried out before a tablet is produced. In this process, the concentration of lubricant, such as magnesium stearate (StMg), might change for one of many reasons during powder transport, which would be a critical problem such as variation in tablet compressibility and dissolution failure of compressed tablets. Our group investigated the feasibility of the quantitative monitoring of a change in the concentration of StMg in the feeder tube of tableting equipment employing real-time near-infrared spectroscopy. PMID:26601418

  13. Quantitation of enniatins in biological samples of Wistar rats after oral administration by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, Laura; Font, Guillermina; Manyes, Lara

    2015-09-01

    The emerging Fusarium mycotoxins enniatins (ENNs) have diverse biological properties, mainly due to their ionophoric activity, and represent a potential risk to human and animal health since they are commonly found in food and feed. In vivo toxicity studies are scarce and limited to the major mycotoxins. Until now, any method for the simultaneous analysis of these compounds in plasma, serum and feces from rat has been reported. A method for the extraction and determination of ENNs A, A1, B and B1 from Wistar rat samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed. The method was successfully validated with satisfactory recoveries (70-106%), good intraday (<10%) and interday (<20%) precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, and good linearity between limits of quantitation (LOQ) and 100 times LOQ. Limits of detection (LOD) and LOQ were ?1 and ?10?ng/ml, respectively. The validated method was applied for the analysis of biological Wistar rat samples that were administered a mixture of ENNs containing 1.19, 2.16, 1.03 and 1.41?mg/kg body weight of ENN A, A1, B and B1, respectively. Blood, urine and feces samples collected every 2?h during the 8-h duration of the experiment were analyzed. The administered dose of the mixture of ENNs did not cause observable adverse effects on the animals. ENNs concentrations detected in serum and urine were below LOQs. The four ENNs were detected in feces reaching the maximum concentration at 6?h after administration. PMID:26228087

  14. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  15. FT-IR TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY FOR QUANTITATION OF AMMONIUM BISULFATE IN FINE PARTICULATE MATTER COLLECTED ON TEFLON FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative measurement method for fine particle bisulfatein ammonium bisulfate collected from the ambient air onto Teflon filters is described. nfrared absorbance measurements of the Teflon filters are made before and after particle collection. ubtraction of the two spectra r...

  16. Polarized Enhanced Backscattering Spectroscopy for Characterization of Biological Tissues at Subdiffusion Length-scales

    PubMed Central

    Radosevich, Andrew J.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Yi, Ji; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1980’s, the enhanced backscattering (EBS) phenomenon has been well-studied in a large variety of non-biological materials. Yet, until recently the use of conventional EBS for the characterization of biological tissue has been fairly limited. In this work we detail the unique ability of EBS to provide spectroscopic, polarimetric, and depth-resolved characterization of biological tissue using a simple backscattering instrument. We first explain the experimental and numerical procedures used to accurately measure and model the full azimuthal EBS peak shape in biological tissue. Next we explore the peak shape and height dependencies for different polarization channels and spatial coherence of illumination. We then illustrate the extraordinary sensitivity of EBS to the shape of the scattering phase function using suspensions of latex microspheres. Finally, we apply EBS to biological tissue samples in order to measure optical properties and observe the spatial length-scales at which backscattering is altered in early colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24163574

  17. A Rapid and High-Throughput Quantitation Assay of the Nuclear Factor ?B Activity Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy in the Setting of Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kenu; Mikuni, Shintaro; Beppu, Hideyuki; Niimi, Hideki; Abe, Shigeki; Hano, Nobuko; Yamagata, Koichi; Kinjo, Masataka; Kitajima, Isao

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcription factor nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) plays a key role in the regulation of immune responses to inflammation. However, convenient assay systems to quantitate the NF-?B activity level in a timely manner are not available in the setting of clinical laboratories. Therefore, we developed a novel and high-throughput quantitative assay based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to detect the NF-?B activity level in cellular nuclear extracts and evaluated the performance of this method. The basic principle of this assay is to calculate the binding fraction of NF-?B to fluorescent-labeled DNA probes, which contain NF-?B binding sites. Methods Non-fluorescent competitive probes are employed to normalize the influence of the viscosity of the nuclear extracts between samples and to eliminate the influence of nonspecific binding of the fluorescent probes. To confirm accurate quantitation, human recombinant NF-?B p50 was mixed into U937 cell nuclear extracts, and the binding fraction of the fluorescent probes to NF-?B in the mixture was calculated for quantitation. To evaluate whether this method can be applied to measure the NF-?B activity in human lymphocytes, the NF-?B activity levels of systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients during perioperative periods were measured. Results The percentage recovery was 88.9%. The coefficients of variation of the intra-assay were approximately 10%. NF-?B activity levels during the perioperative period can were successfully measured. The assay time for the FCS measurement was within 20 minutes. Conclusions This assay system can be used to quantitate NF-?B activity levels in a timely manner in the setting of hospital laboratories. PMID:24124497

  18. Quantitation of DNA using Hoechst 33258 An essential element of cellular and molecular biology is the ability to quantitate DNA in large

    E-print Network

    Raizada, Manish N.

    found in nucleic acid preparations. The fluorescent bisbenzimide (Hoechst) dyes circumvent many is the ability to quantitate DNA in large numbers of samples at a sensitivity that enables determination of small that involve the growth kinetics of cell cultures or cell cycle studies require normalization by DNA content

  19. Synergy within structural biology of single crystal optical spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    De la, Teresa; Mora-Rey; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the adaptation of optical spectroscopy to monitor photo-induced or enzyme catalyzed reactions in the crystalline state have enabled x-ray crystal structures to be accurately linked with spectroscopically defined intermediates. This in turn has led to a deeper understanding of the role protein structural changes play in function. The integration of optical spectroscopy with x-ray crystallography is growing, and now extends beyond linking crystal structure to reaction intermediate. Recent examples of this synergy include applications in protein crystallization, x-ray data acquisition, radiation damage and acquisition of phase information important for structure determination. PMID:17959373

  20. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in vitrified Mn-doped glasses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh, C. E-mail: unnikrishnan.vk@manipal.edu; Sonavane, M. S.; Yeotikar, R. G.; Shah, M. L.; Gupta, G. P.; Suri, B. M.

    2014-09-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an atomic emission spectroscopy method, has rapidly grown as one of the best elemental analysis techniques over the past two decades. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in manganese-doped glasses have been carried out using an optimized LIBS system employing a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser as the source of excitation. The glass samples have been prepared using conventional vitrification methods. The laser pulse irradiance on the surface of the glass samples placed in air at atmospheric pressure was about 1.7×10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatially integrated plasma emission was collected and imaged on to the spectrograph slit using an optical-fiber-based collection system. Homogeneity was checked by recording LIBS spectra from different sites on the sample surface and analyzing the elemental emission intensities for concentration determination. Validation of the observed LIBS results was done by comparison with scanning electron microscope- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) surface elemental mapping. The analytical performance of the LIBS system has been evaluated through the correlation of the LIBS determined concentrations of Mn with its certified values. The results are found to be in very good agreement with the certified concentrations.

  1. Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Chemical Species in Hanford Tank Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy Technology: FY94Florida State University Raman Spectroscopy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, F.R.

    1997-08-11

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  2. Near infrared spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool for on-line quantitative monitoring of alcohol precipitation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ye; Wu, Zengzeng; Liu, Xuesong; Wu, Yongjiang

    2013-04-15

    The application of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for on-line quantitative monitoring of alcohol precipitation of the Danhong injection was investigated. For the NIR measurements, two fiber optic probes designed to transmit NIR radiation through a 2mm path length flow cell were applied to collect spectra in real-time. Particle swarm optimization- (PSO-) based least square support vector machines (LS-SVM) and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed for quantitative analysis of the critical intermediate quality attributes: the soluble solid content (SSC) and concentrations of danshensu (DSS), protocatechuic aldehyde (PA), hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) and salvianolic acid B (SAB). The optimal models were then used for on-line quantitative monitoring of alcohol precipitation. The results showed that the PSO-based LS-SVM with a radial basis function (RBF) kernel was slightly better than the conventional PLS method, even though both methods exhibited satisfactory fitting results and predictive abilities. In this study, successful models were built and applied on-line; these models proffer real-time data and instant feedback about alcohol precipitation. PMID:23357639

  3. Salicylate Detection by Complexation with Iron(III) and Optical Absorbance Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Koch, Jeremy T.; Reid, Kendra R.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratory involving applications of visible spectrophotometry is described. Salicylate, a component found in several medications, as well as the active by-product of aspirin decomposition, is quantified. The addition of excess iron(III) to a solution of salicylate generates a deeply…

  4. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy analyses on the crystallinity of engineered biological hydroxyapatite for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poralan, G. M., Jr.; Gambe, J. E.; Alcantara, E. M.; Vequizo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) derived from thermally-treated fish bones was successfully produced. However, the obtained biological HAp was amorphous and thus making it unfavorable for medical application. Consequently, this research exploits and engineers the crystallinity of BHAp powders by addition of CaCO3 and investigates its degree of crystallinity using XRD and IR spectroscopy. On XRD, the HAp powders with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42, 1.46, 1.61 and 1.93 have degree of crystallinity equal to 58.08, 72.13, 85.79, 75.85% and crystal size equal to 0.67, 0.74, 0.75, 0.72 nm, respectively. The degree of crystallinity and crystal size of the obtained calcium deficient biological HAp powders increase as their [Ca]/[P] ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio by addition of CaCO3 as source of Ca2+ ions. These results show the possibility of engineering the crystallinity and crystal size of biological HAp by addition of CaCO3. Moreover, the splitting factor of PO4 vibration matches the result with % crystallinity on XRD. Also, the area of phosphate-substitution site of PO4 vibration shows linear relationship (R2 = 0.994) with crystal size calculated from XRD. It is worth noting that the crystallinity of the biological HAp with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42 and 1.48 fall near the range 60-70% for highly resorbable HAp used in the medical application.

  5. Retrieving the optical parameters of biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Fourier series expansions. I. theory and application

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón A.; Vázquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The determination of optical parameters of biological tissues is essential for the application of optical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy is a widely used technique to analyze the optical characteristics of biological tissues. In this paper we show that by using diffuse reflectance spectra and a new mathematical model we can retrieve the optical parameters by applying an adjustment of the data with nonlinear least squares. In our model we represent the spectra using a Fourier series expansion finding mathematical relations between the polynomial coefficients and the optical parameters. In this first paper we use spectra generated by the Monte Carlo Multilayered Technique to simulate the propagation of photons in turbid media. Using these spectra we determine the behavior of Fourier series coefficients when varying the optical parameters of the medium under study. With this procedure we find mathematical relations between Fourier series coefficients and optical parameters. Finally, the results show that our method can retrieve the optical parameters of biological tissues with accuracy that is adequate for medical applications. PMID:23082281

  6. Gelatin embedding: a novel way to preserve biological samples for terahertz imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuting; Ung, Benjamin; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-04-01

    Sample dehydration has traditionally been a challenging problem in ex vivo terahertz biomedical experiments as water content changes significantly affect the terahertz properties and can diminish important contrast features. In this paper, we propose a novel method to prevent sample dehydration using gelatin embedding. By looking at terahertz image data and calculating the optical properties of the gelatin-embedded sample, we find that our method successfully preserves the sample for at least 35?h, both for imaging and spectroscopy. Our novel preservation method demonstrates for the first time the capability to simultaneously maintain sample structural integrity and prevent dehydration at room temperature. This is particularly relevant for terahertz studies of freshly excised tissues but could be beneficial for other imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

  7. Passive Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of chemical plumes: an algorithm for quantitative interpretation and real-time background removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Mark L.; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Herr, Kenneth C.

    1995-08-01

    We present a ratioing algorithm for quantitative analysis of the passive Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of a chemical plume. We show that the transmission of a near-field plume is given by tau plume = (Lobsd - Lbb-plume)/(Lbkgd - Lbb-plume), where tau plume is the frequency-dependent transmission of the plume, L obsd is the spectral radiance of the scene that contains the plume, Lbkgd is the spectral radiance of the same scene without the plume, and Lbb-plume is the spectral radiance of a blackbody at the plume temperature. The algorithm simultaneously achieves background removal, elimination of the spectrometer internal signature, and quantification of the plume spectral transmission. It has applications to both real-time processing for plume visualization and quantitative measurements of plume column densities. The plume temperature (Lbb-plume ), which is not always precisely known, can have a profound effect on the quantitative interpretation of the algorithm and is discussed in detail. Finally, we provide an illustrative example of the use of the algorithm on a trichloroethylene and acetone plume.

  8. Laser-induced Breakdown spectroscopy quantitative analysis method via adaptive analytical line selection and relevance vector machine regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Yi, Cancan; Xu, Jinwu; Ma, Xianghong

    2015-05-01

    A new LIBS quantitative analysis method based on analytical line adaptive selection and Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) regression model is proposed. First, a scheme of adaptively selecting analytical line is put forward in order to overcome the drawback of high dependency on a priori knowledge. The candidate analytical lines are automatically selected based on the built-in characteristics of spectral lines, such as spectral intensity, wavelength and width at half height. The analytical lines which will be used as input variables of regression model are determined adaptively according to the samples for both training and testing. Second, an LIBS quantitative analysis method based on RVM is presented. The intensities of analytical lines and the elemental concentrations of certified standard samples are used to train the RVM regression model. The predicted elemental concentration analysis results will be given with a form of confidence interval of probabilistic distribution, which is helpful for evaluating the uncertainness contained in the measured spectra. Chromium concentration analysis experiments of 23 certified standard high-alloy steel samples have been carried out. The multiple correlation coefficient of the prediction was up to 98.85%, and the average relative error of the prediction was 4.01%. The experiment results showed that the proposed LIBS quantitative analysis method achieved better prediction accuracy and better modeling robustness compared with the methods based on partial least squares regression, artificial neural network and standard support vector machine.

  9. Raman spectroscopy provides a rapid, non-invasive method for quantitation of starch in live, unicellular microalgae.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuetong; He, Yuehui; Cui, Yanbin; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Yun; Li, Yuanguang; Huang, Wei E; Xu, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Conventional methods for quantitation of starch content in cells generally involve starch extraction steps and are usually labor intensive, thus a rapid and non-invasive method will be valuable. Using the starch-producing unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model, we employed a customized Raman spectrometer to capture the Raman spectra of individual single cells under distinct culture conditions and along various growth stages. The results revealed a nearly linear correlation (R(2) = 0.9893) between the signal intensity at 478 cm(-1) and the starch content of the cells. We validated the specific correlation by showing that the starch-associated Raman peaks were eliminated in a mutant strain where the AGPase (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) gene was disrupted and consequentially the biosynthesis of starch blocked. Furthermore, the method was validated in an industrial algal strain of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. This is the first demonstration of starch quantitation in individual live cells. Compared to existing cellular starch quantitation methods, this single-cell Raman spectra-based approach is rapid, label-free, non-invasive, culture-independent, low-cost, and potentially able to simultaneously track multiple metabolites in individual live cells, therefore should enable many new applications. PMID:24906189

  10. Relationship between the v2PO4/amide III ratio assessed by Raman spectroscopy and the calcium content measured by quantitative backscattered electron microscopy in healthy human osteonal bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschger, Andreas; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Hofstetter, Birgit; Masic, Admir; Blouin, Stéphane; Messmer, Phaedra; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Paschalis, Eleftherios P.; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy and quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) of bone are powerful tools to investigate bone material properties. Both methods provide information on the degree of bone matrix mineralization. However, a head-to-head comparison of these outcomes from identical bone areas has not been performed to date. In femoral midshaft cross sections of three women, 99 regions (20×20 ?) were selected inside osteons and interstitial bone covering a wide range of matrix mineralization. As the focus of this study was only on regions undergoing secondary mineralization, zones exhibiting a distinct gradient in mineral content close to the mineralization front were excluded. The same regions were measured by both methods. We found a linear correlation (R2=0.75) between mineral/matrix as measured by Raman spectroscopy and the wt. %Mineral/(100-wt. %Mineral) as obtained by qBEI, in good agreement with theoretical estimations. The observed deviations of single values from the linear regression line were determined to reflect biological heterogeneities. The data of this study demonstrate the good correspondence between Raman and qBEI outcomes in describing tissue mineralization. The obtained correlation is likely sensitive to changes in bone tissue composition, providing an approach to detect potential deviations from normal bone.

  11. Micron surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of intact biological organisms and model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, E.A.; Morris, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectra have been obtained within intact zebrafish embryos and inside the 500-fL pores of a Nucleopore filter membrane with the use of coated microelectrodes with 1-3 {mu}m active silver tip diameters. The spectra obtained demonstrate the microelectrode`s ability to penetrate biological membranes as well as restricted volumes. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Estimation of soil clay and organic matter using two quantitative methods (PLSR and MARS) based on reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawar, Said; Buddenbaum, Henning; Hill, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    A rapid and inexpensive soil analytical technique is needed for soil quality assessment and accurate mapping. This study investigated a method for improved estimation of soil clay (SC) and organic matter (OM) using reflectance spectroscopy. Seventy soil samples were collected from Sinai peninsula in Egypt to estimate the soil clay and organic matter relative to the soil spectra. Soil samples were scanned with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectrometer (350-2500 nm). Three spectral formats were used in the calibration models derived from the spectra and the soil properties: (1) original reflectance spectra (OR), (2) first-derivative spectra smoothened using the Savitzky-Golay technique (FD-SG) and (3) continuum-removed reflectance (CR). Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) models using the CR of the 400-2500 nm spectral region resulted in R2 = 0.76 and 0.57, and RPD = 2.1 and 1.5 for estimating SC and OM, respectively, indicating better performance than that obtained using OR and SG. The multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) calibration model with the CR spectra resulted in an improved performance (R2 = 0.89 and 0.83, RPD = 3.1 and 2.4) for estimating SC and OM, respectively. The results show that the MARS models have a great potential for estimating SC and OM compared with PLSR models. The results obtained in this study have potential value in the field of soil spectroscopy because they can be applied directly to the mapping of soil properties using remote sensing imagery in arid environment conditions. Key Words: soil clay, organic matter, PLSR, MARS, reflectance spectroscopy.

  13. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy, and Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe C.; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics (MD) is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger ?-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects.

  14. Series of quinone-containing nanosensors for biologically relevant redox potential determination by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Patrick I T; Camus, Victoria L; Hu, Yuyu; Campbell, Colin J

    2015-05-01

    Redox potential is of key importance in the control and regulation of cellular function and lifecycle, and previous approaches to measuring the biological redox potential noninvasively in real time are limited to areas of hypoxia or normoxia. In this paper, we extend our previous work on nanoparticle-based intracellular nanosensors to cover a much wider redox potential range of -470 to +130 mV vs NHE, which includes the redox potential range occupied by cells in a state of oxidative stress. The nanosensors are rationally designed to target different areas of this redox potential range and are monitored by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which will permit noninvasive real-time imaging of cells undergoing oxidative stress. PMID:25909294

  15. Biogenic unmodified gold nanoparticles for selective and quantitative detection of cerium using UV-vis spectroscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy (DLS).

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, E; Pradhan, N; Panda, P K; Mishra, B K

    2015-06-15

    The ability of self-functionalized biogenic GNPs towards highly selective colorimetric detection of rare earth element cerium is being reported for the first time. GNPs underwent rapid aggregation on addition of cerium indicated by red shift of SPR peak followed by complete precipitation. Hereby, this concept of co-ordination of cerium ions onto the GNP surface has been utilized for detection of cerium. The remarkable capacity of GNPs to sensitively detect Ce without proves beneficial compared to previous reports of colorimetric sensing. MDL was 15 and 35 ppm by DLS and UV-vis spectroscopy respectively, suggesting DLS to be highly sensitive and a practical alternative in ultrasensitive detection studies. The sensing system showed a good linear fit favouring feasible detection of cerium in range of 2-50 ppm. Similar studies further showed the superior selectivity of biogenic GNPs compared to chemically synthesized counterparts. The sensing system favours on-site analysis as it overcomes need of complex instrumentation, lengthy protocols and surface modification of GNP. PMID:25643600

  16. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (?=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(?=8?~14?m), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  17. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: II. In situ analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P.; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in individual biotite crystals in thin sections of ten metapelites and one syenite. The in situ XPS analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in biotite crystals in the metapelites were compared with published Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe values determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) for mineral separates from the same hand samples. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greatest for samples with the lowest Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe (by MS). For eight metamorphic biotites with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe = 9-27% comparison of the two techniques yielded a linear correlation of r = 0.94 and a statistically acceptable fit of [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub xps} = [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub ms}. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greater for two samples with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe {le} 6% (by MS). For biotite in the syenite sample, Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by both in situ XPS and bulk wet chemistry/electron probe microanalysis were similar. This contribution demonstrates that XPS can be used to analyze bulk Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in minerals in thin sections when appropriate precautions taken to avoid oxidation of the near-surface during preparation of samples. 25 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Quantitative compositional profiling of conjugated quantum dots with single atomic layer depth resolution via time-of-flight medium-energy ion scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kang-Won; Yu, Hyunung; Min, Won Ja; Yu, Kyu-Sang; Sortica, M A; Grande, Pedro L; Moon, DaeWon

    2014-01-21

    We report the quantitative compositional profiling of 3-5 nm CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with a perfluorooctanethiol (PFOT) layer using the newly developed time-of-flight (TOF) medium-energy ion scattering (MEIS) spectroscopy with single atomic layer resolution. The collection efficiency of TOF-MEIS is 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional MEIS, enabling the analysis of nanostructured materials with minimized ion beam damage and without ion neutralization problems. The spectra were analyzed using PowerMEIS ion scattering simulation software to allow a wide acceptance angle. Thus, the composition and core-shell structure of the CdSe cores and ZnS shells were determined with a 3% composition uncertainty and a 0.2-nm depth resolution. The number of conjugated PFOT molecules per QD was also quantified. The size and composition of the QDs were consistent with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. We suggest TOF-MEIS as a nanoanalysis technique to successfully elucidate the core-shell and conjugated layer structures of QDs, which is critical for the practical application of QDs in various nano- and biotechnologies. PMID:24350771

  19. A rapid qualitative and quantitative evaluation of grape berries at various stages of development using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Musingarabwi, Davirai M; Nieuwoudt, Hélène H; Young, Philip R; Eyéghè-Bickong, Hans A; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-01-01

    Fourier transform (FT) near-infrared (NIR) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) FT mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy were used to qualitatively and quantitatively analyse Vitis vinifera L. cv Sauvignon blanc grape berries. FT-NIR and ATR FT-MIR spectroscopy, coupled with spectral preprocessing and multivariate data analysis (MVDA), provided reliable methods to qualitatively assess berry samples at five distinct developmental stages: green, pre-véraison, véraison, post-véraison and ripe (harvest), without any prior metabolite extraction. Compared to NIR spectra, MIR spectra provided more reliable discrimination between the berry samples from the different developmental stages. Interestingly, ATR FT-MIR spectra from fresh homogenized berry samples proved more discriminatory than spectra from frozen homogenized berry samples. Different developmental stages were discriminated by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). In order to generate partial least squares (PLS) models from the MIR/NIR spectral datasets; the major sugars (glucose and fructose) and organic acids (malic acid, succinic acid and tartaric acid) were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the data used as a reference dataset. PLS regression was used to develop calibration models to predict the concentration of the major sugars and organic acids in the berry samples from different developmental stages. Our data show that infrared (IR) spectroscopy could provide a rapid, reproducible and cost-effective alternative to the chromatographic analysis of the sugar and organic acid composition of grape berries at various developmental stages, using small sample volumes and requiring limited sample preparation. This provides scope and support for the possible development of hand-held devices to assess quality parameters in field-settings in real-time and non-destructively using IR technologies. PMID:26212968

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Adulterations in Oat Flour by FT-NIR Spectroscopy, Incomplete Unbalanced Randomized Block Design, and Partial Least Squares

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xingxiang; Yu, Zhuo; Li, Guodong; Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper developed a rapid and nondestructive method for quantitative analysis of a cheaper adulterant (wheat flour) in oat flour by NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics. Reflectance FT-NIR spectra in the range of 4000 to 12000?cm?1 of 300 oat flour objects adulterated with wheat flour were measured. The doping levels of wheat flour ranged from 5% to 50% (w/w). To ensure the generalization performance of the method, both the oat and the wheat flour samples were collected from different producing areas and an incomplete unbalanced randomized block (IURB) design was performed to include the significant variations that may be encountered in future samples. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to develop calibration models for predicting the levels of wheat flour. Different preprocessing methods including smoothing, taking second-order derivative (D2), and standard normal variate (SNV) transformation were investigated to improve the model accuracy of PLS. The root mean squared error of Monte Carlo cross-validation (RMSEMCCV) and root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) were 1.921 and 1.975 (%, w/w) by D2-PLS, respectively. The results indicate that NIR and chemometrics can provide a rapid method for quantitative analysis of wheat flour in oat flour. PMID:25143857

  1. Quantitative Metabolomic Profiling of Serum, Plasma, and Urine by 1H NMR Spectroscopy Discriminates between Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serologic biomarkers for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have yielded variable differentiating ability. Quantitative analysis of a large number of metabolites is a promising method to detect IBD biomarkers. Human subjects with active Crohn’s disease (CD) and active ulcerative colitis (UC) were identified, and serum, plasma, and urine specimens were obtained. We characterized 44 serum, 37 plasma, and 71 urine metabolites by use of 1H NMR spectroscopy and “targeted analysis” to differentiate between diseased and non-diseased individuals, as well as between the CD and UC cohorts. We used multiblock principal component analysis and hierarchical OPLS-DA for comparing several blocks derived from the same “objects” (e.g., subject) to examine differences in metabolites. In serum and plasma of IBD patients, methanol, mannose, formate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate, and amino acids such as isoleucine were the metabolites most prominently increased, whereas in urine, maximal increases were observed for mannitol, allantoin, xylose, and carnitine. Both serum and plasma of UC and CD patients showed significant decreases in urea and citrate, whereas in urine, decreases were observed, among others, for betaine and hippurate. Quantitative metabolomic profiling of serum, plasma, and urine discriminates between healthy and IBD subjects. However, our results show that the metabolic differences between the CD and UC cohorts are less pronounced. PMID:22574726

  2. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy of complex technical mixtures using a virtual reference: chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of formaldehyde-water-1,3,5-trioxane.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Grützner, Thomas; Ströfer, Eckhard; Hasse, Hans

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to study chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of both the formation and decomposition of 1,3,5-trioxane in aqueous formaldehyde solutions. The reaction was homogeneously catalyzed with up to 0.10 g g(-1) sulfuric acid at temperatures between 360 and 383 K so that most of the experiments had to be carried out pressurized. The studied mixtures were complex due to the formation of methylene glycol and poly(oxymethylene) glycols in aqueous formaldehyde and the presence of considerable amounts of ionized species. Most common internal standards are decomposed by the hot sulfuric acid and external standards were not applicable using the flow NMR probe or pressurizable NMR sample tubes. Therefore, for the quantification of the small trioxane signals, a novel procedure was applied, in which electronically generated NMR signals were used as highly stable Virtual References (VR). The NMR decoupler channel with wave-form generator was used as the source of the reference signal, which was irradiated into the probe using the lock coil. Details on the experimental procedure are presented. It is shown that the presented method yields reliable quantitative reaction data for the complex studied mixtures. PMID:16773212

  3. Quantitative analysis of CN/TiCN/TiN multilayers and their thermal stability by Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, P.; Morant, C.; Climent-Font, A.; Munoz, A.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J.M.

    2006-03-15

    CN/TiCN/TiN multilayers and the respective single layers have been deposited on Si(100) substrates using a dual ion-beam sputtering system. Both the multilayers and the respective single layers have been chemically characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling combined with factor analysis and by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The combination of AES and RBS allows a quantitative chemical characterization of the multilayer and the respective single layers. Whereas RBS has some difficulties to determine the in-depth distribution of the light elements along the multilayer, AES depth profiling enables their quantitative analysis and even their chemical state along the multilayer. On the contrary, RBS shows its advantages to determine the heavy elements, including the contaminants incorporated during the deposition process (e.g., W). Under special experimental conditions it is shown that RBS is able to determine the composition of the single layers (i.e., CN/Si, TiCN/Si, and TiN/Si) in good agreement with AES depth profiling. As a result of this complementary use we obtain a complete quantitative chemical characterization of the single layers and multilayers. In addition, the thermal stability of the multilayers upon heating for 1 h in vacuum and ambient atmospheres at 500 deg. C has been studied by AES depth profiling. The results show that whereas the multilayer is stable in vacuum it undergoes significant changes when it is heated in air. In fact, it is shown that annealing in air for 1 h causes the disappearance of the CN top layer and the oxidation of the TiCN layer that leads to the formation of TiO{sub 2} on its surface.

  4. Quantitative Study of Liver Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Quality at 3T Using Body and Phased Array Coils with Physical Analysis and Clinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Gu, Shiyong; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Changhong; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the quality difference of short echo time (TE) breathhold 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the liver at 3.0T using the body and phased array coils, respectively. In total, 20 pairs of single-voxel proton spectra of the liver were acquired at 3.0T using the phased array and body coils as receivers. Consecutive stacks of breathhold spectra were acquired using the point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) technique at a short TE of 30 ms and a repetition time (TR) of 1500 ms. The first spectroscopy sequence was “copied” for the second acquisition to ensure identical voxel positioning. The MRS prescan adjustments of shimming and water suppression, signal-to noise ratio (SNR), and major liver quantitative information were compared between paired spectra. Theoretical calculation of the SNR and homogeneity of the region of interest (ROI, 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm) using different coils loaded with 3D liver electromagnetic model of real human body was implemented in the theoretical analysis. The theoretical analysis showed that, inside the ROI, the SNR of the phase array coil was 2.8387 times larger than that of body coil and the homogeneity of the phase array coil and body coil was 80.10% and 93.86%, respectively. The experimental results showed excellent correlations between the paired data (all r > 0.86). Compared with the body coil group, the phased array group had slightly worse shimming effect and better SNR (all P values < .01). The discrepancy of the line width because of the different coils was approximately 0.8 Hz (0.00625 ppm). No significant differences of the major liver quantitative information of Cho/Lip2 height, Cho/Lip2 area, and lipid content were observed (all P values >0.05). The theoretical analysis and clinical experiment showed that the phased array coil was superior to the body coil with respect to 3.0T breathhold hepatic proton MRS. PMID:25881016

  5. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  6. Quantitative PVP mapping in PVDF hollow fiber membranes by using Raman spectroscopy coupled with spectral chemiometrics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, E.; Gassara, S.; Petit, E.; Pochat-Bohatier, C.; Deratani, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication of fouling resistant UF membranes requires the use of hydrophilic polymer additives that must be trapped in the polymer matrix during the phase separation processing. The knowledge of the polymeric additive distribution across the whole thickness should help to the design of more efficient membranes. This paper aims at developing a new methodology based on Raman microscopy spectroscopy owing to its high spatial resolution. A UF hollow fiber made from a blend of PVDF as polymer matrix and PVP as additive was chosen as a model membrane for this study. The PVP concentration profile along the cross-section radial axis was determined by using two ways of spectrum treatment including the analytical method by the peak intensity ratio calculation and a multivariate analysis with a partial least-squares regression model. The feasibility of the two approaches was discussed.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of multiple adulterants in roasted coffee by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Reis, Nádia; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S

    2013-10-15

    The current study presents an application of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy for detection and quantification of fraudulent addition of commonly employed adulterants (spent coffee grounds, coffee husks, roasted corn and roasted barley) to roasted and ground coffee. Roasted coffee samples were intentionally blended with the adulterants (pure and mixed), with total adulteration levels ranging from 1% to 66% w/w. Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) was used to relate the processed spectra to the mass fraction of adulterants and the model obtained provided reliable predictions of adulterations at levels as low as 1% w/w. A robust methodology was implemented that included the detection of outliers. High correlation coefficients (0.99 for calibration; 0.98 for validation) coupled with low degrees of error (1.23% for calibration; 2.67% for validation) confirmed that DRIFTS can be a valuable analytical tool for detection and quantification of adulteration in ground, roasted coffee. PMID:24054633

  8. Rapid evaluation and quantitative analysis of thyme, origano and chamomile essential oils by ATR-IR and NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hartwig; Quilitzsch, Rolf; Krüger, Hans

    2003-12-01

    The essential oils obtained from various chemotypes of thyme, origano and chamomile species were studied by ATR/FT-IR as well as NIR spectroscopy. Application of multivariate statistics (PCA, PLS) in conjunction with analytical reference data leads to very good IR and NIR calibration results. For the main essential oil components (e.g. carvacrol, thymol, ?-terpinene, ?-bisabolol and ?-farnesene) standard errors are in the range of the applied GC reference method. In most cases the multiple coefficients of determination ( R2) are >0.97. Using the IR fingerprint region (900-1400 cm -1) a qualitative discrimination of the individual chemotypes is possible already by visual judgement without to apply any chemometric algorithms.The described rapid and non-destructive methods can be applied in industry to control very easily purifying, blending and redistillation processes of the mentioned essential oils.

  9. Quantitative Prediction of Beef Quality Using Visible and NIR Spectroscopy with Large Data Samples Under Industry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, T.; Ren, J.; Craigie, C.; Zabalza, J.; Maltin, Ch.; Marshall, S.

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that the eating quality of beef has a significant influence on the repurchase behavior of consumers. There are several key factors that affect the perception of quality, including color, tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. To support consumer repurchase choices, there is a need for an objective measurement of quality that could be applied to meat prior to its sale. Objective approaches such as offered by spectral technologies may be useful, but the analytical algorithms used remain to be optimized. For visible and near infrared (VISNIR) spectroscopy, Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) is a widely used technique for meat related quality modeling and prediction. In this paper, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) based machine learning approach is presented to predict beef eating quality traits. Although SVM has been successfully used in various disciplines, it has not been applied extensively to the analysis of meat quality parameters. To this end, the performance of PLSR and SVM as tools for the analysis of meat tenderness is evaluated, using a large dataset acquired under industrial conditions. The spectral dataset was collected using VISNIR spectroscopy with the wavelength ranging from 350 to 1800 nm on 234 beef M. longissimus thoracis steaks from heifers, steers, and young bulls. As the dimensionality with the VISNIR data is very high (over 1600 spectral bands), the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique was applied for feature extraction and data reduction. The extracted principal components (less than 100) were then used for data modeling and prediction. The prediction results showed that SVM has a greater potential to predict beef eating quality than PLSR, especially for the prediction of tenderness. The infl uence of animal gender on beef quality prediction was also investigated, and it was found that beef quality traits were predicted most accurately in beef from young bulls.

  10. Slow-spinning low-sideband HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy: delicate analysis of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Marie; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy has become an extremely versatile analytical tool to study heterogeneous systems endowed with liquid-like dynamics. Spinning frequencies of several kHz are however required to obtain NMR spectra, devoid of spinning sidebands, with a resolution approaching that of purely isotropic liquid samples. An important limitation of the method is the large centrifugal forces that can damage the structure of the sample. In this communication, we show that optimizing the sample preparation, particularly avoiding air bubbles, and the geometry of the sample chamber of the HR-MAS rotor leads to high-quality low-sideband NMR spectra even at very moderate spinning frequencies, thus allowing the use of well-established solution-state NMR procedures for the characterization of small and highly dynamic molecules in the most fragile samples, such as live cells and intact tissues. PMID:24284435

  11. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  12. Slow-spinning low-sideband HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy: delicate analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Marie; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy has become an extremely versatile analytical tool to study heterogeneous systems endowed with liquid-like dynamics. Spinning frequencies of several kHz are however required to obtain NMR spectra, devoid of spinning sidebands, with a resolution approaching that of purely isotropic liquid samples. An important limitation of the method is the large centrifugal forces that can damage the structure of the sample. In this communication, we show that optimizing the sample preparation, particularly avoiding air bubbles, and the geometry of the sample chamber of the HR-MAS rotor leads to high-quality low-sideband NMR spectra even at very moderate spinning frequencies, thus allowing the use of well-established solution-state NMR procedures for the characterization of small and highly dynamic molecules in the most fragile samples, such as live cells and intact tissues.

  13. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-05-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures ({alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  14. Relating Intercellular Variability in Nanoparticle Uptake with Biological Consequence: A Quantitative X-ray Fluorescence Study for Radiosensitization of Cells.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Tyron; Douglass, Michael; Paterson, David; Bezak, Eva; Thierry, Benjamin; Kempson, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Internalized gold nanoparticles were quantified in large numbers of individual prostate cancer cells using large area synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Cells were also irradiated with a 6 MV linear accelerator to assess the biological consequence of radiosensitization with gold nanoparticles. A large degree of heterogeneity in nanoparticle uptake between cells resulted in influenced biological effect. PMID:26461268

  15. Kinetic multichannel spectroscopy of biological molecules: decomposition of the spectral matrix.

    PubMed

    Zimányi, László

    2002-01-01

    The time-resolved difference spectra after flash excitation of various biological molecules are measured on a gated optical multichannel analyzer. Electron transfer between the photoactive covalent label thiouredopyrene-trisulfonate and the heme of cytochrome c and the photocycle of the E204Q mutant bacteriorhodopsin are studied. The spectral matrices containing consecutive difference spectra are analyzed to reveal the reaction kinetics and individual component spectra. Singular value decomposition combined with stoichiometric analysis and self-modeling is demonstrated as a tool for successful dissection of the matrix, despite the difficulties arising from broad, featureless, overlapping spectra and the overlapping kinetics of the components. PMID:12012443

  16. Combining 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate regression techniques to quantitatively determine falsification of porcine heparin with bovine species.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2015-11-10

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to distinguish pure porcine heparin and porcine heparin blended with bovine species and to quantify the degree of such adulteration. For multivariate modelling several statistical methods such as partial least squares regression (PLS), ridge regression (RR), stepwise regression with variable selection (SR), stepwise principal component regression (SPCR) were utilized for modeling NMR data of in-house prepared blends (n=80). The models were exhaustively validated using independent test and prediction sets. PLS and RR showed the best performance for estimating heparin falsification regarding its animal origin with the limit of detection (LOD) and root mean square error of validation (RMSEV) below 2% w/w and 1% w/w, respectively. Reproducibility expressed in coefficients of variation was estimated to be below 10% starting from approximately 5% w/w of bovine adulteration. Acceptable calibration model was obtained by SPCR, by its application range was limited, whereas SR is least recommended for heparin matrix. The developed method was found to be applicable also to heparinoid matrix (not purified heparin). In this case root mean square of prediction (RMSEP) and LOD were approximately 7% w/w and 8% w/w, respectively. The simple and cheap NMR method is recommended for screening of heparin animal origin in parallel with official NMR test of heparin authenticity and purity. PMID:26319747

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Content in Bituminous Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using UV Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiongwei; Mao, Xianglei; Wang, Zhe; Richard, E. Russo

    2015-11-01

    The carbon content of bituminous coal samples was analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The 266 nm laser radiation was utilized for laser ablation and plasma generation in air. The partial least square method and the dominant factor based PLS method were used to improve the measurement accuracy of the carbon content of coal. The results showed that the PLS model could achieve good measurement accuracy, and the dominant factor based PLS model could further improve the measurement accuracy. The coefficient of determination and the root-mean-square error of prediction of the PLS model were 0.97 and 2.19%, respectively; and those values for the dominant factor based PLS model were 0.99 and 1.51%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the 266 nm wavelength could accurately measure the carbon content of bituminous coal. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51276100) and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2013CB228501). The authors also thank the financial funding from the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Science Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (No. 2013CB228501)

  18. Quantitative analysis of toxic metals lead and cadmium in water jet by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheri, M. Sadegh; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2011-03-20

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the analysis of toxic metals Pb and Cd in Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O aqueous solutions, respectively. The plasma is generated by focusing a nanosecond Nd:YAG ({lambda}=1064 nm) laser on the surface of liquid in the homemade liquid jet configuration. With an assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), calibration curves of Pb and Cd were obtained at different delay times between 1 to 5 {mu}s. The temporal behavior of limit of detections (LOD) was investigated and it is shown that the minimum LODs for Pb and Cd are 4 and 68 parts in 10{sup 6} (ppm), respectively. In order to demonstrate the correctness of the LTE assumption, plasma parameters including plasma temperature and electron density are evaluated, and it is shown that the LTE condition is satisfied at all delay times.

  19. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: I. Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P.; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe were calibrated with nine single crystals of biotite of known Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe content. Peak shape parameters for the component Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} Fe 3p peaks were obtained by a constrained lease squares fitting method that minimized the difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by XPS and wet chemistry/electron microprobe (WCEM) analyses. Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} peak separation was estimated from the separation of minima in the second derivative of Fe 3p spectra. The single set of derived peak parameters yielded a good linear correlation (r = 0.87) between XPS and WCEM values over the sample displaying progressive oxidation during XPS analysis resulted in Fe{sup 2} and Fe{sup 3+} component peak shapes largely consistent with the constrained least squares fitting methods. Beam damage, which appeared to be restricted to three single crystals with low {Sigma}Fe, low Fe/Mg, and high Fe(II)/{Sigma}Fe, caused increases in Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe that were proportional to the duration of sample exposure. 60 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  1. Gannet: A Batch-Processing Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid–Edited MR Spectroscopy Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Edden, Richard A.E.; Puts, Nicolaas A.J.; Harris, Ashley D.; Barker, Peter B.; Evans, C. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe the Gannet toolkit for the quantitative batch analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -edited MRS data. Materials and Methods Using MEGA-PRESS editing and standard acquisition parameters, four MEGA-PRESS spectra were acquired in three brain regions in 10 healthy volunteers. These 120 datasets were processed without user intervention with Gannet, a Matlab-based tool that takes raw time-domain data input, processes it to generate the frequency-domain edited spectrum, and applies a simple modeling procedure to estimate GABA concentration relative to the creatine or, if provided, the unsuppressed water signal. A comparison of four modeling approaches is also presented. Results All data were successfully processed by Gannet. Coefficients of variation across subjects ranged from 11% for the occipital region to 17% for the dorsolateral prefrontal region. There was no clear difference in fitting performance between the simple Gaussian model used by Gannet and the other more complex models presented. Conclusion Gannet, the GABA Analysis Toolkit, can be used to process and quantify GABA-edited MRS spectra without user intervention. PMID:25548816

  2. 2D IR spectroscopy using four-wave mixing, pulse shaping, and IR upconversion: a quantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M

    2013-07-25

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase-cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase. PMID:23687988

  3. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biological tissues using projected magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Jachmann, Rebecca C; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject to anisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample about the magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. In projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about two angles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method of obtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MAS experiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at the magic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints, allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such as the shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The application of this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof of principle for future biological or medical applications. PMID:16032677

  4. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  5. QUANTITATIVE SPECTROSCOPY OF BLUE SUPERGIANT STARS IN THE DISK OF M81: METALLICITY, METALLICITY GRADIENT, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Gazak, Zachary; Bresolin, Fabio; Przybilla, Norbert; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz E-mail: urbaneja@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl

    2012-03-01

    The quantitative spectral analysis of low-resolution ({approx}5 A) Keck LRIS spectra of blue supergiants in the disk of the giant spiral galaxy M81 is used to determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, luminosities, interstellar reddening, and a new distance using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship. Substantial reddening and extinction are found with E(B - V) ranging between 0.13 and 0.38 mag and an average value of 0.26 mag. The distance modulus obtained after individual reddening corrections is 27.7 {+-} 0.1 mag. The result is discussed with regard to recently measured tip of the red giant branch and Cepheid distances. The metallicities (based on elements such as iron, titanium, magnesium) are supersolar ( Almost-Equal-To 0.2 dex) in the inner disk (R {approx}< 5 kpc) and slightly subsolar ( Almost-Equal-To - 0.05 dex) in the outer disk (R {approx}> 10 kpc) with a shallow metallicity gradient of 0.034 dex kpc{sup -1}. The comparison with published oxygen abundances of planetary nebulae and metallicities determined through fits of Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams indicates a late metal enrichment and a flattening of the abundance gradient over the last 5 Gyr. This might be the result of gas infall from metal-rich satellite galaxies. Combining these M81 metallicities with published blue supergiant abundance studies in the Local Group and the Sculptor Group, a galaxy mass-metallicity relationship based solely on stellar spectroscopic studies is presented and compared with recent studies of Sloan Digital Sky Survey star-forming galaxies.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  7. On-line quantitative monitoring of liquid-liquid extraction of Lonicera japonica and Artemisia annua using near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sha; Jin, Ye; Liu, Qian; Liu, Qi-an; Wu, Jianxiong; Bi, Yu-an; Wang, Zhengzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Liquid-liquid extraction of Lonicera japonica and Artemisia annua (JQ) plays a significant role in manufacturing Reduning injection. Many process parameters may influence liquid-liquid extraction and cause fluctuations in product quality. Objective: To develop a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy method for on-line monitoring of liquid-liquid extraction of JQ. Materials and Methods: Eleven batches of JQ extraction solution were obtained, ten for building quantitative models and one for assessing the predictive accuracy of established models. Neochlorogenic acid (NCA), chlorogenic acid (CA), cryptochlorogenic acid (CCA), isochlorogenic acid B (ICAB), isochlorogenic acid A (ICAA), isochlorogenic acid C (ICAC) and soluble solid content (SSC) were selected as quality control indicators, and measured by reference methods. NIR spectra were collected in transmittance mode. After selecting the spectral sub-ranges, optimizing the spectral pretreatment and neglecting outliers, partial least squares regression models were built to predict the content of indicators. The model performance was evaluated by the coefficients of determination (R2), the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) and the relative standard error of prediction (RSEP). Results: For NCA, CA, CCA, ICAB, ICAA, ICAC and SSC, R2 was 0.9674, 0.9704, 0.9641, 0.9514, 0.9436, 0.9640, 0.9809, RMSEP was 0.0280, 0.2913, 0.0710, 0.0590, 0.0815, 0.1506, 1.167, and RSEP was 2.32%, 4.14%, 3.86%, 5.65%, 7.29%, 6.95% and 4.18%, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy could provide good predictive ability in monitoring of the content of quality control indicators in liquid-liquid extraction of JQ. PMID:26246744

  8. Direct Analysis of Free and Sulfite-Bound Carbonyl Compounds in Wine by Two-Dimensional Quantitative Proton and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2015-11-01

    Recent developments that have accelerated 2D NMR methods and improved quantitation have made these methods accessible analytical procedures, and the large signal dispersion allows for the analysis of complex samples. Few natural samples are as complex as wine, so the application to challenges in wine analysis look promising. The analysis of carbonyl compounds in wine, key oxidation products, is complicated by a multitude of kinetically reversible adducts, such as acetals and sulfonates, so that sample preparation steps can generate complex interferences. These challenges could be overcome if the compounds could be quantified in situ. Here, two-dimensional ((1)H-(1)H) homonuclear and heteronuclear ((13)C-(1)H) single quantum correlations (correlation spectroscopy, COSY, and heteronuclear single quantum coherence, HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of undiluted wine samples were observed at natural abundance. These techniques achieve simultaneous direct identification and quantitation of acetaldehyde, pyruvic acid, acetoin, methylglyoxal, and ?-ketoglutaric acid in wine with only a small addition of D2O. It was also possible to observe and sometimes quantify the sulfite, hydrate, and acetal forms of the carbonyl compounds. The accuracy of the method was tested in wine samples by spiking with a mixture of all analytes at different concentrations. The method was applied to 15 wine samples of various vintages and grape varieties. The application of this method could provide a powerful tool to better understand the development, evolution, and perception of wine oxidation and insight into the impact of these sulfite bound carbonyls on antimicrobial and antioxidant action by SO2. PMID:26348554

  9. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  10. Applications of High Resolution Laser: Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  11. Microscopic emission and reflectance thermal infrared spectroscopy: instrumentation for quantitative in situ mineralogy of complex planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C S; Christensen, P R

    2013-04-10

    The diversity of investigations of planetary surfaces, especially Mars, using in situ instrumentation over the last decade is unprecedented in the exploration history of our solar system. The style of instrumentation that landed spacecraft can support is dependent on several parameters, including mass, power consumption, instrument complexity, cost, and desired measurement type (e.g., chemistry, mineralogy, petrology, morphology, etc.), all of which must be evaluated when deciding an appropriate spacecraft payload. We present a laboratory technique for a microscopic emission and reflectance spectrometer for the analysis of martian analog materials as a strong candidate for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to definitively assess sample mineralogy and petrology while preserving geologic context. We discuss the instrument capabilities, signal and noise, and overall system performance. We evaluate the ability of this instrument to quantitatively determine sample mineralogy, including bulk mineral abundances. This capability is greatly enhanced. Whereas the number of mineral components observed from existing emission spectrometers is high (often >5 to 10 depending on the number of accessory and alteration phases present), the number of mineral components at any microscopic measurement spot is low (typically <2 to 3). Since this style of instrument is based on a long heritage of thermal infrared emission spectrometers sent to orbit (the thermal emission spectrometer), sent to planetary surfaces [the mini-thermal emission spectrometers (mini-TES)], and evaluated in laboratory environments (e.g., the Arizona State University emission spectrometer laboratory), direct comparisons to existing data are uniquely possible with this style of instrument. The ability to obtain bulk mineralogy and atmospheric data, much in the same manner as the mini-TESs, is of significant additional value and maintains the long history of atmospheric monitoring for Mars. Miniaturization of this instrument has also been demonstrated, as the same microscope objective has been mounted to a flight-spare mini-TES. Further miniaturization of this instrument is straightforward with modern electronics, and the development of this instrument as an arm-mounted device is the end goal. PMID:23670748

  12. A meta-classifier for detecting prostate cancer by quantitative integration of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Recently, in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) have emerged as promising new modalities to aid in prostate cancer (CaP) detection. MRI provides anatomic and structural information of the prostate while MRS provides functional data pertaining to biochemical concentrations of metabolites such as creatine, choline and citrate. We have previously presented a hierarchical clustering scheme for CaP detection on in vivo prostate MRS and have recently developed a computer-aided method for CaP detection on in vivo prostate MRI. In this paper we present a novel scheme to develop a meta-classifier to detect CaP in vivo via quantitative integration of multimodal prostate MRS and MRI by use of non-linear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods including spectral clustering and locally linear embedding (LLE). Quantitative integration of multimodal image data (MRI and PET) involves the concatenation of image intensities following image registration. However multimodal data integration is non-trivial when the individual modalities include spectral and image intensity data. We propose a data combination solution wherein we project the feature spaces (image intensities and spectral data) associated with each of the modalities into a lower dimensional embedding space via NLDR. NLDR methods preserve the relationships between the objects in the original high dimensional space when projecting them into the reduced low dimensional space. Since the original spectral and image intensity data are divorced from their original physical meaning in the reduced dimensional space, data at the same spatial location can be integrated by concatenating the respective embedding vectors. Unsupervised consensus clustering is then used to partition objects into different classes in the combined MRS and MRI embedding space. Quantitative results of our multimodal computer-aided diagnosis scheme on 16 sets of patient data obtained from the ACRIN trial, for which corresponding histological ground truth for spatial extent of CaP is known, show a marginally higher sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value compared to corresponding CAD results with the individual modalities.

  13. Identification of antibody isotypes in biological fluids by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo-Andrade, C.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Barbosa-Sabanero, G.; Frausto-Reyes, C.

    2008-02-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infections, generally are realized by serological methods, which identifies the antibodies presents in serum or tissue fluids of the patient. Antibodies are proteins present in our bodies that aid in the elimination of pathogens or antigens. Identification of antibodies isotypes is important because can help to predict when and whether patients will recover from infections and are commonly diagnosed by means of indirect methods such as serological test. In the other hand, the majority of these methods requires specific kits for the analysis, special sample preparation, chemical reagents, expensive equipment and require long time for getting results. In this work we show the feasibility to discriminate antibody isotypes in biological fluids like human colostrum by means of Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics. Spectra were obtained using an excitation wavelength of 514 nm over dried samples of human colostrum labeled previously as positives to specific IgG and IgM antibodies against Toxoplasma Gondii by means of ELISA test. Partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to discriminate among antibody isotypes by use second derivative of Raman spectra of colostrum samples.

  14. Sensitivity of coded aperture Raman spectroscopy to analytes beneath turbid biological tissue and tissue-simulating phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Jason R.; Matthews, Thomas E.; Reid, Ashley K.; Katz, David F.; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Traditional slit-based spectrometers have an inherent trade-off between spectral resolution and throughput that can limit their performance when measuring diffuse sources such as light returned from highly scattering biological tissue. Recently, multielement fiber bundles have been used to effectively measure diffuse sources, e.g., in the field of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy, by remapping the source (or some region of the source) into a slit shape for delivery to the spectrometer. Another approach is to change the nature of the instrument by using a coded entrance aperture, which can increase throughput without sacrificing spectral resolution. In this study, two spectrometers, one with a slit-based entrance aperture and the other with a coded aperture, were used to measure Raman spectra of an analyte as a function of the optical properties of an overlying scattering medium. Power-law fits reveal that the analyte signal is approximately proportional to the number of transport mean free paths of the scattering medium raised to a power of ?0.47 (coded aperture instrument) or ?1.09 (slit-based instrument). These results demonstrate that the attenuation in signal intensity is more pronounced for the slit-based instrument and highlight the scattering regimes where coded aperture instruments can provide an advantage over traditional slit-based spectrometers. PMID:25371979

  15. Time-Resolved Quantitative Measurement of OH HO2 and CH2O in Fuel Oxidation Reactions by High Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Haifeng; Rotavera, Brandon; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-08-01

    Combined with a Herriott-type multi-pass slow flow reactor, high-resolution differential direct absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe, in situ and quantitatively, hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxy (HO 2 ) and formaldehyde (CH 2 O) molecules in fuel oxidation reactions in the reactor, with a time resolution of about 1 micro-second. While OH and CH 2 O are probed in the mid-infrared (MIR) region near 2870nm and 3574nm respectively, HO 2 can be probed in both regions: near-infrared (NIR) at 1509nm and MIR at 2870nm. Typical sensitivities are on the order of 10 10 - 10 11 molecule cm -3 for OH at 2870nm, 10 11 molecule cm -3 for HO 2 at 1509nm, and 10 11 molecule cm -3 for CH 2 O at 3574nm. Measurements of multiple important intermediates (OH and HO 2 ) and product (CH 2 O) facilitate to understand and further validate chemical mechanisms of fuel oxidation chemistry.

  16. Reduced cortical microvascular oxygenation in multiple sclerosis: a blinded, case-controlled study using a novel quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Runze; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxia (low oxygen) is associated with many brain disorders as well as inflammation, but the lack of widely available technology has limited our ability to study hypoxia in human brain. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a poorly understood neurological disease with a significant inflammatory component which may cause hypoxia. We hypothesized that if hypoxia were to occur, there should be reduced microvascular hemoglobin saturation (StO2). In this study, we aimed to determine if reduced StO2 can be detected in MS using frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy (fdNIRS). We measured fdNIRS data in cortex and assessed disability of 3 clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), 72 MS patients and 12 controls. Control StO2 was 63.5?±?3% (mean?±?SD). In MS patients, 42% of StO2 values were more than 2?×?SD lower than the control mean. There was a significant relationship between StO2 and clinical disability. A reduced microvascular StO2 is supportive (although not conclusive) that there may be hypoxic regions in MS brain. This is the first study showing how quantitative NIRS can be used to detect reduced StO2 in patients with MS, opening the door to understanding how microvascular oxygenation impacts neurological conditions.

  17. Reduced cortical microvascular oxygenation in multiple sclerosis: a blinded, case-controlled study using a novel quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runze; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia (low oxygen) is associated with many brain disorders as well as inflammation, but the lack of widely available technology has limited our ability to study hypoxia in human brain. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a poorly understood neurological disease with a significant inflammatory component which may cause hypoxia. We hypothesized that if hypoxia were to occur, there should be reduced microvascular hemoglobin saturation (StO2). In this study, we aimed to determine if reduced StO2 can be detected in MS using frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy (fdNIRS). We measured fdNIRS data in cortex and assessed disability of 3 clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), 72 MS patients and 12 controls. Control StO2 was 63.5?±?3% (mean?±?SD). In MS patients, 42% of StO2 values were more than 2?×?SD lower than the control mean. There was a significant relationship between StO2 and clinical disability. A reduced microvascular StO2 is supportive (although not conclusive) that there may be hypoxic regions in MS brain. This is the first study showing how quantitative NIRS can be used to detect reduced StO2 in patients with MS, opening the door to understanding how microvascular oxygenation impacts neurological conditions. PMID:26563581

  18. Features of nuclear magnetic resonance signals registration in weak magnetic fields for express – control of biological solutions and liquid medium by nuclear magnetic spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karseev, A.; Vologdin, V.; Davydov, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a method of nuclear magnetic spectroscopy in weak magnetic fields, as well as the peculiarities that arise when experimental studies conducting of biological fluids and liquid medium. The proposed method allows to measure of the condensed matter relaxation constants in weak magnetic fields by the method of nuclear magnetic resonance for express control of their condition at the place of study. The accuracy smaller than 1%. The results of experimental studies of various fluids and their mixtures are presented.

  19. The BioCAT undulator beamline 18ID: A facility for biological non-crystalline diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischetti, R.; Stepanov, S.; Rosenbaum, G.; Barrea, R.; Black, E.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Kondrashkina, E.; Kropf, A.J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, K.; Irving, T.C.; Bunker, G.B.

    2008-07-02

    The 18ID undulator beamline of the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, USA, is a high-performance instrument designed for, and dedicated to, the study of partially ordered and disordered biological materials using the techniques of small-angle X-ray scattering, fiber diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The beamline and associated instrumentation are described in detail and examples of the representative experimental results are presented.

  20. Quantitation of soy-derived phytoestrogens in human breast tissue and biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Julie; Bracke, Marc E; Heyerick, Arne; Depypere, Herman T; Serreyn, Rudolphe F; Mareel, Marc M; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2003-01-25

    A new and reliable HPLC method for the quantitation of daidzein, equol, and genistein in human breast tissue has been developed. The method was applied to biopsies from women undergoing breast reductions, who, prior to surgery, had ingested either a soy isoflavone preparation or a placebo tablet. The results were compared with data collected for urine and serum of the same subjects using standard methods. The limits of detection in the breast tissue homogenate were 24.7 nmol/l for daidzein, 148.0 nmol/l for equol, and 28.4 nmol/l for genistein (S/N of 3). The chromatographic limits of quantitation were 62.5 nmol/l for daidzein and genistein, and 125.0 nmol/l for equol, for which the accuracies were 86.0%, 83.6%, and 81.8%, respectively. The coefficients of variation of these measurements were all below 20% (11.1% for daidzein, 16.4% for genistein, and 13.2% for equol). The sample preparation comprised a concentration step and the absolute limits of quantitation were, therefore, 4.7 nmol/l, 18.8 nmol/l, and 0.94 nmol/l for daidzein and genistein, and 9.4 nmol/l, 37.5 nmol/l, and 1.9 nmol/l for equol in urine, serum, and breast tissue homogenate, respectively. Recoveries were between 70% (+/-5.6%) in breast tissue homogenate and 100% (+/-14.1%) in urine and serum for all three compounds. Equol (less than 1 micromol/l homogenate) was found to be the predominant phytoestrogen in breast tissue and its concentrations exceeded those in serum. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were at least 100-fold higher in urine than in serum and breast tissue. PMID:12504192

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehling, Randy L.

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy refers to measurement of the absorption of different frequencies of IR radiation by foods or other solids, liquids, or gases. IR spectroscopy began in 1800 with an experiment by Herschel. When he used a prism to create a spectrum from white light and placed a thermometer at a point just beyond the red region of the spectrum, he noted an increase in temperature. This was the first observation of the effects of IR radiation. By the 1940s, IR spectroscopy had become an important tool used by chemists to identify functional groups in organic compounds. In the 1970s, commercial near-IR reflectance instruments were introduced that provided rapid quantitative determinations of moisture, protein, and fat in cereal grains and other foods. Today, IR spectroscopy is used widely in the food industry for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of ingredients and finished foods.

  2. Evaluation of Early Osteochondral Defect Repair in a Rabbit Model Utilizing Fourier Transform–Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Quantitative T2 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minwook; Foo, Li F.; Uggen, Christopher; Lyman, Steven; Ryaby, James T.; Moynihan, Daniel P.; Grande, Daniel Anthony; Potter, Hollis G.

    2010-01-01

    Context Evaluation of the morphology and matrix composition of repair cartilage is a critical step toward understanding the natural history of cartilage repair and efficacy of potential therapeutics. In the current study, short-term articular cartilage repair (3 and 6 weeks) was evaluated in a rabbit osteochondral defect model treated with thrombin peptide (TP-508) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), quantitative T2 mapping, and Fourier transform–infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Methods Three-mm-diameter osteochondral defects were made in the rabbit trochlear groove and filled with either TP-508 plus poly-lactoglycolidic acid microspheres or poly-lactoglycolidic acid microspheres alone (placebo). Repair tissue and adjacent normal cartilage were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks postdefect creation. Intact knees were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging for repair morphology, and with quantitative T2 mapping to assess collagen orientation. Histological sections were evaluated by FT-IRIS for parameters that reflect collagen quantity and quality, as well as proteoglycan (PG) content. Results and Conclusion There was no significant difference in volume of repair tissue at either time point. At 6 weeks, placebo repair tissue demonstrated longer T2 values (p?

  3. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Schütz, C L; Brochhausen, C; Hampel, G; Iffland, D; Kuczewski, B; Otto, G; Schmitz, T; Stieghorst, C; Kratz, J V

    2012-10-01

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. PMID:22918535

  4. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's. PMID:26518012

  5. Application of NIR spectroscopy for the quality control of mangosteen pericarp powder: quantitative analysis of alpha-mangostin in mangosteen pericarp powder and capsule.

    PubMed

    Peerapattana, Jomjai; Otsuka, Kuniko; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was applied to the quantitative analysis of the concentration of alpha-mangostin (aM) in mangosteen pericarp powder (MP). The predicted results from the partial least squares chemometric method of various pretreatment data were compared to obtain the best calibration model. Two different types of containers (transparent capsules and glass vials) filled with the same samples were measured. For MP mixture in vials, the calibration model involving nine principal components (PC) could predict the amount of aM most accurately based on non-pretreatment spectral data. For MP mixture in capsules, the calibration model involving nine PC could predict the amount of aM most accurately based on first-derivative pretreatment spectra. The relationships of the calibration models for both samples had sufficiently linear plots. The standard error of cross-validation for the MP mixture in vials was lower and the R(2) values of validation were higher compared to the MP mixture in capsules. The equation for prediction of the concentration of aM in MP mixtures in vials is y = 0.9775x + 0.0425 with R(2) = 0.9950 and for those in capsules is y = 1.0264x + 0.0126 with R(2) = 0.9898. Both validation results indicated that the concentrations of aM in MP mixtures were predicted with sufficient accuracy and repeatability. NIR can be a useful tool for the quality control of herbal medicine in powder form without any sample preparation. The type and the shape of the container should be considered to obtain more accurate data. PMID:22926311

  6. Assessment of Technical and Biological Parameters of Volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography in the Foot: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kirk E.; Whiting, Bruce R.; Reiker, Gregory G.; Commean, Paul K.; Sinacore, David R.; Prior, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies exist for bone densitometry of the whole foot. A phantom study demonstrated the sources of error and necessary controls for accurate quantitative computed tomography of the foot. A loss in bone mineral density in the small foot bones may be an early indicator of diabetic foot complications. Purpose Volumetric quantitative computed tomography (vQCT) facilitates assessment of pedal bone osteopenia, which in the presence of peripheral neuropathy may well be an early sign of diabetic foot deformity. To date, sources and magnitudes of error in foot vQCT measurements have not been reported. Methods Foot phantoms were scanned using a 64-slice CT scanner. Energy (kVp), table height, phantom size and orientation, location of “bone” inserts, insert material, location of calibration phantom, and reconstruction kernel were systematically varied during scan acquisition. Results Energy (kVp) and distance from the isocenter (table height) resulted in relative attenuation changes from ?5% to 22% and ?5% to 0%, respectively, and average bone mineral density (BMD) changes from ?0.9% to 0.0% and ?1.1% to 0.3%, respectively, compared to a baseline 120 kVp scan performed at the isocenter. BMD compared to manufacturer specified values ranged on average from ?2.2% to 0.9%. Phantom size and location of bone-equivalent material inserts resulted in relative attenuation changes of ?1.2% to 1.4% compared to the medium sized phantom. Conclusion This study demonstrated that variations in kVp and table height can be controlled using a calibration phantom scanned at the same energy and height as a foot phantom; however, error due to soft tissue thickness and location of bones within a foot cannot be controlled using a calibration phantom alone. PMID:22147208

  7. Quantitative and in toto imaging in ascidians: working toward an image-centric systems biology of chordate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Veeman, Michael; Reeves, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Developmental biology relies heavily on microscopy to image the finely controlled cell behaviors that drive embryonic development. Most embryos are large enough that a field of view with the resolution and magnification needed to resolve single cells will not span more than a small region of the embryo. Ascidian embryos, however, are sufficiently small that they can be imaged in toto with fine subcellular detail using conventional microscopes and objectives. Unlike other model organisms with particularly small embryos, ascidians have a chordate embryonic body plan that includes a notochord, hollow dorsal neural tube, heart primordium and numerous other anatomical details conserved with the vertebrates. Here we compare the size and anatomy of ascidian embryos with those of more traditional model organisms, and relate these features to the capabilities of both conventional and exotic imaging methods. We review the emergence of Ciona and related ascidian species as model organisms for a new era of image-based developmental systems biology. We conclude by discussing some important challenges in ascidian imaging and image analysis that remain to be solved. PMID:25262824

  8. Adsorption of small biological molecules on silica from diluted aqueous solutions: Quantitative characterization and implications to the Bernal's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Khil'Chevskaya, Elena G.

    1995-08-01

    To describe quantitatively the adsorption of prebiotically important compounds of low molecular weight (amino acids, short linear peptides, cyclic dipeptides, the Krebs's cycle and other carboxylic acids, nucleosides and related phosphates) on silica surface from diluted neutral aqueous solutions, equilibrium constants (K) and free energies (-?G) of adsorption were determined from the retention values measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on a silica gel column and from the isotherms measured under static conditions. For most carboxylic acids (including amino acids and linear peptides) -?G values were negative and K<1, thus showing very weak adsorption. Cyclic dipeptides (2,5-piperazinediones) exhibited higher adsorbability; -?G>0 and K>1 were found for most of them. Influence of the structure of ?-substituent on the adsorbability is analyzed. A linear dependence of -?G on the number of aliphatic carbon atoms in a sorbate molecule was found for the series of aliphatic bifunctional amino acids, related dipeptides and 2,5-piperazinediones, as well as for the row from glycine to triglycyl glycine. The adsorption of nucleosides and their phosphates is characterized by much higherK and -?G values (of the order of 102 and 104, respectively). The adsorption data available from our work and literature are summarized and discussed with implications to the Bernal's hypothesis on the roles of solid surfaces in the prebiotic formation of biopolymers from monomeric ‘building blocks’.

  9. Improving fundamental abilities of atomic force microscopy for investigating quantitative nanoscale physical properties of complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.

    Measurements of local material properties of complex biological systems (e.g. live cells and viruses) in their respective physiological conditions are extremely important in the fields of biophysics, nanotechnology, material science, and nanomedicine. Yet, little is known about the structure-function-property relationship of live cells and viruses. In the case of live cells, the measurements of progressive variations in viscoelastic properties in vitro can provide insight to the mechanistic processes underpinning morphogenesis, mechano-transduction, motility, metastasis, and many more fundamental cellular processes. In the case of living viruses, the relationship between capsid structural framework and the role of the DNA molecule interaction within viruses influencing their stiffness, damping and electrostatic properties can shed light in virological processes like protein subunits assembly/dissassembly, maturation, and infection. The study of mechanics of live cells and viruses has been limited in part due to the lack of technology capable of acquiring high-resolution (nanoscale, subcellular) images of its heterogeneous material properties which vary widely depending on origin and physical interaction. The capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for measuring forces and topography with sub-nm precision have greatly contributed to research related to biophysics and biomechanics during the past two decades. AFM based biomechanical studies have the unique advantage of resolving/mapping spatially the local material properties over living cells and viruses. However, conventional AFM techniques such as force-volume and quasi-static force-distance curves are too low resolution and low speed to resolve interesting biophysical processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics for cells or assembly/dissasembly of viruses. To overcome this bottleneck, a novel atomic force microscopy mode is developed, that leads to sub-10-nm resolution and sub-15-minutes mapping of local material properties of living cells and viruses in their respective physiological conditions. This advance is based on the harnessing of sub and superharmonic channels of cantilever vibration which are especially strong in liquids environments, which enable the mapping with exquisite detail of nanoscale material properties. Material properties such as storage and loss modulus or the spring and damping constant in live cells and the repulsive electrostatic force gradient, hydration layer viscosity and adhesion on viruses. By the use of this multi-harmonic dynamic AFM technique using a commercial AFM system, the local material properties of live rat fibroblast cells (RFB), red blood cells (RBC), human breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231), and bacteriophage ?29 mature virions have been successfully imaged and extracted in relevant physiological conditions. Also, a novel high-speed dynamic AFM technique is developed to image at higher spatiotemporal resolution whole live cells under physiological conditions. This high-throughput technology enables the study of cellular processes in near real time frames, for example, the cytoskeleton structure dynamics of live fibroblast cells and human breast carcinoma cells. Overall, the contributions described in this thesis demonstrate the robustness and versatility of these novel advanced dynamic AFM techniques to investigate a wide range of complex biological relevant problems.

  10. Spatially Localized Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy via Intermolecular Double-Quantum Coherences for Biological Samples at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chunhua; Cai, Shuhui; Huang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) constitutes a mainstream technique for characterizing biological samples. Benefiting from the separation of chemical shifts and J couplings, spatially localized two-dimensional (2D) J-resolved spectroscopy (JPRESS) shows better identification of complex metabolite resonances than one-dimensional MRS does and facilitates the extraction of J coupling information. However, due to variations of macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological samples, conventional JPRESS spectra generally suffer from the influence of field inhomogeneity. In this paper, we investigated the implementation of the localized 2D J-resolved spectroscopy based on intermolecular double-quantum coherences (iDQCs) on a 7 T MRI scanner. Materials and Methods A ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) aqueous solution, an intact pig brain tissue, and a whole fish (Harpadon nehereus) were explored by using the localized iDQC J-resolved spectroscopy (iDQCJRES) method, and the results were compared to those obtained by using the conventional 2D JPRESS method. Results Inhomogeneous line broadening, caused by the variations of macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in the detected biological samples (the intact pig brain tissue and the whole fish), degrades the quality of 2D JPRESS spectra, particularly when a large voxel is selected and some strongly structured components are included (such as the fish spinal cord). By contrast, high-resolution 2D J-resolved information satisfactory for metabolite analyses can be obtained from localized 2D iDQCJRES spectra without voxel size limitation and field shimming. From the contrastive experiments, it is obvious that the spectral information observed in the localized iDQCJRES spectra acquired from large voxels without field shimming procedure (i.e. in inhomogeneous fields) is similar to that provided by the JPRESS spectra acquired from small voxels after field shimming procedure (i.e. in relatively homogeneous fields). Conclusion The localized iDQCJRES method holds advantage for recovering high-resolution 2D J-resolved information from inhomogeneous fields caused by external non-ideal field condition or internal macroscopic magnetic susceptibility variations in biological samples, and it is free of voxel size limitation and time-consuming field shimming procedure. This method presents a complementary way to the conventional JPRESS method for MRS measurements on MRI systems equipped with broad inner bores, and may provide a promising tool for in vivo MRS applications. PMID:26207739

  11. Microfluidic separation and capture of analytes for single-molecule spectroscopy{

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    Microfluidic separation and capture of analytes for single-molecule spectroscopy{ Samuel Kim,a Bo labeled biological molecules is separated electrophoretically on a chip and the constituent molecules specific labeling for quantitative data analysis. Therefore, a purification/separation procedure is usually

  12. Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] : quantitative sssessment of the trans effect of NO.

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, N.; Sage, J. T.; Silvernail, N.; Scheidt, W. R.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents oriented single-crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data for the six-coordinate (6C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl model complex [{sup 57}Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (1; TPP{sup 2-} = tetraphenylporphyrin dianion; MI = 1-methylimidazole). The availability of these data enables for the first time the detailed simulation of the complete NRVS data, including the porphyrin-based vibrations, of a 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyl, using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Importantly, the Fe-NO stretch is split by interaction with a porphyrin-based vibration into two features, observed at 437 and 472 cm{sup -1}. The 437 cm{sup -1} feature is strongly out-of-plane (oop) polarized and shows a {sup 15}N{sup 18}O isotope shift of 8 cm{sup -1} and is therefore assigned to v(Fe-NO). The admixture of Fe-N-O bending character is small. Main contributions to the Fe-N-O bend are observed in the 520-580 cm{sup -1} region, distributed over a number of in-plane (ip) polarized porphyrin-based vibrations. The main component, assigned to {delta}{sub ip}(Fe-N-O), is identified with the feature at 563 cm{sup -1}. The Fe-N-O bend also shows strong mixing with the Fe-NO stretching internal coordinate, as evidenced by the oop NRVS intensity in the 520-580 cm{sup -1} region. Very accurate normal mode descriptions of ?(Fe-NO) and {delta}{sub ip}(Fe-N-O) have been obtained in this study. These results contradict previous interpretations of the vibrational spectra of 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyls where the higher energy feature at {approx}550 cm{sup -1} had usually been associated with v(Fe-NO). Furthermore, these results provide key insight into NO binding to ferrous heme active sites in globins and other heme proteins, in particular with respect to (a) the effect of hydrogen bonding to the coordinated NO and (b) changes in heme dynamics upon NO coordination. [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] constitutes an excellent model system for ferrous NO adducts of myoglobin (Mb) mutants where the distal histidine (His64) has been removed. Comparison to the reported vibrational data for wild-type (wt) Mb-NO then shows that the effect of H bonding to the coordinated NO is weak and mostly leads to a polarization of the {pi}/{pi}* orbitals of bound NO. In addition, the observation that {delta}{sub ip}(Fe-N-O) does not correlate well with ?(N-O) can be traced back to the very mixed nature of this mode. The Fe-N(imidazole) stretching frequency is observed at 149 cm{sup -1} in [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)], and spectral changes upon NO binding to five-coordinate ferrous heme active sites are discussed. The obtained high-quality force constants for the Fe-NO and N-O bonds of 2.57 and 11.55 mdyn/{angstrom} can further be compared to those of corresponding 5C species, which allows for a quantitative analysis of the {sigma} trans interaction between the proximal imidazole (His) ligand and NO. This is key for the activation of the NO sensor soluble guanylate cyclase. Finally, DFT methods are calibrated against the experimentally determined vibrational properties of the Fe-N-O subunit in 1. DFT is in fact incapable of reproducing the vibrational energies and normal mode descriptions of the Fe-N-O unit well, and thus, DFT-based predictions of changes in vibrational properties upon heme modification or other perturbations of these 6C complexes have to be treated with caution.

  13. Oriented Single-Crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy of [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)]: Quantitative Assessment of the trans Effect of NO

    PubMed Central

    Silvernail, Nathan; Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents oriented single-crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data for the six-coordinate (6C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl model complex [57Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (1; TPP2? = tetraphenylporphyrin dianion; MI = 1-methylimidazole). The availability of these data enables for the first time the detailed simulation of the complete NRVS data, including the porphyrin-based vibrations, of a 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyl, using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Importantly, the Fe-NO stretch is split by interaction with a porphyrin-based vibration into two features, observed at 437 and 472 cm?1. The 437 cm?1 feature is strongly out-of-plane (oop) polarized and shows an 15N18O isotope shift of 8 cm?1, and is therefore assigned to ?(Fe-NO). The admixture of Fe-N-O bending character is small. Main contributions to the Fe-N-O bend are observed in the 520 – 580 cm?1 region, distributed over a number of in-plane (ip) polarized porphyrin-based vibrations. The main component, assigned to ?ip(Fe-N-O), is identified with the feature at 563 cm?1. The Fe-N-O bend also shows strong mixing with the Fe-NO stretching internal coordinate, as evidenced by the oop NRVS intensity in the 520 – 580 cm?1 region. Very accurate normal mode descriptions of ?(Fe-NO) and ?ip(Fe-N-O) have been obtained in this study. These results contradict previous interpretations of the vibrational spectra of 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyls where the higher energy feature at ~550 cm?1 had usually been associated with ?(Fe-NO). Furthermore, these results provide key insight into NO binding to ferrous heme active sites in globins and other heme proteins, in particular with respect to (a) the effect of hydrogen bonding to the coordinated NO, and (b) changes in heme dynamics upon NO coordination. [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] constitutes an excellent model system for ferrous NO adducts of myoglobin (Mb) mutants where the distal histidine (His64) has been removed. Comparison to the reported vibrational data for wild-type (wt) Mb-NO then shows that the effect of H-bonding to coordinated NO is weak, and mostly leads to a polarization of the ?/?* orbitals of bound NO. In addition, the observation that ?ip(Fe-N-O) does not correlate well with ?(N-O) can be traced back to the very mixed nature of this mode. The Fe-N(imidazole) stretching frequency is observed at 149 cm?1 in [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)], and spectral changes upon NO binding to five-coordinate ferrous heme active sites are discussed. The obtained high-quality force constants for the Fe-NO and N-O bonds of 2.57 and 11.55 mdyn/Å can further be compared to those of corresponding 5C species, which allows for a quantitative analysis of the ? trans interaction between the proximal imidazole (His) ligand and NO. This is key for the activation of the NO sensor soluble guanylate cyclase. Finally, DFT methods are calibrated against the experimentally determined vibrational properties of the Fe-N-O subunit in 1. DFT is in fact incapable of reproducing the vibrational energies and normal mode descriptions of the Fe-N-O unit well, and thus, DFT-based predictions of changes in vibrational properties upon heme-modification or other perturbations of these 6C complexes have to be treated with caution. PMID:20586416

  14. Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)]: quantitative assessment of the trans effect of NO.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Nicolai; Sage, J Timothy; Silvernail, Nathan; Scheidt, W Robert; Alp, E Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents oriented single-crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data for the six-coordinate (6C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl model complex [(57)Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (1; TPP(2-) = tetraphenylporphyrin dianion; MI = 1-methylimidazole). The availability of these data enables for the first time the detailed simulation of the complete NRVS data, including the porphyrin-based vibrations, of a 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyl, using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Importantly, the Fe-NO stretch is split by interaction with a porphyrin-based vibration into two features, observed at 437 and 472 cm(-1). The 437 cm(-1) feature is strongly out-of-plane (oop) polarized and shows a (15)N(18)O isotope shift of 8 cm(-1) and is therefore assigned to nu(Fe-NO). The admixture of Fe-N-O bending character is small. Main contributions to the Fe-N-O bend are observed in the 520-580 cm(-1) region, distributed over a number of in-plane (ip) polarized porphyrin-based vibrations. The main component, assigned to delta(ip)(Fe-N-O), is identified with the feature at 563 cm(-1). The Fe-N-O bend also shows strong mixing with the Fe-NO stretching internal coordinate, as evidenced by the oop NRVS intensity in the 520-580 cm(-1) region. Very accurate normal mode descriptions of nu(Fe-NO) and delta(ip)(Fe-N-O) have been obtained in this study. These results contradict previous interpretations of the vibrational spectra of 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyls where the higher energy feature at approximately 550 cm(-1) had usually been associated with nu(Fe-NO). Furthermore, these results provide key insight into NO binding to ferrous heme active sites in globins and other heme proteins, in particular with respect to (a) the effect of hydrogen bonding to the coordinated NO and (b) changes in heme dynamics upon NO coordination. [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] constitutes an excellent model system for ferrous NO adducts of myoglobin (Mb) mutants where the distal histidine (His64) has been removed. Comparison to the reported vibrational data for wild-type (wt) Mb-NO then shows that the effect of H bonding to the coordinated NO is weak and mostly leads to a polarization of the pi/pi* orbitals of bound NO. In addition, the observation that delta(ip)(Fe-N-O) does not correlate well with nu(N-O) can be traced back to the very mixed nature of this mode. The Fe-N(imidazole) stretching frequency is observed at 149 cm(-1) in [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)], and spectral changes upon NO binding to five-coordinate ferrous heme active sites are discussed. The obtained high-quality force constants for the Fe-NO and N-O bonds of 2.57 and 11.55 mdyn/A can further be compared to those of corresponding 5C species, which allows for a quantitative analysis of the sigma trans interaction between the proximal imidazole (His) ligand and NO. This is key for the activation of the NO sensor soluble guanylate cyclase. Finally, DFT methods are calibrated against the experimentally determined vibrational properties of the Fe-N-O subunit in 1. DFT is in fact incapable of reproducing the vibrational energies and normal mode descriptions of the Fe-N-O unit well, and thus, DFT-based predictions of changes in vibrational properties upon heme modification or other perturbations of these 6C complexes have to be treated with caution. PMID:20586416

  15. Quantitative solid-state analysis of three solid forms of ranitidine hydrochloride in ternary mixtures using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Norman; Rehder, Sönke; Saville, Dorothy; Rades, Thomas; Aaltonen, Jaakko

    2009-01-15

    The aim of the study was to develop a reliable quantification procedure for mixtures of three solid forms of ranitidine hydrochloride using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis. The effect of mixing methods of the calibration samples on the calibration model quality was also investigated. Thirteen ternary samples of form 1, form 2 and the amorphous form of ranitidine hydrochloride were prepared in triplicate to build a calibration model. The ternary samples were prepared by three mixing methods (a) manual mixing (MM) and ball mill mixing (BM) using two (b) 5 mm (BM5) or (c) 12 mm (BM12) balls for 1 min. The samples were analyzed with XRPD and Raman spectroscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to study the effect of mixing method, while partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to build the quantification models. PCA score plots showed that, in general, BM12 resulted in the narrowest sample clustering indicating better sample homogeneity. In the quantification models, the number of PLS factors was determined using cross-validation and the models were validated using independent test samples with known concentrations. Multiplicative scattering correction (MSC) without scaling gave the best PLS regression model for XPRD, and standard normal variate (SNV) transformation with centering gave the best model for Raman spectroscopy. Using PLS regression, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) values of the best models were 5.0-6.9% for XRPD and 2.5-4.5% for Raman spectroscopy. XRPD and Raman spectroscopy in combination with PLS regression can be used to quantify the amount of single components in ternary mixtures of ranitidine hydrochloride solid forms. Raman spectroscopy gave better PLS regression models than XRPD, allowing a more accurate quantification. PMID:19081220

  16. Leo Szilard Lectureship Award Talk - Universal Scaling Laws from Cells to Cities; A Physicist's Search for Quantitative, Unified Theories of Biological and Social Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Geoffrey

    2013-04-01

    Many of the most challenging, exciting and profound questions facing science and society, from the origins of life to global sustainability, fall under the banner of ``complex adaptive systems.'' This talk explores how scaling can be used to begin to develop physics-inspired quantitative, predictive, coarse-grained theories for understanding their structure, dynamics and organization based on underlying mathematisable principles. Remarkably, most physiological, organisational and life history phenomena in biology and socio-economic systems scale in a simple and ``universal'' fashion: metabolic rate scales approximately as the 3/4-power of mass over 27 orders of magnitude from complex molecules to the largest organisms. Time-scales (such as lifespans and growth-rates) and sizes (such as genome lengths and RNA densities) scale with exponents which are typically simple multiples of 1/4, suggesting that fundamental constraints underlie much of the generic structure and dynamics of living systems. These scaling laws follow from dynamical and geometrical properties of space-filling, fractal-like, hierarchical branching networks, presumed optimised by natural selection. This leads to a general framework that potentially captures essential features of diverse systems including vasculature, ontogenetic growth, cancer, aging and mortality, sleep, cell size, and DNA nucleotide substitution rates. Cities and companies also scale: wages, profits, patents, crime, disease, pollution, road lengths scale similarly across the globe, reflecting underlying universal social network dynamics which point to general principles of organization transcending their individuality. These have dramatic implications for global sustainability: innovation and wealth creation that fuel social systems, left unchecked, potentially sow the seeds for their inevitable collapse.

  17. Quantitative measurement of biological substances in daily-life environment with the little-finger-size one-shot spectroscopic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akane; Sato, Shun; Nakada, Sho; Suzuki, Satoru; Abeygunawardhana, P. K. W.; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2014-02-01

    In daily-life environment, the quantitative measurement of biological substances, such as the blood glucose level in the human skin, is strongly required to realize the non-invasive healthcare apparatus. Fourier-spectroscopic-tomography of the little-finger-size with high time-resolution and with the strong robustness for mechanical vibrations is proposed. The proposed method is a kind of near-common-path interferometer with spatial phase-shift method. We install the transmission-type relative-inclined phase-shifter on the optical Fourier transform plane of the infinity corrected optical system. The phase shifter is constructed with the cuboid and wedge prisms to give the relative phase-shift spatially between each half-flux of the objective beams. The interferograms from each single-bright-point on an objective surface in a line are formed as fringe patterns on 2-dimensional imaging array devices. And because the proposed method is based on the imaging optics, only emitted rays from a focal plane can contribute forming of interferograms. Thus, the measurement plane can be limited onto the focal plane only. From the spectroscopic tomography, only at a localized vessel area in human skins, we can get the pinpointed near-infrared spectroscopic data. And we can expect the improvement of the determination precision, because a Fourier spectroscopic-character is acquired from multiple intensity data in accordance with amount of phase-shift. From the statistical point of view, the gradation of detector is improved with the square root of sample number, based on t-distribution. We constructed the statistical model to assure the determination accuracy, and demonstrated the feasibility of the glucose sensor using liquid cells.

  18. Mapping the metal uptake in plants from Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Allison

    2015-08-20

    Serpentine soil originates in the Earth’s mantle and contains high concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals. Although serpentine soil limits plant growth, endemic and adapted plants at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, located behind SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, can tolerate these conditions. Serpentine soil and seeds belonging to native California and invasive plants were collected at Jasper Ridge. The seeds were grown hydroponically and on serpentine and potting soil to examine the uptake and distribution of ions in the roots and shoots using synchrotron micro-focused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results were used to determine differences between serpentine-tolerant plants. Rye grown on potting soil was enriched in Ni, Fe, Mn, and Cr compared to purple needlegrass grown on serpentine soil. Serpentine vegetation equally suppressed the uptake of Mn, Ni, and Fe in the roots and shoots. The uptake of Ca and Mg affected the uptake of other elements such as K, S, and P.

  19. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  20. Quantitative chemical imaging with multiplex stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dan; Lu, Fa-Ke; Zhang, Xu; Freudiger, Christian; Pernik, Douglas R; Holtom, Gary; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2012-02-29

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a newly developed label-free chemical imaging technique that overcomes the speed limitation of confocal Raman microscopy while avoiding the nonresonant background problem of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Previous demonstrations have been limited to single Raman band measurements. We present a novel modulation multiplexing approach that allows real-time detection of multiple species using the fast Fourier transform. We demonstrate the quantitative determination of chemical concentrations in a ternary mixture. Furthermore, two imaging applications are pursued: (1) quantitative determination of oil content as well as pigment and protein concentration in microalgae cultures; and (2) 3D high-resolution imaging of blood, lipids, and protein distribution in ex vivo mouse skin tissue. We believe that quantitative multiplex SRS uniquely combines the advantage of fast label-free imaging with the fingerprinting capability of Raman spectroscopy and enables numerous applications in lipid biology as well as biomedical imaging. PMID:22316340

  1. Study of energetic-particle-irradiation induced biological effect on Rhizopus oryzae through synchrotron-FTIR micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinghua; Qi, Zeming; Huang, Qing; Wei, Xiaoli; Ke, Zhigang; Fang, Yusheng; Tian, Yangchao; Yu, Zengliang

    2013-01-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously and cause varied biological effects such as DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, cell apoptosis or death. An emerging biotechnology based on ion-beam technique has been developed to serve as an effective tool for mutation breeding of crops and microbes. In order to improve the effectiveness of ion-beam biotechnology for mutation breeding, it is indispensible to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems which is still elusive. A new trend is to conduct more comprehensive research which is based on micro-scaled observation of the changes of the cellular structures and compositions under the interactions. For this purpose, advanced synchrotron FTIR (s-FTIR) microscopy was employed to monitor the cellular changes of single fungal hyphae under irradiation of ?-particles from 241Am. Intracellular contents of ROS, MDA, GSSG/GSH and activities of CAT and SOD were measured via biochemical assay. Ion-irradiation on Rhizopus oryzae causes localized vacuolation, autolysis of cell wall and membrane, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and conformational changes of proteins, which have been clearly revealed by the s-FTIR microspectroscopy. The different changes of cell viability, SOD and CAT activities can be explained by the ROS-involved chemical reactions. Evidently, the elevated level of ROS in hyphal cells upon irradiation plays the key role in the caused biological effect. This study demonstrates that s-FTIR microspectroscopy is an effective tool to study the damage of fungal hyphae caused by ionizing radiation and it facilitates the exploit of the mechanism for the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems.

  2. Development of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Surrogate Biological Warfare Agents in Building Debris and Leachate?

    PubMed Central

    Saikaly, Pascal E.; Barlaz, Morton A.; de los Reyes, Francis L.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of the fate and transport of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills requires the development of specific and sensitive detection assays. The objective of the current study was to develop and validate SYBR green quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assays for the specific detection and quantification of surrogate BW agents in synthetic building debris (SBD) and leachate. Bacillus atrophaeus (vegetative cells and spores) and Serratia marcescens were used as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) and Yersinia pestis (plague), respectively. The targets for SYBR green Q-PCR assays were the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and recA gene for B. atrophaeus and the gyrB, wzm, and recA genes for S. marcescens. All assays showed high specificity when tested against 5 ng of closely related Bacillus and Serratia nontarget DNA from 21 organisms. Several spore lysis methods that include a combination of one or more of freeze-thaw cycles, chemical lysis, hot detergent treatment, bead beat homogenization, and sonication were evaluated. All methods tested showed similar threshold cycle values. The limit of detection of the developed Q-PCR assays was determined using DNA extracted from a pure bacterial culture and DNA extracted from sterile water, leachate, and SBD samples spiked with increasing quantities of surrogates. The limit of detection for B. atrophaeus genomic DNA using the ITS and B. atrophaeus recA Q-PCR assays was 7.5 fg per PCR. The limits of detection of S. marcescens genomic DNA using the gyrB, wzm, and S. marcescens recA Q-PCR assays were 7.5 fg, 75 fg, and 7.5 fg per PCR, respectively. Quantification of B. atrophaeus vegetative cells and spores was linear (R2 > 0.98) over a 7-log-unit dynamic range down to 101 B. atrophaeus cells or spores. Quantification of S. marcescens (R2 > 0.98) was linear over a 6-log-unit dynamic range down to 102 S. marcescens cells. The developed Q-PCR assays are highly specific and sensitive and can be used for monitoring the fate and transport of the BW surrogates B. atrophaeus and S. marcescens in building debris and leachate. PMID:17720820

  3. Final report on LDRD project: Semiconductor surface-emitting microcavity laser spectroscopy for analysis of biological cells and microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E.; Gourley, M.F.; Bellum, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article discusses a new intracavity laser technique that uses living or fixed cells as an integral part of the laser. The cells are placed on a GaAs based semiconductor wafer comprising one half of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. After placement, the cells are covered with a dielectric mirror to close the laser cavity. When photo-pumped with an external laser, this hybrid laser emits coherent light images and spectra that depend sensitively on the cell size, shape, and dielectric properties. The light spectra can be used to identify different cell types and distinguish normal and abnormal cells. The laser can be used to study single cells in real time as a cell-biology lab-on-a-chip, or to study large populations of cells by scanning the pump laser at high speed. The laser is well-suited to be integrated with other micro-optical or micro-fluidic components to lead to micro-optical-mechanical systems for analysis of fluids, particulates, and biological cells.

  4. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to detect anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibody in blood sera of domestic cats: quantitative analysis based on partial least-squares multivariate statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Janaína; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Machado, Rosangela Z.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2010-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important zoonosis in public health because domestic cats are the main agents responsible for the transmission of this disease in Brazil. We investigate a method for diagnosing toxoplasmosis based on Raman spectroscopy. Dispersive near-infrared Raman spectra are used to quantify anti-Toxoplasma gondii (IgG) antibodies in blood sera from domestic cats. An 830-nm laser is used for sample excitation, and a dispersive spectrometer is used to detect the Raman scattering. A serological test is performed in all serum samples by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for validation. Raman spectra are taken from 59 blood serum samples and a quantification model is implemented based on partial least squares (PLS) to quantify the sample's serology by Raman spectra compared to the results provided by the ELISA test. Based on the serological values provided by the Raman/PLS model, diagnostic parameters such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive prediction values, and negative prediction values are calculated to discriminate negative from positive samples, obtaining 100, 80, 90, 83.3, and 100%, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, associated with the PLS, is promising as a serological assay for toxoplasmosis, enabling fast and sensitive diagnosis.

  5. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR telescopic and laboratory studies have shown that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species but the distribution, abundance and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials and address outstanding problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. ABE's core science program includes observations of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System objects, and galaxies, and lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cross-dispersed R-2000 spectrometers that share a single common slit. Each spectrometer measures one spectral octave and together cover the entire 2.5-20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art InSb and Si:As 1024x1024 pixel detectors. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp.

  6. Detection of cancerous biological tissue areas by means of infrared absorption and SERS spectroscopy of intercellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicka, M.; Urboniene, V.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel approach to the detection of cancerous kidney tissue areas by measuring vibrational spectra (IR absorption or SERS) of intercellular fluid taken from the tissue. The method is based on spectral analysis of cancerous and normal tissue areas in order to find specific spectral markers. The samples were prepared by sliding the kidney tissue over a substrate - surface of diamond ATR crystal in case of IR absorption or calcium fluoride optical window in case of SERS. For producing the SERS signal the dried fluid film was covered by silver nanoparticle colloidal solution. In order to suppress fluorescence background the measurements were performed in the NIR spectral region with the excitation wavelength of 1064 nm. The most significant spectral differences - spectral markers - were found in the region between 400 and 1800 cm-1, where spectral bands related to various vibrations of fatty acids, glycolipids and carbohydrates are located. Spectral markers in the IR and SERS spectra are different and the methods can complement each other. Both of them have potential to be used directly during surgery. Additionally, IR absorption spectroscopy in ATR mode can be combined with waveguide probe what makes this method usable in vivo.

  7. Self-consistent absorption correction for quantitative energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of InGaN layers in analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, T.; Wang, X.

    2015-10-01

    A new method of absorption correction for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope is tested on InGaN samples. We simulate the effective k-factor for the In L line with respect to Ga L or Ga K and plot this as a function of the Ga K/L intensity ratio, which can be directly measured from experimental spectra. This basically performs an internal self-consistency check in the quantification using differently absorbed X-ray lines, which is in principle equivalent to an absorption correction as a function of specimen thickness but has the practical advantage that neither specimen thickness nor density or mass-thickness of the specimens need actually be measured.

  8. High-resolution ¹H magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of intact Arctic char (Salvelinus Alpinus) muscle. Quantitative analysis of n-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Gustav; Bankefors, Johan; Schlechtriem, Christian; Brännäs, Eva; Pickova, Jana; Sandström, Corine

    2010-10-27

    The lipid and small metabolite profiles from intact muscles of Arctic char were investigated using (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning ((1)H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Not only the total n-3 fatty acid content but also the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) contents of the muscle were obtained from the (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra without pretreatment of the tissue or lipophilic extraction. A number of small metabolites could also be observed, where creatine/phosphocreatine, anserine and taurine were the most abundant. Thus, the use of (1)H HR-MAS NMR led to simplified analysis techniques that can give direct information on the nutritional value of the fish. PMID:20873863

  9. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75 ± 0.26 (mean ± standard error of the mean). The authors’ spectroscopic investigation has shown that HIFU-treated tissues have a greater optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients than native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. In fact, at 720 and 845 nm, the ratio of the optical absorption coefficient of HIFU-treated tissues to that of native tissues was 1.13 and 1.17, respectively; on the other hand, the ratio of the reduced scattering coefficient of HIFU-treated tissues to that of native tissues was 13.22 and 14.67 at 720 and 845 nm, respectively. Consequently, HIFU-treated tissues have a higher effective attenuation coefficient and a lower light penetration depth than native tissues in the wavelength range 500–900 nm. Conclusions: Using a PA approach, HIFU-treated tissues interrogated at 720 and 845 nm optical wavelengths can be differentiated from untreated tissues. Based on the authors’ spectroscopic investigation, the authors conclude that the observed PA contrast between HIFU-induced thermal lesions and untreated tissue is due, in part, to the increase in the optical absorption coefficient, the reduced scattering coefficient and, therefore, the deposited laser energy fluence in HIFU-treated tissues.

  10. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Vincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR studies (telescopic and laboratory) have demonstrated that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species of a variety of types, but the distribution, abundance, and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEAST mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials to address outstanding important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. Systematic studies include the observation of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System Objects, and galaxies, and multiple lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE will also search for evidence of D enrichment in complex molecules in all these environments. The mission is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cryogenic cross-dispersed spectrographs that share a single common slit. The 3 spectrometers each measure single spectral octaves (2.5-5, 5-10, 10-20 microns) and together cover the entire 2.5 - 20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art 1024x1024 pixel detectors, with a single InSb array for the 2.5-5 micron region and two Si:As arrays for the 5-10 and 10-20 micron regions. The spectral resolution is wavelength dependent but is greater than 2000 across the entire spectral range. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and is designed to take maximum advantage of this environment for cooling, thermal stability, and mission lifetime. ABE would have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years.

  11. Biological mechanisms underlying structural changes induced by colorectal field carcinogenesis measured with low-coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mutyal, Nikhil N; Radosevich, Andrew; Tiwari, Ashish K; Stypula, Yolanda; Wali, Ramesh; Kunte, Dhananjay; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the utility of Low-Coherence Enhanced Backscattering (LEBS) Spectroscopy in detecting optical changes in uninvolved rectal mucosa, changes that are indicative of the presence of advanced colorectal adenomas elsewhere in the colon (field carcinogenesis). We hypothesized that the alterations in optical signatures are due to structural changes in colonocytes. To elucidate those colonocyte changes, we used LEBS and an early time point in an animal model of colorectal field carcinogenesis--rats treated with azoxymethane (AOM). Changes in LEBS markers in intact mucosa from AOM-treated rats could be at least partially attributed to changes in colonocytes. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the colonocyte abnormalities in premalignant colon, we took a candidate approach. We compared expression profiles of genes implicated directly or indirectly in cytoskeletal dysregulation in colorectal tissues from saline-treated versus AOM-treated rats. Our data suggest that a number of genes known to affect colon tumorigenesis are up-regulated in colonocytes, and genes previously reported to be tumor suppressors in metastatic cancer are down-regulated in colonocytes, despite the colonocytes being histologically normal. To further understand the role of the cytoskeleton in generating changes in optical markers of cells, we used pharmacological disruption (using colchicine) of the cytoskeleton. We found that differences in optical markers (between AOM- and control-treated rats) were negated by the disruption, suggesting cytoskeletal involvement in the optical changes. These studies provide significant insights into the micro-architectural alterations in early colon carcinogenesis, and may enable optimization of both bio-photonic and molecular risk stratification techniques to personalize colorectal cancer screening. PMID:23431406

  12. Infrared differential-absorption Mueller matrix spectroscopy and neural network-based data fusion for biological aerosol standoff detection.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Copper, Jack; Owens, David J; Roese, Erik S; Bottiger, Jerold R; Everly, Robert D; Hung, Kevin C

    2010-01-20

    An active spectrophotopolarimeter sensor and support system were developed for a military/civilian defense feasibility study concerning the identification and standoff detection of biological aerosols. Plumes of warfare agent surrogates gamma-irradiated Bacillus subtilis and chicken egg white albumen (analytes), Arizona road dust (terrestrial interferent), water mist (atmospheric interferent), and talcum powders (experiment controls) were dispersed inside windowless chambers and interrogated by multiple CO(2) laser beams spanning 9.1-12.0 microm wavelengths (lambda). Molecular vibration and vibration-rotation activities by the subject analyte are fundamentally strong within this "fingerprint" middle infrared spectral region. Distinct polarization-modulations of incident irradiance and backscatter radiance of tuned beams generate the Mueller matrix (M) of subject aerosol. Strings of all 15 normalized elements {M(ij)(lambda)/M(11)(lambda)}, which completely describe physical and geometric attributes of the aerosol particles, are input fields for training hybrid Kohonen self-organizing map feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANNs). The properly trained and validated ANN model performs pattern recognition and type-classification tasks via internal mappings. A typical ANN that mathematically clusters analyte, interferent, and control aerosols with nil overlap of species is illustrated, including sensitivity analysis of performance. PMID:20090802

  13. Comparison of digestion procedures used for the determination of boron in biological tissues by ICP-AES (inductively-coupled, plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.F.; Miller, D.L.; Steele, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was designed to identify the most accurate and reliable procedures for the digestion of biological tissues prior to the determination of boron by inductively-coupled, plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The four procedures used in this study were an acid bomb digestion and digestions performed in test tubes using perchloric acid and hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and nitric acid alone. Digestions using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid alone were performed in a manner analogous to the perchloric acid/hydrogen peroxide procedure. The tissues used in the study were from dogs that had been administered a boron compound (Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH) and included two brain tissues, a liver and a tongue. These tissues were selected in order to eliminate results that may be due to surface spiking only. None of the test tube procedures were successful in completely dissolving the samples, as was evidenced by residual color and a coagulated precipitate. The amount of precipitate was much larger for the brain tissues in all cases. The acid bomb digestion and the perchloric acid/hydrogen peroxide procedures gave comparable boron concentrations for all of the tissues in this study. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for quantitative analysis of aqueous solution using matrix conversion based on plant fiber spunlaced nonwovens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chenghan; Niu, Guanghui; Shi, Qi; Lin, Qingyu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to detect concentrations of chromium and nickel in aqueous solution in the form of matrix conversion using plant fiber spunlaced nonwovens as a solid-phase support, which can effectively avoid the inherent difficulties such as splashing, a quenching effect, and a shorter plasma lifetime during the liquid LIBS analysis. Drops of the sample solution were transferred to the plant fiber spunlaced nonwovens surface and uniformly diffused from the center to the whole area of the substrate. Owing to good hydrophilicity, the plant fiber spunlaced nonwovens can hold more of the liquid sample, and the surface of this material never wrinkles after being dried in a drying oven, which can effectively reduce the deviation during the LIBS analysis. In addition, the plant fiber spunlaced nonwovens used in the present work are relatively convenient and low cost. Also, the procedure of analysis was simple and fast, which are the unique features of LIBS technology. Therefore, this method has potential applications for practical and in situ analyses. To achieve sensitive elemental detection, the optimal delay time in this experiment was investigated. Under the optimized condition, the limits of detection for Cr and Ni are 0.7 and 5.7???g·mL-1, respectively. The results obtained in the present study show that the matrix conversion method is a feasible option for analyzing heavy metals in aqueous solutions by LIBS technology. PMID:26479603

  15. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes ?[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of molecular orientation in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films by FT-IR transmission and reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Umemura, Junzo; Kamata, Toshihide; Kawai, Takeshi; Takenaka, Tohru )

    1990-01-11

    By a comparison of infrared reflection-absorption (RA) and transmission intensities, a method for the quantitative evaluation of molecular orientation in thin Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films has been developed. The enhancement factors for the RA to transmission absorption intensities of hypothetical isotropic films were theoretically calculated by using Hansen's optical formulas for thin multilayer films. By combination of these values with the experimentally determined intensity ratios of the RA to transmission spectra for uniaxially oriented LB films, the orientation angles of the transition moments of major infrared bands were evaluated. Application of this method to the 7-monolayer LB film of cadmium stearate deposited on AG (for RA measurements) and on ZnSe (for transmission measurements) substrates gave reasonable tilt angles for the molecular chain as compared to those reported by other investigators and to the data from the X-ray analysis. This method will be discussed in detail and the various factors which influence the accuracy of the orientation analysis will also be covered.

  17. Robotic work station for microscale synthetic chemistry: On-line absorption spectroscopy, quantitative automated thin-layer chromatography, and multiple reactions in parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Corkan, L. Andrew; Erb, David; Powers, Gary J.

    1988-06-01

    A robotic work station has been constructed for automatically initiating and monitoring microscale chemical reactions. The work station consists of a robot with a general-purpose arm and interchangeable special-purpose hands, a carousel of seven reaction vessels, a series of stations for performing quantitative automated thin-layer chromatography (TLC), an on-line multichannel absorption spectrophotometer, sensors for verification, syringes and pumps for sample and solvent delivery, a supervisory computer for real-time data acquisition and process control, and a graphics terminal for data display. The controlling software is menu-driven and contains a scheduling algorithm that permits multiple reactions to be performed simultaneously. The automated TLC process is performed in four stages (plate dispensing, sample application, plate development, and plate densitometry), and samples are moved sequentially among these stations by the robot. The partial autonomy of these separate stations permits distributed sample processing. Four TLC plates are processed simultaneously with interleaving segmented schedules, giving a 160% increase in TLC sample throughput. The workstation can be applied to yield optimizations of synthetic reactions and to the exploration of synthetic reaction spaces. The capabilities of the workstation are demonstrated in the two-step synthesis of tetraphenylporphyrin from benzaldehyde and pyrrole in 1 h at room temperature. Kinetic data are obtained from a single-batch reaction concerning the consumption of benzaldehyde, the side reactions forming dipyrrylmethenes, and the formation of tetraphenylporphyrin.

  18. DOI: 10.1037/13620-020 APA Handbook of Research Methods in Psychology: Vol. 2. Quantitative, Qualitative, Neuropsychological, and Biological, H. Cooper (Editor-in-Chief)

    E-print Network

    Townsend, James T.

    science in the Journal of Mathe- matical Psychology [Townsend & Neufeld, 2010]). The power369 DOI: 10.1037/13620-020 APA Handbook of Research Methods in Psychology: Vol. 2. Quantitative Psychological Association. All rights reserved. C h a p t e r 2 0 MatheMatical Psychology Trisha Van Zandt

  19. Quantitative analysis of the near-wall mixture formation process in a passenger car direct-injection Diesel engine by using linear Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taschek, Marco; Egermann, Jan; Schwarz, Sabrina; Leipertz, Alfred

    2005-11-01

    Optimum fuel preparation and mixture formation are core issues in the development of modern direct-injection (DI) Diesel engines, as these are crucial for defining the border conditions for the subsequent combustion and pollutant formation process. The local fuel/air ratio can be seen as one of the key parameters for this optimization process, as it allows the characterization and comparison of the mixture formation quality. For what is the first time to the best of our knowledge, linear Raman spectroscopy is used to detect the fuel/air ratio and its change along a line of a few millimeters directly and nonintrusively inside the combustion bowl of a DI Diesel engine. By a careful optimization of the measurement setup, the weak Raman signals could be separated successfully from disturbing interferences. A simultaneous measurement of the densities of air and fuel was possible along a line of about 10 mm length, allowing a time- and space-resolved measurement of the local fuel/air ratio. This could be performed in a nonreacting atmosphere as well as during fired operating conditions. The positioning of the measurement volume next to the interaction point of one of the spray jets with the wall of the combustion bowl allowed a near-wall analysis of the mixture formation process for a six-hole nozzle under varying injection and engine conditions. The results clearly show the influence of the nozzle geometry and preinjection on the mixing process. In contrast, modulation of the intake air temperature merely led to minor changes of the fuel concentration in the measurement volume.

  20. Biology 153 Biological Sciences

    E-print Network

    Biology · 153 Biological Sciences The Biology programs educate students about diverse aspects, wildlife biology, microbiology or biotechnology. A degree in biology also prepares students for direct employment in the biotechnology sector, environmental biology, or some allied health fields. Biology's best

  1. Exploring Phytoplankton Population Investigation Growth to Enhance Quantitative Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Erin; Biga, Lindsay; Bledsoe, Karen; Dawson, James; Grammer, Julie; Howard, Ava; Snyder, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative literacy is essential to biological literacy (and is one of the core concepts in "Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action"; AAAS 2009). Building quantitative literacy is a challenging endeavor for biology instructors. Integrating mathematical skills into biological investigations can help build…

  2. A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy- first investigations of single biological cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifaiy, Ahmed; Borg, Johan; Lindahl, Olof A; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O 2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O 2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 ± 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 ± 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 ± 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 ± 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 ± 0.412 M ? and 889.7 ± 1.74 M ? respectively. PMID:25907197

  3. In situ infrared emission spectroscopy for quantitative gas-phase measurement under high temperature reaction conditions: an analytical method for methane by means of an innovative small-volume flowing cell.

    PubMed

    Usseglio, Sandro; Thorshaug, Knut; Karlsson, Arne; Dahl, Ivar M; Nielsen, Claus J; Jens, Klaus-J; Tangstad, Elisabeth

    2010-02-01

    We have used infrared emission spectroscopy (IRES) in order to perform in situ studies under flowing gas-phase conditions. When the small-volume cell developed herein is used, we can (1) observe emission spectra from a hot gas-phase sample having an effective volume much less than one milliliter, (2) observe spectra of typical molecular species present, and (3) observe spectra of the more important molecular species down to below 10% and in some cases even as low as 1%. In addition, an analytical method has been derived in order to conduct quantitative studies under typical reaction conditions. We show that simplifications can be made in the data acquisition and handling for a direct linear correlation between band intensity and concentration with only simple background correction. The practical lower limit for methane in the present setup is approximately 0.5-1% v/v depending on the selected temperature. Our data were collected at 500, 600, and 700 degrees C, respectively. The major features of the present cell design are fairly simple and basically formed by a quartz tube (outer diameter=6 mm, inner diameter=4 mm) inside a metal pipe and two tubular ceramic heaters. This simple setup has advantages and attractive features that have extended the application of IRES to new fields and, in particular, for in situ studies of hydrocarbon reactions at different residence times at high temperature. PMID:20149274

  4. Influence of the colloidal structure of dairy gels on milk fat fusion behavior: quantification of the liquid fat content by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR).

    PubMed

    Bouteille, Romain; Perez, Jeanne; Khifer, Farid; Jouan-Rimbaud-Bouveresse, Delphine; Lecanu, Bruno; This, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Dairy gels (DG), such as yoghurts, contain both solid and liquid fats at the time of consumption, as their temperature rises to anything between 10 and 24 °C after being introduced into the mouth at 4 °C. The mass ratio between solid and liquid fats, which depends on the temperature, impacts the organoleptic properties of DG. As the ordinary methods for determining this ratio can only be applied to samples consisting mainly in fat materials, a fat extraction step needs to be added into the analytical process when applied to DG, which prevents the study of the potential impact of their colloidal structure on milk fat fusion behavior. In situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR) was investigated as a method for direct measurements in DG: at temperatures between 20.0 and 70.0 °C, the liquid fat content and the composition of triacylglycerols of the liquid phase (in terms of alkyl chains length) were determined. Spectra of isolated milk fat also enable the quantification of the double bonds of triacylglycerols. Statistical tests showed no significant difference between isolated milk fat and milk fat inside a DG in terms of melting behavior: the fat globule membrane does not seem to have a significant influence on the fat melting behavior. PMID:23464867

  5. Real-time NMR monitoring of biological activities in complex physiological environments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J; Marshall, Christopher B; Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Binolfi, Andres; Selenko, Philipp; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Biological reactions occur in a highly organized spatiotemporal context and with kinetics that are modulated by multiple environmental factors. To integrate these variables in our experimental investigations of 'native' biological activities, we require quantitative tools for time-resolved in situ analyses in physiologically relevant settings. Here, we outline the use of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to directly observe biological reactions in complex environments and in real-time. Specifically, we discuss how real-time NMR (RT-NMR) methods have delineated insights into metabolic processes, post-translational protein modifications, activities of cellular GTPases and their regulators, as well as of protein folding events. PMID:25727665

  6. Quantitation of diethylene glycol and its metabolites by gas chromatography mass spectrometry or ion chromatography mass spectrometry in rat and human biological samples.

    PubMed

    Perala, Adam W; Filary, Mark J; Bartels, Michael J; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2014-05-01

    The misuse of the commonly used chemical diethylene glycol (DEG) has lead to many poisonings worldwide. Methods were developed for analysis of DEG and its potential metabolites; ethylene glycol, glycolic acid, oxalic acid, diglycolic acid and hydroxyethoxy acetic acid in human urine, serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples, collected following a DEG-associated poisoning in the Republic of Panama during 2006. In addition, methods were developed for rat blood, urine, kidney and liver tissue to support toxicokinetic analysis during the conduct of DEG acute toxicity studies in the rat. Sample analysis was conducted using two techniques; ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity and negative ion electrospray ionization with MS detection or with gas chromatography using electron impact ionization or methane negative chemical ionization with MS detection. Stable-isotope-labeled analogs of each analyte were employed as quantitative internal standards in the assays. PMID:24668490

  7. Reference gene selection for quantitative gene expression studies during biological invasions: A test on multiple genes and tissues in a model ascidian Ciona savignyi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuena; Gao, Yangchun; Jiang, Bei; Zhou, Zunchun; Zhan, Aibin

    2016-01-15

    As invasive species have successfully colonized a wide range of dramatically different local environments, they offer a good opportunity to study interactions between species and rapidly changing environments. Gene expression represents one of the primary and crucial mechanisms for rapid adaptation to local environments. Here, we aim to select reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis based on quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) for a model invasive ascidian, Ciona savignyi. We analyzed the stability of ten candidate reference genes in three tissues (siphon, pharynx and intestine) under two key environmental stresses (temperature and salinity) in the marine realm based on three programs (geNorm, NormFinder and delta Ct method). Our results demonstrated only minor difference for stability rankings among the three methods. The use of different single reference gene might influence the data interpretation, while multiple reference genes could minimize possible errors. Therefore, reference gene combinations were recommended for different tissues - the optimal reference gene combination for siphon was RPS15 and RPL17 under temperature stress, and RPL17, UBQ and TubA under salinity treatment; for pharynx, TubB, TubA and RPL17 were the most stable genes under temperature stress, while TubB, TubA and UBQ were the best under salinity stress; for intestine, UBQ, RPS15 and RPL17 were the most reliable reference genes under both treatments. Our results suggest that the necessity of selection and test of reference genes for different tissues under varying environmental stresses. The results obtained here are expected to reveal mechanisms of gene expression-mediated invasion success using C. savignyi as a model species. PMID:26428313

  8. QUANTITATIVE SPECTROSCOPIC DETERMINATION OF HEMOGLOBIN CONCENTRATION AND

    E-print Network

    Fantini, Sergio

    QUANTITATIVE SPECTROSCOPIC DETERMINATION OF HEMOGLOBIN CONCENTRATION AND SATURATION IN A TURBID to the quantitative determination of hemoglobin concentration and saturation by near-infrared spectroscopy in turbid in the near-infrared, and the hemoglobin concentration was about 23 M. It was possible to reversibly saturate

  9. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer ] (

    E-print Network

    , ammonium nitrate, sulfuric acid and nitric acid over a range of compositions and temperatures; Ammonium sulfate; Ammonium nitrate; Sulfuric acid; Nitric acid; Infrared remote sensing 1. Introduction

  10. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer ] (

    E-print Network

    Gamache, Robert R.

    a Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper

  11. Direct and quantitative absorptive spectroscopy of nanowires

    E-print Network

    Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok

    2012-01-01

    Photonic nanostructures exhibit unique optical properties that are attractive in many different applications. However, measuring the optical properties of individual nanostructures, in particular the absorptive properties, ...

  12. Quantitative spectroscopy for detection of cervical dysplasia

    E-print Network

    Mirkovi?, Jelena, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical standard for cervical cancer diagnosis is colposcopy, a procedure that involves visual inspection and biopsy of at-risk tissue, followed by histopathology. The major objective of colposcopy is detection ...

  13. * Corresponding author. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy &

    E-print Network

    Pardo-Carrión, Juan R.

    }433 Submillimeter atmospheric transmission measurements on Mauna Kea during extremely dry El Nin o conditions broadband atmospheric transmission spectra obtained on Mauna Kea, Hawaii (4100 m. above sea level) on UT humidity of +2%. As a result of its dryness the Mauna Kea site allows access to a partially transparent

  14. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  15. On Quantitizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Knafl, George

    2009-01-01

    "Quantitizing", commonly understood to refer to the numerical translation, transformation, or conversion of qualitative data, has become a staple of mixed methods research. Typically glossed are the foundational assumptions, judgments, and compromises involved in converting disparate data sets into each other and whether such conversions advance…

  16. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    System biology models holistically describe, in a quantitative fashion, the relationships between different levels of a biologic system. Relationships between individual components of a system are delineated. System biology models describe how the components of the system inter...

  17. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of a group of volatile organic compounds in biological samples by HS-GC/FID: application in practical cases.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, C; Franco, J M; Proença, P; Castañera, A; Claro, A; Vieira, D N; Corte-Real, F

    2014-10-01

    A simple and sensitive procedure, using n-propanol as internal standard (IS), was developed and validated for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of a group of 11 volatile organic substances with different physicochemical properties (1-butanol, 2-propanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, acetone, acetonitrile, chloroform, diethyl ether, methanol, toluene and p-xylene) in whole blood, urine and vitreous humor. Samples were prepared by dilution with an aqueous solution of internal standard followed by Headspace Gas Chromatography with a Flame-ionization Detector (HS GC-FID) analysis. Chromatographic separation was performed using two capillary columns with different polarities (DB-ALC2: 30m×0.320mm×1.2?m and DB-ALC1: 30m×0.320mm×1.8?m), thus providing a change in the retention and elution order of volatiles. This dual column confirmation increases the specificity, since the risk of another substance co-eluting at the same time in both columns is very small. The method was linear from 5 to 1000mg/L for toluene and p-xylene, 50-1000mg/L for chloroform, and 50-2000mg/L for the remaining substances, with correlation coefficients of over 0.99 for all compounds. The limits of detection (LOD) ranged 1 to 10mg/L, while the limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 2 to 31mg/L. The intra-day precision (CV<6.4%), intermediate precision (CV<7.0%) and accuracy (relative error ±10%) of the method were in conformity with the criteria normally accepted in bioanalytical method validation. The method developed has been applied to forensic cases, with the advantages that it uses a small sample volume and does not require any extraction procedure as it makes use of a headspace injection technique. PMID:25124884

  18. Quantitative determination of biological activity of botulinum toxins utilizing compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), and comparison of neuromuscular transmission blockage and muscle flaccidity among toxins.

    PubMed

    Torii, Yasushi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Motohide; Ishida, Setsuji; Harakawa, Tetsuhiro; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kaji, Ryuji; Kozaki, Shunji; Ginnaga, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    The biological activity of various types of botulinum toxin has been evaluated using the mouse intraperitoneal LD(50) test (ip LD(50)). This method requires a large number of mice to precisely determine toxin activity, and so has posed a problem with regard to animal welfare. We have used a direct measure of neuromuscular transmission, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP), to evaluate the effect of different types of botulinum neurotoxin (NTX), and we compared the effects of these toxins to evaluate muscle relaxation by employing the digit abduction scoring (DAS) assay. This method can be used to measure a broad range of toxin activities the day after administration. Types A, C, C/D, and E NTX reduced the CMAP amplitude one day after administration at below 1 ip LD(50), an effect that cannot be detected using the mouse ip LD(50) assay. The method is useful not only for measuring toxin activity, but also for evaluating the characteristics of different types of NTX. The rat CMAP test is straightforward, highly reproducible, and can directly determine the efficacy of toxin preparations through their inhibition of neuromuscular transmission. Thus, this method may be suitable for pharmacology studies and the quality control of toxin preparations. PMID:19778548

  19. Use of Concept of Chemotherapy-Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose to Provide Quantitative Evaluation of Contribution of Chemotherapy to Local Tumor Control in Chemoradiotherapy Cervical Cancer Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of the contribution of chemotherapy to local tumor control in chemoradiotherapy cervical cancer trials in terms of the concept of the biologically effective dose. Methods and Materials: The local control rates of both arms of each study (radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy plus chemotherapy) reported from randomized controlled trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer were reviewed and expressed using the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) as TCP = exp(-exp E), where E is the logarithm of cell kill. By combining the two TCP values from each study, we calculated the chemotherapy-related log cell kill as Ec = ln[(lnTCP{sub Radiotherapy})/(lnTCP{sub Chemoradiotherapy})]. Assuming a range of radiosensitivities ({alpha} = 0.1-0.5 Gy{sup -1}) and taking the calculated log cell kill, we calculated the chemotherapy-BED, and using the linear quadratic model, the number of 2-Gy fractions corresponding to each BED. The effect of a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities ({alpha} Gy{sup -1}) on the TCP was also explored. Results: The chemotherapy-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions range was 0.2-4 and was greater in tumors with lower radiosensitivity. In those tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity ({alpha} = 0.3 Gy{sup -1}), the equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions was 0.6-1.3, corresponding to 120-260 cGy of extra dose. The opportunities for clinically detectable improvement are only available in tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity with {alpha} = 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. The dependence of TCP on the tumor volume decreases as the radiosensitivity increases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the contribution of chemotherapy to the TCP in cervical cancer is expected to be clinically detectable in larger and less-radiosensitive tumors.

  20. Quantitative radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, C.M.; Hernandez, J.M.; Devine, G.J.

    1991-02-01

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernable by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudocolor images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. Images are captured using DuPont NDT55 industrial x-ray film in Daypack{trademark} packages. X-ray cabinets are of custom design, with helium flight path and a filter wheel for positioning filters if desired. The cabinets contain baffles to reduce scattered radiation and are equipped with drawer for rapid load/unload of parts. Separate units with tungsten-anode or copper-anode tubes are available. The usual operating voltage is 15 to 35 kVp. Fixturing provides for rough part positioning and precise alignment with respect to the x-ray source. Areal density standards are placed at several locations on each film. In interpreting the image, we use the standards nearest the image of the part being quantified. Because of this, small variations in x-ray flux uniformity (heel effects) are unimportant. The usual standard is a step wedge of aluminum containing 13 steps. Films are permanently labeled by imaging a perforated metal numbering strip. Data such as part number, step wedge identification, etc. are read from barcode labels and transferred to a data base for later retrieval and use in quantifying the image.

  1. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy — Biannual survey 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Isao

    2010-06-01

    The publication activities in the field of 2D correlation spectroscopy are surveyed with the emphasis on papers published during the last two years. Pertinent review articles and conference proceedings are discussed first, followed by the examination of noteworthy developments in the theory and applications of 2D correlation spectroscopy. Specific topics of interest include Pareto scaling, analysis of randomly sampled spectra, 2D analysis of data obtained under multiple perturbations, evolution of 2D spectra along additional variables, comparison and quantitative analysis of multiple 2D spectra, orthogonal sample design to eliminate interfering cross peaks, quadrature orthogonal signal correction and other data transformation techniques, data pretreatment methods, moving window analysis, extension of kernel and global phase angle analysis, covariance and correlation coefficient mapping, variant forms of sample-sample correlation, and different display methods. Various static and dynamic perturbation methods used in 2D correlation spectroscopy, e.g., temperature, composition, chemical reactions, H/D exchange, physical phenomena like sorption, diffusion and phase transitions, optical and biological processes, are reviewed. Analytical probes used in 2D correlation spectroscopy include IR, Raman, NIR, NMR, X-ray, mass spectrometry, chromatography, and others. Application areas of 2D correlation spectroscopy are diverse, encompassing synthetic and natural polymers, liquid crystals, proteins and peptides, biomaterials, pharmaceuticals, food and agricultural products, solutions, colloids, surfaces, and the like.

  2. Evaluation of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for quantitative determination of rare earth elements in marine biological tissues by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Costas, M; Lavilla, I; Gil, S; Pena, F; de la Calle, I; Cabaleiro, N; Bendicho, C

    2010-10-29

    In this work, the determination of rare earth elements (REEs), i.e. Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in marine biological tissues by inductively coupled-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after a sample preparation method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is described. The suitability of the extracts for ICP-MS measurements was evaluated. For that, studies were focused on the following issues: (i) use of clean up of extracts with a C18 cartridge for non-polar solid phase extraction; (ii) use of different internal standards; (iii) signal drift caused by changes in the nebulization efficiency and salt deposition on the cones during the analysis. The signal drift produced by direct introduction of biological extracts in the instrument was evaluated using a calibration verification standard for bracketing (standard-sample bracketing, SSB) and cumulative sum (CUSUM) control charts. Parameters influencing extraction such as extractant composition, mass-to-volume ratio, particle size, sonication time and sonication amplitude were optimized. Diluted single acids (HNO(3) and HCl) and mixtures (HNO(3)+HCl) were evaluated for improving the extraction efficiency. Quantitative recoveries for REEs were achieved using 5 mL of 3% (v/v) HNO(3)+2% (v/v) HCl, particle size <200 ?m, 3 min of sonication time and 50% of sonication amplitude. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation from three independent extractions, ranged from 0.1 to 8%. In general, LODs were improved by a factor of 5 in comparison with those obtained after microwave-assisted digestion (MAD). The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the CRM BCR-668 (mussel tissue). Different seafood samples of common consumption were analyzed by ICP-MS after UAE and MAD. PMID:20951856

  3. Microscopic Imaging and Spectroscopy with Scattered Light

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Optical contrast based on elastic scattering interactions between light and matter can be used to probe cellular structure and dynamics, and image tissue architecture. The quantitative nature and high sensitivity of light scattering signals to subtle alterations in tissue morphology, as well as the ability to visualize unstained tissue in vivo, has recently generated significant interest in optical scatter based biosensing and imaging. Here we review the fundamental methodologies used to acquire and interpret optical scatter data. We report on recent findings in this field and present current advances in optical scatter techniques and computational methods. Cellular and tissue data enabled by current advances in optical scatter spectroscopy and imaging stand to impact a variety of biomedical applications including clinical tissue diagnosis, in vivo imaging, drug discovery and basic cell biology. PMID:20617940

  4. Imaging methodologies for systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah E; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology has recently achieved significant success in the understanding of complex interconnected phenomena such as cell polarity and migration. In this context, the definition of systems biology has come to encompass the integration of quantitative measurements with sophisticated modeling approaches. This article will review recent progress in live cell imaging technologies that have expanded the possibilities of quantitative in vivo measurements, particularly in regards to molecule counting and quantitative measurements of protein concentration and dynamics. These methods have gained and continue to gain popularity with the biological community. In general, we will discuss three broad categories: protein interactions, protein quantitation, and protein dynamics. PMID:25482526

  5. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  6. Quantitative proteomic analysis of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells reveals an early host response in important biological pathways: Protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Navare, Arti T.; Sova, Pavel; Purdy, David E.; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Korth, Marcus J.; Chang, Stewart T.; Proll, Sean C.; Jahan, Tahmina A.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2012-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) depends upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate its replication while at the same time inhibiting critical components of innate and/or intrinsic immune response pathways. To characterize the host cell response on protein levels in CD4+ lymphoblastoid SUP-T1 cells after infection with HIV-1 strain LAI, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based global quantitation with iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification). We found 266, 60 and 22 proteins differentially expressed (DE) (P-value{<=}0.05) at 4, 8, and 20 hours post-infection (hpi), respectively, compared to time-matched mock-infected samples. The majority of changes in protein abundance occurred at an early stage of infection well before the de novo production of viral proteins. Functional analyses of these DE proteins showed enrichment in several biological pathways including protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation. Importantly, these early changes before the time of robust viral production have not been described before.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells reveals an early host response in important biological pathways: protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Navare, Arti T; Sova, Pavel; Purdy, David E; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Korth, Marcus J; Chang, Stewart T; Proll, Sean C; Jahan, Tahmina A; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L; Palermo, Robert E; Katze, Michael G

    2012-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) depends upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate its replication while at the same time inhibiting critical components of innate and/or intrinsic immune response pathways. To characterize the host cell response on protein levels in CD4+ lymphoblastoid SUP-T1 cells after infection with HIV-1 strain LAI, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based global quantitation with iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification). We found 266, 60 and 22 proteins differentially expressed (DE) (P-value ? 0.05) at 4, 8, and 20 hours post-infection (hpi), respectively, compared to time-matched mock-infected samples. The majority of changes in protein abundance occurred at an early stage of infection well before the de novo production of viral proteins. Functional analyses of these DE proteins showed enrichment in several biological pathways including protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation. Importantly, these early changes before the time of robust viral production have not been described before. PMID:22542004

  8. Potential Role of Atomic Force Microscopy in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information datasets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on PCR for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  9. Biological detector and method

    SciTech Connect

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  10. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  11. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  12. Visualizing transient dark states by NMR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Visualizing transient dark states by NMR spectroscopy Nicholas J. Anthis and G. Marius Clore resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as long as the dark state is in dynamic equilibrium with an NMR biology techniques, in particular X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  13. Using one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) quantitative proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (q NMR) for the identification and quantification of taste compounds in raw onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs and in aqueous solutions where onion tissues are soaked.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Audrey; De Man, Walter; This, Hervé

    2010-12-01

    Solutions obtained by soaking onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs samples in water are frequently consumed, either directly or as part of dishes, both at home or in the food industry. However, little information is available regarding the extracted metabolites and the extraction mechanisms. In this article, the composition of raw onion extracts and of aqueous solutions where raw onion tissues were soaked was investigated directly by quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (q (1)H NMR). The assignment of NMR signals was performed, with less than 3% (in area) of unidentified peaks. Analyses of one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectra with additional two-dimensional NMR studies showed 20 regions of interest where 3 saccharides, 17 amino acids, and 5 organic acids were detected and quantified. Resonance assignment with chemical shift was done for each saccharide, as well as for each amino acid and organic acid, with additional work on spin-spin coupling pattern and on observed and not observed correlations from correlation spectroscopy studies. Quantification of saccharides was performed and qualified by works on peak decomposition algorithms. Complementary studies by high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy and tandem mass spectroscopy, and thin layer chromatography and preparative layer chromatography were carried out in order to validate the NMR results on identification. PMID:20972556

  14. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- ? precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  15. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( ?Q) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  16. Multilayer approach to the quantitative analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results: Applications to ultrathin SiO2 on Si and to self-assembled monolayers on gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, C.; Yildirim, M.; Stapert, H. R.

    2005-09-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is widely applied for the chemical characterization of surfaces and multilayers of thin films. In order to obtain quantitative results, XPS peak areas generally are divided by sensitivity factors and normalized to 100 at. % to obtain so-called raw concentrations. For homogeneous materials, materials with randomly distributed atoms within the analyzed surface layer, these concentrations may be a useful quantity. Yet, for a material consisting of a substrate on top of which a number of chemically different layers are present, the raw concentrations depend on measuring details like the takeoff angle during the XPS analyses and clearly are not a satisfactory way to describe the sample. The main purpose of this article is to present a calculation method that converts raw concentrations into more meaningful quantities. The method is applicable to a restricted but technologically relevant class of samples: substrates on top of which one or more homogeneous layers are present. Examples are: gate dielectrics on Si or GaAs, self-assembling monolayers on a metallic substrate, thin oxide films on metals with an organic contamination on top. The method is based upon standard exponential attenuation of the photoelectron intensity as a function of traveled distance. For each element or chemical state in the system it has to be known to which layer(s) it belongs. Sensitivity factors are corrected for matrix effects and for intrinsic excitations. Starting from the raw concentrations, the method calculates in a self-consistent way the composition of all layers in the system and the thickness of each layer. Only one measurement at one measuring angle is required to obtain these results. To obtain insight into the accuracy of the calculation method, XPS results obtained on ultrathin SiO2 layers on Si that were slightly contaminated with hydrocarbons have been analyzed with the method. The obtained thicknesses were in good agreement with values for the thickness of the SiO2 layer and the organic surface contamination as obtained by other methods. Consistent values were also obtained for the concentration ratio O/Si in the SiO2 layers. The calculation method has also been verified for three types of self-assembled monolayers (SAM layers) on gold. Layers of C18 (octadecane-thiol) and of EG4 (a mercaptoalkyloligo-ethyleneglycol) deposited from solutions with different concentrations were examined. Also, SAM layers deposited from mixtures with molecules with different chain lengths, mercapto-undecanol (MUO), and a biotinylated oligo-ethyleneglycol-alkyl thiol (BAT), were investigated. The model analysis provided the thickness of the organic layers, the concentrations of the components in the layers, and the coverage of the gold with sulphur (in atoms/cm2). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was applied to determine (in an independent way) the amount of sulphur at the gold surface. The RBS results correlated well with the XPS data. The obtained values for the concentration ratios of the SAM layers were in agreement with the theoretically expected values. It is shown in the article that it is essential to model the mixtures of MUO and BAT as a three-layer system (gold substrate, aliphatic interlayer, and top layer containing the ethylene oxide groups) in order to obtain agreement.

  17. Label-Free Nanoplasmonic-Based Short Noncoding RNA Sensing at Attomolar Concentrations Allows for Quantitative and Highly Specific Assay of MicroRNA-10b in Biological Fluids and Circulating Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs consisting of 18–25 nucleotides that target specific mRNA moieties for translational repression or degradation, thereby modulating numerous biological processes. Although microRNAs have the ability to behave like oncogenes or tumor suppressors in a cell-autonomous manner, their exact roles following release into the circulation are only now being unraveled and it is important to establish sensitive assays to measure their levels in different compartments in the circulation. Here, an ultrasensitive localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based microRNA sensor with single nucleotide specificity was developed using chemically synthesized gold nanoprisms attached onto a solid substrate with unprecedented long-term stability and reversibility. The sensor was used to specifically detect microRNA-10b at the attomolar (10–18 M) concentration in pancreatic cancer cell lines, derived tissue culture media, human plasma, and media and plasma exosomes. In addition, for the first time, our label-free and nondestructive sensing technique was used to quantify microRNA-10b in highly purified exosomes isolated from patients with pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis, and from normal controls. We show that microRNA-10b levels were significantly higher in plasma-derived exosomes from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients when compared with patients with chronic pancreatitis or normal controls. Our findings suggest that this unique technique can be used to design novel diagnostic strategies for pancreatic and other cancers based on the direct quantitative measurement of plasma and exosome microRNAs, and can be readily extended to other diseases with identifiable microRNA signatures. PMID:26444644

  18. Label-Free Nanoplasmonic-Based Short Noncoding RNA Sensing at Attomolar Concentrations Allows for Quantitative and Highly Specific Assay of MicroRNA-10b in Biological Fluids and Circulating Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gayatri K; Deitz-McElyea, Samantha; Liyanage, Thakshila; Lawrence, Katie; Mali, Sonali; Sardar, Rajesh; Korc, Murray

    2015-11-24

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs consisting of 18-25 nucleotides that target specific mRNA moieties for translational repression or degradation, thereby modulating numerous biological processes. Although microRNAs have the ability to behave like oncogenes or tumor suppressors in a cell-autonomous manner, their exact roles following release into the circulation are only now being unraveled and it is important to establish sensitive assays to measure their levels in different compartments in the circulation. Here, an ultrasensitive localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based microRNA sensor with single nucleotide specificity was developed using chemically synthesized gold nanoprisms attached onto a solid substrate with unprecedented long-term stability and reversibility. The sensor was used to specifically detect microRNA-10b at the attomolar (10(-18) M) concentration in pancreatic cancer cell lines, derived tissue culture media, human plasma, and media and plasma exosomes. In addition, for the first time, our label-free and nondestructive sensing technique was used to quantify microRNA-10b in highly purified exosomes isolated from patients with pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis, and from normal controls. We show that microRNA-10b levels were significantly higher in plasma-derived exosomes from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients when compared with patients with chronic pancreatitis or normal controls. Our findings suggest that this unique technique can be used to design novel diagnostic strategies for pancreatic and other cancers based on the direct quantitative measurement of plasma and exosome microRNAs, and can be readily extended to other diseases with identifiable microRNA signatures. PMID:26444644

  19. Raman spectroscopy for noninvasive glucose measurements

    E-print Network

    Enejder, Annika M. K.

    We report the first successful study of the use of Raman spectroscopy for quantitative, noninvasive (“transcutaneous”) measurement of blood analytes, using glucose as an example. As an initial evaluation of the ability of ...

  20. Metalloprotein structures at ambient conditions and in real-time: biological crystallography and spectroscopy using X-ray free electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2015-10-01

    Although the structure of enzymes and the chemistry at the catalytic sites have been studied intensively, an understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry requires a new approach beyond steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure of metallo-enzymes at ambient conditions, while overcoming the severe X-ray-induced changes to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by the intense and ultra-short femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) by acquiring a signal before the sample is destroyed. This review describes the recent and pioneering uses of XFELs to study the protein structure and dynamics of metallo-enzymes using crystallography and scattering, as well as the chemical structure and dynamics of the catalytic complexes (charge, spin, and covalency) using spectroscopy during the reaction to understand the electron-transfer processes and elucidate the mechanism. PMID:26342144

  1. Quarkonium spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1981-06-01

    Recent experimental investigations of heavy quark-antiquark bound state systems are reviewed. Results from SPEAR on charmonium spectroscopy and from DORIS and CESR on bottomonium spectroscopy are presented. The current status of the search for top is also discussed.

  2. Piezoelectric tuning fork biosensors for the quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Rodrigues, Mafalda; Benito, Angel Maria; Pérez-García, Lluïsa; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions is of great interest in molecular biology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proved its capacity to act as a biosensor and determine the affinity between biomolecules of interest. Nevertheless, the detection scheme presents certain limitations when it comes to developing a compact biosensor. Recently, piezoelectric quartz tuning forks (QTFs) have been used as laser-free detection sensors for AFM. However, only a few studies along these lines have considered soft biological samples, and even fewer constitute quantified molecular recognition experiments. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of QTF probes to perform specific interaction measurements between biotin–streptavidin complexes in buffer solution. We propose in this paper a variant of dynamic force spectroscopy based on representing adhesion energies E (aJ) against pulling rates v (nm s–1). Our results are compared with conventional AFM measurements and show the great potential of these sensors in molecular interaction studies.

  3. Piezoelectric tuning fork biosensors for the quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Laura; Rodrigues, Mafalda; Maria Benito, Angel; Pérez-García, Lluïsa; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2015-12-11

    The quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions is of great interest in molecular biology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proved its capacity to act as a biosensor and determine the affinity between biomolecules of interest. Nevertheless, the detection scheme presents certain limitations when it comes to developing a compact biosensor. Recently, piezoelectric quartz tuning forks (QTFs) have been used as laser-free detection sensors for AFM. However, only a few studies along these lines have considered soft biological samples, and even fewer constitute quantified molecular recognition experiments. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of QTF probes to perform specific interaction measurements between biotin-streptavidin complexes in buffer solution. We propose in this paper a variant of dynamic force spectroscopy based on representing adhesion energies E (aJ) against pulling rates v (nm s(-1)). Our results are compared with conventional AFM measurements and show the great potential of these sensors in molecular interaction studies. PMID:26572065

  4. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapi?, Galja; Baranovi?, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture. PMID:25447291

  5. MathBench Biology Modules: Web-Based Math for All Biology Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Karen C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Schneider, Katie; Thompson, Katerina V.; Shields, Patricia A.; Fagan, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, biology has not been a heavily quantitative science, but this is changing rapidly (Ewing 2002; Gross 2000; Hastings and palmer 2003; Jungck 2005; Steen 2005). Quantitative approaches now constitute a key tool for modern biologists, yet undergraduate biology courses remain largely qualitative and descriptive. Although biology majors…

  6. Spectroscopies -- Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, Päivi

    2015-09-01

    This chapter explains how various spectroscopies can be used for probing the many-body quantum state of ultracold gas systems. It starts with a brief reminder of the basic theory of field-matter interactions. The general theory of linear response in the context of many-body quantum physics is then presented. A detailed theoretical description of RF spectroscopy, both the usual one and the momentum-resolved version, is given. This description applies to Raman spectroscopy as well. The basic theory behind Bragg spectroscopy and lattice modulation spectroscopy is also discussed. I explain how RF spectroscopy relates to the spectral function and how Bragg spectroscopy relates to the dynamical/static structure factor. The derivations are detailed and Green's functions are not used, so it is possible to follow this chapter based on simply knowing the basics of second quantization. Finally, self-consistent linear response theory and the use of sum rules is discussed in an overall manner.

  7. Marine Biology

    E-print Network

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy for intracoronary detection of lipid-rich plaques to understand atherosclerotic plaque biology in man and guide clinical therapy.

    PubMed

    Erlinge, D

    2015-08-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. The common denominator for plaques causing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is lipid accumulation, either as a lipid core or lipid pools. An intracoronary imaging device to detect lipid-rich plaques (LRPs) could therefore identify most of the plaques causing ACS and sudden death. Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS) is a promising new intracoronary imaging method that is able to specifically quantify lipid accumulation measured as the lipid core burden index (LCBI). NIRS-IVUS is highly specific for the identification of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) culprit plaques usually in the form of a circular LRP. NIRS-IVUS may assist in defining the aetiology of coronary events. The effect of cholesterol-lowering therapy on the lipid core can be measured in coronary plaques in patients, and NIRS-IVUS may be a useful tool for drug development in phase II studies as a surrogate end-point for future ACS. Plaques with a high LCBI have an increased risk of peri-procedural events. NIRS-IVUS can help to define the diameter and length of stents to avoid procedure-related complications. Increased coronary LCBI predicts a higher risk of future cardiovascular events. Lipid core detection using NIRS may help to identify vulnerable plaques to treat them before they cause ACS or sudden death. PMID:26096457

  9. Broadband Homonuclear Correlation Spectroscopy Driven by Combined R2nv Sequences under Fast Magic Angle Spinning for NMR Structural Analysis of Organic and Biological Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Yan, Si; Trebosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    We recently described a family of experiments for R2nv Driven Spin Diffusion (RDSD) spectroscopy suitable for homonuclear correlation experiments under fast MAS conditions (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 2011, 3943). In these RDSD experiments, since the broadened second-order rotational resonance conditions are dominated by the radio frequency field strength and the phase shifts, as well as the size of reintroduced dipolar couplings, the different R2nv sequences display unique polarization transfer behaviors and different recoupling frequency bandwidths. Herein, we present a series of modified R2nv sequences, dubbed COmbined R2nv-Driven (CORD), that yield broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling and give rise to uniform distribution of cross peak intensities across the entire correlation spectrum. We report NMR experiments and numerical simulations demonstrating that these CORD spin diffusion sequences are suitable for broadband recoupling at a wide range of magnetic fields and MAS frequencies, including fast-MAS conditions (?r = 40 kHz and above). Since these CORD sequences are largely insensitive to dipolar truncation, they are well suited for the determination of long-range distance constraints, which are indispensable for the structural characterization of a broad range of systems. Using U-13C-alanine and U-13C,15N-histidine, we show that under fast-MAS conditions, the CORD sequences display polarization transfer efficiencies within broadband frequency regions that are generally higher than those offered by other existing spin diffusion pulse schemes. A 89-residue U-13C,15N-dynein light chain (LC8) protein has also been used to demonstrate that the CORD sequences exhibit uniformly high cross peak intensities across the entire chemical shift range. PMID:23685715

  10. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  11. Systems cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Fred D.; Ratushny, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology. PMID:25225336

  12. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  13. Basic Principles of Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy deals with the production, measurement, and interpretation of spectra arising from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are many different spectroscopic methods available for solving a wide range of analytical problems. The methods differ with respect to the species to be analyzed (such as molecular or atomic spectroscopy), the type of radiation-matter interaction to be monitored (such as absorption, emission, or diffraction), and the region of the electromagnetic spectrum used in the analysis. Spectroscopic methods are very informative and widely used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Spectroscopic methods based on the absorption or emission of radiation in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), infrared (IR), and radio (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR) frequency ranges are most commonly encountered in traditional food analysis laboratories. Each of these methods is distinct in that it monitors different types of molecular or atomic transitions. The basis of these transitions is explained in the following sections.

  14. The mathematics of cancer: integrating quantitative models.

    PubMed

    Altrock, Philipp M; Liu, Lin L; Michor, Franziska

    2015-11-24

    Mathematical modelling approaches have become increasingly abundant in cancer research. The complexity of cancer is well suited to quantitative approaches as it provides challenges and opportunities for new developments. In turn, mathematical modelling contributes to cancer research by helping to elucidate mechanisms and by providing quantitative predictions that can be validated. The recent expansion of quantitative models addresses many questions regarding tumour initiation, progression and metastases as well as intra-tumour heterogeneity, treatment responses and resistance. Mathematical models can complement experimental and clinical studies, but also challenge current paradigms, redefine our understanding of mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and shape future research in cancer biology. PMID:26597528

  15. The trouble with spectroscopy papers.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A

    1991-11-01

    Writing a critique and guide for authors of clinical spectroscopy research papers is a likely way of ensuring that one never sees another of one's own papers published in this field. Nevertheless, it is disappointing, though perhaps predictable, that despite its historical foundations in quantitative spectroscopy, the field has its fair share of findings that are not so obviously reconciled. Here is the view of one author, one referee, and one spectroscopy protagonist about what might be expected of a clinical spectroscopy paper. In addition to novelty, the fundamental criteria for acceptance should be that the conclusions are supported by properly and objectively quantified results, and that sufficient experimental detail is provided so that one skilled in the art could reproduce the study and its findings. PMID:1924769

  16. The trouble with spectroscopy papers.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A

    1992-01-01

    Writing a critique and guide for authors of clinical spectroscopy research papers is a likely way of ensuring that one never sees another of one's own papers published in this field. Nevertheless, it is disappointing, though perhaps predictable, that despite its historical foundations in quantitative spectroscopy, the field has its fair share of findings that are not so obviously reconciled. Here is the view of one author, one referee, and one spectroscopy protagonist about what might be expected of a clinical spectroscopy paper. In addition to novelty, the fundamental criteria for acceptance should be that the conclusions are supported by properly and objectively quantified results, and that sufficient experimental detail is provided so that one skilled in the art could reproduce the study and its findings. PMID:1623275

  17. Quantitative Mineralogical Characterization of Oregon Erionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, A.; Dogan, M.; Ballirano, P.

    2006-12-01

    Erionite has been classified as Group-I Human Carcinogen by the IARC Working Group. Fibrogenetic potential of erionite varies from low to high yield of mesothelioma. This may require quantitative characterization of physicochemical properties of erionite before any experimental design. The toxicity of the mineral is such that quantitative characterization of erionite is extremely important. Yet, often the erionite specimens were incompletely or incorrectly characterized throwing doubt on the results of the work. For example, none of the Turkish erionite published until recently had balance error (E%) less than 10%, and Mg cation of the type specimen of erionite-Ca from Maze, Niigita Prefecture, Japan is more than 0.8. In the present study, erionite sample near Rome, Oregon have been quantitatively characterized using powder x-ray diffraction, Reitveld refinement, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectroscopy, and Massbauer spectroscopy. The cell parameters of the erionite-K from Oregon is computed as a=13.2217(2) Å and c=15.0671 Å; chemical composition of the erionite as major oxides, rare earth elements and other trace elements, are characterized quantitatively. Crystal chemistries of the erionite are computed based upon the quidelines of the IMAA zeolite report of 1997.

  18. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Role of vibrational spectroscopy in solving problems related to astrobiology will be discussed. Vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for identifying molecules. Theoretical approach used in this work is based on direct computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities from electronic structure codes. One of the applications of this computational technique is possible identification of biological building blocks (amino acids, small peptides, DNA bases) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Identifying small biological molecules in the ISM is very important from the point of view of origin of life. Hybrid (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) theoretical techniques will be discussed that may allow to obtain accurate vibrational spectra of biomolecular building blocks and to create a database of spectroscopic signatures that can assist observations of these molecules in space. Another application of the direct computational spectroscopy technique is to help to design and analyze experimental observations of ice surfaces of one of the Jupiter's moons, Europa, that possibly contains hydrated salts. The presence of hydrated salts on the surface can be an indication of a subsurface ocean and the possible existence of life forms inhabiting such an ocean.

  20. Spot Variation Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Allows for Superresolution Chronoscopy of Confinement Times in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Verena; Wieser, Stefan; Marguet, Didier; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving the dynamical interplay of proteins and lipids in the live-cell plasma membrane represents a central goal in current cell biology. Superresolution concepts have introduced a means of capturing spatial heterogeneity at a nanoscopic length scale. Similar concepts for detecting dynamical transitions (superresolution chronoscopy) are still lacking. Here, we show that recently introduced spot-variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allows for sensing transient confinement times of membrane constituents at dramatically improved resolution. Using standard diffraction-limited optics, spot-variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy captures signatures of single retardation events far below the transit time of the tracer through the focal spot. We provide an analytical description of special cases of transient binding of a tracer to pointlike traps, or association of a tracer with nanodomains. The influence of trap mobility and the underlying binding kinetics are quantified. Experimental approaches are suggested that allow for gaining quantitative mechanistic insights into the interaction processes of membrane constituents. PMID:21641330

  1. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  2. Quantitative environmental risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klovning, J.; Nilsen, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    According to regulations relating to implementation and rise of risk analysis in the petroleum activities issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, it is mandatory for an operator on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to establish acceptance criteria for environmental risk in the activities and carry out environmental risk analysis. This paper presents a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} method for environmental risk analysis developed by the company. The objective has been to assist the company to meet rules and regulations and to assess and describe the environmental risk in a systematic manner. In the environmental risk analysis the most sensitive biological resource in the affected area is used to assess the environmental damage. The analytical method is based on the methodology for quantitative risk analysis related to loss of life. In addition it incorporates the effect of seasonal fluctuations in the environmental risk evaluations. The paper is describing the function of the main analytical sequences exemplified through an analysis of environmental risk related to exploration drilling in an environmental sensitive area on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  3. Combinational pixel-by-pixel and object-level classifying, segmenting, and agglomerating in performing quantitative image analysis that distinguishes between healthy non-cancerous and cancerous cell nuclei and delineates nuclear, cytoplasm, and stromal material objects from stained biological tissue materials

    DOEpatents

    Boucheron, Laura E

    2013-07-16

    Quantitative object and spatial arrangement-level analysis of tissue are detailed using expert (pathologist) input to guide the classification process. A two-step method is disclosed for imaging tissue, by classifying one or more biological materials, e.g. nuclei, cytoplasm, and stroma, in the tissue into one or more identified classes on a pixel-by-pixel basis, and segmenting the identified classes to agglomerate one or more sets of identified pixels into segmented regions. Typically, the one or more biological materials comprises nuclear material, cytoplasm material, and stromal material. The method further allows a user to markup the image subsequent to the classification to re-classify said materials. The markup is performed via a graphic user interface to edit designated regions in the image.

  4. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10–70?nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300?Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs. PMID:26218346

  5. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dokukin, M; Sokolov, I

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70?nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7 s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300?Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs. PMID:26218346

  6. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70?nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300?Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  7. Anatomy-Based Algorithms for Detecting Oral Cancer Using Reflectance and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    McGee, Sasha

    OBJECTIVES: We used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to noninvasively and quantitatively distinguish benign from dysplastic/malignant oral lesions. We designed diagnostic algorithms to account for differences in ...

  8. Pervasive robustness in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Félix, Marie-Anne; Barkoulas, Michalis

    2015-08-01

    Robustness is characterized by the invariant expression of a phenotype in the face of a genetic and/or environmental perturbation. Although phenotypic variance is a central measure in the mapping of the genotype and environment to the phenotype in quantitative evolutionary genetics, robustness is also a key feature in systems biology, resulting from nonlinearities in quantitative relationships between upstream and downstream components. In this Review, we provide a synthesis of these two lines of investigation, converging on understanding how variation propagates across biological systems. We critically assess the recent proliferation of studies identifying robustness-conferring genes in the context of the nonlinearity in biological systems. PMID:26184598

  9. The modified fluorescence based vesicle fluctuation spectroscopy technique for determination of lipid bilayer bending properties.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Dominik; Przyby?o, Magda; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Igli?, Aleš; Langner, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Lipid bilayer is the main constitutive element of biological membrane, which confines intracellular space. The mechanical properties of biological membranes may be characterized by various parameters including membrane stiffness or membrane bending rigidity, which can be measured using flicker noise spectroscopy. The flicker noise spectroscopy exploits the spontaneous thermal undulations of the membrane. The method is based on the quantitative analysis of a series of microscopic images captured during thermal membrane fluctuations. Thus, measured bending rigidity coefficient depends on the image quality as well as the selection of computational tools for image processing and mathematical model used. In this work scanning and spinning disc confocal microscopies were used to visualize fluctuating membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bending rigidity coefficient was calculated for different acquisition modes, using different fluorescent probes and different image processing methods. It was shown that both imaging approaches gave similar bending coefficient values regardless of acquisition time. Using the developed methodology the effect of fluorescent probe type and aqueous phase composition on the value of the membrane bending rigidity coefficient was measured. Specifically it was found that the bending rigidity coefficient of DOPC bilayer in water is smaller than that determined for POPC membrane. It has been found that the POPC and DOPC bending rigidities coefficient in sucrose solution was lower than that in water. Fluorescence imaging makes possible the quantitative analysis of membrane mechanical properties of inhomogeneous membrane. PMID:26615919

  10. Structural Organization of Insulin Fibrils Based on Polarized Raman Spectroscopy: Evaluation of Existing Models.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Valentin; Sawaya, Michael R; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-09-01

    Many different proteins undergo misfolding and self-assemble into amyloid fibrils, resulting in a range of neurodegenerative diseases. The limitations of conventional methods of structural biology for fibril characterization have led to the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy for obtaining quantitative structural information regarding the organization of amyloid fibrils. Herein, we report the orientation of selected chemical groups and secondary structure elements in aligned insulin fibrils, including ?-sheets, which possess a high level of orientation in the cross-? core, and ?-helices in the disordered portions of the fibrils. Strong orientation of disulfide bonds in amyloid fibrils was also revealed, indicating their association with the fibril core. The determined orientation of chemical groups provides strong constraints for modeling the overall structure of amyloid fibrils, including the core and disordered parts. The developed methodology allows for the validation of structural models proposed in the literature for amyloid fibrils. Specifically, the polarized Raman data obtained herein strongly agreed with two insulin fibril models (Jiménez et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2002, 99, 9196-9201 and Ivanova et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2009, 106, 18990-18995) yet revealed significant qualitative and quantitative differences. This work demonstrates the great potential of polarized Raman spectroscopy for structural characterization of anisotropic biological species. PMID:26278047

  11. Biological Threats

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Protection Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may ...

  12. Identification of proteins associated with Aha1 in HeLa cells by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Hartson, Steven D; Matts, Robert L

    2015-05-01

    The identification of the activator of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) ATPase's (Aha1) protein-protein interaction (PPI) network will provide critical insights into the relationship of Aha1 with multi-molecular complexes and shed light onto Aha1's interconnections with Hsp90-regulated biological functions. Flag-tagged Aha1 was over-expressed in HeLa cells and isolated by anti-Flag affinity pull downs, followed by trypsin digestion and identification co-adsorbing proteins by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). A probability-based identification of Aha1 PPIs was generated from the LC-MS/MS analysis by using a relative quantification strategy, spectral counting (SC). By comparing the SC-based protein levels between Aha1 pull-down samples and negative controls, 164 Aha1-interacting proteins were identified that were quantitatively enriched in the pull-down samples over the controls. The identified Aha1-interacting proteins are involved in a wide number of intracellular bioprocesses, including DNA maintenance, chromatin structure, RNA processing, translation, nucleocytoplasmic and vesicle transport, among others. The interactions of 33 of the identified proteins with Aha1 were further confirmed by Western blotting, demonstrating the reliability of our affinity-purification-coupled quantitative SC-MS strategy. Our proteomic data suggests that Aha1 may participate in diverse biological pathways to facilitate Hsp90 chaperone functions in response to stress. PMID:25614414

  13. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Microwave Imaging of Realistic Numerical Breast Phantoms Using Huber Regularization

    E-print Network

    Pizurica, Aleksandra

    imaging, QMWI quantitatively reconstructs the complex permittivity profile of the biological tissue using between these simulated data and the scattered field computed for a current permittivity profile tissues. The complex permittivity reconstruction of inhomogeneous dielectric biological tissues from

  14. Quantitative imaging as cancer biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, David A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to assay tumor biologic features and the impact of drugs on tumor biology is fundamental to drug development. Advances in our ability to measure genomics, gene expression, protein expression, and cellular biology have led to a host of new targets for anticancer drug therapy. In translating new drugs into clinical trials and clinical practice, these same assays serve to identify patients most likely to benefit from specific anticancer treatments. As cancer therapy becomes more individualized and targeted, there is an increasing need to characterize tumors and identify therapeutic targets to select therapy most likely to be successful in treating the individual patient's cancer. Thus far assays to identify cancer therapeutic targets or anticancer drug pharmacodynamics have been based upon in vitro assay of tissue or blood samples. Advances in molecular imaging, particularly PET, have led to the ability to perform quantitative non-invasive molecular assays. Imaging has traditionally relied on structural and anatomic features to detect cancer and determine its extent. More recently, imaging has expanded to include the ability to image regional biochemistry and molecular biology, often termed molecular imaging. Molecular imaging can be considered an in vivo assay technique, capable of measuring regional tumor biology without perturbing it. This makes molecular imaging a unique tool for cancer drug development, complementary to traditional assay methods, and a potentially powerful method for guiding targeted therapy in clinical trials and clinical practice. The ability to quantify, in absolute measures, regional in vivo biologic parameters strongly supports the use of molecular imaging as a tool to guide therapy. This review summarizes current and future applications of quantitative molecular imaging as a biomarker for cancer therapy, including the use of imaging to (1) identify patients whose tumors express a specific therapeutic target; (2) determine whether the drug reaches the target; (3) identify an early response to treatment; and (4) predict the impact of therapy on long-term outcomes such as survival. The manuscript reviews basic concepts important in the application of molecular imaging to cancer drug therapy, in general, and will discuss specific examples of studies in humans, and highlight future directions, including ongoing multi-center clinical trials using molecular imaging as a cancer biomarker.

  15. Quantitative Relaxometry of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Deoni, Sean C.L.

    2011-01-01

    The exquisite soft tissue contrast provided by magnetic resonance imaging arises principally from differences in the intrinsic relaxation properties, T1 and T2. Though the intricate relationships that link tissue microstructure and the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times remain to be firmly established, quantitative measurement of these parameters, also referred to as quantitative relaxometry, can be informative of disease-related tissue change, developmental plasticity, and other biological processes. Further, relaxometry studies potentially offer a more detailed characterization of tissue, compared with conventional qualitative or weighted imaging approaches. The purpose of this review is to briefly review the biophysical basis of relaxation, focusing specifically on the T1, T2 and T2* relaxation times, and to detail some of the more widely used and clinically feasible techniques for their in vivo measurement. We will focus on neuroimaging applications, though the methods described are equally well suited to cardiac, abdominal and musculoskeletal imaging. Potential sources of error, and methods for their correction, are also touched on. Finally, the combination of relaxation time data with other complementary quantitative imaging data, including diffusion tensor imaging, is discussed, with the aim of more thoroughly characterizing brain tissue. PMID:21613875

  16. Quantitative self-assembly of a purely organic three-dimensional catenane in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Huacheng; Lammer, Aaron D; Wang, Ming; Li, Xiaopeng; Lynch, Vincent M; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly by means of coordinative bond formation has opened up opportunities for the high-yield synthesis of molecules with complex topologies. However, the preparation of purely covalent molecular architectures in aqueous media has remained a challenging task. Here, we present the preparation of a three-dimensional catenane through a self-assembly process that relies on the formation of dynamic hydrazone linkages in an acidic aqueous medium. The quantitative synthesis process and the mechanically interlocked structure of the resulting catenane were established by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, X-ray crystallography and HPLC studies. In addition, the labile hydrazone linkages of the individual [2]catenane components may be 'locked' by increasing the pH of the solution, yielding a relatively kinetically stable molecule. The present study thus details a simple approach to the creation and control of complex molecular architectures under reaction conditions that mimic biological milieux. PMID:26587716

  17. HPTLC Hyphenated with FTIR: Principles, Instrumentation and Qualitative Analysis and Quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimpoiu, Claudia

    In recent years, much effort has been devoted to the coupling of high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) with spectrometric methods because of the robustness and simplicity of HPTLC and the need for detection techniques that provide identification and determination of sample constituents. IR is one of the spectroscopic methods that have been coupled with HPTLC. IR spectroscopy has a high potential for the elucidation of molecular structures, and the characteristic absorption bands can be used for compound-specific detection. HPTLC-FTIR coupled method has been widely used in the modern laboratories for the qualitative and quantitative analysis. The potential of this method is demonstrated by its application in different fields of analysis such as drug analysis, forensic analysis, food analysis, environmental analysis, biological analysis, etc. The hyphenated HPTLC-FTIR technique will be developed in the future with the aim of taking full advantage of this method.

  18. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE�s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE�s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  19. Quantitative determination of two polymorphic forms of imatinib mesylate in a drug substance and tablet formulation by X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bellur Atici, Esen; Karl??a, Bekir

    2015-10-10

    Imatinib has been identified as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinases, including Bcr-Abl. The active substance used in drug product is the mesylate salt form of imatinib, a phenylaminopyrimidine derivative and chemically named as N-(3-(4-(pyridin-3-yl) pyrimidin-2-ylamino)-4-methylphenyl)-4-((4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) methyl)-benzamide methanesulfonic acid salt. It exhibits many polymorphic forms and most stable and commercialized polymorphs are known as ? and ? forms. Molecules in ? and ? polymorphic forms exhibit significant conformational differences due to their different intra- and intermolecular interactions, which stabilize their molecular conformations and affect their physicochemical properties such as bulk density, melting point, solubility, stability, and processability. The manufacturing process of a drug tablet included granulation, compression, coating, and drying may cause polymorphic conversions. Therefore, polymorphic content of the drug substance should be controlled during quality control and stability testing. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) methods were evaluated for determination of the polymorphic content of the drug substance and drug product; and PXRD was the most accurate technique and selected as preferred method and validated. Prior to development of a quantification method, pure ? and ? polymorphs were characterized and used throughout the method development and validation studies. Mixtures with different ratios of ? and ? forms were scanned using X-ray diffractometer with a scan rate of 0.250°/min over an angular range of 19.5-21.0° 2? and the peak heights for characteristic peak of ? form at 20.5 ± 0.2° 2? diffraction angle were used to generate a calibration curve. The detection limit of ? polymorph in ? form imatinib mesylate tablets was found as 4% and the linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed good linear relationship with correlation coefficient of 0.992 with respect to relative peak height in the concentration range of 12-75 wt% ? form containing tablet mixtures. The obtained results at each stage of the validation study proved that the method is specific, repeatable, precise and accurate, and could be used for determination of ? polymorph content in tablets produced by using ? polymorph of imatinib mesylate. The developed PXRD quantification method was used to monitor the polymorphic purity of ? form drug substance and corresponding drug products during the quality control analyses and stability studies, and the results indicated that ? form was stable and not converted to ? form during the manufacturing process and stability period. PMID:26099262

  20. Early diagnosis of cancer using light scattering spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Backman, Vadim, 1973-

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel optical technique, light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), developed for quantitative characterization of tissue morphology as well as in vivo detection and diagnosis of the diseases associated ...

  1. Robust network calibration and therapy design in systems biology

    E-print Network

    Kim, Bo S. (Bo Sung)

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biological networks is under active research, receiving attention for its ability to quantitatively represent the modeler's systems-level understanding of network functionalities. Computational ...

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a new analytical tool that provides a simple nondestructive technique for obtaining information about the electronic absorption spectrum of samples such as powders, semisolids, gels, and liquids. It can also be applied to samples which cannot be examined by conventional optical methods. Numerous applications of this technique in the field of inorganic and organic semiconductors, biology, and catalysis have been described. Among the advantages of photoacoustic spectroscopy, the signal is almost insensitive to light scattering by the sample and information can be obtained about nonradiative deactivation processes. Signal saturation, which can modify the intensity of individual absorption bands in special cases, is a drawback of the method.

  3. Modern Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the basic ideas of modern spectroscopy. Both the angular momenta and wave-nature approaches to the determination of energy level patterns for atomic and molecular systems are discussed. The interpretation of spectra, based on atomic and molecular models, is considered. (LC)

  4. A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology

    E-print Network

    Follows, Michael J.

    With biology becoming quantitative, systems-level studies can now be performed at spatial scales ranging from molecules to ecosystems. Biological data generated consistently across scales can be integrated with physico-chemical ...

  5. Quantitative Measurements of HO2 and other products of n-butane oxidation (H2O2, H2O, CH2O, and C2H4) at elevated temperatures by direct coupling of a jet-stirred reactor with sampling nozzle and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS).

    PubMed

    Djehiche, Mokhtar; Le Tan, Ngoc Linh; Jain, Chaithanya D; Dayma, Guillaume; Dagaut, Philippe; Chauveau, Christian; Pillier, Laure; Tomas, Alexandre

    2014-11-26

    For the first time quantitative measurements of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in a jet-stirred reactor were performed thanks to a new experimental setup involving fast sampling and near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy at low pressure. The experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and over a range of temperatures (550-900 K) with n-butane, the simplest hydrocarbon fuel exhibiting cool flame oxidation chemistry which represents a key process for the auto-ignition in internal combustion engines. The same technique was also used to measure H2O2, H2O, CH2O, and C2H4 under the same conditions. This new setup brings new scientific horizons for characterizing complex reactive systems at elevated temperatures. Measuring HO2 formation from hydrocarbon oxidation is extremely important in determining the propensity of a fuel to follow chain-termination pathways from R + O2 compared to chain branching (leading to OH), helping to constrain and better validate detailed chemical kinetics models. PMID:25381864

  6. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  7. Spectroscopy of Isolated Prebiotic Nucleobases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svadlenak, Nathan; Callahan, Michael P.; Ligare, Marshall; Gulian, Lisa; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Nachtigallova, Dana; Hobza, Pavel; deVries, Mattanjah

    2011-01-01

    We use multiphoton ionization and double resonance spectroscopy to study the excited state dynamics of biologically relevant molecules as well as prebiotic nucleobases, isolated in the gas phase. Molecules that are biologically relevant to life today tend to exhibit short excited state lifetimes compared to similar but non-biologically relevant analogs. The mechanism is internal conversion, which may help protect the biologically active molecules from UV damage. This process is governed by conical intersections that depend very strongly on molecular structure. Therefore we have studied purines and pyrimidines with systematic variations of structure, including substitutions, tautomeric forms, and cluster structures that represent different base pair binding motifs. These structural variations also include possible alternate base pairs that may shed light on prebiotic chemistry. With this in mind we have begun to probe the ultrafast dynamics of molecules that exhibit very short excited states and search for evidence of internal conversions.

  8. Systems biology, adverse outcome pathways, and ecotoxicology in the 21st century

    EPA Science Inventory

    While many definitions of systems biology exist, the majority of these contain most (if not all) of the following elements: global measurements of biological molecules to the extent technically feasible, dynamic measurements of key biological molecules to establish quantitative r...

  9. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  10. Grain Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  11. Quantitative Finance CONTACT INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Quantitative Finance CONTACT INFORMATION Pamela Peterson Drake, PhD Department Head, Finance of Finance College of Business ZSH 325 (540) 568-8107 finkjd@jmu.edu Michelle Duncan, Advisor Academic Services Center College of Business ZSH 205 (540) 568-3078 duncanml@jmu.edu What is a quantitative finance

  12. Integrating Quantitative Skills in Introductory Ecology: Investigations of Wild Bird Feeding Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Christine J.; Newtoff, Kiersten N.

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education is undergoing dramatic changes, emphasizing student training in the "tools and practices" of science, particularly quantitative and problem-solving skills. We redesigned a freshman ecology lab to emphasize the importance of scientific inquiry and quantitative reasoning in biology. This multi-week investigation uses…

  13. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, H.; Yoneda, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-02-01

    Anderson localization of matter-waves in a controlled disorder: a quantum simulator? / A. Aspect ... [et al.] -- Squeezing and entanglement in a Bose-Einstein condensate / C. Gross ... [et al.] -- New physics in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates / Y. Kawaguchi, H. Saito, and M. Ueda -- Observation of vacuum fluctuations in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate / C. Klempt ... [et al.] -- Negative-index media for matter waves / F. Perales ... [et al.] -- Entanglement of two individual atoms using the Rydberg blockade / A. Browaeys ... [et al.] -- Array of mesoscopic ensembles on a magnetic atom chip / A. F. Tauschinsky ... [et al.] -- Stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio tested with molecules using an optical link to primary clock / A. Amy-Klein ... [et al.] -- Metastable helium: lifetime measurements using cold atoms as a test of QED / K. G. H. Baldwin ... [et al.] -- Optical lattice clocks with single occupancy bosons and spin-polarized fermions toward 10[symbol] accuracy / M. Takamoto ... [et al.] -- Frequency measurements of Al[symbol] and Hg[symbol] optical standards / W. M. Itano ... [et al.] -- Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber / M. Bajcsy ... [et al.] -- Room-temperature atomic ensembles for quantum memory and magnetometry / K. Jensen ... [et al.] -- Components for multi-photon non-classical state preparation and measurement / G. Puentes ... [et al.] -- Quantum field state measurement and reconstruction in a cavity by quantum nondemolition photon counting / M. Brune ... [et al.] -- XUV frequency comb spectroscopy / C. Gohle ... [et al.] -- Ultrahigh-repetition-rate pulse train with absolute-phase control produced by an adiabatic raman process / M. Katsuragawa ... [et al.] -- Strongly correlated bosons and fermions in optical lattices / S. Will ... [et al.] -- Bragg spectroscopy of ultracold bose gases in optical lattices / L. Fallani ... [et al.] -- Synthetic quantum many-body systems / C. Guerlin ... [et al.] -- Ultracold Ytterbium atoms in optical lattices / S. Sugawa ... [et al.] -- Ultracold polar molecules in the rovibrational ground state / J. Deiglmayr ... [et al.] -- Polar molecules near quantum degeneracy / J. Ye and D. S. Jin -- Production of a quantum gas of rovibronic ground-state molecules in an optical lattice / J. G. Danzl ... [et al.] -- Recent progress in x-ray nonlinear optics / K. Tamasaku, K. Sawada, and T. Ishikawa -- Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - laser spectroscopy in unconventional environments / S. Svanberg -- Laser spectroscopy on relativistic ion beams / S. Reinhardt ... [et al.] -- Single frequency microcavity lasers and applications / L. Xu ... [et al.].

  14. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J; Jesse, Stephen; Karapetian, Edgar; Mirman, B; Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  15. QUANTITY: An Isobaric Tag for Quantitative Glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Wang, Meiyao; Chen, Lijun; Yin, Bojiao; Song, Guoqiang; Turko, Illarion V.; Phinney, Karen W.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Zhang, Hui; Li, Shuwei

    2015-01-01

    Glycan is an important class of macromolecules that play numerous biological functions. Quantitative glycomics - analysis of glycans at global level - however, is far behind genomics and proteomics owing to technical challenges associated with their chemical properties and structural complexity. As a result, technologies that can facilitate global glycan analysis are highly sought after. Here, we present QUANTITY (Quaternary Amine Containing Isobaric Tag for Glycan), a quantitative approach that can not only enhance detection of glycans by mass spectrometry, but also allow high-throughput glycomic analysis from multiple biological samples. This robust tool enabled us to accomplish glycomic survey of bioengineered Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells with knock-in/out enzymes involved in protein glycosylation. Our results demonstrated QUANTITY is an invaluable technique for glycan analysis and bioengineering. PMID:26616285

  16. Automated Quantitative Live Cell Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fero, Michael; Pogliano, Kit

    2010-01-01

    Advances in microscopy automation and image analysis have given biologists the tools to attempt large scale systems-level experiments on biological systems using microscope image readout. Fluorescence microscopy has become a standard tool for assaying gene function in RNAi knockdown screens and protein localization studies in eukaryotic systems. Similar high throughput studies can be attempted in prokaryotes, though the difficulties surrounding work at the diffraction limit pose challenges, and targeting essential genes in a high throughput way can be difficult. Here we will discuss efforts to make live-cell fluorescent microscopy based experiments using genetically encoded fluorescent reporters an automated, high throughput, and quantitative endeavor amenable to systems-level experiments in bacteria. We emphasize a quantitative data reduction approach, using simulation to help develop biologically relevant cell measurements that completely characterize the cell image. We give an example of how this type of data can be directly exploited by statistical learning algorithms to discover functional pathways. PMID:20591990

  17. Causation in biology : a biomolecular systems view

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Nathan Enoch

    2012-01-01

    Ø. in Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science 5535 (In Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science 5535 (complexity of biological systems have presented considerable challenges in achieving the quantitative rigor in the life sciences

  18. Modular languages for systems and synthetic biology 

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology is a rapidly growing field which seeks a refined quantitative understanding of organisms, particularly studying how molecular species such as metabolites, proteins and genes interact in cells to form the ...

  19. SPECTROSCOPY WITH TRAPPED FRANCIUM LUIS A. OROZCO

    E-print Network

    Orozco, Luis A.

    SPECTROSCOPY WITH TRAPPED FRANCIUM LUIS A. OROZCO Department of Physics and Astronomy State of the francium experiments at Stony Brook. The measurements show that the level of quantitative un- derstanding the weak force, in particular about the anapole moment. 2. Francium production and trapping Francium

  20. Assessment of the effect of trichostatin A on HeLa cells through FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengqiu; Huang, Qing; Yan, Jingwen; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jianxin

    2015-02-17

    Trichostatin A (TSA) is one of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor drugs which can suppress the enzymatic activity of deacytylases and promote the acetylation of both histone and nonhistone proteins in cells. Investigation of the effect of TSA on cellular acetylation is critical for better understanding of the antitumor drug's mechanism interacting with cancer cells. As Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical tool which can detect nondestructively and quantitatively biological samples without biotagging and biolabeling, here we employed FT-IR spectroscopy to probe the chemical and structural changes of proteins in the TSA treated cells, and with the aid of fluorescent microscopy, we could scrutinize the time-dependent and dose effects on the acetylation level promoted by TSA. Our results showed that TSA caused an elevated level of cellular acetylation and conformational/structural changes of proteins in the cells, and a higher dosage of TSA caused a higher percent of ?-helix structure accompanied by an increment of acetylation level in both histones and cytoskeleton proteins. This work therefore not only validates the usefulness of FT-IR spectroscopy in the quantitative assessment of cellular acetylation but also may open an avenue to the in-depth investigation of the effect of HDAC inhibitor drugs such as TSA on cancer cells. PMID:25602746