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Sample records for quantitative biological spectroscopy

  1. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-19

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFMGRP) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFMGRP has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca(2+) in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca(2+) sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFMGRP could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca(2+) in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca(2+) bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFMGRP for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2-4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca(2+) bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFMGRP for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry. PMID:27126788

  2. Recapturing Quantitative Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernezny, Ken; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity on estimating animal populations. Uses shoe boxes and candies to emphasize the importance of mathematics in biology while introducing the methods of quantitative ecology. (JRH)

  3. Microfluidic impedance spectroscopy as a tool for quantitative biology and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Ahmet C.; Zhuang, Jie; Kolb, Juergen F.; Beskok, Ali

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidic device that is able to perform dielectric spectroscopy is developed. The device consists of a measurement chamber that is 250 μm thick and 750 μm in radius. Around 1000 cells fit inside the chamber assuming average quantities for cell radius and volume fraction. This number is about 1000 folds lower than the capacity of conventional fixtures. A T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat is tested using the microfluidic device. Measurements of deionized water and salt solutions are utilized to determine parasitic effects and geometric capacitance of the device. Physical models, including Maxwell-Wagner mixture and double shell models, are used to derive quantities for sub-cellular units. Clausius-Mossotti factor of Jurkat cells is extracted from the impedance spectrum. Effects of cellular heterogeneity are discussed and parameterized. Jurkat cells are also tested with a time domain reflectometry system for verification of the microfluidic device. Results indicate good agreement of values obtained with both techniques. The device can be used as a unique cell diagnostic tool to yield information on sub-cellular units. PMID:23853680

  4. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James N; McCall, Benjamin J

    2016-05-14

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined. PMID:27179476

  5. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a quantitative tool to determine the concentrations of biologically produced metabolites: implications in metabolites in safety testing.

    PubMed

    Espina, Robert; Yu, Linning; Wang, Jianyao; Tong, Zeen; Vashishtha, Sarvesh; Talaat, Rasmy; Scatina, JoAnn; Mutlib, Abdul

    2009-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has traditionally been considered as an indispensable tool in elucidating structures of metabolites. With the advent of Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers, along with improvements in software and hardware (such as high-field magnets, cryoprobes, versatile pulse sequences, and solvent suppression techniques), NMR is increasingly being considered as a critical quantitative tool, despite its lower sensitivity as compared to mass spectrometry. A specific quantitative application of NMR is in determining the concentrations of biologically isolated metabolites, which could potentially be used as reference standards for further quantitative work by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. With the recent demands from regulatory agencies on quantitative information on metabolites, it is proposed that NMR will play a significant role in strategies aimed at addressing metabolite coverage in toxicological species. Traditionally, biologically isolated metabolites have not been considered as a way of generating "reference standards" for further quantitative work. However, because of the recent FDA guidance on safety testing of metabolites, one has to consider means of authenticating and quantitating biologically or nonbiologically generated metabolites. 1H NMR is being proposed as the method of choice, as it is able to be used as both a qualitative and a quantitative tool, hence allowing structure determination, purity check, and quantitative measurement of the isolated metabolite. In this publication, the application of NMR as a powerful and robust analytical technique in determining the concentrations of in vitro or in vivo isolated metabolites is discussed. Furthermore, to demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of metabolite concentrations determined by NMR, validation and cross-validation with gravimetric and mass spectrometric methods were conducted. PMID:18980340

  7. Quantitative Spectroscopy of Deneb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Florian; Przybilla, N.

    We use the visually brightest A-type supergiant Deneb (A2 Ia) as benchmark for testing a spectro- scopic analysis technique developed for quantitative studies of BA-type supergiants. Our NLTE spectrum synthesis technique allows us to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances with unprecedented accuracy. The study is based on a high-resolution and high-S/N spectrum obtained with the Echelle spectrograph FOCES on the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope. Practically all inconsistencies reported in earlier studies are resolved. A self-consistent view of Deneb is thus obtained, allowing us to discuss its evolutionary state in detail by comparison with the most recent generation of evolution models for massive stars. The basic atmospheric parameters Teff = 8525 ± 75 K and log g = 1.10 ± 0.05 dex (cgs) and the distance imply the following fundamental parameters for Deneb: M spec = 17 ± 3 M⊙ , L = 1.77 ± 0.29 · 105 L⊙ and R = 192 ± 16 R⊙ . The derived He and CNO abundances indicate mixing with nuclear processed matter. The high N/C ratio of 4.64 ± 1.39 and a N/O ratio of 0.88 ± 0.07 (mass fractions) could in principle be explained by evolutionary models with initially very rapid rotation. A mass of ˜ 22 M⊙ is implied for the progenitor on the zero-age main se- quence, i.e. it was a late O-type star. Significant mass-loss has occurred, probably enhanced by pronounced centrifugal forces. The observational constraints favour a scenario for the evolu- tion of Deneb where the effects of rotational mixing may be amplified by an interaction with a magnetic field. Analogous analyses of such highly luminous BA-type supergiants will allow for precision studies of different galaxies in the Local Group and beyond.

  8. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  9. Quantitative biology of single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, James; Lovatt, Ditte; Buckley, Peter; Dueck, Hannah; Francis, Chantal; Kim, Tae Kyung; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Miler; Miyashiro, Kevin; Morris, Jacqueline; Peritz, Tiina; Schochet, Terri; Spaethling, Jennifer; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Junhyong

    2012-01-01

    The building blocks of complex biological systems are single cells. Fundamental insights gained from single-cell analysis promise to provide the framework for understanding normal biological systems development as well as the limits on systems/cellular ability to respond to disease. The interplay of cells to create functional systems is not well understood. Until recently, the study of single cells has concentrated primarily on morphological and physiological characterization. With the application of new highly sensitive molecular and genomic technologies, the quantitative biochemistry of single cells is now accessible. PMID:22915636

  10. Noise Spectroscopy Used in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žacik, Michal

    This thesis contains glossary topic of spectroscopic measurement methods in broad bands of frequency. There is designed experimental measurement method for simple samples and biological samples measurements for noise spectroscopy in frequency range of 0.1 - 6 GHz, using broadband noise generator. There is realized the workplace and the measurement method is verified by measuring on selected samples. Measurements a displayed and analyzed.

  11. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  12. Biomolecular Plasmonics for Quantitative Biology and Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Lee, Luke P.

    2012-01-01

    Free electrons in a noble metal nanoparticle can be resonantly excited, leading to their collective oscillation termed as a surface plasmon. These surface plasmons enable nanoparticles to absorb light, generate heat, transfer energy, and re-radiate incident photons. Creative designs of nanoplasmonic optical antennae (i.e. plasmon resonant nanoparticles) have become a new foundation of quantitative biology and nanomedicine. This review focuses on the recent developments in dual-functional nanoplasmonic optical antennae for label-free biosensors and nanoplasmonic gene switches. Nanoplasmonic optical antennae, functioning as biosensors to significantly enhance biochemical-specific spectral information via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), are discussed. Nanoplasmonic optical antennae, functioning as nanoplasmonic gene switches to enable spatiotemporal regulation of genetic activity, are also reviewed. Nanoplasmonic molecular rulers and integrated photoacoustic-photothermal contrast agents are also described. PMID:20801636

  13. Quantitative tunneling spectroscopy of nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    First, Phillip N; Whetten, Robert L; Schaaff, T Gregory

    2007-05-25

    The proposed goals of this collaborative work were to systematically characterize the electronic structure and dynamics of 3-dimensional metal and semiconducting nanocrystals using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). This report describes progress in the spectroscopic work and in the development of methods for creating and characterizing gold nanocrystals. During the grant period, substantial effort also was devoted to the development of epitaxial graphene (EG), a very promising materials system with outstanding potential for nanometer-scale ballistic and coherent devices ("graphene" refers to one atomic layer of graphitic, sp2 -bonded carbon atoms [or more loosely, few layers]). Funding from this DOE grant was critical for the initial development of epitaxial graphene for nanoelectronics

  14. Teaching quantitative biology: goals, assessments, and resources

    PubMed Central

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    More than a decade has passed since the publication of BIO2010, calling for an increased emphasis on quantitative skills in the undergraduate biology curriculum. In that time, relatively few papers have been published that describe educational innovations in quantitative biology or provide evidence of their effects on students. Using a “backward design” framework, we lay out quantitative skill and attitude goals, assessment strategies, and teaching resources to help biologists teach more quantitatively. Collaborations between quantitative biologists and education researchers are necessary to develop a broader and more appropriate suite of assessment tools, and to provide much-needed evidence on how particular teaching strategies affect biology students' quantitative skill development and attitudes toward quantitative work. PMID:25368425

  15. Toward quantitative "in vivo biochemistry" with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Brian D; Li, Rong

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative description of protein dynamics and interactions in vivo with temporal and spatial resolution is a key step in dissecting molecular mechanisms in cell biology. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) has recently emerged as a powerful in vivo tool for assessing molecular concentration and movement and formation of hetero- and homo-oligomeric complexes. This article discusses point FFS-based analysis methods that have proven useful to cell biologists, focusing on the kinds of information they provide, their pros and cons, and the basic instrumentation required. Along the way, we describe briefly a few recent examples where these analyses have helped address important biological questions. PMID:21160072

  16. Quantitative biology: where modern biology meets physical sciences

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Zhu, Lian; Mazutis, Linas; Sgro, Allyson E.; Fai, Thomas G.; Podolski, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods and approaches have been playing an increasingly important role in cell biology in recent years. They involve making accurate measurements to test a predefined hypothesis in order to compare experimental data with predictions generated by theoretical models, an approach that has benefited physicists for decades. Building quantitative models in experimental biology not only has led to discoveries of counterintuitive phenomena but has also opened up novel research directions. To make the biological sciences more quantitative, we believe a two-pronged approach needs to be taken. First, graduate training needs to be revamped to ensure biology students are adequately trained in physical and mathematical sciences and vice versa. Second, students of both the biological and the physical sciences need to be provided adequate opportunities for hands-on engagement with the methods and approaches necessary to be able to work at the intersection of the biological and physical sciences. We present the annual Physiology Course organized at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA) as a case study for a hands-on training program that gives young scientists the opportunity not only to acquire the tools of quantitative biology but also to develop the necessary thought processes that will enable them to bridge the gap between these disciplines. PMID:25368426

  17. Quantitative biology: where modern biology meets physical sciences.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Shashank; Zhu, Lian; Mazutis, Linas; Sgro, Allyson E; Fai, Thomas G; Podolski, Marija

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative methods and approaches have been playing an increasingly important role in cell biology in recent years. They involve making accurate measurements to test a predefined hypothesis in order to compare experimental data with predictions generated by theoretical models, an approach that has benefited physicists for decades. Building quantitative models in experimental biology not only has led to discoveries of counterintuitive phenomena but has also opened up novel research directions. To make the biological sciences more quantitative, we believe a two-pronged approach needs to be taken. First, graduate training needs to be revamped to ensure biology students are adequately trained in physical and mathematical sciences and vice versa. Second, students of both the biological and the physical sciences need to be provided adequate opportunities for hands-on engagement with the methods and approaches necessary to be able to work at the intersection of the biological and physical sciences. We present the annual Physiology Course organized at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA) as a case study for a hands-on training program that gives young scientists the opportunity not only to acquire the tools of quantitative biology but also to develop the necessary thought processes that will enable them to bridge the gap between these disciplines. PMID:25368426

  18. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  19. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  20. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  1. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Luiten, Andre N.; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.

    2011-03-15

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler broadening of atomic transitions in {sup 85}Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine k{sub B} with a relative uncertainty of 4.1x10{sup -4} and with a deviation of 2.7x10{sup -4} from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapor, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured k{sub B} value was less than 4x10{sup -6}. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for improvement. We also compare the line-broadening mechanisms, windows of operation and detection limits of some recent DBT experiments.

  2. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  3. Submillimeter wave spectroscopy of biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana

    2005-03-01

    The recently emergence of submillimeter-wave or terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of biological molecules has demonstrated the capability to detect low-frequency internal molecular vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds of the DNA base pairs and/or non-bonded interactions. These multiple bonds, although having only ˜ 5% of the strength of covalent bonds, stabilize the structure of bio-polymers, by holding the two strands of the DNA double helix together, or polypeptides together in different secondary structure conformations. There will be a review of THz-frequency transmission (absorption) results for biological materials obtained from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy during the last few years^1,2. Multiple resonances, due to low frequency vibrational modes within biological macromolecules, have been unambiguously demonstrated in qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction, thereby confirming the fundamental physical nature of observed resonance features. The discovery of resonance character of interaction between THz radiation and biological materials opens many possible applications for THz spectroscopy technique in biological sensing and biomedicine using multiple resonances as distinctive spectral fingerprints. However, many issues still require investigation. Kinetics of interactions with radiation at THz has not been studied and vibrational lifetimes have not been measured directly as a function of frequency. The strength of resonant modes of bio-molecules in aqueous environment and strong dependence of spectra on molecular orientation need explanation. Vibrational modes have not been assigned to specific motions within molecules. THz spectroscopy of bio-polymers makes it only in first steps. 1. T. Globus, D. Woolard, M. Bykhovskaia, B. Gelmont, L. Werbos, A. Samuels. International Journal of High Speed Electronics and Systems (IJHSES), 13, No. 4, 903-936 (2003). 2. T. Globus, T. Khromova, D. Woolard and B. Gelmont. Proceedings of

  4. 1, 2, 3, 4: Infusing Quantitative Literacy into Introductory Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray Speth, Elena; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M.; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret…

  5. Photon-tissue interaction model for quantitative assessment of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; McKenna, Barbara; Simeone, Diane; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we describe a direct fit photon-tissue interaction model to quantitatively analyze reflectance spectra of biological tissue samples. The model rapidly extracts biologically-relevant parameters associated with tissue optical scattering and absorption. This model was employed to analyze reflectance spectra acquired from freshly excised human pancreatic pre-cancerous tissues (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), a common precursor lesion to pancreatic cancer). Compared to previously reported models, the direct fit model improved fit accuracy and speed. Thus, these results suggest that such models could serve as real-time, quantitative tools to characterize biological tissues assessed with reflectance spectroscopy.

  6. Photoacoustic resonance spectroscopy for biological tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    By "listening to photons," photoacoustics allows the probing of chromosomes in depth beyond the optical diffusion limit. Here we report the photoacoustic resonance effect induced by multiburst modulated laser illumination, which is theoretically modeled as a damped mass-string oscillator and a resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit. Through sweeping the frequency of multiburst modulated laser, the photoacoustic resonance effect is observed experimentally on phantoms and porcine tissues. Experimental results demonstrate different spectra for each phantom and tissue sample to show significant potential for spectroscopic analysis, fusing optical absorption and mechanical vibration properties. Unique RLC circuit parameters are extracted to quantitatively characterize phantom and biological tissues.

  7. Photoacoustic resonance spectroscopy for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    By "listening to photons," photoacoustics allows the probing of chromosomes in depth beyond the optical diffusion limit. Here we report the photoacoustic resonance effect induced by multiburst modulated laser illumination, which is theoretically modeled as a damped mass-string oscillator and a resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit. Through sweeping the frequency of multiburst modulated laser, the photoacoustic resonance effect is observed experimentally on phantoms and porcine tissues. Experimental results demonstrate different spectra for each phantom and tissue sample to show significant potential for spectroscopic analysis, fusing optical absorption and mechanical vibration properties. Unique RLC circuit parameters are extracted to quantitatively characterize phantom and biological tissues. PMID:24928154

  8. 1, 2, 3, 4: infusing quantitative literacy into introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Speth, Elena Bray; Momsen, Jennifer L; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret numeric information and data-based claims regarding nearly every aspect of daily life. To address the need for QL in biology education, we incorporated quantitative concepts throughout a semester-long introductory biology course at a large research university. Early in the course, we assessed the quantitative skills that students bring to the introductory biology classroom and found that students had difficulties in performing simple calculations, representing data graphically, and articulating data-driven arguments. In response to students' learning needs, we infused the course with quantitative concepts aligned with the existing course content and learning objectives. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by significant improvement in the quality of students' graphical representations of biological data. Infusing QL in introductory biology presents challenges. Our study, however, supports the conclusion that it is feasible in the context of an existing course, consistent with the goals of college biology education, and promotes students' development of important quantitative skills. PMID:20810965

  9. 1, 2, 3, 4: Infusing Quantitative Literacy into Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Momsen, Jennifer L.; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M.; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret numeric information and data-based claims regarding nearly every aspect of daily life. To address the need for QL in biology education, we incorporated quantitative concepts throughout a semester-long introductory biology course at a large research university. Early in the course, we assessed the quantitative skills that students bring to the introductory biology classroom and found that students had difficulties in performing simple calculations, representing data graphically, and articulating data-driven arguments. In response to students' learning needs, we infused the course with quantitative concepts aligned with the existing course content and learning objectives. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by significant improvement in the quality of students' graphical representations of biological data. Infusing QL in introductory biology presents challenges. Our study, however, supports the conclusion that it is feasible in the context of an existing course, consistent with the goals of college biology education, and promotes students' development of important quantitative skills. PMID:20810965

  10. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  11. Quantitative Spectroscopy of Distant Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T. J.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Perrett, K.; Conley, A.; Astier, P.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Guy, J.; Pain, R.; Pritchet, C. J.; Neill, James D.

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of 24 high-z (zmed = 0.81) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) spectra observed at the Gemini Telescopes for the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) is presented. This analysis includes equivalent width measurements of SNe Ia-specific absorption features with methods tailored to the reduced signal-to-noise and host galaxy contamination present in these distant spectra. The results from this analysis are compared to corresponding measurements of a large set of low-z SNe Ia from the literature. This comparison showed no significant difference (less than 2σ) between the spectroscopic features of the distant and nearby SNe; a result that supports the assumption that SNe Ia are not evolving with redshift. Additionally, a new correlation between SiII absorption (observed near peak luminosity) and SNe Ia peak magnitudes is presented.

  12. On the Edge of Mathematics and Biology Integration: Improving Quantitative Skills in Undergraduate Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feser, Jason; Vasaly, Helen; Herrera, Jose

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how two institutions are helping their undergraduate biology students build quantitative competencies. Incorporation of quantitative skills and reasoning in biology are framed through a discussion of two cases that both concern introductory biology courses, but differ in the complexity of the mathematics and the…

  13. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reble, Carina; Gersonde, Ingo; Andree, Stefan; Eichler, Hans Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Intrinsic Raman spectra of biological tissue are distorted by the influences of tissue absorption and scattering, which significantly challenge signal quantification. A combined Raman and spatially resolved reflectance setup is introduced to measure the absorption coefficient μa and the reduced scattering coefficient μs' of the tissue, together with the Raman signals. The influence of μa and μs' on the resonance Raman signal of β-carotene is measured at 1524 cm-1 by tissue phantom measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for μa=0.01 to 10 mm-1 and μs'=0.1 to 10 mm-1. Both methods show that the Raman signal drops roughly proportional to 1/μa for μa>0.2 mm-1 in the measurement geometry and that the influence of μs' is weaker, but not negligible. Possible correction functions dependent on the elastic diffuse reflectance are investigated to correct the Raman signal for the influence of μa and μs', provided that μa and μs' are measured as well. A correction function based on the Monte Carlo simulation of Raman signals is suggested as an alternative. Both approaches strongly reduce the turbidity-induced variation of the Raman signals and allow absolute Raman scattering coefficients to be determined.

  14. Features of the Quantitative Analysis in Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V. G.; Panchuk, V. V.; Irkaev, S. M.

    2010-07-13

    The results describing the effect of different factors on errors in quantitative determination of the phase composition of studied substances by Moessbauer spectroscopy absorption are presented, and the ways of using them are suggested. The effectiveness of the suggested methods is verified by an example of analyzing standard and unknown compositions.

  15. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: QA TESTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: QA tests, Quantitation and Spectroscopy.

    Robert M. Zucker 1 and Jeremy M. Lerner 2,
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research Development, U.S. Environmen...

  16. Quantitation of vitamin B 12 by first-derivative absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karşilayan, Huriye

    1996-08-01

    Quantitation of vitamin B 12 by first-derivative absorption spectroscopy is described. Peak-to-peak (355 nm to 370 nm) amplitudes were measured from the first derivative spectra. The method permits rapid determination of vitamin B 12, and increases the detection limit while decreasing interference by impurities. The effects of the majority of other absorbing macromolecules which may also be present in biological samples are eliminated or very considerably minimized by this method.

  17. A transformative model for undergraduate quantitative biology education.

    PubMed

    Usher, David C; Driscoll, Tobin A; Dhurjati, Prasad; Pelesko, John A; Rossi, Louis F; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Pusecker, Kathleen; White, Harold B

    2010-01-01

    The BIO2010 report recommended that students in the life sciences receive a more rigorous education in mathematics and physical sciences. The University of Delaware approached this problem by (1) developing a bio-calculus section of a standard calculus course, (2) embedding quantitative activities into existing biology courses, and (3) creating a new interdisciplinary major, quantitative biology, designed for students interested in solving complex biological problems using advanced mathematical approaches. To develop the bio-calculus sections, the Department of Mathematical Sciences revised its three-semester calculus sequence to include differential equations in the first semester and, rather than using examples traditionally drawn from application domains that are most relevant to engineers, drew models and examples heavily from the life sciences. The curriculum of the B.S. degree in Quantitative Biology was designed to provide students with a solid foundation in biology, chemistry, and mathematics, with an emphasis on preparation for research careers in life sciences. Students in the program take core courses from biology, chemistry, and physics, though mathematics, as the cornerstone of all quantitative sciences, is given particular prominence. Seminars and a capstone course stress how the interplay of mathematics and biology can be used to explain complex biological systems. To initiate these academic changes required the identification of barriers and the implementation of solutions. PMID:20810949

  18. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazères, S.; Borrel, V.; Magenc, C.; Courrech, J. L.; Bazer-Bachi, R.

    2006-11-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salomé, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cézanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here.

  19. Reproducible quantitative proteotype data matrices for systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Röst, Hannes L.; Malmström, Lars; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Historically, many mass spectrometry–based proteomic studies have aimed at compiling an inventory of protein compounds present in a biological sample, with the long-term objective of creating a proteome map of a species. However, to answer fundamental questions about the behavior of biological systems at the protein level, accurate and unbiased quantitative data are required in addition to a list of all protein components. Fueled by advances in mass spectrometry, the proteomics field has thus recently shifted focus toward the reproducible quantification of proteins across a large number of biological samples. This provides the foundation to move away from pure enumeration of identified proteins toward quantitative matrices of many proteins measured across multiple samples. It is argued here that data matrices consisting of highly reproducible, quantitative, and unbiased proteomic measurements across a high number of conditions, referred to here as quantitative proteotype maps, will become the fundamental currency in the field and provide the starting point for downstream biological analysis. Such proteotype data matrices, for example, are generated by the measurement of large patient cohorts, time series, or multiple experimental perturbations. They are expected to have a large effect on systems biology and personalized medicine approaches that investigate the dynamic behavior of biological systems across multiple perturbations, time points, and individuals. PMID:26543201

  20. Quantitative Genetic Interactions Reveal Layers of Biological Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Beltrao, Pedro; Cagney, Gerard; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2010-01-01

    In the past, biomedical research has embraced a reductionist approach, primarily focused on characterizing the individual components that comprise a system of interest. Recent technical developments have significantly increased the size and scope of data describing biological systems. At the same time, advances in the field of systems biology have evoked a broader view of how the underlying components are interconnected. In this essay, we discuss how quantitative genetic interaction mapping has enhanced our view of biological systems, allowing a deeper functional interrogation at different biological scales. PMID:20510918

  1. Integrating quantitative thinking into an introductory biology course improves students' mathematical reasoning in biological contexts.

    PubMed

    Hester, Susan; Buxner, Sanlyn; Elfring, Lisa; Nagy, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls for improving undergraduate biology education have emphasized the importance of students learning to apply quantitative skills to biological problems. Motivated by students' apparent inability to transfer their existing quantitative skills to biological contexts, we designed and taught an introductory molecular and cell biology course in which we integrated application of prerequisite mathematical skills with biology content and reasoning throughout all aspects of the course. In this paper, we describe the principles of our course design and present illustrative examples of course materials integrating mathematics and biology. We also designed an outcome assessment made up of items testing students' understanding of biology concepts and their ability to apply mathematical skills in biological contexts and administered it as a pre/postcourse test to students in the experimental section and other sections of the same course. Precourse results confirmed students' inability to spontaneously transfer their prerequisite mathematics skills to biological problems. Pre/postcourse outcome assessment comparisons showed that, compared with students in other sections, students in the experimental section made greater gains on integrated math/biology items. They also made comparable gains on biology items, indicating that integrating quantitative skills into an introductory biology course does not have a deleterious effect on students' biology learning. PMID:24591504

  2. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.

    2007-02-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

  3. Spectroscopy, colorimetry, and biological chemistry in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed Central

    Rinsler, M G

    1981-01-01

    The development of colorimetry and spectroscopy in the nineteenth century is described. An account is given of the application of their techniques to biological chemistry during that period. PMID:7014652

  4. Infusing Quantitative Approaches throughout the Biological Sciences Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Cooke, Todd J.; Fagan, William F.; Gulick, Denny; Levy, Doron; Nelson, Kären C.; Redish, Edward F.; Smith, Robert F.; Presson, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    A major curriculum redesign effort at the University of Maryland is infusing all levels of our undergraduate biological sciences curriculum with increased emphasis on interdisciplinary connections and quantitative approaches. The curriculum development efforts have largely been guided by recommendations in the National Research Council's…

  5. Toward Integration: From Quantitative Biology to Mathbio-Biomath?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsteller, Pat; de Pillis, Lisette; Findley, Ann; Joplin, Karl; Pelesko, John; Nelson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina; Usher, David; Watkins, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In response to the call of "BIO2010" for integrating quantitative skills into undergraduate biology education, 30 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Program Directors at the 2006 HHMI Program Directors Meeting established a consortium to investigate, implement, develop, and disseminate best practices resulting from the integration of math and…

  6. A Transformative Model for Undergraduate Quantitative Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, David C.; Driscoll, Tobin A.; Dhurjati, Prasad; Pelesko, John A.; Rossi, Louis F.; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Pusecker, Kathleen; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The "BIO2010" report recommended that students in the life sciences receive a more rigorous education in mathematics and physical sciences. The University of Delaware approached this problem by (1) developing a bio-calculus section of a standard calculus course, (2) embedding quantitative activities into existing biology courses, and (3) creating…

  7. Quantitation and detection of vanadium in biologic and pollution materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of special considerations and methodology for determining vanadium in biological and air pollution materials. In addition to descriptions of specific analysis procedures, general sections are included on quantitation of analysis procedures, sample preparation, blanks, and methods of detection of vanadium. Most of the information presented is applicable to the determination of other trace elements in addition to vanadium.

  8. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  9. Optical spectroscopy for quantitative sensing in human pancreatic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; Lloyd, William; Chen, Leng-Chun; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2011-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a five-year survival rate of only 6%, largely because current diagnostic methods cannot reliably detect the disease in its early stages. Reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies have the potential to provide quantitative, minimally-invasive means of distinguishing pancreatic adenocarcinoma from normal pancreatic tissue and chronic pancreatitis. The first collection of wavelength-resolved reflectance and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay curves from human pancreatic tissues was acquired with clinically-compatible instrumentation. Mathematical models of reflectance and fluorescence extracted parameters related to tissue morphology and biochemistry that were statistically significant for distinguishing between pancreatic tissue types. These results suggest that optical spectroscopy has the potential to detect pancreatic disease in a clinical setting.

  10. Method for depth-resolved quantitation of optical properties in layered media using spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saager, Rolf B.; Truong, Alex; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated that spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy (SMoQS) is capable of extracting absolute optical properties from homogeneous tissue simulating phantoms that span both the visible and near-infrared wavelength regimes. However, biological tissue, such as skin, is highly structured, presenting challenges to quantitative spectroscopic techniques based on homogeneous models. In order to more accurately address the challenges associated with skin, we present a method for depth-resolved optical property quantitation based on a two layer model. Layered Monte Carlo simulations and layered tissue simulating phantoms are used to determine the efficacy and accuracy of SMoQS to quantify layer specific optical properties of layered media. Initial results from both the simulation and experiment show that this empirical method is capable of determining top layer thickness within tens of microns across a physiological range for skin. Layer specific chromophore concentration can be determined to <±10% the actual values, on average, whereas bulk quantitation in either visible or near infrared spectroscopic regimes significantly underestimates the layer specific chromophore concentration and can be confounded by top layer thickness. PMID:21806282

  11. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  12. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  13. High-Content Screening for Quantitative Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Mattiazzi Usaj, Mojca; Styles, Erin B; Verster, Adrian J; Friesen, Helena; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2016-08-01

    High-content screening (HCS), which combines automated fluorescence microscopy with quantitative image analysis, allows the acquisition of unbiased multiparametric data at the single cell level. This approach has been used to address diverse biological questions and identify a plethora of quantitative phenotypes of varying complexity in numerous different model systems. Here, we describe some recent applications of HCS, ranging from the identification of genes required for specific biological processes to the characterization of genetic interactions. We review the steps involved in the design of useful biological assays and automated image analysis, and describe major challenges associated with each. Additionally, we highlight emerging technologies and future challenges, and discuss how the field of HCS might be enhanced in the future. PMID:27118708

  14. Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qavi, Abraham J.; Washburn, Adam L.; Byeon, Ji-Yeon; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2009-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, information is king and information-rich technologies are critically important drivers in both fundamental biology and medicine. It is now known that single-parameter measurements provide only limited detail and that quantitation of multiple biomolecular signatures can more fully illuminate complex biological function. Label-free technologies have recently attracted significant interest for sensitive and quantitative multiparameter analysis of biological systems. There are several different classes of label-free sensors that are currently being developed both in academia and in industry. In this critical review, we highlight, compare, and contrast some of the more promising approaches. We will describe the fundamental principles of these different methodologies and discuss advantages and disadvantages that might potentially help one in selecting the appropriate technology for a given bioanalytical application. PMID:19221722

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  16. Validation of biological markers for quantitative risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, P; Mazzuckelli, L F

    1991-01-01

    The evaluation of biological markers is recognized as necessary to the future of toxicology, epidemiology, and quantitative risk assessment. For biological markers to become widely accepted, their validity must be ascertained. This paper explores the range of considerations that compose the concept of validity as it applies to the evaluation of biological markers. Three broad categories of validity (measurement, internal study, and external) are discussed in the context of evaluating data for use in quantitative risk assessment. Particular attention is given to the importance of measurement validity in the consideration of whether to use biological markers in epidemiologic studies. The concepts developed in this presentation are applied to examples derived from the occupational environment. In the first example, measurement of bromine release as a marker of ethylene dibromide toxicity is shown to be of limited use in constructing an accurate quantitative assessment of the risk of developing cancer as a result of long-term, low-level exposure. This example is compared to data obtained from studies of ethylene oxide, in which hemoglobin alkylation is shown to be a valid marker of both exposure and effect. PMID:2050067

  17. Quantitative Cherenkov emission spectroscopy for tissue oxygenation assessment

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Johan; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of Cherenkov emission in tissue during radiation therapy are shown to enable estimation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation non-invasively, through spectral fitting of the spontaneous emissions from the treated tissue. Tissue oxygenation plays a critical role in the efficacy of radiation therapy to kill tumor tissue. Yet in-vivo measurement of this has remained elusive in routine use because of the complexity of oxygen measurement techniques. There is a spectrally broad emission of Cherenkov light that is induced during the time of irradiation, and as this travels through tissue from the point of the radiation deposition, the tissue absorption and scatter impart spectral changes. These changes can be quantified by diffuse spectral fitting of the signal. Thus Cherenkov emission spectroscopy is demonstrated for the first time quantitatively in vitro and qualitatively in vivo, and has potential for real-time online tracking of tissue oxygen during radiation therapy when fully characterized and developed. PMID:22418319

  18. Positron annihilation spectroscopy of biological tissue in 11C irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Itoh, Fumitake; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Suzuki, Kosuke; Kato, Daisuke; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) spectra of biological tissue in 11C irradiation are reported and spatial resolution coefficient of positron emission tomography (PET) obtained from the PAS spectrum is discussed for 11C irradiation. A PAS spectrum of the biological tissue with water is the same as that of the water pool phantom in 11C irradiation. However, a PAS spectrum of the biological tissue with less water differs from that of the water pool phantom. The PET spatial resolution coefficient depends on the kind of biological tissue. However, the PET spatial resolution coefficient, 0.00243  ±  0.00014, can be used as a common value of maximum limit.

  19. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, M M; Shkurinov, A P; Kuleshov, E A; Tuchin, V V

    2008-07-31

    Terahertz absorption spectra and dispersion of biologically important substances such as sugar, water, hemoglobin, lipids and tissues are studied. The characteristic absorption lines in the frequency range of a terahertz spectrometer (0.1-3.5 THz) are found. The refraction indices and absorption coefficients of human tooth enamel and dentine are measured. The method of terahertz phase reflection spectroscopy is developed for strongly absorbing substances. Simple and reliable methods of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy are developed. (biophotonics)

  20. Computational Laser Spectroscopy in a Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gantri, M.; Trabelsi, H.; Sediki, E.; Ben Salah, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a numerical spectroscopic study of visible and infrared laser radiation in a biological tissue. We derive a solution of a general two-dimensional time dependent radiative transfer equation in a tissue-like medium. The used model is suitable for many situations especially when the external source is time-dependent or continuous. We use a control volume-discrete ordinate method associated with an implicit three-level second-order time differencing scheme. We consider a very thin rectangular biological-tissue-like medium submitted to a visible or a near infrared light sources. The RTE is solved for a set of different wavelength source. All sources are assumed to be monochromatic and collimated. The energetic fluence rate is computed at a set of detector points on the boundaries. According to the source type, we investigate either the steady-state or transient response of the medium. The used model is validated in the case of a heterogeneous tissue-like medium using referencing experimental results from the literature. Also, the developed model is used to study changes on transmitted light in a rat-liver tissue-like medium. Optical properties depend on the source wavelength and they are taken from the literature. In particular, light-transmission in the medium is studied for continuous wave and for short pulse. PMID:20396377

  1. Toward Integration: From Quantitative Biology to Mathbio-Biomath?

    PubMed Central

    de Pillis, Lisette; Findley, Ann; Joplin, Karl; Pelesko, John; Nelson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina; Usher, David; Watkins, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In response to the call of BIO2010 for integrating quantitative skills into undergraduate biology education, 30 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Program Directors at the 2006 HHMI Program Directors Meeting established a consortium to investigate, implement, develop, and disseminate best practices resulting from the integration of math and biology. With the assistance of an HHMI-funded mini-grant, led by Karl Joplin of East Tennessee State University, and support in institutional HHMI grants at Emory and University of Delaware, these institutions held a series of summer institutes and workshops to document progress toward and address the challenges of implementing a more quantitative approach to undergraduate biology education. This report summarizes the results of the four summer institutes (2007–2010). The group developed four draft white papers, a wiki site, and a listserv. One major outcome of these meetings is this issue of CBE—Life Sciences Education, which resulted from proposals at our 2008 meeting and a January 2009 planning session. Many of the papers in this issue emerged from or were influenced by these meetings. PMID:20810946

  2. Biological characteristics of crucian by quantitative inspection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Mengqi

    2015-04-01

    Biological characteristics of crucian by quantitative inspection method Through quantitative inspection method , the biological characteristics of crucian was preliminary researched. Crucian , Belongs to Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae, Carassius auratus, is a kind of main plant-eating omnivorous fish,like Gregarious, selection and ranking. Crucian are widely distributed, perennial water all over the country all have production. Determine the indicators of crucian in the experiment, to understand the growth, reproduction situation of crucian in this area . Using the measured data (such as the scale length ,scale size and wheel diameter and so on) and related functional to calculate growth of crucian in any one year.According to the egg shape, color, weight ,etc to determine its maturity, with the mean egg diameter per 20 eggs and the number of eggs per 0.5 grams, to calculate the relative and absolute fecundity of the fish .Measured crucian were female puberty. Based on the relation between the scale diameter and length and the information, linear relationship between crucian scale diameter and length: y=1.530+3.0649. From the data, the fertility and is closely relative to the increase of age. The older, the more mature gonad development. The more amount of eggs. In addition, absolute fecundity increases with the pituitary gland.Through quantitative check crucian bait food intake by the object, reveals the main food, secondary foods, and chance food of crucian ,and understand that crucian degree of be fond of of all kinds of bait organisms.Fish fertility with weight gain, it has the characteristics of species and populations, and at the same tmes influenced by the age of the individual, body length, body weight, environmental conditions (especially the nutrition conditions), and breeding habits, spawning times factors and the size of the egg. After a series of studies of crucian biological character, provide the ecological basis for local crucian's feeding, breeding

  3. Lessons learned from quantitative dynamical modeling in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Raue, Andreas; Schilling, Marcel; Bachmann, Julie; Matteson, Andrew; Schelker, Max; Schelke, Max; Kaschek, Daniel; Hug, Sabine; Kreutz, Clemens; Harms, Brian D; Theis, Fabian J; Klingmüller, Ursula; Timmer, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high complexity of biological data it is difficult to disentangle cellular processes relying only on intuitive interpretation of measurements. A Systems Biology approach that combines quantitative experimental data with dynamic mathematical modeling promises to yield deeper insights into these processes. Nevertheless, with growing complexity and increasing amount of quantitative experimental data, building realistic and reliable mathematical models can become a challenging task: the quality of experimental data has to be assessed objectively, unknown model parameters need to be estimated from the experimental data, and numerical calculations need to be precise and efficient. Here, we discuss, compare and characterize the performance of computational methods throughout the process of quantitative dynamic modeling using two previously established examples, for which quantitative, dose- and time-resolved experimental data are available. In particular, we present an approach that allows to determine the quality of experimental data in an efficient, objective and automated manner. Using this approach data generated by different measurement techniques and even in single replicates can be reliably used for mathematical modeling. For the estimation of unknown model parameters, the performance of different optimization algorithms was compared systematically. Our results show that deterministic derivative-based optimization employing the sensitivity equations in combination with a multi-start strategy based on latin hypercube sampling outperforms the other methods by orders of magnitude in accuracy and speed. Finally, we investigated transformations that yield a more efficient parameterization of the model and therefore lead to a further enhancement in optimization performance. We provide a freely available open source software package that implements the algorithms and examples compared here. PMID:24098642

  4. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  5. Quantitative Tissue Spectroscopy of Near Infrared Fluorescent Nanosensor Implants.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Nicole M; Bisker, Gili; Farias, Edgardo; Ivanov, Vsevolod; Ahn, Jiyoung; Wogan, Gerald N; Strano, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Implantable, near infrared (nIR) fluorescent nanosensors are advantageous for in vivo monitoring of biological analytes since they can be rendered selective for a particular target molecule while utilizing their unique optical properties and the nIR tissue transparency window for information transfer without an internal power source or telemetry. However, basic questions remain regarding the optimal encapsulation platform, geometrical properties, and concentration ranges required for high signal to noise ratio and effective detection through biological tissue. In this work, we systematically explore these variables quantitatively to optimize the performance of such optical nanosensors for biomedical applications. We investigate both alginate and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as model hydrogel systems, encapsulating d(GT)15 ssDNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) as model fluorescent nanoparticle sensors, responsive to riboflavin. Hydrogel sensors implanted 0.5 mm into thick tissue samples exhibit 50% reduction of initial fluorescence intensity, allowing an optical detection limit of 5.4 mm and 5.1 mm depth in tissue for alginate and PEG gels, respectively, at a SWNT concentration of 10 mg L(-1), and 785 nm laser excitation of 80 mW and 30 s exposure. These findings are supported with in vivo nIR fluorescent imaging of SWNT hydrogels implanted subcutaneously in mice. For the case of SWNT, we find that the alginate system is preferable in terms of emission intensity, sensor response, rheological properties, and shelf life. PMID:27305824

  6. Localized phosphorus spectroscopy in vivo: Quantitation of metabolite concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena Malgorzata

    This project was dedicated to the investigation of the factors that may affect absolute quantitation in localized 31P MRS and if possible to the improvement of the accuracy of both localization and quantification. Three aspects have been looked at: 1) the acquisition /localization technique used; 2) the strategy used for conversion of signal amplitude/peak areas into concentrations; and 3) methods for MRS signal processing and analysis. With respect to the first aspect, image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) and point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS), were considered. Aspects of ISIS localization, including relaxation effects during inversion and excitation adiabatic pulses, and uniformity of spin excitation across the "in vivo" 31P spectral range, were investigated using simulation. In order to reduce the chemical shift displacement error in ISIS, a new adiabatic pulse for spin inversion, has been designed and experimentally verified. For PRESS, the performance of the selective 90[degrees] and 180[degrees] pulses was investigated experimentally and using simulations. The consequences of nonideal flip angles on T1 measurements based on two PRESS experiments were analyzed. Effects of amplitude and phase modulation of the ATP signal during the PRESS sequence were analyzed using product-operator formalism for an AMX system. A tissue substitute material, with known metabolite concentrations and simulating the 31P spectrum obtained from neonatal brain, has been developed for testing quantitation accuracy. The manufacture, physical properties and chemical stability of a material has been presented. The following calibration protocols have been experimentally verified: use of water as an internal concentration reference (ICR), and use of a standard phantom as an external concentration reference (ECR). A modified ECR protocol using the tissue substitute material as a reference, has been suggested to deal with problems related to off-resonance effects. This protocol has

  7. Integrating Quantitative Thinking into an Introductory Biology Course Improves Students' Mathematical Reasoning in Biological Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Susan; Buxner, Sanlyn; Elfring, Lisa; Nagy, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls for improving undergraduate biology education have emphasized the importance of students learning to apply quantitative skills to biological problems. Motivated by students' apparent inability to transfer their existing quantitative skills to biological contexts, we designed and taught an introductory molecular and cell biology…

  8. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  9. Nanosecond and femtosecond laser spectroscopy of molecules of biological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, P.; Orlando, S.; Santagata, A.; De Bonis, A.; Veronesi, S.; Giardini, A.

    2007-07-01

    This paper mainly concerns on nanosecond and femtosecond laser spectroscopy of aromatic organic compounds as neurotransmitters, and plume diagnostics of the ablated species, in order to characterize the plasma dynamics, i.e. the temporal and spatial evolution of the plume. Optical emission spectroscopy has been applied to characterize the transient species produced in the femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) regimes. The laser sources employed for optical emission spectroscopy are a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG Handy ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 5 ns) and a frequency-doubled Nd:glass ( λ = 527 nm, τ = 250 fs). These studies aim to detect and give information on the photoexcitation and photodissociation of these biological molecules and to compare the plasma characteristics in the two ablation regimes.

  10. High-Resolution Waveguide THz Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules☆

    PubMed Central

    Laman, N.; Harsha, S. Sree; Grischkowsky, D.; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules. PMID:17933879

  11. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  12. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  13. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  14. Quantitative biological imaging by ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Thibault, Pierre; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Beerlink, André; Kewish, Cameron M.; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Salditt, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in coherent x-ray diffractive imaging have paved the way to reliable and quantitative imaging of noncompact specimens at the nanometer scale. Introduced a year ago, an advanced implementation of ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has removed much of the previous limitations regarding sample preparation and illumination conditions. Here, we apply this recent approach toward structure determination at the nanoscale to biological microscopy. We show that the projected electron density of unstained and unsliced freeze-dried cells of the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can be derived from the reconstructed phase in a straightforward and reproducible way, with quantified and small errors. Thus, the approach may contribute in the future to the understanding of the highly disputed nucleoid structure of bacterial cells. In the present study, the estimated resolution for the cells was 85 nm (half-period length), whereas 50-nm resolution was demonstrated for lithographic test structures. With respect to the diameter of the pinhole used to illuminate the samples, a superresolution of about 15 was achieved for the cells and 30 for the test structures, respectively. These values should be assessed in view of the low dose applied on the order of ≃1.3·105 Gy, and were shown to scale with photon fluence. PMID:20018650

  15. Raman spectroscopy of human skin: looking for a quantitative algorithm to reliably estimate human age.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Boffelli, Marco; Miyamori, Daisuke; Uemura, Takeshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Zhu, Wenliang; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of examining soft tissues by Raman spectroscopy is challenged in an attempt to probe human age for the changes in biochemical composition of skin that accompany aging. We present a proof-of-concept report for explicating the biophysical links between vibrational characteristics and the specific compositional and chemical changes associated with aging. The actual existence of such links is then phenomenologically proved. In an attempt to foster the basics for a quantitative use of Raman spectroscopy in assessing aging from human skin samples, a precise spectral deconvolution is performed as a function of donors' ages on five cadaveric samples, which emphasizes the physical significance and the morphological modifications of the Raman bands. The outputs suggest the presence of spectral markers for age identification from skin samples. Some of them appeared as authentic "biological clocks" for the apparent exactness with which they are related to age. Our spectroscopic approach yields clear compositional information of protein folding and crystallization of lipid structures, which can lead to a precise identification of age from infants to adults. Once statistically validated, these parameters might be used to link vibrational aspects at the molecular scale for practical forensic purposes. PMID:26112367

  16. Raman spectroscopy of human skin: looking for a quantitative algorithm to reliably estimate human age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Boffelli, Marco; Miyamori, Daisuke; Uemura, Takeshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Zhu, Wenliang; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of examining soft tissues by Raman spectroscopy is challenged in an attempt to probe human age for the changes in biochemical composition of skin that accompany aging. We present a proof-of-concept report for explicating the biophysical links between vibrational characteristics and the specific compositional and chemical changes associated with aging. The actual existence of such links is then phenomenologically proved. In an attempt to foster the basics for a quantitative use of Raman spectroscopy in assessing aging from human skin samples, a precise spectral deconvolution is performed as a function of donors' ages on five cadaveric samples, which emphasizes the physical significance and the morphological modifications of the Raman bands. The outputs suggest the presence of spectral markers for age identification from skin samples. Some of them appeared as authentic "biological clocks" for the apparent exactness with which they are related to age. Our spectroscopic approach yields clear compositional information of protein folding and crystallization of lipid structures, which can lead to a precise identification of age from infants to adults. Once statistically validated, these parameters might be used to link vibrational aspects at the molecular scale for practical forensic purposes.

  17. Quantitative Measurement of Trans-Fats by Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Edward B.; Davies, Don R.; Campbell, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Trans-fat is a general term, which is mainly used to describe the various trans geometric isomers present in unsaturated fatty acids. Various techniques are now used for a quantitative measurement of the amount of trans-fats present in foods and cooking oil.

  18. [Quantitative Detection of Chinese Cabbage Clubroot Based on FTIR Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-ping; Chai, A-li; Shi, Yan-xia; Xie, Xue-wen; Li, Bao-ju

    2015-05-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is considered the most devastating soilborne disease in Brassica crops. It has emerged as a serious disease threatening the cruciferous crop production industry in China. Nowadays, the detection techniques for P. brassicae are laborious, time-consuming and low sensitivity. Rapid and effective detection methods are needed. The objective of this study is to develop a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) technique for detection of P. brassicae effectively and accurately. FTIR and Real-time PCR techniques were applied in quantitative detection of P. brassicae. Chinese cabbages were inoculated with P. brassicae. By analyzing the FTIR spectra of P. brassicae, infected clubroots and healthy roots, three specific bands 1 105, 1 145 and 1 228 cm-1 were selected. According to the correlation between the peak areas at these sensitive bands and Real-time PCR Ct value, quantitative evaluation model of P. brassicae was established based on FTIR y=34. 17 +12. 24x - 9. 81x2 - 6. 05x3, r=0. 98 (p<0. 05). To validate accuracy of the model, 10 clubroot samples were selected randomly from field, and detected by FTIR spectrum model, the results showed that the average error is 1. 60%. This demonstrated that the FTIR technology is an available one for the quantitative detection of P. brassicae in clubroot, and it provides a new method for quantitative and quickly detection of Chinese cabbage clubroot. PMID:26415436

  19. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  20. Quantitatively Resolving Multivalent Interactions on Macroscopic Scale Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongzheng; Yang, Haopeng; Wang, Yuhong; Xu, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent interactions remain difficult to be characterized and consequently controlled, particularly on a macroscopic scale. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we have resolved the single-, double-, and triple- biotin—streptavidin interactions, multivalent DNA interactions and CXCL12-CXCR4 interactions, on millimetre-scale surfaces. Our results establish FIRMS as a viable method for systematic resolution and controlled formation of multivalent interactions. PMID:26864087

  1. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-12-23

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  2. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY AND FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The reliability of the CLSM to obtain specific measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. For man...

  3. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR MEASUREMENTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  4. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CALIBRATION, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  5. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  6. Quantitating Metabolites in Protein Precipitated Serum Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative NMR-based metabolite profiling is challenged by the deleterious effects of abundant proteins in the intact blood plasma/serum, which underscores the need for alternative approaches. Protein removal by ultrafiltration using low molecular weight cutoff filters thus represents an important step. However, protein precipitation, an alternative and simple approach for protein removal, lacks detailed quantitative assessment for use in NMR based metabolomics. In this study, we have comprehensively evaluated the performance of protein precipitation using methanol, acetonitrile, perchloric acid, and trichloroacetic acid and ultrafiltration approaches using 1D and 2D NMR, based on the identification and absolute quantitation of 44 human blood metabolites, including a few identified for the first time in the NMR spectra of human serum. We also investigated the use of a “smart isotope tag,” 15N-cholamine for further resolution enhancement, which resulted in the detection of a number of additional metabolites. 1H NMR of both protein precipitated and ultrafiltered serum detected all 44 metabolites with comparable reproducibility (average CV, 3.7% for precipitation; 3.6% for filtration). However, nearly half of the quantified metabolites in ultrafiltered serum exhibited 10–74% lower concentrations; specifically, tryptophan, benzoate, and 2-oxoisocaproate showed much lower concentrations compared to protein precipitated serum. These results indicate that protein precipitation using methanol offers a reliable approach for routine NMR-based metabolomics of human blood serum/plasma and should be considered as an alternative to ultrafiltration. Importantly, protein precipitation, which is commonly used by mass spectrometry (MS), promises avenues for direct comparison and correlation of metabolite data obtained from the two analytical platforms to exploit their combined strength in the metabolomics of blood. PMID:24796490

  7. Machine learning methods for quantitative analysis of Raman spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Michael G.; Ryder, Alan G.

    2003-03-01

    The automated identification and quantification of illicit materials using Raman spectroscopy is of significant importance for law enforcement agencies. This paper explores the use of Machine Learning (ML) methods in comparison with standard statistical regression techniques for developing automated identification methods. In this work, the ML task is broken into two sub-tasks, data reduction and prediction. In well-conditioned data, the number of samples should be much larger than the number of attributes per sample, to limit the degrees of freedom in predictive models. In this spectroscopy data, the opposite is normally true. Predictive models based on such data have a high number of degrees of freedom, which increases the risk of models over-fitting to the sample data and having poor predictive power. In the work described here, an approach to data reduction based on Genetic Algorithms is described. For the prediction sub-task, the objective is to estimate the concentration of a component in a mixture, based on its Raman spectrum and the known concentrations of previously seen mixtures. Here, Neural Networks and k-Nearest Neighbours are used for prediction. Preliminary results are presented for the problem of estimating the concentration of cocaine in solid mixtures, and compared with previously published results in which statistical analysis of the same dataset was performed. Finally, this paper demonstrates how more accurate results may be achieved by using an ensemble of prediction techniques.

  8. Quantitative infrared spectroscopy of minor constituents of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Giver, L. P.; Goorvitch, D.; Spencer, M.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1990-01-01

    We obtain quantitative laboratory spectroscopic measurements of molecular constituents which are of importance in understanding the health of the Earth's atmosphere, and, in particular, emphasize those species which are important for understanding stratospheric kinetics or are used for long term monitoring of the stratosphere. Our measurements provide: (1) line and band intensity values which are needed to establish limits of detectability for as yet unobserved species and to quantify the abundance of those species which are observed; (2) line-positions, -half widths and pressure induced shifts are all needed for remote sensing techniques, and (3) data on the above basic molecular parameters at temperatures and pressures appropriate for the real atmosphere.

  9. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen years marked the time between the discovery of the double helix in 1953 and the elucidation of the genetic code in 1966. A similar interval has now passed since the development by Cohen and Boyer of a simple procedure for the cloning of selective DNA fragments. The scientific advances made possible by the subsequent modification and elaboration of these original cloning procedures now amaze, stimulate, and increasingly often overwhelm us. Facts that until recently were virtually unobtainable now flow forth almost effortlessly. Most excitingly, the frenetic pace of these new discoveries, instead of marking the impending end of a glorious moment of learning, give every indication of opening up scientific frontiers that will take hundreds if not thousands of years to explore thoroughly. This new era of enlightenment is nowhere more apparent than in our newfound ability to study ourselves at the molecular level. This volume is the first of two collections of papers submitted by the contributors to the Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology for 1986 - molecular biology of Homo sapiens. Contained in this collection are 80 papers grouped into sessions entitled Human Gene Map, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, and Drugs Made Off Human Genes.

  10. Using Active Learning to Teach Concepts and Methods in Quantitative Biology.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Adolph, Stephen C; Diniz Behn, Cecilia G; Braley, Emily; Drew, Joshua A; Full, Robert J; Gross, Louis J; Jungck, John A; Kohler, Brynja; Prairie, Jennifer C; Shtylla, Blerta; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    This article provides a summary of the ideas discussed at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology society-wide symposium on Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning. It also includes a brief review of the recent advancements in incorporating active learning approaches into quantitative biology classrooms. We begin with an overview of recent literature that shows that active learning can improve students' outcomes in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education disciplines. We then discuss how this approach can be particularly useful when teaching topics in quantitative biology. Next, we describe some of the recent initiatives to develop hands-on activities in quantitative biology at both the graduate and the undergraduate levels. Throughout the article we provide resources for educators who wish to integrate active learning and technology into their classrooms. PMID:26269460

  11. Quantitative multiplex CARS spectroscopy in congested spectral regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Michiel; Rinia, Hilde A.; Bonn, Mischa; Vartiainen, Erik M.; Lisker, Melanie; van Bel, Aart

    2007-02-01

    A novel procedure is developed to describe and reproduce experimental coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) data, with particular emphasis on highly congested spectral regions. The approach - exemplified here with high-quality multiplex CARS data - makes use the maximum entropy method for phase retrieval. The retrieved imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility is shown to be equal to the spontaneous Raman spectrum. The phase retrieval procedure does not influence the noise contained in the spectra. The conversion of CARS to Raman data permits a quantitative interpretation of CARS spectra. This novel approach is demonstrated for highly congested multiplex CARS spectra of sucrose, fructose and glucose. This novel procedures enables extraction of vibrational information from multiplex CARS data without the use of a priori information of the sample.

  12. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  13. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing. PMID:24992094

  14. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  15. Phosphorene: Synthesis, Scale-Up, and Quantitative Optical Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Woomer, Adam H; Farnsworth, Tyler W; Hu, Jun; Wells, Rebekah A; Donley, Carrie L; Warren, Scott C

    2015-09-22

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional (2D) monolayer of black phosphorus, has attracted considerable theoretical interest, although the experimental realization of monolayer, bilayer, and few-layer flakes has been a significant challenge. Here, we systematically survey conditions for liquid exfoliation to achieve the first large-scale production of monolayer, bilayer, and few-layer phosphorus, with exfoliation demonstrated at the 10 g scale. We describe a rapid approach for quantifying the thickness of 2D phosphorus and show that monolayer and few-layer flakes produced by our approach are crystalline and unoxidized, while air exposure leads to rapid oxidation and the production of acid. With large quantities of 2D phosphorus now available, we perform the first quantitative measurements of the material's absorption edge-which is nearly identical to the material's band gap under our experimental conditions-as a function of flake thickness. Our interpretation of the absorbance spectrum relies on an analytical method introduced in this work, allowing the accurate determination of the absorption edge in polydisperse samples of quantum-confined semiconductors. Using this method, we found that the band gap of black phosphorus increased from 0.33 ± 0.02 eV in bulk to 1.88 ± 0.24 eV in bilayers, a range that is larger than that of any other 2D material. In addition, we quantified a higher-energy optical transition (VB-1 to CB), which changes from 2.0 eV in bulk to 3.23 eV in bilayers. This work describes several methods for producing and analyzing 2D phosphorus while also yielding a class of 2D materials with unprecedented optoelectronic properties. PMID:26256770

  16. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 2. Structures of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 1982 Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The volume contains papers on DNA methylation, DNA replication, gene recombination, organization of genes along DNA, molecular structure and enzymology of DNA.

  17. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  18. [Quantitative analysis of alloy steel based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with partial least squares method].

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhi-Bo; Sun, Lan-Xiang; Xin, Yong; Li, Yang; Qi, Li-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Jia

    2014-02-01

    In the present paper both the partial least squares (PLS) method and the calibration curve (CC) method are used to quantitatively analyze the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy data obtained from the standard alloy steel samples. Both the major and trace elements were quantitatively analyzed. By comparing the results of two different calibration methods some useful results were obtained: for major elements, the PLS method is better than the CC method in quantitative analysis; more importantly, for the trace elements, the CC method can not give the quantitative results due to the extremely weak characteristic spectral lines, but the PLS method still has a good ability of quantitative analysis. And the regression coefficient of PLS method is compared with the original spectral data with background interference to explain the advantage of the PLS method in the LIBS quantitative analysis. Results proved that the PLS method used in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is suitable for quantitative analysis of trace elements such as C in the metallurgical industry. PMID:24822436

  19. Steady-state spectroscopy of new biological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2007-02-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and (2,2'-bipyridine)-3,3'-diol (BP(OH) II) were studied here free in solution and in human serum albumin (HSA) in order to test their applicability as new biological probes. HBO and BP(OH) II are known to undergo intramolecular proton transfers in the excited state. Their absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to environmental change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, thus allowing the opportunity to use them as environment-sensitive probes. The effect of water on the steady state spectra of the two molecules also shows unique features which may position them as water sensors in biological systems. For HBO in buffer, fluorescence is only due to the syn-keto tautomer, whereas in HSA the fluorescence is due to four species in equilibrium in the excited state (the syn-keto tautomer, the anti-enol tautomer, the solvated syn-enol tautomer, and the anion species of HBO). Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of HBO in HSA indicates that HBO is exposed to less water in the HBO:HSA complex. For the BP(OH) II molecule, unique absorption due to water was observed in the spectral region of 400-450 nm. This absorption decreases in the presence of HSA due to less accessibility to water as a result of binding to HSA. Fluorescence of BP(OH) II is due solely to the di-keto tautomer after double proton transfer in the excited state. The fluorescence peak of BP(OH) II shows a red-shift upon HSA recognition which is attributed to the hydrophobic environment inside the binding site of HSA. We discuss also the effect of probe-inclusion inside well-defined hydrophobic cavities of cyclodextrins.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Nail Polish Remover Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Markus M.; Caccamis, Joshua T.; Heitz, Mark P.; Schlecht, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Substantial modifications are presented for a previously described experiment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to quantitatively determine analytes in commercial nail polish remover. The revised experiment is intended for a second- or third-year laboratory course in analytical chemistry and can be conducted for larger laboratory…

  1. Quantitative spectroscopy of photospheric-phase type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, L.; Hillier, D. J.

    2005-07-01

    We present first results on the quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the photospheric-phase of type II supernovae (SN). The analyses are based on the model atmosphere code, CMFGEN, of Hillier & Miller (1998) which solves the radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations in expanding outflows under the constraint of radiative equilibrium. A key asset of CMFGEN is its thorough treatment of line-blanketing due to metal species. From its applicability to hot star environments, the main modifications to the source code were to allow a linear velocity law, a power-law density distribution, an adaptive grid to handle the steep H recombination/ionization front occurring in some SN models, and a routine to compute the gray temperature structure in the presence of large velocities. In this first paper we demonstrate the ability of CMFGEN to reproduce, with a high level of accuracy, the UV and optical observations of a sample of well observed type II SN, i.e. SN1987A and SN1999em, at representative stages of their photospheric evolution. Two principal stages of SN are modeled that where hydrogen is fully ionized, and that in which H is only partially ionized. For models with an effective temperature below ~8000 K, hydrogen recombines and gives rise to a steep ionization front. The effect of varying the location of the outer grid radius on the spectral energy distribution (SED) is investigated. We find that going to 5-6 times the optically-thick base radius is optimal, since above that, the model becomes prohibitively large, while below this, significant differences appear because of the reduced line-blanketing (which persists even far above the photosphere) and the truncation of line-formation regions. To constrain the metallicity and the reddening of SN, the UV spectral region of early-time spectra is essential. We find that the density of the photosphere and effect of line blanketing decline as the spatial scale of the SN increases. The density distribution is

  2. Advances in Quantitative UV-Visible Spectroscopy for Clinical and Pre-clinical Application in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Quincy; Vishwanath, Karthik; Palmer, Gregory M.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2009-01-01

    Summary Methods of optical spectroscopy which provide quantitative, physically or physiologically meaningful measures of tissue properties are an attractive tool for the study, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of various cancers. Recent development of methodologies to convert measured reflectance and fluorescence spectra from tissue to cancer-relevant parameters such as vascular volume, oxygenation, extracellular matrix extent, metabolic redox states, and cellular proliferation have significantly advanced the field of tissue optical spectroscopy. The number of publications reporting quantitative tissue spectroscopy results in the UV-visible wavelength range has increased sharply in the last 3 years, and includes new and emerging studies which correlate optically-measured parameters with independent measures such as immunohistochemistry, which should aid in increased clinical acceptance of these technologies. PMID:19268567

  3. Combinatorial epigenetic patterns as quantitative predictors of chromatin biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method for characterizing the epigenetic states of chromatin on a genomic scale. With the recent availability of large genome-wide data sets, often comprising several epigenetic marks, novel approaches are required to explore functionally relevant interactions between histone modifications. Computational discovery of "chromatin states" defined by such combinatorial interactions enabled descriptive annotations of genomes, but more quantitative approaches are needed to progress towards predictive models. Results We propose non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) as a new unsupervised method to discover combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks that frequently co-occur in subsets of genomic regions. We show that this small set of combinatorial "codes" can be effectively displayed and interpreted. NMF codes enable dimensionality reduction and have desirable statistical properties for regression and classification tasks. We demonstrate the utility of codes in the quantitative prediction of Pol2-binding and the discrimination between Pol2-bound promoters and enhancers. Finally, we show that specific codes can be linked to molecular pathways and targets of pluripotency genes during differentiation. Conclusions We have introduced and evaluated a new computational approach to represent combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks as quantitative variables suitable for predictive modeling and supervised machine learning. To foster widespread adoption of this method we make it available as an open-source software-package – epicode at https://github.com/mcieslik-mctp/epicode. PMID:24472558

  4. Online Interactive Teaching Modules Enhance Quantitative Proficiency of Introductory Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Nelson, Karen C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Keller, Michael; Fagan, William F.

    2010-01-01

    There is widespread agreement within the scientific and education communities that undergraduate biology curricula fall short in providing students with the quantitative and interdisciplinary problem-solving skills they need to obtain a deep understanding of biological phenomena and be prepared fully to contribute to future scientific inquiry.…

  5. Quantitative Imaging of Single Upconversion Nanoparticles in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nadort, Annemarie; Sreenivasan, Varun K. A.; Song, Zhen; Grebenik, Ekaterina A.; Nechaev, Andrei V.; Semchishen, Vladimir A.; Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2013-01-01

    The unique luminescent properties of new-generation synthetic nanomaterials, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), enabled high-contrast optical biomedical imaging by suppressing the crowded background of biological tissue autofluorescence and evading high tissue absorption. This raised high expectations on the UCNP utilities for intracellular and deep tissue imaging, such as whole animal imaging. At the same time, the critical nonlinear dependence of the UCNP luminescence on the excitation intensity results in dramatic signal reduction at (∼1 cm) depth in biological tissue. Here, we report on the experimental and theoretical investigation of this trade-off aiming at the identification of optimal application niches of UCNPs e.g. biological liquids and subsurface tissue layers. As an example of such applications, we report on single UCNP imaging through a layer of hemolyzed blood. To extend this result towards in vivo applications, we quantified the optical properties of single UCNPs and theoretically analyzed the prospects of single-particle detectability in live scattering and absorbing bio-tissue using a human skin model. The model predicts that a single 70-nm UCNP would be detectable at skin depths up to 400 µm, unlike a hardly detectable single fluorescent (fluorescein) dye molecule. UCNP-assisted imaging in the ballistic regime thus allows for excellent applications niches, where high sensitivity is the key requirement. PMID:23691012

  6. Quantitative high-resolution on-line NMR spectroscopy in reaction and process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Fischer, Holger H; Kim, Young-Kyu; Albert, Klaus; Hasse, Hans

    2004-02-01

    On-line nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (on-line NMR) is a powerful technique for reaction and process monitoring. Different set-ups for direct coupling of reaction and separation equipment with on-line NMR spectroscopy are described. NMR spectroscopy can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information from complex reacting multicomponent mixtures for equilibrium or reaction kinetic studies. Commercial NMR probes can be used at pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures up to 400 K. Applications are presented for studies of equilibria and kinetics of complex formaldehyde-containing mixtures as well as homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed esterification kinetics. Direct coupling of a thin-film evaporator is described as an example for the benefits of on-line NMR spectroscopy in process monitoring. PMID:14729025

  7. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy of buddingtonite from the Cuprite mining district, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Felzer, B.; Hauff, P.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    1994-02-01

    Buddingtonite, an ammonium-bearing feldspar diagnostic of volcanic-hosted alteration, can be identified and, in some cases, quantitatively measured using short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectance spectroscopy. In this study over 200 samples from Cuprite, Nevada, were evaluated by X ray diffraction, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and SWIR reflectance spectroscopy with the objective of developing a quantitative remote-sensing technique for rapid determination of the amount of ammonium or buddingtonite present, and its distribution across the site. Based upon the Hapke theory of radiative transfer from particulate surfaces, spectra from quantitative, physical mixtures were compared with computed mixture spectra. We hypothesized that the concentration of ammonium in each sample is related to the size and shape of the ammonium absorption bands and tested this hypothesis for samples of relatively pure buddingtonite. We found that the band depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 feature is linearly related to the NH4 concentration for the Cuprite buddingtonite, and that the relationship is approximately exponential for a larger range of NH4 concentrations. Associated minerals such as smectite and jarosite suppress the depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 absorption band. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy is possible when the effects of these associated minerals are also considered.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of bronze objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankova, V.; Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Penkova, P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical technique for qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of solids, liquids and gases. In this work, the method was applied for investigation of archaeological bronze objects. The analytical information obtained by LIBS was used for qualitative determination of the elements in the material used for manufacturing of the objects under study. Quantitative chemical analysis was also performed after generating calibration curves with standard samples of similar matrix composition. Quantitative estimation of the elemental concentration of the bulk of the samples was performed, together with investigation of the surface layer of the objects. The results of the quantitative analyses gave indications about the manufacturing process of the investigated objects.

  9. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Statistical analysis and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarian, Saveez

    2002-01-01

    The experimental design and realization of an apparatus which can be used both for single molecule fluorescence detection and also fluorescence correlation and cross correlation spectroscopy is presented. A thorough statistical analysis of the fluorescence correlation functions including the analysis of bias and errors based on analytical derivations has been carried out. Using the methods developed here, the mechanism of binding and cleavage site recognition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) for their substrates has been studied. We demonstrate that two of the MMP family members, Collagenase (MMP-1) and Gelatinase A (MMP-2) exhibit diffusion along their substrates, the importance of this diffusion process and its biological implications are discussed. We show through truncation mutants that the hemopexin domain of the MMP-2 plays and important role in the substrate diffusion of this enzyme. Single molecule diffusion of the collagenase MMP-1 has been observed on collagen fibrils and shown to be biased. The discovered biased diffusion would make the MMP-1 molecule an active motor, thus making it the first active motor that is not coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The possible sources of energy for this enzyme and their implications are discussed. We propose that a possible source of energy for the enzyme can be in the rearrangement of the structure of collagen fibrils. In a separate application, using the methods developed here, we have observed an intermediate in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein folding process through the changes in its hydrodynamic radius also the fluctuations in the structure of the IFABP in solution were measured using FCS.

  10. Quantitative microanalysis of bile acids in biological samples. Collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, F

    1988-10-28

    The analysis of bile acids in biological samples has always presented a problem because of their complex nature and low concentration. Recently, newer analytical procedures for bile acids have become available, including enzymatic analysis, radioimmunoassay, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selected ion monitoring (SIM). However, they differ greatly with respect to specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and simplicity. On the other hand, the choice of analytical procedure differs according to the specific aims and the nature of biological samples to be analysed. These newer procedures have been compared in a double-blind fashion by distributing bile, plasma and urine samples to seven participating laboratories. GC-MS-SIM was found to be the most sensitive and reliable, but it requires other procedures for preliminary clean-up and fractionation steps. Enzymatic analysis is simple and gives small analytical errors but tends to over-estimate plasma bile acids. Radioimmunoassay gives variable results but is useful as a screening procedure for large numbers of plasma samples. TLC gives reliable results for biliary bile acids in experienced hands, except for differentiation between conjugated dihydroxycholanoic acids. HPLC, whether using derivatization or with fixed 3 alpha-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase detection, is suitable for the analysis of major bile acids in normal human serum but not for the identification of unknown minor peaks. PMID:3243854

  11. Electrical and optical spectroscopy for quantitative screening of hepatic steatosis in donor livers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. L.; Wells, A. C.; Virtue, S.; Vidal-Puig, A.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Watson, C. J. E.; Robertson, P. A.

    2010-11-01

    Macro-steatosis in deceased donor livers is increasingly prevalent and is associated with poor or non-function of the liver upon reperfusion. Current assessment of the extent of steatosis depends upon the macroscopic assessment of the liver by the surgeon and histological examination, if available. In this paper we demonstrate electrical and optical spectroscopy techniques which quantitatively characterize fatty infiltration in liver tissue. Optical spectroscopy showed a correlation coefficient of 0.85 in humans when referenced to clinical hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections in 20 human samples. With further development, an optical probe may provide a comprehensive measure of steatosis across the liver at the time of procurement.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the mixtures of illicit drugs using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Zhao, Shusen; Shen, Jingling

    2008-03-01

    A method was proposed to quantitatively inspect the mixtures of illicit drugs with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy technique. The mass percentages of all components in a mixture can be obtained by linear regression analysis, on the assumption that all components in the mixture and their absorption features be known. For illicit drugs were scarce and expensive, firstly we used common chemicals, Benzophenone, Anthraquinone, Pyridoxine hydrochloride and L-Ascorbic acid in the experiment. Then illicit drugs and a common adulterant, methamphetamine and flour, were selected for our experiment. Experimental results were in significant agreement with actual content, which suggested that it could be an effective method for quantitative identification of illicit drugs.

  13. A study of the 42CrMo4 steel surface by quantitative XPS electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, M.; Gruzza, B.; Bideux, L.; Monier, G.; Robert-Goumet, C.

    2008-05-01

    Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the native oxide film formed on 42CrMo4 steel surface by air exposure in normal conditions. In order to determine the thickness and composition of the oxide layer we have used a stacking layer model together with experimental XPS sputtering depth profiling. At a nanoscale study, to obtain quantitative results one must take into account fundamental parameters like the attenuation depth of photoelectrons. We have found that both lepidocrocit (γ-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe 3O 4) were present and the total thickness of the oxide layer was 16 monolayers.

  14. Sender-receiver systems and applying information theory for quantitative synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Barcena Menendez, Diego; Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Isalan, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Sender-receiver (S-R) systems abound in biology, with communication systems sending information in various forms. Information theory provides a quantitative basis for analysing these processes and is being applied to study natural genetic, enzymatic and neural networks. Recent advances in synthetic biology are providing us with a wealth of artificial S-R systems, giving us quantitative control over networks with a finite number of well-characterised components. Combining the two approaches can help to predict how to maximise signalling robustness, and will allow us to make increasingly complex biological computers. Ultimately, pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology will require moving beyond engineering the flow of information and towards building more sophisticated circuits that interpret biological meaning. PMID:25282688

  15. Sender–receiver systems and applying information theory for quantitative synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Barcena Menendez, Diego; Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Isalan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sender–receiver (S–R) systems abound in biology, with communication systems sending information in various forms. Information theory provides a quantitative basis for analysing these processes and is being applied to study natural genetic, enzymatic and neural networks. Recent advances in synthetic biology are providing us with a wealth of artificial S–R systems, giving us quantitative control over networks with a finite number of well-characterised components. Combining the two approaches can help to predict how to maximise signalling robustness, and will allow us to make increasingly complex biological computers. Ultimately, pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology will require moving beyond engineering the flow of information and towards building more sophisticated circuits that interpret biological meaning. PMID:25282688

  16. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory biology courses. Modules are designed to improve skills in quantitative numeracy, interpreting data sets using visual tools, and making inferences about biological phenomena using mathematical/statistical models. We also examine demographic/background data that predict student improvement in these skills through exposure to these modules. We carried out pre/postassessment tests across four semesters and used student interviews in one semester to examine how students at different levels approached quantitative problems. We found that students improved in all skills in most semesters, although there was variation in the degree of improvement among skills from semester to semester. One demographic variable, transfer status, stood out as a major predictor of the degree to which students improved (transfer students achieved much lower gains every semester, despite the fact that pretest scores in each focus area were similar between transfer and nontransfer students). We propose that increased exposure to quantitative skill development in biology courses is effective at building competency in quantitative reasoning. PMID:27146161

  17. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory biology courses. Modules are designed to improve skills in quantitative numeracy, interpreting data sets using visual tools, and making inferences about biological phenomena using mathematical/statistical models. We also examine demographic/background data that predict student improvement in these skills through exposure to these modules. We carried out pre/postassessment tests across four semesters and used student interviews in one semester to examine how students at different levels approached quantitative problems. We found that students improved in all skills in most semesters, although there was variation in the degree of improvement among skills from semester to semester. One demographic variable, transfer status, stood out as a major predictor of the degree to which students improved (transfer students achieved much lower gains every semester, despite the fact that pretest scores in each focus area were similar between transfer and nontransfer students). We propose that increased exposure to quantitative skill development in biology courses is effective at building competency in quantitative reasoning. PMID:27146161

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis of SF6 partial discharge decomposition components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jiangbo; Li, Jian; Li, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) internal SF6 gas produces specific decomposition components under partial discharge (PD). By detecting these characteristic decomposition components, such information as the type and level of GIS internal insulation deterioration can be obtained effectively, and the status of GIS internal insulation can be evaluated. SF6 was selected as the background gas for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) detection in this study. SOF2, SO2F2, SO2, and CO were selected as the characteristic decomposition components for system analysis. The standard infrared absorption spectroscopy of the four characteristic components was measured, the optimal absorption peaks were recorded and the corresponding absorption coefficient was calculated. Quantitative detection experiments on the four characteristic components were conducted. The volume fraction variation trend of four characteristic components at different PD time were analyzed. And under five different PD quantity, the quantitative relationships among gas production rate, PD time, and PD quantity were studied. PMID:25459612

  19. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis of SF6 partial discharge decomposition components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jiangbo; Li, Jian; Li, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) internal SF6 gas produces specific decomposition components under partial discharge (PD). By detecting these characteristic decomposition components, such information as the type and level of GIS internal insulation deterioration can be obtained effectively, and the status of GIS internal insulation can be evaluated. SF6 was selected as the background gas for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) detection in this study. SOF2, SO2F2, SO2, and CO were selected as the characteristic decomposition components for system analysis. The standard infrared absorption spectroscopy of the four characteristic components was measured, the optimal absorption peaks were recorded and the corresponding absorption coefficient was calculated. Quantitative detection experiments on the four characteristic components were conducted. The volume fraction variation trend of four characteristic components at different PD time were analyzed. And under five different PD quantity, the quantitative relationships among gas production rate, PD time, and PD quantity were studied.

  20. Online Interactive Teaching Modules Enhance Quantitative Proficiency of Introductory Biology Students

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kären C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Keller, Michael; Fagan, William F.

    2010-01-01

    There is widespread agreement within the scientific and education communities that undergraduate biology curricula fall short in providing students with the quantitative and interdisciplinary problem-solving skills they need to obtain a deep understanding of biological phenomena and be prepared fully to contribute to future scientific inquiry. MathBench Biology Modules were designed to address these needs through a series of interactive, Web-based modules that can be used to supplement existing course content across the biological sciences curriculum. The effect of the modules was assessed in an introductory biology course at the University of Maryland. Over the course of the semester, students showed significant increases in quantitative skills that were independent of previous math course work. Students also showed increased comfort with solving quantitative problems, whether or not they ultimately arrived at the correct answer. A survey of spring 2009 graduates indicated that those who had experienced MathBench in their course work had a greater appreciation for the role of mathematics in modern biology than those who had not used MathBench. MathBench modules allow students from diverse educational backgrounds to hone their quantitative skills, preparing them for more complex mathematical approaches in upper-division courses. PMID:20810959

  1. Online interactive teaching modules enhance quantitative proficiency of introductory biology students.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katerina V; Nelson, Kären C; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Keller, Michael; Fagan, William F

    2010-01-01

    There is widespread agreement within the scientific and education communities that undergraduate biology curricula fall short in providing students with the quantitative and interdisciplinary problem-solving skills they need to obtain a deep understanding of biological phenomena and be prepared fully to contribute to future scientific inquiry. MathBench Biology Modules were designed to address these needs through a series of interactive, Web-based modules that can be used to supplement existing course content across the biological sciences curriculum. The effect of the modules was assessed in an introductory biology course at the University of Maryland. Over the course of the semester, students showed significant increases in quantitative skills that were independent of previous math course work. Students also showed increased comfort with solving quantitative problems, whether or not they ultimately arrived at the correct answer. A survey of spring 2009 graduates indicated that those who had experienced MathBench in their course work had a greater appreciation for the role of mathematics in modern biology than those who had not used MathBench. MathBench modules allow students from diverse educational backgrounds to hone their quantitative skills, preparing them for more complex mathematical approaches in upper-division courses. PMID:20810959

  2. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples. PMID:26560783

  3. Quantitative Detection of Pharmaceuticals Using a Combination of Paper Microfluidics and Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Derek; Mazilu, Michael; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an indispensable technique for the identification of various types of analytes due to the fingerprint vibration spectrum obtained. Paper microfluidics has also emerged as a low cost, easy to fabricate and portable approach for point of care testing. However, due to inherent background fluorescence, combining Raman spectroscopy with paper microfluidics is to date an unmet challenge in the absence of using surface enhanced mechanisms. We describe the first use of wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy (WMRS) for analysis on a paper microfluidics platform. This study demonstrates the ability to suppress the background fluorescence of the paper using WMRS and the subsequent implementation of this technique for pharmaceutical analysis. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate between both paracetamol and ibuprofen, whilst, also being able to detect the presence of each analyte quantitatively at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:25938464

  4. Quantitative {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy of cement and silica fume containing paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbig, H. . E-mail: hilbig@cbm.bv.tum.de; Koehler, F.H.; Schiessl, P.

    2006-02-15

    The low natural abundance and the long spin lattice relaxation time of {sup 29}Si lead to long measurement times and/or low signal-to-noise ratios using {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. By contrast, samples containing paramagnetic iron ions have much shorter relaxation times, making measurements up to seven times more efficient, but at the same time making quantitative analysis unreliable. To solve the problem, the spin-lattice relaxation times of ordinary Portland cement (opc) and silica fume with and without iron content has been determined with inversion recovery experiments. The effect of varying the spectrum repetition time on the quantitative analysis is demonstrated for mixtures of opc with silica fume. For opc and silica fume with iron impurities repetition times as short as 5 s has permitted accurate quantitative analysis of the silicates present in these materials.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of the Trends Exhibited by the Three Interdisciplinary Biological Sciences: Biophysics, Bioinformatics, and Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jonghoon; Park, Seyeon; Venkat, Aarya; Gopinath, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    New interdisciplinary biological sciences like bioinformatics, biophysics, and systems biology have become increasingly relevant in modern science. Many papers have suggested the importance of adding these subjects, particularly bioinformatics, to an undergraduate curriculum; however, most of their assertions have relied on qualitative arguments. In this paper, we will show our metadata analysis of a scientific literature database (PubMed) that quantitatively describes the importance of the subjects of bioinformatics, systems biology, and biophysics as compared with a well-established interdisciplinary subject, biochemistry. Specifically, we found that the development of each subject assessed by its publication volume was well described by a set of simple nonlinear equations, allowing us to characterize them quantitatively. Bioinformatics, which had the highest ratio of publications produced, was predicted to grow between 77% and 93% by 2025 according to the model. Due to the large number of publications produced in bioinformatics, which nearly matches the number published in biochemistry, it can be inferred that bioinformatics is almost equal in significance to biochemistry. Based on our analysis, we suggest that bioinformatics be added to the standard biology undergraduate curriculum. Adding this course to an undergraduate curriculum will better prepare students for future research in biology. PMID:26753026

  6. Quantitative Analysis of the Trends Exhibited by the Three Interdisciplinary Biological Sciences: Biophysics, Bioinformatics, and Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jonghoon; Park, Seyeon; Venkat, Aarya; Gopinath, Adarsh

    2015-12-01

    New interdisciplinary biological sciences like bioinformatics, biophysics, and systems biology have become increasingly relevant in modern science. Many papers have suggested the importance of adding these subjects, particularly bioinformatics, to an undergraduate curriculum; however, most of their assertions have relied on qualitative arguments. In this paper, we will show our metadata analysis of a scientific literature database (PubMed) that quantitatively describes the importance of the subjects of bioinformatics, systems biology, and biophysics as compared with a well-established interdisciplinary subject, biochemistry. Specifically, we found that the development of each subject assessed by its publication volume was well described by a set of simple nonlinear equations, allowing us to characterize them quantitatively. Bioinformatics, which had the highest ratio of publications produced, was predicted to grow between 77% and 93% by 2025 according to the model. Due to the large number of publications produced in bioinformatics, which nearly matches the number published in biochemistry, it can be inferred that bioinformatics is almost equal in significance to biochemistry. Based on our analysis, we suggest that bioinformatics be added to the standard biology undergraduate curriculum. Adding this course to an undergraduate curriculum will better prepare students for future research in biology. PMID:26753026

  7. Prospects and challenges of quantitative phase imaging in tumor cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Götte, Martin; Greve, Burkhard; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques provide high resolution label-free quantitative live cell imaging. Here, prospects and challenges of QPI in tumor cell biology are presented, using the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). It is shown that the evaluation of quantitative DHM phase images allows the retrieval of different parameter sets for quantification of cellular motion changes in migration and motility assays that are caused by genetic modifications. Furthermore, we demonstrate simultaneously label-free imaging of cell growth and morphology properties.

  8. A method for three-dimensional quantitative observation of the microstructure of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Wu, Hongxin; Ji, Liang; Sun, Jialin; Lv, Danyu; Zhang, Lu; Li, Ying; Tian, Ning; Zheng, Jinggao; Zhao, Fengying

    2009-07-01

    Contemporary biology has developed into the era of cell biology and molecular biology, and people try to study the mechanism of all kinds of biological phenomena at the microcosmic level now. Accurate description of the microstructure of biological samples is exigent need from many biomedical experiments. This paper introduces a method for 3-dimensional quantitative observation on the microstructure of vital biological samples based on two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). TPLSM is a novel kind of fluorescence microscopy, which has excellence in its low optical damage, high resolution, deep penetration depth and suitability for 3-dimensional (3D) imaging. Fluorescent stained samples were observed by TPLSM, and afterward the original shapes of them were obtained through 3D image reconstruction. The spatial distribution of all objects in samples as well as their volumes could be derived by image segmentation and mathematic calculation. Thus the 3-dimensionally and quantitatively depicted microstructure of the samples was finally derived. We applied this method to quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of chromosomes in meiotic mouse oocytes at metaphase, and wonderful results came out last.

  9. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  10. [The Quantitative Analysis of Raman Spectroscopy to Sulfate Ion in Aqueous Solution].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-qian; Sun, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    As a non-destructive and non-contact method, Raman spectroscopy has been widely applied in many research fields. Based on vibrational wavenumber, Raman spectroscopy is usually applied to determine the molecular species. Therefore, Raman quantitative analysis is necessary. In this study, according to the theoretical analysis of Raman intensity, Raman quantitative measurement should be fulfilled by relative intensity ratio, which can be divided into internal and external standards. This eliminates the influence of the measurement conditions. For aqueous solution, it is reasonable to treat the OH stretching band of water as an internal standard to determine the solute concentrations in aqueous solution. The Raman spectra of Na₂SO₄-H₂O, K₂SO₄-H₂O and NaCl-Na₂SO₄-H₂O are recorded in the paper. In addition, the Raman OH stretching band of water can be fitted into two Gaussian sub-bands. The intensity proportion I(SO₄²⁻)/I(W) is used to determine the molarity of sulfate in aqueous solution, where I(SO₄²⁻) represents the intensity of sulfate band and I(W) represents the sum of the two sub-bands of Raman OH stretching bands of water. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to measure the SO₄²⁻concentrations in aqueous solutions. PMID:27209744

  11. Studying Biology to Understand Risk: Dosimetry Models and Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confidence in the quantitative prediction of risk is increased when the prediction is based to as great an extent as possible on the relevant biological factors that constitute the pathway from exposure to adverse outcome. With the first examples now over 40 years old, physiologi...

  12. Fuzzy Logic as a Computational Tool for Quantitative Modelling of Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Data.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Jure; Moskon, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Mraz, Miha

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative modelling of biological systems has become an indispensable computational approach in the design of novel and analysis of existing biological systems. However, kinetic data that describe the system's dynamics need to be known in order to obtain relevant results with the conventional modelling techniques. These data are often hard or even impossible to obtain. Here, we present a quantitative fuzzy logic modelling approach that is able to cope with unknown kinetic data and thus produce relevant results even though kinetic data are incomplete or only vaguely defined. Moreover, the approach can be used in the combination with the existing state-of-the-art quantitative modelling techniques only in certain parts of the system, i.e., where kinetic data are missing. The case study of the approach proposed here is performed on the model of three-gene repressilator. PMID:26451831

  13. Raman and multichannel Raman spectroscopy of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, Alessandro; Caramazza, R.; Fagnano, C.

    1991-05-01

    Raman and multichannel Raman spectroscopy are molecular techniques able to monitor the bulk and surface structure of a biomaterial, in a non destructive and non invasive way, giving therefore useful information on physical and chemical aspects of biocompatibility. The same techniques can also be adequately used for the characterization of the biomaterial-host tissue interface, hence providing structural information on the biochemical aspect of biocompatibility. Moreover, multichannel Raman spectroscopy can also determine "in vivo" and "in situ" the bulk and surface structure of a biomaterial and the molecular interactions between biomaterials and tissues. Useful information at a molecular level on the biomaterial-tissue system can so be deduced. In particular, the application of traditional Paman spectroscopy to bioactive glasses (glasses derived from Hench's bioglass and meta and oligophosphates of calcium by themselves and with the addition of sodium and aluminium) useful in orthopedics and the application to hydrophobic (PMMA) and hydrophilic (PHEMA and PVP) organic polymers useful in ophthalmology are shown. Instead the applications of multichannel Paman spectroscopy are elucidated in the case of intraocular lenses (lOLs) based on PMMA and contact lenses (CLs) based on hydrophi I ic polymers.

  14. Quantitative analysis of peanut oil content in ternary blended edible oil using near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huacai; Liu, Fuli; Wang, Zhilan; Jin, Shangzhong

    2008-03-01

    Calibration models of quantitative analysis of peanut oil content in ternary blended edible oil by near infrared spectroscopy were built using partial least square (PLS) regression. A total of 92 samples blended with three kinds of pure oil in different proportion (V/V) were prepared. Near infrared diffuse reflectance spectra of the samples were collected over 4 000 cm -1-10 000 cm -1 spectral region with a FT-NIR spectrometer. A calibration model of prediction to the peanut oil content was established with PLS using the original spectra and validated with leave-one-out cross validation method. The correlation coefficient and the RMSEC of the model were 0.9926 and 2.91%, respectively. The result showed that near infrared spectroscopy could be an ideal tool for fast determination to the peanut oil content in blended edible oil.

  15. Identification and quantitative determination of atorvastatin calcium polymorph in tablets using FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Skorda, Dimitra; Kontoyannis, Christos G

    2008-01-15

    Atorvastatin calcium (ATC) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the best selling lipid-lowering formulation Lipitor. Twelve ATC crystal forms are known and several pharmaceutical companies are developing or have developed generic drug formulations based on different ATC polymorphs. The strong overlap of the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) of the polymorphs with the respective patterns of the excipients, the presence of small API quantities in the tablet and the similarity of the crystal phase VIII XRD pattern used in the tablet examined in this work to that of phases IV and IX made identification difficult. Quantitative determination of ATC was attempted using Raman spectroscopy (RS), IR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. It was found that RS exhibited lower detection limit and a calibration model was constructed. Its application on commercial ATC tablets with 40mg strength yielded an error of 1.25%. PMID:18371751

  16. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of urine component in the toilet set using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, So Hyun; Park, Kwang Suk; Choi, Jong Min; Lee, Won Jin

    2004-07-01

    As a part of non-invasive and unaware measurement of physiological signal in the house of live-alone person, Raman spectroscopy was applied for urine component analysis in the toilet set. 785nm, 250-300mW output solid state diode laser and 2048 element linear silicon TE cooled CCD array were incorporated for this system. Several tests were performed for setting up Raman spectroscopy in non-constrained situation: toilet set in the house. The effect of dark current, integration time, warming up time of laser, property of probe and interference of water in the toilet were tested and controlled for appropriate measurement in this environment. The spectra were obtained immediately when the subject uses the toilet set, and they can be transmitted to the server though Bluetooth. Those spectra were pre-processed for removing or correcting the effect of undesired light scattering, sample path-length difference and baseline-effect. The preprocessed data were enhanced for more exact result of multivariate analysis. The training data was prepared for predicting unknown component and its concentration by using multivariate methods. Several kinds of multivariate methods: PCA, PCR, PLS were performed to validate what is the fittest method in this environment. Through quantitative and qualitative analysis of Raman spectroscopy"s spectra obtained in the house's toilet set, we could know the component and its concentration of urine which can be index of disease.

  17. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  18. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 1. Application to sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Michael T.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Bristow, Thomas F.; Pan, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is used to determine the mineralogy of sandstone and mudstone rocks as part of an investigation of linear spectral mixing between sedimentary constituent phases. With widespread occurrences of sedimentary rocks on the surface of Mars, critical examination of the accuracy associated with quantitative models of mineral abundances derived from thermal emission spectra of sedimentary materials is necessary. Although thermal emission spectroscopy has been previously proven to be a viable technique to obtain quantitative mineralogy from igneous and metamorphic materials, sedimentary rocks, with natural variation of composition, compaction, and grain size, have yet to be examined. In this work, we present an analysis of the thermal emission spectral (~270-1650 cm-1) characteristics of a suite of 13 sandstones and 14 mudstones. X-ray diffraction and traditional point counting procedures were all evaluated in comparison with thermal emission spectroscopy. Results from this work are consistent with previous thermal emission spectroscopy studies and indicate that bulk rock mineral abundances can be estimated within 11.2% for detrital grains (i.e., quartz and feldspars) and 14.8% for all other mineral phases present in both sandstones and mudstones, in comparison to common in situ techniques used for determining bulk rock composition. Clay-sized to fine silt-sized grained phase identification is less accurate, with differences from the known ranging from ~5 to 24% on average. Nevertheless, linear least squares modeling of thermal emission spectra is an advantageous technique for determining abundances of detrital grains and sedimentary matrix and for providing a rapid classification of clastic rocks.

  19. Quantitative analysis of (styrene/acrylonitrile/methyl methacrylate) co-polymer systems by infrared resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Jiang, Tao; Fengqi, Liu; Ding, C.; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2002-02-01

    A detailed careful analysis of the infrared resonance (IR) spectra of polystyrene (PSt), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and their co-mixtures were performed. Through this study the absorption peak area to weight ratios as well as working curves were obtained to test for their reliability as well as their suitability. Satisfactory results were achieved and these working curves were then used to measure the polymerized components of binary and ternary co-polymers. By investigating the acquired data we conclude that the monomer preferential polymeric sequence is St>MMA>AN. A quantitative method to measure P (St/AN/MMA) concentrations by IR spectroscopy is proposed in this work.

  20. Quantitative analysis of oils and fats by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi-Jorabchi, H.; Wilson, R. H.; Belton, P. S.; Edwards-Webb, J. D.; Coxon, D. T.

    The rapid analysis of fats and oils is of great importance in the food industry. It is shown that Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy may be used for this purpose. Good quality spectra, free of fluorescence, may be obtained and the spectra may be interpreted in terms of changes in total unsaturation, cis/trans isomer ratios and the number of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chains. Quantitative analysis of total unsaturation and cis/trans is possible and offers considerable improvements in speed when compared with conventional methods.

  1. Optical fibre spectroscopy sensor for the quantitative determination of industrial textile dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillas, Ana M.; Conde, Olga M.; Anuarbe, Pedro; Gutierrez, Monica; Martinez, Vicente; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, an extrinsic optical fibre sensor (OFS) for the quantitative determination of dyes used in the textile industry is presented. The system proposed is based on absorption spectroscopy and multivariate calibration methods to infer the concentration of different textile dyes. The performance of the sensor has been successfully assessed using calibrated dyes, with a very good correlation between the multivariate calibration models and the predicted values. The sensor system here demonstrated could be used to predict the colour of dye mixtures during the dyebath and, therefore, reduce the manufacturing costs.

  2. Quantitative measurement of tip sample forces by dynamic force spectroscopy in ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, H.; Anczykowski, B.

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a dynamic force spectroscopy technique enabling the quantitative measurement of conservative and dissipative tip-sample forces in ambient conditions. In difference to the commonly detected force-vs-distance curves dynamic force microscopy allows to measure the full range of tip-sample forces without hysteresis effects caused by a jump-to-contact. The approach is based on the specific behavior of a self-driven cantilever (frequency-modulation technique). Experimental applications on different samples (Fischer-sample, silicon wafer) are presented.

  3. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  4. Quantitative assessment of biological impact using transcriptomic data and mechanistic network models

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Ty M.; Sewer, Alain; Martin, Florian; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Frushour, Brian P.; Gebel, Stephan; Park, Jennifer; Schlage, Walter K.; Talikka, Marja; Vasilyev, Dmitry M.; Westra, Jurjen W.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to biologically active substances such as therapeutic drugs or environmental toxicants can impact biological systems at various levels, affecting individual molecules, signaling pathways, and overall cellular processes. The ability to derive mechanistic insights from the resulting system responses requires the integration of experimental measures with a priori knowledge about the system and the interacting molecules therein. We developed a novel systems biology-based methodology that leverages mechanistic network models and transcriptomic data to quantitatively assess the biological impact of exposures to active substances. Hierarchically organized network models were first constructed to provide a coherent framework for investigating the impact of exposures at the molecular, pathway and process levels. We then validated our methodology using novel and previously published experiments. For both in vitro systems with simple exposure and in vivo systems with complex exposures, our methodology was able to recapitulate known biological responses matching expected or measured phenotypes. In addition, the quantitative results were in agreement with experimental endpoint data for many of the mechanistic effects that were assessed, providing further objective confirmation of the approach. We conclude that our methodology evaluates the biological impact of exposures in an objective, systematic, and quantifiable manner, enabling the computation of a systems-wide and pan-mechanistic biological impact measure for a given active substance or mixture. Our results suggest that various fields of human disease research, from drug development to consumer product testing and environmental impact analysis, could benefit from using this methodology. - Highlights: • The impact of biologically active substances is quantified at multiple levels. • The systems-level impact integrates the perturbations of individual networks. • The networks capture the relationships between

  5. Designer cantilevers for even more accurate quantitative measurements of biological systems with multifrequency AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contera, S.

    2016-04-01

    Multifrequency excitation/monitoring of cantilevers has made it possible both to achieve fast, relatively simple, nanometre-resolution quantitative mapping of mechanical of biological systems in solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single molecule resolution detection by nanomechanical biosensors. A recent paper by Penedo et al [2015 Nanotechnology 26 485706] has made a significant contribution by developing simple methods to improve the signal to noise ratio in liquid environments, by selectively enhancing cantilever modes, which will lead to even more accurate quantitative measurements.

  6. Noninvasive quantitation of phosphorus metabolites in human tissue by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Hubesch, B.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Naruse, S.; Gober, J. R.; Lawry, T. J.; Boska, M. D.; Matson, G. B.; Weiner, M. W.

    Quantitation of metabolite concentrations by NMR spectroscopy is complicated by the need to determine the volume from which signals are detected, and by the need to obtain the relative sensitivity of detection within this volume. The use of coils with inhomogeneous B1 fields further complicates these problems. In order to quantify metabolite concentrations using 31P NMR spectroscopy, an external reference of hexamethyl phosphoroustriamide was used. Studies were performed on phantoms, using either a surface coil or a Helmholtz head coil to confirm the accuracy of both the ISIS volume selection technique and the use of an external reference. The limitations of this method are related to contamination and signal loss inherent in the ISIS technique and difficulties with integration of broad overlapping peaks. The method was applied to seven normal human subjects. The integrals for metabolite signals in normal brain and calf muscle were determined by using NMRI software. The T1 values of the signals of all phosphorus metabolites in the selected volume were measured in order to correct for saturation effects. The concentrations for PCr, P i, and ATP were 4.9, 2.0, and 2.5 m M in brain and 36.5, 5.7, and 7.3 m M in muscle. These results are in good agreement with those reported for animals, demonstrating the validity of this quantitation technique.

  7. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of α- and β-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the α- and β-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism. PMID:23403188

  8. Quantitative analyses of tartaric acid based on terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Binghua; Fan, Mengbao

    2010-10-01

    Terahertz wave is the electromagnetic spectrum situated between microwave and infrared wave. Quantitative analysis based on terahertz spectroscopy is very important for the application of terahertz techniques. But how to realize it is still under study. L-tartaric acid is widely used as acidulant in beverage, and other food, such as soft drinks, wine, candy, bread and some colloidal sweetmeats. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to quantify the tartaric acid. Two methods are employed to process the terahertz spectra of different samples with different content of tartaric acid. The first one is linear regression combining correlation analysis. The second is partial least square (PLS), in which the absorption spectra in the 0.8-1.4THz region are used to quantify the tartaric acid. To compare the performance of these two principles, the relative error of the two methods is analyzed. For this experiment, the first method does better than the second one. But the first method is suitable for the quantitative analysis of materials which has obvious terahertz absorption peaks, while for material which has no obvious terahertz absorption peaks, the second one is more appropriate.

  9. Quantitative LC-MS/MS Glycomic Analysis of Biological Samples Using AminoxyTMT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; Veillon, Lucas; Snovida, Sergei I; Rogers, John C; Saba, Julian; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycosylation plays an important role in various biological processes, such as modification of protein function, regulation of protein-protein interactions, and control of turnover rates of proteins. Moreover, glycans have been considered as potential biomarkers for many mammalian diseases and development of aberrant glycosylation profiles is an important indicator of the pathology of a disease or cancer. Hence, quantitation is an important aspect of a comprehensive glycomics study. Although numerous MS-based quantitation strategies have been developed in the past several decades, some issues affecting sensitivity and accuracy of quantitation still exist, and the development of more effective quantitation strategies is still required. Aminoxy tandem mass tag (aminoxyTMT) reagents are recently commercialized isobaric tags which enable relative quantitation of up to six different glycan samples simultaneously. In this study, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry conditions have been optimized to achieve reliable LC-MS/MS quantitative glycomic analysis using aminoxyTMT reagents. Samples were resuspended in 0.2 M sodium chloride solution to promote the formation of sodium adduct precursor ions, which leads to higher MS/MS reporter ion yields. This method was first evaluated with glycans from model glycoproteins and pooled human blood serum samples. The observed variation of reporter ion ratios was generally less than 10% relative to the theoretical ratio. Even for the highly complex minor N-glycans, the variation was still below 15%. This strategy was further applied to the glycomic profiling of N-glycans released from blood serum samples of patients with different esophageal diseases. Our results demonstrate the benefits of utilizing aminoxyTMT reagents for reliable quantitation of biological glycomic samples. PMID:27377957

  10. Quantitative phase imaging of biological cells using spatially low and temporally high coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Azeem; Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Singh, Veena; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of biological samples, such as human red blood cells (RBCs) and onion cells using narrow temporal frequency and wide angular frequency spectrum light source. This type of light source was synthesized by the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity of speckle reduction technique. The importance of using low spatial and high temporal coherence light source over the broad band and narrow band light source is that it does not require any dispersion compensation mechanism for biological samples. Further, it avoids the formation of speckle or spurious fringes which arises while using narrow band light source. PMID:27192285

  11. High-Throughput Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for Predicting Quantitative and Qualitative Composition Phenotypes of Individual Maize Kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy can be used for fast and reliable prediction of organic compounds in complex biological samples. We used a recently developed NIR spectroscopy instrument to predict starch, protein, oil, and weight of individual maize (Zea mays) seeds. The starch, prote...

  12. Quantitative neuropathology by high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Ma, M. J.; Becerra, L.; Ptak, T.; Tracey, I.; Lackner, A.; González, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method that directly relates tissue neuropathological analysis to medical imaging. Presently, only indirect and often tenuous relationships are made between imaging (such as MRI or x-ray computed tomography) and neuropathology. We present a biochemistry-based, quantitative neuropathological method that can help to precisely quantify information provided by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), an emerging medical imaging technique. This method, high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1HMRS, is rapid and requires only small amounts of unprocessed samples. Unlike chemical extraction or other forms of tissue processing, this method analyzes tissue directly, thus minimizing artifacts. We demonstrate the utility of this method by assessing neuronal damage using multiple tissue samples from differently affected brain regions in a case of Pick disease, a human neurodegenerative disorder. Among different regions, we found an excellent correlation between neuronal loss shown by traditional neurohistopathology and decrease of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate measured by HRMAS 1HMRS. This result demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a direct, quantitative link between a decrease in N-acetylaspartate and neuronal loss in a human neurodegenerative disease. As a quantitative method, HRMAS 1HMRS has potential applications in experimental and clinical neuropathologic investigations. It should also provide a rational basis for the interpretation of in vivo 1HMRS studies of human neurological disorders. PMID:9177231

  13. Quantitative analysis of skin chemicals using rapid near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Huang, Zhiwei; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2008-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical technique that is very sensitive to the structure and conformation of biochemical constitutes. It has been successfully used to study dysplasia and cancer in a variety of human tissues including skin. Researchers have a strong interest in quantitative analysis of the Raman spectra in the hope to find the quantitative molecule changes associated with cancers. Because skin is the largest organ in humans, it is very important to study the variability of Raman spectra for different body sites. In this presentation we report our quantitative analysis of normal skin Raman spectra of twenty-five body sites. Partial least square (PLS) analysis was used to quantify the skin molecules from the in vivo Raman spectra. We find that the absolute Raman intensity differs from person to person and from body site to body site. However the normalized Raman spectra are identical for the same body site. It is particularly interesting to find that the distribution of skin molecules is clustered for the same body regions.

  14. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikolić, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 μs/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  15. Feasibility of quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for targeted measurement of renal ischemia during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Utsav O.; Maddox, Michael M.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Dorsey, Philip J.; Wang, Mei; McCaslin, Ian Ross; Brown, J. Quincy; Lee, Benjamin R.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of warm ischemia time during partial nephrectomy (PN) is critical to minimizing ischemic damage and improving postoperative kidney function, while maintaining tumor resection efficacy. Recently, methods for localizing the effects of warm ischemia to the region of the tumor via selective clamping of higher-order segmental artery branches have been shown to have superior outcomes compared with clamping the main renal artery. However, artery identification can prolong operative time and increase the blood loss and reduce the positive effects of selective ischemia. Quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can provide a convenient, real-time means to aid in artery identification during laparoscopic PN. The feasibility of quantitative DRS for real-time longitudinal measurement of tissue perfusion and vascular oxygenation in laparoscopic nephrectomy was investigated in vivo in six Yorkshire swine kidneys (n=three animals). DRS allowed for rapid identification of ischemic areas after selective vessel occlusion. In addition, the rates of ischemia induction and recovery were compared for main renal artery versus tertiary segmental artery occlusion, and it was found that the tertiary segmental artery occlusion trends toward faster recovery after ischemia, which suggests a potential benefit of selective ischemia. Quantitative DRS could provide a convenient and fast tool for artery identification and evaluation of the depth, spatial extent, and duration of selective tissue ischemia in laparoscopic PN.

  16. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  17. Multiwavelength UV/visible spectroscopy for the quantitative investigation of platelet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattley, Yvette D.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1998-04-01

    The quality of platelets transfused is vital to the effectiveness of the transfusion. Freshly prepared, discoid platelets are the most effective treatment for preventing spontaneous hemorrhage or for stopping an abnormal bleeding event. Current methodology for the routine testing of platelet quality involves random pH testing of platelet rich plasma and visual inspection of platelet rich plasma for a swirling pattern indicative of the discoid shape of the cells. The drawback to these methods is that they do not provide a quantitative and objective assay for platelet functionality that can be used on each platelet unit prior to transfusion. As part of a larger project aimed at characterizing whole blood and blood components with multiwavelength UV/vis spectroscopy, isolated platelets and platelet in platelet rich plasma have been investigated. Models based on Mie theory have been developed which allow for the extraction of quantitative information on platelet size, number and quality from multi-wavelength UV/vis spectra. These models have been used to quantify changes in platelet rich plasma during storage. The overall goal of this work is to develop a simple, rapid quantitative assay for platelet quality that can be used prior to platelet transfusion to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. As a result of this work, the optical properties for isolated platelets, platelet rich plasma and leukodepleted platelet rich plasma have been determined.

  18. Quantitative Determination of Fluorine Content in Blends of Polylactide (PLA)-Talc Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Elena; Tagliati, Chiara; Bonato, Tiziano; Costa, Stefania; Scapoli, Chiara; Pedrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely used for quantitative and/or qualitative determination of a wide range of matrices. The objective of this study was to develop a NIRS method for the quantitative determination of fluorine content in polylactide (PLA)-talc blends. A blending profile was obtained by mixing different amounts of PLA granules and talc powder. The calibration model was built correlating wet chemical data (alkali digestion method) and NIR spectra. Using FT (Fourier Transform)-NIR technique, a Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression model was set-up, in a concentration interval of 0 ppm of pure PLA to 800 ppm of pure talc. Fluorine content prediction (R²cal = 0.9498; standard error of calibration, SEC = 34.77; standard error of cross-validation, SECV = 46.94) was then externally validated by means of a further 15 independent samples (R²EX.V = 0.8955; root mean standard error of prediction, RMSEP = 61.08). A positive relationship between an inorganic component as fluorine and NIR signal has been evidenced, and used to obtain quantitative analytical information from the spectra. PMID:27490548

  19. Functional genomics bridges the gap between quantitative genetics and molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Deep characterization of molecular function of genetic variants in the human genome is becoming increasingly important for understanding genetic associations to disease and for learning to read the regulatory code of the genome. In this paper, I discuss how recent advances in both quantitative genetics and molecular biology have contributed to understanding functional effects of genetic variants, lessons learned from eQTL studies, and future challenges in this field. PMID:26430152

  20. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  1. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  2. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Smith, Bradley D.; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer.Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  3. Characterisation of transmission Raman spectroscopy for rapid quantitative analysis of intact multi-component pharmaceutical capsules.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Michael D; Macleod, Neil A; Smith, Mark R; Andrews, Darren; Hammond, Stephen V; Matousek, Pavel

    2011-02-20

    A detailed characterisation of the performance of transmission Raman spectroscopy was performed from the standpoint of rapid quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical capsules using production relevant formulations comprising of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and 3 common pharmaceutical excipients. This research builds on our earlier studies that identified the unique benefits of transmission Raman spectroscopy compared to conventional Raman spectroscopy. These include the ability to provide bulk information of the content of capsules, thus avoiding the sub-sampling problem, and the suppression of interference from the capsule shell. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the technique's insensitivity to the amount of material held within the capsules. Different capsules sizes with different overall fill weights (100-400 mg) and capsule shell colours were assayed with a single calibration model developed using only one weight and size sample set (100 mg) to a relative error of typically <3%. The relative root mean square error of prediction of the concentration of API for the main sample set (nominal content 75%, w/w) was 1.5% with a 5s acquisition time. Models built using the same calibration set also predicted the 3 low level excipients with relative errors of 5-15%. The quantity of API was also predicted (with a relative error within ∼3%) using the same model for capsules prepared with different generations of API (i.e. API manufactured via different processes). The study provides further foundation blocks for the establishment of this emerging technique as a routine pharmaceutical analysis tool, capitalising on the inherently high chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy and the non-invasive nature of the measurement. Ultimately, this technique has significant promise as a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tool for online production application. PMID:20947277

  4. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  5. Spectroscopy of Multilayered Biological Tissues for Diabetes Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry

    Neurological and vascular complications of diabetes mellitus are known to cause foot ulceration in diabetic patients. Present clinical screening techniques enable the diabetes care provider to triage treatment by identifying diabetic patients at risk of foot ulceration. However, these techniques cannot effectively identify specific areas of the foot at risk of ulceration. This study aims to develop non-invasive optical techniques for accurate assessment of tissue health and viability with spatial resolution on the order of 1 mm². The thesis can be divided into three parts: (1) the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry to detect microcirculatory changes prior to ulcer formation, (2) development of a two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm and its application to detection of callus formation or epidermal degradation prior to ulceration, and (3) multi-layered tissue fluorescence modeling for identification of bacterial growth in existing diabetic foot wounds. The first part of the dissertation describes a clinical study in which hyperspectral tissue oximetry was performed on multiple diabetic subjects at risk of ulceration. Tissue oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were estimated using the Modified Beer-Lambert law. Then, an ulcer prediction algorithm was developed based on retrospective analysis of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in sites that were known to ulcerate. The ulcer prediction algorithm exhibited a large sensitivity but low specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively. The second part of the dissertation revisited the hyperspectral data presented in part one with a new and novel two-layer tissue spectroscopy algorithm. This algorithm was able to detect not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, but also the thickness of the epidermis, and the tissue's scattering coefficient. Specifically, change in epidermal thickness provided insight into the formation of diabetic foot ulcers over time. Indeed, callus formation or

  6. Improving the Quantitative Skills of Future Benthologists: Better Integration of Mathematics into Undergraduate Biology Curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, R. P.; Marland, E. S.; Venable, M. E.; Arnholt, A. T.; Searcy, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Some of the assumptions biology faculty make about the mathematical background of their students are unwarranted. Through assessment, we have found that students know far less about subjects such as graphing, logarithms etc. than we think. This obviously affects how we teach our classes, how much time we devote to covering topics such as statistical analysis and the degree of quantitative analysis we expect. At ASU we have taken several steps to improve the mathematical background of our students. The Math Department now offers statistics and calculus courses designed for biology majors. These courses are taught in computerized classrooms and are focused on biological data and modeling. By requiring these courses as prerequisites, we hope to reduce the review of basic mathematics in our classes and focus on the "important" topics. In Biology we have expanded on the level of quantitative rigor expected in our classes. In addition, we are increasing the use of modeling and computational exercises in these classes. We will present the results of our ongoing assessment approach and discuss how we are implementing some of our initiatives. This work is based on the recommendations outlined in the NRC's Bio2010 and the MAA's Math and Bio 2010.

  7. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in biology, chemistry, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Perevoshchikova, I V; Kotova, E A; Antonenko, Y N

    2011-05-01

    This review describes the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and its applications. FCS is used for investigating processes associated with changes in the mobility of molecules and complexes and allows researchers to study aggregation of particles, binding of fluorescent molecules with supramolecular complexes, lipid vesicles, etc. The size of objects under study varies from a few angstroms for dye molecules to hundreds of nanometers for nanoparticles. The described applications of FCS comprise various fields from simple chemical systems of solution/micelle to sophisticated regulations on the level of living cells. Both the methodical bases and the theoretical principles of FCS are simple and available. The present review is concentrated preferentially on FCS applications for studies on artificial and natural membranes. At present, in contrast to the related approach of dynamic light scattering, FCS is poorly known in Russia, although it is widely employed in laboratories of other countries. The goal of this review is to promote the development of FCS in Russia so that this technique could occupy the position it deserves in modern Russian science. PMID:21639831

  8. NIR Raman spectroscopy in medicine and biology: results and aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, B.; Dippel, B.; Erb, I.; Keller, S.; Löchte, T.; Schulz, H.; Tatsch, E.; Wessel, S.

    1999-05-01

    Analyses of biomaterial by 'classical' Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the visible range has not been possible since the fluorescence of many essential constituents of all animal and plant cells and tissues overlays the Raman spectra completely. Fluorescence, however, is virtually avoided, when Raman spectra are excited with the Nd : YAG laser line at 1064 nm. Within seven dissertations we explored different fields of potential applications to medical diagnostics. Identification and qualification of tissues and cells is possible. Tumors show small but significant differences to normal tissues; in order to develop a reliable tool for tumor diagnostics more research is necessary, especially a collection of reference spectra in a data bank is needed. Raman spectra of biomineralization structures in teeth and bones show pathological tissues as well as the development of new mineralized structures. NIR Raman spectra of flowers, leaves, and fruit show, without special preparation, their constituents: alkaloids, the essential oils, natural dyes, flavors, spices and drugs. They allow application to taxonomy, optimizing plant breeding and control of food.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection and classification of biological aerosols.

    PubMed

    Hybl, John D; Lithgow, Gregg A; Buckley, Steven G

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is examined as a potential method for detecting airborne biological agents. A spectrally broadband LIBS system was used for laboratory measurements on some common biological agent simulants. These measurements were compared to those of common, naturally occurring biological aerosol components (pollen and fungal spores) to determine the potential of LIBS for discriminating biological agents from natural background aerosols. A principal components analysis illustrates that linear combinations of the detected atomic lines, which are present in different ratios in each of the samples tested, can be used to discriminate biological agent simulants from other biological matter. A more sensitive, narrowband LIBS instrument was used to demonstrate the detection of single simulant (Bg) particles in the size range 1-5 microns. Ca, Mg, and Na, which are present in varying concentrations between 0.3 and 11% (by mass) in the Bg particles, were observed in single particles using LIBS. PMID:14639747

  11. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  12. Quantitative analysis of Cu and Co adsorbed on fish bones via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezk, R. A.; Galmed, A. H.; Abdelkreem, M.; Ghany, N. A. Abdel; Harith, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of heavy metals adsorbed by fish bones. Fish bones were used as a natural and low cost heavy metal sorbent (mainly Cu and Co) from synthetic wastewater. The removal efficiency of the adsorbent was studied as a function of initial metal concentration and pH value. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated for improving the sensitivity of LIBS technique through parametric dependence studies. Furthermore, calibration curves were constructed based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis technique, whereas, the limits of detection (LOD) for Cu and Co were calculated. The results were validated by comparing LIBS data with those obtained by XRF spectrometry. The results of the two techniques are strongly correlated which verified the feasibility of using LIBS to detect traces of heavy metals adsorbed from wastewater by fish bones. This study reflects the potential of using LIBS in environmental applications.

  13. Quantitative analysis of trace metal accumulation in teeth using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Morris, G. W.; Liska, M.; Kaiser, J.

    The technique of laser ablation is receiving increasing attention for applications in dentistry, specifically for the treatment of teeth (e.g. drilling of micro-holes and plaque removal). In the process of ablation a luminous micro-plasma is normally generated which may be exploited for elemental analysis. Here we report on quantitative Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis to study the presence of trace minerals in teeth. A selection of teeth of different age groups has been investigated, ranging from the first teeth of infants, through the second teeth of children, to adults to trace the influence of environmental factors on the accumulation of a number of elements in teeth. We found a close link between elements detected in tooth fillings and toothpastes with those present in teeth.

  14. Quantitative determination of the O({sup 3}P) density via visible cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manish; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2006-12-11

    A simple method has been developed to quantitatively measure the ground state oxygen atom, O({sup 3}P), density. The technique exploits cavity-enhanced spectroscopy to probe the relatively weak O({sup 1}D)(leftarrow)O({sup 3}P{sub 1}) transition near 636 nm. O({sup 3}P{sub 1}) densities of approximately 3.4x10{sup 14} at./cm{sup 3} were measured in an inductively coupled plasma produced within a high-finesse optical cavity, and a minimum detectable atom state density of 1.3x10{sup 12} at./cm{sup 3} was determined. The absorption profile yielded a translational temperature of 453 K. The technique can be readily extended to other atomic species.

  15. Quantitative characterization of traumatic bruises by combined pulsed photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2015-02-01

    We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for characterization of the bruise evolution process. While DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths, the PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin). In this study, we simulate experimental DRS spectra and PPTR signals using the Monte Carlo technique and focus on characterization of a suitable fitting approach for their analysis. We find inverse Monte Carlo to be superior to the diffusion approximation approach for the inverse analysis of DRS spectra. The analysis is then augmented with information obtainable by the fitting of the PPTR signal. We show that both techniques can be coupled in a combined fitting approach. The combining of two complementary techniques improves the robustness and accuracy of the inverse analysis, enabling a comprehensive quantitative characterization of the bruise evolution dynamics.

  16. Detection and quantitative analysis of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide: FY 93 Florida State University Raman spectroscopy report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, C.K.; Vickers, T.J.

    1994-10-11

    This report provides a summary of work to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with tank waste materials. It contains Raman spectra from organics, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetetraacteic acid (HEDTA), imino diacetic acid (IDA), kerosene, tributyl phosphate (TBP), acetone and butanol, anticipated to be present in tank wastes and spectra from T-107 real and BY-104 simulant materials. The results of investigating Raman for determining moisture content in tank materials are also presented. A description of software algorithms developed to process Raman spectra from a dispersive grating spectrometer system and an in initial design for a data base to support qualitative and quantitative application of remote Raman sensing with tank wastes.

  17. Quantitative atomic resolution elemental mapping via absolute-scale energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Weyland, M; Sang, X; Xu, W; Dycus, J H; LeBeau, J M; D'Alfonso, A J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative agreement on an absolute scale is demonstrated between experiment and simulation for two-dimensional, atomic-resolution elemental mapping via energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This requires all experimental parameters to be carefully characterized. The agreement is good, but some discrepancies remain. The most likely contributing factors are identified and discussed. Previous predictions that increasing the probe forming aperture helps to suppress the channelling enhancement in the average signal are confirmed experimentally. It is emphasized that simple column-by-column analysis requires a choice of sample thickness that compromises between being thick enough to yield a good signal-to-noise ratio while being thin enough that the overwhelming majority of the EDX signal derives from the column on which the probe is placed, despite strong electron scattering effects. PMID:27258645

  18. Quantitative determination of the surfactant-induced split ratio of influenza virus by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenny Kwon Ho; Sahin, Yusuf Ziya; Neeleman, Ronald; Trout, Bernhardt L; Kayser, Veysel

    2016-07-01

    The majority of marketed seasonal influenza vaccines are prepared using viruses that are chemically inactivated and treated with a surfactant. Treating with surfactants has important consequences: it produces 'split viruses' by solubilizing viral membranes, stabilizes free membrane proteins and ensures a low level of reactogenicity while retaining high vaccine potency. The formulation stability and potency of split influenza vaccines are largely determined by the specifics of this 'splitting' process; namely, the consequent conformational changes of proteins and interactions of solubilized particles, which may form aggregates. Robust methods to quantitatively determine the split ratio need to be developed before optimal splitting conditions can be investigated to streamline production of superior influenza vaccines. Here, we present a quantitative method, based on both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, to calculate the split ratio of the virus after surfactant treatment. We use the lipophilic dye Nile Red (NR) as a probe to elucidate molecular interactions and track changes in molecular environments. Inactivated whole influenza viruses obtained from a sucrose gradient were incubated with NR and subsequently treated with increasing concentrations of the surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) to induce virus splitting. NR's emission spectra showed that the addition of TX-100 caused ˜27 nm red-shifts in the emission peak, indicative of increasingly hydrophilic environments surrounding NR. The emission spectra of NR at different surfactant concentrations were analyzed with multi-peak fitting to ascertain the number of different micro-environments surrounding NR and track its population change in these different environments. Results from both the emission spectra and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy revealed that NR showed presence in 3 distinct molecular environments. The split ratio of the virus was then calculated from the percentages of NR in

  19. Ultrafast Spectroscopy in Conjugated Organic and Biological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming

    The dynamics of two kinds of conjugated materials, the visual pigment rhodopsin and the organic polymer poly(p -phenylene vinylene), have been studied utilizing femtosecond spectroscopy. The 11-cis to all-trans torsional isomerization of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin for both protonated and deuterated aqueous environments have been studied by time-resolved absorption measurements at room temperature. The kinetic results are well modeled by rate equations based on the scheme which involves the isomerization along the torsional coordinate of the 11-cis bond of the retinal chromophore. A metastable intermediate 90 degree twisted state is formed within 200 fs on the excited state surface by rotation around the C_{11} -C_{12} double bond, and it takes 3 ps to form the fully isomerized all -trans photoproduct known as bathorhodopsin and to repopulate the ground state rhodopsin. These results agree well with the semiempirical energy level and molecular dynamics calculations. The observed dynamics are insensitive to deuteration of the exchangeable protons which suggest that proton translocation is unimportant at physiological temperatures. The conjugated polymer, Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) in a stretch oriented film, has been studied using polarized time-resolved absorption with subpicosecond resolution and transient luminescence measurements. Excitations are generated by photoexcitation near the band edge (500nm -540nm) with a 200 fs pulse and the resulting spectral changes are probed with a white light pulse. Lattice stabilized (singlet) self-trapped excitons are formed within 200 fs which are observed by measuring the stimulated gain in their emission band which decay at 10 ps. The agreement of the photoinduced exciton gain spectrum (<1ps), the transient luminescence spectrum (10 ps) and the steady state luminescence spectrum suggest that the singlet excitons are not further trapped after 200fs of their formation time. Excitation wavelength dependence

  20. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and quantitative analysis of metal gluconates.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxian; Yang, Jingqi; Zhao, Hongwei; Yang, Na; Jing, Dandan; Zhang, Jianbing; Li, Qingnuan; Han, Jiaguang

    2015-01-01

    A series of metal gluconates (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) were investigated by terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. The absorption coefficients and refractive indices of the samples were obtained in the frequency range of 0.5-2.6 THz. The gluconates showed distinct THz characteristic fingerprints, and the dissimilarities reflect their different structures, hydrogen-bond networks, and molecular interactions. In addition, some common features were observed among these gluconates, and the similarities probably come from the similar carbohydrate anion group. The X-ray powder diffraction measurements of these metal gluconates were performed, and the copper(II) gluconate was found to be amorphous, corresponding to the monotonic increase feature in the THz absorption spectrum. The results suggest that THz spectroscopy is sensitive to molecular structure and physical form. Binary and ternary mixtures of different gluconates were quantitatively analyzed based on the Beer-Lambert law. A chemical map of a tablet containing calcium D-gluconate monohydrate and α-lactose in the polyethylene host was obtained by THz imaging. The study shows that THz technology is a useful tool in pharmaceutical research and quality control applications. PMID:25506686

  1. Differentiation and quantitative determination of surface and hydrate water in lyophilized mannitol using NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenjin; Mao, Chen; Chen, Wendy; Lin, Hong; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Cauchon, Nina

    2006-09-01

    Mannitol hydrate is a metastable form produced during lyophilization. It is unstable, and therefore can undergo dehydration to release water to the surrounding environment at room temperature. The analysis of this form is challenging due to its thermodynamic instability. This study describes the development of a fast and non-invasive method to determine the mannitol hydrate and surface water content in a lyophilized product using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The mannitol hydrate was produced through lyophilization and characterized using XRPD, TGA, and NIR spectroscopy. Quantitative methods for hydrate and surface water were developed for NIR spectra with curve fitting and partial least square (PLS) regression models. The curve fitting method deconvoluted the NIR spectra into hydrate and surface water peaks and generated a calibration model by correlating pure spectra peak area to concentration. The standard error of prediction (SEP) for hydrate and surface water content were 0.65 and 0.40%, respectively. The PLS model developed for the same sample set was better than the curve fitting model; SEP = 0.50% for hydrate water and 0.22% for surface water, respectively. The methods can be used to monitor the formation and stability of mannitol hydrate in mannitol-containing formulations during the lyophilization process. PMID:16850397

  2. Quantitative classification of cryptosporidium oocysts and giardia cysts in water using UV/vis spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Christina P.; Rose, J. B.; Patten, K.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1995-05-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are enteric protozoa which cause waterborne diseases. To date, the detection of these organisms in water has relied upon microscopic immunofluorescent assay technology which uses antibodies directed against the cyst and oocyst forms of the protozoa. In this paper, the uv/vis extinction spectra of aqueous dispersions of Cryptosporidium and Giardia have been studied to investigate the potential use of light scattering-spectral deconvolution techniques as a rapid method for the identification and quantification of protozoa in water. Examination of purified samples of Cryptosporidium and Giardia suggests that spectral features apparent in the short wavelength region of the uv/vis spectra contain information that may be species specific for each protozoa. The spectral characteristics, as well as the particle size analysis, determined from the same spectra, allow for the quantitative classification, identification, and possibly, the assessment of the viability of the protozoa. To further increase the sensitivity of this technique, specific antibodies direction against these organisms, labelled with FITC and rhodamine are being used. It is demonstrated that uv/vis spectroscopy provides an alternative method for the characterization of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. The simplicity and reproducibility of uv/vis spectroscopy measurements makes this technique ideally suited for the development of on-line instrumentation for the rapid detection of microorganisms in water supplies.

  3. Artificial neural network for Cu quantitative determination in soil using a portable Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Edilene C.; Milori, Débora M. B. P.; Ferreira, Ednaldo J.; Da Silva, Robson M.; Martin-Neto, Ladislau

    2008-10-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an advanced analytical technique for elemental determination based on direct measurement of optical emission of excited species on a laser induced plasma. In the realm of elemental analysis, LIBS has great potential to accomplish direct analysis independently of physical sample state (solid, liquid or gas). Presently, LIBS has been easily employed for qualitative analysis, nevertheless, in order to perform quantitative analysis, some effort is still required since calibration represents a difficult issue. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a machine learning paradigm inspired on biological nervous systems. Recently, ANNs have been used in many applications and its classification and prediction capabilities are especially useful for spectral analysis. In this paper an ANN was used as calibration strategy for LIBS, aiming Cu determination in soil samples. Spectra of 59 samples from a heterogenic set of reference soil samples and their respective Cu concentration were used for calibration and validation. Simple linear regression (SLR) and wrapper approach were the two strategies employed to select a set of wavelengths for ANN learning. Cross validation was applied, following ANN training, for verification of prediction accuracy. The ANN showed good efficiency for Cu predictions although the features of portable instrumentation employed. The proposed method presented a limit of detection (LOD) of 2.3 mg dm - 3 of Cu and a mean squared error (MSE) of 0.5 for the predictions.

  4. Quantitative Surface Chirality Detection with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy: Twin Polarization Angle Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Feng; Xu, Yanyan; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hongfei

    2009-12-27

    Here we report a novel twin polarization angle (TPA) approach in the quantitative chirality detection with the surface sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). Generally, the achiral contribution dominates the surface SFG-VS signal, and the pure chiral signal is usually two or three orders of magnitude smaller. Therefore, it has been difficult to make quantitative detection and analysis of the chiral contributions to the surface SFG- VS signal. In the TPA method, by varying together the polarization angles of the incoming visible light and the sum frequency signal at fixed s or p polarization of the incoming infrared beam, the polarization dependent SFG signal can give not only direct signature of the chiral contribution in the total SFG-VS signal, but also the accurate measurement of the chiral and achiral components in the surface SFG signal. The general description of the TPA method is presented and the experiment test of the TPA approach is also presented for the SFG-VS from the S- and R-limonene chiral liquid surfaces. The most accurate degree of chiral excess values thus obtained for the 2878 cm⁻¹ spectral peak of the S- and R-limonene liquid surfaces are (23.7±0.4)% and ({25.4±1.3)%, respectively.

  5. Quantitative measurements of binary amino acids mixtures in yellow foxtail millet by terahertz time domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaohua; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhuoyong; Yang, Yuping; Xiang, Yuhong

    2016-11-15

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) combined with chemometrics has been utilized for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of binary mixtures of l-glutamic acid and l-glutamine which have similar chemical structures and properties. The binary mixtures of amino acids were prepared with yellow foxtail millet matrix, substituted for polyethylene (PE) as previously reported. After proper pretreatment of absorption spectra, quantitative analysis was achieved by partial least squares (PLS) and interval partial least squares (iPLS) regressions. The performance of models was evaluated based on the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and correlation coefficient (R(2)) of cross-validations with bootstrapped Latin partitions as criterion. The iPLS yielded better results with low RMSEP (0.39±0.02%, 0.39±0.02%), and higher R(2) values (0.9904, 0.9906) for glutamine and glutamic acid comparing to the conventional PLS models. Multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was successfully applied for resolution of pure THz spectra and concentration profiles of two amino acids components from mixtures. PMID:27283659

  6. Quantitative analysis of lead in aqueous solutions by ultrasonic nebulizer assisted laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shi-Lei; Lu, Yuan; Kong, Wei-Jin; Cheng, Kai; Zheng, Ronger

    2016-08-01

    In this study, an ultrasonic nebulizer unit was established to improve the quantitative analysis ability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for liquid samples detection, using solutions of the heavy metal element Pb as an example. An analytical procedure was designed to guarantee the stability and repeatability of the LIBS signal. A series of experiments were carried out strictly according to the procedure. The experimental parameters were optimized based on studies of the pulse energy influence and temporal evolution of the emission features. The plasma temperature and electron density were calculated to confirm the LTE state of the plasma. Normalizing the intensities by background was demonstrated to be an appropriate method in this work. The linear range of this system for Pb analysis was confirmed over a concentration range of 0-4,150ppm by measuring 12 samples with different concentrations. The correlation coefficient of the fitted calibration curve was as high as 99.94% in the linear range, and the LOD of Pb was confirmed as 2.93ppm. Concentration prediction experiments were performed on a further six samples. The excellent quantitative ability of the system was demonstrated by comparison of the real and predicted concentrations of the samples. The lowest relative error was 0.043% and the highest was no more than 7.1%.

  7. Quantitatively Resolving Ligand–Receptor Bonds on Cell Surfaces Using Force-Induced Remnant Magnetization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecule-specific noncovalent bonding on cell surfaces is the foundation for cellular recognition and functioning. A major challenge in probing these bonds is to resolve the specific bonds quantitatively and efficiently from the nonspecific interactions in a complex environment. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we were able to resolve quantitatively three different interactions for magnetic beads bearing anti-CD4 antibodies with CD4+ T cell surfaces based upon their binding forces. The binding force of the CD4 antibody–antigen bonds was determined to be 75 ± 3 pN. For comparison, the same bonds were also studied on a functionalized substrate surface, and the binding force was determined to be 90 ± 6 pN. The 15 pN difference revealed by high-resolution FIRMS illustrates the significant impact of the bonding environment. Because the force difference was unaffected by the cell number or the receptor density on the substrate, we attributed it to the possible conformational or local environmental differences of the CD4 antigens between the cell surface and substrate surface. Our results show that the high force resolution and detection efficiency afforded by FIRMS are valuable for studying protein–protein interactions on cell surfaces. PMID:27163031

  8. Confocal reflectance quantitative phase microscopy system for cell biology studies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), used to measure the refractive index, provides the optical path delay measurement at each point of the specimen under study and becomes an active field in biological science. In this work we present development of confocal reflection phase microscopy system to provide depth resolved quantitative phase information for investigation of intracellular structures and other biological specimen. The system hardware development is mainly divided into two major parts. First, creates a pinhole array for parallel confocal imaging of specimen at multiple locations simultaneously. Here a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is used to generate pinhole array by turning on a subset micro-mirrors arranged on a grid. Second is the detection of phase information of confocal imaging foci by using a common path interferometer. With this novel approach, it is possible to measure the nuclei membrane fluctuations and distinguish them from the plasma membrane fluctuations. Further, depth resolved quantitative phase can be correlated to the intracellular contents and 3D map of refractive index measurements.

  9. Semi-quantitative prediction of a multiple API solid dosage form with a combination of vibrational spectroscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Hertrampf, A; Sousa, R M; Menezes, J C; Herdling, T

    2016-05-30

    Quality control (QC) in the pharmaceutical industry is a key activity in ensuring medicines have the required quality, safety and efficacy for their intended use. QC departments at pharmaceutical companies are responsible for all release testing of final products but also all incoming raw materials. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Raman spectroscopy are important techniques for fast and accurate identification and qualification of pharmaceutical samples. Tablets containing two different active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) [bisoprolol, hydrochlorothiazide] in different commercially available dosages were analysed using Raman- and NIR Spectroscopy. The goal was to define multivariate models based on each vibrational spectroscopy to discriminate between different dosages (identity) and predict their dosage (semi-quantitative). Furthermore the combination of spectroscopic techniques was investigated. Therefore, two different multiblock techniques based on PLS have been applied: multiblock PLS (MB-PLS) and sequential-orthogonalised PLS (SO-PLS). NIRS showed better results compared to Raman spectroscopy for both identification and quantitation. The multiblock techniques investigated showed that each spectroscopy contains information not present or captured with the other spectroscopic technique, thus demonstrating that there is a potential benefit in their combined use for both identification and quantitation purposes. PMID:26970593

  10. Quantitative determination of biological sulfhydryl groups by postcolumn derivatization and elucidation of microheterogeneity of serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, T; Nokihara, K

    1998-08-15

    A quantitative analytical system for biological sulfhydryl compounds has been developed using an ion-pair reagent with isocratic elution and an on-line postcolumn derivatization with Ellman-type reagents. As human or bovine serum albumin has 35 cysteinyl residues, one cysteinyl residue exists as a free sulfhydryl moiety, and this gives rise to the microheterogeneity in serum albumin. Here we report for the first time the quantitative characterization of the microheterogeneity of serum albumin. Cysteine was found to be the major molecule attached to the sulfydryl group of the serum albumins. Although glutathione could not be detected, the Cys-Gly element of glutathione was found. Freshly prepared human serum albumin from healthy volunteers contained 0.46 nmol of Cys/mL of serum, 0.24 nmol of Cys-Gly/mL of serum, and very small amounts of glutathione (0.02 nmol/mL). PMID:9726170

  11. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  12. Mapping biological composition through quantitative phase and absorption X-ray ptychography.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael W M; Elgass, Kirstin; Junker, Mark D; Luu, Mac B; Ryan, Michael T; Peele, Andrew G; van Riessen, Grant A

    2014-01-01

    Isolating compositional information in biological X-ray imaging can be problematic as such information is conflated with thickness and density variations when viewing in projection through a sample. We demonstrate an effective method for identifying variations in material composition by simultaneously using the quantitative phase and magnitude images provided through soft X-ray ptychography. Using this approach we show significantly increased contrast and improved reliability of the identification of intracellular features from uncharacterised samples. While demonstrated for X-ray ptychography, this method is immediately applicable to electron and optical microscopy methods where the complex transmission function of the sample is recovered. PMID:25348877

  13. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Biological Liquids for Third-Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Débarre, Delphine; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides images of unstained biological samples based on spatial variations in third-order nonlinear susceptibility, refractive index, and dispersion. In this study, we establish quantitative values for the third-order nonlinear susceptibilities of several solvents (water, ethanol, glycerol), physiological aqueous (ions, amino acids, polypeptides, bovine serum albumin, glucose) and lipid (triglycerides, cholesterol) solutions as a function of solute concentration in the 1.05–1.25 μm excitation range. We use these data in conjunction with imaging experiments to show that THG imaging with ∼1.2 μm excitation lacks specificity and sensitivity to detect physiological ion concentration changes, and that nonaqueous structures such as lipid bodies provide a more robust source of signal. Finally, we illustrate the impact of index-matching liquids in THG images. These data provide a basis for interpreting biological THG images and for developing additional applications. PMID:17085492

  15. Quantitative high-throughput analysis of drugs in biological matrices by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bourgogne, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    To support pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism studies, LC-MS/MS plays more and more an essential role for the quantitation of drugs and their metabolites in biological matrices. With the new challenges encountered in drug discovery and drug development, new strategies are put in place to achieve high-throughput analysis, using serial and parallel approaches. To speed-up method development and validation, generic approaches with the direct injection of biological fluids is highly desirable. Column-switching, using various packing materials for the extraction columns, is widely applied. Improvement of mass spectrometers performance, and in particular triple quadrupoles, also strongly influences sample preparation strategies, which remain a key element in the bioanalytical process. PMID:12838545

  16. Introduction to the Symposium "Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning".

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    The broad aim of this symposium and set of associated papers is to motivate the use of inquiry-based, active-learning teaching techniques in undergraduate quantitative biology courses. Practical information, resources, and ready-to-use classroom exercises relevant to physicists, mathematicians, biologists, and engineers are presented. These resources can be used to address the lack of preparation of college students in STEM fields entering the workforce by providing experience working on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary problems in mathematical biology in a group setting. Such approaches can also indirectly help attract and retain under-represented students who benefit the most from "non-traditional" learning styles and strategies, including inquiry-based, collaborative, and active learning. PMID:26269461

  17. Graphene-based platform for nano-scale infrared near-field spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, Omar; Wood, Joshua D.; Doidge, Gregory P.; Damhorst, Gregory L.; Rangarajan, Aniruddh; Bashir, Rashid; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph W.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2014-03-01

    In biological and life sciences, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy serves as a noninvasive probe of vibrational fingerprints used to identify chemical and molecular species. Near-field spectroscopy, based on the illumination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with an infrared laser, allows for determination of IR properties of a material at nanometer length scales. However, application of near-field IR spectroscopy to most biological systems has thus far been elusive. Physiological conditions required for experimentation are incompatible with typical implementations of nano-FTIR. Recently it became possible to trap water and small biomolecules underneath large-area graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The graphene layer serves as an IR-transparent cover that allows for a near-field interrogation of the underlying layers. We present near-field nano-imaging and spectroscopy data of unencapsulated Tobacco Mosaic Viruses (TMV), compared to those sandwiched between two large-area graphene sheets, and discuss the applicability of near-field IR spectroscopy to trapped biomolecules in aqueous environments.

  18. Life at the Common Denominator: Mechanistic and Quantitative Biology for the Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.

    2010-01-01

    The remarkable challenges and possibilities of the coming few decades will compel the biogeochemical and astrobiological sciences to characterize the interactions between biology and its environment in a fundamental, mechanistic, and quantitative fashion. The clear need for integrative and scalable biology-environment models is exemplified in the Earth sciences by the challenge of effectively addressing anthropogenic global change, and in the space sciences by the challenge of mounting a well-constrained yet sufficiently adaptive and inclusive search for life beyond Earth. Our understanding of the life-planet interaction is still, however, largely empirical. A variety of approaches seek to move from empirical to mechanistic descriptions. One approach focuses on the relationship between biology and energy, which is at once universal (all life requires energy), unique (life manages energy flow in a fashion not seen in abiotic systems), and amenable to characterization and quantification in thermodynamic terms. Simultaneously, a focus on energy flow addresses a critical point of interface between life and its geological, chemical, and physical environment. Characterizing and quantifying this relationship for life on Earth will support the development of integrative and predictive models for biology-environment dynamics. Understanding this relationship at its most fundamental level holds potential for developing concepts of habitability and biosignatures that can optimize astrobiological exploration strategies and are extensible to all life.

  19. A Quantitative Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study: A Decrease in Cerebral Hemoglobin Oxygenation in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arai, Heii; Takano, Maki; Miyakawa, Koichi; Ota, Tsuneyoshi; Takahashi, Tadashi; Asaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Tsuneaki

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system was used to measure changes in cortical hemoglobin oxygenation during the Verbal Fluency Task in 32 healthy controls, 15 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 15 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amplitude of changes in the waveform, which was…

  20. Quantitative analysis of cefalexin based on artificial neural networks combined with modified genetic algorithm using short near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Yanfu; Feng, Guodong; Wang, Bin; Ren, Yulin; Fei, Qiang

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a novel chemometric method was developed for rapid, accurate, and quantitative analysis of cefalexin in samples. The experiments were carried out by using the short near-infrared spectroscopy coupled with artificial neural networks. In order to enhancing the predictive ability of artificial neural networks model, a modified genetic algorithm was used to select fixed number of wavelength.

  1. LASER BIOLOGY: Laser spectroscopy technique for estimating the efficiency of photosensitisers in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. V.; Stratonnikov, Aleksandr A.; Loshchenov, V. B.

    2006-06-01

    A fast and highly informative method is presented for estimating the photodynamic activity of photosensitisers. The method makes it possible to determine the rate of photodegradation in erythrocyte-containing biological media in nearly in vivo conditions, estimate the degree of irreversible binding of oxygen dissolved in the medium during laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitisers, and determine the nature of degradation of photosensitisers exposed to light (photobleaching).

  2. Quantitative C2H2 measurements in sooty flames using mid-infrared polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. W.; Li, Z. S.; Li, B.; Alwahabi, Z. T.; Aldén, M.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative measurements of acetylene (C2H2) molecules as a combustion intermediate species in a series of rich premixed C2H4/air flames were non-intrusively performed, spatially resolved, using mid-infrared polarization spectroscopy (IRPS), by probing its fundamental ro-vibrational transitions. The flat sooty C2H4/air premixed flames with different equivalence ratios varying from 1.25 to 2.50 were produced on a 6 cm diameter porous-plug McKenna type burner at atmospheric pressure, and all measurements were performed at a height of 8.5 mm above the burner surface. IRPS excitation scans in different flame conditions were performed and rotational line-resolved spectra were recorded. Spectral features of acetylene molecules were readily recognized in the spectral ranges selected, with special attention to avoid the spectral interference from the large amount of coexisting hot water and other hydrocarbon molecules. On-line calibration of the optical system was performed in a laminar C2H2/N2 gas flow at ambient conditions. Using the flame temperatures measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in a previous work, C2H2 mole fractions in different flames were evaluated with collision effects and spectral overlap between molecular line and laser source being analyzed and taken into account. C2H2 IRPS signals in two different buffering gases, N2 and CO2, had been investigated in a tube furnace in order to estimate the spectral overlap coefficients and collision effects at different temperatures. The soot-volume fractions (SVF) in the studied flames were measured using a He-Ne laser-extinction method, and no obvious degrading of the IRPS technique due to the sooty environment has been observed in the flame with SVF up to ˜2×10-7. With the increase of flame equivalence ratios not only the SVF but also the C2H2 mole fractions increased.

  3. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  4. Biological capacitance studies of anodes in microbial fuel cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhihao; Girguis, Peter; Liang, Peng; Shi, Haifeng; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-07-01

    It is known that cell potential increases while anode resistance decreases during the start-up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Biological capacitance, defined as the apparent capacitance attributed to biological activity including biofilm production, plays a role in this phenomenon. In this research, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to study anode capacitance and resistance during the start-up period of MFCs so that the role of biological capacitance was revealed in electricity generation by MFCs. It was observed that the anode capacitance ranged from 3.29 to 120 mF which increased by 16.8% to 18-20 times over 10-12 days. Notably, lowering the temperature and arresting biological activity via fixation by 4% para formaldehyde resulted in the decrease of biological capacitance by 16.9 and 62.6%, indicating a negative correlation between anode capacitance and anode resistance of MFCs. Thus, biological capacitance of anode should play an important role in power generation by MFCs. We suggest that MFCs are not only biological reactors and/or electrochemical cells, but also biological capacitors, extending the vision on mechanism exploration of electron transfer, reactor structure design and electrode materials development of MFCs. PMID:25656699

  5. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  6. Quantitative measurement of AMS and orange mixtures by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yehao; Wang, Xiaowei

    2012-06-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a new kind of nondestructive detection method, frequency of terahertz wave spans from a few tens of GHz to several THz, which is used to detect material because of its strong identification, it can supply rich vibration information caused by intermolecular and large intra-molecular. Ammonium sulfamate (AMS) is a kind of herbicide, it has special value for many woody plants, which can prevent annual weeds. The excess use of pesticide is a huge threaten for human health in recent years, thus the research on detection of pesticide has absolutely important meaning, in this paper, pure AMS and mixture samples of AMS and orange are measured using THz-TDS, and their absorption coefficient are calculated by the model, which is put forward based on Fresnel equation. We qualitatively analyze the absorption coefficient spectra of pure AMS, which is useful for us to identify the pesticide in agriculture products. Meanwhile, we measured 14 mixture samples of AMS and orange, the weight ratio of mixtures are from 0% to 59.9%. Nine samples are considered as calibration set and the other five samples are regarded as prediction set, to quantitatively analyze the concentration of AMS by the partial least squares (PLS), the result shows that the prediction error is less then 4.5%, in addition, the relationship of the average absorption and weight ratio are absolutely linear. The experiment demonstrates that THz-TDS is promising and efficient to quantitatively detect the component of mixtures, and it has important reference value for the detection of pesticide in agriculture food.

  7. Quantitative FT-IR spectroscopy of gypsum raw material for industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendtner, K.; Libowitzky, E.; Götzinger, M. A.; Koss, S.

    2003-04-01

    Today quality control (QC) is a big issue for being competitive in the gypsum industry. Knowledge and understanding of the raw material help to enhance the quality and permanence of products. Therefore a rapid, precise and user-friendly FT-IR spectroscopic method for quantitative analysis of gypsum, anhydrite, magnesite and dolomite from the gypsum deposit of Puchberg, Austria is being developed. There are decisive advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy compared to thermogravimetric methods (TG, DTA, DSC) or XRD, which are commonly used for QC, e.g. it is frequently available in industry labs and a spectrum can be obtained in a few minutes, with a minimum of sample preparation. The effects of particle size and ratio of dilution with KBr were investigated in transmission mode, using KBr pellets, as well as in diffuse reflexion mode. Little differences in particle size lead to enormous differences in peak height in transmission mode, but show only little effects in diffuse reflexion. The small amounts of sample used in KBr pellets (e.g. 2 mg sample : 500 mg KBr) also turned out to be disadvantageous, just like the time consuming sample preparation. Measurements in diffuse reflexion with a sample to KBr ratio of 1:10 show promising results for use in standardization, whereas higher dilutions hardly improve the quality, and ratios of 1:5 still show components of specular reflection. The calibration model for quantitative analysis is being constructed measuring various defined mixtures of >98% pure natural minerals (gypsum, magnesite, dolomite), and synthetic materials (anhydrite). The latter was obtained by heating gypsum at 350^oC for 10 h. The synthetic material was chosen, because natural material was not available in sufficient amounts with high purity. The IR method is compared with results achieved with XRD-Rietveld and thermogravimetric methods. Advantages of chemometrical software based on multivariate statistical techniques will be investigated and compared with

  8. Quantitative elemental detection of size-segregated particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Taira, Takuya; Zhang, Xiao Bo; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to simulate coal combustion and develop optimal and stable boiler control systems in real power plants, it is imperative to obtain the detailed information in coal combustion processes as well as to measure species contents in fly ash, which should be controlled and analyzed for enhancing boiler efficiency and reducing environmental pollution. The fly ash consists of oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, and so on), unburned carbon, and other minor elements. Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to coal combustion and other industrial fields because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and non-contact features. In these applications it is important to measure controlling factors without any sample preparation to maintain the real-time measurement feature. The relation between particle content and particle diameter is also one of the vital researches, because compositions of particles are dependent on their diameter. In this study, we have detected the contents of size-segregated particles using LIBS. Particles were classified by an Anderson cascade impactor and their contents were measured using the output of 1064 nm YAG laser, a spectrograph and an ICCD camera. The plasma conditions such as plasma temperature are dependent on the size of particles and these effects must be corrected to obtain quantitative information. The plasma temperature was corrected by the emission intensity ratio from the same atom. Using this correction method, the contents of particles can be measured quantitatively in fixed experimental parameters. This method was applied to coal and fly ash from a coal-fired burner to measure unburned carbon and other contents according to the particle diameter. The acquired results demonstrate that the LIBS technique is applicable to measure size-segregated particle contents in real time and this method is useful for the analysis of coal combustion and its control because of its sensitive and

  9. Quantitative photoelectrochemical detection of biological affinity reaction: biotin-avidin interaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dong; Zheng, Dong; Wang, Fu-Quan; Yang, Xi-Qiang; Wang, Na; Li, Yuan-Guang; Guo, Liang-Hong; Cheng, Jing

    2004-01-15

    Quantitative detection of a biological affinity reaction, the biotin/avidin recognition, was achieved using our newly developed photoelectrochemical analytical system. The system is based on the operation mechanism of the well-developed dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells and comprises a ruthenium tris(2,2'-bipyridine) (Ru-bipy) derivative as the photoelectrochemical signal-generating molecule, oxalate as the sacrificial electron donor, and tin oxide nanoparticle as the semiconductor electrode material. To perform the affinity reaction, avidin was immobilized on SnO(2) electrode by passive adsorption. Biotin-linked bovine serum albumin (BSA) was labeled with an NHS-ester derivative of Ru-bipy. After binding of BSA to the surface-immobilized avidin through biotin, photoelectrochemical measurement was carried out in the presence of oxalate. Anodic photocurrent was turned on and off repeatedly by control of incidental light. The action spectrum of the photocurrent resembled the absorption spectrum of Ru-bipy, proving the photocurrent was generated from the metal complex. A linear relationship between photocurrent and BSA concentration was obtained in the range of 1-100 microg/mL. This is the first case of quantitative photoelectrochemical detection of a biological affinity interaction. PMID:14719905

  10. 59. Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology: Molecular genetics of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Investigation of the mechanistic aspects of cancer has its roots in the studies on tumor viruses and their effects on cell proliferation, function, and growth. This outstanding progress was well documented in previous Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. In the early to mid 1980s, progress on the development of chromosome mapping strategies and the accumulation of DNA probes that identified polymorphisms, encouraged by the international Human Genome Project, enabled the identification of other genes that contributed to familial inheritance of high susceptibility to specific cancers. This approach was very successful and led to a degree of optimism that one aspect of cancer, the multistep genetic process from early neoplasia to metastatic tumors, was beginning to be understood. It therefore seemed appropriate that the 59th Symposium on Quantitative Biology focus attention on the Molecular Genetics of Cancer. The concept was to combine the exciting progress on the identification of new genetic alterations in human tumor cells with studies on the function of the cancer gene products and how they go awry in tumor cells.

  11. Closing the Loop: Involving Faculty in the Assessment of Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning Skills of Biology Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurney, Carol A.; Brown, Justin; Griscom, Heather Peckham; Kancler, Erika; Wigtil, Clifton J.; Sundre, Donna

    2011-01-01

    The development of scientific and quantitative reasoning skills in undergraduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is an objective of many courses and curricula. The Biology Department at James Madison University (JMU) assesses these essential skills in graduating biology majors by using a multiple-choice exam…

  12. An integrative strategy for quantitative analysis of the N-glycoproteome in complex biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The complexity of protein glycosylation makes it difficult to characterize glycosylation patterns on a proteomic scale. In this study, we developed an integrated strategy for comparatively analyzing N-glycosylation/glycoproteins quantitatively from complex biological samples in a high-throughput manner. This strategy entailed separating and enriching glycopeptides/glycoproteins using lectin affinity chromatography, and then tandem labeling them with 18O/16O to generate a mass shift of 6 Da between the paired glycopeptides, and finally analyzing them with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and the automatic quantitative method we developed based on Mascot Distiller. Results The accuracy and repeatability of this strategy were first verified using standard glycoproteins; linearity was maintained within a range of 1:10–10:1. The peptide concentration ratios obtained by the self-build quantitative method were similar to both the manually calculated and theoretical values, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.023–0.186 for glycopeptides. The feasibility of the strategy was further confirmed with serum from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and healthy individuals; the expression of 44 glycopeptides and 30 glycoproteins were significantly different between HCC patient and control serum. Conclusions This strategy is accurate, repeatable, and efficient, and may be a useful tool for identification of disease-related N-glycosylation/glycoprotein changes. PMID:24428921

  13. Remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. L.; Liu, W.; Chin, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the feasibility of remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy (FIBS) of biological materials. The fluorescence from egg white and yeast powder, induced by femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in air, was detected in the backward direction with targets located 3.5 m away from the detection system. The remarkably distinct spectra of egg white and yeast allow us to propose that this technique, time-resolved FIBS, could be potentially useful for remote detection and identification of harmful biological agents.

  14. Application of multivariate analysis and vibrational spectroscopy in classification of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A.; Shufan, E.; Lapidot, I.; Tsror, L.; Zeiri, L.; Sahu, R. K.; Moreh, R.; Mordechai, S.; Huleihel, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies have emerged as powerful tools for chemical analysis. This is due to their ability to provide detailed information about the spatial distribution of chemical composition at the molecular level. A biological sample, i.e. bacteria or fungi, has a typical spectrum. This spectral fingerprint, characterizes the sample and can therefore be used for differentiating between biology samples which belong to different groups, i.e., several different isolates of a given fungi. When the spectral differences between the groups are minute, multivariate analysis should be used to provide a good differentiation. We hereby review several results which demonstrate the differentiation success obtained by combining spectroscopy measurements and multivariate analysis.

  15. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  16. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an `aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be `safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  17. Evaluation of green coffee beans quality using near infrared spectroscopy: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Santos, João Rodrigo; Sarraguça, Mafalda C; Rangel, António O S S; Lopes, João A

    2012-12-01

    Characterisation of coffee quality based on bean quality assessment is associated with the relative amount of defective beans among non-defective beans. It is therefore important to develop a methodology capable of identifying the presence of defective beans that enables a fast assessment of coffee grade and that can become an analytical tool to standardise coffee quality. In this work, a methodology for quality assessment of green coffee based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is proposed. NIRS is a green chemistry, low cost, fast response technique without the need of sample processing. The applicability of NIRS was evaluated for Arabica and Robusta varieties from different geographical locations. Partial least squares regression was used to relate the NIR spectrum to the mass fraction of defective and non-defective beans. Relative errors around 5% show that NIRS can be a valuable analytical tool to be used by coffee roasters, enabling a simple and quantitative evaluation of green coffee quality in a fast way. PMID:22953929

  18. Quantitative analysis and detection of adulteration in pork using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuxia; Cheng, Fang; Xie, Lijuan

    2010-04-01

    Authenticity is an important food quality criterion. Rapid methods for confirming authenticity or detecting adulteration are increasingly demanded by food processors and consumers. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been used to detect economic adulteration in pork . Pork samples were adulterated with liver and chicken in 10% increments. Prediction and quantitative analysis were done using raw data and pretreatment spectra. The optimal prediction result was achieved by partial least aquares(PLS) regression with standard normal variate(SNV) pretreatment for pork adulterated with liver samples, and the correlation coefficient(R value), the root mean square error of calibration(RMSEC) and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.97706, 0.0673 and 0.0732, respectively. The best model for pork meat adulterated with chicken samples was obtained by PLS with the raw spectra, and the correlation coefficient(R value), RMSEP and RMSEC were 0.98614, 0.0525, and 0.122, respectively. The result shows that NIR technology can be successfully used to detect adulteration in pork meat adulterated with liver and chicken.

  19. Quantitation of normal metabolite concentrations in six brain regions by in-vivoH-MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Minati, Ludovico; Aquino, Domenico; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Erbetta, Alessandra

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the concentrations of brain metabolites visible to in-vivo(1)H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 1.5 T in a sample of 28 normal subjects. Quantitation was attempted for inositol compounds, choline units, total creatine and N-acetyl moieties, using open-source software. Six brain regions were considered: frontal and parietal white matter, medial temporal lobe, thalamus, pons and cerebellum. Absolute concentrations were derived using tissue water as an internal reference and using an external reference; metabolite signal intensity ratios with respect to creatine were also calculated. The inter-individual variability was smaller for absolute concentrations (internal reference) as compared to that for signal intensity ratios. Significant regional variability in concentration was found for all metabolites, indicating that separate normative values are needed for different brain regions. The values obtained in this study can be used as reference in future studies, provided the same methodology is followed; it is confirmed that despite unsuccessful attempts in the past, smaller coefficients of variation can indeed be obtained through absolute quantification. PMID:20927223

  20. Quantitative determination of sulfur content in concrete with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weritz, F.; Ryahi, S.; Schaurich, D.; Taffe, A.; Wilsch, G.

    2005-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of the sulfur content of concrete. Sulfur compounds are a natural but minor component in building materials. The ingress of sulfates or sulfuric acid constitutes a major risk of chemical aggression for concrete. There is a need for a fast method, which can be used on-site and is able to investigate a wide range of different measuring points, so that damages can be characterized. For quantitative determination the sulfur spectral line at 921.3 nm is used. The optimum ambient atmosphere has been determined by comparison of measurements accomplished under air, argon and helium atmosphere. Reference samples have been produced and calibration curves have been determined, the results of LIBS measurements are compared with results from chemical analysis. Defining a limit for the intensity ratio of a calcium and a oxygen spectral line can reduce the influence of the heterogeneity of the material, so that only spectra with a high amount of cementitious material are evaluated. Depth profiles and spatial resolved sulfur distributions are presented measured on concrete cores originating from a highly sulfate contaminated clarifier.

  1. Quantitative analysis of metformin in antidiabetic tablets by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, U.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; López-de-Alba, P. L.; López-Martínez, L.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays the production of counterfeit and low quality drugs affects human health and generates losses to pharmaceutical industries and tax revenue losses to government. Currently there are several methods for pharmaceutical product analysis; nevertheless, most of them depend on complex and time consuming steps such as sample preparation. In contrast to conventional methods, Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is evaluated as a potential analytical technique for the rapid screening and quality control of anti-diabetic solid formulations. In this paper authors propose a simple method to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) such as Metformin hydrochloride. The authors used ten nanosecond duration pulses (FWHM) from a Nd:YAG laser produces the induced breakdown for the analysis. Light is collected and focused into a Cerny-Turner spectrograph and dispersed into an ICCD camera for its detection. We used atomic emissions from Chlorine atoms present only in APIs as analyte signal. The analysis was improved using Bromine as internal standard. Linear calibration curves from synthetic samples were prepared achieving linearity higher than 99%. Our results were compared with HPLC results and validation was performed by statistical methods. The validation analysis suggests that both methods have no significant differences i.e., the proposed method can be implemented for monitoring the pharmaceutical production process in-situ in real time or for inspection and recognition of authenticity.

  2. Quantitative monitoring of membrane permeation via in-situ ATR FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, Bryan; Miller, Daniel

    Ion conducting membranes are of interest for various energy applications including fuel cells and artificial photosynthesis systems. Within the context of artificial photosynthesis, membranes are desired that facilitate the ion transport necessary to feed the electrochemical reactions while meeting various additional selectivity and permeability demands depending on the CO2 reduction products. Herein, we demonstrate the use of in-situ ATR FT-IR spectroscopy to quantitatively resolve the concentration of single and multicomponent mixtures of various CO2 reduction products including methanol, formate and acetate. We then apply this methodology to the in-situ monitoring of the permeation of single and multicomponent mixtures across commercially available membranes. Membrane permeabilities and selectivities calculated from the single component time-resolved concentration curves are compared to the multicomponent permeation experiments. This material is based upon work performed at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-SC000493.

  3. Quantitative Kα line spectroscopy for energy transport in ultra-intense laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Nishimura, H.; Fujioka, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Nakai, M.; Chen, H.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Ozaki, T.; Shiraga, H.; Kojima, S.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Miyanaga, N.; Kawanaka, J.; Nakata, Y.; Jitsuno, T.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    Absolute Ka line spectroscopy is proposed for studying laser-plasma interactions taking place in the cone-guided fast ignition targets. X-ray spectra ranging from 20 to 100 keV were quantitatively measured with a Laue spectrometer. The absolute sensitivities of the Laue spectrometer system were calibrated using pre-characterized laser-produced x-ray sources and radioisotopes. The integrated reflectivity for the crystal is in good agreement with predictions by an open code for x-ray diffraction. The energy transfer efficiency from incident laser beams to hot electrons, as the energy transfer agency, is derived as a consequence of this work. The absolute yield of Au and Ta Ka lines were measured in the fast ignition experimental campaign performed at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. Applying the hot electron spectrum information from the electron spectrometer, an energy transfer efficiency of the incident LFEX [1], a kJ-class PW laser, to hot electrons was derived for a planar and cone-guided geometry.

  4. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-07-13

    An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.013 g kg(-1)) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.0063 g kg(-1)) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg(-1) for foods (and 0.0063 g kg(-1) for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method. PMID:22704472

  5. Absolute quantification for benzoic acid in processed foods using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-09-15

    The absolute quantification method of benzoic acid (BA) in processed foods using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed and validated. BA levels were determined using proton signals (δ(H) 7.53 and 7.98) referenced to 2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonate-d(6) sodium salt (DSS-d(6)) after simple solvent extraction from processed foods. All recoveries from several kinds of processed foods, spiked at their specified maximum Japanese usage levels (0.6-2.5 g kg(-1)) and at 0.13 g kg(-1) and 0.063 g kg(-1), were greater than 80%. The limit of quantification was confirmed as 0.063 g kg(-1) in processed foods, which was sufficiently low for the purposes of monitoring BA. The accuracy of the proposed method is equivalent to the conventional method using steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method was both rapid and simple. Moreover, it provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. Therefore, the proposed method is a useful and practical tool for determining BA levels in processed foods. PMID:22967562

  6. Quantitative estimation of carbonation and chloride penetration in reinforced concrete by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shuzo; Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Fujii, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2014-11-01

    The penetration profile of chlorine in a reinforced concrete (RC) specimen was determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The concrete core was prepared from RC beams with cracking damage induced by bending load and salt water spraying. LIBS was performed using a specimen that was obtained by splitting the concrete core, and the line scan of laser pulses gave the two-dimensional emission intensity profiles of 100 × 80 mm2 within one hour. The two-dimensional profile of the emission intensity suggests that the presence of the crack had less effect on the emission intensity when the measurement interval was larger than the crack width. The chlorine emission spectrum was measured without using the buffer gas, which is usually used for chlorine measurement, by collinear double-pulse LIBS. The apparent diffusion coefficient, which is one of the most important parameters for chloride penetration in concrete, was estimated using the depth profile of chlorine emission intensity and Fick's law. The carbonation depth was estimated on the basis of the relationship between carbon and calcium emission intensities. When the carbon emission intensity was statistically higher than the calcium emission intensity at the measurement point, we determined that the point was carbonated. The estimation results were consistent with the spraying test results using phenolphthalein solution. These results suggest that the quantitative estimation by LIBS of carbonation depth and chloride penetration can be performed simultaneously.

  7. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and quantitative multivariate analysis of paints and coating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Philippa Alice; Vahur, Signe; Leito, Ivo

    2014-12-01

    The applicability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with partial least squares (PLS) data analysis was evaluated for quantifying the components of mixtures of paint binding media and pigments, and alkyd resins. PLS methods were created using a number of standard mixtures. Validation and measurement uncertainty estimation was carried out. Binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of several common binding media and pigments were quantified, with standard measurement uncertainties in most cases below 3 g/100 g. Classes of components - aromatic anhydrides and alcohols - used in alkyd resin synthesis were also successfully quantified, with standard uncertainties in the range of 2-3 g/100 g. This is a more demanding application because in alkyd resins aromatic anhydrides and alcohols have reacted to form a polyester, and are not present in their original forms. Once a PLS method has been calibrated, analysis time and cost are significantly reduced from typical quantitative methods such as GC/MS. This is beneficial in the case of routine analysis where the components are known.

  8. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and quantitative multivariate analysis of paints and coating materials.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Philippa Alice; Vahur, Signe; Leito, Ivo

    2014-12-10

    The applicability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with partial least squares (PLS) data analysis was evaluated for quantifying the components of mixtures of paint binding media and pigments, and alkyd resins. PLS methods were created using a number of standard mixtures. Validation and measurement uncertainty estimation was carried out. Binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of several common binding media and pigments were quantified, with standard measurement uncertainties in most cases below 3g/100g. Classes of components - aromatic anhydrides and alcohols - used in alkyd resin synthesis were also successfully quantified, with standard uncertainties in the range of 2-3g/100g. This is a more demanding application because in alkyd resins aromatic anhydrides and alcohols have reacted to form a polyester, and are not present in their original forms. Once a PLS method has been calibrated, analysis time and cost are significantly reduced from typical quantitative methods such as GC/MS. This is beneficial in the case of routine analysis where the components are known. PMID:24945861

  9. Hemoglobin consumption by P. falciparum in individual erythrocytes imaged via quantitative phase spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; Park, Han Sang; Walzer, Katelyn A.; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Wax, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection causes structural and biochemical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). To quantify these changes, we apply a novel optical technique, quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) to characterize individual red blood cells (RBCs) during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum. QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475–700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell. The complex field provides complimentary information on hemoglobin content and cell mass, which are both found to dramatically change upon infection by P. falciparum. Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells. Infection also resulted in a 33.1% reduction in RBC’s optical volume, a measure of the cells’ non-aqueous components. Notably, optical volume is only partially correlated with hemoglobin content, suggesting that changes in other dry mass components such as parasite mass may also be assessed using this technique. The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease.

  10. Hemoglobin consumption by P. falciparum in individual erythrocytes imaged via quantitative phase spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Matthew T; Park, Han Sang; Walzer, Katelyn A; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection causes structural and biochemical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). To quantify these changes, we apply a novel optical technique, quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) to characterize individual red blood cells (RBCs) during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum. QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475-700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell. The complex field provides complimentary information on hemoglobin content and cell mass, which are both found to dramatically change upon infection by P. falciparum. Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells. Infection also resulted in a 33.1% reduction in RBC's optical volume, a measure of the cells' non-aqueous components. Notably, optical volume is only partially correlated with hemoglobin content, suggesting that changes in other dry mass components such as parasite mass may also be assessed using this technique. The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease. PMID:27087557

  11. Quantitative orientation measurements in thin lipid films by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F; Buffeteau, T; Desbat, B; Auger, M; Pézolet, M

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative orientation measurements by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy require the accurate knowledge of the dichroic ratio and of the mean-square electric fields along the three axes of the ATR crystal. In this paper, polarized ATR spectra of single supported bilayers of the phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidic acid covered by either air or water have been recorded and the dichroic ratio of the bands due to the methylene stretching vibrations has been calculated. The mean-square electric field amplitudes were calculated using three formalisms, namely the Harrick thin film approximation, the two-phase approximation, and the thickness- and absorption-dependent one. The results show that for dry bilayers, the acyl chain tilt angle varies with the formalism used, while no significant variations are observed for the hydrated bilayers. To test the validity of the different formalisms, s- and p-polarized ATR spectra of a 40-A lipid layer were simulated for different acyl chain tilt angles. The results show that the thickness- and absorption-dependent formalism using the mean values of the electric fields over the film thickness gives the most accurate values of acyl chain tilt angle in dry lipid films. However, for lipid monolayers or bilayers, the tilt angle can be determined with an acceptable accuracy using the Harrick thin film approximation. Finally, this study shows clearly that the uncertainty on the determination of the tilt angle comes mostly from the experimental error on the dichroic ratio and from the knowledge of the refractive index. PMID:9876167

  12. Hemoglobin consumption by P. falciparum in individual erythrocytes imaged via quantitative phase spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; Park, Han Sang; Walzer, Katelyn A.; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection causes structural and biochemical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). To quantify these changes, we apply a novel optical technique, quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) to characterize individual red blood cells (RBCs) during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum. QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475–700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell. The complex field provides complimentary information on hemoglobin content and cell mass, which are both found to dramatically change upon infection by P. falciparum. Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells. Infection also resulted in a 33.1% reduction in RBC’s optical volume, a measure of the cells’ non-aqueous components. Notably, optical volume is only partially correlated with hemoglobin content, suggesting that changes in other dry mass components such as parasite mass may also be assessed using this technique. The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease. PMID:27087557

  13. Development of a Univariate Membrane-Based Mid-Infrared Method for Protein Quantitation and Total Lipid Content Analysis of Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Cappione, Amedeo; Lento, Joseph; Chernokalskaya, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Biological samples present a range of complexities from homogeneous purified protein to multicomponent mixtures. Accurate qualification of such samples is paramount to downstream applications. We describe the development of an MIR spectroscopy-based analytical method offering simultaneous protein quantitation (0.25–5 mg/mL) and analysis of total lipid or detergent species, as well as the identification of other biomolecules present in biological samples. The method utilizes a hydrophilic PTFE membrane engineered for presentation of aqueous samples in a dried format compatible with fast infrared analysis. Unlike classical quantification techniques, the reported method is amino acid sequence independent and thus applicable to complex samples of unknown composition. By comparison to existing platforms, this MIR-based method enables direct quantification using minimal sample volume (2 µL); it is well-suited where repeat access and limited sample size are critical parameters. Further, accurate results can be derived without specialized training or knowledge of IR spectroscopy. Overall, the simplified application and analysis system provides a more cost-effective alternative to high-throughput IR systems for research laboratories with minimal throughput demands. In summary, the MIR-based system provides a viable alternative to current protein quantitation methods; it also uniquely offers simultaneous qualification of other components, notably lipids and detergents. PMID:25371845

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging: non-destructive analysis of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Manley, Marena

    2014-12-21

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has come of age and is now prominent among major analytical technologies after the NIR region was discovered in 1800, revived and developed in the early 1950s and put into practice in the 1970s. Since its first use in the cereal industry, it has become the quality control method of choice for many more applications due to the advancement in instrumentation, computing power and multivariate data analysis. NIR spectroscopy is also increasingly used during basic research performed to better understand complex biological systems, e.g. by means of studying characteristic water absorption bands. The shorter NIR wavelengths (800-2500 nm), compared to those in the mid-infrared (MIR) range (2500-15 000 nm) enable increased penetration depth and subsequent non-destructive, non-invasive, chemical-free, rapid analysis possibilities for a wide range of biological materials. A disadvantage of NIR spectroscopy is its reliance on reference methods and model development using chemometrics. NIR measurements and predictions are, however, considered more reproducible than the usually more accurate and precise reference methods. The advantages of NIR spectroscopy contribute to it now often being favoured over other spectroscopic (colourimetry and MIR) and analytical methods, using chemicals and producing chemical waste, such as gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This tutorial review intends to provide a brief overview of the basic theoretical principles and most investigated applications of NIR spectroscopy. In addition, it considers the recent development, principles and applications of NIR hyperspectral imaging. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides NIR spectral data as a set of images, each representing a narrow wavelength range or spectral band. The advantage compared to NIR spectroscopy is that, due to the additional spatial dimension provided by this technology, the images can be analysed and visualised as

  15. [Study on the application for near-infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis and selecting optimum wavelength by the MAXR regression procedure].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-da; Zhao, Li-li; Zhao, Long-lian; Li, Jun-hui; Yan, Yan-lu

    2005-08-01

    This paper introduces the principle and method with which the model about the quantitative analysis of Fourier transformation near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy by MAXR regression procedure can be established. In this way, the authors have selected the wave length information by Matlab language design programming in order to establish the quantitative analysis models with near infrared spectroscopy. Taking sixty-six wheat samples as experiment materials, quantitative analysis models to determine protein content are established with thirty-three samples. The relative coefficient are 0.977 1 and 0.976 5 respectively and the standard error are 0.335 and 0.340 between the predication result of the two models which include respectively two or three wave length information and Kjeldahl's value for the protein content of the another thirty-three wheat samples. When selecting the wave length information, the MAXR regression procedure can establish the optimum regression models which contain 1 or 2...or k wavelength information respectively. MAXR regression procedure is a useful method when selecting the optimum wavelength information because of its shorter computation time, and the method not only can carefully select the essential wavelength information to establish NIR spectroscopy quantitative analysis models of resisting multicollinearity information disturbance, but also to establish the work for selecting optimum wavelength information which can direct to design the special NIR analysis instrument for analyzing specific component in the special samples. PMID:16329486

  16. Quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contamination in soil using reflectance spectroscopy: a "multipath" approach.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Guy; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2013-11-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are contaminants of great significance. The commonly used analytic method for assessing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil samples is based on extraction with 1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), a substance prohibited to use by the Environmental Protection Agency. During the past 20 years, a new quantitative methodology that uses the reflected radiation of solids has been widely adopted. By using this approach, the reflectance radiation across the visible, near infrared-shortwave infrared region (400-2500 nm) is modeled against constituents determined using traditional analytic chemistry methods and then used to predict unknown samples. This technology is environmentally friendly and permits rapid and cost-effective measurements of large numbers of samples. Thus, this method dramatically reduces chemical analytical costs and secondary pollution, enabling a new dimension of environmental monitoring. In this study we adapted this approach and developed effective steps in which hydrocarbon contamination in soils can be determined rapidly, accurately, and cost effectively solely from reflectance spectroscopy. Artificial contaminated samples were analyzed chemically and spectrally to form a database of five soils contaminated with three types of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), creating 15 datasets of 48 samples each at contamination levels of 50-5000 wt% ppm (parts per million). A brute force preprocessing approach was used by combining eight different preprocessing techniques with all possible datasets, resulting in 120 different mutations for each dataset. The brute force was done based on an innovative computing system developed for this study. A new parameter for evaluating model performance scoring (MPS) is proposed based on a combination of several common statistical parameters. The effect of dividing the data into training validation and test sets on modeling accuracy is also discussed. The results of this study clearly show

  17. Shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo biological samples analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Martins, Mário Augusto; Ribeiro, Dayana Gonçalves; Pereira Dos Santos, Edson Aparecido; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Fontes, Adriana; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2010-01-01

    The contamination of the Raman scattering signal with luminescence is a well-known problem when dealing with biological media excited by visible light. The viability of the shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) technique for luminescence suppression on Raman spectra of biological samples was studied in this work. A tunable Lithrow-configuration diode laser (λ = 785 and 830 nm) coupled (directly or by optical fiber) to a dispersive Raman spectrometer was employed to study two sets of human tissues (tooth and skin) in order to determine the set of experimental parameters suitable for luminescence rejection. It was concluded that systematic and reproducible spectra of biological interest can be acquired by SERDS. PMID:21258495

  18. Elemental analysis of biological samples by graphite furnace, inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (GF-ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Grabau, F.; Zu-cheng, J.

    1984-08-01

    The large number of analyses required for monitoring environmental pollution and its ecological impacts suggests that an analytical screening method would be very useful if it could rapidly distinguish those samples containing environmentally significant concentrations of pollutants from those that do not. In the trace elemental analysis of solids the most time consuming step is often the conversion of the sample into a suitable analytical form, usually a digestion and dissolution process. We have addressed these problems by combining a graphite furnace with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. With this system solid samples of plant and animal tissue, as well as solutions, can be vaporized and introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. A simple standard additions technique was developed for solid samples that yielded acceptable results for a number of elements in biological samples. Powers of detection were not satisfactory for the lowest concentrations of several elements in the NBS biological SRMs and analytical uncertainties were relatively high for quantitative analyses but were generally satisfactory for screening methods. The design of the interface between the graphite furnace and the inductively coupled plasma and the pulse effect caused by the vaporization of the sample are critical factors in the GF-ICP-AES method. 31 references, 21 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy as a Versatile Analytical Tool for the Quantitative Determination of Antioxidants in Agricultural Products, Foods and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cozzolino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods provide with very useful qualitative and quantitative information about the biochemistry and chemistry of antioxidants. Near infrared (NIR) and mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy are considered as powerful, fast, accurate and non-destructive analytical tools that can be considered as a replacement of traditional chemical analysis. In recent years, several reports can be found in the literature demonstrating the usefulness of these methods in the analysis of antioxidants in different organic matrices. This article reviews recent applications of infrared (NIR and MIR) spectroscopy in the analysis of antioxidant compounds in a wide range of samples such as agricultural products, foods and plants. PMID:26783838

  20. Final Report: Investigation of Polarization Spectroscopy and Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing for Quantitative Concentration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Lucht

    2005-03-09

    Laser-induced polarization spectroscopy (LIPS), degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM), and electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are techniques that shows great promise for sensitive measurements of transient gas-phase species, and diagnostic applications of these techniques are being pursued actively at laboratories throughout the world. However, significant questions remain regarding strategies for quantitative concentration measurements using these techniques. The primary objective of this research program is to develop and test strategies for quantitative concentration measurements in flames and plasmas using these nonlinear optical techniques. Theoretically, we are investigating the physics of these processes by direct numerical integration (DNI) of the time-dependent density matrix equations that describe the wave-mixing interaction. Significantly fewer restrictive assumptions are required when the density matrix equations are solved using this DNI approach compared with the assumptions required to obtain analytical solutions. For example, for LIPS calculations, the Zeeman state structure and hyperfine structure of the resonance and effects such as Doppler broadening can be included. There is no restriction on the intensity of the pump and probe beams in these nonperturbative calculations, and both the pump and probe beam intensities can be high enough to saturate the resonance. As computer processing speeds have increased, we have incorporated more complicated physical models into our DNI codes. During the last project period we developed numerical methods for nonperturbative calculations of the two-photon absorption process. Experimentally, diagnostic techniques are developed and demonstrated in gas cells and/or well-characterized flames for ease of comparison with model results. The techniques of two-photon, two-color H-atom LIPS and three-laser ERE CARS for NO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were demonstrated during the

  1. [Quantitative analysis of hybrid maize seed purity using near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Yan; Zhu, Li-Wei; Ma, Han-Xu; Li, Jun-Hui; Sun, Bao-Qi; Sun, Qun

    2011-10-01

    A quantitative identification model for testing the purity of hybrid maize seeds was built by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy with quantitative partial least squares (QPLS). The NIR spectra of 123 seeds powder samples (Nongda108 and mother178) with the purity of 600-100% were collected using MPA spectrometer. All samples were divided into two groups: calibration set (82 samples) and validation set (41 samples). Synergy interval partial least squares (SiPLSu) was used for selecting effective spectral regions and building models. The influences of different spectral regions and different calibration samples on the prediction results and different main components were compared. The result showed that the spectral regions 6 000 8 000, 6 000-9 000 and 6 000-10 000 cm(-1) all had better prediction results (R2 over 95%). Spectral region 6 000-10 000 cm(-1) was regarded the optimum spectral region for building the model with less main components(8), and the determination coefficient (R2) of calibration and validation sets were 96.61% and 97.67% respectively, SEC (standard error of calibration) and SEP (standard error of prediction) were 2.15% and 1.78% respectively, RSDs (relative standard deviation) were 2.04% and 1.94% respectively. Even with different calibration samples, the average determination coefficients (R2) of calibration and validation sets were 96.21% and 95.75%, SEC (standard error of calibration) and SEP (standard error of prediction) were 2.29% and 2.23% respectively, RSDs (relative standard deviation) were 2.81% and 2.73% respectively, which further proved the model's stability. With the increase in the number of main components, the identification rates in calibration set and validation set gradually increased, when the number of main components reached 8, the model determination coefficients reached the best (96.61% and 97.67%), and related coefficients of true value and predicted value were 98.29% and 98.87% respectively. The results have

  2. Clustering and training set selection methods for improving the accuracy of quantitative laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Bell, James F., III; Wiens, Roger C.; Morris, Richard V.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2012-04-01

    We investigated five clustering and training set selection methods to improve the accuracy of quantitative chemical analysis of geologic samples by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The LIBS spectra were previously acquired for 195 rock slabs and 31 pressed powder geostandards under 7 Torr CO2 at a stand-off distance of 7 m at 17 mJ per pulse to simulate the operational conditions of the ChemCam LIBS instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. The clustering and training set selection methods, which do not require prior knowledge of the chemical composition of the test-set samples, are based on grouping similar spectra and selecting appropriate training spectra for the partial least squares (PLS2) model. These methods were: (1) hierarchical clustering of the full set of training spectra and selection of a subset for use in training; (2) k-means clustering of all spectra and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each cluster; (3) iterative use of PLS2 to predict sample composition and k-means clustering of the predicted compositions to subdivide the groups of spectra; (4) soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) classification of spectra, and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each class; (5) use of Bayesian information criteria (BIC) to determine an optimal number of clusters and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each cluster. The iterative method and the k-means method using 5 clusters showed the best performance, improving the absolute quadrature root mean squared error (RMSE) by ~ 3 wt.%. The statistical significance of these improvements was ~ 85%. Our results show that although clustering methods can modestly improve results, a large and diverse training set is the most reliable way to improve the accuracy of quantitative LIBS. In particular, additional sulfate standards and specifically fabricated

  3. Quantitative interpretation of molecular dynamics simulations for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Parry, Krista M; Powell, Cedric J; Tobias, Douglas J; Brown, Matthew A

    2016-04-21

    Over the past decade, energy-dependent ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) has emerged as a powerful analytical probe of the ion spatial distributions at the vapor (vacuum)-aqueous electrolyteinterface. These experiments are often paired with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in an attempt to provide a complete description of the liquidinterface. There is, however, no systematic protocol that permits a straightforward comparison of the two sets of results. XPS is an integrated technique that averages signals from multiple layers in a solution even at the lowest photoelectron kinetic energies routinely employed, whereas MD simulations provide a microscopic layer-by-layer description of the solution composition near the interface. Here, we use the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) to quantitatively interpret atom-density profiles from MD simulations for XPS signal intensities using sodium and potassium iodide solutions as examples. We show that electron inelastic mean free paths calculated from a semi-empirical formula depend strongly on solution composition, varying by up to 30% between pure water and concentrated NaI. The XPS signal thus arises from different information depths in different solutions for a fixed photoelectron kinetic energy. XPS signal intensities are calculated using SESSA as a function of photoelectron kinetic energy (probe depth) and compared with a widely employed ad hoc method. SESSA simulations illustrate the importance of accounting for elastic-scattering events at low photoelectron kinetic energies (<300 eV) where the ad hoc method systematically underestimates the preferential enhancement of anions over cations. Finally, some technical aspects of applying SESSA to liquidinterfaces are discussed. PMID:27389231

  4. Ni speciation in a New Caledonian lateritic regolith: A quantitative X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublet, Gabrielle; Juillot, Farid; Morin, Guillaume; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Fandeur, Dik; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Brown, Gordon E.

    2012-10-01

    Changes in Ni speciation in a 64 m vertical profile of a New Caledonian saprolitic-lateritic regolith developed over ultramafic rocks under tropical weathering conditions were investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the EXAFS spectra by linear combination-least squares fitting (LC-LSF) using a large set of model compound spectra showed that Ni hosted in primary silicate minerals (olivine and serpentine) in the bedrock is incorporated in secondary phyllosilicates (serpentine) and Fe-oxides (goethite) in the saprolite unit and mainly in goethite in the laterite unit. A significant concentration of Ni (up to 30% of total Ni) is also hosted by Mn-oxides in the transition laterite (i.e. the lowest part of the laterite unit which contains large amounts of Mn-oxides). However, the amount of Ni associated with Mn-oxides does not exceed 20% of the total Ni in the overlying laterite unit. This sequence of Ni species from bedrock to laterite yields information about the behavior of Ni during tropical weathering of ultramafic rocks. The different Ni distributions in phyllosilicates in the bedrock (randomly distributed) and in the saprolite unit (clustered) indicate two generations of Ni-bearing phyllosilicates. The first, which formed at higher temperature, is related to serpentinization of oceanic crust, whereas the second one, which formed at lower temperature, is associated with post-obduction weathering of ultramafic rocks. In addition, the observed decrease in the proportion of Ni hosted by Mn-oxides from the transition laterite to the upper lateritic horizons indicates dissolution of Mn-oxides during the last stages of differentiation of the lateritic regolith (i.e. lateritization). Finally, the ubiquitous occurrence of Ni-bearing goethite emphasizes the major role of this phase in Ni speciation at the different weathering stages and suggests that goethite represents the major host for Ni in the final tropical weathering stages of New Caledonian

  5. Quantitative Determination of Dielectric Thin-Film Properties Using Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.E.; Haaland, D.M.; Niemczyk, T.M.; Zhang, S.

    1998-10-14

    We have completed an experimental study to investigate the use of infrared emission spectroscopy (IRES) for the quantitative analysis of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) thin films on silicon monitor wafers. Experimental parameters investigated included temperatures within the range used in the microelectronics industry to produce these films; hence the potential for using the IRES technique for real-time monitoring of the film deposition process has been evaluated. The film properties that were investigated included boron content, phosphorus content, film thickness, and film temperature. The studies were conducted over two temperature ranges, 125 to 225 *C and 300 to 400 *C. The later temperature range includes realistic processing temperatures for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of the BPSG films. Partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration methods were applied to spectral and film property calibration data. The cross-validated standard errors of prediction (CVSEP) fi-om the PLS analysis of the IRES spectraof21 calibration samples each measured at 6 temperatures in the 300 to 400 "C range were found to be 0.09 wt. `?40 for B, 0.08 wt. `%0 for P, 3.6 ~m for film thickness, and 1.9 *C for temperature. By lowering the spectral resolution fi-om 4 to 32 cm-l and decreasing the number of spectral scans fi-om 128 to 1, we were able to determine that all the film properties could be measured in less than one second to the precision required for the manufacture and quality control of integrated circuits. Thus, real-time in-situ monitoring of BPSG thin films formed by CVD deposition on Si monitor wafers is possible with the methods reported here.

  6. Exploring the potential of Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. G.; Bass, A.; Addison, C.; Hughesman, C.; So, A. P.; Haynes, C. A.; Blades, M. W.; Turner, R. F. B.

    2005-09-01

    Advances in DNA microarray fabrication technologies, expanding probe libraries, and new bioinformatics methods and resources have firmly established array-based techniques as mainstream bioanalytical tools and the application space is proliferating rapidly. However, the capability of these tools to yield truly quantitative information remains limited, primarily due to problems inherent to the use of fluorescence imaging for reading the hybridized arrays. The obvious advantages of fluorescence are the unrivaled sensitivity and simplicity of the instrumentation. There are disadvantages of this approach, however, such as difficulties in achieving optimal labeling of targets and reproducible signals (due to quenching, resonance energy transfer, photobleaching effects, etc.) that undermine precision. We are exploring alternative approaches, based mainly on Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, that in principle permit direct analysis of structural differences between hybridized and unhybridized probes, thereby eliminating the need for labeling the target analytes. We report here on the status of efforts to evaluate the potential of these methods based on a combination of measured data and simulated experiments involving short (12-mer) ssDNA oligomer probes with varying degrees of hybridized target DNA. Preliminary results suggest that it may be possible to determine the fraction of duplex probes within a single register on a DNA microarray from 100% down to 10% (or possibly less) with a precision of +/-2 5%. Details of the methods used, their implementation, and their potential advantages and limitations are presented, along with discussion of the utility of using 2DCOS methods to emphasize small spectral changes sensitive to interstrand H bonding, backbone flexibility, hypochromicity due to base-stacking in duplex structures and solvation effects.

  7. Quantitative determination and classification of energy drinks using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Anita; Héberger, Károly; Fodor, Marietta

    2016-09-01

    Almost a hundred commercially available energy drink samples from Hungary, Slovakia, and Greece were collected for the quantitative determination of their caffeine and sugar content with FT-NIR spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Calibration models were built with partial least-squares regression (PLSR). An HPLC-UV method was used to measure the reference values for caffeine content, while sugar contents were measured with the Schoorl method. Both the nominal sugar content (as indicated on the cans) and the measured sugar concentration were used as references. Although the Schoorl method has larger error and bias, appropriate models could be developed using both references. The validation of the models was based on sevenfold cross-validation and external validation. FT-NIR analysis is a good candidate to replace the HPLC-UV method, because it is much cheaper than any chromatographic method, while it is also more time-efficient. The combination of FT-NIR with multidimensional chemometric techniques like PLSR can be a good option for the detection of low caffeine concentrations in energy drinks. Moreover, three types of energy drinks that contain (i) taurine, (ii) arginine, and (iii) none of these two components were classified correctly using principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis. Such classifications are important for the detection of adulterated samples and for quality control, as well. In this case, more than a hundred samples were used for the evaluation. The classification was validated with cross-validation and several randomization tests (X-scrambling). Graphical Abstract The way of energy drinks from cans to appropriate chemometric models. PMID:27531031

  8. Quantitative interpretation of molecular dynamics simulations for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Parry, Krista M.; Powell, Cedric J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, energy-dependent ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has emerged as a powerful analytical probe of the ion spatial distributions at the vapor (vacuum)-aqueous electrolyte interface. These experiments are often paired with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in an attempt to provide a complete description of the liquid interface. There is, however, no systematic protocol that permits a straightforward comparison of the two sets of results. XPS is an integrated technique that averages signals from multiple layers in a solution even at the lowest photoelectron kinetic energies routinely employed, whereas MD simulations provide a microscopic layer-by-layer description of the solution composition near the interface. Here, we use the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) to quantitatively interpret atom-density profiles from MD simulations for XPS signal intensities using sodium and potassium iodide solutions as examples. We show that electron inelastic mean free paths calculated from a semi-empirical formula depend strongly on solution composition, varying by up to 30% between pure water and concentrated NaI. The XPS signal thus arises from different information depths in different solutions for a fixed photoelectron kinetic energy. XPS signal intensities are calculated using SESSA as a function of photoelectron kinetic energy (probe depth) and compared with a widely employed ad hoc method. SESSA simulations illustrate the importance of accounting for elastic-scattering events at low photoelectron kinetic energies (<300 eV) where the ad hoc method systematically underestimates the preferential enhancement of anions over cations. Finally, some technical aspects of applying SESSA to liquid interfaces are discussed.

  9. Quantitative treatment of coarsely binned low-resolution recordings in molecular absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spietz, Peter; Martín, Juan Carlos Gómez; Burrows, John P.

    2006-06-01

    Optical multichannel detectors like photodiode arrays or CCD cameras combined with grating spectrometers are commonly used as detection systems in quantitative absorption spectroscopy. As a trade-off to broad spectral coverage, banded spectral features are sometimes recorded with insufficient spectral resolution and/or insufficiently fine detector binning. This renders the true physical spectrum of recorded intensities changed by instrumental and spectrum specific artefacts thus impeding comparability between results from different set-ups. In this work, it is demonstrated that in the case of a "well-behaved" - i.e. free of ro-vibronic structure - absorption band like the iodine monoxide IO(4 ← 0) transition, these effects can easily change the apparent peak absorption by up to 50%. Also deviations from the strict linearity (Beer-Lambert's law) between absorber concentration and apparent, i.e. pixelwise optical density occur. This can be critical in studies of chemical kinetics. It is shown that the observed non-linearity can cause errors of up to 50% in the determination of a second order rate coefficient for the IO self reaction. To overcome the problem, a consistent and rigorous integral approach for the treatment of intensity recordings is developed. Linearity between optical density and absorber concentration thereby is re-established. The method is validated using artificial test data as well as experimental data of the IO(4 ← 0) absorption transition, obtained in the context of I 2/O 3 photochemistry studies. The agreement is accurate to within ±2% (test data) and ±3% (experimental data) supporting the validity of the approach. Possible consequences for other spectroscopic work are indicated.

  10. Quantitative treatment of coarsely binned low-resolution recordings in molecular absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spietz, Peter; Martín, Juan Carlos Gómez; Burrows, John P

    2006-06-01

    Optical multichannel detectors like photodiode arrays or CCD cameras combined with grating spectrometers are commonly used as detection systems in quantitative absorption spectroscopy. As a trade-off to broad spectral coverage, banded spectral features are sometimes recorded with insufficient spectral resolution and/or insufficiently fine detector binning. This renders the true physical spectrum of recorded intensities changed by instrumental and spectrum specific artefacts thus impeding comparability between results from different set-ups. In this work, it is demonstrated that in the case of a "well-behaved"--i.e. free of ro-vibronic structure--absorption band like the iodine monoxide IO(4<--0) transition, these effects can easily change the apparent peak absorption by up to 50%. Also deviations from the strict linearity (Beer-Lambert's law) between absorber concentration and apparent, i.e. pixelwise optical density occur. This can be critical in studies of chemical kinetics. It is shown that the observed non-linearity can cause errors of up to 50% in the determination of a second order rate coefficient for the IO self reaction. To overcome the problem, a consistent and rigorous integral approach for the treatment of intensity recordings is developed. Linearity between optical density and absorber concentration thereby is re-established. The method is validated using artificial test data as well as experimental data of the IO(4<--0) absorption transition, obtained in the context of I2/O3 photochemistry studies. The agreement is accurate to within +/-2% (test data) and +/-3% (experimental data) supporting the validity of the approach. Possible consequences for other spectroscopic work are indicated. PMID:16387540

  11. Microwave-accelerated bioassay technique for rapid and quantitative detection of biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-01-15

    Quantitative detection of molecules of interest from biological and environmental samples in a rapid manner, particularly with a relevant concentration range, is imperative to the timely assessment of human diseases and environmental issues. In this work, we employed the microwave-accelerated bioassay (MAB) technique, which is based on the combined use of circular bioassay platforms and microwave heating, for rapid and quantitative detection of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Shiga like toxin (STX 1). The proof-of-principle use of the MAB technique with the circular bioassay platforms for the rapid detection of GFAP in buffer based on colorimetric and fluorescence readouts was demonstrated with a 900W kitchen microwave. We also employed the MAB technique with a new microwave system (called the iCrystal system) for the detection of GFAP from mice with brain injuries and STX 1 from a city water stream. Control bioassays included the commercially available gold standard bioassay kits run at room temperature. Our results show that the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the colorimetric and fluorescence based bioassays for GFAP was decreased by ~1000 times using the MAB technique and our circular bioassay platforms as compared to the commercially available bioassay kits. The overall bioassay time for GFAP and STX 1 was reduced from 4h using commercially available bioassay kits to 10min using the MAB technique. PMID:26356762

  12. Detection of biological analytes using nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy with a nanoporous microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The highly sensitive nanoporous cantilever beam without immobilized receptors was combined with highly selective mid-infrared (IR) spectroscopy for molecular recognition of analytes using characteristic molecular vibrations. Unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, in addition, the detection sensitivity and resolution are drastically enhanced by combining high power tunable quantum cascade laser with a nanoporous cantilever having large surface area, low modulus, and nanowell structures. Further, analytes can be easily loaded on the porous microcantilever without receptor due to nanowells. In addition, orthogonal signals, variations in the mass and IR spectrum, provide more reliable and quantitative results including physical as well as chemical information of samples. We have used this technique to rapidly identify single and double stranded DNA.

  13. High-resolution mass spectrometry for integrated qualitative and quantitative analysis of pharmaceuticals in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Tonoli, David; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative and qualitative high-resolution (HR) dependent and independent acquisition schemes on a QqTOF MS (with resolving power 20,000-40,000) were investigated for the analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in biological fluids. High-resolution selected reaction monitoring (HR-SRM) was found to be linear over three orders of magnitude for quantitative analysis of paracetamol in human plasma, offering a real alternative to triple quadrupole LC-SRM/MS. Metabolic stability of talinolol in microsomes was characterized by use of three different acquisition schemes: (i) information-dependent acquisition (IDA) with a TOF MS experiment as survey scan and product-ion scan as dependent scan; (ii) MS(ALL) by collecting TOF mass spectra with and without fragmentation by alternating the collision energy of the collision cell between a low (i.e., 10 eV) and high setting (i.e., 40 eV); and (iii) a novel independent acquisition mode referred to as "sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra" (SWATH) or "global precursor ions scan mode" (GPS) in which sequential precursor ions windows (typically 20 u) are used to collect the same spectrum precursor and fragment ions using a collision energy range. SWATH or GPS was found to be superior to IDA or MS(ALL) in combination with UHPLC for qualitative analysis but requires a rapidly acquiring mass spectrometer. Finally, the GPS concept was used for QUAL/QUAN analysis (i.e. integration of qualitative and quantitative analysis) of bosentan and its metabolites in urine over a concentration range from 5 to 2,500 ng mL(-1). PMID:22203371

  14. Combining Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy with quantitative isotopic labeling for differentiation of E. coli cells at community and single cell levels.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Chisanga, Malama; Subaihi, Abdu; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-04-21

    There is no doubt that the contribution of microbially mediated bioprocesses toward maintenance of life on earth is vital. However, understanding these microbes in situ is currently a bottleneck, as most methods require culturing these microorganisms to suitable biomass levels so that their phenotype can be measured. The development of new culture-independent strategies such as stable isotope probing (SIP) coupled with molecular biology has been a breakthrough toward linking gene to function, while circumventing in vitro culturing. In this study, for the first time we have combined Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as metabolic fingerprinting approaches, with SIP to demonstrate the quantitative labeling and differentiation of Escherichia coli cells. E. coli cells were grown in minimal medium with fixed final concentrations of carbon and nitrogen supply, but with different ratios and combinations of (13)C/(12)C glucose and (15)N/(14)N ammonium chloride, as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The cells were collected at stationary phase and examined by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies. The multivariate analysis investigation of FT-IR and Raman data illustrated unique clustering patterns resulting from specific spectral shifts upon the incorporation of different isotopes, which were directly correlated with the ratio of the isotopically labeled content of the medium. Multivariate analysis results of single-cell Raman spectra followed the same trend, exhibiting a separation between E. coli cells labeled with different isotopes and multiple isotope levels of C and N. PMID:25831066

  15. Quantitative assessment of image motion blur in diffraction images of moving biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Jin, Changrong; Feng, Yuanming; Qi, Dandan; Sa, Yu; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Motion blur (MB) presents a significant challenge for obtaining high-contrast image data from biological cells with a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method. A new p-DIFC experimental system has been developed to evaluate the MB and its effect on image analysis using a time-delay-integration (TDI) CCD camera. Diffraction images of MCF-7 and K562 cells have been acquired with different speed-mismatch ratios and compared to characterize MB quantitatively. Frequency analysis of the diffraction images shows that the degree of MB can be quantified by bandwidth variations of the diffraction images along the motion direction. The analytical results were confirmed by the p-DIFC image data acquired at different speed-mismatch ratios and used to validate a method of numerical simulation of MB on blur-free diffraction images, which provides a useful tool to examine the blurring effect on diffraction images acquired from the same cell. These results provide insights on the dependence of diffraction image on MB and allow significant improvement on rapid biological cell assay with the p-DIFC method.

  16. Quantitative changes in sets of proteins as markers of biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Taylor, J.; Gemmell, M.A.; Tollaksen, S.L. ); Lalwani, N.D.; Reddy, J.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to either physical or chemical insults triggers a cascade of bio-chemical events within the target cell. This response requires adjustment within the protein population of the cell, some proteins becoming more abundant (those involved in the cellular response), others less abundant (those not required or counterproductive to the response). Thus, quantitative changes in the global protein population of an exposed biological system may well serve as an indicator of exposure, provided the alterations observed are selective and dose-dependent. In this paper we present results from a study in which liver protein changes induced by exposure of mice to chemicals known to cause peroxisome proliferation and subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma where monitored. Clofibrate, and its chemical analog ciprofibrate, are hypolipidemic drugs. Di-(ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer used widely in disposable containers for blood products. WY-14643 is a chemical shown to cause hypolipidemic and peroxisome proliferation, similar to clofibrate, ciprofibrate and DEHP, but structurally different from these three chemicals. Thus, two of the four chemicals are structurally similar while the remaining two are very distinct, although all four chemicals cause the same gross biological response. Our results show that although common protein effects are observed in mice exposed to these chemicals, each chemical also causes specific alterations in selective subsets of proteins that could serve as markers of a particular exposure. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A comparison of quantitative reconstruction techniques for PIXE-tomography analysis applied to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. G.; Alves, L. C.; Barberet, Ph.; Bourret, S.; Devès, G.; Gordillo, N.; Michelet, C.; Le Trequesser, Q.; Marques, A. C.; Seznec, H.; da Silva, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of biological specimens requires robust algorithms, able to deal with low density contrast and low element concentrations. At the IST/ITN microprobe facility new GPU-accelerated reconstruction software, JPIXET, has been developed, which can significantly increase the speed of quantitative reconstruction of Proton Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) data. It has a user-friendly graphical user interface for pre-processing, data analysis and reconstruction of PIXE-T and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T). The reconstruction of PIXE-T data is performed using either an algorithm based on a GPU-accelerated version of the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) method or a GPU-accelerated version of the Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm (DISRA) (Sakellariou (2001) [2]). The original DISRA, its accelerated version, and the MLEM algorithm, were compared for the reconstruction of a biological sample of Caenorhabditis elegans - a small worm. This sample was analysed at the microbeam line of the AIFIRA facility of CENBG, Bordeaux. A qualitative PIXE-T reconstruction was obtained using the CENBG software package TomoRebuild (Habchi et al. (2013) [6]). The effects of pre-processing and experimental conditions on the elemental concentrations are discussed.

  18. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences. PMID:23267180

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences. PMID:23267180

  1. Proton MR spectroscopy-detectable major neurotransmitters of the brain: biology and possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, N; Renshaw, P F

    2012-04-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical substances that, by definition, allow communication between neurons and permit most neuronal-glial interactions in the CNS. Approximately 80% of all neurons use glutamate, and almost all interneurons use GABA. A third neurotransmitter, NAAG, modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission. Concentration changes in these molecules due to defective synthetic machinery, receptor expression, or errors in their degradation and metabolism are accepted causes of several neurologic disorders. Knowledge of changes in neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain can add useful information in making a diagnosis, helping to pick the right drug of treatment, and monitoring patient response to drugs in a more objective manner. Recent advances in (1)H-MR spectroscopy hold promise in providing a more reliable in vivo detection of these neurotransmitters. In this article, we summarize the essential biology of 3 major neurotransmitters: glutamate, GABA, and NAAG. Finally we illustrate possible applications of (1)H-MR spectroscopy in neuroscience research. PMID:22207303

  2. Quantitative, comparable coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy: correcting errors in phase retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Charles H., Jr.; Lee, Young Jong; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has demonstrated significant potential for biological and materials imaging. To date, however, the primary mechanism of disseminating CARS spectroscopic information is through pseudocolor imagery, which explicitly neglects a vast majority of the hyperspectral data. Furthermore, current paradigms in CARS spectral processing do not lend themselves to quantitative sample-to-sample comparability. The primary limitation stems from the need to accurately measure the so-called nonresonant background (NRB) that is used to extract the chemically-sensitive Raman information from the raw spectra. Measurement of the NRB on a pixel-by-pixel basis is a nontrivial task; thus, reference NRB from glass or water are typically utilized, resulting in error between the actual and estimated amplitude and phase. In this manuscript, we present a new methodology for extracting the Raman spectral features that significantly suppresses these errors through phase detrending and scaling. Classic methods of error-correction, such as baseline detrending, are demonstrated to be inaccurate and to simply mask the underlying errors. The theoretical justification is presented by re-developing the theory of phase retrieval via the Kramers-Kronig relation, and we demonstrate that these results are also applicable to maximum entropy method-based phase retrieval. This new error-correction approach is experimentally applied to glycerol spectra and tissue images, demonstrating marked consistency between spectra obtained using different NRB estimates, and between spectra obtained on different instruments. Additionally, in order to facilitate implementation of these approaches, we have made many of the tools described herein available free for download.

  3. Alternate strategies to obtain mass balance without the use of radiolabeled compounds: application of quantitative fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul; Espina, Robert; Atherton, James; Wang, Jianyao; Talaat, Rasmy; Scatina, JoAnn; Chandrasekaran, Appavu

    2012-03-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the quantitation of small and large molecules. Recently, we demonstrated that (1)H NMR could be used to quantitate drug metabolites isolated in submilligram quantities from biological sources. It was shown that these metabolites, once quantitated by NMR, were suitable to be used as reference standards in quantitative LC/MS-based assays, hence circumventing the need for radiolabeled material or synthetic standards to obtain plasma exposure estimates in humans and preclinical species. The quantitative capabilities of high-field NMR is further demonstrated in the current study by obtaining the mass balance of fluorinated compounds using (19)F-NMR. Two fluorinated compounds which were radio-labeled with carbon-14 on metabolically stable positions were dosed in rats and urine and feces collected. The mass balance of the compounds was obtained initially by counting the radioactivity present in each sample. Subsequently, the same sets of samples were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, and the concentrations determined by this method were compared with data obtained using radioactivity counting. It was shown that the two methods produced comparable values. To demonstrate the value of this analytical technique in drug discovery, a fluorinated compound was dosed intravenously in dogs and feces and urine collected. Initial profiling of samples showed that this compound was excreted mainly unchanged in feces, and hence, an estimate of mass balance was obtained using (19)F-NMR. The data obtained by this method was confirmed by additional quantitative studies using mass spectrometry. Hence cross-validations of the quantitative (19)F-NMR method by radioactivity counting and mass spectrometric analysis were demonstrated in this study. A strategy outlining the use of fluorinated compounds in conjunction with (19)F-NMR to understand their routes of excretion or mass balance in animals is proposed. These

  4. Quantitative analysis of liquids from aerosols and microdrops using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Erica M; Almirall, Jose R

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is shown to be capable of low volume (90 pL) quantitative elemental analysis of picogram amounts of dissolved metals in solutions. Single-pulse and collinear double-pulse LIBS were investigated using a 532 nm dual head laser coupled to a spectrometer with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) detector. Aerosols were produced using a micronebulizer, conditioned inside a concentric spray chamber, and released through an injector tube with a diameter of 1 mm such that a LIBS plasma could be formed ~2 mm from the exit of the tube. The emissions from both the aerosols and a single microdrop were then collected with a broadband high resolution spectrometer. Multielement calibration solutions were prepared, and continuing calibration verification (CCV) standards were analyzed for both aerosol and microdrop systems to calculate the precision, accuracy, and limits of detection for each system. The calibration curves produced correlation coefficients with R(2) values > 0.99 for both systems. The precision, accuracy, and limit of detection (LOD) determined for aerosol LIBS were averaged and determined for the emission lines of Sr II (421.55 nm), Mg II (279.80 nm), Ba II (493.41 nm), and Ca II (396.84 nm) to be ~3.8% RSD, 3.1% bias, 0.7 μg/mL, respectively. A microdrop dispenser was used to deliver single drops containing 90 pL into the space where a LIBS plasma was generated with a focused laser pulse. In the single drop microdrop LIBS experiment, the analysis of a single drop, containing a total mass of 45 pg, resulted in a precision of 13% RSD and a bias of 1% for the Al I (394.40 nm) emission line. The absolute limits of detection of single drop microdrop LIBS for the emission lines Al I (394.40 nm) and Sr II (421.5 nm) were approximately 1 pg, and Ba II (493.41 nm) produced an absolute detection limit of approximately 3 pg. Overall, the precision, accuracy, and absolute LOD determined for single microdrop LIBS resulted in

  5. Multivariate processing strategies for enhancing qualitative and quantitative analysis based on infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Boyong

    2007-12-01

    Airborne passive Fourier transform infrared spectrometry is gaining increased attention in environmental applications because of its great flexibility. Usually, pattern recognition techniques are used for automatic analysis of large amount of collected data. However, challenging problems are the constantly changing background and high calibration cost. As aircraft is flying, background is always changing. Also, considering the great variety of backgrounds and high expense of data collection from aircraft, cost of collecting representative training data is formidable. Instead of using airborne data, data generated from simulation strategies can be used for training purposes. Training data collected under controlled conditions on the ground or synthesized from real backgrounds can be both options. With both strategies, classifiers may be developed with much lower cost. For both strategies, signal processing techniques need to be used to extract analyte features. In this dissertation, signal processing methods are applied either in interferogram or spectral domain for features extraction. Then, pattern recognition methods are applied to develop binary classifiers for automated detection of air-collected methanol and ethanol vapors. The results demonstrate, with optimized signal processing methods and training set composition, classifiers trained from ground-collected or synthetic data can give good classification on real air-collected data. Near-infrared (NIR) spectrometry is emerging as a promising tool for noninvasive blood glucose detection. In combination with multivariate calibration techniques, NIR spectroscopy can give quick quantitative determinations of many species with minimal sample preparation. However, one main problem with NIR calibrations is degradation of calibration model over time. The varying background information will worsen the prediction precision and complicate the multivariate models. To mitigate the needs for frequent recalibration and

  6. Classification of the biological material with use of FTIR spectroscopy and statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Bombalska, Aneta; Mularczyk-Oliwa, Monika; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Włodarski, Maksymilian; Kaliszewski, Miron; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Szpakowska, Małgorzata; Trafny, Elżbieta A

    2011-04-01

    Rapid detection and discrimination of dangerous biological materials such as bacteria and their spores has become a security aim of considerable importance. Various analytical methods, including FTIR spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have been used to identify vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores and background interferants. The present work discusses the application of FTIR technique performed in reflectance mode using Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance accessory (HATR) to the discrimination of biological materials. In comparison with transmission technique the HATR is more rapid and do not require the sample destruction, simultaneously giving similar absorbance bands. HATR-FTIR results combined with statistical analysis PCA and HCA demonstrate that this combination provides novel and accurate microbial identification technique. PMID:21257340

  7. Classification of the biological material with use of FTIR spectroscopy and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombalska, Aneta; Mularczyk-Oliwa, Monika; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Włodarski, Maksymilian; Kaliszewski, Miron; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Szpakowska, Małgorzata; Trafny, Elżbieta A.

    2011-04-01

    Rapid detection and discrimination of dangerous biological materials such as bacteria and their spores has become a security aim of considerable importance. Various analytical methods, including FTIR spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have been used to identify vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores and background interferants. The present work discusses the application of FTIR technique performed in reflectance mode using Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance accessory (HATR) to the discrimination of biological materials. In comparison with transmission technique the HATR is more rapid and do not require the sample destruction, simultaneously giving similar absorbance bands. HATR-FTIR results combined with statistical analysis PCA and HCA demonstrate that this combination provides novel and accurate microbial identification technique.

  8. Detection of biological contaminants on foods and food surfaces using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Multari, Rosalie A; Cremers, David A; Dupre, Jo Anne M; Gustafson, John E

    2013-09-11

    The rapid detection of biological contaminants, such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica , on foods and food-processing surfaces is important to ensure food safety and streamline the food-monitoring process. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal candidate technology for this application because sample preparation is minimal and results are available rapidly (seconds to minutes). Here, multivariate regression analysis of LIBS data is used to differentiate the live bacterial pathogens E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica on various foods (eggshell, milk, bologna, ground beef, chicken, and lettuce) and surfaces (metal drain strainer and cutting board). The type (E. coli or S. enterica) of bacteria could be differentiated in all cases studied along with the metabolic state (viable or heat killed). This study provides data showing the potential of LIBS for the rapid identification of biological contaminants using spectra collected directly from foods and surfaces. PMID:23941554

  9. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McCartt, A Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels. Sources of inaccuracies are presented and discussed, and the capability to measure carbon-14 in biological samples is demonstrated by comparing pharmacokinetics from carbon-14 dosed guinea pigs analyzed by both CRDS and accelerator mass spectrometry. The CRDS approach presented affords easy access to powerful carbon-14 tracer techniques that can characterize complex biochemical systems. PMID:27458740

  10. Near- and Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for the Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several decades near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to determine the composition of a variety of agricultural products. More recently, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) has similarly been shown to be able to determine the co...

  11. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy of model random and biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yici

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopy and microscopy applied to biomedical science are emerging as new and rapidly growing areas which offer important insight into basic phenomena. Ultrafast NLO processes provide temporal, spectral and spatial sensitivities complementary or superior to those achieved through conventional linear optical approaches. The goal of this thesis is to explore the potential of two fundamental NLO processes to produce noninvasive histological maps of biological tissues. Within the goal of the thesis, steady state intensity, polarization and angular measurements of second- and third-harmonic generations (SHG, THG) have been performed on model random scattering and animal tissue samples. The nonlinear optical effects have been evaluated using models. Conversion efficiencies of SHG and THG from animal tissue interfaces have been determined, ranging from 10-7 to 10-10. The changes in the multiharmonic signals were found to depend on both local and overall histological structures of biological samples. The spectral signatures of two photon excitation induced fluorescence from intrinsic fluorophores have been acquired and used to characterize the physical state and types of tissues. Two dimensional scanning SHG and TPF tomographic images have been obtained from in vitro animal tissues, normal and diseased human breast tissues, and resolved subsurface layers and histo-chemical distributions. By combining consecutive 2D maps, a 3D image can be produced. The structure and morphology dependence of the SH signal has been utilized to image and evaluate subsurface tumor progression depth. Second harmonic microscopy in model random and biological cells has been studied using a CCD camera to obtain direct images from subcellular structures. Finally, near infrared (NIR) NLO spectroscopy and microscopy based on SHG and TPF have demonstrated high spatial resolution, deeper penetration depth, low level photo-damaging and enhanced morphological sensitivity for

  12. Application of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy combined with chemometrics to quantitative analysis of imidacloprid in rice samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zewei; Zhang, Zhuoyong; Zhu, Ruohua; Xiang, Yuhong; Yang, Yuping; Harrington, Peter B.

    2015-12-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has been utilized as an effective tool for quantitative analysis of imidacloprid in rice powder samples. Unlike previous studies, our method for sample preparation was mixing imidacloprid with rice powder instead of polyethylene. Then, terahertz time domain transmission spectra of these mixed samples were measured and the absorption coefficient spectra of the samples with frequency range extending from 0.3 to 1.7 THz were obtained. Asymmetric least square (AsLS) method was utilized to correct the slope baselines that are presented in THz absorption coefficient spectra and improve signal-to-noise ratio of THz spectra. Chemometrics methods, including partial least squares (PLS), support vector regression (SVR), interval partial least squares (iPLS), and backward interval partial least squares (biPLS), were used for quantitative model building and prediction. To achieve a reliable and unbiased estimation, bootstrapped Latin partition was chosen as an approach for statistical cross-validation. Results showed that the mean value of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for PLS (0.5%) is smaller than SVR (0.7%), these two methods were based on the whole absorption coefficient spectra. In addition, PLS performed a better performance with a lower RMSEP (0.3%) based on the THz absorption coefficient spectra after AsLS baseline correction. Alternatively, two methods for variable selection, namely iPLS and biPLS, yielded models with improved predictions. Comparing with conventional PLS and SVR, the mean values of RMSEP were 0.4% (iPLS) and 0.3% (biPLS) by selecting the informative frequency ranges. The results demonstrated that an accurate quantitative analysis of imidacloprid in rice powder samples could be achieved by terahertz time-domain transmission spectroscopy combined with chemometrics. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that THz time-domain spectroscopy can be used for quantitative determinations of other

  13. A quantitative study for determination of sugar concentration using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhandy, Diding; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Ogawa, Yuichi; Kondo, Naoshi; Ishihara, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yuichiro

    2011-06-01

    The objective of our research was to use ATR-THz spectroscopy together with chemometric for quantitative study in food analysis. Glucose, fructose and sucrose are main component of sugar both in fresh and processed fruits. The use of spectroscopic-based method for sugar determination is well reported especially using visible, near infrared (NIR) and middle infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. However, the use of terahertz spectroscopy for sugar determination in fruits has not yet been reported. In this work, a quantitative study for sugars determination using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy was conducted. Each samples of glucose, fructose and sucrose solution with different concentrations were prepared respectively and their absorbance spectra between wavenumber 20 and 450 cm-1 (between 0.6 THz and 13.5 THz) were acquired using a terahertz-based Fourier Transform spectrometer (FARIS-1S, JASCO Co., Japan). This spectrometer was equipped with a high pressure of mercury lamp as light source and a pyroelectric sensor made from deuterated L-alanine triglycine sulfate (DLTGS) as detector. Each spectrum was acquired using 16 cm-1 of resolution and 200 scans for averaging. The spectra of water and sugar solutions were compared and discussed. The results showed that increasing sugar concentration caused decreasing absorbance. The correlation between sugar concentration and its spectra was investigated using multivariate analysis. Calibration models for glucose, fructose and sucrose determination were developed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The calibration model was evaluated using some parameters such as coefficient of determination (R2), standard error of calibration (SEC), standard error of prediction (SEP), bias between actual and predicted sugar concentration value and ratio prediction to deviation (RPD) parameter. The cross validation method was used to validate each calibration model. It is showed that the use of ATR

  14. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  15. Direct visualization and quantitative analysis of water diffusion in complex biological tissues using CARS microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying-Chun; Sohma, Yoshiro; Takimoto, Shinichi; Miyauchi, Takayuki; Yasui, Masato

    2013-01-01

    To date, it has not been possible to measure microscopic diffusive water movements in epithelia and in the interstitial space of complex tissues and organs. Diffusive water movements are essential for life because they convey physiologically important small molecules, e.g. nutrients and signaling ligands throughout the extracellular space of complex tissues. Here we report the development of a novel method for the direct observation and quantitative analysis of water diffusion dynamics in a biologically organized tissue using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy. Using a computer simulation model to analyze the CARS O-H bond vibration data during H2O/D2O exchange in a 3D epithelial cyst, we succeeded in measuring the diffusive water permeability of the individual luminal and basolateral water pathways and also their response to hormonal stimulation. Our technique will be applicable to the measurement of diffusive water movements in other structurally complex and medically important tissues and organs. PMID:24067894

  16. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional biological cells using interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Wax, Adam

    2011-06-01

    Live biological cells are three-dimensional microscopic objects that constantly adjust their sizes, shapes and other biophysical features. Wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) is a holographic technique that is able to record the complex wavefront of the light which has interacted with in-vitro cells in a single camera exposure, where no exogenous contrast agents are required. However, simple quasi-three-dimensional holographic visualization of the cell phase profiles need not be the end of the process. Quantitative analysis should permit extraction of numerical parameters which are useful for cytology or medical diagnosis. Using a transmission-mode setup, the phase profile represents the multiplication between the integral refractive index and the thickness of the sample. These coupled variables may not be distinct when acquiring the phase profiles of dynamic cells. Many morphological parameters which are useful for cell biologists are based on the cell thickness profile rather than on its phase profile. We first overview methods to decouple the cell thickness and its refractive index using the WFDI-based phase profile. Then, we present a whole-cell-imaging approach which is able to extract useful numerical parameters on the cells even in cases where decoupling of cell thickness and refractive index is not possible or desired.

  17. Monitoring intracellular polyphosphate accumulation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems by quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Amaral, A Luís; Leal, Cristiano; Carvalheira, Mónica; Cunha, Jorge R; Oehmen, Adrian; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    A rapid methodology for intracellular storage polyphosphate (poly-P) identification and monitoring in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems is proposed based on quantitative image analysis (QIA). In EBPR systems, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) is usually combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to evaluate the microbial community. The proposed monitoring technique is based on a QIA procedure specifically developed for determining poly-P inclusions within a biomass suspension using solely DAPI by epifluorescence microscopy. Due to contradictory literature regarding DAPI concentrations used for poly-P detection, the present work assessed the optimal DAPI concentration for samples acquired at the end of the EBPR aerobic stage when the accumulation occurred. Digital images were then acquired and processed by means of image processing and analysis. A correlation was found between average poly-P intensity values and the analytical determination. The proposed methodology can be seen as a promising alternative procedure for quantifying intracellular poly-P accumulation in a faster and less labour-intensive way. PMID:24901627

  18. Synthesis, biological activities, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of novel camptothecin analogues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Liu, Ying-Qian; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Wei; Liu, Huan-Xiang; Chen, An-Liang

    2015-01-01

    In continuation of our program aimed at the development of natural product-based pesticidal agents, three series of novel camptothecin derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their biological activities against T. Cinnabarinus, B. brassicae, and B. xylophilus. All of the derivatives showed good-to-excellent activity against three insect species tested, with LC50 values ranging from 0.00761 to 0.35496 mmol/L. Remarkably, all of the compounds were more potent than CPT against T. Cinnabarinus, and compounds 4d and 4c displayed superior activity (LC50 0.00761 mmol/L and 0.00942 mmol/L, respectively) compared with CPT (LC50 0.19719 mmol/L) against T. Cinnabarinus. Based on the observed bioactivities, preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) correlations were also discussed. Furthermore, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was built. The model gave statistically significant results with the cross-validated q2 values of 0.580 and correlation coefficient r2 of 0.991 and  of 0.993. The QSAR analysis indicated that the size of the substituents play an important in the activity of 7-modified camptothecin derivatives. These findings will pave the way for further design, structural optimization, and development of camptothecin-derived compounds as pesticidal agents. PMID:25985362

  19. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and related techniques in studies of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Thomas; Sebesta, Aleksandar; Stadler, Johannes; Opilik, Lothar; Balabin, Roman M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-02-01

    Biological materials can be highly heterogeneous at the nanometer scale. The investigation of nanostructures is often hampered by the low spatial resolution (e.g. spectroscopic techniques) or very little chemical information (e.g. atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)) provided by analytical techniques. Our research focuses on combined instruments, which allow the analysis of the exactly same area of a sample by complementary techniques, such as AFM and Raman spectroscopy. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) combines the high spatial resolution of AFM or STM with the chemical information provided by Raman spectroscopy. The technique is based on enhancement effects known from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In TERS the enhancing metallic nanostructure is brought to the sample by an AFM or STM tip. With a TERS-active tip, enhanced Raman signals can be generated from a sample area as small as 10-50 nm in diameter. AFM analysis of bacterial biofilms has demonstrated their heterogeneity at the nanometer scale, revealing a variety of nanostructures such as pili, flagella, and extracelullar polymers. TERS measurements of the biopolymers alginate and cytochrome c have yielded spectroscopic fingerprints even of such weak Raman scatterers, which in future can allow their localization in complex matrices. Furthermore, biofilms of the bacterium Halomonas meridiana were studied, which was found to be involved in the generation of the mineral dolomite. Only combined AFM-Raman analysis was able to identify the nanoglobules found in laboratory cultures of H. meridiana as dolomite nanoparticles. Our combined setups are and will be applied to the investigation of biofilms, fish spermatozoa as well as biological membranes.

  20. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 μm-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 μm-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Steel with Multi-Line Internal Standard Calibration Method Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Congyuan; Du, Xuewei; An, Ning; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Shengbo; Wang, Qiuping

    2016-04-01

    A multi-line internal standard calibration method is proposed for the quantitative analysis of carbon steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A procedure based on the method was adopted to select the best calibration curves and the corresponding emission lines pairs automatically. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments with carbon steel samples were performed, and C, Cr, and Mn were analyzed via the proposed method. Calibration curves of these elements were constructed via a traditional single line internal standard calibration method and a multi-line internal standard calibration method. The calibration curves obtained were evaluated with the determination coefficient, the root mean square error of cross-validation, and the average relative error of cross-validation. All of the parameters were improved significantly with the proposed method. The results show that accurate and stable calibration curves can be obtained efficiently via the multi-line internal standard calibration method. PMID:26872822

  2. Quantitative Determination of Methylcyclohexanone Mixtures Using 13C NMR Spectroscopy: A Project for an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Joseph W.; Silveira, Augustine, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The percentage composition of mixtures of four methylcyclohexanones was determined using 13C NMR spectroscopy as a quantitative analytical method. The data were acquired using standard broadband proton decoupling and inverse-gated decoupling, the latter done both with and without the paramagnetic relaxation reagent chromium(III) acetylacetonate [Cr(acac)3]. The standard broadband decoupled spectrum resulted in percentages far from the actual values owing to the varying nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) of the various carbon atoms. These effects were eliminated in the inverse-gated experiments, and the results were very close to the actual percentages. Before examining the mixtures, the students studied a pure sample of 2-methylcyclohexanone. They assigned the 13C spectrum and determined the T1 of the carbonyl group both with and without Cr(acac)3 using the inversion-recovery method. Then a five-times-T1 delay was inserted between pulses in all subsequent inverse-gated decoupling experiments. This project provides students with valuable experience with modern NMR techniques. These include COrrelated SpectroscopY (COSY), Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT) spectroscopy, HETeronuclear CORrelated (HETCOR) spectroscopy, T1 determination, standard broadband versus inverse-gated decoupling, and the addition of a paramagnetic relaxation reagent to dramatically shorten both the T

  3. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars: accurate atomic data applied on a large scale as driver of recent breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Nieva, Maria-Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    OB-type stars present hotbeds for non-LTE physics because of their strong radiation fields that drive the atmospheric plasma out of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We report on recent breakthroughs in the quantitative analysis of the optical and UV-spectra of OB-type stars that were facilitated by application of accurate and precise atomic data on a large scale. An astophysicist's dream has come true, by bringing observed and model spectra into close match over wide parts of the observed wavelength ranges. This facilitates tight observational constraints to be derived from OB-type stars for wide applications in astrophysics. However, despite the progress made, many details of the modelling may be improved further. We discuss atomic data needs in terms of laboratory measurements and also ab-initio calculations. Particular emphasis is given to quantitative spectroscopy in the near-IR, which will be in focus in the era of the upcoming extremely large telescopes.

  4. Quantitative analysis of routine chemical constituents in tobacco by near-infrared spectroscopy and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Cong, Qian; Xie, Yunfei; JingxiuYang; Zhao, Bing

    2008-12-15

    It is important to monitor quality of tobacco during the production of cigarette. Therefore, in order to scientifically control the tobacco raw material and guarantee the cigarette quality, fast and accurate determination routine chemical of constituents of tobacco, including the total sugar, reducing sugar, Nicotine, the total nitrogen and so on, is needed. In this study, 50 samples of tobacco from different cultivation areas were surveyed by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, and the spectral differences provided enough quantitative analysis information for the tobacco. Partial least squares regression (PLSR), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM), were applied. The quantitative analysis models of 50 tobacco samples were studied comparatively in this experiment using PLSR, ANN, radial basis function (RBF) SVM regression, and the parameters of the models were also discussed. The spectrum variables of 50 samples had been compressed through the wavelet transformation technology before the models were established. The best experimental results were obtained using the (RBF) SVM regression with gamma=1.5, 1.3, 0.9, and 0.1, separately corresponds to total sugar, reducing sugar, Nicotine, and total nitrogen, respectively. Finally, compared with the back propagation (BP-ANN) and PLSR approach, SVM algorithm showed its excellent generalization for quantitative analysis results, while the number of samples for establishing the model is smaller. The overall results show that NIR spectroscopy combined with SVM can be efficiently utilized for rapid and accurate analysis of routine chemical compositions in tobacco. Simultaneously, the research can serve as the technical support and the foundation of quantitative analysis of other NIR applications. PMID:18538628

  5. Quantitative analysis of routine chemical constituents in tobacco by near-infrared spectroscopy and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Cong, Qian; Xie, Yunfei; Yang, Jingxiu; Zhao, Bing

    2008-12-01

    It is important to monitor quality of tobacco during the production of cigarette. Therefore, in order to scientifically control the tobacco raw material and guarantee the cigarette quality, fast and accurate determination routine chemical of constituents of tobacco, including the total sugar, reducing sugar, Nicotine, the total nitrogen and so on, is needed. In this study, 50 samples of tobacco from different cultivation areas were surveyed by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, and the spectral differences provided enough quantitative analysis information for the tobacco. Partial least squares regression (PLSR), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM), were applied. The quantitative analysis models of 50 tobacco samples were studied comparatively in this experiment using PLSR, ANN, radial basis function (RBF) SVM regression, and the parameters of the models were also discussed. The spectrum variables of 50 samples had been compressed through the wavelet transformation technology before the models were established. The best experimental results were obtained using the (RBF) SVM regression with γ = 1.5, 1.3, 0.9, and 0.1, separately corresponds to total sugar, reducing sugar, Nicotine, and total nitrogen, respectively. Finally, compared with the back propagation (BP-ANN) and PLSR approach, SVM algorithm showed its excellent generalization for quantitative analysis results, while the number of samples for establishing the model is smaller. The overall results show that NIR spectroscopy combined with SVM can be efficiently utilized for rapid and accurate analysis of routine chemical compositions in tobacco. Simultaneously, the research can serve as the technical support and the foundation of quantitative analysis of other NIR applications.

  6. A Practical Approach to Quantitative Processing and Analysis of Small Biological Structures by Fluorescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Noller, Crystal M; Boulina, Maria; McNamara, George; Szeto, Angela; McCabe, Philip M; Mendez, Armando J

    2016-09-01

    Standards in quantitative fluorescent imaging are vaguely recognized and receive insufficient discussion. A common best practice is to acquire images at Nyquist rate, where highest signal frequency is assumed to be the highest obtainable resolution of the imaging system. However, this particular standard is set to insure that all obtainable information is being collected. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate that for quantification purposes, these correctly set acquisition rates can be redundant; instead, linear size of the objects of interest can be used to calculate sufficient information density in the image. We describe optimized image acquisition parameters and unbiased methods for processing and quantification of medium-size cellular structures. Sections of rabbit aortas were immunohistochemically stained to identify and quantify sympathetic varicosities, >2 μm in diameter. Images were processed to reduce background noise and segment objects using free, open-access software. Calculations of the optimal sampling rate for the experiment were based on the size of the objects of interest. The effect of differing sampling rates and processing techniques on object quantification was demonstrated. Oversampling led to a substantial increase in file size, whereas undersampling hindered reliable quantification. Quantification of raw and incorrectly processed images generated false structures, misrepresenting the underlying data. The current study emphasizes the importance of defining image-acquisition parameters based on the structure(s) of interest. The proposed postacquisition processing steps effectively removed background and noise, allowed for reliable quantification, and eliminated user bias. This customizable, reliable method for background subtraction and structure quantification provides a reproducible tool for researchers across biologic disciplines. PMID:27182204

  7. A Practical Approach to Quantitative Processing and Analysis of Small Biological Structures by Fluorescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Noller, Crystal M.; Boulina, Maria; McNamara, George; Szeto, Angela; McCabe, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Standards in quantitative fluorescent imaging are vaguely recognized and receive insufficient discussion. A common best practice is to acquire images at Nyquist rate, where highest signal frequency is assumed to be the highest obtainable resolution of the imaging system. However, this particular standard is set to insure that all obtainable information is being collected. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate that for quantification purposes, these correctly set acquisition rates can be redundant; instead, linear size of the objects of interest can be used to calculate sufficient information density in the image. We describe optimized image acquisition parameters and unbiased methods for processing and quantification of medium-size cellular structures. Sections of rabbit aortas were immunohistochemically stained to identify and quantify sympathetic varicosities, >2 μm in diameter. Images were processed to reduce background noise and segment objects using free, open-access software. Calculations of the optimal sampling rate for the experiment were based on the size of the objects of interest. The effect of differing sampling rates and processing techniques on object quantification was demonstrated. Oversampling led to a substantial increase in file size, whereas undersampling hindered reliable quantification. Quantification of raw and incorrectly processed images generated false structures, misrepresenting the underlying data. The current study emphasizes the importance of defining image-acquisition parameters based on the structure(s) of interest. The proposed postacquisition processing steps effectively removed background and noise, allowed for reliable quantification, and eliminated user bias. This customizable, reliable method for background subtraction and structure quantification provides a reproducible tool for researchers across biologic disciplines. PMID:27182204

  8. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  9. Analysis of biological and chemical compounds by remote spectroscopy using IR TeX glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Foulgoc, Karine; Le Neindre, Lydia; Guimond, Yann; Ma, Hong Li; Zhang, Xhang H.; Lucas, Jacques

    1995-09-01

    The TeX glasses are attracting much attention as materials for low loss mid-IR optical fibers and are consequently good candidates for thermal imaging, laser power delivery, and more recently remote sensing. The TeX glass fiber, transmitting in a wide optical window, has a minimum attenuation in the 9-10 micrometers region. Fibers with an attenuation of less than 0.5 dB/m have been repeatly obtained. These fibers are coated with a UV curable or thermal plastic, in order to improve their mechanical properites. The IR remote spectroscopy using TeX fibers is one of the most promising applications. This technology allows to perform in situ, real-time, and on-line analysis of chemical and biological compounds. The study of industrial processes such as fermentations has been performed by this method, based on the use of these IR TeX fibers.

  10. Small cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, M. B.; Schaffer, T. E.; Chand, A.; Smith, B. L.; Hansma, P. K.; Wendman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Small cantilevers offer new possibilities for high speed/low noise atomic force microscopy of soft, biological samples. We have used a novel process to fabricate metallic cantilevers that should maximize reflectivity and minimize thermal bending. We have fabricated and measured the properties of aluminum, nickel, silver, and 14-karat gold cantilevers that are 3-12 um long, 1-4 um wide, and 60-300 nm thick and have resonant frequencies of 0.5-2 MHz and spring constants of 0.1-3 N/m. We also have fabricated small cantilevers with ultra-low spring constants (1-10 mN/m) out of silicon nitride and used them for force spectroscopy of DNA. This work was supported by grant numbers NSF-DMR9622169 and NSF-DMR9632716 from the Materials Research Division of the National Science Foundation and by grant number DAAH04-96-1-004 from the Army Research Office.

  11. Single-molecule Spectroscopy: Exploring Heterogeneity in Chemical and Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-04-01

    Many chemical and biological systems are heterogeneous in the molecular length scale (∼ 1 nm). Heterogeneity in many chemical systems and organized assemblies may be monitored using single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS). In SMS, the size of the focal spot (i.e., the smallest region to be probed) is nearly half of the excitation wavelength (λ/2, i.e., 200-375 nm) for visible light (400-750 nm). We discuss how one can get spatial resolutions better than 200 nm using molecules as nanometric probes. We show that polymer hydrogels, lipid vesicles, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), and binary liquid mixtures exhibit such heterogeneity. Another important observation is solute-dependent friction in RTILs. In an RTIL, diffusion of an ionic solute is slower than that of a neutral solute. PMID:26814020

  12. Application of UV-Raman spectroscopy to the detection of chemical and biological threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Christesen, Steven D.; Chyba, Tom; Ponsardin, Pat

    2004-03-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC) and ITT Industries Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division (AES) have been collaborating on the transitioning and subsequent development of a short-range, non-contact Raman lidar system specifically designed to detect and identify chemical agents on the battlefield. [The instrument, referred to as LISA (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents), will the subject of an accompanying paper.] As part of this collaboration, BNL has the responsibility for developing a spectral database (library) of surrogates and precursors for use with LISA"s pattern recognition algorithms. In this paper, the authors discuss the phenomenon of UV Raman and resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, the development of an instrument-independent Raman spectral library, and highlight the exploitable characteristics present in the acquired spectral signatures that suggest potential utility in our country"s efforts on Homeland Security.

  13. Parallel analysis of individual biological cells using multifocal laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Taylor, Douglas S; Matthews, Dennis L; Chan, James W

    2010-11-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a multifocal laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (M-LTRS) technique for parallel Raman spectral acquisition of individual biological cells. Using a 785-nm diode laser and a time-sharing laser trapping scheme, multiple laser foci are generated to optically trap single polystyrene beads and suspension cells in a linear pattern. Raman signals from the trapped objects are simultaneously projected through the slit of a spectrometer and spatially resolved on a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector with minimal signal crosstalk between neighboring cells. By improving the rate of single-cell analysis, M-LTRS is expected to be a valuable method for studying single-cell dynamics of cell populations and for the development of high-throughput Raman based cytometers. PMID:21073802

  14. QUANTITATIVE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY IN WEATHERING OF A MODEL POLYESTER-URETHANE COATING. (R828081E01)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spectroscopy was used to quantify the effects of ultraviolet light on a model polyester–urethane coating as it degraded in an accelerated exposure chamber. An explorative calculation of the effective dosage absorbed by the coatings was made and, depending on the quantum...

  15. Quantitative analyses of glass via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, C.; Hermann, J.; Mercadier, L.; Loewenthal, L.; Axente, E.; Luculescu, C. R.; Sarnet, T.; Sentis, M.; Viöl, W.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that elemental analysis of glass with a measurement precision of about 10% can be performed via calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Therefore, plasma emission spectra recorded during ultraviolet laser ablation of different glasses are compared to the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Using an iterative calculation algorithm, we deduce the relative elemental fractions and the plasma properties from the best agreement between measured and computed spectra. The measurement method is validated in two ways. First, the LIBS measurements are performed on fused silica composed of more than 99.9% of SiO2. Second, the oxygen fractions measured for heavy flint and barite crown glasses are compared to the values expected from the glass composing oxides. The measured compositions are furthermore compared with those obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that accurate LIBS analyses require spectra recording with short enough delays between laser pulse and detector gate, when the electron density is larger than 1017 cm- 3. The results show that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy based on accurate plasma modeling is suitable for elemental analysis of complex materials such as glasses, with an analytical performance comparable or even better than that obtained with standard techniques.

  16. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  17. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Nadeau, Kyle P; Jaworski, Frank B; Tromberg, Bruce J; Durkin, Anthony J

    2015-03-01

    We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ∼1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ∼400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns. PMID:25803186

  18. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ∼1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ∼400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns. PMID:25803186

  19. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ˜1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ˜400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns.

  20. Assessment of Proton Microbeam Analysis of 11B for Quantitative Microdistribution Analysis of Boronated Neutron Capture Agent Analogs in Biological Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G; Grant, P G; Ueda, D L; Autry-Conwell, S A; Hou, Y; Boggan, J E

    2002-12-04

    Purpose: To assess the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* nuclear reaction for quantitatively mapping the in-vivo sub-cellular distribution of boron within gliosarcoma tumors treated with boronated neutron capture therapy agent (NCTA) analogs. Materials and Methods: Intracranial tumors were produced in Fisher 344 rats using a 9L gliosarcoma model. Fourteen days later, the majority of rats were treated with f-boronophenylalanine and sacrificed 30 or 180 minutes after intravenous injection. Freeze dried tumor cryosections were imaged using the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* nuclear reaction and proton microbeams obtained from the nuclear microprobe at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Results/Discussion: With{sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* analysis, {sup 11}B distributions within cells can be quantitatively imaged with spatial resolutions down to 1.5 {micro}m, minimum detection limits of 0.8 mg/kg and acquisition times of several hours. These capabilities offer advantages over alpha track autoradiography, electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for 'B quantitation in tissues. However, the spatial resolution, multi-isotope capability and analysis times achieved with SIMS are superior to those achieved with {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* analysis. Conclusions: When accuracy in quantitation is crucial, the assessing the microdistribution of {sup 11}B. {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* reaction is well suited for Otherwise, SIMS may well be better suited to image the microdistribution of boron associated with NCTAs in biological tissues.

  1. [Quantitative analysis of surface composition of polypropylene blends using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-jia; Zhu, Ya-fei; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Jia-rui

    2008-08-01

    The surface composition and structure of solid organic polymers influence many of their properties and applications. Oligomers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and their graft copolymers of polybutadiene and polypropylene were used as the macromolecular surface modifiers of polypropylene. The compositions on surface and in bulk of the polypropylene (PP) blends were determined quantitatively using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) technique with a variable-angle multiple-reflection ATR accessory and FTIR measurements, respectively. By validating by Lambert-Beer law, 1103 and 1733 cm(-1) can be used to represent modifiers characteristic absorbance band to determine quantitatively the surface composition of modifiers including poly(ethylene glycol) and carbonyl segment in PP blends, respectively. The determination error can be effectively eliminated by calibrating wavelength and using absorption peak area ratio as the calibrating basis for the quantitative analysis. To minimize the effect of contact between the polymer film and the internal reflection element on the results of absolute absorbance, the technique of "band ratioing" was developed, and it was testified that the error of the peak area ratios of interest can be reduced to 5% or below, which was suitable for ATR-FTIR used as a determining quantitative tool for surface composition. The working curves were then established and used to calculate the composition of the responding functional groups in the film surface of the PP blends. The depth distribution of modifiers on the surface of blend films also can be determined by changing the incident angle of interest on the basis of the equation of the depth of penetration of the excursion wave in ATR spectra. The results indicated that ATR-FTIR can be used to determine quantitatively the surface composition and distribution of modifiers with reproducible and reliable

  2. Rapid Quantitative Determination of Squalene in Shark Liver Oils by Raman and IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hall, David W; Marshall, Susan N; Gordon, Keith C; Killeen, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Squalene is sourced predominantly from shark liver oils and to a lesser extent from plants such as olives. It is used for the production of surfactants, dyes, sunscreen, and cosmetics. The economic value of shark liver oil is directly related to the squalene content, which in turn is highly variable and species-dependent. Presented here is a validated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis method for the quantitation of squalene in shark liver oils, with an accuracy of 99.0 %, precision of 0.23 % (standard deviation), and linearity of >0.999. The method has been used to measure the squalene concentration of 16 commercial shark liver oils. These reference squalene concentrations were related to infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the same oils using partial least squares regression. The resultant models were suitable for the rapid quantitation of squalene in shark liver oils, with cross-validation r (2) values of >0.98 and root mean square errors of validation of ≤4.3 % w/w. Independent test set validation of these models found mean absolute deviations of the 4.9 and 1.0 % w/w for the IR and Raman models, respectively. Both techniques were more accurate than results obtained by an industrial refractive index analysis method, which is used for rapid, cheap quantitation of squalene in shark liver oils. In particular, the Raman partial least squares regression was suited to quantitative squalene analysis. The intense and highly characteristic Raman bands of squalene made quantitative analysis possible irrespective of the lipid matrix. PMID:26620374

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Strategies for Assessing the Biological Consequences and Repair of DNA Adducts.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-02-16

    , where liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is employed for the identification, and sometimes quantification, of the progeny products arising from the replication or transcription of lesion-bearing DNA substrates in vitro and in mammalian cells. We also highlight their applications to lesion bypass, mutagenesis, and repair studies of three representative types of DNA lesions, that is, the methylglyoxal-induced N(2)-CEdG, oxidatively induced 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, and regioisomeric alkylated thymidine lesions. Specially, we discuss the similar and distinct effects of the minor-groove DNA lesions including N(2)-CEdG and O(2)-alkylated thymidine lesions, as well as the major-groove O(4)-alkylated thymidine lesions on DNA replication and transcription machinery. For example, we found that the addition of an alkyl group to the O(4) position of thymine may facilitate its preferential pairing with guanine and thus induce exclusively the misincorporation of guanine nucleotide opposite the lesion, whereas alkylation of thymine at the O(2) position may render the nucleobase unfavorable in pairing with any of the canonical nucleobases and thus exhibit promiscuous miscoding properties during DNA replication and transcription. The MS-based strategies described herein should be generally applicable for quantitative measurement of the biological consequences and repair of other DNA lesions in vitro and in cells. PMID:26758048

  4. Quantitative analysis of liquid formulations using FT-Raman spectroscopy and HPLC The case of diphenhydramine hydrochloride in Benadryl.

    PubMed

    Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G; Markopoulou, C K; Koundourellis, J E

    2006-06-16

    The capability of FT-Raman spectroscopy for the fast and non-destructive quantitative analysis of liquid formulations was tested and the results were compared to those obtained by HPLC. Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DPH), the active ingredient of Benadryl, was determined in the presence of the numerous excipients of the elixir. A Raman calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of different standard solutions of DPH vibration at 1003 cm(-1). Application of the calibration model on the peak intensity recorded from the as-received commercially available sample with 2.5 mg ml(-1) DPH nominal value yielded a value of 2.49+/-0.05 mg ml(-1) DPH. The reliability of this method was verified by testing it against the conventionally used HPLC. The results from both methods were in excellent agreement. The main advantage of Raman over HPLC method during routine analysis is that is considerably faster and less solvent consuming. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy is non-destructive for the sample. On the other hand, the detection limit for Raman spectroscopy is much higher than the corresponding for the HPLC methodology. PMID:16621405

  5. Quantitative nondestructive methods for the determination of ticlopidine in tablets using reflectance near-infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Markopoulou, C K; Koundourellis, J E; Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G

    2008-02-01

    Two different nondestructive spectroscopy methods based on near-infrared (NIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy were developed for the determination of ticlopidine-hydrochloride (TCL) in pharmaceutical formulations and the results were compared to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An NIR assay was performed by reflectance over the 850-1700 nm region using a partial least squares (PLS) prediction model, while the absolute FT-Raman intensity of TCL's most intense vibration was used for constructing the calibration curve. For both methodologies the spectra were obtained from the as-received film-coated tablets of TCL. The two quantitative techniques were built using five "manual compressed" tablets containing different concentrations and validated by evaluating the calibration model as well as the accuracy and precision. The models were applied to commercial preparations (Ticlid). The results were compared to those obtained from the application of HPLC using the methodology described by "Sanofi Research Department" and were found to be in excellent agreement, proving that NIR, using fiber-optic probes, and FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used for the fast and reliable determination of the major component in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:18284803

  6. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  7. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and the quantitative monitoring of mechanochemical cocrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien Nguyen, K.; Friščić, Tomislav; Day, Graeme M.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Jones, William

    2007-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation probes intermolecular interactions through crystal lattice vibrations, allowing the characterization of solid materials. Thus, THz spectroscopy is a promising alternative to mainstream solid-state analytical tools such as X-ray diffraction or thermal analysis. The method provides the benefits of online measurement, remote sampling and three-dimensional imaging, all of which are attractive for quality control and security applications. In the context of pharmaceutical solids, THz spectroscopy can differentiate and quantify different forms of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Here, we apply this technique to monitor a dynamic process involving two molecular crystals. In particular, we follow the mechanochemical construction of a two-component cocrystal by grinding together phenazine (phen) and mesaconic acid (mes). To rationalize the observed changes in the spectra, we conduct lattice dynamics calculations that lead to the tentative assignment of at least one feature in the cocrystal THz spectrum.

  8. [Study on the application of ridge regression to near-infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis and optimum wavelength selection].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Liu, Xu-Hua; He, Xiong-Kui; Zhang, Lu-Da; Zhao, Long-Lian; Li, Jun-Hui

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper, taking 66 wheat samples for testing materials, ridge regression technology in near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy quantitative analysis was researched. The NIR-ridge regression model for determination of protein content was established by NIR spectral data of 44 wheat samples to predict the protein content of the other 22 samples. The average relative error was 0.015 18 between the predictive results and Kjeldahl's values (chemical analysis values). And the predictive results were compared with those values derived through partial least squares (PLS) method, showing that ridge regression method was deserved to be chosen for NIR spectroscopy quantitative analysis. Furthermore, in order to reduce the disturbance to predictive capacity of the quantitative analysis model resulting from irrelevant information, one effective way is to screen the wavelength information. In order to select the spectral information with more content information and stronger relativity with the composition or the nature of the samples to improve the model's predictive accuracy, ridge regression was used to select wavelength information in this paper. The NIR-ridge regression model was established with the spectral information at 4 wavelength points, which were selected from 1 297 wavelength points, to predict the protein content of the 22 samples. The average relative error was 0.013 7 and the correlation coefficient reached 0.981 7 between the predictive results and Kjeldahl's values. The results showed that ridge regression was able to screen the essential wavelength information from a large amount of spectral information. It not only can simplify the model and effectively reduce the disturbance resulting from collinearity information, but also has practical significance for designing special NIR analysis instrument for analyzing specific component in some special samples. PMID:20672604

  9. Quantitative detection of uric acid by electrochemical-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a multilayered Au/Ag substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Blackburn, Jonathan; Brosseau, Christa L

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid is a potential important biomarker in urine and serum samples for early diagnosis of preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive disorder that occurs during pregnancy. Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal death, especially in developing nation settings. Quantitative detection of uric acid for rapid and routine diagnosis of early preeclampsia using electrochemical-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) is presented herein. A uniform EC-SERS active Au/Ag substrate was developed by depositing nearly monodisperse gold and silver nanoparticles on the carbon working electrode surface of screen printed electrodes. The multilayered Au/Ag substrates were characterized by electron microscopy and used for quantitative detection of uric acid in 0.1 M NaF and synthetic urine at clinically relevant concentrations. These results showed a linear relationship between the EC-SERS signal intensity and the uric acid concentration. Relative errors calculated for selected concentrations were all within the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) criterion for uric acid analysis (±17%). It is believed that routine and early diagnosis of disease could be possible through such quantitative detection of biomarkers in patient samples using this EC-SERS method. PMID:25483146

  10. Determination of optical properties of turbid media spanning visible and near-infrared regimes via spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saager, Rolf B.; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, noncontact method for the determination of quantitative optical properties of turbid media from 430 to 1050 nm. Through measuring the broadband reflectance from an unknown sample as a function of the spatial frequency of the projected illumination patterns, the absolute absorption and reduced scattering coefficients can be calculated without a priori assumptions of the chromophores present. This technique, which is called spatially modulated quantitative spectroscopy (SMoQS), was validated through the quantification of optical properties of homogenous liquid phantoms with known concentrations of absorbers and scatterers. The properties of the phantoms were recovered across the range of values prepared with R2 values of 0.985 and 0.996 for absorption and reduced scattering, respectively. A measurement was also performed on skin tissue as a demonstration of the method’s performance in vivo. The resultant absorption spectrum was well described by a multichromophore fit, and the quantitative values for oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, water, and melanin were within published ranges for skin. PMID:20210486

  11. Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation.

    PubMed

    Kobrina, Yevgeniya; Isaksson, Hanna; Sinisaari, Miikka; Rieppo, Lassi; Brama, Pieter A; van Weeren, Rene; Helminen, Heikki J; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Saarakkala, Simo

    2010-01-01

    The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation. PMID:21198207

  12. Infrared spectroscopy reveals both qualitative and quantitative differences in equine subchondral bone during maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrina, Yevgeniya; Isaksson, Hanna; Sinisaari, Miikka; Rieppo, Lassi; Brama, Pieter A.; van Weeren, René; Helminen, Heikki J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2010-11-01

    The collagen phase in bone is known to undergo major changes during growth and maturation. The objective of this study is to clarify whether Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with cluster analysis, can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone in horses during maturation and growth. Equine subchondral bone samples (n = 29) from the proximal joint surface of the first phalanx are prepared from two sites subjected to different loading conditions. Three age groups are studied: newborn (0 days old), immature (5 to 11 months old), and adult (6 to 10 years old) horses. Spatial collagen content and collagen cross-link ratio are quantified from the spectra. Additionally, normalized second derivative spectra of samples are clustered using the k-means clustering algorithm. In quantitative analysis, collagen content in the subchondral bone increases rapidly between the newborn and immature horses. The collagen cross-link ratio increases significantly with age. In qualitative analysis, clustering is able to separate newborn and adult samples into two different groups. The immature samples display some nonhomogeneity. In conclusion, this is the first study showing that FTIR spectral imaging combined with clustering techniques can detect quantitative and qualitative changes in the collagen matrix of subchondral bone during growth and maturation.

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of the Carbon Hybridization State by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mangolini, Filippo; McClimon, J Brandon; Carpick, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of the local bonding configuration of carbon in carbon-based materials is of paramount importance since the properties of such materials strongly depend on the distribution of carbon hybridization states, the local ordering, and the degree of hydrogenation. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful techniques for gaining insights into the bonding configuration of near-surface carbon atoms. The common methodology for quantitatively evaluating the carbon hybridization state using C 1s NEXAFS measurements, which is based on the analysis of the sample of interest and of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) reference sample, was reviewed and critically assessed, noting that inconsistencies are found in the literature in applying this method. A theoretical rationale for the specific experimental conditions to be used for the acquisition of HOPG reference spectra is presented together with the potential sources of uncertainty and errors in the correctly computed fraction of sp(2)-bonded carbon. This provides a specific method for analyzing the distribution of carbon hybridization state using NEXAFS spectroscopy. As an illustrative example, a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film was analyzed using this method and showed good agreement with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (which is surface sensitive). Furthermore, the results were consistent with analysis from Raman spectroscopy (which is not surface sensitive), indicating the absence of a structurally different near-surface region in this particular thin film material. The present work can assist surface scientists in the analysis of NEXAFS spectra for the accurate characterization of the structure of carbon-based materials. PMID:26814796

  14. Absolute Quantitation of Bacterial Biofilm Adhesion and Viscoelasticity by Microbead Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Peter C.Y.; Dutcher, John R.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the most prevalent mode of bacterial growth in nature. Adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play important roles at different stages of biofilm development. Following irreversible attachment of bacterial cells onto a surface, a biofilm can grow in which its matrix viscoelasticity helps to maintain structural integrity, determine stress resistance, and control ease of dispersion. In this study, a novel application of force spectroscopy was developed to characterize the surface adhesion and viscoelasticity of bacterial cells in biofilms. By performing microbead force spectroscopy with a closed-loop atomic force microscope, we accurately quantified these properties over a defined contact area. Using the model gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we observed that the adhesive and viscoelastic properties of an isogenic lipopolysaccharide mutant wapR biofilm were significantly different from those measured for the wild-type strain PAO1 biofilm. Moreover, biofilm maturation in either strain also led to prominent changes in adhesion and viscoelasticity. To minimize variability in force measurements resulting from experimental parameter changes, we developed standardized conditions for microbead force spectroscopy to enable meaningful comparison of data obtained in different experiments. Force plots measured under standard conditions showed that the adhesive pressures of PAO1 and wapR early biofilms were 34 ± 15 Pa and 332 ± 47 Pa, respectively, whereas those of PAO1 and wapR mature biofilms were 19 ± 7 Pa and 80 ± 22 Pa, respectively. Fitting of creep data to a Voigt Standard Linear Solid viscoelasticity model revealed that the instantaneous and delayed elastic moduli in P. aeruginosa were drastically reduced by lipopolysaccharide deficiency and biofilm maturation, whereas viscosity was decreased only for biofilm maturation. In conclusion, we have introduced a direct biophysical method for simultaneously quantifying

  15. A highly linear superconducting bolometer for quantitative THz Fourier transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kehrt, Mathias; Monte, Christian; Beyer, Jörn; Hollandt, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    A superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer operating in the spectral range from 0.1 THz to 3 THz was designed. It is especially intended for Fourier transform spectroscopy and features a higher dynamic range and a highly linear response at a similar response compared to commercially available silicon composite bolometers. The design is based on a thin film metal mesh absorber, a superconducting thermistor and Si3N4 membrane technology. A prototype was set up, characterized and successfully used in first applications. PMID:25969213

  16. Analysis of poly-β-hydroxyalkonates (PHA) during the enhanced biological phosphorus removal process using FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-hua; Mao, Qin-yan; Liu, Yi-xin; Sheng, Guo-ping; Yu, Han-qing; Huang, Xian-huai; Liu, Shao-geng; Ling, Qi; Yan, Guo-bing

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is the main phosphorus removal technique for wastewater treatment. During the anaerobic-aerobic alternative process, the activated sludge experienced the anaerobic storage of polyhydroxy-β-alkonates (PHA) and aerobic degradation, corresponding the infrared peak intensity of sludge at 1 740 cm(-1) increased in the aerobic phase and declined in the anaerobic phase. Compared with PHA standard, this peak was indentified to attribute the carbonyl of PHA. The overlapping peaks of PHA, protein I and II bands were separated using Gaussian peak fitting method. The infrared peak area ratios of PHA versus protein I had a good relationship with the PHA contents measured by gas chromatography, and the correlation coefficient was 0.873. Thus, the ratio of the peak area of PHA versus protein I can be considered as the indicator of the PHA content in the sludge. The infrared spectra of 1 480-1 780 cm(-1) was selected, normalized and transferred to the absorption data. Combined with the chromatography analysis of PHA content in the sludge sample, a model between the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ETIR) spectra of the sludge and PHA content was established, which could be used for the prediction of the PHA content in the unknown sample. The PHA content in the sludge sample could be acquired by the infrared spectra of the sludge sample and the established model, and the values fitted well with the results obtained from chromatograph. The results would provide a novel analysis method for the rapid characterization and quantitative determination of the intracellular PHA content in the activated sludge. PMID:25358156

  17. Qualitative and Quantitative Control of Carbonated Cola Beverages Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D2O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as “fingerprints” and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  18. Qualitative and quantitative control of carbonated cola beverages using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maes, Pauline; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Reusch, Helmut; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2012-03-21

    ¹H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D₂O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as "fingerprints" and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  20. Multispectral diode laser based shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for biological sample identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a well established analytical method with applications in many areas, e.g. analysis of biological samples. To overcome the problem of an undesired fluorescence background masking the Raman signals we present a multi-spectral approach using shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). For our investigations we applied microsystem diode lasers which realize two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths required to perform SERDS at 488 nm, 671 nm, and 785 nm. The emission at 488 nm with an optical power of up to 30 mW and a spectral shift of 0.3 nm (12 cm-1) is realized by frequency doubling of a 976 nm distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser. The 671 nm laser diode contains two separate laser cavities (spectral shift: 0.7 nm (13 cm-1)) each incorporating a volume Bragg grating as frequency selective element. In that case, optical powers up to 50 mW can be obtained. For investigations at 785 nm we used a DFB laser with a maximum optical power of 110 mW and a spectral shift of 0.5 nm (7 cm-1). Meat, fat tissue, connective tissue and bones from pork and beef were used as test samples to demonstrate the effective background removal using SERDS. For all three wavelengths integration times of only 5 - 10 seconds were necessary showing the possibility of SERDS for rapid sample identification. A comparison with conventional Raman spectra is given pointing out the improvement of spectral quality. The applicability of SERDS for other analytical applications, e.g. medical diagnosis will be discussed.

  1. Distribution of Hydroxyl Groups in Kukersite Shale Oil: Quantitative Determination Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baird, Zachariah Steven; Oja, Vahur; Järvik, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the use of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to quantitatively measure the hydroxyl concentrations among narrow boiling shale oil cuts. Shale oil samples were from an industrial solid heat carrier retort. Reference values were measured by titration and were used to create a partial least squares regression model from FT-IR data. The model had a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.44 wt% OH. This method was then used to study the distribution of hydroxyl groups among more than 100 shale oil cuts, which showed that hydroxyl content increased with the average boiling point of the cut up to about 350 °C and then leveled off and decreased. PMID:25811170

  2. Improving the quantitative accuracy of cerebral oxygen saturation in monitoring the injured brain using atlas based Near Infrared Spectroscopy models.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Michael; Belli, Antonio; Davies, David; Lucas, Samuel J E; Su, Zhangjie; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    The application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for the monitoring of the cerebral oxygen saturation within the brain is well established, albeit using temporal data that can only measure relative changes of oxygenation state of the brain from a baseline. The focus of this investigation is to demonstrate that hybridisation of existing near infrared probe designs and reconstruction techniques can pave the way to produce a system and methods that can be used to monitor the absolute oxygen saturation in the injured brain. Using registered Atlas models in simulation, a novel method is outlined by which the quantitative accuracy and practicality of NIRS for specific use in monitoring the injured brain, can be improved, with cerebral saturation being recovered to within 10.1 ± 1.8% of the expected values. PMID:27003677

  3. Performance evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devangad, Praveen; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Tamboli, M. M.; Muhammed Shameem, K. M.; Santhosh, C.; Kumar, G. A.; Sardar, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    In the current study, we have determined the elemental compositions of synthesized rare earth doped phosphate glasses using a laboratory Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) system. LIBS spectra of this rare earth (samarium (Sm), thulium (Tm) and ytterbium (Yb)) doped glass samples with known composition are recorded using a highly sensitive detector. Major atomic emission lines of Sm, Tm and Yb found in LIBS spectra are reported. By considering the atomic emission line of phosphorous as an internal standard, calibration curves were constructed for all the rare earth concentrations. Very good linear regression coefficient (R2) values were obtained using this technique. Analytical predictive skill of LIBS was studied further using leave-one-out method. Low values of the reported correlation uncertainty between measured LIBS concentration ratio and certified concentration ratio confirms that LIBS technique has great potential for quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in glass matrix.

  4. The quantitative determination of FeS2 phases in coal by means of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, B.J.; King, Hobart M.; Renton, John J.; Stiller, A.

    1990-01-01

    A knowledge of the concentration of pyrite and marcasite in coals can provide important insight into the genesis of coal deposits. Determinations of the relative amounts of pyrite and marcasite by traditional methods of coal analysis are, however, beset with many difficulties. Using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and a mild chemical treatment with hydrofluoric acid, a technique has been devised for the quantitative determination of the relative concentrations of pyrite and marcasite in samples of whole coals or their low-temperature ashes. The sample preparation procedure is comparable to less accurate methods. Good qualitative agreement has been obtained between ore microscopic and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques for a series of extensively investigated whole coal samples.

  5. Quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy on patients with peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Fantini, Sergio; Palumbo, Renato; Pasqualini, Leonella; Vaudo, Gaetano; Franceschini, Edoardo; Gratton, Enrico; Palumbo, Barbara; Innocente, Salvatore; Mannarino, Elmo

    1998-01-01

    We have used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure the hemoglobin saturation at rest and during exercise on patients affected by peripheral vascular disease (PVD). The instrument used in our study is a frequency-domain tissue oximeter which employs intensity modulated (110 MHz) laser diodes. We examined 9 subjects, 3 of which were controls and 6 were patients affected by stage II PVD. The optical probe was located on the calf muscle of the subjects. The measurement protocol consisted of: (1) baseline (approximately 5 min); (2) stationary bicycle exercise (approximately 5 min); (3) recovery (approximately 15 min). The change in hemoglobin saturation during exercise ((Delta) Y) and the recovery time after exercise (trec) were significantly greater in the PVD patients ((Delta) Y equals -21 +/- 3%, trec equals 5.9 +/- 3.8 min) than in the control subjects ((Delta) Y equals 2 +/- 3%, trec equals 0.6 +/- 0.1 min).

  6. Quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy on patients with peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Maria A.; Fantini, Sergio; Palumbo, Renato; Pasqualini, Leonella; Vaudo, Gaetano; Franceschini, Edoardo; Gratton, Enrico; Palumbo, Barbara; Innocente, Salvatore; Mannarino, Elmo

    1997-12-01

    We have used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure the hemoglobin saturation at rest and during exercise on patients affected by peripheral vascular disease (PVD). The instrument used in our study is a frequency-domain tissue oximeter which employs intensity modulated (110 MHz) laser diodes. We examined 9 subjects, 3 of which were controls and 6 were patients affected by stage II PVD. The optical probe was located on the calf muscle of the subjects. The measurement protocol consisted of: (1) baseline (approximately 5 min); (2) stationary bicycle exercise (approximately 5 min); (3) recovery (approximately 15 min). The change in hemoglobin saturation during exercise ((Delta) Y) and the recovery time after exercise (trec) were significantly greater in the PVD patients ((Delta) Y equals -21 +/- 3%, trec equals 5.9 +/- 3.8 min) than in the control subjects ((Delta) Y equals 2 +/- 3%, trec equals 0.6 +/- 0.1 min).

  7. Quantitative analysis of mebendazole polymorphs in pharmaceutical raw materials using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Vitor H; Gonçalves, Jacqueline L; Vasconcelos, Fernanda V C; Pimentel, M Fernanda; Pereira, Claudete F

    2015-11-10

    This work evaluates the feasibility of using NIR spectroscopy for quantification of three polymorphs of mebendazole (MBZ) in pharmaceutical raw materials. Thirty ternary mixtures of polymorphic forms of MBZ were prepared, varying the content of forms A and C from 0 to 100% (w/w), and for form B from 0 to 30% (w/w). Reflectance NIR spectra were used to develop partial least square (PLS) regression models using all spectral variables and the variables with significant regression coefficients selected by the Jack-Knife algorithm (PLS/JK). MBZ polymorphs were quantified with RMSEP values of 2.37% w/w, 1.23% w/w and 1.48% w/w for polymorphs A, B and C, respectively. This is an easy, fast and feasible method for monitoring the quality of raw pharmaceutical materials of MBZ according to polymorph purity. PMID:26320077

  8. Quantitation of Organics in Supercritical Fluid Aging Experiments Using FTIR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher J.; Riley, Robert G.; Amonette, James E.; Gassman, Paul L.

    2004-03-31

    Aging is a natural process in which hydrophobic organic contaminants slowly accumulate in the mineral pores and organic matter of soils and sediments. Contaminants in aged soils exhibit decreased bioavailability and slow release to the environment. Therefore, aging may have a significant influence on the applicability and effectiveness of remediation strategies (e.g., bioremediation and natural attenuation) and the accuracy of numerical transport models. Previous research in our laboratory has demonstrated that circulating supercritical carbon dioxide can be used to rapidly prepare artificially aged materials for studying slow-release behavior. In this investigation, FTIR spectroscopy was evaluated as a means of monitoring the progress of the aging process in real time. Solvent interferences, measurement sensitivity for selected halocarbons and the influence of temperature and pressure on the FTIR spectra were assessed. Application of this methodology to monitoring the incorporation of carbon tetrachloride into natural soils will be discussed.

  9. [Quantitative analysis of contents in compound fertilizer and application research using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Le; Zhang, Hong; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Bin-Mei; Yu, Li-Xiang; Wang, Qi; Wu, Yue-Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a new approach to fast determining the content of urea, biuret and moisture in compound fertilizer composed of urea, ammonium dihydrogenphosphate and potassium chloride was proposed by using near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. After preprocessing the original spectrum, partial least squares (PLS) models of urea, biuret and moisture were built with the R2 values of 0.9861, 0.9770 and 0.9713 respectively, the root mean square errors of cross validation were 2.59, 0.38, 0.132 respectively. And the prediction correlation factors were 0.9733, 0.9215 and 0.9679 respectively. The authors detected six kinds of compound fertilizer in market for the model verification, the correlation factors were 0.9237, 0.9786 and 0.9874 respectively. The data implied that the new method can be used for situ quality control in the production process of compound fertilizer. PMID:24783536

  10. [Research on Quantitative Analytical Model for Determination of Phosmet by Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Hao, Yong; Chen, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy combined with surface enhanced technology was adopted for analysis of phosmet pesticide. Continuous wavelet transforms (CWT) and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were used for Raman spectral preprocess and characteristic Raman shifts selection, respectively. Multi-linear regression (MLR) was used for spectral modeling. It is shown that enhanced chips can achieve enhanced Raman spectral signal for low concentration of pesticides. CWT can improve spectral resolution and smoothness, and remove translation error. Characteristic Raman shifts selection method of SPA can improve analytical precision, and simplify modeling variables of MLR. CWT-SPA-MLR model can improve correlation coefficient (r) of prediction from 0.823 to 0.903, and reduce root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) from 1.640 to 1.122. CWT-SPA-MLR method can be used for constructing analytical models for Raman spectra and has good interpretability and repeatability. PMID:26669168

  11. Quantitative infrared spectroscopy of glucose in blood using partial least-squares analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, K.J.; Haaland, D.M.; Robinson, M.R.; Eaton, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of glucose in drawn samples of human blood has been determined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and partial least-squares (PLS) multivariate calibration. A twelve sample calibration set over the physiological glucose range of 50-400 mg/deciliter (dl) resulted in an average error of 5.2 mg/dl. These results were obtained using a cross validated PLS calibration over all infrared data in the frequency range of 950-1200 cm/sup /minus/1/. These results are a dramatic improvement relative to those obtained by previous studies of this system using univariate peak height analyses. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Microbicide Concentrations in Fluids, Gels and Tissues Using Confocal Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chuchuen, Oranat; Henderson, Marcus H.; Sykes, Craig; Kim, Min Sung; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Katz, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Topical vaginal anti-HIV microbicides are an important focus in female-based strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Understanding microbicide pharmacokinetics is essential to development, characterization and implementation of efficacious microbicide drug delivery formulations. Current methods to measure drug concentrations in tissue (e.g., LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) are highly sensitive, but destructive and complex. This project explored the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy to detect microbicide drugs and to measure their local concentrations in fluids, drug delivery gels, and tissues. We evaluated three candidate microbicide drugs: tenofovir, Dapivirine and IQP-0528. Measurements were performed in freshly excised porcine buccal tissue specimens, gel vehicles and fluids using two Horiba Raman microscopes, one of which is confocal. Characteristic spectral peak calibrations for each drug were obtained using serial dilutions in the three matrices. These specific Raman bands demonstrated strong linear concentration dependences in the matrices and were characterized with respect to their unique vibrational signatures. At least one specific Raman feature was identified for each drug as a marker band for detection in tissue. Sensitivity of detection was evaluated in the three matrices. A specific peak was also identified for tenofovir diphosphate, the anti-HIV bioactive product of tenofovir after phosphorylation in host cells. Z-scans of drug concentrations vs. depth in excised tissue specimens, incubated under layers of tenofovir solution in a Transwell assay, showed decreasing concentration with depth from the surface into the tissue. Time-dependent concentration profiles were obtained from tissue samples incubated in the Transwell assay, for times ranging 30 minutes - 6 hours. Calibrations and measurements from tissue permeation studies for tenofovir showed good correlation with gold standard LC-MS/MS data

  13. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  14. The Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Cohorts' Early Enrollment in Physics: concurrent with enrollment in mathematics, biology and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Robert Bruce Rodes

    Cohorts of 48 entering biological science majors was recruited in the fall of 2007 and again in 2008 and 2009 for the Interdisciplinary Science Experience (ISE). These ISE students enrolled in their own sections of standard courses of physics, chemistry, and biology. In these courses average ISE student out-performed their non-cohort peers by up to a full letter grade. A qualitative analysis of ISE student interviews illuminates the student experience and shows how the ISE students perceived themselves to be different than their non-cohort peers. Quantitative modeling of student performance shows that higher grades are correlated with multiple factors. These factors includes admissions characteristics such as high school GPA, and SAT scores, as well as demographic information. These trends support and elaborate on the selection narratives told by participants. Additionally the quantitative model found that higher student performance is predicted by structural aspects of the ISE program, specifically the timing of course, enrolling as a freshmen in many of their courses, and the sequencing of physics and chemistry courses. There is a statistically significant benefit to student performance in general and organic chemistry courses associated with completing the first quarter of the Physics for Bio-Science majors prior to enrollment. Further the combination of quantitative and qualitative data suggest that there is a epistemological transfer of problem solving skills and outlook from the physics to the chemistry courses.

  15. Detection and quantitative determination of diethylene glycol in ethyl alcohol using gamma- ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Udagani, Chikkappa; Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the toxic diethylene glycol contamination in ethyl alcohol demands a rapid, accurate and reliable method. Diethylene glycol (DEG) ingestion, accidental or intentional, can lead to death. Clinical and analytical methods used to detect diethylene glycol in alcohol require several hours to days due to tedious instrument handling and measurements. Enzymatic assays face difficulty due to analytic problems. As an alternative method of data analysis, we have used γ-ray spectroscopic method to estimate the diethylene glycol contamination in alcohol by monitoring the variation in the linear and mass attenuation coefficients. This method is simple, robust, portable and can provide reliable and quantitative information about the ethyl alcohol adulterated with diethylene glycol which is of broader interest to society. PMID:26243958

  16. Quantitative spectroscopy on individual wire, slot, bow-tie, rectangular, and square-shaped optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Husnik, Martin; Niegemann, Jens; Busch, Kurt; Wegener, Martin

    2013-11-15

    By using a recently introduced approach combining a focus-modulation technique with a common-path interferometer, we measure quantitatively the extinction, scattering, and absorption cross-section spectra of individual optical antennas. The experimental results on thin-wire antennas, slot antennas, bow-tie antennas, rectangular antennas, and square-shaped antennas resonating at around 1.4 μm wavelength are discussed. We find increased resonant scattering cross sections for the latter four antennas compared to the thin-wire antenna, both in absolute terms and relative to the absorption cross section. The square-shaped antenna's resonant extinction cross section approaches the limit of a coherent point dipole. However, the ratio of the resonant extinction cross section to the geometrical cross section of 38 is largest for the simple thin-wire antenna. PMID:24322083

  17. Metabolic differences between multiple sclerosis subtypes measured by quantitative MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, J W; Coyle, P K; Bashir, K; Whitaker, J N; Krupp, L B; Hetherington, H P

    2002-05-01

    We used quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging with T1-based image segmentation to evaluate the subtypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) (eight patients each group of relapsing-remitting [RR], secondary progressive [SP] and primary progressive [PP]). There was no significant difference in age between the PP group with the RP, SP or control group. We found that the metabolite ratio of choline/NA from the periventricular white matter region was not significantly different between the RR and SP groups. Using an ANOVA, the ratios of periventricular choline/NA or creatine/NA of these combined groups were significantly higher than the PP and control groups. Quantification of these data suggest that the major cause of the elevation of these parameters is due to an increase in choline and creatine in the RR group while NA is decreased in the SP group. Thus, early PP disease appears to be relatively intact with respect to neuronal loss. PMID:12120690

  18. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G.

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  19. Quantitative chemical state analysis of supported vanadium oxide catalysts by high resolution vanadium Kα spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Nanbu, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Tsunehiro; Kawai, Jun

    2011-03-01

    Oxidation states of vanadium species on Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), and TiO(2) were quantitatively analyzed by least-squares fitting of V Kα spectra recorded with a two-crystal X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Uncertainties of analytical results by the normalization procedure, and coefficient of validation and the reduction behavior of vanadium species by X-ray irradiation were discussed. The V(5+)/V(4+)/V(3+) ratios on Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), and TiO(2) calcined at 773 K in air were determined to be ca. 6/3/1, 3/6/1, and 5/4/1, respectively. The possible chemical states of vanadium species on supports were proposed. PMID:21302919

  20. Quantitative determination of molecular structure in multilayered thin films of biaxial and lower symmetry from photon spectroscopies. I. Reflection infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Atul N.; Allara, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A semitheoretical formalism based on classical electromagnetic wave theory has been developed for application to the quantitative treatment of reflection spectra from multilayered anisotropic films on both metallic and nonmetallic substrates. Both internal and external reflection experiments as well as transmission can be handled. The theory is valid for all wavelengths and is appropriate, therefore, for such experiments as x-ray reflectivity, uv-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry, and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Further, the theory is applicable to multilayered film structures of variable number of layers, each with any degree of anisotropy up to and including full biaxial symmetry. The reflectivities (and transmissivities) are obtained at each frequency by solving the wave propagation equations using a rigorous 4×4 transfer matrix method developed by Yeh in which the optical functions of each medium are described in the form of second rank (3×3) tensors. In order to obtain optical tensors for materials not readily available in single crystal form, a method has been developed to evaluate tensor elements from the complex scalar optical functions (n̂) obtained from the isotropic material with the limitations that the molecular excitations are well characterized and obey photon-dipole selection rules. This method is intended primarily for infrared vibrational spectroscopy and involves quantitative decomposition of the isotropic imaginary optical function (k) spectrum into a sum of contributions from fundamental modes, the assignment of a direction in molecular coordinates to the transition dipole matrix elements for each mode, the appropriate scaling of each k vector component in surface coordinates according to a selected surface orientation of the molecule to give a diagonal im(n̂) tensor, and the calculation of the real(n̂) spectrum tensor elements by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Tensors for other surface orientations are generated by an

  1. Purity analysis of hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride and phosgene by quantitative (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Terry J; Cullinan, David B

    2007-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride and phosgene are produced in tremendously large quantities today by the chemical industry. The compounds are also particularly attractive to foreign states and terrorists seeking an inexpensive mass-destruction capability. Along with contemporary warfare agents, therefore, the US Army evaluates protective equipment used by warfighters and domestic emergency responders against the compounds, and requires their certification at > or = 95 carbon atom % before use. We have investigated the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation behavior of the compounds to develop a quantitative NMR method for characterizing chemical lots supplied to the Army. Behavior was assessed at 75 and 126 MHz for temperatures between 5 and 15 degrees C to hold the compounds in their liquid states, dramatically improving detection sensitivity. T(1) values for cyanogen chloride and phosgene were somewhat comparable, ranging between 20 and 31 s. Hydrogen cyanide values were significantly shorter at 10-18 s, most likely because of a (1)H--(13)C dipolar contribution to relaxation not possible for the other compounds. The T(1) measurements were used to derive relaxation delays for collecting the quantitative (13)C data sets. At 126 MHz, only a single data acquisition with a cryogenic probehead gave a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding that necessary for certifying the compounds at > or = 95 carbon atom % and 99% confidence. Data acquired at 75 MHz with a conventional probehead, however, required > or = 5 acquisitions to reach this certifying signal-to-noise ratio for phosgene, and >/= 12 acquisitions were required for the other compounds under these same conditions. In terms of accuracy and execution time, the NMR method rivals typical chromatographic methods. PMID:17924355

  2. Accurate quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy: repeatability over time of site-specific 13C isotope ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Caytan, Elsa; Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2007-11-01

    The stability over time (repeatability) for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy has been tested on three probes: enriched bilabeled [1,2-13C2]ethanol; ethanol at natural abundance; and vanillin at natural abundance. It is shown in all three cases that the standard deviation for a series of measurements taken every 2-3 months over periods between 9 and 13 months is equal to or smaller than the standard deviation calculated from 5-10 replicate measurements made on a single sample. The precision which can be achieved using the present analytical 13C NMR protocol is higher than the prerequisite value of 1-2 per thousand for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance (13C-SNIF-NMR). Hence, this technique permits the discrimination of very small variations in 13C/12C ratios between carbon positions, as found in biogenic natural products. This observed stability over time in 13C NMR spectroscopy indicates that further improvements in precision will depend primarily on improved signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:17900175

  3. Qualitative and quantitative study of polymorphic forms in drug formulations by near infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Martin E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.; Sawatzki, Juergen

    2003-12-01

    Near infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of polymorphic forms in a number of commercial drug products containing the polymorphic drug compounds sorbitol, mannitol, famotidine, acemetacin, carbamazepine, meprobamate and phenylbutazone. The crystal forms present in the drug products were identified based on the position, intensity and shape of characteristic bands. Quantitative analysis of a mixture of two crystal forms of mannitol in a drug product was carried out using a partial least-squares method. In drug products containing meprobamate, sorbitol, and carbamazepine, the thermodynamically stable form was found exclusively, whereas metastable polymorphs were found in solid dosage forms of acemetacin, phenylbutazone, famotidine and mannitol. A mixture of two polymorphic forms of mannitol in Lipobay tablets was determined to consist of 30.8±3.8% of the metastable modification I. The simple sample preparation, the occurrence of sharp bands in the spectra as well as the high reproducibility and accuracy qualifies FT-Raman spectroscopy for the identification and quantification of crystal forms in drug products. The method is perfectly suited to meet the regulatory requirements of monitoring crystal forms during processing and storage and often succeeds in detecting the present crystal form in drug products even when the used excipients are not known.

  4. Quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Erxleben, Andrea; Ryder, Alan G; McArdle, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    The simultaneous quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs (forms I, III and V) in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is reported. To reduce the effect of systematic variations, four different data pre-processing methods; multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variate (SNV), first and second derivatives, were applied and their performance was evaluated using their prediction errors. It was possible to derive a reliable calibration model for the three polymorphic forms, in powder ternary mixtures, using a partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with SNV pre-processing, which predicted the concentration of polymorphs I, III and V. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for ATR-IR spectra were 5.0%, 5.1% and 4.5% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively, while NIR spectra had a RMSEP of 2.0%, 2.9%, and 2.8% and Raman spectra had a RMSEP of 3.5%, 4.1%, and 3.6% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively. NIR spectroscopy exhibits the smallest analytical error, higher accuracy and robustness. When these advantages are combined with the greater convenience of NIR's "in glass bottle" sampling method both ATR-IR and Raman methods appear less attractive. PMID:20605386

  5. Proton transport in biological systems can be probed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chungwen; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method to determine the proton transfer (PT) rate in channel proteins by two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. Proton transport processes in biological systems, such as proton channels, trigger numerous fundamental biochemical reactions. Due to the limitation in both spatial and time resolution of the traditional experimental approaches, describing the whole proton transport process and identifying the rate limiting steps at the molecular level is challenging. In the present paper, we focus on proton transport through the Gramicidin A channel. Using a kinetic PT model derived from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we model the amide I region of the 2DIR spectrum of the channel protein to examine its sensitivity to the proton transport process. We demonstrate that the 2DIR spectrum of the isotope-labeled channel contain information on the PT rate, which may be extracted by analyzing the antidiagonal linewidth of the spectral feature related to the labeled site. Such experiments in combination with detailed numerical simulations should allow the extraction of site dependent PT rates, providing a method for identifying possible rate limiting steps for proton channel transfer.

  6. Technique for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the kubelka-munk function

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Yang, Yuanlong

    2003-09-02

    Method and apparatus for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function. In one aspect, the method is used to determine whether a tissue sample is cancerous or not and comprises the steps of (a) measuring the diffuse reflectance from the tissue sample at a first wavelength and at a second wavelength, wherein the first wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 255-265 nm and wherein the second wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 275-285 nm; (b) using the Kubelka-Munk function to transform the diffuse reflectance measurement obtained at the first and second wavelengths; and (c) comparing a ratio or a difference of the transformed Kubelka-Munk measurements at the first and second wavelengths to appropriate standards determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous. One can use the spectral profile of KMF between 250 nm to 300 nm to determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous or precancerous. According to the value at the first and second wavelengths determine whether or not the malignant tissue is invasive or mixed invasive and in situ or carcinoma in situ.

  7. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  8. Next generation techniques in the high resolution spectroscopy of biologically relevant molecules.

    PubMed

    Neill, Justin L; Douglass, Kevin O; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2011-04-28

    Recent advances in the technology of test and measurement equipment driven by the computer and telecommunications industries have made possible the development of a new broadband, Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer that operates on principles similar to FTNMR. This technique uses a high sample-rate arbitrary waveform generator to construct a phase-locked chirped microwave pulse that gives a linear frequency sweep over a wide frequency range in 1 μs. The chirped pulse efficiently polarizes the molecular sample at all frequencies lying within this band. The subsequent free induction decay of this polarization is measured with a high-speed digitizer and then fast Fourier-transformed to yield a broadband, frequency-resolved rotational spectrum, spanning up to 11.5 GHz and containing lines that are as narrow as 100 kHz. This new technique is called chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy. The technique offers the potential to determine the structural and dynamical properties of very large molecules solely from fully resolved pure rotational spectra. FTMW double resonance techniques employing a low-resolution UV laser facilitate an easy assignment of overlapping spectra produced by different conformers in the sample. Of particular interest are the energy landscapes of conformationally flexible molecules of biological importance, including studies of their interaction with solvent and/or other weakly bound molecules. An example is provided from the authors' work on p-methoxyphenethylamine, a neurotransmitter, and its complexes with water. PMID:21394332

  9. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Electrical pulse induced biological effects using dielectric spectroscopy and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Allen Lawrence

    This dissertation studies the effects of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on biological cells by measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the pulsed cells and mathematically modeling avascular tumor growth, cell population dynamics, and Ohmic heating. These issues are critical because of the recent use of intense ultrashort PEFs for various biological and medical applications. Recent research using PEFs for tumor treatment motivated an investigation of a simple model for the growth of an avascular tumor. We modeled tumor growth before and after necrotic core formation by incorporating spatial dependence into a one dimensional scaling law. This model emphasized the importance of cell metabolic rate in determining the final steady state size of the tumor. Experimental results showing changes in cell survival and cell cycle due to PEFs led to an investigation of a simple mathematical model for cell population dynamics that considered the cells to be proliferating (dividing) or quiescent (resting). Although some cell populations apparently reached steady state quickly, the proliferating cell population fell below one, meaning that the overall cell population would eventually decay away. This result, which was unaltered by including a transition from the quiescent to proliferating state, emphasized the importance of targeting proliferating cells for successful cancer treatments. Time domain dielectric spectroscopy was used to measure the electrical properties of a biological cell suspension over a wide frequency range with a single pulse following multiple PEFs. Fitting the dielectric properties of a cancer cell (Jurkat) suspension to a double shell model yielded the dielectric parameters of the cell membrane, cytoplasm, nuclear envelope, and nucleoplasm. Decreased cytoplasm and nucleoplasm conductivity and increased suspension conductivity suggestion transport from the cell interior to the exterior consistent with electroporation. Reduced cell membrane

  11. A comparison of Fourier transform infrared and near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements: An application in polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeley, C. M.; Spragg, R. A.; Threlfall, T. L.

    Polymorphism in cortisone acetate, a synthetic adrenocortical steroid, and in a compound from a heart disease project has been studied with near-infrared Fourier transform Raman (NIR FT-Raman) spectroscopy. For cortisone acetate similar quantitative precision was obtained with both Raman and diffuse reflection IR measurements. The Raman measurements of the heart disease compound gave a calibration with a standard error of prediction of better than 2.5%. The combination of excellent precision with very convenient measurement of powders makes NIR FT-Raman spectroscopy a valuable tool for quantitative measurements of polymorphism.

  12. A Comparison of Multivariate and Pre-Processing Methods for Quantitative Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Geologic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Bell, J. F., III; Humphries, S. D.; Wiens, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument selected for the Curiosity rover is capable of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).[1] We used a remote LIBS instrument similar to ChemCam to analyze 197 geologic slab samples and 32 pressed-powder geostandards. The slab samples are well-characterized and have been used to validate the calibration of previous instruments on Mars missions, including CRISM [2], OMEGA [3], the MER Pancam [4], Mini-TES [5], and Moessbauer [6] instruments and the Phoenix SSI [7]. The resulting dataset was used to compare multivariate methods for quantitative LIBS and to determine the effect of grain size on calculations. Three multivariate methods - partial least squares (PLS), multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks (MLP ANNs) and cascade correlation (CC) ANNs - were used to generate models and extract the quantitative composition of unknown samples. PLS can be used to predict one element (PLS1) or multiple elements (PLS2) at a time, as can the neural network methods. Although MLP and CC ANNs were successful in some cases, PLS generally produced the most accurate and precise results.

  13. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: a technique for rapid, quantitative analysis of biogeochemical properties from Lake El gygytgyn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P.; Vogel, H.; Cunningham, L.; Persson, P.; Melles, M.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) as a fast and cost efficient analytical tool for quantitative estimations of biogenic silica (BSi), total nitrogen (TN), total organic carbon (TOC), and total inorganic carbon (TIC) in lacustrine sediment. Simultaneous inference of these components is possible because IR-spectra in the MIR-region contain a wide variety of information on minerogenic and organic substances. The technique requires only small amounts (0.01g dry weight) of sample material and negligible sample pre-treatments. In this study the FTIRS technique is applied to sediment successions from the ICDP deep drilling site Lake El gygytgyn, NE Siberia. FTIRS calibrations for BSi, TN, TOC, and TIC yielded good statistical performances and emphasize the potential of the technique for high-resolution investigations of long sediment successions. This is particularly crucial since the sediment successions recovered during the winter/spring 2009 ICDP campaign are c. 320 m long, reach back 3.6 million years and provide the longest continental climate record in the Arctic. The results from Lake El gygytgyn indicate that FTIRS is a useful analytical alternative for quantitative inference of BSi, TN, TOC, and TIC and might therefore also be interesting for other ICDP lake drilling projects where long sediment successions are recovered and need to be analyzed.

  14. Partial Least Squares and Neural Networks for Quantitative Calibration of Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBs) of Geologic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Morris, Richard V.; Clegg, S. M.; Humphries, S. D.; Wiens, R. C.; Bell, J. F., III; Mertzman, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument [1] on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover will be used to obtain the chemical composition of surface targets within 7 m of the rover using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). ChemCam analyzes atomic emission spectra (240-800 nm) from a plasma created by a pulsed Nd:KGW 1067 nm laser. The LIBS spectra can be used in a semiquantitative way to rapidly classify targets (e.g., basalt, andesite, carbonate, sulfate, etc.) and in a quantitative way to estimate their major and minor element chemical compositions. Quantitative chemical analysis from LIBS spectra is complicated by a number of factors, including chemical matrix effects [2]. Recent work has shown promising results using multivariate techniques such as partial least squares (PLS) regression and artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict elemental abundances in samples [e.g. 2-6]. To develop, refine, and evaluate analysis schemes for LIBS spectra of geologic materials, we collected spectra of a diverse set of well-characterized natural geologic samples and are comparing the predictive abilities of PLS, cascade correlation ANN (CC-ANN) and multilayer perceptron ANN (MLP-ANN) analysis procedures.

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to measure quantitatively soil carbon with emphasis on soil organic carbon. A review.

    PubMed

    Senesi, Giorgio S; Senesi, Nicola

    2016-09-28

    Soil organic carbon (OC) measurement is a crucial factor for quantifying soil C pools and inventories and monitoring the inherent temporal and spatial heterogeneity and changes of soil OC content. These are relevant issues in addressing sustainable management of terrestrial OC aiming to enhance C sequestration in soil, thus mitigating the impact of increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and related effects on global climate change. Nowadays, dry combustion by an elemental analyzer or wet combustion by dichromate oxidation of the soil sample are the most recommended and commonly used methods for quantitative soil OC determination. However, the unanimously recognized uncertainties and limitations of these classical laboursome methods have prompted research efforts focusing on the development and application of more advanced and appealing techniques and methods for the measurement of soil OC in the laboratory and possibly in situ in the field. Among these laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has raised the highest interest for its unique advantages. After an introduction and a highlight of the LIBS basic principles, instrumentation, methodologies and supporting chemometric methods, the main body of this review provides an historical and critical overview of the developments and results obtained up-to-now by the application of LIBS to the quantitative measurement of soil C and especially OC content. A brief critical summary of LIBS advantages and limitations/drawbacks including some final remarks and future perspectives concludes this review. PMID:27619082

  16. Solution-Based Electro-Orientation Spectroscopy for the Automated, Quantitative Characterization and Sorting of 1D Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Cevat; Shan, Jerry; Yi, Jingang; Feldman, Leonard; Durand, Corentin; Li, An-Ping

    2014-11-01

    The electrical-transport properties of 1D nanomaterials are often poorly known and vary with size and surface effects. Traditional quantitative characterization methods require specialized facilities and are usually slow, invasive and not suitable for the large number of measurements needed to statistically characterize samples with a heterogeneous distribution of properties. Here, we introduce a contactless, solution-based method to rapidly and quantitatively measure the electrical properties of 1D nanomaterials based on their transient alignment behavior in AC electric fields of different frequencies. The electro-orientation method can be automated and is compatible with further solution-based techniques for nanowire alignment and assembly, including electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis and flow control. We demonstrate the accuracy of the solution-based method using a variety of insulating, semiconducting and metallic nanowires, and show that electro-orientation spectroscopy can detect true nanoscale surface effects on the electrical conductivity of 1D nanomaterials. We further discuss our progress toward implementing the method in a microfluidic device capable of automated electrical characterization and sorting of nanowires and nanotubes.

  17. Quantitative studies of the Optogalvanic Effect and Optogalvanic Line Ratio Spectroscopy (OGLRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, C. J.; Stewart, R. S.; Chavez-Chavez, A.

    We have developed the technique of Optogalvanic Line Ratio Spectroscopy (OGLRS) in which simultaneous optogalvanic and absorption measurements are made on both lines for a pair of transitions under the same discharge conditions. This removes the need for accurate knowledge of the difficult-to-determine discharge dynamic impedance, and leaves terms describing the kinetics of the excited states of the particlar transitions selected. We believe OGLRS has considerable advantages because all the necessary experimental data can be determined accurately and compared with the theoretical model for the line ratio. We have measured and tested line ratios for a large number of neon 1s-2p transitions in the positive column as well as preliminary testing in the negative glow of a hollow-cathode discharge. For cases where the optogalvanic line ratio is strongly dependent on the particular states involved in the two transitions, we have shown that OGLRS may be successfully used as a sensitive test of important kinetic processes such as direct and indirect collisional population mixing and wall losses due to diffusion and resonance radiation trapping.

  18. Quantitative analysis of adhesive resin in the hybrid layer using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuan; Armstrong, Steven R.; Jessop, Julie L. P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine absolute molar concentration of adhesive resin components in the hybrid layer by establishing methods based on Raman spectroscopy fundamentals. The hybrid layer was treated as a three-component system consisting of collagen and an adhesive resin containing two monomers. Adhesive standard specimens and Raman peak area ratios obtained with a 785 nm excitation wavelength were used to construct separate calibration curves for comonomer relative molar concentration and Bis-GMA absolute molar concentration. Since collagen and water had no measurable peaks in the fingerprint region, a dilution coefficient Kj was defined to describe their impact on Raman peak area and to calculate HEMA absolute molar concentration. Methodology was validated using an analogous system containing acetone/ethanol/water. The absolute molar concentration of Bis-GMA and HEMA decreased 87% and 83%, respectively, from the top quarter to the middle of the hybrid layer. Additionally, less Bis-GMA penetrated the hybrid layer than HEMA, as indicated by the ∼20% decrease in comonomer molar concentration ratio between the adhesive resin layer and the top half of the hybrid layer. Lack of complete monomer infiltration will further challenge dentin-adhesive bond longevity. PMID:20186729

  19. [Rapid quantitative analysis of hydrocarbon composition of furfural extract oils using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yuan, Hong-Fu; Hu, Ai-Qin; Liu, Wei; Song, Chun-Feng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Song, Yi-Chang; He, Qi-Jun; Liu, Sha; Xu, Xiao-Xuan

    2014-07-01

    A set of rapid analysis system for hydrocarbon composition of heavy oils was designed using attenuated total reflection FTIR spectrometer and chemometrics to determine the hydrocarbon composition of furfural extract oils. Sixty two extract oil samples were collected and their saturates and aromatics content data were determined according to the standard NB/SH/T0509-2010, then the total contents of resins plus asphaltenes were calculated by the subtraction method in the percentage of weight. Based on the partial least squares (PLS), calibration models for saturates, aromatics, and resin+asphaltene contents were established using attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy, with their SEC, 1.43%, 0.91% and 1.61%, SEP, 1.56%, 1.24% and 1.81%, respectively, meeting the accuracy and repeatability required for the standard. Compared to the present standard method, the efficiency of hydrocarbon composition analysis for furfural extract oils is significantly improved by the new method which is rapid and simple. The system could also be used for other heavy oil analysis, with excellent extension and application foreground. PMID:25269288

  20. Quantitative analysis of arsenic in mine tailing soils using double pulse-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Ji-hyun; Lenth, Christoph; Salb, Christian; Ko, Eun-Joung; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Park, Kihong

    2009-10-01

    A double pulse-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) was used to determine arsenic (As) concentration in 16 soil samples collected from 5 different mine tailing sites in Korea. We showed that the use of double pulse laser led to enhancements of signal intensity (by 13% on average) and signal-to-noise ratio of As emission lines (by 165% on average) with smaller relative standard deviation compared to single pulse laser approach. We believe this occurred because the second laser pulse in the rarefied atmosphere produced by the first pulse led to the increase of plasma temperature and populations of exited levels. An internal standardization method using a Fe emission line provided a better correlation and sensitivity between As concentration and the DP-LIBS signal than any other elements used. The Fe was known as one of the major components in current soil samples, and its concentration varied not substantially. The As concentration determined by the DP-LIBS was compared with that obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) to evaluate the current LIBS system. They are correlated with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. The As concentration by the DP-LIBS was underestimated in the high concentration range (>1000 mg-As/kg). The loss of sensitivity that occurred at high concentrations could be explained by self-absorption in the generated plasma.

  1. Quantitative analysis of α-mangostin in hydrophilic ointment using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peerapattana, Jomjai; Otsuka, Kuniko; Hattori, Yusuke; Otsuka, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this research was to quantify the α-mangostin content in mangosteen pericarp (MP) ointment as a colloidal dispersion using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Various concentrations of MP (IP and EP) ointments containing both internal and external pericarps were prepared and the NIR spectra of these ointments were measured. The NIR spectrum of each ointment was correlated with α-mangostin concentration by partial least square (PLS) regression. Validation of the models was performed and their predictive ability was also investigated. The equation and R(2) value for the prediction of α-mangostin concentration in IP ointment were y=0.9843x+0.4441 and 0.9730 and those in EP ointment were y=0.9569x+0.1142 and 0.9136, respectively. The biases of the IP and EP ointment models were 0.23 and 0.00, respectively. The results showed that NIR could be a useful tool for the quality control of herbal medicine in hydrophilic ointment without any sample preparation. It could predict α-mangostin content in hydrophilic ointment at very low concentration with sufficient accuracy. PMID:24517571

  2. Quantitative determinations of levofloxacin and rifampicin in pharmaceutical and urine samples using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, A. A.; Mossa, H. A.; Barsoum, B. N.

    2005-11-01

    Rapid, specific and simple methods for determining levofloxacin and rifampicin antibiotic drugs in pharmaceutical and human urine samples were developed. The methods are based on 1H NMR spectroscopy using maleic acid as an internal standard and DMSO-d6 as NMR solvent. Integration of NMR signals at 8.9 and 8.2 ppm were, respectively, used for calculating the concentration of levofloxacin and rifampicin drugs per unit dose. Maleic acid signal at 6.2 ppm was used as the reference signal. Recoveries of (97.0-99.4) ± 0.5 and (98.3-99.7) ± 1.08% were obtained for pure levofloxacin and rifampicin, respectively. Corresponding recoveries of 98.5-100.3 and 96.8-100.0 were, respectively, obtained in pharmaceutical capsules and urine samples. Relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) values ≤2.7 were obtained for analyzed drugs in pure, pharmaceutical and urine samples. Statistical Student's t-test gave t-values ≤2.87 indicating insignificant difference between the real and the experimental values at the 95% confidence level. F-test revealed insignificant difference in precisions between the developed NMR methods and each of fluorimetric and HPLC methods for analyzing levofloxacin and rifampicin.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy and microspectroscopy analyzing qualitatively and quantitatively pharmaceutical hot melt extrudates.

    PubMed

    Netchacovitch, L; Thiry, J; De Bleye, C; Chavez, P-F; Krier, F; Sacré, P-Y; Evrard, B; Hubert, Ph; Ziemons, E

    2015-09-10

    Since the last decade, more and more Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) candidates have poor water solubility inducing low bioavailability. These molecules belong to the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) classes II and IV. Thanks to Hot-Melt Extrusion (HME), it is possible to incorporate these candidates in pharmaceutical solid forms. Indeed, HME increases the solubility and the bioavailability of these drugs by encompassing them in a polymeric carrier and by forming solid dispersions. Moreover, in 2004, the FDA's guidance initiative promoted the usefulness of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tools when developing a manufacturing process. Indeed, the main objective when developing a new pharmaceutical process is the product quality throughout the production chain. The trend is to follow this parameter in real-time in order to react immediately when there is a bias. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, NIR and Raman, are useful to analyze processes in-line. Moreover, off-line Raman microspectroscopy is more and more used when developing new pharmaceutical processes or when analyzing optimized ones by combining the advantages of Raman spectroscopy and imaging. It is an interesting tool for homogeneity and spatial distribution studies. This review treats about spectroscopic techniques analyzing a HME process, as well off-line as in-line, presenting their advantages and their complementarities. PMID:25704954

  4. Quantitative Determination of Fusarium proliferatum Concentration in Intact Garlic Cloves Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tamburini, Elena; Mamolini, Elisabetta; De Bastiani, Morena; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium proliferatum is considered to be a pathogen of many economically important plants, including garlic. The objective of this research was to apply near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to rapidly determine fungal concentration in intact garlic cloves, avoiding the laborious and time-consuming procedures of traditional assays. Preventive detection of infection before seeding is of great interest for farmers, because it could avoid serious losses of yield during harvesting and storage. Spectra were collected on 95 garlic cloves, divided in five classes of infection (from 1-healthy to 5-very highly infected) in the range of fungal concentration 0.34–7231.15 ppb. Calibration and cross validation models were developed with partial least squares regression (PLSR) on pretreated spectra (standard normal variate, SNV, and derivatives), providing good accuracy in prediction, with a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.829 and 0.774, respectively, a standard error of calibration (SEC) of 615.17 ppb, and a standard error of cross validation (SECV) of 717.41 ppb. The calibration model was then used to predict fungal concentration in unknown samples, peeled and unpeeled. The results showed that NIRS could be used as a reliable tool to directly detect and quantify F. proliferatum infection in peeled intact garlic cloves, but the presence of the external peel strongly affected the prediction reliability. PMID:27428978

  5. Differential pathlength spectroscopy for the quantitation of optical properties of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Constantin; Amelink, Arjen; Rayavarapu, Raja G; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Manohar, Srirang; van Leeuwen, Ton G

    2010-07-27

    An accurate estimation of optical absorption coefficient (microabs) and scattering coefficient (microsca) is important in characterizing nanoparticles for identifying or optimizing applications such as photothermal therapy and photoacoustic imaging. In this exciting period where several fascinating methods have been unveiled for the synthesis of various nanoparticles, the field is still lacking in the availability of efficient characterization methods. We introduce an accurate and simple methodology to optically characterize nanoparticles which could fill the gap. This is based on differential pathlength spectroscopy (DPS), a dual optical fiber approach, originally developed to detect cancer endoscopically by measuring the optical properties of tissue in small interrogation volumes. We expand its use to nanoparticles in a method that allows us to resolve the effects of microabs and microsca in the extinction coefficient of low concentration samples. We outline the measurement protocol using the DPS system and describe the analysis of the data taking additional inputs from electron microscopy and discrete dipole approximation (DDA) simulations. The DPS signal from the sample is first translated into the backscattering coefficient using a calibration constant. Further, the backscattering coefficient is converted via the simulated scattering phase function into the scattering coefficient. With this knowledge and extinction coefficient measured using a conventional photospectrometer, the absorption coefficient is calculated. We prove the validity of the method using spherical and rod-shaped gold nanoparticles, comparing the results with outputs from DDA simulations. We also briefly touch upon the dilemma of the choice of the appropriate dielectric function for gold at the nanoscale. PMID:20557072

  6. Quantitative analysis of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) lint trash by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Gary R; Foulk, Jonn A

    2007-06-27

    The presence of cotton plant botanical components, or trash, embedded in lint subsequent to harvesting and ginning is an important criterion in the classification of baled cotton by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Marketing Service. The trash particles may be reduced in size to the point that specific trash types are not identifiable by image or gravimetric analysis, and it is desirable to quantify different trash types so that processing lines may be optimized for removal of the most problematic trash to enhance processing performance and cotton lint quality. Currently, there are no methods available to adequately quantify cotton lint trash based on botanical origin. The present work attempts to address this issue through the analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy of dimethyl sulfoxide extracts of mixtures of six botanical trash types. The fluorescence data are subsequently subjected to chemometric analysis. The resulting 6 partial least-squares calibration models obtained from 128 mixtures are demonstrated in the case of leaf and hull to be capable of predicting individual trash component concentrations with a high degree of confidence. PMID:17536818

  7. Quantitative analysis of mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids using Raman spectroscopy with partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gumin; Lee, Kwangchil; Park, Haesung; Lee, Jinho; Jung, Youngjean; Kim, Kyoungsik; Son, Boongho; Park, Hyoungkuk

    2010-06-15

    Mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids are widely used as a good etchant for the pickling process of stainless steels. The cost reduction and the procedure optimization in the manufacturing process can be facilitated by optically detecting the concentration of the mixed acids. In this work, we developed a novel method which allows us to obtain the concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) mixture samples with high accuracy. The experiments were carried out for the mixed acids which consist of the HF (0.5-3wt%) and the HNO(3) (2-12wt%) at room temperature. Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to measure the concentration of the mixed acids HF and HNO(3), because the mixture sample has several strong Raman bands caused by the vibrational mode of each acid in this spectrum. The calibration of spectral data has been performed using the partial least squares regression method which is ideal for local range data treatment. Several figures of merit (FOM) were calculated using the concept of net analyte signal (NAS) to evaluate performance of our methodology. PMID:20441916

  8. Quantitative Determination of Fusarium proliferatum Concentration in Intact Garlic Cloves Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Elena; Mamolini, Elisabetta; De Bastiani, Morena; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium proliferatum is considered to be a pathogen of many economically important plants, including garlic. The objective of this research was to apply near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to rapidly determine fungal concentration in intact garlic cloves, avoiding the laborious and time-consuming procedures of traditional assays. Preventive detection of infection before seeding is of great interest for farmers, because it could avoid serious losses of yield during harvesting and storage. Spectra were collected on 95 garlic cloves, divided in five classes of infection (from 1-healthy to 5-very highly infected) in the range of fungal concentration 0.34-7231.15 ppb. Calibration and cross validation models were developed with partial least squares regression (PLSR) on pretreated spectra (standard normal variate, SNV, and derivatives), providing good accuracy in prediction, with a coefficient of determination (R²) of 0.829 and 0.774, respectively, a standard error of calibration (SEC) of 615.17 ppb, and a standard error of cross validation (SECV) of 717.41 ppb. The calibration model was then used to predict fungal concentration in unknown samples, peeled and unpeeled. The results showed that NIRS could be used as a reliable tool to directly detect and quantify F. proliferatum infection in peeled intact garlic cloves, but the presence of the external peel strongly affected the prediction reliability. PMID:27428978

  9. Strategies for improving sensitivity and selectivity for the quantitation of biotherapeutics in biological matrix using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jim X; Liu, Guowen; Zhao, Yue

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the applicability of using LC-MS/MS as a complementary technique to traditional ligand binding assays in the absolute quantitation of therapeutic proteins in biologic matrix has been demonstrated. Protein quantitation workflow via LC-MS/MS is primarily based on a enzymatic digestion model and recent works seek to improve selectivity and sensitivity. This review focuses on recent innovations in this field and discusses the following in detail: the applicability of two-dimensional liquid chromatography and its use to improve sensitivity and alleviate matrix ion suppression; the use of derivatization agents after digestion to improve extraction and MS ionization efficiency; techniques to reduce excess protein background and their positive effects on sensitivity, selectivity, and extraction consistency; the application of immunoaffinity extraction of proteins to enrich the analyte(s) of interest while improving selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:25776016

  10. Quantitative Sulfur Analysis using Stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Tucker, J. M.; Clegg, S. M.; Barefield, J. E.; Wiens, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS) in the ChemCam instrument on Mars Science Laboratory has the capability to produce robust, quantitative analyses not only for major elements, but also for a large range of light elements and trace elements that are of great interest to geochemists. However, sulfur presents a particular challenge because it reacts easily with oxygen in the plasma and because the brightest S emission lines lie outside ChemCam's spectral range. This work was undertaken within the context of our larger effort to identify and compensate for matrix effects, which are chemical properties of the material that influence the ratio of a given emission line to the abundance of the element producing that line. Samples for this study include two suites of rocks: a suite of 12 samples that are mixtures of sulfate minerals and host rocks, generally with high S contents (0.1-26.0 wt% S), and a large suite of 118 igneous rocks from varying parageneses with S contents in the 0-2 wt% range. These compositions provide several different types of matrices to challenge our calibration procedures. Samples were analyzed under ChemCam-like conditions: a Nd:YAG laser producing 17 mJ per 10ns pulse was directed onto samples positioned 5-9 m away from the laser and tele­scope. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber filled with 7 Torr CO2 to replicate the Martian surface pressure as the atmospheric pressure influences the LIBS plasma. Some of the LIBS plasma emission is collected with a telescope and transmitted through a 1 m, 300 um, 0.22NA optical fiber connected to a commercial Ocean Optics spectrometer. We are testing and comparing three different strategies to evaluate sulfur contents. 1) We have calculated regression lines comparing the intensity at each channel to the S content. This analysis shows that there are dozens of S emission lines in the ChemCam wavelength range that are suitable for use in quantitative analysis, even in the presence of Fe. 2

  11. Quantitative phenotyping of powdery mildew resistance in grapevine reveals differences in host resistance biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent demonstration of race-specific resistance to Erysiphe necator has encouraged grapevine breeders to identify and introgress quantitative resistance genes exhibiting complementary mechanisms. In 2012, we established a phenotyping center (VitisGenPM) for detailed evaluation of resistance to...

  12. Quantitation of Bacillus clausii in biological samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Mario; Mancini, Nicasio; Cavallero, Annalisa; Carletti, Silvia; Canducci, Filippo; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    A real-time PCR assay targeting the highly specific erm34 sequence of Bacillus clausii DNA was developed and optimized. The quantitative assay showed a sensitivity level of 10(2) CFU/microl of sample. The method may represent a useful tool for monitoring the role of B. clausii as probiotic in vivo. PMID:16318892

  13. Measurement issues associated with quantitative molecular biology analysis of complex food matrices for the detection of food fraud.

    PubMed

    Burns, Malcolm; Wiseman, Gordon; Knight, Angus; Bramley, Peter; Foster, Lucy; Rollinson, Sophie; Damant, Andrew; Primrose, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Following a report on a significant amount of horse DNA being detected in a beef burger product on sale to the public at a UK supermarket in early 2013, the Elliott report was published in 2014 and contained a list of recommendations for helping ensure food integrity. One of the recommendations included improving laboratory testing capacity and capability to ensure a harmonised approach for testing for food authenticity. Molecular biologists have developed exquisitely sensitive methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or mass spectrometry for detecting the presence of particular nucleic acid or peptide/protein sequences. These methods have been shown to be specific and sensitive in terms of lower limits of applicability, but they are largely qualitative in nature. Historically, the conversion of these qualitative techniques into reliable quantitative methods has been beset with problems even when used on relatively simple sample matrices. When the methods are applied to complex sample matrices, as found in many foods, the problems are magnified resulting in a high measurement uncertainty associated with the result which may mean that the assay is not fit for purpose. However, recent advances in the technology and the understanding of molecular biology approaches have further given rise to the re-assessment of these methods for their quantitative potential. This review focuses on important issues for consideration when validating a molecular biology assay and the various factors that can impact on the measurement uncertainty of a result associated with molecular biology approaches used in detection of food fraud, with a particular focus on quantitative PCR-based and proteomics assays. PMID:26631264

  14. Quantitative determination of aflatoxin B1 concentration in acetonitrile by chemometric methods using terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongyi; Jiang, Yuying; Lian, Feiyu; Zhang, Yuan; Xia, Shanhong

    2016-10-15

    Aflatoxins contaminate and colonize agricultural products, such as grain, and thereby potentially cause human liver carcinoma. Detection via conventional methods has proven to be time-consuming and complex. In this paper, the terahertz (THz) spectra of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solutions with concentration ranges of 1-50μg/ml and 1-50μg/l are obtained and analyzed for the frequency range of 0.4-1.6THz. Linear and nonlinear regression models are constructed to relate the absorption spectra and the concentrations of 160 samples using the partial least squares (PLS), principal component regression (PCR), support vector machine (SVM), and PCA-SVM methods. Our results indicate that PLS and PCR models are more accurate for the concentration range of 1-50μg/ml, whereas SVM and PCA-SVM are more accurate for the concentration range of 1-50μg/l. Furthermore, ten unknown concentration samples extracted from mildewed maize are analyzed quantitatively using these methods. PMID:27173565

  15. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers.

    PubMed

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-04-20

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  16. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers

    PubMed Central

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  17. Quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in tablets by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Roman; Mazurek, Sylwester

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in pharmaceuticals by PLS (partial least squares) and PCR (principal component regression) treatment of FT (Fourier transform)-Raman spectroscopic data is proposed. The proposed method was tested on powdered samples. Three chemometric models were built: the first, for samples consisting of an active substance diluted by lactose, starch and talc; the second, in which a simple inorganic salt was applied as an internal standard and additions were not taken into account; and the third, in which a model was constructed for a commercial pharmaceutical, where all constituents of the tablet were known. By utilising selected spectral ranges and by changing the chemometric conditions it is possible to carry out fast and precise analysis of the active component content in medicines on the basis of the simplified chemometric models. The proposed method was tested on five commercial tablets. The results were compared with data obtained by intensity ratio and pharmacopoeial methods. To appraise the quality of the models, the relative standard error of predictions (RSEPs) were calculated for calibration and prediction data sets. These were 0.7-2.0% and 0.8-2.3%, respectively, for the different PLS models. Application of these models to the Raman spectra of commercial tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid gave RSEP values of 1.3-2.0% and a mean accuracy of 1.2-1.7% with a standard deviation of 0.6-1.2%. PMID:11827382

  18. Fiber optic based multiparametric spectroscopy in vivo: Toward a new quantitative tissue vitality index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutai-Asis, Hofit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Deutsch, Assaf; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2006-02-01

    In our previous publication (Mayevsky et al SPIE 5326: 98-105, 2004) we described a multiparametric fiber optic system enabling the evaluation of 4 physiological parameters as indicators of tissue vitality. Since the correlation between the various parameters may differ in various pathophysiological conditions there is a need for an objective quantitative index that will integrate the relative changes measured in real time by the multiparametric monitoring system into a single number-vitality index. Such an approach to calculate tissue vitality index is critical for the possibility to use such an instrument in clinical environments. In the current presentation we are reporting our preliminary results indicating that calculation of an objective tissue vitality index is feasible. We used an intuitive empirical approach based on the comparison between the calculated index by the computer and the subjective evaluation made by an expert in the field of physiological monitoring. We used the in vivo brain of rats as an animal model in our current studies. The rats were exposed to anoxia, ischemia and cortical spreading depression and the responses were recorded in real time. At the end of the monitoring session the results were analyzed and the tissue vitality index was calculated offline. Mitochondrial NADH, tissue blood flow and oxy-hemoglobin were used to calculate the vitality index of the brain in vivo, where each parameter received a different weight, in each experiment type based on their significance. It was found that the mitochondrial NADH response was the main factor affected the calculated vitality index.

  19. Variables selection for quantitative determination of cotton content in textile blends by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xu-dong; Zhou, Ming-xing; Sun, Yi-ze

    2016-07-01

    Investigations were initiated to develop near infrared (NIR) techniques coupled with variables selection method to rapidly measure cotton content in blend fabrics of cotton and polyester. Multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), smooth, first derivative (1Der), second derivative (2Der) and their combination were employed to preprocess the spectra. Monte Carlo uninformative variables elimination (MCUVE), successive projections algorithm (SPA), and genetic algorithm (GA) were performed comparatively to choose characteristic variables associated with cotton content distributions. One hundred and thirty-five and fifty-nine samples were used to calibrate models and assess the performance of the models, respectively. Through comparing the performance of partial least squares (PLS) regression models with new samples, the optimal model of cotton content was obtained with spectral pretreatment method of 2 Der-Smooth-MSC and variables selection method of MCUVE-SPA-PLS. The correlation coefficient of prediction (rp) and root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.988% and 2.100%, respectively. The results suggest that NIR technique combining with variables selection method of MCUVE-SPA has significant potential to quantitatively analyze cotton content in blend fabrics of cotton and polyester; moreover, it could indicate the related spectral contributions.

  20. Quantitative resonance Raman spectroscopy of N-acetylpyrrolidine in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Harhay, G.P.; Hudson, B.S. )

    1993-08-05

    The resonance Raman spectra of aqueous solutions of N-acetylpyrrolidine are determined at seven excitation frequencies from 40 660 to 53 130 cm[sup [minus]1] spanning the first strong absorption band which is broad and diffuse The resonance Raman spectra are dominated by the single amide II[prime]-like vibration at 1485 cm[sup [minus]1] and its overtones of up to five quanta. Absolute resonance Raman cross sections are determined for these fundamental and overtone transitions at each excitation wavelength by reference to an internal standard of sodium perchlorate. A quantitative analysis of these data and the broad absorption spectrum is made on the basis of a model for the electronic excitation that includes the effects of inhomogeneous broadening. The observation of only a single enhanced vibrational normal mode, with the assumption that there is no Duschinsky rotation upon electronic excitation, makes this a particularly simple case for detailed analysis. A reasonably good fit to the experimental data is obtained using standard assumptions of Lorentzian inhomogeneous broadening and A-term (Condom) Raman scattering. In this fitting procedure, the integrated absorption spectrum determines the transition dipole length. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid, quantitative analysis of bitter acids in hops (Humulus lupulus).

    PubMed

    Killeen, Daniel P; Andersen, David H; Beatson, Ron A; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2014-12-31

    Hops, Humulus lupulus, are grown worldwide for use in the brewing industry to impart characteristic flavor and aroma to finished beer. Breeders produce many varietal crosses with the aim of improving and diversifying commercial hops varieties. The large number of crosses critical to a successful breeding program imposes high demands on the supporting chemical analytical laboratories. With the aim of reducing the analysis time associated with hops breeding, quantitative partial least-squares regression (PLS-R) models have been produced, relating reference data acquired by the industrial standard HPLC and UV methods, to vibrational spectra of the same, chemically diverse hops sample set. These models, produced from rapidly acquired infrared (IR), near-infrared (NIR), and Raman spectra, were appraised using standard statistical metrics. Results demonstrated that all three spectroscopic methods could be used for screening hops for α-acid, total bitter acids, and cohumulone concentrations in powdered hops. Models generated from Raman and IR spectra also showed potential for use in screening hops varieties for xanthohumol concentrations. NIR analysis was performed using both a standard benchtop spectrometer and a portable NIR spectrometer, with comparable results obtained by both instruments. Finally, some important vibrational features of cohumulone, colupulone, and xanthohumol were assigned using DFT calculations, which allow more insightful interpretation of PLS-R latent variable plots. PMID:25485767

  2. Qualitative and quantitative determination of human biomarkers by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Matei, C.; Cernat, R.; Popescu, A.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-07-01

    The hypothesis that blood, urine and other body fluids and tissues can be sampled and analyzed to produce clinical information for disease diagnosis or therapy monitoring is the basis of modern clinical diagnosis and medical practice. The analysis of breath air has major advantages because it is a non-invasive method, represents minimal risk to personnel collecting the samples and can be often sampled. Breath air samples from the human subjects were collected using aluminized bags from QuinTron and analyzed using the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) technique. LPAS is used to detect traces of ethylene in breath air resulting from lipid peroxidation in lung epithelium following the radiotherapy and also traces of ammonia from patients subjected to hemodialysis for treatment of renal failure. In the case of patients affected by cancer and treated by external radiotherapy, all measurements were done at 10P(14) CO2 laser line, where the ethylene absorption coefficient has the largest value (30.4 cm-1 atm-1), whereas for patients affected by renal failure and treated by standard dialysis, all measurements were performed at 9R(30) CO2 laser line, where the ammonia absorption coefficient has the maximum value of 57 cm-1 atm-1. The levels of ethylene and ammonia in exhaled air, from patients with cancer and renal failure, respectively, were measured and compared with breath air contents from healthy humans. Human gas biomarkers were measured at sub-ppb (parts per billion) concentration sensitivities. It has been demonstrated that LPAS technique will play an important role in the future of exhaled breath air analysis. The key attributes of this technique are sensitivity, selectivity, fast and real time response, as well as its simplicity.

  3. Quantitative Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Reveals a 1000-Fold Increase in Lifetime of Protein Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianwen; Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated dilute protein solutions with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and have observed that a rapid loss of proteins occurs from solution. It is commonly assumed that such a loss is the result of protein adsorption to interfaces. A protocol was developed in which this mode of protein loss can be prevented. However, FCS on fluorescent protein (enhanced green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mStrawberry) solutions enclosed by adsorption-protected interfaces still reveals a decrease of the fluorescent protein concentration, while the diffusion time is stable over long periods of time. We interpret this decay as a loss of protein functionality, probably caused by denaturation of the fluorescent proteins. We show that the typical lifetime of protein functionality in highly dilute, approximately single molecule per femtoliter solutions can be extended more than 1000-fold (typically from a few hours to >40 days) by adding compounds with surfactant behavior. No direct interactions between the surfactant and the fluorescent proteins were observed from the diffusion time measured by FCS. A critical surfactant concentration of more than 23 μM was required to achieve the desired protein stabilization for Triton X-100. The surfactant does not interfere with DNA-protein binding, because similar observations were made using DNA-cutting restriction enzymes. We associate the occurrence of denaturation of proteins with the activity of water at the water-protein interface, which was recently proposed in terms of the “water attack model”. Our observations suggest that soluble biomolecules can extend an influence over much larger distances than suggested by their actual volume. PMID:18586843

  4. [Quantitative Analysis of the Hydration Process of Mine Gas Mixture Based on Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-yong; Yu, Yue; Wu, Qiang; Gao, Xia

    2015-07-01

    The research on micro crystal structure of mine gas hydrate is especially significant for the technology of gas hydrate separation. Using Raman spectroscopy to observe hydration process of 3 kinds of mine gas mixture on line which contains high concentration of carbon dioxide, this experiment obtained the information of the hydrate crystals including large and small cage occupancy. Meanwhile obtained the hydration number indirectly based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw. The results show that cage occupancy and hydration number of mine gas hydrates change little during different growth stages. The large cages of hydrate phases are nearly full occupied by carbon dioxide and methane molecules together, with the occupancy ratios between 97.70% and 98.68%. Most of the guest molecules in large cages is carbon dioxide (78.58%-94.09%) and only a few (4.52%-19.12%) is filled with methane, it is because carbon dioxide concentration in the gas sample is higher than methane and there is competition between them. However the small cage occupancy ratios is generally low in the range from 17.93% to 82.41%, and the guest molecules are all methane. With the increase of methane concentration in gas sample, the cage occupancy both large and small which methane occupied has increased, meanwhile the large cage occupancy which methane occupied is lower than small cage. The hydration numbers of mine gas hydrate during different growth stages are between 6.13 and 7.33. Small cage occupancy has increased with the increase of methane concentration, this lead to hydration number decreases. Because of the uneven distribution of hydrate growth, the hydration numbers of 3 kinds of gas samples show irregular change during different growth stages. PMID:26717751

  5. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsukube, Takuro; Yagi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching. PMID:25343804

  6. Molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurement of biological molecule by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kei; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    Surface charge distributions on biological molecules in aqueous solutions are essential for the interactions between biomolecules, such as DNA condensation, antibody-antigen interactions, and enzyme reactions. There has been a significant demand for a molecular-scale charge density measurement technique for better understanding such interactions. In this paper, we present the local electric double layer (EDL) force measurements on DNA molecules in aqueous solutions using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a three-dimensional force mapping technique. The EDL forces measured in a 100 mM KCl solution well agreed with the theoretical EDL forces calculated using reasonable parameters, suggesting that FM-AFM can be used for molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurements on biological molecules especially in a highly concentrated electrolyte.

  7. Systems Biology of Cancer: A Challenging Expedition for Clinical and Quantitative Biologists

    PubMed Central

    Korsunsky, Ilya; McGovern, Kathleen; LaGatta, Tom; Olde Loohuis, Loes; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Griffeth, Nancy; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    A systems-biology approach to complex disease (such as cancer) is now complementing traditional experience-based approaches, which have typically been invasive and expensive. The rapid progress in biomedical knowledge is enabling the targeting of disease with therapies that are precise, proactive, preventive, and personalized. In this paper, we summarize and classify models of systems biology and model checking tools, which have been used to great success in computational biology and related fields. We demonstrate how these models and tools have been used to study some of the twelve biochemical pathways implicated in but not unique to pancreatic cancer, and conclude that the resulting mechanistic models will need to be further enhanced by various abstraction techniques to interpret phenomenological models of cancer progression. PMID:25191654

  8. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    SciTech Connect

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert; Evans, Christopher J.; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Carraro, Giovanni E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at E-mail: chris.evans@stfc.ac.uk E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl

    2014-04-20

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (∼4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T {sub eff} indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low α/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  9. Predicting Skin Permeability from Complex Chemical Mixtures: Dependency of Quantitative Structure Permeation Relationships on Biology of Skin Model Used

    PubMed Central

    Riviere, Jim E.; Brooks, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Dermal absorption of topically applied chemicals usually occurs from complex chemical mixtures; yet, most attempts to quantitate dermal permeability use data collected from single chemical exposure in aqueous solutions. The focus of this research was to develop quantitative structure permeation relationships (QSPR) for predicting chemical absorption from mixtures through skin using two levels of in vitro porcine skin biological systems. A total of 16 diverse chemicals were applied in 384 treatment mixture combinations in flow-through diffusion cells and 20 chemicals in 119 treatment combinations in isolated perfused porcine skin. Penetrating chemical flux into perfusate from diffusion cells was analyzed to estimate a normalized dermal absorptive flux, operationally an apparent permeability coefficient, and total perfusate area under the curve from perfused skin studies. These data were then fit to a modified dermal QSPR model of Abraham and Martin including a sixth term to account for mixture interactions based on physical chemical properties of the mixture components. Goodness of fit was assessed using correlation coefficients (r2), internal and external validation metrics (qLOO2, qL25%2, qEXT2), and applicable chemical domain determinations. The best QSPR equations selected for each experimental biological system had r2 values of 0.69–0.73, improving fits over the base equation without the mixture effects. Different mixture factors were needed for each model system. Significantly, the model of Abraham and Martin could also be reduced to four terms in each system; however, different terms could be deleted for each of the two biological systems. These findings suggest that a QSPR model for estimating percutaneous absorption as a function of chemical mixture composition is possible and that the nature of the QSPR model selected is dependent upon the biological level of the in vitro test system used, both findings having significant implications when dermal

  10. Simple, fast, and accurate methodology for quantitative analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with bio-hybrid fuel cell examples

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, David M.; Jahnke, Justin P.; Benyamin, Marcus S.; Sumner, James J.

    2016-01-01

    The standard methodologies for quantitative analysis (QA) of mixtures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) instruments have evolved until they are now more complicated than necessary for many users’ purposes. We present a simpler methodology, suitable for widespread adoption of FTIR QA as a standard laboratory technique across disciplines by occasional users.•Algorithm is straightforward and intuitive, yet it is also fast, accurate, and robust.•Relies on component spectra, minimization of errors, and local adaptive mesh refinement.•Tested successfully on real mixtures of up to nine components. We show that our methodology is robust to challenging experimental conditions such as similar substances, component percentages differing by three orders of magnitude, and imperfect (noisy) spectra. As examples, we analyze biological, chemical, and physical aspects of bio-hybrid fuel cells. PMID:26977411

  11. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Diane N. H.; Teitell, Michael A.; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples. PMID:26305212

  12. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Diane N H; Teitell, Michael A; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples. PMID:26305212

  13. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Diane N. H.; Teitell, Michael A.; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A.

    2015-11-01

    Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples.

  14. Sample Preparation Approaches for iTRAQ Labeling and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Christos; Moore, J Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of global quantification strategies utilized in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) are an attractive option for examining the relative amounts of proteins in different samples. The inherent complexity of mammalian proteomes and the diversity of protein physicochemical properties mean that complete proteome coverage is still unlikely from a single analytical method. Numerous options exist for reducing protein sample complexity and resolving digested peptides prior to MS analysis. Indeed, the reliability and efficiency of protein identification and quantitation from an iTRAQ workflow strongly depend on sample preparation upstream of MS. Here we describe our methods for: (1) total protein extraction from immortalized cells; (2) subcellular fractionation of murine tissue; (3) protein sample desalting, digestion, and iTRAQ labeling; (4) peptide separation by strong cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography; and (5) peptide separation by isoelectric focusing. PMID:26700038

  15. Quantitative analysis of sulfur functional groups in natural organic matter by XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manceau, Alain; Nagy, Kathryn L.

    2012-12-01

    Two new approaches to quantify sulfur functionalities in natural organic matter from S K-edge XANES spectroscopy are presented. In the first, the K-edge spectrum is decomposed into Gaussian and two arctangent functions, as in the usual Gaussian curve fitting (GCF) method, but the applicability of the model is improved by a rigorous simulation procedure that constrains the model-fit to converge toward chemically and physically realistic values. Fractions of each type of functionality are obtained after spectral decomposition by correcting Gaussian areas for the change in X-ray absorption cross-section with increasing oxidation state. This correction is made using published calibration curves and a new curve obtained in this study. Calibration-induced errors, inherent to the choice of a particular curve, are typically lower than 5% of total sulfur for oxidized species (e.g., sulfate), may reach 10% for organic reduced sulfur, and may be as high as 30-40% for inorganic reduced sulfur. A generic curve, which reduces the calibration-induced uncertainty by a factor of two on data collected to avoid X-ray overabsorption, is derived. In the second analytical scheme, the K-edge spectrum is partitioned into a weighted sum of component species, as in the usual linear combination fitting (LCF) method, but is fit to an extended database of reference spectra under the constraint of non-negativity in the loadings (Combo fit). The fraction of each sulfur functionality is taken as the sum of all positive fractions of references with similar oxidation state of sulfur. The two proposed methods are applied to eight humic and fulvic acids from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). The nature and fractions of sulfur functionalities obtained by the two analytical approaches are consistent with each other. The accuracy of the derived values, expressed as the difference in values of a fraction obtained on the same material by the two independent methods, is on average 4.5 ± 3

  16. Quantitative Antimony Speciation in Shooting-Range Soils by EXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinost,A.; Rossberg, A.; Vantelon, D.; Xifra, I.; Kretzschmar, R.; Leuz, A.; Funke, H.; Johnson, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Sb speciation in soil samples from Swiss shooting ranges was determined using Sb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and advanced statistical data analysis methods (iterative transformation factor analysis, ITFA). The XAS analysis was supported by a spectral data set of 13 Sb minerals and 4 sorption complexes. In spite of a high variability in geology, soil pH (3.1-7.5), Sb concentrations (1000-17,000 mg/kg) and shooting-range history, only two Sb species were identified. In the first species, Sb is surrounded solely by other Sb atoms at radial distances of 2.90, 3.35, 4.30 and 4.51 Angstroms, indicative of metallic Sb(0). While part of this Sb(0) may be hosted by unweathered bullet fragments consisting of PbSb alloy, Pb L{sub III}-edge XAS of the soil with the highest fraction (0.75) of Sb(0) showed no metallic Pb, but only Pb{sup 2+} bound to soil organic matter. This suggests a preferential oxidation of Pb in the alloy, driven by the higher standard reduction potential of Sb. In the second species, Sb is coordinated to 6 O-atoms at a distance of 1.98 Angstroms, indicative of Sb(V). This oxidation state is further supported by an edge energy of 30,496-30,497 eV for the soil samples with <10% Sb(0). Iron atoms at radial distances of 3.10 and 3.56 Angstroms from Sb atoms are in line with edge-sharing and bidentate corner-sharing linkages between Sb(O,OH)6 and Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra. While similar structural units exist in tripuhyite, the absence of Sb neighbors contradicts formation of this Fe antimonate. Hence the second species most likely consists of inner-sphere sorption complexes on Fe oxides, with edge and corner-sharing configuration occurring simultaneously. This pentavalent Sb species was present in all samples, suggesting that it is the prevailing species after weathering of metallic Sb(0) in oxic soils. No indication of Sb(III) was found.

  17. An Assessment of the Quantitative Skills of Students Taking Introductory College Biology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Jeffrey Flake; Anderson, Norman D.

    The mathematical skills possessed by students taking introductory biology courses were investigated. A list of 23 mathematical competencies was identified as part of the development of a 46-item multiple-choice test to measure the extent to which students possessed these competencies. The Biomathematics Skills Test (BST) was administered to…

  18. Determining enzyme kinetics for systems biology with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eicher, Johann J; Snoep, Jacky L; Rohwer, Johann M

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics for systems biology should ideally yield information about the enzyme's activity under in vivo conditions, including such reaction features as substrate cooperativity, reversibility and allostery, and be applicable to enzymatic reactions with multiple substrates. A large body of enzyme-kinetic data in the literature is based on the uni-substrate Michaelis-Menten equation, which makes unnatural assumptions about enzymatic reactions (e.g., irreversibility), and its application in systems biology models is therefore limited. To overcome this limitation, we have utilised NMR time-course data in a combined theoretical and experimental approach to parameterize the generic reversible Hill equation, which is capable of describing enzymatic reactions in terms of all the properties mentioned above and has fewer parameters than detailed mechanistic kinetic equations; these parameters are moreover defined operationally. Traditionally, enzyme kinetic data have been obtained from initial-rate studies, often using assays coupled to NAD(P)H-producing or NAD(P)H-consuming reactions. However, these assays are very labour-intensive, especially for detailed characterisation of multi-substrate reactions. We here present a cost-effective and relatively rapid method for obtaining enzyme-kinetic parameters from metabolite time-course data generated using NMR spectroscopy. The method requires fewer runs than traditional initial-rate studies and yields more information per experiment, as whole time-courses are analyzed and used for parameter fitting. Additionally, this approach allows real-time simultaneous quantification of all metabolites present in the assay system (including products and allosteric modifiers), which demonstrates the superiority of NMR over traditional spectrophotometric coupled enzyme assays. The methodology presented is applied to the elucidation of kinetic parameters for two coupled glycolytic enzymes from Escherichia coli (phosphoglucose isomerase and

  19. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  20. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C; Liu, Stanley K

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Liver Fat with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Cruite, Irene; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is characterized by abnormal and excessive accumulation of lipids within hepatocytes. It is an important feature of diffuse liver disease, and the histological hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Other conditions associated with steatosis include alcoholic liver disease, viral hepatitis, HIV and genetic lipodystrophies, cystic fibrosis liver disease, and hepatotoxicity from various therapeutic agents. Liver biopsy, the current clinical gold standard for assessment of liver fat, is invasive and has sampling errors, and is not optimal for screening, monitoring, clinical decision making, or well-suited for many types of research studies. Non-invasive methods that accurately and objectively quantify liver fat are needed. Ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess liver fat but have limited accuracy as well as other limitations. Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques can decompose the liver signal into its fat and water signal components and therefore assess liver fat more directly than CT or US. Most magnetic resonance (MR) techniques measure the signal fat-fraction (the fraction of the liver MR signal attributable to liver fat), which may be confounded by numerous technical and biological factors and may not reliably reflect fat content. By addressing the factors that confound the signal fat-fraction, advanced MR techniques measure the proton density fat-fraction (the fraction of the liver proton density attributable to liver fat), which is a fundamental tissue property and a direct measure of liver fat content. These advanced techniques show promise for accurate fat quantification and are likely to be commercially available soon. PMID:22025886

  2. Development of a biologically relevant calcium phosphate substrate for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McGall, Sarah J; Davies, Paul B; Neivandt, David J

    2005-10-01

    A novel biologically relevant composite substrate has been prepared consisting of a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer formed by magnetron sputter-coating from a hydroxyapatite (HA) target onto a gold-coated silicon substrate. The CaP layer is intended to mimic tooth and bone surfaces and allows polymers used in oral care to be deposited in a procedure analogous to that used for dental surfaces. The polymer cetyl dimethicone copolyol (CDC) was deposited onto the CaP surface of the substrate by Langmuir Blodgett deposition, and the structure of the adsorbed layer was investigated by the surface specific technique of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The gold sublayer provides enhancement of the SFG signal arising from the polymer but plays no part in the adsorption of the polymer. The surface morphology of the substrate was investigated using SEM and AFM. The surface roughness was commensurate with that of the thermally evaporated gold sublayer and uniform over areas of at least 36 mum(2). The chemical composition of the CaP-coated surface was determined by FTIR and TOF-SIMS. It was concluded that the surface is primarily calcium phosphate present as a mixture of amorphous, non-hydroxylated phases rather than solely stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. The SFG spectra from CDC on CaP were closely similar, both in resonance wavenumbers and in their relative intensities, with spectra of thin films of CDC recorded directly on gold. Application of previous analysis of the spectra of CDC on gold therefore enabled interpretation of the polymer orientation and conformation on the CaP substrate. PMID:16834276

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  5. A method for quantitative mapping of thick oil spills using imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; Livo, K. Eric; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd; Lundeen, Sarah; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Pearson, Neil; Sarture, Charles; McCubbin, Ian; Roberts, Dar; Bradley, Eliza; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne; The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Team

    2010-01-01

    subject to revision pending further analysis. Based on laboratory measurements, near-infrared (NIR) photons penetrate only a few millimeters into oil-water emulsions. As such, the oil volumes derived with this method are lower limits. Further, the detection is only of thick surface oil and does not include sheens, underwater oil, or oil that had already washed onto beaches and wetlands, oil that had been burned or evaporated as of May 17. Because NIR light penetration within emulsions is limited, and having made field observations that oil emulsions sometimes exceeded 20 millimeters in thickness, we estimate that the volume of oil, including oil thicker than can be probed in the AVIRIS imagery, is possibly as high as 150,000 barrels in the AVIRIS scenes. When this value is projected to the entire spill, it gives a volume of about 500,000 barrels for thick oil remaining on the sea surface as of May 17. AVIRIS data cannot be used to confirm this higher volume, and additional field work including more in-situ measurements of oil thickness would be required to confirm this higher oil volume. Both the directly detected minimum range of oil volume, and the higher possible volume projection for oil thicker than can be probed with NIR spectroscopy imply a significantly higher total volume of oil relative to that implied by the early NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) estimate of 5,000 barrels per day reported on their Web site.

  6. Introduction: Andrew Thomson and the Centre for Metalloprotein Spectroscopy and Biology at the University of East Anglia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael T

    2008-12-01

    The present article briefly relates the early history and growth of the Centre for Metalloprotein Spectroscopy and Biology at UEA (University of East Anglia) under the joint directorship of A.J. Thomson and C. Greenwood, and charts the exceptional success that this centre has had in fostering bioinorganic chemistry in the U.K. and the impact that it has had internationally. PMID:19021505

  7. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  8. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results. PMID:24188921

  9. The application of HPLC and microprobe NMR spectroscopy in the identification of metabolites in complex biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhaoxia; Jin, Mengxia; Liu, Xia; Guo, Wei; Jin, Xiangju; Liu, Hongyue; Wang, Yinghong

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics can be used directly to identify a variety of metabolites in biological fluids and tissues. Metabolite analysis is an important part of life science and metabolomics research. However, the identification of some metabolites using NMR spectroscopy remains a big challenge owing to low abundance or signal overlap. It is important to develop a method to measure these compounds accurately. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, metabolite prediction software packages, and spike-in experiments with authentic standards are often used to solve these problems, but they are costly and time-consuming. In this study, methods were developed to identify metabolites in complex biological mixtures using both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and off-line microprobe NMR spectroscopy. With use of these methods, 83 and 73 metabolites were identified in Sprague Dawley rat urine and feces, respectively. Among them, 40 and 45 metabolites, respectively, could not be identified with traditional NMR methods. Our research revealed that the combination of HPLC and NMR techniques could significantly improve the accuracy of trace and overlapped metabolite identification, while offering an effective and convenient approach to identify potential biomarkers in complex biological systems. PMID:25814271

  10. Quantitative carbon analysis in coal by combining data processing and spatial confinement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiongwei; Yin, Hualiang; Wang, Zhe; Fu, Yangting; Li, Zheng; Ni, Weidou

    2015-09-01

    Online measurement of carbon content of coal is important for coal-fired power plants to realize the combustion optimization of coal-fired boilers. Given that the measurement of carbon content of coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) suffers from low measurement accuracy because of matrix effects, our previous study has proposed a combination model to improve the measurement accuracy of carbon content of coal. The spatial confinement method, which utilizes the spectral emissions of laser-induced plasmas spatially confined by cavities for quantitative analysis, has potential to improve quantitative analysis performance. In the present study, the combination model was used for coal measurement with cylindrical cavity confinement to further improve the measurement accuracy of carbon content of coal. Results showed that measurement accuracy was improved when the combination model was used with spatial confinement method. The coefficient of determination, root-mean-square error of prediction, average relative error, and average absolute error for the combination model with cylindrical cavity confinement were 0.99, 1.35%, 1.66%, and 1.08%, respectively, whereas values for the combination model without cylindrical cavity confinement were 0.99, 1.63%, 1.82%, and 1.27%, respectively. This is the first time that the average absolute error of carbon measurement for coal analysis has achieved close to 1.0% using LIBS, which is the critical requirement set for traditional chemical processing method by Chinese national standard. These results indicated that LIBS had significant application potential for coal analysis.

  11. Quantitative Subtractively Normalized Interfacial Fourier Transform Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy Study of the Adsorption of Adenine on Au(111) Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Francisco; Su, Zhangfei; Leitch, J Jay; Rueda, Manuela; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2016-04-26

    Quantitative subtractively normalized interfacial Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy (SNIFTIRS) was used to determine the molecular orientation and identify the metal-molecular interactions responsible for the adsorption of adenine from the bulk electrolyte solution onto the surface of the Au(111) electrode. The recorded p-polarized IR spectra of the adsorbed species were subtracted from the collected s-polarized IR spectra to remove the IR contributions of the vibrational bands of the desorbed molecules that are located within the thin layer cavity of the spectroelectrochemical cell. The intense IR band around 1640 cm(-1), which is assigned to the pyrimidine ring stretching vibrations of the C5-C6 and C6-N10 bonds, and the IR band at 1380 cm(-1), which results from a combination of the ring stretching vibration of the C5-C7 bond and the in-plane CH bending vibration, were selected for the quantitative analysis measurements. The transition dipoles of these bands were evaluated by DFT calculations. Their orientations differed by 85 ± 5°. The tilt angles of adsorbed adenine molecules were calculated from the intensity of these two vibrations at different potentials. The results indicate that the molecular plane is tilted at an angle of 40° with respect to the surface normal of the electrode and rotates by 16° around its normal axis with increasing electrode potential. This orientation results from the chemical interaction between the N10 and gold atoms coupled with the π-π parallel stacking interactions between the adjacent adsorbed molecules. Furthermore, the changes in the molecular plane rotation with the electric field suggests that the N1 atom of adenine must also participate in the interaction between the molecule and metal. PMID:27040121

  12. Quantitative analysis of chromium in potatoes by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy coupled with linear multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianbing; Huang, Lin; Yao, Mingyin; Hu, Huiqin; Wang, Caihong; Liu, Muhua

    2015-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) coupled with the linear multivariate regression method was utilized to analyze chromium (Cr) quantitatively in potatoes. The plasma was generated using a Nd:YAG laser, and the spectra were acquired by an Andor spectrometer integrated with an ICCD detector. The models between intensity of LIBS characteristic line(s) and concentration of Cr were constructed to predict quantitatively the content of target. The unary, binary, ternary, and quaternary variables were chosen for verifying the accuracy of linear regression calibration curves. The intensity of characteristic lines Cr (CrI: 425.43, 427.48, 428.97 nm) and Ca (CaI: 422.67, 428.30, 430.25, 430.77, 431.86 nm) were used as input data for the multivariate calculations. According to the results of linear regression, the model of quaternary linear regression was established better in comparing with the other three models. A good agreement was observed between the actual content provided by atomic absorption spectrometry and the predicted value obtained by the quaternary linear regression model. And the relative error was below 5.5% for validation samples S1 and S2. The result showed that the multivariate approach can obtain better predicted accuracy than the univariate ones. The result also suggested that the LIBS technique coupled with the linear multivariate calibration method could be a great tool to predict heavy metals in farm products in a rapid manner even though samples have similar elemental compositions. PMID:26368908

  13. Case studies in quantitative biology: Biochemistry on a leash and a single-molecule Hershey-Chase experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Valen, David

    2011-12-01

    The last 50 years of biological research has seen a marked increase in the amount of quantitative data that describes living systems. This wealth of data provides a unique opportunity to recast the pictorial level descriptions of biological processes in the language of mathematics, with the hope that such an undertaking will lead to deeper insights into the behavior of living systems. To achieve this end, we have undertaken three case studies in physical biology. In the first case study, we used statistical mechanics and polymer physics to construct a simple model that describes how flexible chains of amino acids, referred to as tethers, influence the information processing properties of signaling proteins. In the second case study, we studied the DNA ejection process of phage lambda in vitro. In particular, we used bulk and single-molecule methods to study the control parameters that govern the force and kinematics of the ejection process in vitro. In the last case study, we studied the DNA ejection process of phage lambda in vivo. We developed an assay that allows real-time monitoring of DNA ejection in vivo at the single-molecule level. We also developed a parallel system that allows the simultaneous visualization of both phage capsids and phage DNA at the single-cell level, constituting a true single-molecule Hershey-Chase experiment. The work described in this thesis outlines new tools, both in theory and experiment, that can be used to study biological systems as well as a paradigm that can be employed to mathematicize the cartoons of biology.

  14. Lab on chip optical imaging of biological sample by quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Gennari, O.; Mugnano, M.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative imaging and three dimensional (3D) morphometric analysis of flowing and not-adherent cells is an important aspect for diagnostic purposes at Lab on Chip scale. Diagnostics tools need to be quantitative, label-free and, as much as possible, accurate. In recent years digital holography (DH) has been improved to be considered as suitable diagnostic method in several research field. In this paper we demonstrate that DH can be used for retrieving 3D morphometric data for sorting and diagnosis aims. Several techniques exist for 3D morphological study as optical coherent tomography and confocal microscopy, but they are not the best choice in case of dynamic events as flowing samples. Recently, a DH approach, based on shape from silhouette algorithm (SFS), has been developed for 3D shape display and calculation of cells biovolume. Such approach, adopted in combination with holographic optical tweezers (HOT) was successfully applied to cells with convex shape. Unfortunately, it's limited to cells with convex surface as sperm cells or diatoms. Here, we demonstrate an improvement of such procedure. By decoupling thickness information from refractive index ones and combining this with SFS analysis, 3D shape of concave cells is obtained. Specifically, the topography contour map is computed and used to adjust the 3D shape retrieved by the SFS algorithm. We prove the new procedure for healthy red blood cells having a concave surface in their central region. Experimental results are compared with theoretical model.

  15. FIXED DOSE COMBINATIONS WITH SELECTIVE BETA-BLOCKERS: QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS.

    PubMed

    Mahu, Ştefania Corina; Hăncianu, Monica; Agoroaei, Luminiţa; Grigoriu, Ioana Cezara; Strugaru, Anca Monica; Butnaru, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common causes of death, a complex and incompletely controlled disease for millions of patients. Metoprolol, bisoprolol, nebivolol and atenolol are selective beta-blockers frequently used in the management of arterial hypertension, alone or in fixed combination with other substances. This study presents the most used analytical methods for simultaneous determination in biological fluids of fixed combinations containing selective beta-blockers. Articles in Pub-Med, Science Direct and Wiley Journals databases published between years 2004-2014 were reviewed. Methods such as liquid chromatography--mass spectrometry--mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or high performance liquid chromatography--mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) were used for determination of fixed combination with beta-blockers in human plasma, rat plasma and human breast milk. LC-MS/MS method was used for simultaneous determination of fixed combinations of metoprolol with simvastatin, hydrochlorothiazide or ramipril, combinations of nebivolol and valsartan, or atenolol and amlodipine. Biological samples were processed by protein precipitation techniques or by liquid-liquid extraction. For the determination of fixed dose combinations of felodipine and metoprolol in rat plasma liquid chromatography--electrospray ionization--mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied, using phenacetin as internal standard. HPLC-MS method was applied for the determination of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide in human plasma. For the determination of atenolol and chlorthalidone from human breast milk and human plasma the HPLC method was used. The analytical methods were validated according to the specialized guidelines, and were applied to biological samples, thing that confirms the permanent concern of researchers in this field. PMID:26204671

  16. Raman Spectroscopy Techniques for the Detection of Biological Samples in Suspensions and as Aerosol Particles: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix-Rivera, Hilsamar; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews current scientific literature focusing on Raman spectroscopy modalities that have been successfully applied to the detection of biological samples in aqueous suspensions and in aerosols. Normal Raman, surface enhanced Raman scattering, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering, resonance Raman and UV-Raman spectropies, allow the detection of biological samples in situ in the near field and as well as in the far field at standoff distances. Applications span from fundamental studies to applied research in areas of defense and security and in monitoring of environmental pollution. A primary focus has been placed on biological samples including bacteria, pollen, virus, and biological contents in these specimens, in suspensions, and in aerosols. Several Raman spectroscopy studies have been reviewed to show how various modalities can achieve detection in these biosystems. Current data generated by our group is also included. Necessary parameters used to accomplish the detection and data analysis, which could also be used to interpret the results and to render the methodologies robust and reliable, are discussed.

  17. Quantitation of normal metabolite concentrations in six brain regions by in-vivo 1H-MR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Minati, Ludovico; Aquino, Domenico; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Erbetta, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concentrations of brain metabolites visible to in-vivo 1H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 1.5 T in a sample of 28 normal subjects. Quantitation was attempted for inositol compounds, choline units, total creatine and N-acetyl moieties, using open-source software. Six brain regions were considered: frontal and parietal white matter, medial temporal lobe, thalamus, pons and cerebellum. Absolute concentrations were derived using tissue water as an internal reference and using an external reference; metabolite signal intensity ratios with respect to creatine were also calculated. The inter-individual variability was smaller for absolute concentrations (internal reference) as compared to that for signal intensity ratios. Significant regional variability in concentration was found for all metabolites, indicating that separate normative values are needed for different brain regions. The values obtained in this study can be used as reference in future studies, provided the same methodology is followed; it is confirmed that despite unsuccessful attempts in the past, smaller coefficients of variation can indeed be obtained through absolute quantification. PMID:20927223

  18. Noninvasive, quantitative analysis of drug mixtures in containers using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) and multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Olds, William J; Sundarajoo, Shankaran; Selby, Mark; Cletus, Biju; Fredericks, Peter M; Izake, Emad L

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) is demonstrated for noninvasively investigating the composition of drug mixtures inside an opaque plastic container. The mixtures consisted of three components including a target drug (acetaminophen or phenylephrine hydrochloride) and two diluents (glucose and caffeine). The target drug concentrations ranged from 5% to 100%. After conducting SORS analysis to ascertain the Raman spectra of the concealed mixtures, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the SORS spectra to reveal trends within the data. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to construct models that predicted the concentration of each target drug, in the presence of the other two diluents. The PLS models were able to predict the concentration of acetaminophen in the validation samples with a root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 3.8% and the concentration of phenylephrine hydrochloride with an RMSEP of 4.6%. This work demonstrates the potential of SORS, used in conjunction with multivariate statistical techniques, to perform noninvasive, quantitative analysis on mixtures inside opaque containers. This has applications for pharmaceutical analysis, such as monitoring the degradation of pharmaceutical products on the shelf, in forensic investigations of counterfeit drugs, and for the analysis of illicit drug mixtures which may contain multiple components. PMID:22524958

  19. Quantitative sampling of conformational heterogeneity of a DNA hairpin using molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Voltz, Karine; Léonard, Jérémie; Touceda, Patricia Tourón; Conyard, Jamie; Chaker, Ziyad; Dejaegere, Annick; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Stote, Roland H.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and time resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy were combined to quantitatively describe the conformational landscape of the DNA primary binding sequence (PBS) of the HIV-1 genome, a short hairpin targeted by retroviral nucleocapsid proteins implicated in the viral reverse transcription. Three 2-aminopurine (2AP) labeled PBS constructs were studied. For each variant, the complete distribution of fluorescence lifetimes covering 5 orders of magnitude in timescale was measured and the populations of conformers experimentally observed to undergo static quenching were quantified. A binary quantification permitted the comparison of populations from experimental lifetime amplitudes to populations of aromatically stacked 2AP conformers obtained from simulation. Both populations agreed well, supporting the general assumption that quenching of 2AP fluorescence results from pi-stacking interactions with neighboring nucleobases and demonstrating the success of the proposed methodology for the combined analysis of TRF and MD data. Cluster analysis of the latter further identified predominant conformations that were consistent with the fluorescence decay times and amplitudes, providing a structure-based rationalization for the wide range of fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, the simulations provided evidence of local structural perturbations induced by 2AP. The approach presented is a general tool to investigate fine structural heterogeneity in nucleic acid and nucleoprotein assemblies. PMID:26896800

  20. Rate-equation model for quantitative concentration measurements in flames with picosecond pump-probe absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiechtner, G J; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1995-02-20

    Measurement of radical concentrations is important in understanding the chemical kinetics involved in combustion. Application of optical techniques allows for the nonintrusive determination of specific radical concentrations. One of the most challenging problems for investigators is to obtain flame data that are independent of the collisional environment. We seek to obviate this difficulty by the use of picosecond pump-probe absorption spectroscopy. A picosecond pump-probe absorption model is developed by rate-equation analysis. Implications are discussed for a laser-pulse width that is much smaller than the excited-state lifetime of the absorbing atom or molecule. The possibility of quantitative, quenching-independent concentration measurements is discussed, and detection limits for atomic sodium and the hydroxyl radical are estimated. For a three-level absorber-emitter, the model leads to a novel pump-probe strategy, called dual-beam asynchronous optical sampling, that can be used to obtain both the electronic quenching-rate coefficient and the doublet mixing-rate coefficient during a single measurement. We discuss the successful demonstration of the technique in a companion paper [Appl. Opt. 34, XXX (1995)]. PMID:21037640

  1. Quantitative determination of coenzyme Q10 from dietary supplements by FT-NIR spectroscopy and statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Anita; Vass, Andrea; Héberger, Károly; Fodor, Marietta

    2015-04-01

    A novel, time- and money-sparing method has been developed and validated for the quantitative determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) from several dietary supplements. FT-NIR spectroscopy was applied for the examination, and a calibration model was built by partial least-square regression (PLS-R) using 50 dietary supplements. The combination of FT-NIRS and multivariate calibration methods is a very fast and simple way to replace the commonly used HPLC-UV method; because in contrast with the traditional techniques, sample pretreatment and reagents are not required and no wastes are produced. The calibration models could be improved by different variable selection techniques (for instance interval PLS, interval selectivity ratio, genetic algorithm), which are very fast and user-friendly. The R(2) (goodness of calibration) and Q(2) (goodness of validation) of the variable selected models are highly increased, the R(2) values being over 0.90 and the Q(2) values being over 0.86 in every case. Fivefold cross-validation and external validation were applied. The developed method(s) could be used by quality assurance laboratories for routine measurement of coenzyme Q10 products. PMID:25662936

  2. Quantitative sampling of conformational heterogeneity of a DNA hairpin using molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Voltz, Karine; Léonard, Jérémie; Touceda, Patricia Tourón; Conyard, Jamie; Chaker, Ziyad; Dejaegere, Annick; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Stote, Roland H

    2016-04-20

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and time resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy were combined to quantitatively describe the conformational landscape of the DNA primary binding sequence (PBS) of the HIV-1 genome, a short hairpin targeted by retroviral nucleocapsid proteins implicated in the viral reverse transcription. Three 2-aminopurine (2AP) labeled PBS constructs were studied. For each variant, the complete distribution of fluorescence lifetimes covering 5 orders of magnitude in timescale was measured and the populations of conformers experimentally observed to undergo static quenching were quantified. A binary quantification permitted the comparison of populations from experimental lifetime amplitudes to populations of aromatically stacked 2AP conformers obtained from simulation. Both populations agreed well, supporting the general assumption that quenching of 2AP fluorescence results from pi-stacking interactions with neighboring nucleobases and demonstrating the success of the proposed methodology for the combined analysis of TRF and MD data. Cluster analysis of the latter further identified predominant conformations that were consistent with the fluorescence decay times and amplitudes, providing a structure-based rationalization for the wide range of fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, the simulations provided evidence of local structural perturbations induced by 2AP. The approach presented is a general tool to investigate fine structural heterogeneity in nucleic acid and nucleoprotein assemblies. PMID:26896800

  3. Protein analysis by 31p NMR spectroscopy in ionic liquid: quantitative determination of enzymatically created cross-links.

    PubMed

    Monogioudi, Evanthia; Permi, Perttu; Filpponen, Ilari; Lienemann, Michael; Li, Bin; Argyropoulos, Dimitris; Buchert, Johanna; Mattinen, Maija-Liisa

    2011-02-23

    Cross-linking of β-casein by Trichoderma reesei tyrosinase (TrTyr) and Streptoverticillium mobaraense transglutaminase (Tgase) was analyzed by (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in ionic liquid (IL). According to (31)P NMR, 91% of the tyrosine side chains were cross-linked by TrTyr at high dosages. When Tgase was used, no changes were observed because a different cross-linking mechanism was operational. However, this verified the success of the phosphitylation of phenolics within the protein matrix in the IL. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solid state showed that disk-shaped nanoparticles were formed in the reactions with average diameters of 80 and 20 nm for TrTyr and Tgase, respectively. These data further advance the current understanding of the action of tyrosinases on proteins on molecular and chemical bond levels. Quantitative (31)P NMR in IL was shown to be a simple and efficient method for the study of protein modification. PMID:21218836

  4. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative investigations of ubiquitin interactions with the ubiquitin-binding domains of NEMO.

    PubMed

    Dubosclard, Virginie; Fontan, Elisabeth; Agou, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin serves as a signal for a variety of cellular processes and its specific interaction with ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) regulates key cellular events including protein degradation, cell-cycle control, DNA repair, and kinase activation. Several binding mechanisms for isolated UBDs have been reported in recent years. However, little is known about the mechanism through which proteins containing multiple-UBDs achieve specificity for a particular oligomer of polyUb. The NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO, also known IKKγ), which plays a key role in the NF-κB signaling pathway, belongs to the latter family of proteins since it contains two distal NOA (also known UBAN/CC2-LZ/NUB) and ZF UBDs, separated by an unstructured proline-rich linker of about 40 residues in length. Here, we show a new procedure for fast purification of this bipartite domain. We also describe the use of intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative investigations of ubiquitin interactions between two distal ubiquitin-binding domains of NEMO (NOA and ZF). This spectroscopic method has many advantages over other techniques like GST pulldown and Biacore's SPR for monitoring avid interactions between two UBDs, especially when UBDs are located at significant distance from each other within the protein. PMID:25736758

  5. Remote quantitative analysis of minerals based on multispectral line-calibrated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiong; Wang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a feasible remote sensing technique used for mineral analysis in some unapproachable places where in situ probing is needed, such as analysis of radioactive elements in a nuclear leak or the detection of elemental compositions and contents of minerals on planetary and lunar surfaces. Here a compact custom 15 m focus optical component, combining a six times beam expander with a telescope, has been built, with which the laser beam of a 1064 nm Nd ; YAG laser is focused on remote minerals. The excited LIBS signals that reveal the elemental compositions of minerals are collected by another compact single lens-based signal acquisition system. In our remote LIBS investigations, the LIBS spectra of an unknown ore have been detected, from which the metal compositions are obtained. In addition, a multi-spectral line calibration (MSLC) method is proposed for the quantitative analysis of elements. The feasibility of the MSLC and its superiority over a single-wavelength determination have been confirmed by comparison with traditional chemical analysis of the copper content in the ore. PMID:25239065

  6. In Situ Determination of Fructose Isomer Concentrations in Wine Using (13)C Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia; Aupic, Clara; Lewis, Andrew R; Pinto, B Mario

    2015-09-30

    A practical method for simultaneously quantifying fructose and ethanol contents in wines using (13)C quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is reported. Less than 0.6 mL of wine is needed, and the method leaves an unmodified sample available for subsequent testing or additional analyses. The relative ratios of the five known fructose isomers in ethanolic solutions at different pH and their variations with the temperature are also reported. The data are correlated with the sweetness of wines. The technique was applied to commercially available wines, and the results are compared to other methods. Sugar levels above 0.6 g/L can also be measured. A simple adaptation of the method permits measurement of different carbohydrates using integration of single peaks for each compound, in combination with an external reference (13)C qNMR spectrum of a sample with a known concentration. The method can be applied at all stages of wine production, including grape must, during fermentation, and before and after bottling. PMID:26350157

  7. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  8. Quantitative conformationally sampled pharmacophore for delta opioid ligands: reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2007-04-19

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for delta opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of delta opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the delta opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 3103-3107) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of delta opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174 864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values>0.9, and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental values. PMID:17367120

  9. Quantitative methods for studying the role of free radicals in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Judit; Kriska, Tamas; Maximova, Tatjana K.; Nemeth, Andras; Korecz, Laszlo; Gal, Dezso

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of the primary sensitization steps in Photodynamic Therapy could be of essential importance concerning the efficiency of the treatment. Besides the well known mechanisms there is a possibility that the interaction between the excited triplet state sensitizer and the doublet state free radicals generated by the cells adds a significant contribution to the overall photodynamic effect. To support this hypothesis the quantification and identification of free radicals would be required. For this purpose chemiluminescence studies and spin trapping seemed to be the most suitable methods due to the extremely short lifetime of free radicals in biological systems. We present data on the kinetics of accumulation of free radicals: (1) by measuring luminol- dependent chemiluminescence of stimulated macrophages both in the absence and in the presence of a free radical inhibitor 3,5 di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl propionic acid; (2) by following the production of primary, secondary and tertiary radical adducts using DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) as spin trapping agent in chemical model systems. The measured data are used to determine the effect of the excited sensitizers on the kinetics of accumulation of free radicals under biological conditions. These results would serve to design new and more effective sensitizers used for therapy based on the triplet-doublet mechanism of action.

  10. Biological Matrix Effects in Quantitative Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Analytical Methods: Advancing Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E.; D’Souza, Priya E.; Chen, Xianyu; Radford, Samantha A.; Cohen, Jordan R.; Marder, M. Elizabeth; Kartavenka, Kostya; Ryan, P. Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    The ability to quantify levels of target analytes in biological samples accurately and precisely, in biomonitoring, involves the use of highly sensitive and selective instrumentation such as tandem mass spectrometers and a thorough understanding of highly variable matrix effects. Typically, matrix effects are caused by co-eluting matrix components that alter the ionization of target analytes as well as the chromatographic response of target analytes, leading to reduced or increased sensitivity of the analysis. Thus, before the desired accuracy and precision standards of laboratory data are achieved, these effects must be characterized and controlled. Here we present our review and observations of matrix effects encountered during the validation and implementation of tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods. We also provide systematic, comprehensive laboratory strategies needed to control challenges posed by matrix effects in order to ensure delivery of the most accurate data for biomonitoring studies assessing exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:25562585

  11. The EVB as a quantitative tool for formulating simulations and analyzing biological and chemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Warshel, Arieh

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen dramatic improvements in computer power, allowing ever more challenging problems to be approached. In light of this, it is imperative to have a quantitative model for examining chemical reactivity, both in the condensed phase and in solution, as well as to accurately quantify physical organic chemistry (particularly as experimental approaches can often be inconclusive). Similarly, computational approaches allow for great progress in studying enzyme catalysis, as they allow for the separation of the relevant energy contributions to catalysis. Due to the complexity of the problems that need addressing, there is a need for an approach that can combine reliability with an ability to capture complex systems in order to resolve long-standing controversies in a unique way. Herein, we will demonstrate that the empirical valence bond (EVB) approach provides a powerful way to connect the classical concepts of physical organic chemistry to the actual energies of enzymatic reactions by means of computation. Additionally, we will discuss the proliferation of this approach, as well as attempts to capture its basic chemistry and repackage it under different names. We believe that the EVB approach is the most powerful tool that is currently available for studies of chemical processes in the condensed phase in general and enzymes in particular, particularly when trying to explore the different proposals about the origin of the catalytic power of enzymes. PMID:25285029

  12. Water Vapor Uptake of Ultrathin Films of Biologically Derived Nanocrystals: Quantitative Assessment with Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Niinivaara, Elina; Faustini, Marco; Tammelin, Tekla; Kontturi, Eero

    2015-11-10

    Despite the relevance of water interactions, explicit analysis of vapor adsorption on biologically derived surfaces is often difficult. Here, a system was introduced to study the vapor uptake on a native polysaccharide surface; namely, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) ultrathin films were examined with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A significant mass uptake of water vapor by the CNC films was detected using the QCM-D upon increasing relative humidity. In addition, thickness changes proportional to changes in relative humidity were detected using SE. Quantitative analysis of the results attained indicated that in preference to being soaked by water at the point of hydration each individual CNC in the film became enveloped by a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water vapor, resulting in the detected thickness response. PMID:26461931

  13. A New Technique for Quantitative Determination of Dexamethasone in Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples Using Kinetic Spectrophotometric Method

    PubMed Central

    Akhoundi-Khalafi, Ali Mohammad; Shishehbore, Masoud Reza

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a type of steroidal medications that is prescribed in many cases. In this study, a new reaction system using kinetic spectrophotometric method for quantitative determination of dexamethasone is proposed. The method is based on the catalytic effect of dexamethasone on the oxidation of Orange G by bromate in acidic media. The change in absorbance as a criterion of the oxidation reaction progress was followed spectrophotometrically. To obtain the maximum sensitivity, the effective reaction variables were optimized. Under optimized experimental conditions, calibration graph was linear over the range 0.2–54.0 mg L−1. The calculated detection limit (3sb/m) was 0.14 mg L−1 for six replicate determinations of blank signal. The interfering effect of various species was also investigated. The present method was successfully applied for the determination of dexamethasone in pharmaceutical and biological samples satisfactorily. PMID:25737724

  14. A bench-top K X-ray fluorescence system for quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticles for biological sample diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, K.; Guazzoni, C.; Castoldi, A.; Royle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles can be targeted to biomarkers to give functional information on a range of tumour characteristics. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques offer potential quantitative measurement of the distribution of such heavy metal nanoparticles. Biologists are developing 3D tissue engineered cellular models on the centimetre scale to optimise targeting techniques of nanoparticles to a range of tumour characteristics. Here we present a high energy bench-top K-X-ray fluorescence system designed for sensitivity to bulk measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration for intended use in such thick biological samples. Previous work has demonstrated use of a L-XRF system in measuring gold concentrations but being a low energy technique it is restricted to thin samples or superficial tumours. The presented system comprised a high purity germanium detector and filtered tungsten X-ray source, capable of quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration of thicker samples. The developed system achieved a measured detection limit of between 0.2 and 0.6 mgAu/ml, meeting specifications of biologists and being approximately one order of magnitude better than the detection limit of alternative K-XRF nanoparticle detection techniques. The scatter-corrected K-XRF signal of gold was linear with GNP concentrations down to the detection limit, thus demonstrating potential in GNP concentration quantification. The K-XRF system demonstrated between 5 and 9 times less sensitivity than a previous L-XRF bench-top system, due to a fundamental limitation of lower photoelectric interaction probabilities at higher K-edge energies. Importantly, the K-XRF technique is however less affected by overlying thickness, and so offers future potential in interrogating thick biological samples.

  15. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system

    PubMed Central

    Lumen, Annie; McNally, Kevin; George, Nysia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Loizou, George D.

    2015-01-01

    A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local sensitivity analysis

  16. Common biology of craving across legal and illegal drugs - a quantitative meta-analysis of cue-reactivity brain response.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The present quantitative meta-analysis set out to test whether cue-reactivity responses in humans differ across drugs of abuse and whether these responses constitute the biological basis of drug craving as a core psychopathology of addiction. By means of activation likelihood estimation, we investigated the concurrence of brain regions activated by cue-induced craving paradigms across studies on nicotine, alcohol and cocaine addicts. Furthermore, we analysed the concurrence of brain regions positively correlated with self-reported craving in nicotine and alcohol studies. We found direct overlap between nicotine, alcohol and cocaine cue reactivity in the ventral striatum. In addition, regions of close proximity were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; nicotine and cocaine) and amygdala (alcohol, nicotine and cocaine). Brain regions of concurrence in drug cue-reactivity paradigms that overlapped with brain regions of concurrence in self-reported craving correlations were found in the ACC, ventral striatum and right pallidum (for alcohol). This first quantitative meta-analysis on drug cue reactivity identifies brain regions underlying nicotine, alcohol and cocaine dependency, i.e. the ventral striatum. The ACC, right pallidum and ventral striatum were related to drug cue reactivity as well as self-reported craving, suggesting that this set of brain regions constitutes the core circuit of drug craving in nicotine and alcohol addiction. PMID:21261758

  17. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Alexiou, Christoph; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration.

  18. Rapid and quantitative detection of the microbial spoilage of meat by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Ellis, David I; Broadhurst, David; Kell, Douglas B; Rowland, Jem J; Goodacre, Royston

    2002-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a rapid, noninvasive technique with considerable potential for application in the food and related industries. We show here that this technique can be used directly on the surface of food to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints." Spoilage in meat is the result of decomposition and the formation of metabolites caused by the growth and enzymatic activity of microorganisms. FT-IR was exploited to measure biochemical changes within the meat substrate, enhancing and accelerating the detection of microbial spoilage. Chicken breasts were purchased from a national retailer, comminuted for 10 s, and left to spoil at room temperature for 24 h. Every hour, FT-IR measurements were taken directly from the meat surface using attenuated total reflectance, and the total viable counts were obtained by classical plating methods. Quantitative interpretation of FT-IR spectra was possible using partial least-squares regression and allowed accurate estimates of bacterial loads to be calculated directly from the meat surface in 60 s. Genetic programming was used to derive rules showing that at levels of 10(7) bacteria.g(-1) the main biochemical indicator of spoilage was the onset of proteolysis. Thus, using FT-IR we were able to acquire a metabolic snapshot and quantify, noninvasively, the microbial loads of food samples accurately and rapidly in 60 s, directly from the sample surface. We believe this approach will aid in the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point process for the assessment of the microbiological safety of food at the production, processing, manufacturing, packaging, and storage levels. PMID:12039738

  19. Multiparametric monitoring of chemotherapy treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer using quantitative ultrasound and diffuse optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, William T.; Childs, Charmaine; Chin, Lee; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Tadayyon, Hadi; Watkins, Elyse; Wong, Sharon Lemon; Curpen, Belinda; Kaffas, Ahmed El; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) biomarkers in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Materials and Methods The institution's ethics review board approved this study. Subjects (n = 22) gave written informed consent prior to participating. US and DOSI data were acquired, relative to the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, at weeks 0, 1, 4, 8 and preoperatively. QUS parameters including the mid-band fit (MBF), 0-MHz intercept (SI), and the spectral slope (SS) were determined from tumor ultrasound data using spectral analysis. In the same patients, DOSI was used to measure parameters relating to tumor hemoglobin and composition. Discriminant analysis and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to classify clinical and pathological response during treatment and to estimate the area under the curve (AUC). Additionally, multivariate analysis was carried out for pairwise QUS/DOSI parameter combinations using a logistic regression model. Results Individual QUS and DOSI parameters, including the (SI), oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2), and total hemoglobin (HbT) were significant markers for response after one week of treatment (p < 0.01). Multivariate (pairwise) combinations increased the sensitivity, specificity and AUC at this time; the SI + HbO2 showed a sensitivity/specificity of 100%, and an AUC of 1.0. Conclusions QUS and DOSI demonstrated potential as coincident markers for treatment response and may potentially facilitate response-guided therapies. Multivariate QUS and DOSI parameters increased the sensitivity and specificity of classifying LABC patients as early as one week after treatment. PMID:26942698

  20. Developments in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative in situ measurements of free radicals in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived free radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH. Chemical oxidation cycles, which also involve peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2), remove natural or anthropogenic emissions (for example methane) and generate a range of secondary products, for example ozone, nitrogen dioxide, acidic and multifunctional organic species, and secondary organic aerosol, which impact on human health and climate. Owing to their short lifetime in the atmosphere, the abundance of radicals is determined solely by their rate of chemical production and loss, and not by transport. Field measurements of the concentrations of radicals and comparison with calculations using a numerical model therefore constitutes one of the very best ways to test whether the chemistry in each of these locations is understood and accurately represented in the model. Validation of the chemistry is important, as the predictions of climate and air quality models containing this chemistry are used to drive the formulation of policy and legislation. However, in situ measurements of radical species, owing to their very low abundance (often sub part per trillion) and short lifetimes (< 1 second for OH), remain extremely challenging. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) has enjoyed considerable success worldwide for the quantitative detection of radicals in a range of environments. The radicals are either excited directly by the laser (e.g. OH, IO) or are first chemically converted to OH prior to detection (e.g. HO2, RO2). Recent developments in the LIF technique for radical detection, which uses a supersonic expansion with detection at low pressure and multi kHz pulse repetition rate tunable laser systems, will be discussed, together with calibration methods to make signals absolute, and identification of potential interferences. LIF instruments have been operated on ground, ship and aircraft platforms at a

  1. Natural products as insecticides: the biology, biochemistry and quantitative structure-activity relationships of spinosyns and spinosoids.

    PubMed

    Sparks, T C; Crouse, G D; Durst, G

    2001-10-01

    The spinosyns, a novel family of insecticidal macrocyclic lactones, are active on a wide variety of insect pests, especially lepidopterans and dipterans. The biological activity of a mixture (spinosad; Tracer, Spin-Tor, Success) of the two most abundant spinosyns (spinosyns A and D) against pest insects is on a par with that of many pyrethroid insecticides. The spinosyns also exhibit a very favorable environmental and toxicological profile, and possess a mode of action that appears unique, with studies to date suggesting that both nicotinic and gamma-aminobutryic acid receptor functions are altered in a novel manner. Compared to pyrethroids such as cypermethrin, spinosyn A is slow to penetrate into insect larvae such as tobacco budworm larvae (Heliothis virescens); however, once inside the insect, spinosyn A is not readily metabolized. To date, more than 20 spinosyns and more than 800 spinosoids (semi-synthetic analogs) have been isolated or synthesized, respectively. Artificial neural network-based quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) studies for the spinosyns suggested that modification of the 2',3',4'-tri-O-methylrhamnosyl moiety could improve activity and several spinosoids incorporating these modifications exhibited markedly improved lepidopteran activity compared to spinosad. Multiple linear regression-based QSAR studies also suggest that whole molecule properties such as CLogP and MOPAC dipole moment can explain much of the biological activity observed for the spinosyns and closely related spinosoids. PMID:11695182

  2. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration–response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration–response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure–activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>105 compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery. PMID:16864780

  3. Anomalous Diffusion in Polymer Solution as Probed by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Its Universal Importance in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushida, Kiminori

    2008-02-01

    Experimental evidence of anomalous diffusion occurring in an inhomogeneous media (hyaluronan aquous solution) was obtained by use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) combined with other techniques (PFG-NMR and Photochemical reactions). The diffusion coefficient was obtained as a function of diffusion time or diffusion distance. Since this polymer solution can be regarded as a model system of extracellular matrices (ECMs), intercellular communication, which takes part in ECM, is greatly influenced by this anomalous diffusion mode. Therefore universal importance of anomalous diffusion in biological activity is identified in this series of independent experiments to measure diffusion coefficients.

  4. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy of single biological cells using optical trapping and shifted excitation difference techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Li, Yong-qing

    2003-03-01

    We report on the study of single biological cells with a confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy system that uses optical trapping and shifted excitation Raman difference technique. A tunable diode laser was used to capture a living cell in solution, confine it in the confocal excitation volume, and then excite the Raman scattering. The optical trapping allows us to lift the cell well off the cover plate so that the fluorescence interference from the plate can be effectively reduced. In order to further remove the interference of the fluorescence and stray light from the trapped cell, we employed a shifted excitation Raman difference technique with slightly tuned laser frequencies. With this system, high-quality Raman spectra were obtained from single optically trapped biological cells including E. coli bacteria, yeast cells, and red blood cells. A significant difference between control and heat-treated E. coli B cells was observed due to the denaturation of biomolecules.

  5. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    As synchrotron light sources and optics deliver greater photon flux on samples, X-ray-induced photo-chemistry is increasingly encountered in X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments. The resulting problems are particularly pronounced for biological XAS experiments. This is because biological samples are very often quite dilute and therefore require signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratios, with correspondingly greater exposures to the X-ray beam. This paper reviews the origins of photo-reduction and photo-oxidation, the impact that they can have on active site structure, and the methods that can be used to provide relief from X-ray-induced photo-chemical artifacts. PMID:23093745

  6. Quantitative monitoring of an activated sludge reactor using on-line UV-visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarraguça, Mafalda C; Paulo, Ana; Alves, Madalena M; Dias, Ana M A; Lopes, João A; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2009-10-01

    The performance of an activated sludge reactor can be significantly enhanced through use of continuous and real-time process-state monitoring, which avoids the need to sample for off-line analysis and to use chemicals. Despite the complexity associated with wastewater treatment systems, spectroscopic methods coupled with chemometric tools have been shown to be powerful tools for bioprocess monitoring and control. Once implemented and optimized, these methods are fast, nondestructive, user friendly, and most importantly, they can be implemented in situ, permitting rapid inference of the process state at any moment. In this work, UV-visible and NIR spectroscopy were used to monitor an activated sludge reactor using in situ immersion probes connected to the respective analyzers by optical fibers. During the monitoring period, disturbances to the biological system were induced to test the ability of each spectroscopic method to detect the changes in the system. Calibration models based on partial least squares (PLS) regression were developed for three key process parameters, namely chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrate concentration (N-NO(3)(-)), and total suspended solids (TSS). For NIR, the best results were achieved for TSS, with a relative error of 14.1% and a correlation coefficient of 0.91. The UV-visible technique gave similar results for the three parameters: an error of approximately 25% and correlation coefficients of approximately 0.82 for COD and TSS and 0.87 for N-NO(3)(-) . The results obtained demonstrate that both techniques are suitable for consideration as alternative methods for monitoring and controlling wastewater treatment processes, presenting clear advantages when compared with the reference methods for wastewater treatment process qualification. PMID:19701801

  7. Laser spectroscopy technique for estimating the efficiency of photosensitisers in biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, A V; Stratonnikov, Aleksandr A; Loshchenov, V B

    2006-06-30

    A fast and highly informative method is presented for estimating the photodynamic activity of photosensitisers. The method makes it possible to determine the rate of photodegradation in erythrocyte-containing biological media in nearly in vivo conditions, estimate the degree of irreversible binding of oxygen dissolved in the medium during laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitisers, and determine the nature of degradation of photosensitisers exposed to light (photobleaching). (laser biology)

  8. Insight into the Local Solvent Environment of Biologically Relevant Iron-nitroysl Systems through Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Jennifer Faith

    Iron-nitrosyl systems, particularly in the form of heme proteins, with their iron metal active sites play an important role in biological systems. Heme proteins act as storage, transporters, and receptors for nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule that is important in immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems of mammals. By better understanding the local environment of the active site of NO binding heme proteins we can gain insight into disease in which the NO pathways have been implicated. This is an important step to being able to develop pharmaceuticals targeting NO pathways in humans. Sodium nitroprusside ((SNP, Na2[Fe(CN)5is NO]·2H 2O) investigated as a model system for the active site of nitric oxide binding heme proteins. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) to obtain dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretch (nuNO) in a series of solvents we are able to better understand the local environment of the more complicated metalloproteins. Rigorous line shape analysis is performed by using nonlinear response theory to simulate 2D IR spectra which are then fit to experimental data in an iterative process to extract frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs). The time scales obtained are then correlated to empirical solvent polarity parameters. The analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveal that the spectral diffusion timescale of the nuNO in SNP varies from 0.8 -- 4 ps and is negatively correlated with the empirical solvent polarity scales. We continue to investigate NO binding of metalloproteins through 2D IR experiments on nitrophorin 4 (NP4). NP4 is a pH-sensitive NO transporter protein present in the salivary gland of the blood sucking insect Rhodius prolixus which undergoes a pH sensitive structural change between a closed and open conformation allowing for the storage and delivery of NO. The two structures are observed spectroscopically as two distinct pH-dependent nu NO frequencies at ~1904 and ~1917 cm-1. We obtain FFCFs by globally

  9. Quantitative Applications of Deep-Sea Raman Spectroscopy: Geochemistry of 1,4- thioxane in sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hester, K. C.; Walz, P. M.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed quantitative Raman spectroscopic techniques for the novel detection of dissolved species in sea water to determine their fundamental properties. In this example we use a field-deployable Raman system to determine the solubility of 1,4-thioxane (TO) in sea water as 0.65 to 0.63 mol/kg H2O between 4.5°C and 25.0°C (which varies greatly from an earlier report of 2.75 mol/kg H2O), and to assess the conditions under which it may form a hydrate. TO is of unusual environmental interest as a breakdown product of the chemical weapon mustard gas, and thus development of non-contact field- deployable sensing techniques is highly desirable. Raman spectroscopy has typically been considered as only a qualitative technique due to the complexity of the optical path and the substantial changes in components between different instruments. We show here that by self-referencing to the ubiquitous water peaks (the water ν2 mode from 1500 to 1800 cm-1) we can derive quantitative information with a precision of ± 4%, and provide essential new information. The long-term fate of large quantities of chemical weapons disposed of in the ocean some 50 years ago is poorly known. Part of this lacking knowledge can be attributed to the hazards associated with the direct study of these materials leaving ocean scientists vulnerable when sampling in inadequately marked sites. Mustard gas (1,1'-thiobis[2-chloroethane]) represents the largest tonnage of material disposed of until the 1972 London Convention banned such activities. Thus there is strong interest in determining the fate and lifetime of these materials, their decomposition products, and the extent of the affected zones. We have earlier shown that TO forms a hydrate with a help-gas, such as methane or hydrogen sulfide, and that the temperature, pressure and reducing conditions required for hydrate formation commonly occur at known disposal sites. In fact, a mixed TO hydrate is more stable than methane hydrate by almost

  10. Quantitative evaluation of the lactate signal loss and its spatial dependence in press localized (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jung, W I; Bunse, M; Lutz, O

    2001-10-01

    Localized (1)H NMR spectroscopy using the 90 degrees -t(1)-180 degrees -t(1)+t(2)-180 degrees -t(2)-Acq. PRESS sequence can lead to a signal loss for the lactate doublet compared with signals from uncoupled nuclei which is dependent on the choice of t(1) and t(2). The most striking signal loss of up to 78% of the total signal occurs with the symmetrical PRESS sequence (t(1)=t(2)) at an echo time of 2/J (approximately 290 ms). Calculations have shown that this signal loss is related to the pulse angle distributions produced by the two refocusing pulses which leads to the creation of single quantum polarization transfer (PT) as well as to not directly observable states (NDOS) of the lactate AX(3) spin system: zero- and multiple-quantum coherences, and longitudinal spin orders. In addition, the chemical shift dependent voxel displacement (VOD) leads to further signal loss. By calculating the density operator for various of the echo times TE=n/J, n=1, 2, 3,..., we calculated quantitatively the contributions of these effects to the signal loss as well as their spatial distribution. A maximum signal loss of 75% can be expected from theory for the symmetrical PRESS sequence and TE=2/J for Hamming filtered sinc pulses, whereby 47% are due to the creation of NDOS and up to 28% arise from PT. Taking also the VOD effect into account (2 mT/m slice selection gradients, 20-mm slices) leads to 54% signal loss from NDOS and up to 24% from PT, leading to a maximum signal loss of 78%. Using RE-BURP pulses with their more rectangular pulse angle distributions reduces the maximum signal loss to 44%. Experiments at 1.5 T using a lactate solution demonstrated a maximum lactate signal loss for sinc pulses of 82% (52% NDOS, 30% PT) at TE=290 ms using the symmetrical PRESS sequence. The great signal loss and its spatial distribution is of importance for investigations using a symmetrical PRESS sequence at TE=2/J. PMID:11567573

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of the Lactate Signal Loss and Its Spatial Dependence in PRESS Localized 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Bunse, Michael; Lutz, Otto

    2001-10-01

    Localized 1H NMR spectroscopy using the 90°-t1-180°-t1+t2-180°-t2-Acq. PRESS sequence can lead to a signal loss for the lactate doublet compared with signals from uncoupled nuclei which is dependent on the choice of t1 and t2. The most striking signal loss of up to 78% of the total signal occurs with the symmetrical PRESS sequence (t1=t2) at an echo time of 2/J (≃290 ms). Calculations have shown that this signal loss is related to the pulse angle distributions produced by the two refocusing pulses which leads to the creation of single quantum polarization transfer (PT) as well as to not directly observable states (NDOS) of the lactate AX3 spin system: zero- and multiple-quantum coherences, and longitudinal spin orders. In addition, the chemical shift dependent voxel displacement (VOD) leads to further signal loss. By calculating the density operator for various of the echo times TE=n/J, n=1, 2, 3, …, we calculated quantitatively the contributions of these effects to the signal loss as well as their spatial distribution. A maximum signal loss of 75% can be expected from theory for the symmetrical PRESS sequence and TE=2/J for Hamming filtered sinc pulses, whereby 47% are due to the creation of NDOS and up to 28% arise from PT. Taking also the VOD effect into account (2 mT/m slice selection gradients, 20-mm slices) leads to 54% signal loss from NDOS and up to 24% from PT, leading to a maximum signal loss of 78%. Using RE-BURP pulses with their more rectangular pulse angle distributions reduces the maximum signal loss to 44%. Experiments at 1.5 T using a lactate solution demonstrated a maximum lactate signal loss for sinc pulses of 82% (52% NDOS, 30% PT) at TE=290 ms using the symmetrical PRESS sequence. The great signal loss and its spatial distribution is of importance for investigations using a symmetrical PRESS sequence at TE=2/J.

  12. Polarized Enhanced Backscattering Spectroscopy for Characterization of Biological Tissues at Subdiffusion Length-scales

    PubMed Central

    Radosevich, Andrew J.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Yi, Ji; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1980’s, the enhanced backscattering (EBS) phenomenon has been well-studied in a large variety of non-biological materials. Yet, until recently the use of conventional EBS for the characterization of biological tissue has been fairly limited. In this work we detail the unique ability of EBS to provide spectroscopic, polarimetric, and depth-resolved characterization of biological tissue using a simple backscattering instrument. We first explain the experimental and numerical procedures used to accurately measure and model the full azimuthal EBS peak shape in biological tissue. Next we explore the peak shape and height dependencies for different polarization channels and spatial coherence of illumination. We then illustrate the extraordinary sensitivity of EBS to the shape of the scattering phase function using suspensions of latex microspheres. Finally, we apply EBS to biological tissue samples in order to measure optical properties and observe the spatial length-scales at which backscattering is altered in early colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24163574

  13. Gelatin embedding: a novel way to preserve biological samples for terahertz imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuting; Ung, Benjamin; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-04-01

    Sample dehydration has traditionally been a challenging problem in ex vivo terahertz biomedical experiments as water content changes significantly affect the terahertz properties and can diminish important contrast features. In this paper, we propose a novel method to prevent sample dehydration using gelatin embedding. By looking at terahertz image data and calculating the optical properties of the gelatin-embedded sample, we find that our method successfully preserves the sample for at least 35 h, both for imaging and spectroscopy. Our novel preservation method demonstrates for the first time the capability to simultaneously maintain sample structural integrity and prevent dehydration at room temperature. This is particularly relevant for terahertz studies of freshly excised tissues but could be beneficial for other imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

  14. FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Dementia Diagnosis Through Analysis of Biological Fluids.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jéssica; Correia, Marta; Martins, Ilka; Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; da Cruz E Silva, Odete; Nunes, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    To date, it is still difficult to perform an early and accurate diagnosis of dementia, therefore significant research has focused on finding new dementia biomarkers that can aid in this respect. There is an urgent need for non-invasive, rapid, and relatively inexpensive procedures for early diagnostics. Studies have demonstrated that of spectroscopic techniques, such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy could be a useful and accurate procedure to diagnose dementia. Given that several biochemical mechanisms related to neurodegeneration and dementia can lead to changes in plasma components and others peripheral body fluids; blood-based samples coupled to spectroscopic analyses can be used as a simple and less invasive approach. PMID:27079713

  15. Rapid, noninvasive concentration measurements of aqueous biological analytes by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berger, A J; Wang, Y; Feld, M S

    1996-01-01

    Accurate concentration measurements of glucose, lactic acid, and creatinine in saline solution have beena chieved with near-IR Raman spectroscopy and a partial least-squares analysis. The Raman spectra were acquired remotely through optical fibers. A root-mean-squared prediction error of 1.2 mM for glucose concentration was achieved in 100 s. Concentrations of other analytes were predicted with similar accuracy. PMID:21069001

  16. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy analyses on the crystallinity of engineered biological hydroxyapatite for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poralan, G. M., Jr.; Gambe, J. E.; Alcantara, E. M.; Vequizo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) derived from thermally-treated fish bones was successfully produced. However, the obtained biological HAp was amorphous and thus making it unfavorable for medical application. Consequently, this research exploits and engineers the crystallinity of BHAp powders by addition of CaCO3 and investigates its degree of crystallinity using XRD and IR spectroscopy. On XRD, the HAp powders with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42, 1.46, 1.61 and 1.93 have degree of crystallinity equal to 58.08, 72.13, 85.79, 75.85% and crystal size equal to 0.67, 0.74, 0.75, 0.72 nm, respectively. The degree of crystallinity and crystal size of the obtained calcium deficient biological HAp powders increase as their [Ca]/[P] ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio by addition of CaCO3 as source of Ca2+ ions. These results show the possibility of engineering the crystallinity and crystal size of biological HAp by addition of CaCO3. Moreover, the splitting factor of PO4 vibration matches the result with % crystallinity on XRD. Also, the area of phosphate-substitution site of PO4 vibration shows linear relationship (R2 = 0.994) with crystal size calculated from XRD. It is worth noting that the crystallinity of the biological HAp with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42 and 1.48 fall near the range 60-70% for highly resorbable HAp used in the medical application.

  17. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  18. Gross boron determination in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.F.; Johnson, D.A.; Steele, S.M.; Messick, K.; Miller, D.L.; Propp, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the analysis of boron in biological samples including urine, blood plasma, and tissues with subsequent boron determinations by ICP-AES. A comparison will be made between results obtained by this method and by the prompt-gamma technique on the same samples. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Micron surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of intact biological organisms and model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, E.A.; Morris, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectra have been obtained within intact zebrafish embryos and inside the 500-fL pores of a Nucleopore filter membrane with the use of coated microelectrodes with 1-3 {mu}m active silver tip diameters. The spectra obtained demonstrate the microelectrode`s ability to penetrate biological membranes as well as restricted volumes. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Elucidation of molecular structures at buried polymer interfaces and biological interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Myers, John; Chen, Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been developed into an important technique to study surfaces and interfaces. It can probe buried interfaces in situ and provide molecular level structural information such as the presence of various chemical moieties, quantitative molecular functional group orientation, and time dependent kinetics or dynamics at such interfaces. This paper focuses on these three most important advantages of SFG and reviews some of the recent progress in SFG studies on interfaces related to polymer materials and biomolecules. The results discussed here demonstrate that SFG can provide important molecular structural information of buried interfaces in situ and in real time, which is difficult to obtain by other surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:23710244

  1. Retrieving the optical parameters of biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Fourier series expansions. I. theory and application

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón A.; Vázquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The determination of optical parameters of biological tissues is essential for the application of optical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy is a widely used technique to analyze the optical characteristics of biological tissues. In this paper we show that by using diffuse reflectance spectra and a new mathematical model we can retrieve the optical parameters by applying an adjustment of the data with nonlinear least squares. In our model we represent the spectra using a Fourier series expansion finding mathematical relations between the polynomial coefficients and the optical parameters. In this first paper we use spectra generated by the Monte Carlo Multilayered Technique to simulate the propagation of photons in turbid media. Using these spectra we determine the behavior of Fourier series coefficients when varying the optical parameters of the medium under study. With this procedure we find mathematical relations between Fourier series coefficients and optical parameters. Finally, the results show that our method can retrieve the optical parameters of biological tissues with accuracy that is adequate for medical applications. PMID:23082281

  2. [Quantitative models of Raman spectroscopy for five kinds of traditional Chinese medicine containing CaCO3 based on an improved siPLS].

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Yuan, Ming-yang; Ming, Jing; Liu, Yi-mei; Huang, Bi-sheng; Chen, Ke-li

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to apply Raman spectroscopy technique to develop rapid quantitative models for five kinds of Traditional Chinese Medicine containing CaCO3. In the experiment, Raman spectras of 67 batch of sample including Otolithum Sciaenae, Galaxeae Os, Ophicalcitum, Calcite, Stalactite and their mixture which had different content of CaCO3 were collected, and the quantitative models were established by using an improved siPLS to optimize the characteristic spectral bands and using the CaCO3 contents which were measured by EDTA titration method as references. Compared with the results by EDTA titration, the established quantitative model for CaCO, content showed a prediction result that the average relative deviation of the prediction results is 2. 71% and the average recovery rate was 100.46%, when the content is between 0.465 4-0.999 7, and when the characteristic spectral bands of 1 290-1 280, 730-714, 700-690, 660-650, 465-460, 455-445, 405-385 cm(-1) had been optimized. The result also showed that the model using Raman spectroscopy and based on an improved siPLS can get a rapid determination for contents of 5 kinds of Traditional Chinese Medicine containing CaCO3. PMID:26983209

  3. Testing biological liquid samples using modified m-line spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusciuk, Elzbieta; Rybiński, Grzegorz

    2005-09-01

    Non-chemical method of detection of sugar concentration in biological (animal and plant source) liquids has been investigated. Simplified set was build to show the easy way of carrying out the survey and to make easy to gather multiple measurements for error detecting and statistics. Method is suggested as easy and cheap alternative for chemical methods of measuring sugar concentration, but needing a lot effort to be made precise.

  4. Spectral pre and post processing for infrared and Raman spectroscopy of biological tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Hugh J; Knief, Peter; Keating, Mark E; Bonnier, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, both infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications, from in vivo and ex vivo disease diagnostics and screening, to in vitro screening of therapeutics. There remain, however, many challenges related to the accuracy of analysis of physically and chemically inhomogeneous samples, across heterogeneous sample sets. Data preprocessing is required to deal with variations in instrumental responses and intrinsic spectral backgrounds and distortions in order to extract reliable spectral data. Data postprocessing is required to extract the most reliable information from the sample sets, based on often very subtle changes in spectra associated with the targeted pathology or biochemical process. This review presents the current understanding of the factors influencing the quality of spectra recorded and the pre-processing steps commonly employed to improve on spectral quality. It further explores some of the most common techniques which have emerged for classification and analysis of the spectral data for biomedical applications. The importance of sample presentation and measurement conditions to yield the highest quality spectra in the first place is emphasised, as is the potential of model simulated datasets to validate both pre- and post-processing protocols. PMID:26463830

  5. Infrared fiber optic evanescent wave spectroscopy: applications in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-04-01

    A new powerful and highly sensitive technique for non-invasive biomedical diagnostics in vivo has been developed using Infrared Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FEW-FTIR). This compact and portable method allows to detect functional chemical groups and bonds via vibrational spectroscopy directly from surfaces including living tissue. Such differences and similarities in molecular structure of tissue and materials can be evaluated online. Operating in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) regime in the middle-infrared (MIR) range, the FEW-FTIR technique provides direct contact between the fiber probe and tissue for non-destructive, non-invasive, fast and remote (few meters) diagnostics and quality control of materials. This method utilizes highly flexible and extremely low loss unclad fibers, for example silver halide fibers. Applications of this method include investigations of normal skin, precancerous and cancerous conditions, monitoring of the process of aging, allergic reactions and radiation damage to the skin. This setup is suitable as well for the detection of the influence of environmental factors (sun, water, pollution, and weather) on skin surfaces. The FEW-FTIR technique is very promising also for fast histological examinations in vitro. In this review, we present recent investigations of skin, breast, lung, stomach, kidney tissues in vivo and ex vivo (during surgery) to define the areas of tumor localization. The main advantages of the FEW-FTIR technique for biomedical, clinical, and environmental applications are discussed.

  6. FT-IR TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY FOR QUANTITATION OF AMMONIUM BISULFATE IN FINE PARTICULATE MATTER COLLECTED ON TEFLON FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative measurement method for fine particle bisulfatein ammonium bisulfate collected from the ambient air onto Teflon filters is described. nfrared absorbance measurements of the Teflon filters are made before and after particle collection. ubtraction of the two spectra r...

  7. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  8. Nanoporous leaky waveguide based chemical and biological sensors with broadband spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhi-Mei; Honma, Itaru; Zhou, Haoshen

    2007-01-01

    Here the authors demonstrate spectral optical chemical and biological sensors based on a nanoporous thin-film leaky waveguide that were fabricated by dip coating the gold-layer-covered glass substrate from the colloidal TiO2 solution. The sensor operates by interrogating the resonance wavelengths for the leaky modes in a broad bandwidth using the Kretschmann configuration. Sensitivities of the sensor to refractive index of liquid and protein adsorption were investigated and compared with the spectral surface plasmon resonance sensors. The best fitting to the experimental data was carried out with the Fresnel equations, and thickness and porosity of the nanoporous waveguiding layer were determined.

  9. Sensitive, Rapid, Quantitative and in Vitro Method for the Detection of Biologically Active Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Type E.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula; Hernlem, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial cause of clinical infections and foodborne illnesses through its production of a group of enterotoxins (SEs) which cause gastroenteritis and also function as superantigens to massively activate T cells. In the present study, we tested Staphylococcal enterotoxin type E (SEE), which was detected in 17 of the 38 suspected staphylococcal food poisoning incidents in a British study and was the causative agent in outbreaks in France, UK and USA. The current method for detection of enterotoxin activity is an in vivo monkey or kitten bioassay; however, this expensive procedure has low sensitivity and poor reproducibility, requires many animals, is impractical to test on a large number of samples, and raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. The purpose of this study is to develop rapid sensitive and quantitative bioassays for detection of active SEE. We apply a genetically engineered T cell-line expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells response element (NFAT-RE), combined with a Raji B-cell line that presents the SEE-MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class II to the engineered T cell line. Exposure of the above mixed culture to SEE induces differential expression of the luciferase gene and bioluminescence is read out in a dose dependent manner over a 6-log range. The limit of detection of biologically active SEE is 1 fg/mL which is 10⁸ times more sensitive than the monkey and kitten bioassay. PMID:27187474

  10. Roles of biologic breast tissue composition and quantitative image analysis of mammographic images in breast tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Christopher I.; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Shepherd, John

    2014-03-01

    Purpose. Investigate whether knowledge of the biologic image composition of mammographic lesions provides imagebased biomarkers above and beyond those obtainable from quantitative image analysis (QIA) of X-ray mammography. Methods. The dataset consisted of 45 in vivo breast lesions imaged with the novel 3-component breast (3CB) imaging technique based on dual-energy mammography (15 malignant, 30 benign diagnoses). The 3CB composition measures of water, lipid, and protein thicknesses were assessed and mathematical descriptors, `3CB features', were obtained for the lesions and their periphery. The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method obtaining `QIA features' describing morphology and texture. We investigated the correlation within the `3CB features', within the `QIA features', and between the two. In addition, the merit of individual features in the distinction between malignant and benign lesions was assessed. Results. Whereas many descriptors within the `3CB features' and `QIA features' were, often by design, highly correlated, correlation between descriptors of the two feature groups was much weaker (maximum absolute correlation coefficient 0.58, p<0.001) indicating that 3CB and QIA-based biomarkers provided potentially complementary information. Single descriptors from 3CB and QIA appeared equally well-suited for the distinction between malignant and benign lesions, with maximum area under the ROC curve 0.71 for a protein feature (3CB) and 0.71 for a texture feature (QIA). Conclusions. In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of breast tissue composition appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between benign and malignant lesions.

  11. Sensitive, Rapid, Quantitative and in Vitro Method for the Detection of Biologically Active Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Type E

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula; Hernlem, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial cause of clinical infections and foodborne illnesses through its production of a group of enterotoxins (SEs) which cause gastroenteritis and also function as superantigens to massively activate T cells. In the present study, we tested Staphylococcal enterotoxin type E (SEE), which was detected in 17 of the 38 suspected staphylococcal food poisoning incidents in a British study and was the causative agent in outbreaks in France, UK and USA. The current method for detection of enterotoxin activity is an in vivo monkey or kitten bioassay; however, this expensive procedure has low sensitivity and poor reproducibility, requires many animals, is impractical to test on a large number of samples, and raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. The purpose of this study is to develop rapid sensitive and quantitative bioassays for detection of active SEE. We apply a genetically engineered T cell-line expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells response element (NFAT-RE), combined with a Raji B-cell line that presents the SEE-MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class II to the engineered T cell line. Exposure of the above mixed culture to SEE induces differential expression of the luciferase gene and bioluminescence is read out in a dose dependent manner over a 6-log range. The limit of detection of biologically active SEE is 1 fg/mL which is 109 times more sensitive than the monkey and kitten bioassay. PMID:27187474

  12. Non-invasive chemically specific measurement of subsurface temperature in biological tissues using surface-enhanced spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-06-23

    Here we demonstrate for the first time the viability of characterising non-invasively the subsurface temperature of SERS nanoparticles embedded within biological tissues using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS). The proposed analytical method (T-SESORS) is applicable in general to diffusely scattering (turbid) media and features high sensitivity and high chemical selectivity. The method relies on monitoring the Stokes and anti-Stokes bands of SERS nanoparticles in depth using SORS. The approach has been conceptually demonstrated using a SORS variant, transmission Raman spectroscopy (TRS), by measuring subsurface temperatures within a slab of porcine tissue (5 mm thick). Root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of 0.20 °C were achieved when measuring temperatures over ranges between 25 and 44 °C. This unique capability complements the array of existing, predominantly surface-based, temperature monitoring techniques. It expands on a previously demonstrated SORS temperature monitoring capability by adding extra sensitivity stemming from SERS to low concentration analytes. The technique paves the way for a wide range of applications including subsurface, chemical-specific, non-invasive temperature analysis within turbid translucent media including: the human body, subsurface monitoring of chemical (e.g. catalytic) processes in manufacture quality and process control and research. Additionally, the method opens prospects for control of thermal treatment of cancer in vivo with direct non-invasive feedback on the temperature of mediating plasmonic nanoparticles. PMID:27049293

  13. Cellular phone-based image acquisition and quantitative ratiometric method for detecting cocaine and benzoylecgonine for biological and forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Cadle, Brian A; Rasmus, Kristin C; Varela, Juan A; Leverich, Leah S; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K; Cooper, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe the first report of using low-cost cellular or web-based digital cameras to image and quantify standardized rapid immunoassay strips as a new point-of-care diagnostic and forensics tool with health applications. Quantitative ratiometric pixel density analysis (QRPDA) is an automated method requiring end-users to utilize inexpensive (∼ $1 USD/each) immunotest strips, a commonly available web or mobile phone camera or scanner, and internet or cellular service. A model is described whereby a central computer server and freely available IMAGEJ image analysis software records and analyzes the incoming image data with time-stamp and geo-tag information and performs the QRPDA using custom JAVA based macros (http://www.neurocloud.org). To demonstrate QRPDA we developed a standardized method using rapid immunotest strips directed against cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine. Images from standardized samples were acquired using several devices, including a mobile phone camera, web cam, and scanner. We performed image analysis of three brands of commercially available dye-conjugated anti-cocaine/benzoylecgonine (COC/BE) antibody test strips in response to three different series of cocaine concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 300 ng/ml and BE concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 0.1 ng/ml. This data was then used to create standard curves to allow quantification of COC/BE in biological samples. Across all devices, QRPDA quantification of COC and BE proved to be a sensitive, economical, and faster alternative to more costly methods, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, or high pressure liquid chromatography. The limit of detection was determined to be between 0.1 and 5 ng/ml. To simulate conditions in the field, QRPDA was found to be robust under a variety of image acquisition and testing conditions that varied temperature, lighting, resolution, magnification and concentrations of biological fluid in a sample. To

  14. Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Chemical Species in Hanford Tank Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy Technology: FY94Florida State University Raman Spectroscopy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, F.R.

    1997-08-11

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  15. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24734732

  17. Quantitative detection of caffeine in human skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy--A systematic in vitro validation study.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Anderski, Juliane; Windbergs, Maike

    2015-09-01

    For rational development and evaluation of dermal drug delivery, the knowledge of rate and extent of substance penetration into the human skin is essential. However, current analytical procedures are destructive, labor intense and lack a defined spatial resolution. In this context, confocal Raman microscopy bares the potential to overcome current limitations in drug depth profiling. Confocal Raman microscopy already proved its suitability for the acquisition of qualitative penetration profiles, but a comprehensive investigation regarding its suitability for quantitative measurements inside the human skin is still missing. In this work, we present a systematic validation study to deploy confocal Raman microscopy for quantitative drug depth profiling in human skin. After we validated our Raman microscopic setup, we successfully established an experimental procedure that allows correlating the Raman signal of a model drug with its controlled concentration in human skin. To overcome current drawbacks in drug depth profiling, we evaluated different modes of peak correlation for quantitative Raman measurements and offer a suitable operating procedure for quantitative drug depth profiling in human skin. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman microscopy for quantitative drug depth profiling in human skin as valuable alternative to destructive state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:25828208

  18. High-extinction virtually imaged phased array-based Brillouin spectroscopy of turbid biological media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jitao; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin microscopy has recently emerged as a powerful technique to characterize the mechanical properties of biological tissue, cell, and biomaterials. However, the potential of Brillouin microscopy is currently limited to transparent samples, because Brillouin spectrometers do not have sufficient spectral extinction to reject the predominant non-Brillouin scattered light of turbid media. To overcome this issue, we combined a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer with a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer. The Fabry-Perot etalon acts as an ultra-narrow band-pass filter for Brillouin light with high spectral extinction and low loss. We report background-free Brillouin spectra from Intralipid solutions and up to 100 μm deep within chicken muscle tissue. PMID:27274097

  19. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  20. High-extinction virtually imaged phased array-based Brillouin spectroscopy of turbid biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Antonio; Zhang, Jitao; Shao, Peng; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-05-01

    Brillouin microscopy has recently emerged as a powerful technique to characterize the mechanical properties of biological tissue, cell, and biomaterials. However, the potential of Brillouin microscopy is currently limited to transparent samples, because Brillouin spectrometers do not have sufficient spectral extinction to reject the predominant non-Brillouin scattered light of turbid media. To overcome this issue, we combined a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer with a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer. The Fabry-Perot etalon acts as an ultra-narrow band-pass filter for Brillouin light with high spectral extinction and low loss. We report background-free Brillouin spectra from Intralipid solutions and up to 100 μm deep within chicken muscle tissue.

  1. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Assessment of bone quality using Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Suda, Hiromi Kimura

    2015-10-01

    Bone quality, which was defined as "the sum total of characteristics of the bone that influence the bone's resistance to fracture" at the National Institute of Health (NIH) conference in 2001, contributes to bone strength in combination with bone mass. Bone mass is often measured as bone mineral density (BMD) and, consequently, can be quantified easily. On the other hand, bone quality is composed of several factors such as bone structure, bone matrix, calcification degree, microdamage, and bone turnover, and it is not easy to obtain data for the various factors. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify bone quality. We are eager to develop new measurement methods for bone quality that make it possible to determine several factors associated with bone quality at the same time. Analytic methods based on Raman and FTIR spectroscopy have attracted a good deal of attention as they can provide a good deal of chemical information about hydroxyapatite and collagen, which are the main components of bone. A lot of studies on bone quality using Raman and FTIR imaging have been reported following the development of the two imaging systems. Thus, both Raman and FTIR imaging appear to be promising new bone morphometric techniques. PMID:26412727

  2. Sensing lanthanide metal content in biological tissues with magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Dina V; Gonzalez, Sandra I; Li, Jessica F; Pagel, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The development and validation of MRI contrast agents consisting of a lanthanide chelate often requires a determination of the concentration of the agent in ex vivo tissue. We have developed a protocol that uses 70% nitric acid to completely digest tissue samples that contain Gd(III), Dy(III), Tm(III), Eu(III), or Yb(III) ions, or the MRI contrast agent gadodiamide. NMR spectroscopy of coaxial tubes containing a digested sample and a separate control solution of nitric acid was used to rapidly and easily measure the bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift caused by each lanthanide ion and gadodiamide. Each BMS shift was shown to be linearly correlated with the concentration of each lanthanide ion and gadodiamide in the 70% nitric acid solution and in digested rat kidney and liver tissues. These concentration measurements had outstanding precision, and also had good accuracy for concentrations ≥10 mM for Tm(III) Eu(III), and Yb(III), and ≥3 mM for Gd(III), gadodiamide, and Dy(III). Improved sample handling methods are needed to improve measurement accuracy for samples with lower concentrations. PMID:24152931

  3. State of the art Raman techniques for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Rae, Alasdair; Stosch, Rainer; Klapetek, Petr; Hight Walker, Angela R; Roy, Debdulal

    2014-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the elucidation of qualitative and quantitative information from biological systems and has huge potential in areas such as biotechnologies, drug discovery, agro-chemical research and clinical diagnostics. This report summarises the principal Raman techniques applied to biomedical systems and discusses the challenges that exist to the wide spread adoption of Raman spectroscopy. PMID:24662479

  4. Applications of High Resolution Laser: Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  5. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  6. HNS(+) and HSN(+) cations: Electronic states, spin-rovibronic spectroscopy with planetary and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Tarek; Ben Yaghlane, Saida; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-28

    Ab initio methods in conjunction with a large basis set are used to compute the potential energy surfaces of the 12 lowest electronic states of the HNS(+) and HSN(+) isomeric forms. These potentials are used in discussions of the metastability of these cations and plausible mechanisms for the H(+)/H + SN(+)/SN, S/S(+) + NH(+)/NH, N/N(+) + SH(+)/SH ion-molecule reactions. Interestingly, the low rovibrational levels of HSN(+)(1(2)A″) and HNS(+)(1(2)A″) electronically excited ions are predicted to be long-lived. Both ions are suggested to be a suitable candidate for light-sensitive NO(⋅) donor in vivo and as a possible marker for the detection of intermediates in nitrites + H2S reactions at the cellular level. The full spin rovibronic levels of HNS(+) are presented, which may assist in the experimental identification of HNS(+) and HSN(+) ions and in elucidating their roles in astrophysical and biological media. PMID:27586922

  7. Salicylate Detection by Complexation with Iron(III) and Optical Absorbance Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Koch, Jeremy T.; Reid, Kendra R.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratory involving applications of visible spectrophotometry is described. Salicylate, a component found in several medications, as well as the active by-product of aspirin decomposition, is quantified. The addition of excess iron(III) to a solution of salicylate generates a deeply…

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy quantitative determination of Pefloxacin mesylate concentration in pharmaceuticals by using partial least squares and principal component regression multivariate calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunfei; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Bing

    2010-05-01

    Pefloxacin mesylate, a broad-spectrum antibacterial fluoroquinolone, has been widely used in clinical practice. Therefore, it is very important to detect the concentration of Pefloxacin mesylate. In this research, the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been applied to quantitatively analyze on 108 injection samples, which was divided into a calibration set containing 89 samples and a prediction set containing 19 samples randomly. In order to get a satisfying result, partial least square (PLS) regression and principal components regression (PCR) have been utilized to establish quantitative models. Also, the process of establishing the models, parameters of the models, and prediction results were discussed in detail. In the PLS regression, the values of the coefficient of determination ( R2) and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of PLS regression are 0.9263 and 0.00119, respectively. For comparison, though applying PCR method to get the values of R2 and RMSECV we obtained are 0.9685 and 0.00108, respectively. And the values of the standard error of prediction set (SEP) of PLS and PCR models are 0.001480 and 0.001140. The result of the prediction set suggests that these two quantitative analysis models have excellent generalization ability and prediction precision. However, for this PFLX injection samples, the PCR quantitative analysis model achieved more accurate results than the PLS model. The experimental results showed that NIRS together with PCR method provide rapid and accurate quantitative analysis of PFLX injection samples. Moreover, this study supplied technical support for the further analysis of other injection samples in pharmaceuticals.

  9. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in vitrified Mn-doped glasses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh, C. E-mail: unnikrishnan.vk@manipal.edu; Sonavane, M. S.; Yeotikar, R. G.; Shah, M. L.; Gupta, G. P.; Suri, B. M.

    2014-09-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an atomic emission spectroscopy method, has rapidly grown as one of the best elemental analysis techniques over the past two decades. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in manganese-doped glasses have been carried out using an optimized LIBS system employing a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser as the source of excitation. The glass samples have been prepared using conventional vitrification methods. The laser pulse irradiance on the surface of the glass samples placed in air at atmospheric pressure was about 1.7×10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatially integrated plasma emission was collected and imaged on to the spectrograph slit using an optical-fiber-based collection system. Homogeneity was checked by recording LIBS spectra from different sites on the sample surface and analyzing the elemental emission intensities for concentration determination. Validation of the observed LIBS results was done by comparison with scanning electron microscope- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) surface elemental mapping. The analytical performance of the LIBS system has been evaluated through the correlation of the LIBS determined concentrations of Mn with its certified values. The results are found to be in very good agreement with the certified concentrations.

  10. The use of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for the quantitative determination of glucose concentration in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y C; Davies, A G; Linfleld, E H; Elsey, T S; Taday, P F; Arnone, D D

    2003-07-01

    Fourier-transform infrared transmission spectroscopy has been used for the determination of glucose concentration in whole blood samples from 28 patients. A 4-vector partial least-squares calibration model, using the spectral range 950-1200 cm(-1), yielded a standard-error-of-prediction of 0.59 mM for an independent test set. For blood samples from a single patient, we found that the glucose concentration was proportional to the difference between the values of the second derivative spectrum at 1082 cm(-1) and 1093 cm(-1). This indicates that spectroscopy at these two specific wavenumbers alone could be used to determine the glucose concentration in blood plasma samples from a single patient, with a prediction error of 0.95 mM. PMID:12884933

  11. High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

    PubMed

    Möbius, K; Savitsky, A; Schnegg, A; Plato, M; Fuchst, M

    2005-01-01

    -induced electron-transfer intermediates in wild-type and mutant reaction-centre proteins from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, (2) light-driven proton-transfer intermediates of site-specifically nitroxide spin-labelled mutants of bacteriorhodopsin proteins from Halobacterium salinarium, (3) refolding intermediates of site-specifically nitroxide spin-labelled mutants of the channel-forming protein domain of Colicin A bacterial toxin produced in Escherichia coli. The detailed information obtained is complementary to that of protein crystallography, solid-state NMR, infrared and optical spectroscopy techniques. A unique strength of high-field EPR is particularly noteworthy: it can provide highly desired detailed information on transient intermediates of proteins in biological action. They can be observed and characterized while staying in their working states on biologically relevant time scales. The review introduces the audience to origins and basic experiments of EPR in relation to NMR, describes the underlying strategies for extending conventional EPR to high-field/high-frequency EPR, and highlights those details of molecular information that are obtained from high-field EPR in conjunction with genetic engineering and that are not accessible by "classical" spectroscopy. The importance of quantum-chemical interpretation of the experimental data by DFT and advanced semiempirical molecular-orbital theory is emphasized. A short description of the laboratory-built 95 GHz and 360 GHz EPR/ENDOR spectrometers at FU Berlin is also presented. The review concludes with an outlook to future opportunities and challenges of advanced bio-EPR in interdisciplinary research. PMID:19785170

  12. Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) combined with chemometrics for quantitative analysis of dextrin in Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) granule.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Feng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Gao, Hui-Min; Wang, Zhi-Min; Gao, Liang-Liang

    2016-05-10

    The granule of Chinese medicine (GCM) is prepared by water-soluble extract of single yinpian (WESY) of herbal medicine, and used as a drug ingredient for clinical formulation. The WESY content or corresponding yinpian amount is the most important parameter in evaluating the quality of GCM. Low WESY content reflects poor GCM. Classical quantitative methods, such as HPLC, cannot fully detect the adulteration by adding characteristic ingredients and less WESY production. GCM is composed of WESY and a high content of specific excipient. The WESY content in the GCM may be indirectly analyzed using mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR). In this paper, a quantitative method to evaluate the quality of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) granule (DG) was developed using MIR combined with chemometrics. Appropriate characteristic quantitative regions (CQR) were extracted by selecting the spectral regions corresponding to altered excipient content in DG. The best model of dextrin content determination in DG with low RMSEC of 1.97, low RMSEP of 2.07, and excellent RPD of 5.03 (>5.0) was obtained using partial least-squares (PLS) regression, and validated using accepted values of precision and recovery. The results suggest that FT-MIR combined with PLS is a rapid and valuable analytical tool to determine the WESY in DG based on excipient content. The model enabling indirect calculation of WESY content in GCM represents a reference standard for rapid analysis of other WESYs in GCM industry. PMID:26859611

  13. Wavelet prism decomposition analysis applied to CARS spectroscopy: a tool for accurate and quantitative extraction of resonant vibrational responses.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yelena; Lensu, Lasse; Hehl, Gregor; Volkmer, Andreas; Vartiainen, Erik M

    2016-05-30

    We propose an approach, based on wavelet prism decomposition analysis, for correcting experimental artefacts in a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectrum. This method allows estimating and eliminating a slowly varying modulation error function in the measured normalized CARS spectrum and yields a corrected CARS line-shape. The main advantage of the approach is that the spectral phase and amplitude corrections are avoided in the retrieved Raman line-shape spectrum, thus significantly simplifying the quantitative reconstruction of the sample's Raman response from a normalized CARS spectrum in the presence of experimental artefacts. Moreover, the approach obviates the need for assumptions about the modulation error distribution and the chemical composition of the specimens under study. The method is quantitatively validated on normalized CARS spectra recorded for equimolar aqueous solutions of D-fructose, D-glucose, and their disaccharide combination sucrose. PMID:27410113

  14. Quantitative determination of lead in mixtures of lead(II) halides using solid-state 207Pb NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Stephenson, Nicole; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil; Perry, Dale L

    2006-11-01

    We demonstrate a multi-spectrum technique for facile, quantitative determination of lead in solid materials using solid-state (207)Pb NMR that avoids the major problem of uniform excitation across a wide spectral range; the method can be employed without chemical separation or other chemical manipulations and without any prior sample preparation, resulting in a non-destructive analysis, and producing results that are in agreement with gravimetric analyses of mixed samples of the lead halides. PMID:17066187

  15. Laser-induced Breakdown spectroscopy quantitative analysis method via adaptive analytical line selection and relevance vector machine regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Yi, Cancan; Xu, Jinwu; Ma, Xianghong

    2015-05-01

    A new LIBS quantitative analysis method based on analytical line adaptive selection and Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) regression model is proposed. First, a scheme of adaptively selecting analytical line is put forward in order to overcome the drawback of high dependency on a priori knowledge. The candidate analytical lines are automatically selected based on the built-in characteristics of spectral lines, such as spectral intensity, wavelength and width at half height. The analytical lines which will be used as input variables of regression model are determined adaptively according to the samples for both training and testing. Second, an LIBS quantitative analysis method based on RVM is presented. The intensities of analytical lines and the elemental concentrations of certified standard samples are used to train the RVM regression model. The predicted elemental concentration analysis results will be given with a form of confidence interval of probabilistic distribution, which is helpful for evaluating the uncertainness contained in the measured spectra. Chromium concentration analysis experiments of 23 certified standard high-alloy steel samples have been carried out. The multiple correlation coefficient of the prediction was up to 98.85%, and the average relative error of the prediction was 4.01%. The experiment results showed that the proposed LIBS quantitative analysis method achieved better prediction accuracy and better modeling robustness compared with the methods based on partial least squares regression, artificial neural network and standard support vector machine.

  16. Quantitation of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients in powder blends using designed multivariate calibration models by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyong; Worosila, Gregory D

    2005-05-13

    This research note demonstrates the simultaneous quantitation of a pharmaceutical active ingredient and three excipients in a simulated powder blend containing acetaminophen, Prosolv and Crospovidone. An experimental design approach was used in generating a 5-level (%, w/w) calibration sample set that included 125 samples. The samples were prepared by weighing suitable amount of powders into separate 20-mL scintillation vials and were mixed manually. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used in calibration model development. The models generated accurate results for quantitation of Crospovidone (at 5%, w/w) and magnesium stearate (at 0.5%, w/w). Further testing of the models demonstrated that the 2-level models were as effective as the 5-level ones, which reduced the calibration sample number to 50. The models had a small bias for quantitation of acetaminophen (at 30%, w/w) and Prosolv (at 64.5%, w/w) in the blend. The implication of the bias is discussed. PMID:15848006

  17. Raman spectroscopy provides a rapid, non-invasive method for quantitation of starch in live, unicellular microalgae.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuetong; He, Yuehui; Cui, Yanbin; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Yun; Li, Yuanguang; Huang, Wei E; Xu, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Conventional methods for quantitation of starch content in cells generally involve starch extraction steps and are usually labor intensive, thus a rapid and non-invasive method will be valuable. Using the starch-producing unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model, we employed a customized Raman spectrometer to capture the Raman spectra of individual single cells under distinct culture conditions and along various growth stages. The results revealed a nearly linear correlation (R(2) = 0.9893) between the signal intensity at 478 cm(-1) and the starch content of the cells. We validated the specific correlation by showing that the starch-associated Raman peaks were eliminated in a mutant strain where the AGPase (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) gene was disrupted and consequentially the biosynthesis of starch blocked. Furthermore, the method was validated in an industrial algal strain of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. This is the first demonstration of starch quantitation in individual live cells. Compared to existing cellular starch quantitation methods, this single-cell Raman spectra-based approach is rapid, label-free, non-invasive, culture-independent, low-cost, and potentially able to simultaneously track multiple metabolites in individual live cells, therefore should enable many new applications. PMID:24906189

  18. Passive Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of chemical plumes: an algorithm for quantitative interpretation and real-time background removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Mark L.; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Herr, Kenneth C.

    1995-08-01

    We present a ratioing algorithm for quantitative analysis of the passive Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of a chemical plume. We show that the transmission of a near-field plume is given by tau plume = (Lobsd - Lbb-plume)/(Lbkgd - Lbb-plume), where tau plume is the frequency-dependent transmission of the plume, L obsd is the spectral radiance of the scene that contains the plume, Lbkgd is the spectral radiance of the same scene without the plume, and Lbb-plume is the spectral radiance of a blackbody at the plume temperature. The algorithm simultaneously achieves background removal, elimination of the spectrometer internal signature, and quantification of the plume spectral transmission. It has applications to both real-time processing for plume visualization and quantitative measurements of plume column densities. The plume temperature (Lbb-plume ), which is not always precisely known, can have a profound effect on the quantitative interpretation of the algorithm and is discussed in detail. Finally, we provide an illustrative example of the use of the algorithm on a trichloroethylene and acetone plume.

  19. Biogenic unmodified gold nanoparticles for selective and quantitative detection of cerium using UV-vis spectroscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy (DLS).

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, E; Pradhan, N; Panda, P K; Mishra, B K

    2015-06-15

    The ability of self-functionalized biogenic GNPs towards highly selective colorimetric detection of rare earth element cerium is being reported for the first time. GNPs underwent rapid aggregation on addition of cerium indicated by red shift of SPR peak followed by complete precipitation. Hereby, this concept of co-ordination of cerium ions onto the GNP surface has been utilized for detection of cerium. The remarkable capacity of GNPs to sensitively detect Ce without proves beneficial compared to previous reports of colorimetric sensing. MDL was 15 and 35 ppm by DLS and UV-vis spectroscopy respectively, suggesting DLS to be highly sensitive and a practical alternative in ultrasensitive detection studies. The sensing system showed a good linear fit favouring feasible detection of cerium in range of 2-50 ppm. Similar studies further showed the superior selectivity of biogenic GNPs compared to chemically synthesized counterparts. The sensing system favours on-site analysis as it overcomes need of complex instrumentation, lengthy protocols and surface modification of GNP. PMID:25643600

  20. Development of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy coupled to UV-Visible analysis technique for aminosides and glycopeptides quantitation in antibiotic locks.

    PubMed

    Sayet, G; Sinegre, M; Ben Reguiga, M

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic Lock technique maintains catheters' sterility in high-risk patients with long-term parenteral nutrition. In our institution, vancomycin, teicoplanin, amikacin and gentamicin locks are prepared in the pharmaceutical department. In order to insure patient safety and to comply to regulatory requirements, antibiotic locks are submitted to qualitative and quantitative assays prior to their release. The aim of this study was to develop an alternative quantitation technique for each of these 4 antibiotics, using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) coupled to UV-Visible spectroscopy and to compare results to HPLC or Immunochemistry assays. Prevalidation studies permitted to assess spectroscopic conditions used for antibiotic locks quantitation: FTIR/UV combinations were used for amikacin (1091-1115cm(-1) and 208-224nm), vancomycin (1222-1240cm(-1) and 276-280nm), and teicoplanin (1226-1230cm(-1) and 278-282nm). Gentamicin was quantified with FTIR only (1045-1169cm(-1) and 2715-2850cm(-1)) due to interferences in UV domain of parabens, preservatives present in the commercial brand used to prepare locks. For all AL, the method was linear (R(2)=0.996 to 0.999), accurate, repeatable (intraday RSD%: from 2.9 to 7.1% and inter-days RSD%: 2.9 to 5.1%) and precise. Compared to the reference methods, the FTIR/UV method appeared tightly correlated (Pearson factor: 97.4 to 99.9%) and did not show significant difference in recovery determinations. We developed a new simple reliable analysis technique for antibiotics quantitation in locks using an original association of FTIR and UV analysis, allowing a short time analysis to identify and quantify the studied antibiotics. PMID:24438668