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Sample records for quantitative immunocytochemical image

  1. Quantitation of the immunocytochemical assay for estrogen receptor protein (ER-ICA) in human breast cancer by television imaging.

    PubMed

    Sklarew, R J; Pertschuk, L P

    1987-11-01

    A Quantimet 720D Image Analysis System has been programmed for light microscopic evaluation of the nuclear estrogen receptor distribution in frozen sections of human breast cancer stained by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method using monoclonal antibodies to estrogen receptor protein (ER). This method provides precise criteria for distinguishing ER-positive and -negative cells and a sensitive and reproducible means for densitometric quantification of the staining patterns. Although imaging sequence and graphic analysis are automated by computer programs, light pen interaction provides supervision of feature selection. Imaging of the immunocytochemical assay (ER-ICA) in 50 patients revealed marked heterogeneity of nuclear estrogen receptor concentration varying over a nearly 100 fold concentration range. Various ER concentration patterns were evident: (I) distributions with a single peak (CV = 5%) present at various concentration levels; (II) bimodal distributions, revealing co-existent ER-positive and ER-negative subpopulations; (III) multimodal distributions with a number of resolvable concentration peaks; and (IV) highly skewed distributions with or without discernible peaks, frequently extending over the entire concentration range. Statistical methods of de-convolution were applied to determine the frequency and ER concentration characteristics of component subpopulations in the mosaic cases and for resolving the proportion of ER-positive and -negative cells. An approach for evaluating nuclear ER content in conjunction with ER concentration patterns in individual patients revealed whether spread in the ER concentration distribution resulted from differences in nuclear ER content or from variability in nuclear volume distribution. PMID:2821106

  2. Hypergravity exposure decreases gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity in axon terminals contacting pyramidal cells in the rat somatosensory cortex: a quantitative immunocytochemical image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Wu, L. C.; Fox, R. A.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Polyakov, I.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14 days of exposure to hypergravity (hyper-G) was conducted by using computer-assisted image processing. The area of GABA-IR axosomatic terminals apposed to pyramidal cells of cortical layer V was reduced in rats exposed to hyper-G compared with control rats, which were exposed either to rotation alone or to vivarium conditions. Based on previous immunocytochemical and behavioral studies, we suggest that this reduction is due to changes in sensory feedback information from muscle receptors. Consequently, priorities for muscle recruitment are altered at the cortical level, and a new pattern of muscle activity is thus generated. It is proposed that the reduction observed in GABA-IR of the terminal area around pyramidal neurons is the immunocytochemical expression of changes in the activity of GABAergic cells that participate in reprogramming motor outputs to achieve effective movement control in response to alterations in the afferent information.

  3. Expression of the G2-M checkpoint regulators cyclin B1 and cdc2 in nonmalignant and malignant human breast lesions: immunocytochemical and quantitative image analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, H.; Koizumi, H.; Uchikoshi, T.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo expression of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 (key molecules for G2-M transition during the cell cycle) in nonmalignant and cancerous human breast lesions using immunohistochemistry and quantitative proliferative index (PI) analysis. Breast epithelial cells co-expressed cyclin B1 and Cdc2 in their cytoplasm in the G2 phase and in their nuclei in the M phase. Cyclin B1, but not Cdc2, immunostaining rapidly disappeared from the nuclei during the mitotic metaphase to anaphase transition. Static image analysis revealed the mean proliferative index for cyclin B1/cdc2 for each type of lesion to be as follows: normal glands (n = 20), 2.0/2.5%; benign lesions, including typical ductal hyperplasia (n = 76), 2.5/5.8%; atypical ductal hyperplasia (n = 21), 3.0/6.6%; carcinomas in situ (n = 70), 7.4/14.0%; and invasive carcinomas (n = 58), 10.0/22.9%. Proliferative index data for atypical hyperplasia were virtually identical to those for benign lesions and were significantly lower than those for breast cancer, suggesting that expression levels of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 may be used to distinguish premalignant human breast lesions from advanced disease. Furthermore, the proliferative index for cyclin B1 for comedo-type ductal carcinomas in situ agreed with that for invasive ductal carcinomas (mean, 10.1% versus 9.5%), apparently explaining the clinicopathological aggressiveness of this tumor at the molecular level. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9006317

  4. Quantitative immunocytochemical characterization of four murine macrophage-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nibbering, P H; van Furth, R

    1988-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain quantitative data on the expression of seven cell-surface antigens by the murine macrophage-like cell lines WEHI-3, P388-D1, J774.1, and PU5-1.8, and to compare these data with those obtained for various mononuclear phagocytes. Binding of monoclonal antibodies F4/80, M1/70, 2.4.G.2., 30.G.12, M3/38, M3/84, and 59AD2.2 to cells from these four cell lines was detected by the biotin-avidin immunoperoxidase staining method and quantified by cytophotometry. The results are expressed as the percentage cells expressing a given antigen and the mean specific integrated absorbance per 0.25 micron2 cell-surface area. The results revealed that the phenotypes of the four macrophage-like cell lines differ markedly. Expression of the cell antigens by the cells of the various cell lines did not follow a normal distribution. Although the cell lines divide continuously and have certain characteristics in common with mature mononuclear phagocytes, none of the macrophage-like cell lines accurately resembles any of the mononuclear phagocyte populations. The strongest correlations for membrane were found between on the one hand WEHI-3 and P388-D1 cells and monoblasts and promonocytes (P greater than 0.011) on the other. P388-D1, J774.1 and PU5-1.8 cells expressed four of the six antigens to the same extent as skin macrophages (P greater than 0.012). With respect to expression of antigens recognized by antibodies 2.4.G.2., 30.G.12, M3/38, and M3/84 PU5-1.8 cells resembled activated peritoneal macrophages (P greater than 0.031). It is concluded that WEHI-3 is the most immature cell line, followed by the P388-D1 cell line, while J774.1, and PU5-1.8 are the most mature cell lines. PMID:3292404

  5. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marvin E.; Aalderink, Bernard J.; Padoan, Roberto; de Bruin, Gerrit; Steemers, Ted A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared). By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands) to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  6. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  7. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  8. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  9. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  10. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  11. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination—a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  12. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B; Yokoo, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination-a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  13. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  14. Image analysis and quantitative morphology.

    PubMed

    Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Aguila, Marcia Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative studies are increasingly found in the literature, particularly in the fields of development/evolution, pathology, and neurosciences. Image digitalization converts tissue images into a numeric form by dividing them into very small regions termed picture elements or pixels. Image analysis allows automatic morphometry of digitalized images, and stereology aims to understand the structural inner three-dimensional arrangement based on the analysis of slices showing two-dimensional information. To quantify morphological structures in an unbiased and reproducible manner, appropriate isotropic and uniform random sampling of sections, and updated stereological tools are needed. Through the correct use of stereology, a quantitative study can be performed with little effort; efficiency in stereology means as little counting as possible (little work), low cost (section preparation), but still good accuracy. This short text provides a background guide for non-expert morphologists. PMID:19960334

  15. Quantitative imaging as cancer biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, David A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to assay tumor biologic features and the impact of drugs on tumor biology is fundamental to drug development. Advances in our ability to measure genomics, gene expression, protein expression, and cellular biology have led to a host of new targets for anticancer drug therapy. In translating new drugs into clinical trials and clinical practice, these same assays serve to identify patients most likely to benefit from specific anticancer treatments. As cancer therapy becomes more individualized and targeted, there is an increasing need to characterize tumors and identify therapeutic targets to select therapy most likely to be successful in treating the individual patient's cancer. Thus far assays to identify cancer therapeutic targets or anticancer drug pharmacodynamics have been based upon in vitro assay of tissue or blood samples. Advances in molecular imaging, particularly PET, have led to the ability to perform quantitative non-invasive molecular assays. Imaging has traditionally relied on structural and anatomic features to detect cancer and determine its extent. More recently, imaging has expanded to include the ability to image regional biochemistry and molecular biology, often termed molecular imaging. Molecular imaging can be considered an in vivo assay technique, capable of measuring regional tumor biology without perturbing it. This makes molecular imaging a unique tool for cancer drug development, complementary to traditional assay methods, and a potentially powerful method for guiding targeted therapy in clinical trials and clinical practice. The ability to quantify, in absolute measures, regional in vivo biologic parameters strongly supports the use of molecular imaging as a tool to guide therapy. This review summarizes current and future applications of quantitative molecular imaging as a biomarker for cancer therapy, including the use of imaging to (1) identify patients whose tumors express a specific therapeutic target; (2) determine

  16. Clinical utility of quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G; Burton, Kirsteen R; Yu, John-Paul J; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Lenchik, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently used in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

  17. Clinical Utility of Quantitative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G.; Burton, Kirsteen R.; Yu, John-Paul J.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.; Lenchik, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently employed in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

  18. GPC and quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is a light efficient method for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions using binary-only or analog phase levels. It has been used in applications such as optical trapping and manipulation, active microscopy, structured illumination, optical security, parallel laser marking and labelling and recently in contemporary biophotonics applications such as for adaptive and parallel two-photon optogenetics and neurophotonics. We will present our most recent GPC developments geared towards these applications. We first show a very compact static light shaper followed by the potential of GPC for biomedical and multispectral applications where we experimentally demonstrate the active light shaping of a supercontinuum laser over most of the visible wavelength range. Finally, we discuss how GPC can be advantageously applied for Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI).

  19. Quantitative analysis of qualitative images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockney, David; Falco, Charles M.

    2005-03-01

    We show optical evidence that demonstrates artists as early as Jan van Eyck and Robert Campin (c1425) used optical projections as aids for producing their paintings. We also have found optical evidence within works by later artists, including Bermejo (c1475), Lotto (c1525), Caravaggio (c1600), de la Tour (c1650), Chardin (c1750) and Ingres (c1825), demonstrating a continuum in the use of optical projections by artists, along with an evolution in the sophistication of that use. However, even for paintings where we have been able to extract unambiguous, quantitative evidence of the direct use of optical projections for producing certain of the features, this does not mean that paintings are effectively photographs. Because the hand and mind of the artist are intimately involved in the creation process, understanding these complex images requires more than can be obtained from only applying the equations of geometrical optics.

  20. Quantitative analysis of digital microscope images.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E; Samarasekera, Champika; Swedlow, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses quantitative analysis of digital microscope images and presents several exercises to provide examples to explain the concept. This chapter also presents the basic concepts in quantitative analysis for imaging, but these concepts rest on a well-established foundation of signal theory and quantitative data analysis. This chapter presents several examples for understanding the imaging process as a transformation from sample to image and the limits and considerations of quantitative analysis. This chapter introduces to the concept of digitally correcting the images and also focuses on some of the more critical types of data transformation and some of the frequently encountered issues in quantization. Image processing represents a form of data processing. There are many examples of data processing such as fitting the data to a theoretical curve. In all these cases, it is critical that care is taken during all steps of transformation, processing, and quantization. PMID:23931513

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Image Retrieval Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the problems of developing a framework and testbed for quantitative assessment of image retrieval effectiveness. To better harness the extensive research on content-based retrieval and improve capabilities of image retrieval systems, this article advocates the establishment of common image retrieval testbeds consisting of standardized…

  2. White-light quantitative phase imaging unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, YoonSeok; Lee, KyeoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the white light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool.

  3. White-light quantitative phase imaging unit.

    PubMed

    Baek, YoonSeok; Lee, KyeoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the white-light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool. PMID:27137546

  4. Quantitative histogram analysis of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Oliver; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2006-11-01

    A routine for histogram analysis of images has been written in the object-oriented, graphical development environment LabVIEW. The program converts an RGB bitmap image into an intensity-linear greyscale image according to selectable conversion coefficients. This greyscale image is subsequently analysed by plots of the intensity histogram and probability distribution of brightness, and by calculation of various parameters, including average brightness, standard deviation, variance, minimal and maximal brightness, mode, skewness and kurtosis of the histogram and the median of the probability distribution. The program allows interactive selection of specific regions of interest (ROI) in the image and definition of lower and upper threshold levels (e.g., to permit the removal of a constant background signal). The results of the analysis of multiple images can be conveniently saved and exported for plotting in other programs, which allows fast analysis of relatively large sets of image data. The program file accompanies this manuscript together with a detailed description of two application examples: The analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, specifically of tau-immunofluorescence in primary cultures of rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and the quantification of protein bands by Western-blot. The possibilities and limitations of this kind of analysis are discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: HAWGC Catalogue identifier: ADXG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXG_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Mobile Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron Installations: No installation necessary—Executable file together with necessary files for LabVIEW Run-time engine Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: WindowsME/2000/XP Programming language used: LabVIEW 7.0 Memory required to execute with typical data:˜16MB for starting and ˜160MB used for

  5. Accuracy in Quantitative 3D Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 3D imaging is becoming an increasingly popular and powerful approach to investigate plant growth and development. With the increased use of 3D image analysis, standards to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of these data are required. This commentary highlights how image acquisition and postprocessing can introduce artifacts into 3D image data and proposes steps to increase both the accuracy and reproducibility of these analyses. It is intended to aid researchers entering the field of 3D image processing of plant cells and tissues and to help general readers in understanding and evaluating such data. PMID:25804539

  6. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification for Quantitative Imaging Holdup Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bevill, Aaron M; Bledsoe, Keith C

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear fuel cycle safeguards, special nuclear material "held up" in pipes, ducts, and glove boxes causes significant uncertainty in material-unaccounted-for estimates. Quantitative imaging is a proposed non-destructive assay technique with potential to estimate the holdup mass more accurately and reliably than current techniques. However, uncertainty analysis for quantitative imaging remains a significant challenge. In this work we demonstrate an analysis approach for data acquired with a fast-neutron coded aperture imager. The work includes a calibrated forward model of the imager. Cross-validation indicates that the forward model predicts the imager data typically within 23%; further improvements are forthcoming. A new algorithm based on the chi-squared goodness-of-fit metric then uses the forward model to calculate a holdup confidence interval. The new algorithm removes geometry approximations that previous methods require, making it a more reliable uncertainty estimator.

  8. Nonspectroscopic imaging for quantitative chlorophyll sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehoon; Kim, Jeong-Im; Visbal-Onufrak, Michelle A.; Chapple, Clint; Kim, Young L.

    2016-01-01

    Nondestructive imaging of physiological changes in plants has been intensively used as an invaluable tool for visualizing heterogeneous responses to various types of abiotic and biotic stress. However, conventional approaches often have intrinsic limitations for quantitative analyses, requiring bulky and expensive optical instruments for capturing full spectral information. We report a spectrometerless (or spectrometer-free) reflectance imaging method that allows for nondestructive and quantitative chlorophyll imaging in individual leaves in situ in a handheld device format. The combination of a handheld-type imaging system and a hyperspectral reconstruction algorithm from an RGB camera offers simple instrumentation and operation while avoiding the use of an imaging spectrograph or tunable color filter. This platform could potentially be integrated into a compact, inexpensive, and portable system, while being of great value in high-throughput phenotyping facilities and laboratory settings.

  9. Quantitative Nuclear Imaging in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Y.; Lanièce, Ph.; Mastrippolito, R.; Siebert, R.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    Used initially and extensively for medical diagnosis, nuclear imaging has been progressively extended to other applications like molecular genetics, neurosciences and surgical aids. This review article covers new types of imaging apparatus resulting from this diversification. Far from being exhaustive, we limit ourselves to the three applications cited above, in which our research group has focused its interest. In an extensive first part, we describe three types of detectors dedicated to the three complementary areas of research in genetics at the molecular level: in situ hybridization, gene cartography and DNA sequencing. In addition, we discuss the current limits of these methods and the efforts that we propose to progress further. Then, after recalling some general aspects of in vivo micro-imaging, we present our new technical strategy to investigate in vivo cerebral mechanisms in rodents. Finally, we describe our current development of mini-cameras for assisting surgeons during operations. Exploitée de longue date pour le diagnostic médical, l'imagerie associée aux techniques de marquage radioactif se diversifie depuis peu, sur de nouvelles bases, selon les exigences de la génétique moléculaire, des neurosciences, voire de l'assistance chirurgicale. Cet article de revue, loin d'être exhaustif, se limite à ces trois domaines exemplaires dans lesquels notre équipe a fortement impliqué ses développements. Dans ce contexte, nous consacrons une large première partie à la présentation de trois types de détecteurs dédiés à trois genres d'expériences complémentaires de la génétique moléculaire: l'hybridation in situ, la cartographie des gènes, et le séquençage de l'ADN. Nous discutons au passage les limites actuelles de ces trois méthodes avec les tentatives que nous proposons pour s'en affranchir. Puis, après avoir rappelé quelques aspects généraux de la micro-imagerie in vivo, nous montrons comment nous avons abordé, à partir d

  10. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  11. Quantitative Imaging with a Mobile Phone Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D.; Switz, Neil A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone–based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications. PMID:24824072

  12. Quantitative image processing in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus; Helman, James; Ning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The current status of digital image processing in fluid flow research is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to a comprehensive approach to the extraction of quantitative data from multivariate databases and examples of recent developments. The discussion covers numerical simulations and experiments, data processing, generation and dissemination of knowledge, traditional image processing, hybrid processing, fluid flow vector field topology, and isosurface analysis using Marching Cubes.

  13. Quantitative Functional Morphology by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Vorobjev, Ivan A; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes advantages and limitations of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) based on Imagestream instrumentation using a hybrid approach of morphometric measurement and quantitation of multiparametric fluorescent intensities' distribution in cells and particles. Brief comparison is given of IFC with conventional flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Some future directions of the IFC technology are described and discussed. PMID:27460234

  14. Cardiovascular and pulmonary dynamics by quantitative imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    The accuracy and range of studies on cardiovascular and pulmonary functions can be greatly facilitated if the motions of the underlying organ systems throughout individual cycles can be directly visualized and readily measured with minimum or preferably no effect on these motions. Achievement of this objective requires development of techniques for quantitative noninvasive or minimally invasive dynamic and stop-action imaging of the organ systems. A review of advances in dynamic quantitative imaging of moving organs reveals that the revolutionary value of cross-sectional and three-dimensional images produced by various types of radiant energy such as X-rays and gamma rays, positrons, electrons, protons, light, and ultrasound for clinical diagnostic and biomedical research applications is just beginning to be realized. The fabrication of a clinically useful cross-section reconstruction device with sensing capabilities for both anatomical structural composition and chemical composition may be possible and awaits future development.

  15. Quantitative imaging features: extension of the oncology medical image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P. T.; Young, K. C.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. With the advent of digital imaging modalities and the rapid growth in both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of data is of paramount importance. The Oncology Medical Image Database (OMI-DB) was created to provide a centralized, fully annotated dataset for research. The database contains both processed and unprocessed images, associated data, and annotations and where applicable expert determined ground truths describing features of interest. Medical imaging provides the ability to detect and localize many changes that are important to determine whether a disease is present or a therapy is effective by depicting alterations in anatomic, physiologic, biochemical or molecular processes. Quantitative imaging features are sensitive, specific, accurate and reproducible imaging measures of these changes. Here, we describe an extension to the OMI-DB whereby a range of imaging features and descriptors are pre-calculated using a high throughput approach. The ability to calculate multiple imaging features and data from the acquired images would be valuable and facilitate further research applications investigating detection, prognosis, and classification. The resultant data store contains more than 10 million quantitative features as well as features derived from CAD predictions. Theses data can be used to build predictive models to aid image classification, treatment response assessment as well as to identify prognostic imaging biomarkers.

  16. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Evolution and Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Olya; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapy, even when highly targeted, typically fails because of the remarkable capacity of malignant cells to evolve effective adaptations. These evolutionary dynamics are both a cause and a consequence of cancer system heterogeneity at many scales, ranging from genetic properties of individual cells to large-scale imaging features. Tumors of the same organ and cell type can have remarkably diverse appearances in different patients. Furthermore, even within a single tumor, marked variations in imaging features, such as necrosis or contrast enhancement, are common. Similar spatial variations recently have been reported in genetic profiles. Radiologic heterogeneity within tumors is usually governed by variations in blood flow, whereas genetic heterogeneity is typically ascribed to random mutations. However, evolution within tumors, as in all living systems, is subject to Darwinian principles; thus, it is governed by predictable and reproducible interactions between environmental selection forces and cell phenotype (not genotype). This link between regional variations in environmental properties and cellular adaptive strategies may permit clinical imaging to be used to assess and monitor intratumoral evolution in individual patients. This approach is enabled by new methods that extract, report, and analyze quantitative, reproducible, and mineable clinical imaging data. However, most current quantitative metrics lack spatialness, expressing quantitative radiologic features as a single value for a region of interest encompassing the whole tumor. In contrast, spatially explicit image analysis recognizes that tumors are heterogeneous but not well mixed and defines regionally distinct habitats, some of which appear to harbor tumor populations that are more aggressive and less treatable than others. By identifying regional variations in key environmental selection forces and evidence of cellular adaptation, clinical imaging can enable us to define intratumoral

  17. From Quantitative Microscopy to Automated Image Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kai; Murphy, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative microscopy has been extensively used in biomedical research and has provided significant insights into structure and dynamics at the cell and tissue level. The entire procedure of quantitative microscopy is comprised of specimen preparation, light absorption/reflection/emission from the specimen, microscope optical processing, optical/electrical conversion by a camera or detector, and computational processing of digitized images. Although many of the latest digital signal processing techniques have been successfully applied to compress, restore, and register digital microscope images, automated approaches for recognition and understanding of complex subcellular patterns in light microscope images have been far less widely used. In this review, we describe a systematic approach for interpreting protein subcellular distributions using various sets of Subcellular Location Features (SLF) in combination with supervised classification and unsupervised clustering methods. These methods can handle complex patterns in digital microscope images and the features can be applied for other purposes such as objectively choosing a representative image from a collection and performing statistical comparison of image sets. PMID:15447010

  18. Quantitative statistical methods for image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Joyita; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measures of image quality and reliability are critical for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis of medical images. While, in theory, it is possible to analyze reconstructed images by means of Monte Carlo simulations using a large number of noise realizations, the associated computational burden makes this approach impractical. Additionally, this approach is less meaningful in clinical scenarios, where multiple noise realizations are generally unavailable. The practical alternative is to compute closed-form analytical expressions for image quality measures. The objective of this paper is to review statistical analysis techniques that enable us to compute two key metrics: resolution (determined from the local impulse response) and covariance. The underlying methods include fixed-point approaches, which compute these metrics at a fixed point (the unique and stable solution) independent of the iterative algorithm employed, and iteration-based approaches, which yield results that are dependent on the algorithm, initialization, and number of iterations. We also explore extensions of some of these methods to a range of special contexts, including dynamic and motion-compensated image reconstruction. While most of the discussed techniques were developed for emission tomography, the general methods are extensible to other imaging modalities as well. In addition to enabling image characterization, these analysis techniques allow us to control and enhance imaging system performance. We review practical applications where performance improvement is achieved by applying these ideas to the contexts of both hardware (optimizing scanner design) and image reconstruction (designing regularization functions that produce uniform resolution or maximize task-specific figures of merit). PMID:24312148

  19. Quantitative Statistical Methods for Image Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measures of image quality and reliability are critical for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis of medical images. While, in theory, it is possible to analyze reconstructed images by means of Monte Carlo simulations using a large number of noise realizations, the associated computational burden makes this approach impractical. Additionally, this approach is less meaningful in clinical scenarios, where multiple noise realizations are generally unavailable. The practical alternative is to compute closed-form analytical expressions for image quality measures. The objective of this paper is to review statistical analysis techniques that enable us to compute two key metrics: resolution (determined from the local impulse response) and covariance. The underlying methods include fixed-point approaches, which compute these metrics at a fixed point (the unique and stable solution) independent of the iterative algorithm employed, and iteration-based approaches, which yield results that are dependent on the algorithm, initialization, and number of iterations. We also explore extensions of some of these methods to a range of special contexts, including dynamic and motion-compensated image reconstruction. While most of the discussed techniques were developed for emission tomography, the general methods are extensible to other imaging modalities as well. In addition to enabling image characterization, these analysis techniques allow us to control and enhance imaging system performance. We review practical applications where performance improvement is achieved by applying these ideas to the contexts of both hardware (optimizing scanner design) and image reconstruction (designing regularization functions that produce uniform resolution or maximize task-specific figures of merit). PMID:24312148

  20. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  1. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients. PMID:25759524

  2. Metrology Standards for Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Daniel C; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Kessler, Larry G; Raunig, David L; Gatsonis, Constantine; Huang, Erich P; Kondratovich, Marina; McShane, Lisa M; Reeves, Anthony P; Barboriak, Daniel P; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Wahl, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    Although investigators in the imaging community have been active in developing and evaluating quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIBs), the development and implementation of QIBs have been hampered by the inconsistent or incorrect use of terminology or methods for technical performance and statistical concepts. Technical performance is an assessment of how a test performs in reference objects or subjects under controlled conditions. In this article, some of the relevant statistical concepts are reviewed, methods that can be used for evaluating and comparing QIBs are described, and some of the technical performance issues related to imaging biomarkers are discussed. More consistent and correct use of terminology and study design principles will improve clinical research, advance regulatory science, and foster better care for patients who undergo imaging studies. PMID:26267831

  3. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  4. Quantitative preclinical PET imaging: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntner, Claudia; Stout, David

    2014-02-01

    PET imaging of metabolism involves many choices, from hardware settings, software options to animal handling considerations. How to decide what settings or conditions to use is not straightforward, as the experimental design is dependent on the particular science being investigated. There is no single answer, yet there are factors that are common to all experiments that are the subject of this review. From physics to physiology, there are many factors to consider, each of which can have a significant impact upon measurements of metabolism in vivo. This review examines the most common factors related to all types of quantitative PET imaging.

  5. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging. PMID:26833935

  6. Quantitative Characterization of Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Ruby

    An optical imaging modality for small animal cancer studies using Cerenkov radiation is currently being developed in the Cherry lab at the University of California, Davis. Cerenkov radiation is a well-known phenomenon, in which optical photons are emitted when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a medium. This emerging modality is referred to as Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging. The significance of this work is that it enables imaging on widely available small animal optical imaging systems of radionuclides being developed for therapeutic applications and positron emitting radiotracers developed for diagnostic purposes. A Monte Carlo based simulation was performed to predict the number of photons expected for a given radionuclide decay. The simulations calculated Cerenkov light intensity produced by radionuclides of interest for nuclear imaging and radionuclide therapy treatments. A quantitative understanding of Cerenkov light levels using parameters that are representative of situations encountered in vivo will help guide future applications and possible clinical implementation of Cerenkov luminescence imaging.

  7. The quantitative potential for breast tomosynthesis imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, Christina M.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Due to its limited angular scan range, breast tomosynthesis has lower resolution in the depth direction, which may limit its accuracy in quantifying tissue density. This study assesses the quantitative potential of breast tomosynthesis using relatively simple reconstruction and image processing algorithms. This quantitation could allow improved characterization of lesions as well as image processing to present tomosynthesis images with the familiar appearance of mammography by preserving more low-frequency information. Methods: All studies were based on a Siemens prototype MAMMOMAT Novation TOMO breast tomo system with a 45 deg. total angular span. This investigation was performed using both simulations and empirical measurements. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using the breast tomosynthesis geometry and tissue-equivalent, uniform, voxelized phantoms with cuboid lesions of varying density embedded within. Empirical studies were then performed using tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms which were imaged on the actual prototype system. The material surrounding the lesions was set to either fat-equivalent or glandular-equivalent plastic. From the simulation experiments, the effects of scatter, lesion depth, and background material density were studied. The empirical experiments studied the effects of lesion depth, background material density, x-ray tube energy, and exposure level. Additionally, the proposed analysis methods were independently evaluated using a commercially available QA breast phantom (CIRS Model 11A). All image reconstruction was performed with a filtered backprojection algorithm. Reconstructed voxel values within each slice were corrected to reduce background nonuniformities. Results: The resulting lesion voxel values varied linearly with known glandular fraction (correlation coefficient R{sup 2}>0.90) under all simulated and empirical conditions, including for the independent tests with the QA phantom. Analysis of variance performed

  8. Bayesian Image Reconstruction in Quantitative Photoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Tanja; Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben; Kaipio, Jari; Arridge, Simon

    2013-08-30

    Quantitative photoacoustic tomography is an emerging imaging technique aimed at estimating chromophore concentrations inside tissues from photoacoustic images, which are formed by combining optical information and ultrasonic propagation. This is a hybrid imaging problem in which the solution of one inverse problem acts as the data for another ill-posed inverse problem. In the optical reconstruction of quantitative photoacoustic tomography, the data is obtained as a solution of an acoustic inverse initial value problem. Thus, both the data and the noise are affected by the method applied to solve the acoustic inverse problem. In this paper, the noise of optical data is modelled as Gaussian distributed with mean and covariance approximated by solving several acoustic inverse initial value problems using acoustic noise samples as data. Furthermore, Bayesian approximation error modelling is applied to compensate for the modelling errors in the optical data caused by the acoustic solver. The results show that modelling of the noise statistics and the approximation errors can improve the optical reconstructions. PMID:24001987

  9. Quantitative phase imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollárová, Vera; Colláková, Jana; Dostál, Zbynek; Slabý, Tomas; Veselý, Pavel; Chmelík, Radim

    2015-03-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) is an off-axis holographic system. It enables observation of a sample and its quantitative phase imaging with coherent as well as with incoherent illumination. The spatial and temporal coherence can be modified and thus also the quality and type of the image information. The coherent illumination provides numerical refocusing in wide depth range similarly to a classic coherent-light digital holographic microscopy (HM). Incoherent-light HM is characterized by a high quality, coherence-noise-free imaging with up to twice higher resolution compared to coherent illumination. Owing to an independent, free of sample reference arm of the CCHM the low spatial light coherence induces coherence-gating effect. This makes possible to observe specimen also through scattering media. We have described theoretically and simulated numerically imaging of a two dimensional object through a scattering layer by CCHM using the linear systems theory. We have investigated both strongly and weakly scattering media characterized by different amount of ballistic and diffuse light. The influence of a scattering layer on the quality of a phase signal is discussed for both types of the scattering media. A strong dependence of the imaging process on the light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data gained with model samples, as well as real biologic objects particularly then by time-lapse observations of live cells reactions to substances producing optically turbid emulsion.

  10. Quantitative imaging of the optical near field.

    PubMed

    Kühler, Paul; García de Abajo, F Javier; Leiprecht, Philipp; Kolloch, Andreas; Solis, Javier; Leiderer, Paul; Siegel, Jan

    2012-09-24

    When exposing small particles on a substrate to a light plane wave, the scattered optical near field is spatially modulated and highly complex. We show, for the particular case of dielectric microspheres, that it is possible to image these optical near-field distributions in a quantitative way. By placing a single microsphere on a thin film of the photosensitive phase change material Ge(2)Sb(5)Te(5) and exposing it to a single short laser pulse, the spatial intensity modulation of the near field is imprinted into the film as a pattern of different material phases. The resulting patterns are investigated by using optical as well as high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Quantitative information on the local optical near field at each location is obtained by calibrating the material response to pulsed laser irradiation. We discuss the influence of polarization and angle of incidence of the laser beam as well as particle size on the field distribution. The experimental results are in good quantitative agreement with a model based on a rigorous solution of Maxwell's equations. Our results have potential application to near-field optical lithography and experimental determination of near fields in complex nanostructures. PMID:23037356

  11. Rapid Quantitative Pharmacodynamic Imaging with Bayesian Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Jonathan M.; Vachon, M. Jonathan; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We recently described rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging, a novel method for estimating sensitivity of a biological system to a drug. We tested its accuracy in simulated biological signals with varying receptor sensitivity and varying levels of random noise, and presented initial proof-of-concept data from functional MRI (fMRI) studies in primate brain. However, the initial simulation testing used a simple iterative approach to estimate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) parameters, an approach that was computationally efficient but returned parameters only from a small, discrete set of values chosen a priori. Here we revisit the simulation testing using a Bayesian method to estimate the PKPD parameters. This improved accuracy compared to our previous method, and noise without intentional signal was never interpreted as signal. We also reanalyze the fMRI proof-of-concept data. The success with the simulated data, and with the limited fMRI data, is a necessary first step toward further testing of rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging. PMID:27092045

  12. Quantitative phase imaging with programmable illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Edwards, Chris; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Even with the recent rapid advances in the field of microscopy, non-laser light sources used for light microscopy have not been developing significantly. Most current optical microscopy systems use halogen bulbs as their light sources to provide a white-light illumination. Due to the confined shapes and finite filament size of the bulbs, little room is available for modification in the light source, which prevents further advances in microscopy. By contrast, commercial projectors provide a high power output that is comparable to the halogen lamps while allowing for great flexibility in patterning the illumination. In addition to their high brightness, the illumination can be patterned to have arbitrary spatial and spectral distributions. Therefore, commercial projectors can be adopted as a flexible light source to an optical microscope by careful alignment to the existing optical path. In this study, we employed a commercial projector source to a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), which is an outside module for an existing phase contrast (PC) microscope. By replacing the ring illumination of PC with a ring-shaped pattern projected onto the condenser plane, we were able to recover the same result as the original SLIM. Furthermore, the ring illumination is replaced with multiple dots aligned along the same ring to minimize the overlap between the scattered and unscattered fields. This new method minimizes the halo artifact of the imaging system, which allows for a halo-free high-resolution quantitative phase microscopy system.

  13. Towards a Quantitative OCT Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Garrido, Marina; Beck, Susanne C.; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Julien, Sylvie; Schraermeyer, Ulrich; Seeliger, Mathias W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an invaluable diagnostic tool for the detection and follow-up of retinal pathology in patients and experimental disease models. However, as morphological structures and layering in health as well as their alterations in disease are complex, segmentation procedures have not yet reached a satisfactory level of performance. Therefore, raw images and qualitative data are commonly used in clinical and scientific reports. Here, we assess the value of OCT reflectivity profiles as a basis for a quantitative characterization of the retinal status in a cross-species comparative study. Methods Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), confocal Scanning-La­ser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Fluorescein Angiography (FA) were performed in mice (Mus musculus), gerbils (Gerbillus perpadillus), and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) using the Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system, and additional SLOs and FAs were obtained with the HRA I (same manufacturer). Reflectivity profiles were extracted from 8-bit greyscale OCT images using the ImageJ software package (http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/). Results Reflectivity profiles obtained from OCT scans of all three animal species correlated well with ex vivo histomorphometric data. Each of the retinal layers showed a typical pattern that varied in relative size and degree of reflectivity across species. In general, plexiform layers showed a higher level of reflectivity than nuclear layers. A comparison of reflectivity profiles from specialized retinal regions (e.g. visual streak in gerbils, fovea in non-human primates) with respective regions of human retina revealed multiple similarities. In a model of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), the value of reflectivity profiles for the follow-up of therapeutic interventions was demonstrated. Conclusions OCT reflectivity profiles provide a detailed, quantitative description of retinal layers and structures including specialized retinal regions

  14. Quantitative thermal imaging of aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.; Syed, Hazari I.

    1995-03-01

    Aircraft structural integrity is a major concern for airlines and airframe manufacturers. To remain economically competitive, airlines are looking at ways to retire older aircraft, not when some fixed number of flight hours or cycles has been reached, but when true structural need dictates. This philosophy is known as `retirement for cause.' The need to extend the life of commercial aircraft has increased the desire to develop nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of detecting critical flaws such as disbonding and corrosion. These subsurface flaws are of major concern in bonded lap joints. Disbonding in such a joint can provide an avenue for moisture to enter the structure leading to corrosion. Significant material loss due to corrosion can substantially reduce the structural strength, load bearing capacity and ultimately reduce the life of the structure. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center has developed a thermal NDE system designed for application to disbonding and corrosion detection in aircraft skins. By injecting a small amount of heat into the front surface of an aircraft skin, and recording the time history of the resulting surface temperature variations using an infrared camera, quantitative images of both bond integrity and material loss due to corrosion can be produced. This paper presents a discussion of the development of the thermal imaging system as well as the techniques used to analyze the resulting thermal images. The analysis techniques presented represent a significant improvement in the information available over conventional thermal imaging due to the inclusion of data from both the heating and cooling portion of the thermal cycle. Results of laboratory experiments on fabricated disbond and material loss samples are presented to determine the limitations of the system. Additionally, the results of actual aircraft inspections are shown, which help to establish the field applicability for this

  15. Castleman's disease of a submandibular mass diagnosed on Fine Needle Cytology: Report of a case with histopathological, immunocytochemical and imaging correlations

    PubMed Central

    Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Campanile, Anna Cipolletta; Sanna, Veronica; Ionna, Franco; Longo, Francesco; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Botti, Gerardo; Fulciniti, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Castleman's disease (CD) is an unusual inflammatory lymphoproliferative disorder of uncertain aetiology, mainly involving lymphatic tissue in the mediastinum, but also occurring in the neck, lung, abdomen, pelvis, skeletal muscle and retroperitoneum. Fine Needle Cytology (FNC) is a quick, cost-effective and safe diagnostic modality to investigate on organs involved by CD, also providing a guide to treatment and management of patients with lymphoadenopathy. We report a case of a 44-year-old man who underwent FNC of a submandibular mass with subsequent surgical excision. Cytology revealed an atypical lymphoproliferative process, which arose the suspicion of CD. Histopathological study of the excised masses combined with immunhistochemistry and imaging of the submandibular and neck areas, confirmed the suspicion. A final diagnosis of Unicentric Castleman's disease, hyaline-vascular type, was made. PMID:26989647

  16. Quantitative Photoacoustic Image Reconstruction using Fluence Dependent Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B.T.; Laufer, J.G.; Beard, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In biomedical photoacoustic imaging the images are proportional to the absorbed optical energy density, and not the optical absorption, which makes it difficult to obtain a quantitatively accurate image showing the concentration of a particular absorbing chromophore from photoacoustic measurements alone. Here it is shown that the spatially varying concentration of a chromophore whose absorption becomes zero above a threshold light fluence can be estimated from photoacoustic images obtained at increasing illumination strengths. This technique provides an alternative to model-based multiwavelength approaches to quantitative photoacoustic imaging, and a new approach to photoacoustic molecular and functional imaging. PMID:21258458

  17. Quantitative Photoacoustic Imaging of Nanoparticles in Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason R.; Frey, Wolfgang; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative visualization of nanoparticles in cells and tissues, while preserving the spatial information, is very challenging. A photoacoustic imaging technique to depict the presence and quantity of nanoparticles is presented. This technique is based on the dependence of the photoacoustic signal with both the nanoparticle quantity and the laser fluence. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging is a robust technique that doesn’t require knowledge of the local fluence, but a relative change in the fluence. This eliminates the need for sophisticated methods or models to determine the energy distribution of light in turbid media. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging was first applied to nanoparticle-loaded cells and quantitation was validated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging was then extended to xenograft tumor tissue sections, and excellent agreement with traditional histopathological analysis was demonstrated. Our results suggest that quantitative photoacoustic imaging may be used in many applications including the determination of the efficiency and effectiveness of molecular targeting strategies for cell studies and animal models, the quantitative assessment of photoacoustic contrast agent biodistribution, and the validation of in vivo photoacoustic imaging. PMID:23312348

  18. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative imaging in microgravity combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the imaging techniques implemented by researchers in the microgravity combustion program shows that for almost any system, imaging of the flame may be accomplished in a variety of ways. Standard and intensified video, high speed, and infrared cameras and fluorescence, laser schlieren, rainbow schlieren, soot volume fraction, and soot temperature imaging have all been used in the laboratory and many in reduced gravity to make the necessary experimental measurements.

  20. Quantitative imaging of coronary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Adam M; Butterworth, Erik; Caldwell, James H; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality based on the administration of a positron-emitting radiotracer, the imaging of the distribution and kinetics of the tracer, and the interpretation of the physiological events and their meaning with respect to health and disease. PET imaging was introduced in the 1970s and numerous advances in radiotracers and detection systems have enabled this modality to address a wide variety of clinical tasks, such as the detection of cancer, staging of Alzheimer's disease, and assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). This review provides a description of the logic and the logistics of the processes required for PET imaging and a discussion of its use in guiding the treatment of CAD. Finally, we outline prospects and limitations of nanoparticles as agents for PET imaging. PMID:22110860

  1. Quantitative imaging of coronary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Alessio, Adam M.; Butterworth, Erik; Caldwell, James H.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality based on the administration of a positron-emitting radiotracer, the imaging of the distribution and kinetics of the tracer, and the interpretation of the physiological events and their meaning with respect to health and disease. PET imaging was introduced in the 1970s and numerous advances in radiotracers and detection systems have enabled this modality to address a wide variety of clinical tasks, such as the detection of cancer, staging of Alzheimer's disease, and assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). This review provides a description of the logic and the logistics of the processes required for PET imaging and a discussion of its use in guiding the treatment of CAD. Finally, we outline prospects and limitations of nanoparticles as agents for PET imaging. PMID:22110860

  2. Quantitative spectroscopic imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Chieh; Lau, Condon; O'Donoghue, Geoffrey; Mirkovic, Jelena; McGee, Sasha; Galindo, Luis; Elackattu, Alphi; Stier, Elizabeth; Grillone, Gregory; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2008-09-29

    We report a fully quantitative spectroscopy imaging instrument for wide area detection of early cancer (dysplasia). This instrument provides quantitative maps of tissue biochemistry and morphology, making it a potentially powerful surveillance tool for objective early cancer detection. We describe the design, construction, calibration, and first clinical application of this new system. We demonstrate its accuracy using physical tissue models. We validate its diagnostic ability on a resected colon adenoma, and demonstrate feasibility of in vivo imaging in the oral cavity. PMID:18825262

  3. Quantitative chemical imaging with multiplex stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dan; Lu, Fa-Ke; Zhang, Xu; Freudiger, Christian; Pernik, Douglas R; Holtom, Gary; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2012-02-29

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a newly developed label-free chemical imaging technique that overcomes the speed limitation of confocal Raman microscopy while avoiding the nonresonant background problem of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Previous demonstrations have been limited to single Raman band measurements. We present a novel modulation multiplexing approach that allows real-time detection of multiple species using the fast Fourier transform. We demonstrate the quantitative determination of chemical concentrations in a ternary mixture. Furthermore, two imaging applications are pursued: (1) quantitative determination of oil content as well as pigment and protein concentration in microalgae cultures; and (2) 3D high-resolution imaging of blood, lipids, and protein distribution in ex vivo mouse skin tissue. We believe that quantitative multiplex SRS uniquely combines the advantage of fast label-free imaging with the fingerprinting capability of Raman spectroscopy and enables numerous applications in lipid biology as well as biomedical imaging. PMID:22316340

  4. Progress in Evaluating Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of advanced fugitive emission detection and assessment technologies that facilitate cost effective leak and malfunction mitigation strategies is an ongoing goal shared by industry, regulators, and environmental groups. Optical gas imaging (OGI) represents an importan...

  5. Quantitative profiling of tissue drug distribution by MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Pirman, David

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights recent advancements in the quantitative measurement of drug distribution by MS imaging (MSI). Quantitation by MSI was recently considering the primary disadvantage of MSI approaches particularly when compared with widely used autoradiography techniques. These approaches show significant progress in the area of quantitative MSI and have been used in numerous drug and metabolite distribution measurements. As quantitative limitations are overcome, the use of MSI in drug development should increase significantly providing key insights into both tissue-target validation as well as identifying off tissue-target issues with drug delivery. PMID:26495807

  6. Quantitative In Vivo Imaging of Embryonic Development: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Chelsea L.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models are critically important for mechanistic understanding of embryonic morphogenesis. For decades, visualizing these rapid and complex multidimensional events has relied on projection images and thin section reconstructions. While much insight has been gained, fixed tissue specimens offer limited information on dynamic processes that are essential for tissue assembly and organ patterning. Quantitative imaging is required to unlock the important basic science and clinically relevant secrets that remain hidden. Recent advances in live imaging technology have enabled quantitative longitudinal analysis of embryonic morphogenesis at multiple length and time scales. Four different imaging modalities are currently being used to monitor embryonic morphogenesis: optical, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Each has its advantages and limitations with respect to spatial resolution, depth of field, scanning speed, and tissue contrast. In addition, new processing tools have been developed to enhance live imaging capabilities. In this review, we analyze each type of imaging source and its use in quantitative study of embryonic morphogenesis in small animal models. We describe the physics behind their function, identify some examples in which the modality has revealed new quantitative insights, and then conclude with a discussion of new research directions with live imaging. PMID:22695188

  7. Quantitative Imaging in Laboratory: Fast Kinetics and Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Tanya; Hanley, Quentin S.

    2007-01-01

    The process of quantitative imaging, which is very commonly used in laboratory, is shown to be very useful for studying the fast kinetics and fluorescence quenching of many experiments. The imaging technique is extremely cheap and hence can be used in many absorption and luminescence experiments.

  8. Quantitative in vivo imaging of embryonic development: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Chelsea L; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2012-07-01

    Animal models are critically important for a mechanistic understanding of embryonic morphogenesis. For decades, visualizing these rapid and complex multidimensional events has relied on projection images and thin section reconstructions. While much insight has been gained, fixed tissue specimens offer limited information on dynamic processes that are essential for tissue assembly and organ patterning. Quantitative imaging is required to unlock the important basic science and clinically relevant secrets that remain hidden. Recent advances in live imaging technology have enabled quantitative longitudinal analysis of embryonic morphogenesis at multiple length and time scales. Four different imaging modalities are currently being used to monitor embryonic morphogenesis: optical, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Each has its advantages and limitations with respect to spatial resolution, depth of field, scanning speed, and tissue contrast. In addition, new processing tools have been developed to enhance live imaging capabilities. In this review, we analyze each type of imaging source and its use in quantitative study of embryonic morphogenesis in small animal models. We describe the physics behind their function, identify some examples in which the modality has revealed new quantitative insights, and then conclude with a discussion of new research directions with live imaging. PMID:22695188

  9. Quantitative Imaging of Single, Unstained Viruses with Coherent X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Song Changyong; Jiang Huaidong; Mancuso, Adrian; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Miao Jianwei; Peng Li; Sun Ren; Shah, Sanket S.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2008-10-10

    We report the recording and reconstruction of x-ray diffraction patterns from single, unstained viruses, for the first time. By separating the diffraction pattern of the virus particles from that of their surroundings, we performed quantitative and high-contrast imaging of a single virion. The structure of the viral capsid inside a virion was visualized. This work opens the door for quantitative x-ray imaging of a broad range of specimens from protein machineries and viruses to cellular organelles. Moreover, our experiment is directly transferable to the use of x-ray free electron lasers, and represents an experimental milestone towards the x-ray imaging of large protein complexes.

  10. Quantitative SPECT/CT: SPECT joins PET as a quantitative imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L; Willowson, Kathy P

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of combined modality single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT cameras has revived interest in quantitative SPECT. Schemes to mitigate the deleterious effects of photon attenuation and scattering in SPECT imaging have been developed over the last 30 years but have been held back by lack of ready access to data concerning the density of the body and photon transport, which we see as key to producing quantitative data. With X-ray CT data now routinely available, validations of techniques to produce quantitative SPECT reconstructions have been undertaken. While still suffering from inferior spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, SPECT scans nevertheless can be produced that are as quantitative as PET scans. Routine corrections are applied for photon attenuation and scattering, resolution recovery, instrumental dead time, radioactive decay and cross-calibration to produce SPECT images in units of kBq.ml(-1). Though clinical applications of quantitative SPECT imaging are lacking due to the previous non-availability of accurately calibrated SPECT reconstructions, these are beginning to emerge as the community and industry focus on producing SPECT/CT systems that are intrinsically quantitative. PMID:24037503

  11. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  12. Partial volume correction in quantitative amyloid imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E; Marcus, Daniel S; Ances, Beau M; Bateman, Randall J; Cairns, Nigel J; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C; Farrar, Angela M; Owen, Christopher J; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C; Thompson, Paul M; Ghetti, Bernadino; Saykin, Andrew J; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Schofield, Peter R; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2015-02-15

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  13. Improving quantitative neutron radiography through image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, D. S.; Coakley, K. J.; Baltic, E.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2013-11-01

    Commonly in neutron image experiments, the interpretation of the point spread function (PSF) is limited to describing the achievable spatial resolution in an image. In this article it is shown that for various PSF models, the resulting blurring due to the PSF affects the quantification of the neutron transmission of an object and that the effect is separate from the scattered neutron field from the sample. The effect is observed in several neutron imaging detector configurations using different neutron scintillators and light sensors. In the context of estimation of optical densities with an algorithm that assumes a parallel beam, the effect of blurring fractionates the neutron signal spatially and introduces an effective background that scales with the area of the detector illuminated by neutrons. Examples are provided that demonstrate that the illuminated field of view can alter the observed neutron transmission for nearly purely absorbing objects. It is found that by accurately modeling the PSF, image restoration methods can yield more accurate estimates of the neutron attenuation by an object.

  14. Non-interferometric quantitative phase imaging of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen K.; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Real-time imaging of live cells is quite difficult without the addition of external contrast agents. Various methods for quantitative phase imaging of living cells have been proposed like digital holographic microscopy and diffraction phase microscopy. In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental results of quantitative phase imaging of live yeast cells with nanometric precision using transport of intensity equations (TIE). We demonstrate nanometric depth sensitivity in imaging live yeast cells using this technique. This technique being noninterferometric, does not need any coherent light sources and images can be captured through a regular bright-field microscope. This real-time imaging technique would deliver the depth or 3-D volume information of cells and is highly promising in real-time digital pathology applications, screening of pathogens and staging of diseases like malaria as it does not need any preprocessing of samples.

  15. Imaging Performance of Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lenox, Mark W.; Wiskin, James; Lewis, Matthew A.; Darrouzet, Stephen; Borup, David; Hsieh, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QTUS) is a tomographic transmission ultrasound modality that is capable of generating 3D speed-of-sound maps of objects in the field of view. It performs this measurement by propagating a plane wave through the medium from a transmitter on one side of a water tank to a high resolution receiver on the opposite side. This information is then used via inverse scattering to compute a speed map. In addition, the presence of reflection transducers allows the creation of a high resolution, spatially compounded reflection map that is natively coregistered to the speed map. A prototype QTUS system was evaluated for measurement and geometric accuracy as well as for the ability to correctly determine speed of sound. PMID:26604918

  16. Phase calibration target for quantitative phase imaging with ptychography.

    PubMed

    Godden, T M; Muñiz-Piniella, A; Claverley, J D; Yacoot, A; Humphry, M J

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes refractive index and thickness variations that lead to optical phase shifts. This gives contrast to images of transparent objects. In quantitative biology, phase images are used to accurately segment cells and calculate properties such as dry mass, volume and proliferation rate. The fidelity of the measured phase shifts is of critical importance in this field. However to date, there has been no standardized method for characterizing the performance of phase imaging systems. Consequently, there is an increasing need for protocols to test the performance of phase imaging systems using well-defined phase calibration and resolution targets. In this work, we present a candidate for a standardized phase resolution target, and measurement protocol for the determination of the transfer of spatial frequencies, and sensitivity of a phase imaging system. The target has been carefully designed to contain well-defined depth variations over a broadband range of spatial frequencies. In order to demonstrate the utility of the target, we measure quantitative phase images on a ptychographic microscope, and compare the measured optical phase shifts with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) topography maps and surface profile measurements from coherence scanning interferometry. The results show that ptychography has fully quantitative nanometer sensitivity in optical path differences over a broadband range of spatial frequencies for feature sizes ranging from micrometers to hundreds of micrometers. PMID:27137054

  17. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image. PMID:26556680

  18. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  19. Informatics Methods to Enable Sharing of Quantitative Imaging Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mia A.; Freymann, John B.; Kirby, Justin S.; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Berglund, Anders E.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Tan, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaotao; Casavant, Thomas L.; Brown, Bartley J.; Braun, Terry A.; Dekker, Andre; Roelofs, Erik; Mountz, James M.; Boada, Fernando; Laymon, Charles; Oborski, Matt; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Quantitative Research Network (QIN) is a collaborative research network whose goal is to share data, algorithms and research tools to accelerate quantitative imaging research. A challenge is the variability in tools and analysis platforms used in quantitative imaging. Our goal was to understand the extent of this variation and to develop an approach to enable sharing data and to promote reuse of quantitative imaging data in the community. Methods We performed a survey of the current tools in use by the QIN member sites for representation and storage of their QIN research data including images, image meta-data and clinical data. We identified existing systems and standards for data sharing and their gaps for the QIN use case. We then proposed a system architecture to enable data sharing and collaborative experimentation within the QIN. Results There area variety of tools currently used by each QIN institution. We developed a general information system architecture to support the QIN goals. We also describe the remaining architecture gaps we are developing to enable members to share research images and image meta-data across the network. Conclusions As a research network, the QIN will stimulate quantitative imaging research by pooling data, algorithms and research tools. However, there are gaps in current functional requirements that will need to be met by future informatics development. Special attention must be given to the technical requirements needed to translate these methods into the clinical research workflow to enable validation and qualification of these novel imaging biomarkers. PMID:22770688

  20. Quantitative imaging biomarker ontology (QIBO) for knowledge representation of biomedical imaging biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Andrew J; Liu, Tiffany Ting; Savig, Erica; Suzek, Baris E; Ouellette, M; Danagoulian, J; Wernsing, G; Rubin, Daniel L; Paik, David

    2013-08-01

    A widening array of novel imaging biomarkers is being developed using ever more powerful clinical and preclinical imaging modalities. These biomarkers have demonstrated effectiveness in quantifying biological processes as they occur in vivo and in the early prediction of therapeutic outcomes. However, quantitative imaging biomarker data and knowledge are not standardized, representing a critical barrier to accumulating medical knowledge based on quantitative imaging data. We use an ontology to represent, integrate, and harmonize heterogeneous knowledge across the domain of imaging biomarkers. This advances the goal of developing applications to (1) improve precision and recall of storage and retrieval of quantitative imaging-related data using standardized terminology; (2) streamline the discovery and development of novel imaging biomarkers by normalizing knowledge across heterogeneous resources; (3) effectively annotate imaging experiments thus aiding comprehension, re-use, and reproducibility; and (4) provide validation frameworks through rigorous specification as a basis for testable hypotheses and compliance tests. We have developed the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Ontology (QIBO), which currently consists of 488 terms spanning the following upper classes: experimental subject, biological intervention, imaging agent, imaging instrument, image post-processing algorithm, biological target, indicated biology, and biomarker application. We have demonstrated that QIBO can be used to annotate imaging experiments with standardized terms in the ontology and to generate hypotheses for novel imaging biomarker-disease associations. Our results established the utility of QIBO in enabling integrated analysis of quantitative imaging data. PMID:23589184

  1. Widefield quantitative multiplex surface enhanced Raman scattering imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Patrick Z; Mallia, Rupananda J; Veilleux, Israel; Wilson, Brian C

    2013-04-01

    In recent years numerous studies have shown the potential advantages of molecular imaging in vitro and in vivo using contrast agents based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), however the low throughput of traditional point-scanned imaging methodologies have limited their use in biological imaging. In this work we demonstrate that direct widefield Raman imaging based on a tunable filter is capable of quantitative multiplex SERS imaging in vivo, and that this imaging is possible with acquisition times which are orders of magnitude lower than achievable with comparable point-scanned methodologies. The system, designed for small animal imaging, has a linear response from (0.01 to 100 pM), acquires typical in vivo images in <10 s, and with suitable SERS reporter molecules is capable of multiplex imaging without compensation for spectral overlap. To demonstrate the utility of widefield Raman imaging in biological applications, we show quantitative imaging of four simultaneous SERS reporter molecules in vivo with resulting probe quantification that is in excellent agreement with known quantities (R²>0.98). PMID:23591913

  2. Quantitative imaging of gene expression in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Surkova, Svetlana; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Kozlov, Konstantin N; Pisarev, Andrei; Reinitz, John; Samsonova, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurements derived using sophisticated microscopy techniques are essential for understanding the basic principles that control the behavior of biological systems. Here we describe a data pipeline developed to extract quantitative data on segmentation gene expression from confocal images of gene expression patterns in Drosophila. The pipeline consists of image segmentation, background removal, temporal characterization of an embryo, data registration, and data averaging. This pipeline has been successfully applied to obtain quantitative gene expression data at cellular resolution in space and at 6.5-min resolution in time. It has also enabled the construction of a spatiotemporal atlas of segmentation gene expression. We describe the software used to construct a workflow for extracting quantitative data on segmentation gene expression and the BREReA package, which implements the methods for background removal and registration of segmentation gene expression patterns. PMID:23734022

  3. Development of a quantitative autoradiography image analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Volkert, W.A.; Holmes R.A.

    1986-03-01

    A low cost image analysis system suitable for quantitative autoradiography (QAR) analysis has been developed. Autoradiographs can be digitized using a conventional Newvicon television camera interfaced to an IBM-XT microcomputer. Software routines for image digitization and capture permit the acquisition of thresholded or windowed images with graphic overlays that can be stored on storage devices. Image analysis software performs all background and non-linearity corrections prior to display as black/white or pseudocolor images. The relationship of pixel intensity to a standard radionuclide concentration allows the production of quantitative maps of tissue radiotracer concentrations. An easily modified subroutine is provided for adaptation to use appropriate operational equations when parameters such as regional cerebral blood flow or regional cerebral glucose metabolism are under investigation. This system could provide smaller research laboratories with the capability of QAR analysis at relatively low cost.

  4. Quantitative multimodality imaging in cancer research and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Abramson, Richard G.; Quarles, C. Chad

    2016-01-01

    Advances in hardware and software have enabled the realization of clinically feasible, quantitative multimodality imaging of tissue pathophysiology. Earlier efforts relating to multimodality imaging of cancer have focused on the integration of anatomical and functional characteristics, such as PET–CT and single-photon emission CT (SPECT–CT), whereas more-recent advances and applications have involved the integration of multiple quantitative, functional measurements (for example, multiple PET tracers, varied MRI contrast mechanisms, and PET–MRI), thereby providing a more-comprehensive characterization of the tumour phenotype. The enormous amount of complementary quantitative data generated by such studies is beginning to offer unique insights into opportunities to optimize care for individual patients. Although important technical optimization and improved biological interpretation of multimodality imaging findings are needed, this approach can already be applied informatively in clinical trials of cancer therapeutics using existing tools. These concepts are discussed herein. PMID:25113842

  5. Quantitative planar imaging in renal scintigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lárraga, J. M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Martínez-Duncker, C.; Rodríguez, R. Herrera

    2002-08-01

    In this work we show the results of the implementation of the double energy window method (DEW) to correct for scatter and geometric mean of opposite image to correct for attenuation of radiation within the patient for absolute quantification of radiotracer in renal scintigraphy studies. We show that DEW method subestimates the scatter radiation within main energy window and that result in a 11% of maximun error for the determination of true activity of a renal kidney phantom. Moreover, in order to avoid transmission scans of patients we perform a Monte Carlo simulation (MC) for the determination of scatter component of the main energy window. The results of the MC simulation was validated with experimental data of emission studies.

  6. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  7. Methods and Challenges in Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Development

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Richard G.; Burton, Kirsteen R.; Yu, John-Paul J.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Lenchik, Leon; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Academic radiology is poised to play an important role in the development and implementation of quantitative imaging (QI) tools. This manuscript, drafted by the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) Radiology Research Alliance (RRA) Quantitative Imaging Task Force, reviews current issues in QI biomarker research. We discuss motivations for advancing QI, define key terms, present a framework for QI biomarker research, and outline challenges in QI biomarker development. We conclude by describing where QI research and development is currently taking place and discussing the paramount role of academic radiology in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:25481515

  8. Radiometric calibration to consider in quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litorja, M.; Urbas, A.; Zong, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent light detected by a clinical imager is assumed to be proportional only to the amount of fluorescent substance present in the sample and the level of excitation. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can add or subtract to the light signal directly attributable to the desired fluorescence emission, especially with fluorescence from inside the body imaged remotely. The quantification of fluorescence emission is feasible by calibrating the imager using international system of units (SI)-traceable physical and material calibration artifacts such that the detector's digital numbers (DN) can be converted to radiometric units. Here we discuss three calibration methods for quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging systems.

  9. Quantitative Imaging of Gut Microbiota Spatial Organization.

    PubMed

    Earle, Kristen A; Billings, Gabriel; Sigal, Michael; Lichtman, Joshua S; Hansson, Gunnar C; Elias, Joshua E; Amieva, Manuel R; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2015-10-14

    Genomic technologies have significantly advanced our understanding of the composition and diversity of host-associated microbial populations. However, their spatial organization and functional interactions relative to the host have been more challenging to study. Here we present a pipeline for the assessment of intestinal microbiota localization within immunofluorescence images of fixed gut cross-sections that includes a flexible software package, BacSpace, for high-throughput quantification of microbial organization. Applying this pipeline to gnotobiotic and human microbiota-colonized mice, we demonstrate that elimination of microbiota-accessible carbohydrates (MACs) from the diet results in thinner mucus in the distal colon, increased proximity of microbes to the epithelium, and heightened expression of the inflammatory marker REG3β. Measurements of microbe-microbe proximity reveal that a MAC-deficient diet alters monophyletic spatial clustering. Furthermore, we quantify the invasion of Helicobacter pylori into the glands of the mouse stomach relative to host mitotic progenitor cells, illustrating the generalizability of this approach. PMID:26439864

  10. Dual function microscope for quantitative DIC and birefringence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-03-01

    A spectral multiplexing interferometry (SXI) method is presented for integrated birefringence and phase gradient measurement on label-free biological specimens. With SXI, the retardation and orientation of sample birefringence are simultaneously encoded onto two separate spectral carrier waves, generated by a crystal retarder oriented at a specific angle. Thus sufficient information for birefringence determination can be obtained from a single interference spectrum, eliminating the need for multiple acquisitions with mechanical rotation or electrical modulation. In addition, with the insertion of a Nomarski prism, the setup can then acquire quantitative differential interference contrast images. Red blood cells infected by malaria parasites are imaged for birefringence retardation as well as phase gradient. The results demonstrate that the SXI approach can achieve both quantitative phase imaging and birefringence imaging with a single, high-sensitivity system.

  11. Quantitative phase imaging of Breast cancer cell based on SLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Wu, Shulian

    2016-02-01

    We illustrated a novel optical microscopy technique to observe cell dynamics via spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). SLIM combines Zemike's phase contrast microscopy and Gabor's holography. When the light passes through the transparent specimens, it could render high contrast intensity and record the phase information from the object. We reconstructed the Breast cancer cell phase image by SLIM and the reconstruction algorithm. Our investigation showed that SLIM has the ability to achieve the quantitative phase imaging (QPI).

  12. NSCLC tumor shrinkage prediction using quantitative image features.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Luke A; Chen, Yi Pei; Zhang, Lifei; Matney, Jason E; Choi, Haesun; Kry, Stephen F; Martel, Mary K; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Yang, Jinzhong; Court, Laurence E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative image feature model to predict non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) volume shrinkage from pre-treatment CT images. 64 stage II-IIIB NSCLC patients with similar treatments were all imaged using the same CT scanner and protocol. For each patient, the planning gross tumor volume (GTV) was deformed onto the week 6 treatment image, and tumor shrinkage was quantified as the deformed GTV volume divided by the planning GTV volume. Geometric, intensity histogram, absolute gradient image, co-occurrence matrix, and run-length matrix image features were extracted from each planning GTV. Prediction models were generated using principal component regression with simulated annealing subset selection. Performance was quantified using the mean squared error (MSE) between the predicted and observed tumor shrinkages. Permutation tests were used to validate the results. The optimal prediction model gave a strong correlation between the observed and predicted tumor shrinkages with r=0.81 and MSE=8.60×10(-3). Compared to predictions based on the mean population shrinkage this resulted in a 2.92 fold reduction in MSE. In conclusion, this study indicated that quantitative image features extracted from existing pre-treatment CT images can successfully predict tumor shrinkage and provide additional information for clinical decisions regarding patient risk stratification, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:26878137

  13. Resolution and quantitative accuracy improvements in ultrasound transmission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevert, T. L.

    The type of ultrasound transmission imaging, referred to as ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT), reconstructs distributions of tissue speed of sound and sound attenuation properties from measurements of acoustic pulse time of flight (TCF) and energy received through tissue. Although clinical studies with experimental UCT scanners have demonstrated UCT is sensitive to certain tissue pathologies not easily detected with conventional ultrasound imaging, they have also shown UCT to suffer from artifacts due to physical differences between the acoustic beam and its ray model implicit in image reconstruction algorithms. Artifacts are expressed as large quantitative errors in attenuation images, and poor spatial resolution and size distortion (exaggerated size of high speed of sound regions) in speed of sound images. Methods are introduced and investigated which alleviate these problems in UCT imaging by providing improved measurements of pulse TCF and energy.

  14. Diagnosis of breast cancer biopsies using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The standard practice in the histopathology of breast cancers is to examine a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue biopsy under a microscope. The pathologist looks at certain morphological features, visible under the stain, to diagnose whether a tumor is benign or malignant. This determination is made based on qualitative inspection making it subject to investigator bias. Furthermore, since this method requires a microscopic examination by the pathologist it suffers from low throughput. A quantitative, label-free and high throughput method for detection of these morphological features from images of tissue biopsies is, hence, highly desirable as it would assist the pathologist in making a quicker and more accurate diagnosis of cancers. We present here preliminary results showing the potential of using quantitative phase imaging for breast cancer screening and help with differential diagnosis. We generated optical path length maps of unstained breast tissue biopsies using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM). As a first step towards diagnosis based on quantitative phase imaging, we carried out a qualitative evaluation of the imaging resolution and contrast of our label-free phase images. These images were shown to two pathologists who marked the tumors present in tissue as either benign or malignant. This diagnosis was then compared against the diagnosis of the two pathologists on H&E stained tissue images and the number of agreements were counted. In our experiment, the agreement between SLIM and H&E based diagnosis was measured to be 88%. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential and promise of SLIM for a push in the future towards quantitative, label-free and high throughput diagnosis.

  15. Ultrasound introscopic image quantitative characteristics for medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselets, Mikhail K.; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Gridko, Alexander N.; Tcheban, Anatoliy K.

    1993-09-01

    The results on computer aided extraction of quantitative characteristics (QC) of ultrasound introscopic images for medical diagnosis are presented. Thyroid gland (TG) images of Chernobil Accident sufferers are considered. It is shown that TG diseases can be associated with some values of selected QCs of random echo distribution in the image. The possibility of these QCs usage for TG diseases recognition in accordance with calculated values is analyzed. The role of speckle noise elimination in the solution of the problem on TG diagnosis is considered too.

  16. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Oliva, Piernicola; Golosio, Bruno; Delogu, Pasquale

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11-30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  17. Microcomputer-based digital image analysis system for quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Volkert, W.A.; Holmes, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized image processing system utilizing an IBM-XT personal microcomputer with the capability of performing quantitative cerebral autoradiography is described. All of the system components are standard computer and optical hardware that can be easily assembled. The system has 512 horizontal by 512 vertical axis resolution with 8 bits per pixel (256 gray levels). Unlike other dedicated image processing systems, the IBM-XT permits the assembly of an efficient, low-cost image analysis system without sacrificing other capabilities of the IBM personal computer. The application of this system in both qualitative and quantitative autoradiography has been the principal factor in developing a new radiopharmaceutical to measure regional cerebral blood flow.

  18. A large field CCD system for quantitative imaging of microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, G.; Brown, N.; Oseroff, V.; Huey, B.; Segraves, R.; Sudar, D.; Kumler, J.; Albertson, D.; Pinkel, D.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging system for microarrays capable of acquiring quantitative, high dynamic range images of very large fields. Illumination is supplied by an arc lamp, and filters are used to define excitation and emission bands. The system is linear down to fluorochrome densities ≪1 molecule/µm2. The ratios of the illumination intensity distributions for all excitation wavelengths have a maximum deviation ∼±4% over the object field, so that images can be analyzed without computational corrections for the illumination pattern unless higher accuracy is desired. Custom designed detection optics produce achromatic images of the spectral region from ∼ 450 to ∼750 nm. Acquisition of a series of images of multiple fluorochromes from multiple arrays occurs under computer control. The version of the system described in detail provides images of 20 mm square areas using a 27 mm square, 2K × 2K pixel, cooled CCD chip with a well depth of ∼105 electrons, and provides ratio measurements accurate to a few percent over a dynamic range in intensity >1000. Resolution referred to the sample is 10 µm, sufficient for obtaining quantitative multicolor images from >30 000 array elements in an 18 mm × 18 mm square. PMID:16670425

  19. Open tools for storage and management of quantitative image data.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joshua; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Loranger, Brian; MacDonald, Donald; Monk, Jonathan; Swedlow, Jason R

    2008-01-01

    The explosion in quantitative imaging has driven the need to develop tools for storing, managing, analyzing, and viewing large sets of data. In this chapter, we discuss tools we have built for storing large data sets for the lifetime of a typical research project. As part of the Open Microscopy Environment (OME) Consortium, we have built a series of open-source tools that support the manipulation and visualization of large sets of complex image data. Images from a number of proprietary file formats can be imported and then accessed from a single server running in a laboratory or imaging facility. We discuss the capabilities of the OME Server, a Perl-based data management system that is designed for large-scale analysis of image data using a web browser-based user interface. In addition, we have recently released a lighter weight Java-based OME Remote Objects Server that supports remote applications for managing and viewing image data. Together these systems provide a suite of tools for large-scale quantitative imaging that is now commonly used throughout cell and developmental biology. PMID:18155479

  20. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  1. Ultrasonic propagation in inhomogeneous media: Toward quantitative ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trousil, Rebecca Leigh

    The goal of this dissertation is to explore the physics underpinning the use of quantitative acoustic measurements to extend the role of ultrasonic imaging. In the 30 year history of medical ultrasonic imaging, the diagnostic use of this modality has primarily relied upon morphology and motion to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. Significant improvements in the bandwidth and dynamic range of clinical ultrasonic imaging systems in recent years offer the possibility of complementing existing qualitative information with truly quantitative information, derived from measurements of the acoustic properties of soft tissue. The phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and backscatter coefficient are three such acoustic properties that are often employed to characterize the state of soft tissues. One goal of this dissertation was to investigate the reliability of these measurements, based on systematic laboratory studies performed on well-characterized tissue-mimicking media. To this end, quantitative measurements of the frequency dependence of phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and backscatter coefficient were performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms as part of a national, multi-center study, sponsored by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. Both the intra- and inter-laboratory variability associated with these measurements were addressed. In addition to assessing the reproducibility of quantitative estimates of these acoustic parameters, this dissertation introduces and experimentally validates a novel measurement technique, based on the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations, that improves the robustness of frequency domain phase velocity estimates in tissue-like media.

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Lung Using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Kiarash; Stephen, Michael; Kadlecek, Stephen; Cadman, Robert V.; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in the quantitative assessment of structure, function, and metabolic activity in the lung, combined with improvements in the spatial resolution of those assessments, enhance the diagnosis and evaluation of pulmonary disorders. Radiologic methods are among the most attractive techniques for the comprehensive assessment of the lung, as they allow quantitative assessment of this organ through measurements of a number of structural, functional, and metabolic parameters. Hyperpolarized nuclei magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has opened up new territories for the quantitative assessment of lung function and structure with an unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. This review article presents a survey of recent developments in the field of pulmonary imaging using hyperpolarized nuclei MRI for quantitative imaging of different aspects of the lung, as well as preclinical applications of these techniques to diagnose and evaluate specific pulmonary diseases. After presenting a brief overview of various hyperpolarization techniques, this survey divides the research activities of the field into four broad areas: lung microstructure, ventilation, oxygenation, and perfusion. Finally, it discusses the challenges currently faced by researchers in this field to translate this rich body of methodology into wider-scale clinical applications. PMID:19687215

  3. Assessing the Reliability of Quantitative Imaging of Sm-153

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Zijie; Dagan, Maáyan; Veldman, Jeanette; Trees, Brad

    2013-03-01

    Samarium-153 is used for palliation of and recently has been investigated for therapy for bone metastases. Patient specific dosing of Sm-153 is based on quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and knowing the accuracy and precision of image-based estimates of the in vivo activity distribution. Physical phantom studies are useful for estimating these in simple objects, but do not model realistic activity distributions. We are using realistic Monte Carlo simulations combined with a realistic digital phantom modeling human anatomy to assess the accuracy and precision of Sm-153 SPECT. Preliminary data indicates that we can simulate projection images and reconstruct them with compensation for various physical image degrading factors, such as attenuation and scatter in the body as well as non-idealities in the imaging system, to provide realistic SPECT images.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy on rough surfaces-quantitative image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, G.; Brückl, H.; Vancea, J.; Lecheler, R.; Hastreiter, E.

    1991-07-01

    In this communication, the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) for a quantitative evaluation of roughnesses and mean island sizes of polycrystalline thin films is discussed. Provided strong conditions concerning the resolution are satisfied, the results are in good agreement with standard techniques as, for example, transmission electron microscopy. Owing to its high resolution, STM can supply a better characterization of surfaces than established methods, especially concerning the roughness. Microscopic interpretations of surface dependent physical properties thus can be considerably improved by a quantitative analysis of STM images.

  5. IMAGING RED BLOOD CELL DYNAMICS BY QUANTITATIVE PHASE MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease. PMID:18387320

  6. Summary of Quantitative Interpretation of Image Far Ultraviolet Auroral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. U.; Immel, T. J.; Mende, S. B.; Gerard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.; Habraken, S.; Span, J.; Gladstone, G. R.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by instruments on the IMAGE spacecraft is supplemented by simultaneous observations of the global aurora in three far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength bands. The purpose of the multi-wavelength imaging is to study the global auroral particle and energy input from thc magnetosphere into the atmosphere. This paper describes provides the method for quantitative interpretation of FUV measurements. The Wide-Band Imaging Camera (WIC) provides broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora with maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the nitrogen lines and bands between 140 and 180 nm wavelength. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a dual wavelength monochromatic instrument, images both Doppler-shifted Lyman alpha emissions produced by precipitating protons, in the SI-12 channel and OI 135.6 nm emissions in the SI-13 channel. From the SI-12 Doppler shifted Lyman alpha images it is possible to obtain the precipitating proton flux provided assumptions are made regarding the mean energy of the protons. Knowledge of the proton (flux and energy) component allows the calculation of the contribution produced by protons in the WIC and SI-13 instruments. Comparison of the corrected WIC and SI-13 signals provides a measure of the electron mean energy, which can then be used to determine the electron energy fluxun-. To accomplish this reliable modeling emission modeling and instrument calibrations are required. In-flight calibration using early-type stars was used to validate the pre-flight laboratory calibrations and determine long-term trends in sensitivity. In general, very reasonable agreement is found between in-situ measurements and remote quantitative determinations.

  7. Biomechanical cell analysis using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wax, Adam; Park, Han Sang; Eldridge, William J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging provides nanometer scale sensitivity and has been previously used to study spectral and temporal characteristics of individual cells in vitro, especially red blood cells. Here we extend this work to study the mechanical responses of individual cells due to the influence of external stimuli. Cell stiffness may be characterized by analyzing the inherent thermal fluctuations of cells but by applying external stimuli, additional information can be obtained. The time dependent response of cells due to external shear stress is examined with high speed quantitative phase imaging and found to exhibit characteristics that relate to their stiffness. However, analysis beyond the cellular scale also reveals internal organization of the cell and its modulation due to pathologic processes such as carcinogenesis. Further studies with microfluidic platforms point the way for using this approach in high throughput assays.

  8. Quantitative nanoscale vortex imaging using a cryogenic quantum magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Thiel, L; Rohner, D; Ganzhorn, M; Appel, P; Neu, E; Müller, B; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D; Maletinsky, P

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic studies of superconductors and their vortices play a pivotal role in understanding the mechanisms underlying superconductivity. Local measurements of penetration depths or magnetic stray fields enable access to fundamental aspects such as nanoscale variations in superfluid densities or the order parameter symmetry of superconductors. However, experimental tools that offer quantitative, nanoscale magnetometry and operate over large ranges of temperature and magnetic fields are still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the first operation of a cryogenic scanning quantum sensor in the form of a single nitrogen-vacancy electronic spin in diamond, which is capable of overcoming these existing limitations. To demonstrate the power of our approach, we perform quantitative, nanoscale magnetic imaging of Pearl vortices in the cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. With a sensor-to-sample distance of ∼10 nm, we observe striking deviations from the prevalent monopole approximation in our vortex stray-field images, and find excellent quantitative agreement with Pearl's analytic model. Our experiments provide a non-invasive and unambiguous determination of the system's local penetration depth and are readily extended to higher temperatures and magnetic fields. These results demonstrate the potential of quantitative quantum sensors in benchmarking microscopic models of complex electronic systems and open the door for further exploration of strongly correlated electron physics using scanning nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry. PMID:27136133

  9. Quantitative nanoscale vortex imaging using a cryogenic quantum magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, L.; Rohner, D.; Ganzhorn, M.; Appel, P.; Neu, E.; Müller, B.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Maletinsky, P.

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic studies of superconductors and their vortices play a pivotal role in understanding the mechanisms underlying superconductivity. Local measurements of penetration depths or magnetic stray fields enable access to fundamental aspects such as nanoscale variations in superfluid densities or the order parameter symmetry of superconductors. However, experimental tools that offer quantitative, nanoscale magnetometry and operate over large ranges of temperature and magnetic fields are still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the first operation of a cryogenic scanning quantum sensor in the form of a single nitrogen–vacancy electronic spin in diamond, which is capable of overcoming these existing limitations. To demonstrate the power of our approach, we perform quantitative, nanoscale magnetic imaging of Pearl vortices in the cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7–δ. With a sensor-to-sample distance of ∼10 nm, we observe striking deviations from the prevalent monopole approximation in our vortex stray-field images, and find excellent quantitative agreement with Pearl's analytic model. Our experiments provide a non-invasive and unambiguous determination of the system's local penetration depth and are readily extended to higher temperatures and magnetic fields. These results demonstrate the potential of quantitative quantum sensors in benchmarking microscopic models of complex electronic systems and open the door for further exploration of strongly correlated electron physics using scanning nitrogen–vacancy magnetometry.

  10. Labeling of virus components for advanced, quantitative imaging analyses.

    PubMed

    Sakin, Volkan; Paci, Giulia; Lemke, Edward A; Müller, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, investigation of virus-cell interactions has moved from ensemble measurements to imaging analyses at the single-particle level. Advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques provide single-molecule sensitivity and subdiffraction spatial resolution, allowing observation of subviral details and individual replication events to obtain detailed quantitative information. To exploit the full potential of these techniques, virologists need to employ novel labeling strategies, taking into account specific constraints imposed by viruses, as well as unique requirements of microscopic methods. Here, we compare strengths and limitations of various labeling methods, exemplify virological questions that were successfully addressed, and discuss challenges and future potential of novel approaches in virus imaging. PMID:26987299

  11. CI Slide: calibration slide for quantitative microscopy imaging in absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Ye, Qian; Zulkafly, Nasir; Carraro, Anita; Korbelic, Jagoda; Chen, Zhaoyang; Harrison, Alan; Follen, Michele; MacAulay, Calum; Ward, Rabab K.; Guillaud, Martial

    2014-03-01

    New imaging technologies are changing the field of digital pathology. This field faces numerous challenges and there is a pressing need for standardization, calibration protocols, quality control and quantitative assessment. We have designed a new calibration imaging slide (Cancer Imaging Slide), specifically to measure the characteristics of old or new imaging systems or scanners. The layout of the slide consists of 138 boxes with the side length of 1.6 mm, containing objects of known morphologic and photometric characteristics. Among them, 112 boxes contain different permutations of circles, ovals, and squares. The circles have different radii, radius/pitch ratios and step transmissions. The ovals have different sizes and orientations. The squares are consistent in size and orientation but have different step transmission values. Also, 16 boxes contain three resolution test targets: crosses, USAF target and Siemens star. The last 10 boxes are blank boxes with different transmission values. Four slides were scanned and imaged on one commercial whole-slide scanner and one high resolution imaging system. After segmenting the images, about 200 features (photometric, morphologic and architectural) were measured with our in-house image processing software. The objective of the project is to develop a statistical process control using this new slide. In this paper, we describe the characteristics of the slide and present our preliminary results.

  12. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  13. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-06-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector.

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Surface Self-Assembly Imaging Using Shapelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin; Suderman, Robert; Lizotte, Daniel J.

    Microscopy and imaging of surface self-assembly phenomena have advanced significantly over the past decade. In order to determine structure/property relationships robust automated analysis of the resulting images is required, but has not advanced at an equally rapid pace. Recently, quantitative characterization techniques have been developed and applied, such as using bond-orientational order (BOO) theory. BOO-based methods have significant limitations in that they do not provide pixel-level resolution and are not robust in the presence of measurement noise. In this work, a fundamentally different method for automated quantitative characterization of surface self-assembly imaging is presented which uses a family of localized functions called ``shapelets''. The method is presented and applied to quantitative characterization of stripe and hexagonal patterns which are frequently observed in surface self-assembly. The shapelet-based method is shown to be general, highly accurate, and robust in the presence of measurement noise. It is able to efficiently determine local pattern characteristics such as pattern strength and orientation for the determination of structure/property relationships. This work was made possible by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Compute Ontario.

  15. Prognostic value of quantitative high-speed myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S.; Gransar, Heidi; Hyun, Mark; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Kite, Faith C.; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Rozanski, Alan; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies have reported using semi-quantitative analysis to assess the prognostic utility of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Thus we studied the prognostic value of fully automated quantitative analysis software applied to new solid-state, high-speed (HS) SPECT-MPI. Methods 1613 consecutive patients undergoing exercise or adenosine HS-MPI were followed for 2.6±0.5 years for all-cause mortality (ACM). Automated quantitative software was used for assessing stress total perfusion deficit (sTPD) and was compared to semi-quantitative visual analysis. MPI was characterized as 0% (normal); 1–4% (minimal perfusion defect); 5–10% (mildly abnormal); and >10% (moderately/severely abnormal). Results During follow-up, 79 patients died (4.9%). Annualized ACM increased with progressively increasing sTPD; 0% (0.87%), 1–4% (1.94%), 5–10% (3.10%) and >10% (5.33%) (log-rank p<0.0001). While similar overall findings were observed with visual analysis, only sTPD demonstrated increased risk in patients with minimal perfusion defects. In multivariable analysis, sTPD >10% was a mortality predictor (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.30–7.09, p=0.01). Adjusted mortality rate was substantial in adenosine MPI, but low in exercise MPI (9.0% versus 1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusions By quantitative analysis, ACM increases with increasing perfusion abnormality among patients undergoing stress HS-MPI. These findings confirm previous results obtained with visual analysis using conventional Anger camera imaging systems. PMID:23065414

  16. Quantitative imaging of lymphatic function with liposomal indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Steven T; Luciani, Paola; Derzsi, Stefanie; Rinderknecht, Matthias; Mumprecht, Viviane; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael

    2010-09-15

    Lymphatic vessels play a major role in cancer progression and in postsurgical lymphedema, and several new therapeutic approaches targeting lymphatics are currently being developed. Thus, there is a critical need for quantitative imaging methods to measure lymphatic flow. Indocyanine green (ICG) has been used for optical imaging of the lymphatic system, but it is unstable in solution and may rapidly enter venous capillaries after local injection. We developed a novel liposomal formulation of ICG (LP-ICG), resulting in vastly improved stability in solution and an increased fluorescence signal with a shift toward longer wavelength absorption and emission. When injected intradermally to mice, LP-ICG was specifically taken up by lymphatic vessels and allowed improved visualization of deep lymph nodes. In a genetic mouse model of lymphatic dysfunction, injection of LP-ICG showed no enhancement of draining lymph nodes and slower clearance from the injection site. In mice bearing B16 luciferase-expressing melanomas expressing vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), sequential near-IR imaging of intradermally injected LP-ICG enabled quantification of lymphatic flow. Increased flow through draining lymph nodes was observed in mice bearing VEGF-C-expressing tumors without metastases, whereas a decreased flow pattern was seen in mice with a higher lymph node tumor burden. This new method will likely facilitate quantitative studies of lymphatic function in preclinical investigations and may also have potential for imaging of lymphedema or improved sentinel lymph detection in cancer. PMID:20823159

  17. Quantitative study on appearance of microvessels in spectral endoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Yasushi; Arai, Fumihito; Morimoto, Yoshinori; Yuasa, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Increase in abnormal microvessels in the superficial mucosa is often relevant to diagnostic findings of neoplasia in digestive endoscopy; hence, observation of superficial vasculature is crucial for cancer diagnosis. To enhance the appearance of such vessels, several spectral endoscopic imaging techniques have been developed, such as narrow-band imaging and blue laser imaging. Both techniques exploit narrow-band blue light for the enhancement. The emergence of such spectral imaging techniques has increased the importance of understanding the relation of the light wavelength to the appearance of superficial vasculature, and thus a new method is desired for quantitative analysis of vessel visibility in relation to the actual structure in the tissue. Here, we developed microvessel-simulating phantoms that allowed quantitative evaluation of the appearance of 15-μm-thick vessels. We investigated the relation between the vascular contrast and light wavelength by the phantom measurements and also verified it in experiments with swine, where the endoscopically observed vascular contrast was investigated together with its real vascular depth and diameter obtained by microscopic observation of fluorescence-labeled vessels. Our study indicates that changing the spectral property even in the wavelength range of blue light may allow selective enhancement of the vascular depth for clinical use.

  18. Quantitative imaging features to predict cancer status in lung nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Atwater, Thomas; Antic, Sanja; Li, Qian; Walker, Ronald; Smith, Gary T.; Massion, Pierre P.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Background: We propose a systematic methodology to quantify incidentally identified lung nodules based on observed radiological traits on a point scale. These quantitative traits classification model was used to predict cancer status. Materials and Methods: We used 102 patients' low dose computed tomography (LDCT) images for this study, 24 semantic traits were systematically scored from each image. We built a machine learning classifier in cross validation setting to find best predictive imaging features to differentiate malignant from benign lung nodules. Results: The best feature triplet to discriminate malignancy was based on long axis, concavity and lymphadenopathy with average AUC of 0.897 (Accuracy of 76.8%, Sensitivity of 64.3%, Specificity of 90%). A similar semantic triplet optimized on Sensitivity/Specificity (Youden's J index) included long axis, vascular convergence and lymphadenopathy which had an average AUC of 0.875 (Accuracy of 81.7%, Sensitivity of 76.2%, Specificity of 95%). Conclusions: Quantitative radiological image traits can differentiate malignant from benign lung nodules. These semantic features along with size measurement enhance the prediction accuracy.

  19. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas–Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography. PMID:24587692

  20. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas-Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography.

  1. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  2. Immunocytochemical features of obstructed saphenous vein coronary artery bypass grafts.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, J I; Pickering, N J; Fink, G B

    1989-01-01

    The peroxidase-immunoperoxidase immunocytochemical method was used on 27 saphenous vein coronary artery bypass grafts, which had been resected because of recurrent angina, to identify in situ cellular and humoral elements possibly associated with graft occlusion. Immunostaining was performed on paraffin wax embedded control saphenous vein and graft sections incubated directly with primary antibodies against von Willebrand antigen (vWFAg), fibronectin, fibrinogen, leucocyte common antigen (LCA), lysozyme, vimentin, desmin, platelet factor 4, and thrombospondin. Antigens were visualised by a chromogen providing an orange-red immunoprecipitate at the site of epitope localisation. The intraluminal, amorphous exudate present in most grafts was not composed simply of fibrin or fibrinogen, as previously thought, but was a multiprotein complex including wWFAg, fibronectin, thrombospondin and platelet factor 4. Along with macrophages, these components probably enter the graft after haemodynamic, physical, and chemical injury to, and disruption of, the endothelial cell. Progressive myointimal proliferation and fibrosis of these grafts may be local repetitive responses to macrophages and platelets, cells previously known to participate in vascular disease. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:2659629

  3. Real-time quantitative phase imaging for cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hoa Vinh

    Most biological cells are not clearly visible with a bright field microscope. Several methods have been developed to improve contrast in cell imaging, including use of exogenous contrast agents such as fluorescence microscopy, as well as utilizing properties of light-specimen interaction for optics design, to reveal the endogenous contrast, such as phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Although PCM and DIC methods significantly improve the image contrast without the need for staining agents, they only provide qualitative information about the phase change induced by the cells as light passes through them. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has recently emerged as an effective imaging tool which provides not only better image contrast but also cell-induced phase shifts in the optical pathlength, thus allowing nanometer-scale measurements of structures and dynamics of the cells. Other important aspects of an imaging system are its imaging speed and throughput. High-throughput, high-speed, real-time quantitative phase imaging with high spatial and temporal sensitivity is highly desirable in many applications including applied physics and biomedicine. In this dissertation, to address this need, I discuss the development of such an imaging system that includes the white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a new optical imaging method, and image reconstruction/analysis algorithms using graphics processing units (GPUs). wDPM can measure optical pathlength changes at nanometer scale both spatially and temporally with single-shot image acquisition, enabling very fast imaging. I also exploit the broadband spectrum of white light used as the light source in wDPM to develop a system called spectroscopic diffraction phase microscopy (sDPM). This sDPM system allows QPI measurements at several wavelengths, which solves the problem of thickness and refractive index coupling in the phase shifts induced by the cell, and which

  4. Binary Imaging Analysis for Comprehensive Quantitative Assessment of Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Daniel A.; Moradzadeh, Arash; Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Brenner, Michael J.; Myckatyn, Terence M.; Wei, Cindy H.; Tung, Thomas H.H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative histomorphometry is the current gold standard for objective measurement of nerve architecture and its components. Many methods still in use rely heavily upon manual techniques that are prohibitively time consuming, predisposing to operator fatigue, sampling error, and overall limited reproducibility. More recently, investigators have attempted to combine the speed of automated morphometry with the accuracy of manual and semi-automated methods. Systematic refinements in binary imaging analysis techniques combined with an algorithmic approach allow for more exhaustive characterization of nerve parameters in the surgically relevant injury paradigms of regeneration following crush, transection, and nerve gap injuries. The binary imaging method introduced here uses multiple bitplanes to achieve reproducible, high throughput quantitative assessment of peripheral nerve. Number of myelinated axons, myelinated fiber diameter, myelin thickness, fiber distributions, myelinated fiber density, and neural debris can be quantitatively evaluated with stratification of raw data by nerve component. Results of this semi-automated method are validated by comparing values against those obtained with manual techniques. The use of this approach results in more rapid, accurate, and complete assessment of myelinated axons than manual techniques. PMID:17675163

  5. Quantum dots for quantitative imaging: from single molecules to tissue.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tania Q; Lam, Wai Yan; Hatch, Ellen W; Lidke, Diane S

    2015-04-01

    Since their introduction to biological imaging, quantum dots (QDs) have progressed from a little known, but attractive, technology to one that has gained broad application in many areas of biology. The versatile properties of these fluorescent nanoparticles have allowed investigators to conduct biological studies with extended spatiotemporal capabilities that were previously not possible. In this review, we focus on QD applications that provide enhanced quantitative information concerning protein dynamics and localization, including single particle tracking and immunohistochemistry, and finish by examining the prospects of upcoming applications, such as correlative light and electron microscopy and super-resolution. Advances in single molecule imaging, including multi-color and three-dimensional QD tracking, have provided new insights into the mechanisms of cell signaling and protein trafficking. New forms of QD tracking in vivo have allowed the observation of biological processes at molecular level resolution in the physiological context of the whole animal. Further methodological development of multiplexed QD-based immunohistochemistry assays should enable more quantitative analysis of key proteins in tissue samples. These advances highlight the unique quantitative data sets that QDs can provide to further our understanding of biological and disease processes. PMID:25620410

  6. Hyperspectral imaging and quantitative analysis for prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma V.; Schuster, David M.; Osunkoya, Adeboye; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter T.; Chen, Georgia Z.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for various medical applications. Its spectroscopic data might be able to be used to noninvasively detect cancer. Quantitative analysis is often necessary in order to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. We propose the use of an advanced image processing and classification method in order to analyze hyperspectral image data for prostate cancer detection. The spectral signatures were extracted and evaluated in both cancerous and normal tissue. Least squares support vector machines were developed and evaluated for classifying hyperspectral data in order to enhance the detection of cancer tissue. This method was used to detect prostate cancer in tumor-bearing mice and on pathology slides. Spatially resolved images were created to highlight the differences of the reflectance properties of cancer versus those of normal tissue. Preliminary results with 11 mice showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the hyperspectral image classification method are 92.8% to 2.0% and 96.9% to 1.3%, respectively. Therefore, this imaging method may be able to help physicians to dissect malignant regions with a safe margin and to evaluate the tumor bed after resection. This pilot study may lead to advances in the optical diagnosis of prostate cancer using HSI technology. PMID:22894488

  7. Hyperspectral imaging and quantitative analysis for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma V.; Schuster, David M.; Osunkoya, Adeboye; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter T.; Chen, Georgia Z.; Fei, Baowei

    2012-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for various medical applications. Its spectroscopic data might be able to be used to noninvasively detect cancer. Quantitative analysis is often necessary in order to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. We propose the use of an advanced image processing and classification method in order to analyze hyperspectral image data for prostate cancer detection. The spectral signatures were extracted and evaluated in both cancerous and normal tissue. Least squares support vector machines were developed and evaluated for classifying hyperspectral data in order to enhance the detection of cancer tissue. This method was used to detect prostate cancer in tumor-bearing mice and on pathology slides. Spatially resolved images were created to highlight the differences of the reflectance properties of cancer versus those of normal tissue. Preliminary results with 11 mice showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the hyperspectral image classification method are 92.8% to 2.0% and 96.9% to 1.3%, respectively. Therefore, this imaging method may be able to help physicians to dissect malignant regions with a safe margin and to evaluate the tumor bed after resection. This pilot study may lead to advances in the optical diagnosis of prostate cancer using HSI technology.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging and quantitative analysis for prostate cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma V; Schuster, David M; Osunkoya, Adeboye; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter T; Chen, Georgia Z; Fei, Baowei

    2012-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for various medical applications. Its spectroscopic data might be able to be used to noninvasively detect cancer. Quantitative analysis is often necessary in order to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. We propose the use of an advanced image processing and classification method in order to analyze hyperspectral image data for prostate cancer detection. The spectral signatures were extracted and evaluated in both cancerous and normal tissue. Least squares support vector machines were developed and evaluated for classifying hyperspectral data in order to enhance the detection of cancer tissue. This method was used to detect prostate cancer in tumor-bearing mice and on pathology slides. Spatially resolved images were created to highlight the differences of the reflectance properties of cancer versus those of normal tissue. Preliminary results with 11 mice showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the hyperspectral image classification method are 92.8% to 2.0% and 96.9% to 1.3%, respectively. Therefore, this imaging method may be able to help physicians to dissect malignant regions with a safe margin and to evaluate the tumor bed after resection. This pilot study may lead to advances in the optical diagnosis of prostate cancer using HSI technology. PMID:22894488

  9. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  10. Quantitative image analysis of broadband CARS hyperspectral images of polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Jong; Moon, Doyoung; Migler, Kalman B; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate that broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy can be very useful for fast acquisition of quantitative chemical images of multilayer polymer blends. This is challenging because the raw CARS signal results from the coherent interference of resonant Raman and nonresonant background and its intensity is not linearly proportional to the concentration of molecules of interest. Here we have developed a sequence of data-processing steps to retrieve background-free and noise-reduced Raman spectra over the whole frequency range including both the fingerprint and C-H regions. Using a classical least-squares approach, we are able to decompose a Raman hyperspectral image of a tertiary polymer blend into quantitative chemical images of individual components. We use this method to acquire 3-D sectioned quantitative chemical images of a multilayer polymer blend of polystyrene, styrene-ethylene/propylene copolymer, and polypropylene that have overlapping spectral peaks. PMID:21395296

  11. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  12. 3D Slicer as an Image Computing Platform for the Quantitative Imaging Network

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Andriy; Beichel, Reinhard; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Finet, Julien; Fillion-Robin, Jean-Christophe; Pujol, Sonia; Bauer, Christian; Jennings, Dominique; Fennessy, Fiona; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John; Aylward, Stephen; Miller, James V.; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis has tremendous but mostly unrealized potential in healthcare to support objective and accurate interpretation of the clinical imaging. In 2008, the National Cancer Institute began building the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) initiative with the goal of advancing quantitative imaging in the context of personalized therapy and evaluation of treatment response. Computerized analysis is an important component contributing to reproducibility and efficiency of the quantitative imaging techniques. The success of quantitative imaging is contingent on robust analysis methods and software tools to bring these methods from bench to bedside. 3D Slicer is a free open source software application for medical image computing. As a clinical research tool, 3D Slicer is similar to a radiology workstation that supports versatile visualizations but also provides advanced functionality such as automated segmentation and registration for a variety of application domains. Unlike a typical radiology workstation, 3D Slicer is free and is not tied to specific hardware. As a programming platform, 3D Slicer facilitates translation and evaluation of the new quantitative methods by allowing the biomedical researcher to focus on the implementation of the algorithm, and providing abstractions for the common tasks of data communication, visualization and user interface development. Compared to other tools that provide aspects of this functionality, 3D Slicer is fully open source and can be readily extended and redistributed. In addition, 3D Slicer is designed to facilitate the development of new functionality in the form of 3D Slicer extensions. In this paper, we present an overview of 3D Slicer as a platform for prototyping, development and evaluation of image analysis tools for clinical research applications. To illustrate the utility of the platform in the scope of QIN, we discuss several use cases of 3D Slicer by the existing QIN teams, and we elaborate on the future

  13. 3D Slicer as an image computing platform for the Quantitative Imaging Network.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Beichel, Reinhard; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Finet, Julien; Fillion-Robin, Jean-Christophe; Pujol, Sonia; Bauer, Christian; Jennings, Dominique; Fennessy, Fiona; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John; Aylward, Stephen; Miller, James V; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative analysis has tremendous but mostly unrealized potential in healthcare to support objective and accurate interpretation of the clinical imaging. In 2008, the National Cancer Institute began building the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) initiative with the goal of advancing quantitative imaging in the context of personalized therapy and evaluation of treatment response. Computerized analysis is an important component contributing to reproducibility and efficiency of the quantitative imaging techniques. The success of quantitative imaging is contingent on robust analysis methods and software tools to bring these methods from bench to bedside. 3D Slicer is a free open-source software application for medical image computing. As a clinical research tool, 3D Slicer is similar to a radiology workstation that supports versatile visualizations but also provides advanced functionality such as automated segmentation and registration for a variety of application domains. Unlike a typical radiology workstation, 3D Slicer is free and is not tied to specific hardware. As a programming platform, 3D Slicer facilitates translation and evaluation of the new quantitative methods by allowing the biomedical researcher to focus on the implementation of the algorithm and providing abstractions for the common tasks of data communication, visualization and user interface development. Compared to other tools that provide aspects of this functionality, 3D Slicer is fully open source and can be readily extended and redistributed. In addition, 3D Slicer is designed to facilitate the development of new functionality in the form of 3D Slicer extensions. In this paper, we present an overview of 3D Slicer as a platform for prototyping, development and evaluation of image analysis tools for clinical research applications. To illustrate the utility of the platform in the scope of QIN, we discuss several use cases of 3D Slicer by the existing QIN teams, and we elaborate on the future

  14. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science

    SciTech Connect

    Copper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1991-06-01

    During the past three years the program has undergone a substantial revitalization. There has been no significant change in the scientific direction of this grant, in which emphasis continues to be placed on developing new or improved methods of obtaining quantitative data from radiotracer imaging studies. However, considerable scientific progress has been made in the three areas of interest: Radiochemistry, Quantitative Methodologies, and Experimental Methods and Feasibility Studies, resulting in a sharper focus of perspective and improved integration of the overall scientific effort. Changes in Faculty and staff, including development of new collaborations, have contributed to this, as has acquisition of additional and new equipment and renovations and expansion of the core facilities. 121 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  16. Sensitivity, noise and quantitative model of Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai

    In the dissertation, I present several studies on Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI). The two major goals of those studies are: (1) to improve the signal-noise-ratio (SNR) of LSCI so it can be used to detect small blood flow change due to brain activities; (2) to find a reliable quantitative model so LSCI results can be compared among experiments and subjects and even with results from other blood flow monitoring techniques. We sought to improve SNR in the following ways: (1) We investigated the relationship between exposure time and the sensitivities of LSCI. We found that relative sensitivity reaches its maximum at an exposure time of around 5 ms. (2) We studied the relationship between laser speckle and camera aperture stop, which is actually the relationship between laser speckle and speckle/pixel size ratio. In general, speckle and pixel size should be approximately 1.5 - 2 to reach the maximum of detection factor beta as well as speckle contrast (SC) value and absolute sensitivity. This is also an important study for quantitative model development. (3) We worked on noise analysis and modeling. Noise affects both SNR and quantitative model. Usually random noise is more critical for SNR analysis. The main random noises in LSCI are statistical noise and physiological noise. Some physiological noises are caused by the small motions induced by heart beat or breathing. These are periodic and can be eliminated using methods discussed in this dissertation. Statistical noise is more fundamental and cannot be eliminated entirely. However it can be greatly reduced by increasing the effective pixel number N for speckle contrast processing. To develop the quantitative model, we did the following: (1) We considered more experimental factors in the quantitative model and removed several ideal case assumptions. In particular, in our model we considered the general detection factor beta, static scatterers and systematic noise. A simple calibration procedure is suggested

  17. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: characterisation of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Johnson, G; Tofts, P S; Landon, D N

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used quantitatively to define the characteristics of two different models of experimental cerebral oedema in cats: vasogenic oedema produced by cortical freezing and cytotoxic oedema induced by triethyl tin. The MRI results have been correlated with the ultrastructural changes. The images accurately delineated the anatomical extent of the oedema in the two lesions, but did not otherwise discriminate between them. The patterns of measured increase in T1' and T2' were, however, characteristic for each type of oedema, and reflected the protein content. The magnetisation decay characteristics of both normal and oedematous white matter were monoexponential for T1 but biexponential for T2 decay. The relative sizes of the two component exponentials of the latter corresponded with the physical sizes of the major tissue water compartments. Quantitative MRI data can provide reliable information about the physico-chemical environment of tissue water in normal and oedematous cerebral tissue, and are useful for distinguishing between acute and chronic lesions in multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:3572428

  18. Quantitative MR imaging in fracture dating-Initial results.

    PubMed

    Baron, Katharina; Neumayer, Bernhard; Widek, Thomas; Schick, Fritz; Scheicher, Sylvia; Hassler, Eva; Scheurer, Eva

    2016-04-01

    For exact age determinations of bone fractures in a forensic context (e.g. in cases of child abuse) improved knowledge of the time course of the healing process and use of non-invasive modern imaging technology is of high importance. To date, fracture dating is based on radiographic methods by determining the callus status and thereby relying on an expert's experience. As a novel approach, this study aims to investigate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for bone fracture dating by systematically investigating time-resolved changes in quantitative MR characteristics after a fracture event. Prior to investigating fracture healing in children, adults were examined for this study in order to test the methodology for this application. Altogether, 31 MR examinations in 17 subjects (♀: 11 ♂: 6; median age 34±15 y, scanned 1-5 times over a period of up to 200 days after the fracture event) were performed on a clinical 3T MR scanner (TimTrio, Siemens AG, Germany). All subjects were treated conservatively for a fracture in either a long bone or in the collar bone. Both, qualitative and quantitative MR measurements were performed in all subjects. MR sequences for a quantitative measurement of relaxation times T1 and T2 in the fracture gap and musculature were applied. Maps of quantitative MR parameters T1, T2, and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) were calculated and evaluated by investigating changes over time in the fractured area by defined ROIs. Additionally, muscle areas were examined as reference regions to validate this approach. Quantitative evaluation of 23 MR data sets (12 test subjects, ♀: 7 ♂: 5) showed an initial peak in T1 values in the fractured area (T1=1895±607ms), which decreased over time to a value of 1094±182ms (200 days after the fracture event). T2 values also peaked for early-stage fractures (T2=115±80ms) and decreased to 73±33ms within 21 days after the fracture event. After that time point, no significant changes

  19. Use of high dynamic range imaging for quantitative combustion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Giassi, Davide; Liu, Bolun; Long, Marshall B

    2015-05-10

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is applied to quantitative combustion diagnostics in coflow laminar diffusion flames as a way to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and measurement sensitivity. The technique relies on the combination of partially saturated frames into a single unsaturated image; in this work, the effectiveness of the HDR approach is demonstrated when applied to two-color ratio pyrometry. Specifically, it is shown than an increase in SNR results in more precise temperature measurements for both soot and thin filament pyrometry. Linearity and reciprocity analysis under partially saturated conditions were performed on three selected detectors, and the camera response functions, which are required for HDR image reconstruction, were determined. The linearity/reciprocity of the detectors allowed the use of a simplified algorithm that was implemented to compute the HDR images; soot and flame temperature were calculated from those images by employing color-ratio pyrometry. The reciprocity analysis revealed that pixel cross talk can be a limiting factor in a detector's HDR capabilities. The comparison with low dynamic range results showed the advantage of the HDR approach. Due to the higher SNR, the measured temperature exhibits a smoother distribution, and the range is extended to lower temperature regions, where the pyrometry technique starts to lose sensitivity due to detector limitations. PMID:25967519

  20. Quantitative Medical Image Analysis for Clinical Development of Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa

    There has been significant progress in development of therapeutics for prevention and management of several disease areas in recent years, leading to increased average life expectancy, as well as of quality of life, globally. However, due to complexity of addressing a number of medical needs and financial burden of development of new class of therapeutics, there is a need for better tools for decision making and validation of efficacy and safety of new compounds. Numerous biological markers (biomarkers) have been proposed either as adjunct to current clinical endpoints or as surrogates. Imaging biomarkers are among rapidly increasing biomarkers, being examined to expedite effective and rational drug development. Clinical imaging often involves a complex set of multi-modality data sets that require rapid and objective analysis, independent of reviewer's bias and training. In this chapter, an overview of imaging biomarkers for drug development is offered, along with challenges that necessitate quantitative and objective image analysis. Examples of automated and semi-automated analysis approaches are provided, along with technical review of such methods. These examples include the use of 3D MRI for osteoarthritis, ultrasound vascular imaging, and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for oncology. Additionally, a brief overview of regulatory requirements is discussed. In conclusion, this chapter highlights key challenges and future directions in this area.

  1. Assessment of breast tumor margins via quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Quincy; Bydlon, Torre M.; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Geradts, Joseph; Wilke, Lee G.; Barry, William; Richards, Lisa M.; Junker, Marlee K.; Gallagher, Jennifer; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2010-02-01

    A particular application of interest for tissue reflectance spectroscopy in the UV-Visible is intraoperative detection of residual cancer at the margins of excised breast tumors, which could prevent costly and unnecessary repeat surgeries. Our multi-disciplinary group has developed an optical imaging device, which is capable of surveying the entire specimen surface down to a depth of 1-2mm, all within a short time as required for intraoperative use. In an IRB-approved study, reflectance spectral images were acquired from 54 margins in 48 patients. Conversion of the spectral images to quantitative tissue parameter maps was facilitated by a fast scalable inverse Monte-Carlo model. Data from margin parameter images were reduced to image-descriptive scalar values and compared to gold-standard margin pathology. The utility of the device for classification of margins was determined via the use of a conditional inference tree modeling approach, and was assessed both as a function of type of disease present at the margin, as well as a function of distance of disease from the issue surface. Additionally, the influence of breast density on the diagnostic parameters, as well as the accuracy of the device, was evaluated.

  2. Preliminary investigation into sources of uncertainty in quantitative imaging features.

    PubMed

    Fave, Xenia; Cook, Molly; Frederick, Amy; Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Jinzhong; Fried, David; Stingo, Francesco; Court, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the potential for quantitative imaging features to classify non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients as high or low risk. However applying the results from one institution to another has been difficult because of the variations in imaging techniques and feature measurement. Our study was designed to determine the effect of some of these sources of uncertainty on image features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. CT images from 20 NSCLC patients were obtained for investigating the impact of four sources of uncertainty: Two region of interest (ROI) selection conditions (breathing phase and single-slice vs. whole volume) and two imaging protocol parameters (peak tube voltage and current). Texture values did not vary substantially with the choice of breathing phase; however, almost half (12 out of 28) of the measured textures did change significantly when measured from the average images compared to the end-of-exhale phase. Of the 28 features, 8 showed a significant variation when measured from the largest cross sectional slice compared to the entire tumor, but 14 were correlated to the entire tumor value. While simulating a decrease in tube voltage had a negligible impact on texture features, simulating a decrease in mA resulted in significant changes for 13 of the 23 texture values. Our results suggest that substantial variation exists when textures are measured under different conditions, and thus the development of a texture analysis standard would be beneficial for comparing features between patients and institutions. PMID:26004695

  3. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M B; Lake, R R; Graham, L S; King, M A; Kling, A S; Fitten, L J; O'Rear, J; Bronca, G A; Gan, M; Servrin, R

    1989-10-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n [123I]IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. "Hypofrontality" was not observed. PMID:2795201

  4. Quantitative imaging of disease signatures through radioactive decay signal conversion

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel LJ; Ogirala, Anuja; Beattie, Bradley J; Grimm, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine there is an urgent need for in vivo techniques able to sensitively detect and quantify molecular activities. Sensitive imaging of gamma rays is widely used, but radioactive decay is a physical constant and signal is independent of biological interactions. Here we introduce a framework of novel targeted and activatable probes excited by a nuclear decay-derived signal to identify and measure molecular signatures of disease. This was accomplished utilizing Cerenkov luminescence (CL), the light produced by β-emitting radionuclides such as clinical positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. Disease markers were detected using nanoparticles to produce secondary Cerenkov-induced fluorescence. This approach reduces background signal compared to conventional fluorescence imaging. In addition to information from a PET scan, we demonstrate novel medical utility by quantitatively determining prognostically relevant enzymatic activity. This technique can be applied to monitor other markers and facilitates a shift towards activatable nuclear medicine agents. PMID:24013701

  5. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Lake, R.R.; Graham, L.S.; King, M.A.; Kling, A.S.; Fitten, L.J.; O'Rear, J.; Bronca, G.A.; Gan, M.; Servrin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n ({sup 123}I)IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. Hypofrontality was not observed.

  6. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Faber, Dirk J

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion. PMID:27126250

  7. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion.

  8. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Yahya, Z.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  9. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion. PMID:27126250

  10. Optical coherence Doppler tomography for quantitative cerebral blood flow imaging

    PubMed Central

    You, Jiang; Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence Doppler tomography (ODT) is a promising neurotechnique that permits 3D imaging of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) network; however, quantitative CBF velocity (CBFv) imaging remains challenging. Here we present a simple phase summation method to enhance slow capillary flow detection sensitivity without sacrificing dynamic range for fast flow and vessel tracking to improve angle correction for absolute CBFv quantification. Flow phantom validation indicated that the CBFv quantification accuracy increased from 15% to 91% and the coefficient of variation (CV) decreased 9.3-fold; in vivo mouse brain validation showed that CV decreased 4.4-/10.8- fold for venular/arteriolar flows. ODT was able to identify cocaine-elicited microischemia and quantify CBFv disruption in branch vessels and capillaries that otherwise would have not been possible. PMID:25401033

  11. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, M; Zeqiri, B; Beard, P C; Cox, B T

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP's acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be [Formula: see text]  =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated. PMID:27286411

  12. Quantitative viscoelastic parameters measured by harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying the mechanical properties of soft tissues remains a challenging objective in the field of elasticity imaging. In this work, we propose an ultrasound-based method for quantitatively estimating viscoelastic properties, using the amplitude-modulated harmonic motion imaging (HMI) technique. In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is generated inside the medium by using focused ultrasound and the resulting displacements are measured using an imaging transducer. The proposed approach is a two-step method that uses both the properties of the propagating shear wave and the phase shift between the applied stress and the measured strain in order to infer to the shear storage (G') and shear loss modulus (G''), which refer to the underlying tissue elasticity and viscosity, respectively. The proposed method was first evaluated on numerical phantoms generated by finite-element simulations, where a very good agreement was found between the input and the measured values of G' and G''. Experiments were then performed on three soft tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. HMI measurements were compared to rotational rheometry (dynamic mechanical analysis), and very good agreement was found at the only overlapping frequency (10 Hz) in the estimate of the shear storage modulus G' (14% relative error, averaged p-value of 0.34), whereas poorer agreement was found in G'' (55% relative error, averaged p-value of 0.0007), most likely due to the significantly lower values of G'' of the gel phantoms, posing thus a greater challenge in the sensitivity of the method. Nevertheless, this work proposes an original model-independent ultrasound-based elasticity imaging method that allows for direct, quantitative estimation of tissue viscoelastic properties, together with a validation against mechanical testing. PMID:19454785

  13. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Beard, P. C.; Cox, B. T.

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP’s acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be Γ   =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated.

  14. Quantitative multispectral biosensing and imaging using plasmonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Matthew E.

    Conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) systems use a prism to couple light into a surface plasmon mode at a metal film-dielectric interface. This cumbersome experimental setup is difficult to integrate into a robust, portable, low-cost, and high-resolution imaging-based device for rapid bioanalytical measurements. More recent work with nanostructured metals, such as nanohole arrays in gold films, enable sensing and imaging of surface binding events using simple, normal incident reflection or transmission configurations. These plasmonic structures exhibit multiple resonances that can be leveraged in sensing applications using multispectral analysis protocols. This thesis describes two new types of low-cost plasmonic crystal sensors formed by soft UV nanoimprint lithography that enable quantitative multispectral analysis of surface binding events in spectroscopic and imaging modes. The first plasmonic optic reported is a quasi-3D crystal consisting of a periodic array of nanoscale holes in a thin gold film with a second, physically separate level of isolated gold disks below each nanoscale hole. The second plasmonic optic reported is a full-3D plasmonic crystal that consists of a polymer embossed with a square array of nanowells covered with a conformal thin gold film. These crystals enable quantitative spectroscopy and imaging of surface binding events with submonolayer sensitivities and micrometer spatial resolution, and can be readily integrated into microfluidic channels for the development of compact form factor devices. Full-3D finite difference time domain calculations are used to accurately model the i transmission spectra and the electromagnetic field distributions in and around the metal nanostructures of the crystals, and to provide insight into the physics underlying the complex optical response of these novel plasmonic structures.

  15. I Vivo Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging and Scatter Assessments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng Feng

    There is evidence that "instrument independent" measurements of ultrasonic scattering properties would provide useful diagnostic information that is not available with conventional ultrasound imaging. This dissertation is a continuing effort to test the above hypothesis and to incorporate quantitative ultrasound methods into clinical examinations for early detection of diffuse liver disease. A well-established reference phantom method was employed to construct quantitative ultrasound images of tissue in vivo. The method was verified by extensive phantom tests. A new method was developed to measure the effective attenuation coefficient of the body wall. The method relates the slope of the difference between the echo signal power spectrum from a uniform region distal to the body wall and the echo signal power spectrum from a reference phantom to the body wall attenuation. The accuracy obtained from phantom tests suggests further studies with animal experiments. Clinically, thirty-five healthy subjects and sixteen patients with diffuse liver disease were studied by these quantitative ultrasound methods. The average attenuation coefficient in normals agreed with previous investigators' results; in vivo backscatter coefficients agreed with the results from normals measured by O'Donnell. Strong discriminating power (p < 0.001) was found for both attenuation and backscatter coefficients between fatty livers and normals; a significant difference (p < 0.01) was observed in the backscatter coefficient but not in the attenuation coefficient between cirrhotic livers and normals. An in vivo animal model of steroid hepatopathy was used to investigate the system sensitivity in detecting early changes in canine liver resulting from corticosteroid administration. The average attenuation coefficient slope increased from 0.7 dB/cm/MHz in controls to 0.82 dB/cm/MHz (at 6 MHz) in treated animals on day 14 into the treatment, and the backscatter coefficient was 26times 10^{ -4}cm^{-1}sr

  16. Unlimited field-of-view optofluidic quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Marchesano, V.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    Here we show a novel imaging modality, named Space-Time Scanning Interferometry (STSI), which synthesizes interferograms mapped in a hybrid space-time domain. A single linear sensor array is sufficient to create hybrid interferograms with unlimited Field of View (FoV) along the scanning direction, and allowing quantitative phase retrieval by Phase Shifting (PS) interferometry algorithms. We applied the STSI method to microfluidic imaging of biological samples, where the required phase shift between interferograms is intrinsically offered due to the sample movement. Besides, out-of-focus recordings are performed using a single line detector, in order to synthesize an unlimited FoV Space-Time Digital Hologram (STDH) yielding full-field, 3D information. Experimental proofs have been carried out to demonstrate the useful capability of STDH to overcome the trade-off existing between FoV and sample magnification, thus providing a high-throughput, label/free, quantitative, diagnostic tool to study biological elements onboard LoC platforms.

  17. Quantitative tomographic imaging of intermolecular FRET in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative transfer of energy between two fluorescent molecules (a donor and an acceptor) in nanometer range proximity. FRET imaging methods have been applied to proteomic studies and drug discovery applications based on intermolecular FRET efficiency measurements and stoichiometric measurements of FRET interaction as quantitative parameters of interest. Importantly, FRET provides information about biomolecular interactions at a molecular level, well beyond the diffraction limits of standard microscopy techniques. The application of FRET to small animal imaging will allow biomedical researchers to investigate physiological processes occurring at nanometer range in vivo as well as in situ. In this work a new method for the quantitative reconstruction of FRET measurements in small animals, incorporating a full-field tomographic acquisition system with a Monte Carlo based hierarchical reconstruction scheme, is described and validated in murine models. Our main objective is to estimate the relative concentration of two forms of donor species, i.e., a donor molecule involved in FRETing to an acceptor close by and a nonFRETing donor molecule. PMID:23243567

  18. Potential of compressed sensing in quantitative MR imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David S.; Li, Xia; Abramson, Richard G.; Chad Quarles, C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Classic signal processing theory dictates that, in order to faithfully reconstruct a band-limited signal (e.g., an image), the sampling rate must be at least twice the maximum frequency contained within the signal, i.e., the Nyquist frequency. Recent developments in applied mathematics, however, have shown that it is often possible to reconstruct signals sampled below the Nyquist rate. This new method of compressed sensing (CS) requires that the signal have a concise and extremely dense representation in some mathematical basis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is particularly well suited for CS approaches, owing to the flexibility of data collection in the spatial frequency (Fourier) domain available in most MRI protocols. With custom CS acquisition and reconstruction strategies, one can quickly obtain a small subset of the full data and then iteratively reconstruct images that are consistent with the acquired data and sparse by some measure. Successful use of CS results in a substantial decrease in the time required to collect an individual image. This extra time can then be harnessed to increase spatial resolution, temporal resolution, signal-to-noise, or any combination of the three. In this article, we first review the salient features of CS theory and then discuss the specific barriers confronting CS before it can be readily incorporated into clinical quantitative MRI studies of cancer. We finally illustrate applications of the technique by describing examples of CS in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. PMID:24434808

  19. Quantitative analysis of ultrasound images for computer-aided diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie Ying; Tuomi, Adam; Beland, Michael D; Konrad, Joseph; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2016-01-01

    We propose an adaptable framework for analyzing ultrasound (US) images quantitatively to provide computer-aided diagnosis using machine learning. Our preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis, adenomyosis, and craniosynostosis. For steatosis and adenomyosis, we collected US studies from 288 and 88 patients, respectively, as well as their biopsy or magnetic resonanceconfirmed diagnosis. Radiologists identified a region of interest (ROI) on each image. We filtered the US images for various texture responses and use the pixel intensity distribution within each ROI as feature parameterizations. Our craniosynostosis dataset consisted of 22 CT-confirmed cases and 22 age-matched controls. One physician manually measured the vectors from the center of the skull to the outer cortex at every 10 deg for each image and we used the principal directions as shape features for parameterization. These parameters and the known diagnosis were used to train classifiers. Testing with cross-validation, we obtained 72.74% accuracy and 0.71 area under receiver operating characteristics curve for steatosis ([Formula: see text]), 77.27% and 0.77 for adenomyosis ([Formula: see text]), and 88.63% and 0.89 for craniosynostosis ([Formula: see text]). Our framework is able to detect a variety of diseases with high accuracy. We hope to include it as a routinely available support system in the clinic. PMID:26835502

  20. Quantitative PET Imaging Using A Comprehensive Monte Carlo System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Southekal, S.; Vaska, P.; Southekal, s.; Purschke, M.L.; Schlyer, d.J.; Vaska, P.

    2011-10-01

    We present the complete image generation methodology developed for the RatCAP PET scanner, which can be extended to other PET systems for which a Monte Carlo-based system model is feasible. The miniature RatCAP presents a unique set of advantages as well as challenges for image processing, and a combination of conventional methods and novel ideas developed specifically for this tomograph have been implemented. The crux of our approach is a low-noise Monte Carlo-generated probability matrix with integrated corrections for all physical effects that impact PET image quality. The generation and optimization of this matrix are discussed in detail, along with the estimation of correction factors and their incorporation into the reconstruction framework. Phantom studies and Monte Carlo simulations are used to evaluate the reconstruction as well as individual corrections for random coincidences, photon scatter, attenuation, and detector efficiency variations in terms of bias and noise. Finally, a realistic rat brain phantom study reconstructed using this methodology is shown to recover >; 90% of the contrast for hot as well as cold regions. The goal has been to realize the potential of quantitative neuroreceptor imaging with the RatCAP.

  1. Quantitative optical imaging of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Lihong H.

    The development and application of optical imaging tools and probing techniques have been the subject of exciting research. These tools and techniques allow for non-invasive, simple sample preparation and relatively fast measurement of electronic and optical properties. They also provided crucial information on optoelectronic device application and development. As the field of nanostructure research emerged, they were modified and employed to understand various properties of these structures at the diffraction limit of light. Carbon nanotubes, up to hundreds of micrometers long and several nanometers thin, are perfect for testing and demonstrating newly-developed optical measurement platforms for individual nanostructures, due to their heterogeneous nature. By employing two quantitative imaging techniques, wide-field on-chip Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy and spatial modulation confocal absorption microscopy, we investigate the optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes. These techniques allow us to obtain the Rayleigh scattering intensity, absolute absorption cross section, spatial resolution, and spectral information of single-walled carbon nanotubes. By probing the optical resonance of hundreds of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a single measurement, the first technique utilizes Rayleigh scattering mechanism to obtain the chirality of carbon nanotubes. The second technique, by using high numerical aperture oil immersion objective lenses, we measure the absolute absorption cross section of a single-walled carbon nanotube. Combining all the quantitative values obtained from these techniques, we observe various interesting and recently discovered physical behaviors, such as long range optical coupling and universal optical conductivity on resonance, and demonstrate the possibility of accurate quantitative absorption measurement for individual structures at nanometer scale.

  2. Quantitative Imaging Network: Data Sharing and Competitive AlgorithmValidation Leveraging The Cancer Imaging Archive1

    PubMed Central

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Freymann, John Blake; Kirby, Justin Stephen; Kinahan, Paul Eugene; Prior, Fred William

    2014-01-01

    The Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN), supported by the National Cancer Institute, is designed to promote research and development of quantitative imaging methods and candidate biomarkers for the measurement of tumor response in clinical trial settings. An integral aspect of the QIN mission is to facilitate collaborative activities that seek to develop best practices for the analysis of cancer imaging data. The QIN working groups and teams are developing new algorithms for image analysis and novel biomarkers for the assessment of response to therapy. To validate these algorithms and biomarkers and translate them into clinical practice, algorithms need to be compared and evaluated on large and diverse data sets. Analysis competitions, or “challenges,” are being conducted within the QIN as a means to accomplish this goal. The QIN has demonstrated, through its leveraging of The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), that data sharing of clinical images across multiple sites is feasible and that it can enable and support these challenges. In addition to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) imaging data, many TCIA collections provide linked clinical, pathology, and “ground truth” data generated by readers that could be used for further challenges. The TCIA-QIN partnership is a successful model that provides resources for multisite sharing of clinical imaging data and the implementation of challenges to support algorithm and biomarker validation. PMID:24772218

  3. Quantitative image analysis in sonograms of the thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, Skouroliakou; Maria, Lyra; Aristides, Antoniou; Lambros, Vlahos

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution, real-time ultrasound is a routine examination for assessing the disorders of the thyroid gland. However, the current diagnosis practice is based mainly on qualitative evaluation of the resulting sonograms, therefore depending on the physician's experience. Computerized texture analysis is widely employed in sonographic images of various organs (liver, breast), and it has been proven to increase the sensitivity of diagnosis by providing a better tissue characterization. The present study attempts to characterize thyroid tissue by automatic texture analysis. The texture features that are calculated are based on co-occurrence matrices as they have been proposed by Haralick. The sample consists of 40 patients. For each patient two sonographic images (one for each lobe) are recorded in DICOM format. The lobe is manually delineated in each sonogram, and the co-occurrence matrices for 52 separation vectors are calculated. The texture features extracted from each one of these matrices are: contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity. Primary component analysis is used to select the optimal set of features. The statistical analysis resulted in the extraction of 21 optimal descriptors. The optimal descriptors are all co-occurrence parameters as the first-order statistics did not prove to be representative of the images characteristics. The bigger number of components depends mainly on correlation for very close or very far distances. The results indicate that quantitative analysis of thyroid sonograms can provide an objective characterization of thyroid tissue.

  4. Quantitative biological imaging by ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Thibault, Pierre; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Beerlink, André; Kewish, Cameron M.; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Salditt, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in coherent x-ray diffractive imaging have paved the way to reliable and quantitative imaging of noncompact specimens at the nanometer scale. Introduced a year ago, an advanced implementation of ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has removed much of the previous limitations regarding sample preparation and illumination conditions. Here, we apply this recent approach toward structure determination at the nanoscale to biological microscopy. We show that the projected electron density of unstained and unsliced freeze-dried cells of the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can be derived from the reconstructed phase in a straightforward and reproducible way, with quantified and small errors. Thus, the approach may contribute in the future to the understanding of the highly disputed nucleoid structure of bacterial cells. In the present study, the estimated resolution for the cells was 85 nm (half-period length), whereas 50-nm resolution was demonstrated for lithographic test structures. With respect to the diameter of the pinhole used to illuminate the samples, a superresolution of about 15 was achieved for the cells and 30 for the test structures, respectively. These values should be assessed in view of the low dose applied on the order of ≃1.3·105 Gy, and were shown to scale with photon fluence. PMID:20018650

  5. Real time blood testing using quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoa V; Bhaduri, Basanta; Tangella, Krishnarao; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a real-time blood testing system that can provide remote diagnosis with minimal human intervention in economically challenged areas. Our instrument combines novel advances in label-free optical imaging with parallel computing. Specifically, we use quantitative phase imaging for extracting red blood cell morphology with nanoscale sensitivity and NVIDIA's CUDA programming language to perform real time cellular-level analysis. While the blood smear is translated through focus, our system is able to segment and analyze all the cells in the one megapixel field of view, at a rate of 40 frames/s. The variety of diagnostic parameters measured from each cell (e.g., surface area, sphericity, and minimum cylindrical diameter) are currently not available with current state of the art clinical instruments. In addition, we show that our instrument correctly recovers the red blood cell volume distribution, as evidenced by the excellent agreement with the cell counter results obtained on normal patients and those with microcytic and macrocytic anemia. The final data outputted by our instrument represent arrays of numbers associated with these morphological parameters and not images. Thus, the memory necessary to store these data is of the order of kilobytes, which allows for their remote transmission via, for example, the cellular network. We envision that such a system will dramatically increase access for blood testing and furthermore, may pave the way to digital hematology. PMID:23405194

  6. Quantitation and mapping of tissue optical properties using modulated imaging.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, David J; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Durkin, Anthony J; Ayers, Frederick R; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development of a rapid, noncontact imaging method, modulated imaging (MI), for quantitative, wide-field characterization of optical absorption and scattering properties of turbid media. MI utilizes principles of frequency-domain sampling and model-based analysis of the spatial modulation transfer function (s-MTF). We present and compare analytic diffusion and probabilistic Monte Carlo models of diffuse reflectance in the spatial frequency domain. Next, we perform MI measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms exhibiting a wide range of l values (0.5 mm to 3 mm) and (micro(s) (')micro(a)) ratios (8 to 500), reporting an overall accuracy of approximately 6% and 3% in absorption and reduced scattering parameters, respectively. Sampling of only two spatial frequencies, achieved with only three camera images, is found to be sufficient for accurate determination of the optical properties. We then perform MI measurements in an in vivo tissue system, demonstrating spatial mapping of the absorption and scattering optical contrast in a human forearm and dynamic measurements of a forearm during venous occlusion. Last, metrics of spatial resolution are assessed through both simulations and measurements of spatially heterogeneous phantoms. PMID:19405742

  7. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation)

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

    1992-07-01

    This document is the annual progress report for project entitled 'Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.' Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of image registration techniques in the case of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavet, Yann; Fernandes, Mathieu; Pinoli, Jean-Charles

    2012-04-01

    In human retina observation (with non mydriatic optical microscopes), an image registration process is often employed to enlarge the field of view. Analyzing all the images takes a lot of time. Numerous techniques have been proposed to perform the registration process. Its good evaluation is a difficult question that is then raising. This article presents the use of two quantitative criterions to evaluate and compare some classical feature-based image registration techniques. The images are first segmented and the resulting binary images are then registered. The good quality of the registration process is evaluated with a normalized criterion based on the ɛ dissimilarity criterion, and the figure of merit criterion (fom), for 25 pairs of images with a manual selection of control points. These criterions are normalized by the results of the affine method (considered as the most simple method). Then, for each pair, the influence of the number of points used to perform the registration is evaluated.

  9. Realization of quantitative-grade fieldable snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen; Iannarilli, Frank; Kebabian, Paul

    2004-12-27

    We discuss achievement of a long-standing technology goal: the first practical realization of a quantitative-grade, field-worthy snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter. The instrument employs Polarimetric Spectral Intensity Modulation (PSIM), a technique that enables full Stokes instantaneous "snapshot" spectropolarimetry with perfect channel registration. This is achieved with conventional single beam optics and a single focal plane array (FPA). Simultaneity and perfect registration are obtained by encoding the polarimetry onto the spectrum via a novel optical arrangement which enables sensing from moving platforms against dynamic scenes. PSIM is feasible across the electro-optical sensing range (UV-LWIR). We present measurement results from a prototype sensor that operates in the visible and near infrared regime (450-900 nm). We discuss in some detail the calibration and Stokes spectrum inversion algorithms that are presently achieving 0.5% polarimetric accuracy. PMID:19488307

  10. Realization of quantitative-grade fieldable snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen H.; Iannarilli, Frank J.; Kebabian, Paul L.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss achievement of a long-standing technology goal: the first practical realization of a quantitative-grade, field-worthy snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter. The instrument employs Polarimetric Spectral Intensity Modulation (PSIM), a technique that enables full Stokes instantaneous "snapshot" spectropolarimetry with perfect channel registration. This is achieved with conventional single beam optics and a single focal plane array (FPA). Simultaneity and perfect registration are obtained by encoding the polarimetry onto the spectrum via a novel optical arrangement which enables sensing from moving platforms against dynamic scenes. PSIM is feasible across the electro-optical sensing range (UV-LWIR). We present measurement results from a prototype sensor that operates in the visible and near infrared regime (450-900 nm). We discuss in some detail the calibration and Stokes spectrum inversion algorithms that are presently achieving 0.5% polarimetric accuracy.

  11. Quantitative Image Analysis of HIV-1 Infection in Lymphoid Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Ashley T.; Henry, Keith; Zupancic, Mary; Sedgewick, Gerald; Faust, Russell A.; Melroe, Holly; Cavert, Winston; Gebhard, Kristin; Staskus, Katherine; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Dailey, Peter J.; Balfour, Henry H., Jr.; Erice, Alejo; Perelson, Alan S.

    1996-11-01

    Tracking human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection at the cellular level in tissue reservoirs provides opportunities to better understand the pathogenesis of infection and to rationally design and monitor therapy A quantitative technique was developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid tissues. Image analysis and in situ hybridization were combined to show that in the presymptomatic stages of infection there is a large, relatively stable pool of virions on the surfaces of follicular dendritic cells and a smaller pool of productively infected cells Despite evidence of constraints on HIV-1 replication in the infected cell population in lymphoid tissues, estimates of the numbers of these cells and the virus they could produce are consistent with the quantities of virus that have been detected in the bloodstream. The cellular sources of virus production and storage in lymphoid tissues can now be studied with this approach over the course of infection and treatment.

  12. Quantitative imaging of light-triggered doxorubicin release

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Jeremy; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Carter, Kevin A.; Luo, Dandan; Shao, Shuai; Lele, Shashikant; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Sunar, Ulas

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapy is related, in large part, to the concentration of drug that reaches tumor sites. Doxorubicin (DOX) is a common anti-cancer drug that is also approved for use in liposomal form for the treatment of ovarian cancer. We recently developed a porphyrin-phospholipid (PoP)-liposome system that enables on demand release of DOX from liposomes using near infrared irradiation to improve DOX bioavailability. Owing to its intrinsic fluorescence, it is possible, and desirable, to quantify DOX concentration and distribution, preferably noninvasively. Here we quantified DOX distribution following light-triggered drug release in phantoms and an animal carcass using spatial frequency domain imaging. This study demonstrates the feasibility of non-invasive quantitative mapping of DOX distributions in target areas. PMID:26417522

  13. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  14. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  16. Quantitative assessment of image motion blur in diffraction images of moving biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Jin, Changrong; Feng, Yuanming; Qi, Dandan; Sa, Yu; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Motion blur (MB) presents a significant challenge for obtaining high-contrast image data from biological cells with a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method. A new p-DIFC experimental system has been developed to evaluate the MB and its effect on image analysis using a time-delay-integration (TDI) CCD camera. Diffraction images of MCF-7 and K562 cells have been acquired with different speed-mismatch ratios and compared to characterize MB quantitatively. Frequency analysis of the diffraction images shows that the degree of MB can be quantified by bandwidth variations of the diffraction images along the motion direction. The analytical results were confirmed by the p-DIFC image data acquired at different speed-mismatch ratios and used to validate a method of numerical simulation of MB on blur-free diffraction images, which provides a useful tool to examine the blurring effect on diffraction images acquired from the same cell. These results provide insights on the dependence of diffraction image on MB and allow significant improvement on rapid biological cell assay with the p-DIFC method.

  17. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  18. Quantitative computational infrared imaging of buoyant diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newale, Ashish S.

    Studies of infrared radiation from turbulent buoyant diffusion flames impinging on structural elements have applications to the development of fire models. A numerical and experimental study of radiation from buoyant diffusion flames with and without impingement on a flat plate is reported. Quantitative images of the radiation intensity from the flames are acquired using a high speed infrared camera. Large eddy simulations are performed using fire dynamics simulator (FDS version 6). The species concentrations and temperature from the simulations are used in conjunction with a narrow-band radiation model (RADCAL) to solve the radiative transfer equation. The computed infrared radiation intensities rendered in the form of images and compared with the measurements. The measured and computed radiation intensities reveal necking and bulging with a characteristic frequency of 7.1 Hz which is in agreement with previous empirical correlations. The results demonstrate the effects of stagnation point boundary layer on the upstream buoyant shear layer. The coupling between these two shear layers presents a model problem for sub-grid scale modeling necessary for future large eddy simulations.

  19. Quantitative imaging of disease signatures through radioactive decay signal conversion.

    PubMed

    Thorek, Daniel L J; Ogirala, Anuja; Beattie, Bradley J; Grimm, Jan

    2013-10-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, there is an urgent need for in vivo techniques able to sensitively detect and quantify molecular activities. Sensitive imaging of gamma rays is widely used; however, radioactive decay is a physical constant, and its signal is independent of biological interactions. Here, we introduce a framework of previously uncharacterized targeted and activatable probes that are excited by a nuclear decay-derived signal to identify and measure molecular signatures of disease. We accomplished this by using Cerenkov luminescence, the light produced by β-particle-emitting radionuclides such as clinical positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. Disease markers were detected using nanoparticles to produce secondary Cerenkov-induced fluorescence. This approach reduces background signal compared to conventional fluorescence imaging. In addition to tumor identification from a conventional PET scan, we demonstrate the medical utility of our approach by quantitatively determining prognostically relevant enzymatic activity. This technique can be applied to monitor other markers and represents a shift toward activatable nuclear medicine agents. PMID:24013701

  20. Quantitative 3D Optical Imaging: Applications in Dosimetry and Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Andrew Stephen

    Optical-CT has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the two very different spheres of biologists and radiation therapy physicists, but it has yet to live up to that potential. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical-CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters, but it is yet to be a clinically relevant tool as the technology is too slow to be considered practical. Biologists have used the technique for structural imaging, but have struggled with emission tomography as the reality of photon attenuation for both excitation and emission have made the images quantitatively irrelevant. Dosimetry. The DLOS (Duke Large field of view Optical-CT Scanner) was designed and constructed to make 3D dosimetry utilizing optical-CT a fast and practical tool while maintaining the accuracy of readout of the previous, slower readout technologies. Upon construction/optimization/implementation of several components including a diffuser, band pass filter, registration mount & fluid filtration system the dosimetry system provides high quality data comparable to or exceeding that of commercial products. In addition, a stray light correction algorithm was tested and implemented. The DLOS in combination with the 3D dosimeter it was designed for, PREAGETM, then underwent rigorous commissioning and benchmarking tests validating its performance against gold standard data including a set of 6 irradiations. DLOS commissioning tests resulted in sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution (MTF >0.5 for frequencies of 1.5lp/mm) and a dynamic range of ˜60dB. Flood field uniformity was 10% and stable after 45minutes. Stray light proved to be small, due to telecentricity, but even the residual can be removed through deconvolution. Benchmarking tests showed the mean 3D passing gamma rate (3%, 3mm, 5% dose threshold) over the 6 benchmark data sets was 97.3% +/- 0.6% (range 96%-98%) scans totaling ˜10 minutes, indicating excellent ability to perform 3D dosimetry while improving the speed of

  1. Real-time quantitative fluorescence imaging using a single snapshot optical properties technique for neurosurgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Pablo A.; Angelo, Joseph; Gioux, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging has shown promise as an adjunct to improve the extent of resection in neurosurgery and oncologic surgery. Nevertheless, current fluorescence imaging techniques do not account for the heterogeneous attenuation effects of tissue optical properties. In this work, we present a novel imaging system that performs real time quantitative fluorescence imaging using Single Snapshot Optical Properties (SSOP) imaging. We developed the technique and performed initial phantom studies to validate the quantitative capabilities of the system for intraoperative feasibility. Overall, this work introduces a novel real-time quantitative fluorescence imaging method capable of being used intraoperatively for neurosurgical guidance.

  2. Quantitative phase imaging technologies to assess neuronal activity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Active neurons tends to have a different dynamical behavior compared to resting ones. Non-exhaustively, vesicular transport towards the synapses is increased, since axonal growth becomes slower. Previous studies also reported small phase variations occurring simultaneously with the action potential. Such changes exhibit times scales ranging from milliseconds to several seconds on spatial scales smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, QPI systems are of particular interest to measure neuronal activity without labels. Here, we report the development of two new QPI systems that should enable the detection of such activity. Both systems can acquire full field phase images with a sub nanometer sensitivity at a few hundreds of frames per second. The first setup is a synchronous combination of Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) and Fluorescence wide field imaging. The latter modality enables the measurement of neurons electrical activity using calcium indicators. In cultures, FF-OCT exhibits similar features to Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), except from complex computational reconstruction. However, FF-OCT is of particular interest in order to measure phase variations in tissues. The second setup is based on a Quantitative Differential Interference Contrast setup mounted in an epi-illumination configuration with a spectrally incoherent illumination. Such a common path interferometer exhibits a very good mechanical stability, and thus enables the measurement of phase images during hours. Additionally, such setup can not only measure a height change, but also an optical index change for both polarization. Hence, one can measure simultaneously a phase change and a birefringence change.

  3. Thermography as a quantitative imaging method for assessing postoperative inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J; Matzen, LH; Vaeth, M; Schou, S; Wenzel, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in skin temperature between the operated and control side of the face after mandibular third molar surgery using thermography. Methods 127 patients had 1 mandibular third molar removed. Before the surgery, standardized thermograms were taken of both sides of the patient's face using a Flir ThermaCam™ E320 (Precisions Teknik AB, Halmstad, Sweden). The imaging procedure was repeated 2 days and 7 days after surgery. A region of interest including the third molar region was marked on each image. The mean temperature within each region of interest was calculated. The difference between sides and over time were assessed using paired t-tests. Results No significant difference was found between the operated side and the control side either before or 7 days after surgery (p > 0.3). The temperature of the operated side (mean: 32.39 °C, range: 28.9–35.3 °C) was higher than that of the control side (mean: 32.06 °C, range: 28.5–35.0 °C) 2 days after surgery [0.33 °C, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22–0.44 °C, p < 0.001]. No significant difference was found between the pre-operative and the 7-day post-operative temperature (p > 0.1). After 2 days, the operated side was not significantly different from the temperature pre-operatively (p = 0.12), whereas the control side had a lower temperature (0.57 °C, 95% CI: 0.29–0.86 °C, p < 0.001). Conclusions Thermography seems useful for quantitative assessment of inflammation between the intervention side and the control side after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. However, thermography cannot be used to assess absolute temperature changes due to normal variations in skin temperature over time. PMID:22752326

  4. Structured illumination quantitative phase microscopy for enhanced resolution amplitude and phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established microscopy technique typically used to image samples at resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. Until now, however, achieving sub-diffraction resolution has predominantly been limited to intensity-based imaging modalities. Here, we introduce an analogue to conventional SIM that allows sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase-contrast imaging of optically transparent objects. We demonstrate sub-diffraction resolution amplitude and quantitative-phase imaging of phantom targets and enhanced resolution quantitative-phase imaging of cells. We report a phase accuracy to within 5% and phase noise of 0.06 rad. PMID:24156044

  5. Quantitative analysis of electroluminescence images from polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeland, Marco; Rösch, Roland; Hoppe, Harald

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the micro-diode-model (MDM) based on a discrete network of interconnected diodes, which allows for quantitative description of lateral electroluminescence emission images obtained from organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. Besides the distributed solar cell description, the equivalent circuit, respectively, network model considers interface and bulk resistances as well as the sheet resistance of the semitransparent electrode. The application of this model allows direct calculation of the lateral current and voltage distribution within the solar cell and thus accounts well for effects known as current crowding. In addition, network parameters such as internal resistances and the sheet-resistance of the higher resistive electrode can be determined. Furthermore, upon introduction of current sources the micro-diode-model also is able to describe and predict current-voltage characteristics for solar cell devices under illumination. The local nature of this description yields important conclusions concerning the geometry dependent performance and the validity of classical models and equivalent circuits describing thin film solar cells.

  6. Differentiation among parkinsonisms using quantitative diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto; Ohtsuka, Chigumi; Yokosawa, Suguru; Harada, Taisuke; Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Terayama, Yasuo

    2015-03-25

    Differential diagnoses among Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSPS) are often difficult. Hence, we investigated whether diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) could detect pathological changes that occur in these disorders and be used to differentiate between such patients. Fourteen patients (five with PD, four MSA, and five PSPS) and six healthy controls were examined using a 1.5-T scanner. Mean kurtosis (MK), fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity maps were generated, and these values of the midbrain tegmentum (MBT) and pontine crossing tract (PCT), as well as MBT/PCT ratios, were obtained. We found no significant differences in MBT and PCT values on DKI maps among the groups. In contrast, MBT/PCT ratios from MK maps were significantly increased in the MSA group and decreased in the PSPS group compared with the other groups. MBT/PCT ratios from mean diffusivity maps showed a significant increase in the PSPS group. Therefore, quantitative DKI analyses, particularly the MBT/PCT ratio from MK maps, can differentiate patients with parkinsonisms. PMID:25714421

  7. Quantitative phase imaging applied to laser damage detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Douti, Dam-Bé L; Chrayteh, Mhamad; Aknoun, Sherazade; Doualle, Thomas; Hecquet, Christophe; Monneret, Serge; Gallais, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    We investigate phase imaging as a measurement method for laser damage detection and analysis of laser-induced modification of optical materials. Experiments have been conducted with a wavefront sensor based on lateral shearing interferometry associated with a high-magnification optical microscope. The system has been used for the in-line observation of optical thin films and bulk samples, laser irradiated in two different conditions: 500 fs pulses at 343 and 1030 nm, and millisecond to second irradiation with a CO2 laser at 10.6 μm. We investigate the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold of optical material by detection and phase changes and show that the technique realizes high sensitivity with different optical path measurements lower than 1 nm. Additionally, the quantitative information on the refractive index or surface modification of the samples under test that is provided by the system has been compared to classical metrology instruments used for laser damage or laser ablation characterization (an atomic force microscope, a differential interference contrast microscope, and an optical surface profiler). An accurate in-line measurement of the morphology of laser-ablated sites, from few nanometers to hundred microns in depth, is shown. PMID:26479612

  8. Photogrammetric and image processing aspects in quantitative flow visualization.

    PubMed

    Machacek, Matthias; Rosgen, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    The development of a measurement system for the visualization, topological classification, and quantitative analysis of complex flows in large-scale wind tunnel experiments is described. A new approach was sought in which the topological features of the flow (e.g., stream lines, separation and reattachment regions, stagnation points, and vortex lines) were extracted directly and preferably visualized in real-time in a virtual wind tunnel environment. The system was based on a stereo arrangement of two CCD cameras. A frame rate of 120 fps allowed measurements at high flow velocities. The paper focuses on the problem of fast and accurate reconstruction of path lines of helium filled soap bubbles in three dimensions (3D). A series of simple algorithmic steps was employed to ensure fast data processing. These included fast image segmentation, a spline approximation of the path lines, a camera model, point correspondence building, calculation of path line points in 3D and creation of a three-dimensional spline representation. The path lines, which contained both velocity and topological information, were analyzed to extract the relevant information. PMID:12495995

  9. Quantitative image analysis of HIV-1 infection in lymphoid tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, A.T.; Zupancic, M.; Cavert, W.

    1996-11-08

    Tracking human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection at the cellular level in tissue reservoirs provides opportunities to better understand the pathogenesis of infection and to rationally design and monitor therapy. A quantitative technique was developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid tissues. Image analysis and in situ hybridization were combined to show that in the presymptomatic stages of infection there is a large, relatively stable pool of virions on the surfaces of follicular dendritic cells and a smaller pool of productivity infected cells. Despite evidence of constraints on HIV-1 replication in the infected cell population in lymphoid tissues, estimates of the numbers of these cells and the virus they could produce are consistent with the quantities of virus that have been detected in the bloodstream. The cellular sources of virus production and storage in lymphoid tissues can now be studied with this approach over the course of infection and treatment. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Quantitative coronary angiography using image recovery techniques for background estimation in unsubtracted images

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jerry T.; Kamyar, Farzad; Molloi, Sabee

    2007-10-15

    Densitometry measurements have been performed previously using subtracted images. However, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in coronary angiography is highly susceptible to misregistration artifacts due to the temporal separation of background and target images. Misregistration artifacts due to respiration and patient motion occur frequently, and organ motion is unavoidable. Quantitative densitometric techniques would be more clinically feasible if they could be implemented using unsubtracted images. The goal of this study is to evaluate image recovery techniques for densitometry measurements using unsubtracted images. A humanoid phantom and eight swine (25-35 kg) were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the following image recovery techniques: Local averaging (LA), morphological filtering (MF), linear interpolation (LI), and curvature-driven diffusion image inpainting (CDD). Images of iodinated vessel phantoms placed over the heart of the humanoid phantom or swine were acquired. In addition, coronary angiograms were obtained after power injections of a nonionic iodinated contrast solution in an in vivo swine study. Background signals were estimated and removed with LA, MF, LI, and CDD. Iodine masses in the vessel phantoms were quantified and compared to known amounts. Moreover, the total iodine in left anterior descending arteries was measured and compared with DSA measurements. In the humanoid phantom study, the average root mean square errors associated with quantifying iodine mass using LA and MF were approximately 6% and 9%, respectively. The corresponding average root mean square errors associated with quantifying iodine mass using LI and CDD were both approximately 3%. In the in vivo swine study, the root mean square errors associated with quantifying iodine in the vessel phantoms with LA and MF were approximately 5% and 12%, respectively. The corresponding average root mean square errors using LI and CDD were both 3%. The standard deviations

  11. Evaluation of impact of immunocytochemical techniques in cytological diagnosis of neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, A; Bussolati, G

    1989-01-01

    A prospective study (1984-87) on the immunocytochemical identification of cancer cells in effusions using HMFG2 monoclonal antibody, and in addition, monoclonal anti-CEA and B72.3 antibodies in cases of suspected mesothelioma, was undertaken. On the basis of cytology alone, of a total of 2362 pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions, 525 cases were diagnosed as positive and 1485 as negative for neoplastic cells, while in 352 (15%) specimens from 307 patients the diagnosis was doubtful. Sections of the embedded sediment of doubtful cases were tested with HMFG2 antibody and proved positive in 215 cases, negative in 108, and inconclusive in 29. The results were checked by following the clinical outcome of the cases. The method was specific in identifying cancer cells in cases at best diagnosed as suspicious on the basis of cytology alone; this represents a clear diagnostic gain. Sensitivity of the test, however, was relatively low (41%). Combined cytological and immunocytochemical characteristics (CEA negative and only some of the neoplastic cells positive with HMFG2 and B72.3 monoclonal antibodies) permitted diagnosis on the effusions of most cases of mesothelioma. The impact of the diagnosis on the progress of the disease was not appreciable as no difference in outcome was noted, irrespective of whether cancer cells had been recognised. The occurrence of an effusion remains an ominous sign in most patients treated for cancer. Images PMID:2685053

  12. Immunocytochemical localization of progesterone receptors in endocrine cells of the human pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Gambacorta, M.; Zamboni, G.; Coggi, G.; Viale, G.

    1990-01-01

    Progesterone receptors (PgR) have been immunocytochemically localized in the nuclei of several (40% to 75%) endocrine cells of the human pancreas and in a more variable number of neoplastic cells of 7 of 18 endocrine pancreatic tumors. Conversely the exocrine epithelial cells of the pancreas did not exhibit any PgR immunoreactivity in normal as well as in different pathologic conditions, including pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Estrogen receptors were not detected in any of the pancreatic samples investigated. Double immunocytochemical experiments have documented that PgR immunoreactivity in normal Langerhans islets is a consistent feature of most (75%) glucagon-producing A cells, of approximately 5% to 20% of insulin-producing B cells, and of a variable percentage of pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-producing cells, ranging from 5% to 70%. These figures were not affected by the sex, age, or underlying disease of the patients. The reported findings corroborate previous clinical and experimental evidence indicating that sex steroid hormones may have some regulatory effects on the functional activity of the endocrine pancreas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2240168

  13. Optical digital coherent detection technology enabled flexible and ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan-Hua; Lu, Xing; Song, Lu; Guo, Xiaojie; Wang, Yawei; Zhu, Linyan; Sui, Qi; Li, Jianping; Shi, Kebin; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-07-25

    Quantitative phase imaging has been an important labeling-free microscopy modality for many biomedical and material science applications. In which, ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging is indispensable for dynamic or transient characteristics analysis. Conventional wide field optical interferometry is a common scheme for quantitative phase imaging, while its data acquisition rate is usually hindered by the frame rate of arrayed detector. By utilizing novel balanced-photo-detector based digital optics coherent detection techniques, we report on a method of constructing ultra-fast quantitative phase microscopy at the line-scan rate of 100 MHz with ~2 μm spatial resolution. PMID:27464166

  14. Real Time Quantitative 3-D Imaging of Diffusion Flame Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Daniel J.; Silver, Joel A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment, in space or ground-based facilities such as drop towers, provides a unique setting for study of combustion mechanisms. Understanding the physical phenomena controlling the ignition and spread of flames in microgravity has importance for space safety as well as better characterization of dynamical and chemical combustion processes which are normally masked by buoyancy and other gravity-related effects. Even the use of so-called 'limiting cases' or the construction of 1-D or 2-D models and experiments fail to make the analysis of combustion simultaneously simple and accurate. Ideally, to bridge the gap between chemistry and fluid mechanics in microgravity combustion, species concentrations and temperature profiles are needed throughout the flame. However, restrictions associated with performing measurements in reduced gravity, especially size and weight considerations, have generally limited microgravity combustion studies to the capture of flame emissions on film or video laser Schlieren imaging and (intrusive) temperature measurements using thermocouples. Given the development of detailed theoretical models, more sophisticated studies are needed to provide the kind of quantitative data necessary to characterize the properties of microgravity combustion processes as well as provide accurate feedback to improve the predictive capabilities of the computational models. While there have been a myriad of fluid mechanical visualization studies in microgravity combustion, little experimental work has been completed to obtain reactant and product concentrations within a microgravity flame. This is largely due to the fact that traditional sampling methods (quenching microprobes using GC and/or mass spec analysis) are too heavy, slow, and cumbersome for microgravity experiments. Non-intrusive optical spectroscopic techniques have - up until now - also required excessively bulky, power hungry equipment. However, with the advent of near-IR diode

  15. Quantitative evaluation of image-based distortion correction in diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Netsch, Thomas; van Muiswinkel, Arianne

    2004-07-01

    A statistical method for the evaluation of image registration for a series of images based on the assessment of consistency properties of the registration results is proposed. Consistency is defined as the residual error of the composition of cyclic registrations. By combining the transformations of different algorithms the consistency error allows a quantitative comparison without the use of ground truth, specifically, it allows a determination as to whether the algorithms are compatible and hence provide comparable registrations. Consistency testing is applied to evaluate retrospective correction of eddy current-induced image distortion in diffusion tensor imaging of the brain. In the literature several image transformations and similarity measures have been proposed, generally showing a significant reduction of distortion in side-by-side comparison of parametric maps before and after registration. Transformations derived from imaging physics and a three-dimensional affine transformation as well as mutual information (MI) and local correlation (LC) similarity are compared to each other by means of consistency testing. The dedicated transformations could not demonstrate a significant difference for more than half of the series considered. LC similarity is well-suited for distortion correction providing more consistent registrations which are comparable to MI. PMID:15250631

  16. Quantitative Imaging of Enzymatic Vitreolysis-Induced Fiber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Filas, Benjamen A.; Shah, Nihar S.; Zhang, Qianru; Shui, Ying-Bo; Lake, Spencer P.; Beebe, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Collagen fiber remodeling in the vitreous body has been implicated in cases of vitreomacular traction, macular hole, and retinal detachment, and also may occur during pharmacologic vitreolysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitative polarized light imaging (QPLI) as a tool for studying fiber organization in the vitreous and near the vitreoretinal interface in control and enzymatically perturbed conditions. Methods. Fiber alignment was measured in anterior-posterior sections of bovine and porcine vitreous. Additional tests were performed on bovine lenses and nasal-temporal vitreous sections. Effects of proteoglycan degradation on collagen fiber alignment using trypsin and plasmin were assessed at the microstructural level using electron microscopy and at the global level using QPLI. Results. Control vitreous showed fiber organization patterns consistent with the literature across multiple-length scales, including the global anterior-posterior coursing of vitreous fibers, as well as local fibers parallel to the equatorial vitreoretinal interface and transverse to the posterior interface. Proteoglycan digestion with trypsin or plasmin significantly increased fiber alignment throughout the vitreous (P < 0.01). The largest changes (3×) occurred in the posterior vitreous where fibers are aligned transverse to the posterior vitreoretinal interface (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Proteoglycan loss due to enzymatic vitreolysis differentially increases fiber alignment at locations where tractions are most common. We hypothesize that a similar mechanism leads to retinal complications during age-related vitreous degeneration. Structural changes to the entire vitreous body (as opposed to the vitreoretinal interface alone) should be evaluated during preclinical testing of pharmacological vitreolysis candidates. PMID:25468895

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Human Cancer Cell Extravasation Using Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Lian; Bond, David; Stoletov, Konstantin; Lewis, John D

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis, or the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to distant sites, is the leading cause of cancer-associated death. Metastasis is a complex multi-step process comprised of invasion, intravasation, survival in circulation, extravasation, and formation of metastatic colonies. Currently, in vitro assays are limited in their ability to investigate these intricate processes and do not faithfully reflect metastasis as it occurs in vivo. Traditional in vivo models of metastasis are limited by their ability to visualize the seemingly sporadic behavior of where and when cancer cells spread (Reymond et al., Nat Rev Cancer 13:858-870, 2013). The avian embryo model of metastasis is a powerful platform to study many of the critical steps in the metastatic cascade including the migration, extravasation, and invasion of human cancer cells in vivo (Sung et al., Nat Commun 6:7164, 2015; Leong et al., Cell Rep 8, 1558-1570, 2014; Kain et al., Dev Dyn 243:216-28, 2014; Leong et al., Nat Protoc 5:1406-17, 2010; Zijlstra et al., Cancer Cell 13:221-234, 2008; Palmer et al., J Vis Exp 51:2815, 2011). The chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a readily accessible and well-vascularized tissue that surrounds the developing embryo. When the chicken embryo is grown in a shell-less, ex ovo environment, the nearly transparent CAM provides an ideal environment for high-resolution fluorescent microcopy approaches. In this model, the embryonic chicken vasculature and labeled cancer cells can be visualized simultaneously to investigate specific steps in the metastatic cascade including extravasation. When combined with the proper image analysis tools, the ex ovo chicken embryo model offers a cost-effective and high-throughput platform for the quantitative analysis of tumor cell metastasis in a physiologically relevant in vivo setting. Here we discuss detailed procedures to quantify cancer cell extravasation in the shell-less chicken embryo model with advanced fluorescence

  18. Quantitative PLIF Imaging in High-Pressure Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for a research project aimed at developing planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) techniques for quantitative 2-D species imaging in fuel-lean, high-pressure combustion gases, relevant to modem aircraft gas turbine combustors. The program involved both theory and experiment. The theoretical activity led to spectroscopic models that allow calculation of the laser-induced fluorescence produced in OH, NO and 02 for arbitrary excitation wavelength, pressure, temperature, gas mixture and laser linewidth. These spectroscopic models incorporate new information on line- broadening, energy transfer and electronic quench rates. Extensive calculations have been made with these models in order to identify optimum excitation strategies, particularly for detecting low levels (ppm) of NO in the presence of large 02 mole fractions (10% is typical for the fuel-lean combustion of interest). A promising new measurement concept has emerged from these calculations, namely that excitation at specific wavelengths, together with detection of fluorescence in multiple spectral bands, promises to enable simultaneous detection of both NO (at ppm levels) and 02 or possibly NO, 02 and temperature. Calculations have been made to evaluate the expected performance of such a diagnostic for a variety of conditions and choices of excitation and detection wavelengths. The experimental effort began with assembly of a new high-pressure combustor to provide controlled high-temperature and high-pressure combustion products. The non-premixed burner enables access to postflame gases at high temperatures (to 2000 K) and high pressures (to 13 atm), and a range of fuel-air equivalence ratios. The chamber also allowed use of a sampling probe, for chemiluminescent detection of NO/NO2, and thermocouples for measurement of gas temperature. Experiments were conducted to confirm the spectroscopic models for OH, NO and 02.

  19. Prospects and challenges of quantitative phase imaging in tumor cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Götte, Martin; Greve, Burkhard; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques provide high resolution label-free quantitative live cell imaging. Here, prospects and challenges of QPI in tumor cell biology are presented, using the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). It is shown that the evaluation of quantitative DHM phase images allows the retrieval of different parameter sets for quantification of cellular motion changes in migration and motility assays that are caused by genetic modifications. Furthermore, we demonstrate simultaneously label-free imaging of cell growth and morphology properties.

  20. Imaging deformation of adherent cells due to shear stress using quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Will J; Sheinfeld, Adi; Rinehart, Matthew T; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-15

    We present a platform for detecting cellular deformations from mechanical stimuli, such as fluid shear stress, using rapid quantitative phase imaging. Rapid quantitative phase imaging was used to analyze changes in the optical path length of adherent skin cancer cells during mechanical displacement. Both the whole-cell phase displacement and the resultant shift of the cellular center of mass were calculated over the duration of the stimulus. Whole-cell phase displacement images were found to match expectation. Furthermore, center-of-mass shifts of adherent cells were found to resemble that of a one-dimensional Kelvin-Voigt (KV) viscoelastic solid. Cellular steady-state displacements from step fluid shear stimuli were found to be linearly related to the shear stress. Shear stiffness constants for cells exposed to a cytoskeletal disrupting toxin were found to be significantly lower than unexposed cells. This novel technique allows for elastographic analysis of whole-cell effective shear stiffness without the use of an exogenous force applicator, a specialized culture substrate, or tracking net perimeter movement of the cell. PMID:26766712

  1. The emerging science of quantitative imaging biomarkers terminology and definitions for scientific studies and regulatory submissions.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Larry G; Barnhart, Huiman X; Buckler, Andrew J; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Kondratovich, Marina V; Toledano, Alicia; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Filice, Ross; Zhang, Zheng; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2015-02-01

    The development and implementation of quantitative imaging biomarkers has been hampered by the inconsistent and often incorrect use of terminology related to these markers. Sponsored by the Radiological Society of North America, an interdisciplinary group of radiologists, statisticians, physicists, and other researchers worked to develop a comprehensive terminology to serve as a foundation for quantitative imaging biomarker claims. Where possible, this working group adapted existing definitions derived from national or international standards bodies rather than invent new definitions for these terms. This terminology also serves as a foundation for the design of studies that evaluate the technical performance of quantitative imaging biomarkers and for studies of algorithms that generate the quantitative imaging biomarkers from clinical scans. This paper provides examples of research studies and quantitative imaging biomarker claims that use terminology consistent with these definitions as well as examples of the rampant confusion in this emerging field. We provide recommendations for appropriate use of quantitative imaging biomarker terminological concepts. It is hoped that this document will assist researchers and regulatory reviewers who examine quantitative imaging biomarkers and will also inform regulatory guidance. More consistent and correct use of terminology could advance regulatory science, improve clinical research, and provide better care for patients who undergo imaging studies. PMID:24919826

  2. Prospective image registration for automated scan prescription of follow-up knee images in quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Goldenstein, Janet; Schooler, Joseph; Crane, Jason C; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-06-01

    Consistent scan prescription for MRI of the knee is very important for accurate comparison of images in a longitudinal study. However, consistent scan region selection is difficult due to the complexity of the knee joint. We propose a novel method for registering knee images using a mutual information registration algorithm to align images in a baseline and follow-up exam. The output of the registration algorithm, three translations and three Euler angles, is then used to redefine the region to be imaged and acquire an identical oblique imaging volume in the follow-up exam as in the baseline. This algorithm is robust to articulation of the knee and anatomical abnormalities due to disease (e.g., osteophytes). The registration method is performed only on the distal femur and is not affected by the proximal tibia or soft tissues. We have incorporated this approach in a clinical MR system and have demonstrated its utility in automatically obtaining consistent scan regions between baseline and follow-up examinations, thus improving the precision of quantitative evaluation of cartilage. Results show an improvement with prospective registration in the coefficient of variation for cartilage thickness, cartilage volume and T2 relaxation measurements. PMID:21546186

  3. Advances in whole-embryo imaging: a quantitative transition is underway.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Periklis; Supatto, Willy

    2014-05-01

    With the advent of imaging probes and live microscopy, developmental biologists have markedly extended our understanding of the molecular and cellular details of embryonic development. To fully comprehend the complex mechanistic framework that forms the developing organism, quantitative studies with high fidelity in space and time are now required. We discuss how integrating established, newly introduced and future imaging tools with quantitative analysis will ensure that imaging can fulfil its promise to elucidate how new life begins. PMID:24739741

  4. A quantitative, non-interferometric X-ray phase contrast imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Peter R.T.; Rigon, Luigi; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Lopez, Frances C.M.; Dreossi, Diego; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative, non-interferometric, X-ray differential phase contrast imaging technique based on the edge illumination principle. We derive a novel phase retrieval algorithm which requires only two images to be acquired and verify the technique experimentally using synchrotron radiation. The technique is useful for planar imaging but is expected to be important for quantitative phase tomography also. The properties and limitations of the technique are studied in detail. PMID:23388958

  5. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  6. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  7. Quantitative imaging of volcanic plumes - Results, needs, and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Ulrich; Lübcke, Peter; Kuhn, Jonas; Bobrowski, Nicole; Prata, Fred; Burton, Mike; Kern, Christoph

    2015-07-01

    Recent technology allows two-dimensional "imaging" of trace gas distributions in plumes. In contrast to older, one-dimensional remote sensing techniques, that are only capable of measuring total column densities, the new imaging methods give insight into details of transport and mixing processes as well as chemical transformation within plumes. We give an overview of gas imaging techniques already being applied at volcanoes (SO2 cameras, imaging DOAS, FT-IR imaging), present techniques where first field experiments were conducted (LED-LIDAR, tomographic mapping), and describe some techniques where only theoretical studies with application to volcanology exist (e.g. Fabry-Pérot Imaging, Gas Correlation Spectroscopy, bi-static LIDAR). Finally, we discuss current needs and future trends in imaging technology.

  8. Immunocytochemical localization of gamma-glutamyltransferase in induced hyperplastic nodules of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Spater, H W; Quintana, N; Becker, F F; Novikoff, A B

    1983-01-01

    The immunocytochemical localization of gamma-glutamyltransferase [(5-glutamyl)-peptide:amino-acid 5-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.2; gamma-GluTase] was demonstrated in hyperplastic liver induced by the carcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). The method used a specific antiserum and protein A-horseradish peroxidase and permitted visualization of antigenic sites at both the light and electron microscopic levels. Electron microscopy revealed deposits of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) reaction product in the plasma membranes of (i) hyperplastic cells, (ii) bile canaliculi, (iii) endothelial cell membranes, and (iv) lymphocytes. The so-called ATPase activity was localized in the plasma membrane in bile canaliculi and in endothelial cells; the hyperplastic cells show marked variability in the levels of this activity. Images PMID:6136038

  9. Electronic imaging systems for quantitative electrophoresis of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is one of the most powerful and widely used methods for the separation of DNA. During the last decade, instruments have been developed that accurately quantitate in digital form the distribution of materials in a gel or on a blot prepared from a gel. In this paper, I review the various physical properties that can be used to quantitate the distribution of DNA on gels or blots and the instrumentation that has been developed to perform these tasks. The emphasis here is on DNA, but much of what is said also applies to RNA, proteins and other molecules. 36 refs.

  10. Immunocytochemical localization of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase in developing potato tuber cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo Taek; Franceschi, V.R.; Okita, T.W. ); Robinson, N.L.; Morell, M.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-09-01

    The subcellular localization of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis, was determined in developing potato tuber cells by immunocytochemical localization techniques at the light microscopy level. Specific labeling of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase by either immunofluorescence or immunogold followed by silver enhancement was detected only in the amyloplasts and indicates that this enzyme is located exclusively in the amyloplasts in developing potato tuber cells. Labeling occurred on the starch grains and, in some instances, specific labeling patterns were evident which may be related to sites active in starch deposition.

  11. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  12. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G; Kolnick, Aleksandra L; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-10-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  13. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  14. Quantitative digital X-ray imaging using frozen hydrated and frozen dried tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Saubermann, A J; Heyman, R V

    1987-05-01

    Application of quantitative X-ray imaging to frozen hydrated tissue sections has presented a number of major problems including lack of a suitable algorithm which could deal effectively with mass loss due to radiation damage, problems of low characteristic X-ray signal to background ratios, and provide a means of analysis of the same location in both hydrated and dried states. This paper presents details of the application of our algorithm for analysis of frozen hydrated, then dried cryosections applied to quantitative X-ray imaging, which provides relatively high precision quantitative measurement of elemental content (related to both wet and dry weight) and water content of each pixel. This algorithm largely circumvents many of the problems of analysis of frozen hydrated tissue sections. Our algorithm for X-ray imaging obtains reasonably precise quantitative measurements coupled with morphological information by trading speed and image resolution. PMID:3612771

  15. System and methods for wide-field quantitative fluorescence imaging during neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Pablo A; Jacobs, Valerie L; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frederic; Roberts, David W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2013-08-01

    We report an accurate, precise and sensitive method and system for quantitative fluorescence image-guided neurosurgery. With a low-noise, high-dynamic-range CMOS array, we perform rapid (integration times as low as 50 ms per wavelength) hyperspectral fluorescence and diffuse reflectance detection and apply a correction algorithm to compensate for the distorting effects of tissue absorption and scattering. Using this approach, we generated quantitative wide-field images of fluorescence in tissue-simulating phantoms for the fluorophore PpIX, having concentrations and optical absorption and scattering variations over clinically relevant ranges. The imaging system was tested in a rodent model of glioma, detecting quantitative levels down to 20 ng/ml. The resulting performance is a significant advance on existing wide-field quantitative imaging techniques, and provides performance comparable to a point-spectroscopy probe that has previously demonstrated significant potential for improved detection of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection. PMID:23903142

  16. SQUID-sensor-based ultra-low-field MRI calibration with phantom images: Towards quantitative imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabek, Juhani; Vesanen, Panu T.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2012-11-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), measured resonance signals oscillate at Larmor frequencies around 1 kHz compared to even above 100 MHz in high-field MRI. Thus, detection by induction coils in ULF MRI is not feasible, whereas superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors can measure these femtotesla-level signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by prepolarization in a field that is typically 100-1000 times higher than the field during acquisition. Based on both measurements and simulations, a procedure for calibrating a SQUID-sensor-based MRI system with MR images is presented in this article. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be integrated with ULF MRI, and may also benefit from such a calibration procedure. Conventionally, electromagnet probe signals have been used for the SQUID-sensor calibration in MEG; the presented ULF-MRI-based approach using an imaging phantom could replace this procedure in hybrid MEG-MRI or ULF MRI alone. The necessary theory is provided here with experimental verification. The calibration procedure opens the possibility of performing quantitative ULF MRI without sample-specific reference scans.

  17. Cell cycle imaging with quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyk, Piotr; Phelan, Shelley; Xu, Min

    2013-02-01

    We report a microscopic approach for determining cell cycle stages by measuring the nuclear optical path length (OPL) with quantitative differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The approach is validated by the excellent agreement between the proportion of proliferating-to-quiescent cancerous breast epithelial cells obtained from DIC microscopy, and that from a standard immunofluorescence assay.

  18. Single Acquisition Quantitative Single Point Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyungseok; Subramanian, Sankaran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Saito, Keita; Matsumoto, Shingo; Krishna, Murali C; McMillan, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has emerged as a promising non-invasive technology to dynamically image tissue oxygenation. Due to its extremely short spin-spin relaxation times, EPRI benefits from a single-point imaging (SPI) scheme where the entire FID signal is captured using pure phase encoding. However, direct T2*/pO2 quantification is inhibited due to constant magnitude gradients which result in time-decreasing FOV. Therefore, conventional acquisition techniques require repeated imaging experiments with differing gradient amplitudes (typically 3), which results in long acquisition time. Methods In this study, gridding was evaluated as a method to reconstruct images with equal FOV to enable direct T2*/pO2 quantification within a single imaging experiment. Additionally, an enhanced reconstruction technique that shares high spatial k-space regions throughout different phase encoding time delays was investigated (k-space extrapolation). Results The combined application of gridding and k-space extrapolation enables pixelwise quantification of T2* from a single acquisition with improved image quality across a wide range of phase encoding delay times. The calculated T2*/pO2 does not vary across this time range. Conclusion By utilizing gridding and k-space extrapolation, accurate T2*/pO2 quantification can be achieved within a single dataset to allow enhanced temporal resolution (by a factor of 3). PMID:23913515

  19. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  20. Immunocytochemical identification of carcinomas of unknown primary in serous effusions.

    PubMed

    Pomjanski, Natalia; Grote, Hans Juergen; Doganay, Peyrüze; Schmiemann, Viola; Buckstegge, Birgit; Böcking, Alfred

    2005-11-01

    Metastases from carcinomas of unknown primary site (CUP) in serous effusion are a common clinical problem. Immunocytochemistry was applied as an adjunct to the cytological diagnosis of metastatic carcinomas in serous effusions. Subjects of this study were 118 pleural, 53 peritoneal, and 9 pericardial effusions from 180 patients routinely investigated in the Institute of Cytopathology. Specimens were primarily stained according to Papanicolaou (Pap). The avidin-biotin-complex method (ABC) was secondarily applied for the visualization of immunologic reactions. We have used a panel of six monoclonal antibodies (CK 5/6, CK 7, CK 20, CA 125, TTF-1, and cdx 2) so as to identify the primary tumor site of metastatic carcinoma cells in serous effusions. Applying an algorithm of immunocytochemical marker constellations, we were able to correctly diagnose primary tumor sites in 86 of 101 (85.1%) patients with CUP syndromes. The best result was achieved for the identification of metastatic carcinomas of the ovaries (94.7%) and the lungs (88.1%). We established an algorithm comprising six immunocytochemical markers that enabled a correct diagnosis of primary tumor sites in 85.1%. The panel studied could be useful in diagnostic routine for the identification of primary tumors of unknown origin metastatic to the serous membranes. PMID:16240395

  1. Extending the detectability index to quantitative imaging performance: applications in tomosynthesis and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Chen, Baiyu; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to extend Fourier-based imaging metrics for the modeling of quantitative imaging performance. Breast tomosynthesis was used as a platform for investigating acquisition and processing parameters (e.g., acquisition angle and dose) that can significantly affect 3D signal and noise, and consequently quantitative imaging performance. The detectability index was computed using the modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum combined with a Fourier description of imaging task. Three imaging tasks were considered: detection, area estimation (in coronal slice), and volume estimation of a 4 mm diameter spherical target. Task functions for size estimation were generated by using measured performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator as training data. The detectability index computed with the size estimation tasks correlated well with precision measurements for area and volume estimation over a fairly broad range of imaging conditions and provided a meaningful figure of merit for quantitative imaging performance. Furthermore, results highlighted that optimal breast tomosynthesis acquisition parameters depend significantly on imaging task. Mass detection was optimal at an acquisition angle of 85° while area and volume estimation for the same mass were optimal at ~100° and 125° acquisition angles, respectively. These findings provide key initial validation that the Fourier-based detectability index extended to estimation tasks can represent a meaningful metric and predictor of quantitative imaging performance.

  2. A novel knowledge representation framework for the statistical validation of quantitative imaging biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Andrew J; Paik, David; Ouellette, Matt; Danagoulian, Jovanna; Wernsing, Gary; Suzek, Baris E

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative imaging biomarkers are of particular interest in drug development for their potential to accelerate the drug development pipeline. The lack of consensus methods and carefully characterized performance hampers the widespread availability of these quantitative measures. A framework to support collaborative work on quantitative imaging biomarkers would entail advanced statistical techniques, the development of controlled vocabularies, and a service-oriented architecture for processing large image archives. Until now, this framework has not been developed. With the availability of tools for automatic ontology-based annotation of datasets, coupled with image archives, and a means for batch selection and processing of image and clinical data, imaging will go through a similar increase in capability analogous to what advanced genetic profiling techniques have brought to molecular biology. We report on our current progress on developing an informatics infrastructure to store, query, and retrieve imaging biomarker data across a wide range of resources in a semantically meaningful way that facilitates the collaborative development and validation of potential imaging biomarkers by many stakeholders. Specifically, we describe the semantic components of our system, QI-Bench, that are used to specify and support experimental activities for statistical validation in quantitative imaging. PMID:23546775

  3. Computerized quantitative evaluation of mammographic accreditation phantom images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Shinohara, Norimitsu

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The objective was to develop and investigate an automated scoring scheme of the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic accreditation phantom (RMI 156, Middleton, WI) images. Methods: The developed method consisted of background subtraction, determination of region of interest, classification of fiber and mass objects by Mahalanobis distance, detection of specks by template matching, and rule-based scoring. Fifty-one phantom images were collected from 51 facilities for this study (one facility provided one image). A medical physicist and two radiologic technologists also scored the images. The human and computerized scores were compared. Results: In terms of meeting the ACR's criteria, the accuracies of the developed method for computerized evaluation of fiber, mass, and speck were 90%, 80%, and 98%, respectively. Contingency table analysis revealed significant association between observer and computer scores for microcalcifications (p<5%) but not for masses and fibers. Conclusions: The developed method may achieve a stable assessment of visibility for test objects in mammographic accreditation phantom image in whether the phantom image meets the ACR's criteria in the evaluation test, although there is room left for improvement in the approach for fiber and mass objects.

  4. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  5. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  6. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  7. A collaborative enterprise for multi-stakeholder participation in the advancement of quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Andrew J; Bresolin, Linda; Dunnick, N Reed; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2011-03-01

    Medical imaging has seen substantial and rapid technical advances during the past decade, including advances in image acquisition devices, processing and analysis software, and agents to enhance specificity. Traditionally, medical imaging has defined anatomy, but increasingly newer, more advanced, imaging technologies provide biochemical and physiologic information based on both static and dynamic modalities. These advanced technologies are important not only for detecting disease but for characterizing and assessing change of disease with time or therapy. Because of the rapidity of these advances, research to determine the utility of quantitative imaging in either clinical research or clinical practice has not had time to mature. Methods to appropriately develop, assess, regulate, and reimburse must be established for these advanced technologies. Efficient and methodical processes that meet the needs of stakeholders in the biomedical research community, therapeutics developers, and health care delivery enterprises will ultimately benefit individual patients. To help address this, the authors formed a collaborative program-the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance. This program draws from the very successful precedent set by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise effort but is adapted to the needs of imaging science. Strategic guidance supporting the development, qualification, and deployment of quantitative imaging biomarkers will lead to improved standardization of imaging tests, proof of imaging test performance, and greater use of imaging to predict the biologic behavior of tissue and monitor therapy response. These, in turn, confer value to corporate stakeholders, providing incentives to bring new and innovative products to market. PMID:21339352

  8. Automatic segmentation method of striatum regions in quantitative susceptibility mapping images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, Saki; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Toshinori

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain iron has been detected in various neurodegenerative diseases. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel contrast mechanism in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and enables the quantitative analysis of local tissue susceptibility property. Therefore, automatic segmentation tools of brain regions on QSM images would be helpful for radiologists' quantitative analysis in various neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to develop an automatic segmentation and classification method of striatum regions on QSM images. Our image database consisted of 22 QSM images obtained from healthy volunteers. These images were acquired on a 3.0 T MR scanner. The voxel size was 0.9×0.9×2 mm. The matrix size of each slice image was 256×256 pixels. In our computerized method, a template mating technique was first used for the detection of a slice image containing striatum regions. An image registration technique was subsequently employed for the classification of striatum regions in consideration of the anatomical knowledge. After the image registration, the voxels in the target image which correspond with striatum regions in the reference image were classified into three striatum regions, i.e., head of the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus. The experimental results indicated that 100% (21/21) of the slice images containing striatum regions were detected accurately. The subjective evaluation of the classification results indicated that 20 (95.2%) of 21 showed good or adequate quality. Our computerized method would be useful for the quantitative analysis of Parkinson diseases in QSM images.

  9. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  10. Quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of breast cancer metastatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Nioka, Shoko; Glickson, Jerry D.; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2010-05-01

    Predicting tumor metastatic potential remains a challenge in cancer research and clinical practice. Our goal was to identify novel biomarkers for differentiating human breast tumors with different metastatic potentials by imaging the in vivo mitochondrial redox states of tumor tissues. The more metastatic (aggressive) MDA-MB-231 and less metastatic (indolent) MCF-7 human breast cancer mouse xenografts were imaged with the low-temperature redox scanner to obtain multi-slice fluorescence images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp). The nominal concentrations of NADH and Fp in tissue were measured using reference standards and used to calculate the Fp redox ratio, Fp/(NADH+Fp). We observed significant core-rim differences, with the core being more oxidized than the rim in all aggressive tumors but not in the indolent tumors. These results are consistent with our previous observations on human melanoma mouse xenografts, indicating that mitochondrial redox imaging potentially provides sensitive markers for distinguishing aggressive from indolent breast tumor xenografts. Mitochondrial redox imaging can be clinically implemented utilizing cryogenic biopsy specimens and is useful for drug development and for clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

  11. Quantitative Imaging of Single Upconversion Nanoparticles in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nadort, Annemarie; Sreenivasan, Varun K. A.; Song, Zhen; Grebenik, Ekaterina A.; Nechaev, Andrei V.; Semchishen, Vladimir A.; Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2013-01-01

    The unique luminescent properties of new-generation synthetic nanomaterials, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), enabled high-contrast optical biomedical imaging by suppressing the crowded background of biological tissue autofluorescence and evading high tissue absorption. This raised high expectations on the UCNP utilities for intracellular and deep tissue imaging, such as whole animal imaging. At the same time, the critical nonlinear dependence of the UCNP luminescence on the excitation intensity results in dramatic signal reduction at (∼1 cm) depth in biological tissue. Here, we report on the experimental and theoretical investigation of this trade-off aiming at the identification of optimal application niches of UCNPs e.g. biological liquids and subsurface tissue layers. As an example of such applications, we report on single UCNP imaging through a layer of hemolyzed blood. To extend this result towards in vivo applications, we quantified the optical properties of single UCNPs and theoretically analyzed the prospects of single-particle detectability in live scattering and absorbing bio-tissue using a human skin model. The model predicts that a single 70-nm UCNP would be detectable at skin depths up to 400 µm, unlike a hardly detectable single fluorescent (fluorescein) dye molecule. UCNP-assisted imaging in the ballistic regime thus allows for excellent applications niches, where high sensitivity is the key requirement. PMID:23691012

  12. Online quantitative analysis of multispectral images of human body tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenko, S A

    2013-08-31

    A method is developed for online monitoring of structural and morphological parameters of biological tissues (haemoglobin concentration, degree of blood oxygenation, average diameter of capillaries and the parameter characterising the average size of tissue scatterers), which involves multispectral tissue imaging, image normalisation to one of its spectral layers and determination of unknown parameters based on their stable regression relation with the spectral characteristics of the normalised image. Regression is obtained by simulating numerically the diffuse reflectance spectrum of the tissue by the Monte Carlo method at a wide variation of model parameters. The correctness of the model calculations is confirmed by the good agreement with the experimental data. The error of the method is estimated under conditions of general variability of structural and morphological parameters of the tissue. The method developed is compared with the traditional methods of interpretation of multispectral images of biological tissues, based on the solution of the inverse problem for each pixel of the image in the approximation of different analytical models. (biomedical optics)

  13. Quantitative characterization of the limiting resolution of a microscanning imager.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhang, Jian-Qi

    2006-08-01

    A method to determine the limiting resolution of a microscanning imager is proposed. Specifically, both the sample-scene phase effects and aliasing effects due to microscanning are modeled in this method by combining the pixel transfer function and the squeeze modulation transfer function. Further, this model is used to calculate the amount of improvement from typical microscanning modes to the limiting resolution of the imager focusing on various blur factors. Analytical results show that the limiting resolution of the microscanning imager is closely related to microscanning modes. The amount of improvement from different microscanning modes to the limiting resolution is different and is closely associated with the fill factor and the blur factors. The conclusion obtained will be helpful in choosing the optimum microscanning mode according to the fill factor of the detector and system blur factors. PMID:16835642

  14. Photoacoustic molecular imaging for in vivo liver iron quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarinelli, Federica; Carmona, Fernando; Regoni, Maria; Arosio, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    A recent study showed that ferritin is a suitable endogenous contrast agent for photoacoustic molecular imaging in cultured mammalian cells. We have therefore tested whether this imaging technique can be used for in vivo quantification of iron in mouse livers. To verify this hypothesis, we used multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) to image albino CD1 mice before and after experimental iron loading. Postmortem assays showed that the iron treatment caused a 15-fold increase in liver iron and a 40-fold increase in liver ferritin levels, while in vivo longitudinal analysis using MSOT revealed just a 1.6-fold increase in the ferritin/iron photoacoustic signal in the same animals. We conclude that MSOT can monitor changes in ferritin/iron levels in vivo, but its sensitivity is much lower than that of ex vivo iron assays.

  15. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Ross, Steven G.; Asma, Evren; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Cheng, Lishui; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M.

    2015-08-01

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs.

  16. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sangtae; Ross, Steven G; Asma, Evren; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Cheng, Lishui; Wollenweber, Scott D; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M

    2015-08-01

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs. PMID:26158503

  17. Quantitative super-resolution imaging with qPAINT.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Ralf; Avendaño, Maier S; Dai, Mingjie; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Agasti, Sarit S; Feiger, Zachary; Rodal, Avital; Yin, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Counting molecules in complexes is challenging, even with super-resolution microscopy. Here, we use the programmable and specific binding of dye-labeled DNA probes to count integer numbers of targets. This method, called quantitative points accumulation in nanoscale topography (qPAINT), works independently of dye photophysics for robust counting with high precision and accuracy over a wide dynamic range. qPAINT was benchmarked on DNA nanostructures and demonstrated for cellular applications by quantifying proteins in situ and the number of single-molecule FISH probes bound to an mRNA target. PMID:27018580

  18. Quantitative 3-D imaging topogrammetry for telemedicine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The technology to reliably transmit high-resolution visual imagery over short to medium distances in real time has led to the serious considerations of the use of telemedicine, telepresence, and telerobotics in the delivery of health care. These concepts may involve, and evolve toward: consultation from remote expert teaching centers; diagnosis; triage; real-time remote advice to the surgeon; and real-time remote surgical instrument manipulation (telerobotics with virtual reality). Further extrapolation leads to teledesign and telereplication of spare surgical parts through quantitative teleimaging of 3-D surfaces tied to CAD/CAM devices and an artificially intelligent archival data base of 'normal' shapes. The ability to generate 'topogrames' or 3-D surface numerical tables of coordinate values capable of creating computer-generated virtual holographic-like displays, machine part replication, and statistical diagnostic shape assessment is critical to the progression of telemedicine. Any virtual reality simulation will remain in 'video-game' realm until realistic dimensional and spatial relational inputs from real measurements in vivo during surgeries are added to an ever-growing statistical data archive. The challenges of managing and interpreting this 3-D data base, which would include radiographic and surface quantitative data, are considerable. As technology drives toward dynamic and continuous 3-D surface measurements, presenting millions of X, Y, Z data points per second of flexing, stretching, moving human organs, the knowledge base and interpretive capabilities of 'brilliant robots' to work as a surgeon's tireless assistants becomes imaginable. The brilliant robot would 'see' what the surgeon sees--and more, for the robot could quantify its 3-D sensing and would 'see' in a wider spectral range than humans, and could zoom its 'eyes' from the macro world to long-distance microscopy. Unerring robot hands could rapidly perform machine-aided suturing with

  19. Identifying severity of electroporation through quantitative image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Bashir I.; Shams, Maitham; Mussivand, Tofy

    2011-04-01

    Electroporation is the formation of reversible hydrophilic pores in the cell membrane under electric fields. Severity of electroporation is challenging to measure and quantify. An image analysis method is developed, and the initial results with a fabricated microfluidic device are reported. The microfluidic device contains integrated microchannels and coplanar interdigitated electrodes allowing low-voltage operation and low-power consumption. Noninvasive human buccal cell samples were specifically stained, and electroporation was induced. Captured image sequences were analyzed for pixel color ranges to quantify the severity of electroporation. The method can detect even a minor occurrence of electroporation and can perform comparative studies.

  20. QIN. Promise and pitfalls of quantitative imaging in oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Brenda F.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Mountz, James M.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Graham, Michael M.; Buatti, John M.; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Eikman, Edward A.; Kumar, Virendra; Forster, Kenneth M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Lieberman, Frank S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative imaging using CT, MRI, and PET modalities will play an increasingly important role in the design of oncology trials addressing molecularly targeted, personalized therapies. The advent of molecularly targeted therapies, exemplified by antiangiogenic drugs, creates new complexities in the assessment of response. The Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) addresses the need for imaging modalities which can accurately and reproducibly measure not just change in tumor size, but changes in relevant metabolic parameters, modulation of relevant signaling pathways, drug delivery to tumor, and differentiation of apoptotic cell death from other changes in tumor volume. This article provides an overview of the applications of quantitative imaging to phase 0 through phase 3 oncology trials. We describe the use of a range of quantitative imaging modalities in specific tumor types including malignant gliomas, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphoma, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and sarcoma. In the concluding section, we discuss potential constraints on clinical trials using quantitative imaging, including complexity of trial conduct, impact on subject recruitment, incremental costs, and institutional barriers. Strategies for overcoming these constraints are presented. PMID:22898682

  1. Rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging by a novel method: theory, simulation testing and proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin J; Koller, Jonathan M; Miller, Brad D

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological challenge imaging has mapped, but rarely quantified, the sensitivity of a biological system to a given drug. We describe a novel method called rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging. This method combines pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling, repeated small doses of a challenge drug over a short time scale, and functional imaging to rapidly provide quantitative estimates of drug sensitivity including EC 50 (the concentration of drug that produces half the maximum possible effect). We first test the method with simulated data, assuming a typical sigmoidal dose-response curve and assuming imperfect imaging that includes artifactual baseline signal drift and random error. With these few assumptions, rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging reliably estimates EC 50 from the simulated data, except when noise overwhelms the drug effect or when the effect occurs only at high doses. In preliminary fMRI studies of primate brain using a dopamine agonist, the observed noise level is modest compared with observed drug effects, and a quantitative EC 50 can be obtained from some regional time-signal curves. Taken together, these results suggest that research and clinical applications for rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging are realistic. PMID:23940831

  2. Simplified approach for quantitative digital holographic phase contrast imaging of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Vollmer, Angelika; Rommel, Christina E.; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Bally, Gert Von

    2011-02-01

    Many interferometry-based quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques require a separately generated coherent reference wave. This results in a low phase stability and the demand for a precise adjustment of the intensity ratio between object and reference wave. To overcome these problems, the performance of a Michelson interferometer approach for digital holographic microscopy was analyzed that avoids a separately generated reference wave by superposition of different image areas. It is shown that this simplified arrangement yields improved phase stability. Furthermore, results from time-lapse investigations on living pancreas tumor cells demonstrate the capability of the method for reliable quantitative phase contrast imaging.

  3. Quantitative label-free sperm imaging by means of transport of intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen Kumar; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Jayaraman, Varshini; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Most living cells are optically transparent which makes it difficult to visualize them under bright field microscopy. Use of contrast agents or markers and staining procedures are often followed to observe these cells. However, most of these staining agents are toxic and not applicable for live cell imaging. In the last decade, quantitative phase imaging has become an indispensable tool for morphological characterization of the phase objects without any markers. In this paper, we report noninterferometric quantitative phase imaging of live sperm cells by solving transport of intensity equations with recorded intensity measurements along optical axis on a commercial bright field microscope.

  4. Quantitative appraisal for noise reduction in digital holographic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Silvio; Picart, Pascal

    2016-06-27

    This paper discusses on a quantitative comparison of the performances of different advanced algorithms for phase data de-noising. In order to quantify the performances, several criteria are proposed: the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio, the Q index, the standard deviation of the phase error, and the signal to distortion ratio. The proposed methodology to investigate de-noising algorithms is based on the use of a realistic simulation of noise-corrupted phase data. A database including 25 fringe patterns divided into 5 patterns and 5 different signal-to-noise ratios was generated to evaluate the selected de-noising algorithms. A total of 34 algorithms divided into different families were evaluated. Quantitative appraisal leads to ranking within the considered criteria. A fairly good correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio gain and the quality index has been observed. There exists an anti-correlation between the phase error and the quality index which indicates that the phase errors are mainly structural distortions in the fringe pattern. Experimental results are thoroughly discussed in the paper. PMID:27410587

  5. Quantitative phase imaging using grating-based quadrature phase interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Yaqoob, Zahid; Heng, Xin; Cui, Xiquan; Yang, Changhuei

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report the use of holographic gratings, which act as the free-space equivalent of the 3x3 fiber-optic coupler, to perform full field phase imaging. By recording two harmonically-related gratings in the same holographic plate, we are able to obtain nontrivial phase shift between different output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The phase difference can be adjusted by changing the relative phase of the recording beams when recording the hologram. We have built a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using harmonically-related holographic gratings with 600 and 1200 lines/mm spacing. Two CCD cameras at the output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer are used to record the full-field quadrature interferograms, which are subsequently processed to reconstruct the phase image. The imaging system has ~12X magnification with ~420μmx315μm field-of-view. To demonstrate the capability of our system, we have successfully performed phase imaging of a pure phase object and a paramecium caudatum.

  6. Quantitative imaging of RBC suspensions in bifurcating microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Joseph; Holmes, David; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Balabani, Stavroula

    2014-11-01

    The local velocity and concentration characteristics of both red blood cells (RBCs) and suspending medium flowing in a bifurcating microchannel were measured simultaneously. An imaging technique involving alternate bright field and laser light illumination was employed to capture both RBC and fluorescent PIV images of human healthy blood, flowing through a sequentially bifurcating 50 micrometer square PDMS microchannel. The acquired images were further processed using PIV algorithms to yield the velocity distribution of RBCs and suspending medium while the brightfield images also provided data on hematocrit distribution and cell-depleted layer. Various flow rates, aggregation states and proportions of flow entering each branch were considered. Asymmetric hematocrit distributions were quantified around the bifurcations and found to be enhanced by aggregation. The data were compared with computational fluid dynamics studies of continuous Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids in order to elucidate the impact of the two-phase nature of the flow, particularly RBC aggregation. The work is currently being extended to examine the role of RBC properties on microhemodynamics and the implications for disease. Department of Bioengineering.

  7. Normal Cerebellar Development by Qualitative and Quantitative MR Imaging: From the Fetus to the Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Brossard-Racine, Marie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    This article presents an overview of published studies using conventional and quantitative MR imaging to describe normal development of the cerebellum prenatally and postnatally through 18 years of age. Normal cerebellar development and maturational processes are described here within the context of MR imaging morphology, microstructure, metabolism, and functional connectivity. In addition, strengths and weaknesses of these reviewed studies are critically appraised and new directions for future cerebellar MR imaging investigation are made. PMID:27423797

  8. Quantitative and qualitative image quality analysis of super resolution images from a low cost scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Sergio; Echegaray, Sebastian; Zamora, Gilberto; Soliz, Peter; Bauman, Wendall

    2011-03-01

    The lurking epidemic of eye diseases caused by diabetes and aging will put more than 130 million Americans at risk of blindness by 2020. Screening has been touted as a means to prevent blindness by identifying those individuals at risk. However, the cost of most of today's commercial retinal imaging devices makes their use economically impractical for mass screening. Thus, low cost devices are needed. With these devices, low cost often comes at the expense of image quality with high levels of noise and distortion hindering the clinical evaluation of those retinas. A software-based super resolution (SR) reconstruction methodology that produces images with improved resolution and quality from multiple low resolution (LR) observations is introduced. The LR images are taken with a low-cost Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO). The non-redundant information of these LR images is combined to produce a single image in an implementation that also removes noise and imaging distortions while preserving fine blood vessels and small lesions. The feasibility of using the resulting SR images for screening of eye diseases was tested using quantitative and qualitative assessments. Qualitatively, expert image readers evaluated their ability of detecting clinically significant features on the SR images and compared their findings with those obtained from matching images of the same eyes taken with commercially available high-end cameras. Quantitatively, measures of image quality were calculated from SR images and compared to subject-matched images from a commercial fundus imager. Our results show that the SR images have indeed enough quality and spatial detail for screening purposes.

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Strain Near Tooth Fillet by Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Tomoya; Yoshiizumi, Satoshi; Inoue, Katsumi

    The accurate measurement of strain and stress in a tooth is important for the reliable evaluation of the strength or life of gears. In this research, a strain measurement method which is based on image processing is applied to the analysis of strain near the tooth fillet. The loaded tooth is photographed using a CCD camera and stored as a digital image. The displacement of the point in the tooth flank is tracked by the cross-correlation method, and then, the strain is calculated. The interrogation window size of the correlation method and the overlap amount affect the accuracy and resolution. In the case of measurements at structures with complicated profiles such as fillets, the interrogation window maintains a large size and the overlap amount should be large. The surface condition also affects the accuracy. The white painted surface with a small black particle is suitable for measurement.

  10. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  11. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Retinopathy Using Multi-parameter Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Jamali, Nasim; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    A multi-parameter quantification method was implemented to quantify retinal vascular injuries in microscopic images of clinically relevant eye diseases. This method was applied to wholemount retinal trypsin digest images of diabetic Akita/+, and bcl-2 knocked out mice models. Five unique features of retinal vasculature were extracted to monitor early structural changes and retinopathy, as well as quantifying the disease progression. Our approach was validated through simulations of retinal images. Results showed fewer number of cells (P = 5.1205e-05), greater population ratios of endothelial cells to pericytes (PCs) (P = 5.1772e-04; an indicator of PC loss), higher fractal dimension (P = 8.2202e-05), smaller vessel coverage (P = 1.4214e-05), and greater number of acellular capillaries (P = 7.0414e-04) for diabetic retina as compared to normal retina. Quantification using the present method would be helpful in evaluating physiological and pathological retinopathy in a high-throughput and reproducible manner. PMID:27186534

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Retinopathy Using Multi-parameter Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Jamali, Nasim; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    A multi-parameter quantification method was implemented to quantify retinal vascular injuries in microscopic images of clinically relevant eye diseases. This method was applied to wholemount retinal trypsin digest images of diabetic Akita/+, and bcl-2 knocked out mice models. Five unique features of retinal vasculature were extracted to monitor early structural changes and retinopathy, as well as quantifying the disease progression. Our approach was validated through simulations of retinal images. Results showed fewer number of cells (P = 5.1205e-05), greater population ratios of endothelial cells to pericytes (PCs) (P = 5.1772e-04; an indicator of PC loss), higher fractal dimension (P = 8.2202e-05), smaller vessel coverage (P = 1.4214e-05), and greater number of acellular capillaries (P = 7.0414e-04) for diabetic retina as compared to normal retina. Quantification using the present method would be helpful in evaluating physiological and pathological retinopathy in a high-throughput and reproducible manner. PMID:27186534

  14. Quantitative assessment of susceptibility weighted imaging processing methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningzhi; Wang, Wen-Tung; Sati, Pascal; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate different susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) phase processing methods and parameter selection, thereby improving understanding of potential artifacts, as well as facilitating choice of methodology in clinical settings. Materials and Methods Two major phase processing methods, Homodyne-filtering and phase unwrapping-high pass (HP) filtering, were investigated with various phase unwrapping approaches, filter sizes, and filter types. Magnitude and phase images were acquired from a healthy subject and brain injury patients on a 3T clinical Siemens MRI system. Results were evaluated based on image contrast to noise ratio and presence of processing artifacts. Results When using a relatively small filter size (32 pixels for the matrix size 512 × 512 pixels), all Homodyne-filtering methods were subject to phase errors leading to 2% to 3% masked brain area in lower and middle axial slices. All phase unwrapping-filtering/smoothing approaches demonstrated fewer phase errors and artifacts compared to the Homodyne-filtering approaches. For performing phase unwrapping, Fourier-based methods, although less accurate, were 2–4 orders of magnitude faster than the PRELUDE, Goldstein and Quality-guide methods. Conclusion Although Homodyne-filtering approaches are faster and more straightforward, phase unwrapping followed by HP filtering approaches perform more accurately in a wider variety of acquisition scenarios. PMID:24923594

  15. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration. PMID:24743971

  16. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation). Progress report, January 15, 1992--January 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

    1992-07-01

    This document is the annual progress report for project entitled ``Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.`` Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging.

  17. Calibration of Wide-Field Deconvolution Microscopy for Quantitative Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Wee, Tse-Luen (Erika); Brown, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Deconvolution enhances contrast in fluorescence microscopy images, especially in low-contrast, high-background wide-field microscope images, improving characterization of features within the sample. Deconvolution can also be combined with other imaging modalities, such as confocal microscopy, and most software programs seek to improve resolution as well as contrast. Quantitative image analyses require instrument calibration and with deconvolution, necessitate that this process itself preserves the relative quantitative relationships between fluorescence intensities. To ensure that the quantitative nature of the data remains unaltered, deconvolution algorithms need to be tested thoroughly. This study investigated whether the deconvolution algorithms in AutoQuant X3 preserve relative quantitative intensity data. InSpeck Green calibration microspheres were prepared for imaging, z-stacks were collected using a wide-field microscope, and the images were deconvolved using the iterative deconvolution algorithms with default settings. Afterwards, the mean intensities and volumes of microspheres in the original and the deconvolved images were measured. Deconvolved data sets showed higher average microsphere intensities and smaller volumes than the original wide-field data sets. In original and deconvolved data sets, intensity means showed linear relationships with the relative microsphere intensities given by the manufacturer. Importantly, upon normalization, the trend lines were found to have similar slopes. In original and deconvolved images, the volumes of the microspheres were quite uniform for all relative microsphere intensities. We were able to show that AutoQuant X3 deconvolution software data are quantitative. In general, the protocol presented can be used to calibrate any fluorescence microscope or image processing and analysis procedure. PMID:24688321

  18. Immunocytochemical fluorescent in situ visualization of proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Grebe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of cellular and subcellular functions often relies on the ability to visualize proteins as close as possible to their endogenous locations. A number of immunocytochemical techniques have been developed to detect proteins in situ using specific antibodies raised against proteins of interest. Here, we describe in detail two protocols commonly, successfully employed in Arabidopsis research. The first allows for immunolocalization of proteins in whole-mount Arabidopsis roots without the need for physical sectioning. The second allows for immunolocalization of proteins on semi-thin microtome sections of wax-embedded swamples. This approach is particularly useful when sectioning of Arabidopsis roots or other thicker plant organs is required for immunolocalization. We provide step-by-step protocols with extensive troubleshooting for both the whole-mount and sectioning protocols. Furthermore, critical steps, advantages, and limitations of the two protocols described here are discussed. PMID:24057381

  19. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  20. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Roger N; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E; Price, Julie C

    2015-11-21

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  1. Quantitative diffusion tensor imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: revisited.

    PubMed

    Sage, Caroline A; Van Hecke, Wim; Peeters, Ronald; Sijbers, Jan; Robberecht, Wim; Parizel, Paul; Marchal, Guy; Leemans, Alexander; Sunaert, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Voxel-based analyses (VBA) are increasingly being used to detect white matter abnormalities with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in different types of pathologies. However, the validity, specificity, and sensitivity of statistical inferences of group differences to a large extent depend on the quality of the spatial normalization of the DTI images. Using high-dimensional nonrigid coregistration techniques that are able to align both the spatial and orientational diffusion information and incorporate appropriate templates that contain this complete DT information may improve this quality. Alternatively, a hybrid technique such as tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) may improve the reliability of the statistical results by generating voxel-wise statistics without the need for perfect image alignment and spatial smoothing. In this study, we have used (1) a coregistration algorithm that was optimized for coregistration of DTI data and (2) a population-based DTI atlas to reanalyze our previously published VBA, which compared the fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity maps of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with those of healthy controls. Additionally, we performed a complementary TBSS analysis to improve our understanding and interpretation of the VBA results. We demonstrate that, as the overall variance of the diffusion properties is lowered after normalizing the DTI data with such recently developed techniques (VBA using our own optimized high-dimensional nonrigid coregistration and TBSS), more reliable voxel-wise statistical results can be obtained than had previously been possible, with our VBA and TBSS yielding very similar results. This study provides support for the view of ALS as a multisystem disease, in which the entire frontotemporal lobe is implicated. PMID:19404990

  2. Nanoparticles for biomedical imaging, therapy, and quantitative diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yust, Brian G.

    Nanoparticles and nanomaterials are known to exhibit extraordinary characteristics and have a wide range of application which utilizes their unique properties. In particular, nanoparticles have shown great promise towards advancing the state of biological and biomedical techniques such as in vivo and in vitro imaging modalities, biosensing, and disease detection and therapy. Nanocrystalline hosts: NaYF4, KYF4, KGdF4, NaMF3, and KMF3 (M=Mg, Ba, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cr) doped with rare earth ions have been synthesized by thermolysis, solvothermal, and hydrothermal methods. The morphology and spectroscopic properties have been thoroughly characterized. These nanoparticles (NP) are particularly useful for biomedical purposes since both the exciting and emitting wavelengths are in the near-infrared, where most tissues do not strongly absorb or scatter light. In vivo and in vitro imaging was performed with a 980 nm excitation source. Finally, NPs were conjugated with zinc phthalocyanine, a photosensitizer with a large absorption coefficient in the red and NIR regions, to illustrate the efficacy of these NPs as a platform for dual-mode infrared-activated imaging and photodynamic platforms. In addition, nonlinear optical nanomaterials, such as BaTiO3 and Ag@BaTiO3, were also synthesized and characterized. The nonlinear optical properties were investigated, and it is demonstrated that these nanoparticles can produce phase conjugate waves when used in a counterpropagating four wave mixing setup. The third order susceptibility is quantified using the z-scan technique, and the toxicity of these nanoparticles is also explored.

  3. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of (F18)fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), (F18)fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of (F18)-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

  4. Quantitative carrier lifetime images optically measured on rough silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Martin C.; Pingel, Sebastian; The, Manuel; Warta, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    Results of optical carrier lifetime measurements like carrier density imaging significantly depend on surface conditions of the sample under test. Rough or textured surfaces have a severe impact on the measurement quality since they cause blurring and overestimation of the lifetime measurement. We propose a correction method for both, the adjustment of the absolute value and the restoration of the spatial distribution of the recombination lifetime. The absolute value is corrected by taking the emissivity of the sample into account. The unblurred signal distribution is obtained by mathematical deconvolution via Wiener filtering. For this purpose an appropriate point spread function is experimentally determined.

  5. Quantitative high-resolution acoustic imaging of the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C. W.; Dettmer, J.; Steininger, G.; Dosso, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the properties of the seafloor interface and near surface (a few tens of meters) is of considerable interest to science as well as industry. Scales of interest range from the order of tens of kilometers (survey size) down to less than a centimeter. These scales can be probed using an AUV equipped with a broadband source and a short streamer. The data are processed for energy (rather than peak) reflection coefficients and scattering cross-section versus bi-static angle. In order to tackle spatial scales ranging over 8 orders of magnitude of, it is useful to divide the parameter space into deterministic and stochastic parameters. The energy reflection coefficients contain information on deterministic properties including sound speed, density and attenuation vs depth in the upper tens of meters of sediment. Vertical resolution is a function of depth, but typically of order 0.1 m near surface. The statistical properties of the smaller scales, i.e., seafloor roughness and/or volume heterogeneities are obtained from the bi-static scattering data. Physics-based models are used to relate the sediment micro-structure (the Buckingham model) and sediment fluctuations (the Von Karman spectrum) to the acoustic observables. Quantitative parameter and inter-parameter uncertainties are obtained from Bayesian methods for both deterministic and stochastic parameters.

  6. Quantitative Live Imaging of Endogenous DNA Replication in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Andrew; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the analysis of DNA replication in mammalian tissue culture cells has been limited to static time points, and the use of nucleoside analogues to pulse-label replicating DNA. Here we characterize for the first time a novel Chromobody cell line that specifically labels endogenous PCNA. By combining this with high-resolution confocal time-lapse microscopy, and with a simplified analysis workflow, we were able to produce highly detailed, reproducible, quantitative 4D data on endogenous DNA replication. The increased resolution allowed accurate classification and segregation of S phase into early-, mid-, and late-stages based on the unique subcellular localization of endogenous PCNA. Surprisingly, this localization was slightly but significantly different from previous studies, which utilized over-expressed GFP tagged forms of PCNA. Finally, low dose exposure to Hydroxyurea caused the loss of mid- and late-S phase localization patterns of endogenous PCNA, despite cells eventually completing S phase. Taken together, these results indicate that this simplified method can be used to accurately identify and quantify DNA replication under multiple and various experimental conditions. PMID:23029203

  7. Quantitative image analysis of histological sections of coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-06-01

    The study of coronary arteries has evolved from examining gross anatomy and morphology to scrutinizing micro-anatomy and cellular composition. Technological advances such as high- resolution digital microscopes and high precision cutting devices have allowed examination of coronary artery morphology and pathology at micron resolution. We have developed a software toolkit to analyze histological sections. In particular, we are currently engaged in examining normal coronary arteries in order to provide the foundation for study of remodeled tissue. The first of two coronary arteries was stained for elastin and collagen. The second coronary artery was sectioned and stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High resolution light microscopy was used to image the sections. Segmentation was accomplished initially with slice- to-slice thresholding algorithms. These segmentation techniques choose optimal threshold values by modeling the tissue as one or more distributions. Morphology and image statistics were used to further differentiate the thresholded data into different tissue categories therefore refine the results of the segmentation. Specificity/sensitivity analysis suggests that automatic segmentation can be very effective. For both tissue samples, greater than 90% specificity was achieved. Summed voxel projection and maximum intensity projection appear to be effective 3-D visualization tools. Shading methods also provide useful visualization, however it is important to incorporate combined 2-D and 3-D displays. Surface rendering techniques (e.g. color mapping) can be used for visualizing parametric data. Preliminary results are promising, but continued development of algorithms is needed.

  8. An open-source deconvolution software package for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Y.; DAVIS, P.; KOSMACEK, E. A.; IANZINI, F.; MACKEY, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Deconvolution techniques have been widely used for restoring the 3-D quantitative information of an unknown specimen observed using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Deconv, an open-source deconvolution software package, was developed for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging and was released under the GNU Public License. Deconv provides numerical routines for simulation of a 3-D point spread function and deconvolution routines implemented three constrained iterative deconvolution algorithms: one based on a Poisson noise model and two others based on a Gaussian noise model. These algorithms are presented and evaluated using synthetic images and experimentally obtained microscope images, and the use of the library is explained. Deconv allows users to assess the utility of these deconvolution algorithms and to determine which are suited for a particular imaging application. The design of Deconv makes it easy for deconvolution capabilities to be incorporated into existing imaging applications. PMID:19941558

  9. Quantitative SHG imaging in osteoarthritis model mice, implying a diagnostic application.

    PubMed

    Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yusuke; Saitou, Takashi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Miura, Hiromasa; Iimura, Tadahiro; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) restricts the daily activities of patients and significantly decreases their quality of life. The development of non-invasive quantitative methods for properly diagnosing and evaluating the process of degeneration of articular cartilage due to OA is essential. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging enables the observation of collagen fibrils in live tissues or organs without staining. In the present study, we employed SHG imaging of the articular cartilage in OA model mice ex vivo. Consequently, three-dimensional SHG imaging with successive image processing and statistical analyses allowed us to successfully characterize histopathological changes in the articular cartilage consistently confirmed on histological analyses. The quantitative SHG imaging technique presented in this study constitutes a diagnostic application of this technology in the setting of OA. PMID:25780732

  10. Mechanical Model Analysis for Quantitative Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Based on Ultrasound Tissue Elasticity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Maki, Tomonori; Yamakawa, Makoto; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    Precise evaluation of the stage of chronic hepatitis C with respect to fibrosis has become an important issue to prevent the occurrence of cirrhosis and to initiate appropriate therapeutic intervention such as viral eradication using interferon. Ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, i.e., elastography can visualize tissue hardness/softness, and its clinical usefulness has been studied to detect and evaluate tumors. We have recently reported that the texture of elasticity image changes as fibrosis progresses. To evaluate fibrosis progression quantitatively on the basis of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, we introduced a mechanical model of fibrosis progression and simulated the process by which hepatic fibrosis affects elasticity images and compared the results with those clinical data analysis. As a result, it was confirmed that even in diffuse diseases like chronic hepatitis, the patterns of elasticity images are related to fibrous structural changes caused by hepatic disease and can be used to derive features for quantitative evaluation of fibrosis stage.

  11. Imaging and Quantitation Techniques for Tracking Cargo along Endosome-to-Golgi Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of light microscopy, coupled with the development of a range of fluorescent-based probes, have provided new approaches to dissecting membrane domains and the regulation of membrane trafficking. Here, we review these advances, as well as highlight developments in quantitative image analysis and novel unbiased analytical approaches to quantitate protein localization. The application of these approaches to endosomal sorting and endosome-to-Golgi transport is discussed. PMID:24709647

  12. Detection of Prostate Cancer: Quantitative Multiparametric MR Imaging Models Developed Using Registered Correlative Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Gregory J; Kalavagunta, Chaitanya; Spilseth, Benjamin; Bolan, Patrick J; Li, Xiufeng; Hutter, Diane; Nam, Jung W; Johnson, Andrew D; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Moench, Laura; Konety, Badrinath; Warlick, Christopher A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To develop multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging models to generate a quantitative, user-independent, voxel-wise composite biomarker score (CBS) for detection of prostate cancer by using coregistered correlative histopathologic results, and to compare performance of CBS-based detection with that of single quantitative MR imaging parameters. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer underwent multiparametric MR imaging before surgery for treatment. All MR imaging voxels in the prostate were classified as cancer or noncancer on the basis of coregistered histopathologic data. Predictive models were developed by using more than one quantitative MR imaging parameter to generate CBS maps. Model development and evaluation of quantitative MR imaging parameters and CBS were performed separately for the peripheral zone and the whole gland. Model accuracy was evaluated by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and confidence intervals were calculated with the bootstrap procedure. The improvement in classification accuracy was evaluated by comparing the AUC for the multiparametric model and the single best-performing quantitative MR imaging parameter at the individual level and in aggregate. Results Quantitative T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), reflux rate constant (kep), and area under the gadolinium concentration curve at 90 seconds (AUGC90) were significantly different between cancer and noncancer voxels (P < .001), with ADC showing the best accuracy (peripheral zone AUC, 0.82; whole gland AUC, 0.74). Four-parameter models demonstrated the best performance in both the peripheral zone (AUC, 0.85; P = .010 vs ADC alone) and whole gland (AUC, 0.77; P = .043 vs ADC alone). Individual-level analysis showed statistically significant improvement in AUC in 82% (23 of 28) and 71% (24 of 34

  13. Quantitative analysis of rib movement based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Oda, M.; Mitsutaka, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakuta, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Rib movement during respiration is one of the diagnostic criteria in pulmonary impairments. In general, the rib movement is assessed in fluoroscopy. However, the shadows of lung vessels and bronchi overlapping ribs prevent accurate quantitative analysis of rib movement. Recently, an image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs, called "bone suppression technique", has been developed. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images created by the bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 10 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). Bone suppression technique based on a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) was applied to the dynamic chest images to create bone images. Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic bone images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as reduced rib velocity vectors. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left-right symmetric distributions, whereas those in abnormal cases showed nonuniform distributions. In conclusion, dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements: Limited rib movements were indicated as a reduction of rib movement and left-right asymmetric distribution on vector maps. Thus, dynamic bone images can be a new diagnostic tool for quantitative analysis of rib movements without additional radiation dose.

  14. The Neglected Side of the Coin: Quantitative Benefit-risk Analyses in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat B

    2016-03-01

    While it is implicitly recognized that the benefits of diagnostic imaging far outweigh any theoretical radiogenic risks, quantitative estimates of the benefits are rarely, if ever, juxtaposed with quantitative estimates of risk. This alone - expression of benefit in purely qualitative terms versus expression of risk in quantitative, and therefore seemingly more certain, terms - may well contribute to a skewed sense of the relative benefits and risks of diagnostic imaging among healthcare providers as well as patients. The current paper, therefore, briefly compares the benefits of diagnostic imaging in several cases, based on actual mortality or morbidity data if ionizing radiation were not employed, with theoretical estimates of radiogenic cancer mortality based on the "linear no-threshold" (LNT) dose-response model. PMID:26808890

  15. A correlative imaging based methodology for accurate quantitative assessment of bone formation in additive manufactured implants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Todd, Naomi M; Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kim, Taek Bo; Madi, Kamel; Cartmell, Sarah; Mitchell, Christopher A; Jones, Julian R; Lee, Peter D

    2016-06-01

    A correlative imaging methodology was developed to accurately quantify bone formation in the complex lattice structure of additive manufactured implants. Micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry were combined, integrating the best features from both, while demonstrating the limitations of each imaging modality. This semi-automatic methodology registered each modality using a coarse graining technique to speed the registration of 2D histology sections to high resolution 3D μCT datasets. Once registered, histomorphometric qualitative and quantitative bone descriptors were directly correlated to 3D quantitative bone descriptors, such as bone ingrowth and bone contact. The correlative imaging allowed the significant volumetric shrinkage of histology sections to be quantified for the first time (~15 %). This technique demonstrated the importance of location of the histological section, demonstrating that up to a 30 % offset can be introduced. The results were used to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D printed titanium lattice implants. PMID:27153828

  16. Subsurface imaging and cell refractometry using quantitative phase/ shear-force feedback microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2009-10-01

    Over the last few years, several novel quantitative phase imaging techniques have been developed for the study of biological cells. However, many of these techniques are encumbered by inherent limitations including 2π phase ambiguities and diffraction limited spatial resolution. In addition, subsurface information in the phase data is not exploited. We hereby present a novel quantitative phase imaging system without 2 π ambiguities, which also allows for subsurface imaging and cell refractometry studies. This is accomplished by utilizing simultaneously obtained shear-force topography information. We will demonstrate how the quantitative phase and topography data can be used for subsurface and cell refractometry analysis and will present results for a fabricated structure and a malaria infected red blood cell.

  17. Absolute Quantitative MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry: A Case of Rifampicin in Liver Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chumbley, Chad W; Reyzer, Michelle L; Allen, Jamie L; Marriner, Gwendolyn A; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-02-16

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) elucidates molecular distributions in thin tissue sections. Absolute pixel-to-pixel quantitation has remained a challenge, primarily lacking validation of the appropriate analytical methods. In the present work, isotopically labeled internal standards are applied to tissue sections to maximize quantitative reproducibility and yield accurate quantitative results. We have developed a tissue model for rifampicin (RIF), an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis, and have tested different methods of applying an isotopically labeled internal standard for MALDI IMS analysis. The application of the standard and subsequently the matrix onto tissue sections resulted in quantitation that was not statistically significantly different from results obtained using HPLC-MS/MS of tissue extracts. Quantitative IMS experiments were performed on liver tissue from an animal dosed in vivo. Each microspot in the quantitative images measures the local concentration of RIF in the thin tissue section. Lower concentrations were detected from the blood vessels and around the portal tracts. The quantitative values obtained from these measurements were comparable (>90% similarity) to HPLC-MS/MS results obtained from extracts of the same tissue. PMID:26814665

  18. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF QUANTITATIVE IMAGE DATA USING ISOMORPHIC FUNCTIONAL MIXED MODELS, WITH APPLICATION TO PROTEOMICS DATA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jeffrey S.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Herrick, Richard C.; Sanna, Pietro; Gutstein, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Image data are increasingly encountered and are of growing importance in many areas of science. Much of these data are quantitative image data, which are characterized by intensities that represent some measurement of interest in the scanned images. The data typically consist of multiple images on the same domain and the goal of the research is to combine the quantitative information across images to make inference about populations or interventions. In this paper, we present a unified analysis framework for the analysis of quantitative image data using a Bayesian functional mixed model approach. This framework is flexible enough to handle complex, irregular images with many local features, and can model the simultaneous effects of multiple factors on the image intensities and account for the correlation between images induced by the design. We introduce a general isomorphic modeling approach to fitting the functional mixed model, of which the wavelet-based functional mixed model is one special case. With suitable modeling choices, this approach leads to efficient calculations and can result in flexible modeling and adaptive smoothing of the salient features in the data. The proposed method has the following advantages: it can be run automatically, it produces inferential plots indicating which regions of the image are associated with each factor, it simultaneously considers the practical and statistical significance of findings, and it controls the false discovery rate. Although the method we present is general and can be applied to quantitative image data from any application, in this paper we focus on image-based proteomic data. We apply our method to an animal study investigating the effects of opiate addiction on the brain proteome. Our image-based functional mixed model approach finds results that are missed with conventional spot-based analysis approaches. In particular, we find that the significant regions of the image identified by the proposed method

  19. Structured illumination diffraction phase microscopy for broadband, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established technique that allows sub-diffraction resolution imaging by heterodyning high sample frequencies into the system’s passband via structured illumination. However, until now, SIM has been typically used to achieve sub-diffraction resolution for intensity-based imaging. Here, we present a novel optical setup that uses structured illumination with a broadband-light source to obtain noise-reduced, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative-phase (QPM) imaging of cells. We compare this with a previous work for sub-diffraction QPM imaging via SIM that used a laser source, and was thus still corrupted by coherent noise. PMID:24562266

  20. High resolution quantitative phase imaging of live cells with constrained optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Khare, Kedar; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) aims at studying weakly scattering and absorbing biological specimens with subwavelength accuracy without any external staining mechanisms. Use of a reference beam at an angle is one of the necessary criteria for recording of high resolution holograms in most of the interferometric methods used for quantitative phase imaging. The spatial separation of the dc and twin images is decided by the reference beam angle and Fourier-filtered reconstructed image will have a very poor resolution if hologram is recorded below a minimum reference angle condition. However, it is always inconvenient to have a large reference beam angle while performing high resolution microscopy of live cells and biological specimens with nanometric features. In this paper, we treat reconstruction of digital holographic microscopy images as a constrained optimization problem with smoothness constraint in order to recover only complex object field in hologram plane even with overlapping dc and twin image terms. We solve this optimization problem by gradient descent approach iteratively and the smoothness constraint is implemented by spatial averaging with appropriate size. This approach will give excellent high resolution image recovery compared to Fourier filtering while keeping a very small reference angle. We demonstrate this approach on digital holographic microscopy of live cells by recovering the quantitative phase of live cells from a hologram recorded with nearly zero reference angle.

  1. An operative quantitative analysis of multispectral images of the eyeground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Firago, V. A.; Kubarko, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    In the approximation of a four-layer model of the eyeground, we have studied the information content of photographs of the eyeground obtained in different spectral intervals from the visible range of the spectrum. We have shown that, under conditions of a priori uncertainty of all parameters of the eyeground that affect spectral fluxes of light multiply scattered by the eyeground, the two-dimensional distributions of the following parameters can be determined: (i) the contents of hemoglobin and macular pigment in the retina; (ii) the contents of melanin in the pigment epithelium and choroid; (iii) the degree of blood oxygenation; and (iv) the structural parameter of the retina, which characterizes the volume concentration of its effective scatterers. Based on results of a numerical simulation of the light-transfer process in the medium under study, we have determined regression relationships between parameters of the eyeground and spectral characteristics of its image and have proposed a method for the operative retrieval of parameter maps of the eyeground, which uses the determined regressions.

  2. Quantitative Characterization of Super-Resolution Infrared Imaging Based on Time-Varying Focal Plane Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution infrared image has been the goal of an infrared imaging system. In this paper, a super-resolution infrared imaging method using time-varying coded mask is proposed based on focal plane coding and compressed sensing theory. The basic idea of this method is to set a coded mask on the focal plane of the optical system, and the same scene could be sampled many times repeatedly by using time-varying control coding strategy, the super-resolution image is further reconstructed by sparse optimization algorithm. The results of simulation are quantitatively evaluated by introducing the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), which illustrate that the effect of compressed measurement coefficient r and coded mask resolution m on the reconstructed image quality. Research results show that the proposed method will promote infrared imaging quality effectively, which will be helpful for the practical design of new type of high resolution ! infrared imaging systems.

  3. Quantitative analysis of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy images for surface structure determination: Sulfur on Re(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Dunphy, J.C.; Salmeron, M.B.; Sautet, P. |

    1993-02-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) images of adsorbed atoms and molecules on single crystal substrates provide important information on surface structure and order. In many cases images are interpreted qualitatively based on other information on the system. To obtain quantitative information, a theoretical analysis of the STM image is required. A new method of calculating STM images is presented that includes a full description of the STM tip and surface structure. This method is applied to experimental STM images of sulfur adsorbed on Re(0001). Effects of adsorption site, adsorbate geometry, tip composition and tunnel gap resistance on STM image contrast are analyzed. The chemical identity of tip apex atom and substrate subsurface structure are both shown to significantly affect STM image contrast.

  4. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method provided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output. PMID:26430292

  5. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  6. Comparison of immunocytochemical estrogen receptor assay, estrogen receptor enzyme immunoassay, and radioligand-labeled estrogen receptor assay in human breast cancer and uterine tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Heubner, A.; Beck, T.; Grill, H.J.; Pollow, K.

    1986-08-01

    Determination of estrogen receptor content in 82 breast cancer specimens with immunocytochemical estrogen receptor assay (ER-EIA) (Abbott) was compared with our routinely used binding assay using /sup 125/I-estradiol as radioligand with Scatchard plot analysis of the binding data. Although the estrogen receptor content measured with the ER-EIA was approximately 2-fold higher compared with the binding assay, the immunochemical method proved to be a useful alternative for estrogen receptor determination. Furthermore, it is possible to detect estrogen receptors in FPLC Superose 12 (size exclusion column) eluates or in the fractions obtained after sucrose density centrifugation using the ER-EIA. Forty breast cancer samples were analyzed utilizing the immunocytochemical technique (ER-ICA) for visualization of the estrogen receptor content in frozen tumor tissues in relationship to the quantitative results obtained with the ER-EIA assay. Specific staining for estrogen receptor was confined only to the cell nucleus, was distributed irregularly among the tumor cells, and was variable in intensity. The staining intensity and the percentage of positively stained cells increased with increasing level of cytosolic estrogen receptor. In 27 of 40 cases the immunocytochemical results correlated well with the ER-EIA assay. Nine cases were ER-ICA negative with positive ER-EIA, and four were ER-ICA positive with negative ER-EIA.

  7. Low-coherence wavelength shifting interferometry for high-speed quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-08-01

    We propose low-coherence wavelength shifting interferometry and demonstrate its application to quantitative phase imaging of dynamic specimens. By shifting the source wavelength, multiple interferograms of the sample can be acquired at different spectral bands. A sample phase is thus encoded in the phase step between consecutive acquisitions. For the particular case of four-band imaging, we show that the phase can be extracted with a modified Carré algorithm. We describe signal demodulation in detail and discuss its implication on system implementation. A swept laser-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to demonstrate the technique for real-time imaging of live sperm cells at 62.5 Hz. The dynamic dry mass of the sperm head is measured with a full-scale error of ±2%, validating the technique's capability for high-sensitivity, high-speed quantitative phase imaging. PMID:27472586

  8. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  9. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Xu, Y.; Lin, B.; Chen, H.

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565-750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565-750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as <0.66, 0.66-1.06, 1.06-1.62, and >1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems.

  10. Microscope-Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (M-Qlis) Description and User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, K. A.

    1991-10-01

    A Microscope Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (M-QLIS} has been designed and constructed. The M-QLIS is designed for use in studies of chemiluminescent phenomena associated with absorption of radio-frequency radiation. The system consists of a radio-frequency waveguide/sample holder, microscope, intensified video camera, radiometric calibration source and optics, and computer-based image processor with radiometric analysis software. The system operation, hardware, software, and radiometric procedures are described.

  11. Immunocytochemical studies on the localization of 5-aminolevulinate synthase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Rohde, M; Srivastava, G; Rylatt, D B; Bundesen, P; Zamattia, J; Crane, D I; May, B K

    1990-08-01

    The localization of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) in hepatocytes of untreated and porphyrinogenic drug-treated rats has been examined by an immunocytochemical approach using a monoclonal antibody and protein A-gold labeling. Gold particles representing antigenic sites for ALAS were observed in the mitochondria and cytoplasm of untreated and drug-treated cells. Quantitative analysis of the labeling density showed that levels of ALAS increased significantly in both of these cellular compartments following drug treatment. Evidence that the detected cytoplasmic form of ALAS represents the precursor of the enzyme was obtained from immunoblotting experiments. The direct detection of cytosolic ALAS in vivo rules out the possibility that enzyme activity previously detected in the cytosol fraction resulted from mitochondrial leakage during cell fractionation. The results indicate that the cytosolic accumulation of ALAS is not a consequence of the inability of mitochondria to accommodate more enzyme. However, the molecular basis for this cytosolic accumulation is not known. The studies also established that the mitochondrial enzyme is predominantly, if not exclusively, associated with the matrix side of the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:2369125

  12. Quantitative Analysis Tools and Digital Phantoms for Deformable Image Registration Quality Assurance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haksoo; Park, Samuel B; Monroe, James I; Traughber, Bryan J; Zheng, Yiran; Lo, Simon S; Yao, Min; Mansur, David; Ellis, Rodney; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W

    2015-08-01

    This article proposes quantitative analysis tools and digital phantoms to quantify intrinsic errors of deformable image registration (DIR) systems and establish quality assurance (QA) procedures for clinical use of DIR systems utilizing local and global error analysis methods with clinically realistic digital image phantoms. Landmark-based image registration verifications are suitable only for images with significant feature points. To address this shortfall, we adapted a deformation vector field (DVF) comparison approach with new analysis techniques to quantify the results. Digital image phantoms are derived from data sets of actual patient images (a reference image set, R, a test image set, T). Image sets from the same patient taken at different times are registered with deformable methods producing a reference DVFref. Applying DVFref to the original reference image deforms T into a new image R'. The data set, R', T, and DVFref, is from a realistic truth set and therefore can be used to analyze any DIR system and expose intrinsic errors by comparing DVFref and DVFtest. For quantitative error analysis, calculating and delineating differences between DVFs, 2 methods were used, (1) a local error analysis tool that displays deformation error magnitudes with color mapping on each image slice and (2) a global error analysis tool that calculates a deformation error histogram, which describes a cumulative probability function of errors for each anatomical structure. Three digital image phantoms were generated from three patients with a head and neck, a lung and a liver cancer. The DIR QA was evaluated using the case with head and neck. PMID:25336380

  13. Quantitative reflection imaging of fixed Aplysia californica pedal ganglion neurons on nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Le, An-Phong; Kang, Somi; Thompson, Lucas B; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2013-10-24

    Studies of the interactions between cells and surrounding environment including cell culture surfaces and their responses to distinct chemical and physical cues are essential to understanding the regulation of cell growth, migration, and differentiation. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of a label-free optical imaging technique-surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-to quantitatively investigate the relative thickness of complex biomolecular structures using a nanoimprinted plasmonic crystal and laboratory microscope. Polyelectrolyte films of different thicknesses deposited by layer-by-layer assembly served as the model system to calibrate the reflection contrast response originating from SPRs. The calibrated SPR system allows quantitative analysis of the thicknesses of the interface formed between the cell culture substrate and cellular membrane regions of fixed Aplysia californica pedal ganglion neurons. Bandpass filters were used to isolate spectral regions of reflected light with distinctive image contrast changes. Combining of the data from images acquired using different bandpass filters leads to increase image contrast and sensitivity to topological differences in interface thicknesses. This SPR-based imaging technique is restricted in measurable thickness range (∼100-200 nm) due to the limited plasmonic sensing volume, but we complement this technique with an interferometric analysis method. Described here simple reflection imaging techniques show promise as quantitative methods for analyzing surface thicknesses at nanometer scale over large areas in real-time and in physicochemical diverse environments. PMID:23647567

  14. Quantitative Neutron Dark-field Imaging through Spin-Echo Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Markus; Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Kaestner, Anders; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Neutron dark-field imaging constitutes a seminal progress in the field of neutron imaging as it combines real space resolution capability with information provided by one of the most significant neutron scattering techniques, namely small angle scattering. The success of structural characterizations bridging the gap between macroscopic and microscopic features has been enabled by the introduction of grating interferometers so far. The induced interference pattern, a spatial beam modulation, allows for mapping of small-angle scattering signals and hence addressing microstructures beyond direct spatial resolution of the imaging system with high efficiency. However, to date the quantification in the small angle scattering regime is severely limited by the monochromatic approach. To overcome such drawback we here introduce an alternative and more flexible method of interferometric beam modulation utilizing a spin-echo technique. This novel method facilitates straightforward quantitative dark-field neutron imaging, i.e. the required quantitative microstructural characterization combined with real space image resolution. For the first time quantitative microstructural reciprocal space information from small angle neutron scattering becomes available together with macroscopic image information creating the potential to quantify several orders of magnitude in structure sizes simultaneously. PMID:26560644

  15. Quantitative Neutron Dark-field Imaging through Spin-Echo Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Strobl, Markus; Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G; Tremsin, Anton S; Kaestner, Anders; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Neutron dark-field imaging constitutes a seminal progress in the field of neutron imaging as it combines real space resolution capability with information provided by one of the most significant neutron scattering techniques, namely small angle scattering. The success of structural characterizations bridging the gap between macroscopic and microscopic features has been enabled by the introduction of grating interferometers so far. The induced interference pattern, a spatial beam modulation, allows for mapping of small-angle scattering signals and hence addressing microstructures beyond direct spatial resolution of the imaging system with high efficiency. However, to date the quantification in the small angle scattering regime is severely limited by the monochromatic approach. To overcome such drawback we here introduce an alternative and more flexible method of interferometric beam modulation utilizing a spin-echo technique. This novel method facilitates straightforward quantitative dark-field neutron imaging, i.e. the required quantitative microstructural characterization combined with real space image resolution. For the first time quantitative microstructural reciprocal space information from small angle neutron scattering becomes available together with macroscopic image information creating the potential to quantify several orders of magnitude in structure sizes simultaneously. PMID:26560644

  16. Fully automated screening of immunocytochemically stained specimens for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, André A.; Schneider, Timna E.; Müller-Frank, Dirk A. C.; Meyer-Ebrecht, Dietrich; Böcking, Alfred; Aach, Til

    2007-03-01

    Cytopathological cancer diagnoses can be obtained less invasive than histopathological investigations. Cells containing specimens can be obtained without pain or discomfort, bloody biopsies are avoided, and the diagnosis can, in some cases, even be made earlier. Since no tissue biopsies are necessary these methods can also be used in screening applications, e.g., for cervical cancer. Among the cytopathological methods a diagnosis based on the analysis of the amount of DNA in individual cells achieves high sensitivity and specificity. Yet this analysis is time consuming, which is prohibitive for a screening application. Hence, it will be advantageous to retain, by a preceding selection step, only a subset of suspicious specimens. This can be achieved using highly sensitive immunocytochemical markers like p16 ink4a for preselection of suspicious cells and specimens. We present a method to fully automatically acquire images at distinct positions at cytological specimens using a conventional computer controlled microscope and an autofocus algorithm. Based on the thus obtained images we automatically detect p16 ink4a-positive objects. This detection in turn is based on an analysis of the color distribution of the p16 ink4a marker in the Lab-colorspace. A Gaussian-mixture-model is used to describe this distribution and the method described in this paper so far achieves a sensitivity of up to 90%.

  17. Application of multispectral imaging in quantitative immunohistochemistry study of breast cancer: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Lou; Wang, Lin-Wei; Chen, Jia-Mei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Qing-Ming; Yang, Gui-Fang; Qu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) based on imaging and spectroscopy, as relatively novel to the field of histopathology, has been used in biomedical multidisciplinary researches. We analyzed and compared the utility of multispectral (MS) versus conventional red-green-blue (RGB) images for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining to explore the advantages of MSI in clinical-pathological diagnosis. The MS images acquired of IHC-stained membranous marker human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytoplasmic marker cytokeratin5/6 (CK5/6), and nuclear marker estrogen receptor (ER) have higher resolution, stronger contrast, and more accurate segmentation than the RGB images. The total signal optical density (OD) values for each biomarker were higher in MS images than in RGB images (all P < 0.05). Moreover, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that a greater area under the curve (AUC), higher sensitivity, and specificity in evaluation of HER2 gene were achieved by MS images (AUC = 0.91, 89.1 %, 83.2 %) than RGB images (AUC = 0.87, 84.5, and 81.8 %). There was no significant difference between quantitative results of RGB images and clinico-pathological characteristics (P > 0.05). However, by quantifying MS images, the total signal OD values of HER2 positive expression were correlated with lymph node status and histological grades (P = 0.02 and 0.04). Additionally, the consistency test results indicated the inter-observer agreement was more robust in MS images for HER2 (inter-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.95, r s = 0.94), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.88), and ER (ICC = 0.94, r s = 0.94) (all P < 0.001) than that in RGB images for HER2 (ICC = 0.91, r s = 0.89), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.85, r s = 0.84), and ER (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.89) (all P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the application of MS images in quantitative IHC analysis could obtain higher accuracy, reliability, and more

  18. A Quantitative Categorical Analysis of Metadata Elements in Image-Applicable Metadata Schemas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a quantitative categorical analysis of metadata elements in the Dublin Core, VRA (Visual Resource Association) Core, REACH (Record Export for Art and Cultural Heritage), and EAD (Encoded Archival Description) metadata schemas, all of which can be used for organizing and describing images. Introduces a new schema comparison methodology…

  19. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  20. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the understanding of cell biology and has become an indispens...

  1. Raman spectral imaging for quantitative contaminant evaluation in skim milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study uses a point-scan Raman spectral imaging system for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial r...

  2. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  3. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF ANTERIOR SEGMENT PARAMETERS IN THE ERA OF IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Dorairaj, Syril; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To review the parameters for quantitative assessment of the anterior segment and iridocorneal angle and to develop a comprehensive schematic for the evaluation of angle anatomy and pathophysiology by high-resolution imaging. Methods The published literature of the last 15 years was reviewed, analyzed, and organized into a construct for assessment of anterior segment processes. Results Modern anterior segment imaging techniques have allowed us to devise new quantitative parameters to improve the information obtained. Ultrasound biomicroscopy, slit-lamp optical coherence tomography, and anterior segment optical coherence tomography provide high-resolution images for analysis of physiologic and pathologic processes. These include iridocorneal angle analysis (eg, angle opening distance, angle recess area, trabecular-iris space area), anterior and posterior chamber depth and area, iris and ciliary body cross-sectional area and volume, quantitative anatomic relationships between structures, and videographic analysis of iris movement and accommodative changes under various conditions. Modern devices permit imaging of the entire anterior chamber, allowing calculation of anterior chamber and pupillary diameters and correlating these with measurement of anterior chamber dynamics in light vs dark conditions. We have tabulated all reported anterior segment measurement modalities and devised a construct for assessment of normal and abnormal conditions. Conclusion Quantitative measurement of static and dynamic anterior segment parameters, both normal and abnormal, provides a broad range of parameters for analysis of the numerous aspects of the pathophysiology of the anterior segment of the eye. PMID:18427599

  4. Ultrastructural Localization of Sucrases in Streptococcus mutans GS-5 and an Extracellular Polysaccharide Mutant: a Comparative Cytochemical and Immunocytochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bozzola, J. J.; Johnson, M. C.; Shechmeister, I. L.

    1977-01-01

    Electron microscopy and cytochemical and immunocytochemical procedures were used to study the ultrastructural distribution of sucrase enzymes in two strains of Streptococcus mutans. In a strongly adherent and virulent parent strain, GS-5, most of the invertase and fructosyltransferase activities were demonstrated extracellularly or bound to the cell surfaces. Intracellularly, enzymatic sites were detected near the plasma membrane on the periphery of the nucleoid and central mesosome. In GS-511, a mutant of diminished virulence and adherence, most of the enzymatic activity was not located on the cell surfaces, but was found away from the cell walls and associated with extracellular polysaccharides. Intracellularly, GS-511 manifested the same distribution of invertase and fructosyltransferase as did GS-5; however, the close association of these enzymes with the plasma membrane was not shown in GS-511. In both strains, extracellular areas near regions associated with cross wall formation appeared to show localized concentrations of these sucrases. Antibodies against partially purified glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzymes from GS-5 were used to localize GTF by immunocytochemical techniques. Indirect ferritin localization procedures showed that the extracellular and cell-bound GTF enzymes were distributed in similar locations as the fructosyltransferase and invertase enzymes. By absorption of the antiserum with whole GS-511 cells, the location of extracellular GTF and surface antigens unique to GS-5 was demonstrated. The dramatically reduced levels of cell-bound sucrase activity in GS-511 indicates the significant role of these enzymes in adherence and cariogenicity. Images PMID:330413

  5. Quantitative analysis of rib kinematics based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs has been developed. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 16 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector and processed to create bone images by using commercial software (Clear Read BS, Riverain Technologies). Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as a reduced rib velocity field, resulting in an asymmetrical distribution of rib movement. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left/right symmetric distributions of the velocity field, whereas those in abnormal cases showed asymmetric distributions because of locally limited rib movements. Dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements. The present method has a potential for an additional functional examination in chest radiography. PMID:26158097

  6. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging Applied to the Noninvasive and Quantitative Imaging of Blood Vessels in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, J.; Papadacci, C.; Demene, C.; Gennisson, J-L.; Tanter, M.; Pernot, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast Doppler Imaging was introduced as a technique to quantify blood flow in an entire 2-D field of view, expanding the field of application of ultrasound imaging to the highly sensitive anatomical and functional mapping of blood vessels. We have recently developed 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging, a technique that can produce thousands of ultrasound volumes per second, based on three-dimensional plane and diverging wave emissions, and demonstrated its clinical feasibility in human subjects in vivo. In this study, we show that non-invasive 3-D Ultrafast Power Doppler, Pulsed Doppler, and Color Doppler Imaging can be used to perform quantitative imaging of blood vessels in humans when using coherent compounding of three-dimensional tilted plane waves. A customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 3-D Ultrafast Imaging. Using a 32X32, 3-MHz matrix phased array (Vermon, France), volumes were beamformed by coherently compounding successive tilted plane wave emissions. Doppler processing was then applied in a voxel-wise fashion. 3-D Ultrafast Power Doppler Imaging was first validated by imaging Tygon tubes of varying diameter and its in vivo feasibility was demonstrated by imaging small vessels in the human thyroid. Simultaneous 3-D Color and Pulsed Doppler Imaging using compounded emissions were also applied in the carotid artery and the jugular vein in one healthy volunteer. PMID:26276956

  7. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  8. Quantitative metrics for assessment of chemical image quality and spatial resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Cahill, John F.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-02-28

    Rationale: Currently objective/quantitative descriptions of the quality and spatial resolution of mass spectrometry derived chemical images are not standardized. Development of these standardized metrics is required to objectively describe chemical imaging capabilities of existing and/or new mass spectrometry imaging technologies. Such metrics would allow unbiased judgment of intra-laboratory advancement and/or inter-laboratory comparison for these technologies if used together with standardized surfaces. Methods: We developed two image metrics, viz., chemical image contrast (ChemIC) based on signal-to-noise related statistical measures on chemical image pixels and corrected resolving power factor (cRPF) constructed from statistical analysis of mass-to-charge chronograms across features of interest inmore » an image. These metrics, quantifying chemical image quality and spatial resolution, respectively, were used to evaluate chemical images of a model photoresist patterned surface collected using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system under different instrument operational parameters. Results: The calculated ChemIC and cRPF metrics determined in an unbiased fashion the relative ranking of chemical image quality obtained with the laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system. These rankings were used to show that both chemical image contrast and spatial resolution deteriorated with increasing surface scan speed, increased lane spacing and decreasing size of surface features. Conclusions: ChemIC and cRPF, respectively, were developed and successfully applied for the objective description of chemical image quality and spatial resolution of chemical images collected from model surfaces using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system.« less

  9. Prostate cancer diagnosis using quantitative phase imaging and machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Balla, Andre K.; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We report, for the first time, the use of Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) images to perform automatic prostate cancer diagnosis. A machine learning algorithm is implemented to learn textural behaviors of prostate samples imaged under QPI and produce labeled maps of different regions for testing biopsies (e.g. gland, stroma, lumen etc.). From these maps, morphological and textural features are calculated to predict outcomes of the testing samples. Current performance is reported on a dataset of more than 300 cores of various diagnosis results.

  10. Quantitative In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging with Multienergy X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S.; Wilkins, S. W.; Paganin, D.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2001-06-01

    We present a new method for quantitative nondestructive characterization of objects by x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Spatial distributions of the projected values of the complex refractive index in the sample are reconstructed by processing near-field images collected at a fixed sample-to-detector distance using a polychromatic incident beam and an energy-sensitive area detector, such as a CCD used in the photon-counting spectroscopy mode. The method has the potential advantages of decreased radiation dose and increased accuracy compared to conventional techniques of x-ray imaging.

  11. Quantitative in-line phase-contrast imaging with multienergy X rays.

    PubMed

    Gureyev, T E; Mayo, S; Wilkins, S W; Paganin, D; Stevenson, A W

    2001-06-18

    We present a new method for quantitative nondestructive characterization of objects by x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Spatial distributions of the projected values of the complex refractive index in the sample are reconstructed by processing near-field images collected at a fixed sample-to-detector distance using a polychromatic incident beam and an energy-sensitive area detector, such as a CCD used in the photon-counting spectroscopy mode. The method has the potential advantages of decreased radiation dose and increased accuracy compared to conventional techniques of x-ray imaging. PMID:11415368

  12. QIN. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doot, Robert K.; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E.; Allberg, Keith C.; Linden, Hannah M.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging is a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  13. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, Gann; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/ tk-luc). A good correlation ( R2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 ( R2=0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Noninvasive quantitative documentation of cutaneous inflammation in vivo using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatas, Georgios N.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2006-02-01

    Skin inflammation is often accompanied by edema and erythema. While erythema is the result of capillary dilation and subsequent local increase of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentration, edema is characterized by an increase in extracellular fluid in the dermis leading to local tissue swelling. Edema and erythema are typically graded visually. In this work we tested the potential of spectral imaging as a non-invasive method for quantitative documentation of both the erythema and the edema reactions. As examples of dermatological conditions that exhibit skin inflammation we imaged patients suffering from acne, herpes zoster, and poison ivy rashes using a hyperspectral-imaging camera. Spectral images were acquired in the visible and near infrared part of the spectrum, where oxy-Hb and water demonstrate absorption bands. The values of apparent concentrations of oxy-Hb and water were calculated based on an algorithm that takes into account spectral contributions of deoxy-hemoglobin, melanin, and scattering. In each case examined concentration maps of oxy-Hb and water can be constructed that represent quantitative visualizations of the intensity and extent of erythema and edema correspondingly. In summary, we demonstrate that spectral imaging can be used in dermatology to quantitatively document parameters relating to skin inflammation. Applications may include monitoring of disease progression as well as efficacy of treatments.

  15. Quantitative annular dark-field imaging of single-layer graphene—II: atomic-resolution image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shunsuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Kikkawa, Jun; Ishizuka, Kazuo; Kimoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated how accurately atomic-resolution annular dark-field (ADF) images match between experiments and simulations to conduct more reliable crystal structure analyses. Quantitative ADF imaging, in which the ADF intensity at each pixel represents the fraction of the incident probe current, allows us to perform direct comparisons with simulations without the use of fitting parameters. Although the conventional comparison suffers from experimental uncertainties such as an amorphous surface layer and specimen thickness, in this study we eliminated such uncertainties by using a single-layer graphene as a specimen. Furthermore, to reduce image distortion and shot noises in experimental images, multiple acquisitions with drift correction were performed, and the atomic ADF contrast was quantitatively acquired. To reproduce the experimental ADF contrast, we used three distribution functions as the effective source distribution in simulations. The optimum distribution function and its full-width at half-maximum were evaluated by measuring the residuals between the experimental and simulated images. It was found that the experimental images could be explained well by a linear combination of a Gaussian function and a Lorentzian function with a longer tail than the Gaussian function. PMID:26347577

  16. Review of Quantitative Ultrasound: Envelope Statistics and Backscatter Coefficient Imaging and Contributions to Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Michael L; Mamou, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Conventional medical imaging technologies, including ultrasound, have continued to improve over the years. For example, in oncology, medical imaging is characterized by high sensitivity, i.e., the ability to detect anomalous tissue features, but the ability to classify these tissue features from images often lacks specificity. As a result, a large number of biopsies of tissues with suspicious image findings are performed each year with a vast majority of these biopsies resulting in a negative finding. To improve specificity of cancer imaging, quantitative imaging techniques can play an important role. Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. However, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging can provide specific numbers related to tissue features that can increase the specificity of image findings leading to improvements in diagnostic ultrasound. QUS imaging can encompass a wide variety of techniques including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, shear wave imaging, flow estimation, and envelope statistics. Currently, spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics are not available on most conventional clinical ultrasound machines. However, in recent years, QUS techniques involving spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics have demonstrated success in many applications, providing additional diagnostic capabilities. Spectral-based techniques include the estimation of the backscatter coefficient (BSC), estimation of attenuation, and estimation of scatterer properties such as the correlation length associated with an effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC) of scatterers. Envelope statistics include the estimation of the number density of scatterers and quantification of coherent to incoherent signals produced from the tissue. Challenges for clinical application include correctly accounting for attenuation effects and transmission losses and implementation of QUS on

  17. Quantitative evaluation of noise reduction and vesselness filters for liver vessel segmentation on abdominal CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Moelker, Adriaan; Niessen, Wiro; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-05-01

    Liver vessel segmentation in CTA images is a challenging task, especially in the case of noisy images. This paper investigates whether pre-filtering improves liver vessel segmentation in 3D CTA images. We introduce a quantitative evaluation of several well-known filters based on a proposed liver vessel segmentation method on CTA images. We compare the effect of different diffusion techniques i.e. Regularized Perona-Malik, Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch and Vessel Enhancing Diffusion as well as the vesselness approaches proposed by Sato, Frangi and Erdt. Liver vessel segmentation of the pre-processed images is performed using a histogram-based region grown with local maxima as seed points. Quantitative measurements (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) are determined based on manual landmarks inside and outside the vessels, followed by T-tests for statistic comparisons on 51 clinical CTA images. The evaluation demonstrates that all the filters make liver vessel segmentation have a significantly higher accuracy than without using a filter (p  <  0.05) Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch achieves the best performance. Compared to the diffusion filters, vesselness filters have a greater sensitivity but less specificity. In addition, the proposed liver vessel segmentation method with pre-filtering is shown to perform robustly on a clinical dataset having a low contrast-to-noise of up to 3 (dB). The results indicate that the pre-filtering step significantly improves liver vessel segmentation on 3D CTA images.

  18. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A; Yeom, Kristen W; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. PMID:25270052

  19. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. PMID:25270052

  20. NOTE: An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarot, C. B.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Haycocks, T.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D—spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy—from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery.

  1. An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Chiarot, C B; Siewerdsen, J H; Haycocks, T; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D--spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy--from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery. PMID:16237228

  2. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  3. Application of adaptive optics in retinal imaging: a quantitative and clinical comparison with standard cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, E. S.; Erry, G.; Yang, S.; Russell, S.; Raman, B.; Soliz, P.

    2005-04-01

    Aim: The objective of this project was to evaluate high resolution images from an adaptive optics retinal imager through comparisons with standard film-based and standard digital fundus imagers. Methods: A clinical prototype adaptive optics fundus imager (AOFI) was used to collect retinal images from subjects with various forms of retinopathy to determine whether improved visibility into the disease could be provided to the clinician. The AOFI achieves low-order correction of aberrations through a closed-loop wavefront sensor and an adaptive optics system. The remaining high-order aberrations are removed by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or by blind deconvolution when the PSF is not available. An ophthalmologist compared the AOFI images with standard fundus images and provided a clinical evaluation of all the modalities and processing techniques. All images were also analyzed using a quantitative image quality index. Results: This system has been tested on three human subjects (one normal and two with retinopathy). In the diabetic patient vascular abnormalities were detected with the AOFI that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. Very small features, such as the fine vascular structures on the optic disc and the individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved by the AOFI. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that adaptive optic images have great potential in providing clinically significant detail of anatomical and pathological structures to the ophthalmologist.

  4. Human atherosclerosis. II. Immunocytochemical analysis of the cellular composition of human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Gown, A. M.; Tsukada, T.; Ross, R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have performed immunocytochemical investigations of the distribution of various cell types in human atherosclerotic plaques using monoclonal antibodies specific to smooth muscle cells (CGA7 [Gown et al, J Cell Biol 1985, 100:807-813] and HHF35 [Tsukada et al, Am J Pathol (In press)] ); lymphocytes (T200 antigen); endothelial cells (Factor VIII and the Ulex europeus agglutinin); and macrophages, the latter with a new macrophage-specific antibody HAM56. All studies were performed on methanol-Carnoy's-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. In areas of grossly normal aorta, significant numbers of macrophages were noted within areas of diffuse intimal thickening. The cellular composition of the following three types of raised lesions were analyzed: fibro-fatty lesions, which, despite their gross appearance, consistent with fibrous plaques, were composed almost exclusively of macrophages and lymphocytes and almost devoid of smooth muscle cells; fibrous plaques, which were predominantly composed of smooth muscle cells displaying considerable morphologic heterogeneity and an admixture of blood-borne cells; advanced plaques, which were characterized by complex layers of smooth muscle cells and macrophages with considerable variation from region to region. Also noted were foci of medial and even intimal vascularization subjacent to the more advanced plaques. These studies demonstrate the application of monoclonal antibody technology to the study of the cellular composition of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p195-a Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 p201-a Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3777135

  5. HHF35, a muscle-actin-specific monoclonal antibody. I. Immunocytochemical and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, T.; Tippens, D.; Gordon, D.; Ross, R.; Gown, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to muscle cell actin isotypes was produced and characterized. Immunocytochemical analysis of methanol-Carnoy's-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissue revealed that this antibody, termed HHF35, reacts with skeletal muscle cells, cardiac muscle cells, smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and myoepithelial cells, but is nonreactive with endothelial, epithelial, neural, or connective tissue cells. When assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, HHF35 reacts with microfilament bundles from various cultured mammalian smooth muscle cells, but does not react with cultured human dermal fibroblasts or various epithelial tumor cell lines. In one-dimensional gel electrophoresis immunoblot experiments this antibody detects a 42-kd polypeptide from tissue extracts of uterus, ileum, aorta, diaphragm, and heart and extract from smooth muscle cells. The antibody also reacts with a comigrating 42-kd band of highly purified rabbit skeletal muscle actin. HHF35 is nonreactive on immunoblots of extracts from all tested nonmuscle cell extracts. Immunoelectrophoresis followed by immunoblotting performed in the presence of urea and reducing agents reveals recognition of the alpha isoelectrophoretic variant of actin from skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle sources and of the gamma variant from smooth muscle sources. Because HHF35 reacts with virtually all muscle cells, it will be useful as a marker for muscle and muscle-derived cells. Images Figure 1 p55-a Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3544852

  6. Quantitative spatial frequency fluorescence imaging in the sub-diffusive domain for image-guided glioma resection

    PubMed Central

    Sibai, Mira; Veilleux, Israel; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Leblond, Frederic; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative 5- aminolevulinic acid induced-Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence guidance enables maximum safe resection of glioblastomas by providing surgeons with real-time tumor optical contrast. However, visual assessment of PpIX fluorescence is subjective and limited by the distorting effects of light attenuation and tissue autofluorescence. We have previously shown that non-invasive point measurements of absolute PpIX concentration identifies residual tumor that is otherwise non-detectable. Here, we extend this approach to wide-field quantitative fluorescence imaging by implementing spatial frequency domain imaging to recover tissue optical properties across the field-of-view in phantoms and ex vivo tissue. PMID:26713206

  7. Quantitative spatial frequency fluorescence imaging in the sub-diffusive domain for image-guided glioma resection.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Mira; Veilleux, Israel; Elliott, Jonathan T; Leblond, Frederic; Wilson, Brian C

    2015-12-01

    Intraoperative 5- aminolevulinic acid induced-Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence guidance enables maximum safe resection of glioblastomas by providing surgeons with real-time tumor optical contrast. However, visual assessment of PpIX fluorescence is subjective and limited by the distorting effects of light attenuation and tissue autofluorescence. We have previously shown that non-invasive point measurements of absolute PpIX concentration identifies residual tumor that is otherwise non-detectable. Here, we extend this approach to wide-field quantitative fluorescence imaging by implementing spatial frequency domain imaging to recover tissue optical properties across the field-of-view in phantoms and ex vivo tissue. PMID:26713206

  8. Quantitative ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic image analysis of hepatic iron accumulation in pigeons (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Matheson, Jodi S; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; O'Brien, Robert T; Steinberg, Howard

    2007-06-01

    Iron overload was induced by iron dextran i.v. in clinically healthy adult pigeons, Columbia livia, (n = 8). Hemosiderosis was induced in all treated birds. Two control pigeons received no iron injections. Pigeons did not show clinical signs of iron overload during the 6-wk study. Ultrasound examination of the liver in the pigeons receiving iron dextran was performed on days 0, 13, 28, and 42. No ultrasound images were collected on the control pigeons. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on days 0, 13, 28, and 42 on all study pigeons and imaging sequences were collected in three different imaging formats: T1, T2, and gradient-recalled echo (GRE). Surgical liver biopsies were performed on pigeons receiving iron dextran on days 2, 16, and 45 (at necropsy). A single liver sample was collected at necropsy from the control birds. Histologic examination, quantitative image analysis, and tissue iron analysis by thin-layer chromatography were performed on each liver sample and compared to the imaging studies. Although hemosiderosis was confirmed histologically in each experimental pigeon, no significant change in pixel intensity of the ultrasound images was seen at any point in the study. Signal intensity, in all magnetic resonance imaging formats, significantly decreased in a linear fashion as the accumulation of iron increased. PMID:17679505

  9. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Laningham, Fred H.; Glass, John O.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Method and results Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment Conclusion In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. PMID:17653705

  10. Histological Image Processing Features Induce a Quantitative Characterization of Chronic Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in tumors signifies resistance to therapy. Despite a wealth of tumor histology data, including anti-pimonidazole staining, no current methods use these data to induce a quantitative characterization of chronic tumor hypoxia in time and space. We use image-processing algorithms to develop a set of candidate image features that can formulate just such a quantitative description of xenographed colorectal chronic tumor hypoxia. Two features in particular give low-variance measures of chronic hypoxia near a vessel: intensity sampling that extends radially away from approximated blood vessel centroids, and multithresholding to segment tumor tissue into normal, hypoxic, and necrotic regions. From these features we derive a spatiotemporal logical expression whose truth value depends on its predicate clauses that are grounded in this histological evidence. As an alternative to the spatiotemporal logical formulation, we also propose a way to formulate a linear regression function that uses all of the image features to learn what chronic hypoxia looks like, and then gives a quantitative similarity score once it is trained on a set of histology images. PMID:27093539

  11. Quantitative phase imaging of weakly scattering objects using partially coherent illumination.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tan H; Edwards, Chris; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-05-30

    In this paper, we extend our recent work on partially coherent quantitative phase imaging (pcQPI) from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) imaging of weakly scattering samples. Due to the mathematical complexity, most theoretical modeling of quantitative phase image formation under partial coherence has focused on thin, well-focused samples. It is unclear how these abberations are affected by defocusing. Also, as 3D QPI techniques continue to develop, a better model needs to be developed to understand and quantify these aberrations when imaging thicker samples. Here, using the first order Born's approximation, we derived a mathematical framework that provides an intuitive model of image formation under varying degrees of coherence. Our description provides a clear connection between the halo effect and phase underestimation, defocusing and the 3D structure of the sample under investigation. Our results agree very well with the experiments and show that the microscope objective defines the sectioning ability of the imaging system while the condenser lens is responsible for the halo effect. PMID:27410094

  12. A triple energy window scatter subtraction approach for quantitative anger camera imaging of iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, E.J.; Macey, D.J.; Bayouth, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    Dose estimates for organs and tumor volumes in radioimmunotherapy with I-131 frequently depend on in-vivo quantitation methods using planar Anger camera images. Compton scatter and collimator septal penetration result in overestimation of activity and dose. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a triple energy window subtraction method for quantitative imaging of I-131. The energy spectrum of I-131 was modeled as a superposition of the spectra of Cr-51 (320 keV) and Cs-137 (662 keV). Images were acquired with three adjacent 15% energy windows--photopeak(PP), upper scatter(US), and lower scatter(LS)--for small sources of these radionuclides. The PP window was centered at 364 keV for I-131 and Cs-137 and 320 keV for Cr-51. Three scatter multipliers were derived from analysis of count profiles of the Cs-137 and Cr-51 images, and used to sequentially remove septal penetration and scatter events included in the 364 keV photopeak of I-131. This method was tested by acquiring images of an abdominal phantom containing a liver, spleen and spherical {open_quotes}tumor{close_quotes} filled with different concentrations of I-131, both with and without background activity in the surrounding phantom. A body thickness attenuation compensation factor was applied to the geometric mean of the conjugate view counts using a narrow beam linear attenuation coefficient of 0.11 cm{sup -1}. With scatter subtraction, the accuracy and reproducibility of activity quantitation was improved because the background count density was more uniformly scored. Also, the influence of different activity concentrations in source organs relative to background on the accuracy of quantitation was removed, and the perimeters of organs were more clearly defined. This method has been used to provide improved dose estimates for I-131 labeled antibody therapy in breast cancer patients.

  13. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging with retrospective motion correction for quantitative assessment of cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Lisa M.; Towle, Erica L.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Although multiple intraoperative cerebral blood flow (CBF) monitoring techniques are currently available, a quantitative method that allows for continuous monitoring and that can be easily integrated into the surgical workflow is still needed. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical imaging technique with a high spatiotemporal resolution that has been recently demonstrated as feasible and effective for intraoperative monitoring of CBF during neurosurgical procedures. This study demonstrates the impact of retrospective motion correction on the quantitative analysis of intraoperatively acquired LSCI images. LSCI images were acquired through a surgical microscope during brain tumor resection procedures from 10 patients under baseline conditions and after a cortical stimulation in three of those patients. The patient’s electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded during acquisition for postprocess correction of pulsatile artifacts. Automatic image registration was retrospectively performed to correct for tissue motion artifacts, and the performance of rigid and nonrigid transformations was compared. In baseline cases, the original images had 25%±27% noise across 16 regions of interest (ROIs). ECG filtering moderately reduced the noise to 20%±21%, while image registration resulted in a further noise reduction of 15%±4%. Combined ECG filtering and image registration significantly reduced the noise to 6.2%±2.6% (p<0.05). Using the combined motion correction, accuracy and sensitivity to small changes in CBF were improved in cortical stimulation cases. There was also excellent agreement between rigid and nonrigid registration methods (15/16 ROIs with <3% difference). Results from this study demonstrate the importance of motion correction for improved visualization of CBF changes in clinical LSCI images. PMID:26157974

  14. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Poole, Kristin M; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Sit, Wesley W; Walsh, Alex J; Duvall, Craig L; Skala, Melissa C

    2013-10-15

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  15. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kristin M.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Walsh, Alex J.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  16. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF): immunocytochemical localization and radioimmunoassay (RIA). [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vigh, S.; Merchenthaler, I.; Torres-Aleman, I.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Coy, D.; Carter, W.H.; Petrusz, P.; Schally, A.V.

    1982-11-29

    Two fragments of the amino acid sequence corresponding to ovine corticotropin releasing factor (CRF 37-41 and CRF 22-41), as well as the full sequence of 41 residues (CRF 1-41), synthesized in our laboratories by solid-phase methods, were coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glutaraldehyde. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with the emulsified mixtures of peptide-BSA conjugates and Freund's adjuvant as immunogens. The specificity of the generated antibodies was studied by agar-gel diffusion, absorption tests in the immunohistochemical system, and with the aid of displacement curves in RIA. /sup 125/I-Tyr(35)-CRF 36-41 and /sup 125/I-Tyr(0)-CRF 1-41 were used as radioligands in the RIA. The minimum detectable dose was 20 pg. The linearity observed in RIA for immunoreactive CRF in extracts of rat hypothalami, together with the immunocytochemical findings in the rat brain, indicate the presence of substance(s) immunologically indistinguishable from CRF. Immunohistochemistry with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique detected the following CRF-immunoreactive structures in vibratome sections of hypothalami of colchicine-treated rats: CRF-containing cell bodies were observed mainly in smaller neurons of the paraventricular nucleus. CRF-positive nerve fibers and/or terminals were present in the external zone of the median eminence, with some immunoreactive CRF also present in the internal zone. The CRF-positive terminals were localized in the central regions of the median eminence. Data reinforce the view that this polypeptide plays a physiological role in the control of ACTH release.

  17. Quantitative ultrasound images generated by a PE-CMOS sensor array: scatter modeling and image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lasser, Marvin E.; Lasser, Bob; Kula, John; Wang, Yue Joseph

    2007-03-01

    In the projection geometry, the detected ultrasound energy through a soft-tissue is mainly attributed to the attenuated primary intensity and the scatter intensity. In order to extract ultrasound image of attenuated primary beam out of the detected raw data, the scatter component must be carefully quantified for restoring the original image. In this study, we have designed a set of apparatus to modeling the ultrasound scattering in soft-tissue. The employed ultrasound imaging device was a C-Scan (projection) prototype using a 4th generation PE-CMOS sensor array (model I400, by Imperium Inc., Silver Spring, MD) as the detector. Right after the plane wave ultrasound transmitting through a soft-tissue mimicking material (Zerdine, by CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA), a ring aperture is used to collimate the signal before reaching the acoustic lens and the PE-CMOS sensor. Three sets of collimated ring images were acquired and analyzed to obtain the scattering components as a function of the off-center distance. Several pathological specimens and breast phantoms consisting of simulated breast tissue with masses, cysts and microcalcifications were imaged by the same C-Scan imaging prototype. The restoration of these ultrasound images were performed by using a standard deconvolution computation. Our study indicated that the resultant images show shaper edges and detailed features as compared to their unprocessed counterparts.

  18. Pathology imaging informatics for quantitative analysis of whole-slide images

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Sonal; Phan, John H; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives With the objective of bringing clinical decision support systems to reality, this article reviews histopathological whole-slide imaging informatics methods, associated challenges, and future research opportunities. Target audience This review targets pathologists and informaticians who have a limited understanding of the key aspects of whole-slide image (WSI) analysis and/or a limited knowledge of state-of-the-art technologies and analysis methods. Scope First, we discuss the importance of imaging informatics in pathology and highlight the challenges posed by histopathological WSI. Next, we provide a thorough review of current methods for: quality control of histopathological images; feature extraction that captures image properties at the pixel, object, and semantic levels; predictive modeling that utilizes image features for diagnostic or prognostic applications; and data and information visualization that explores WSI for de novo discovery. In addition, we highlight future research directions and discuss the impact of large public repositories of histopathological data, such as the Cancer Genome Atlas, on the field of pathology informatics. Following the review, we present a case study to illustrate a clinical decision support system that begins with quality control and ends with predictive modeling for several cancer endpoints. Currently, state-of-the-art software tools only provide limited image processing capabilities instead of complete data analysis for clinical decision-making. We aim to inspire researchers to conduct more research in pathology imaging informatics so that clinical decision support can become a reality. PMID:23959844

  19. Exploring new quantitative CT image features to improve assessment of lung cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emaminejad, Nastaran; Qian, Wei; Kang, Yan; Guan, Yubao; Lure, Fleming; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Due to the promotion of lung cancer screening, more Stage I non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are currently detected, which usually have favorable prognosis. However, a high percentage of the patients have cancer recurrence after surgery, which reduces overall survival rate. To achieve optimal efficacy of treating and managing Stage I NSCLC patients, it is important to develop more accurate and reliable biomarkers or tools to predict cancer prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate a new quantitative image analysis method to predict the risk of lung cancer recurrence of Stage I NSCLC patients after the lung cancer surgery using the conventional chest computed tomography (CT) images and compare the prediction result with a popular genetic biomarker namely, protein expression of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1) genes. In this study, we developed and tested a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to segment lung tumors and initially compute 35 tumor-related morphologic and texture features from CT images. By applying a machine learning based feature selection method, we identified a set of 8 effective and non-redundant image features. Using these features we trained a naïve Bayesian network based classifier to predict the risk of cancer recurrence. When applying to a test dataset with 79 Stage I NSCLC cases, the computed areas under ROC curves were 0.77±0.06 and 0.63±0.07 when using the quantitative image based classifier and ERCC1, respectively. The study results demonstrated the feasibility of improving accuracy of predicting cancer prognosis or recurrence risk using a CAD-based quantitative image analysis method.

  20. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Andrew B; Franc, Benjamin L; Gullberg, Grant T; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2009-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  1. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET parametric imaging at the voxel-level.

    PubMed

    Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Lodge, Martin A; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) PET has the potential to enhance detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction, characterization of flow-limiting effects of coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of balanced reduction of flow due to multivessel stenosis. We aim to enable quantitative MP-PET at the individual voxel level, which has the potential to allow enhanced visualization and quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) as computed from uptake parametric images. This framework is especially challenging for the (82)Rb radiotracer. The short half-life enables fast serial imaging and high patient throughput; yet, the acquired dynamic PET images suffer from high noise-levels introducing large variability in uptake parametric images and, therefore, in the estimates of MBF and MFR. Robust estimation requires substantial post-smoothing of noisy data, degrading valuable functional information of physiological and pathological importance. We present a feasible and robust approach to generate parametric images at the voxel-level that substantially reduces noise without significant loss of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology, denoted physiological clustering, makes use of the functional similarity of voxels to penalize deviation of voxel kinetics from physiological partners. The results were validated using extensive simulations (with transmural and non-transmural perfusion defects) and clinical studies. Compared to post-smoothing, physiological clustering depicted enhanced quantitative noise versus bias performance as well as superior recovery of perfusion defects (as quantified by CNR) with minimal increase in bias. Overall, parametric images obtained from the proposed methodology were robust in the presence of high-noise levels as manifested in the voxel time-activity-curves. PMID:26216052

  2. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  3. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET parametric imaging at the voxel-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) PET has the potential to enhance detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction, characterization of flow-limiting effects of coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of balanced reduction of flow due to multivessel stenosis. We aim to enable quantitative MP-PET at the individual voxel level, which has the potential to allow enhanced visualization and quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) as computed from uptake parametric images. This framework is especially challenging for the 82Rb radiotracer. The short half-life enables fast serial imaging and high patient throughput; yet, the acquired dynamic PET images suffer from high noise-levels introducing large variability in uptake parametric images and, therefore, in the estimates of MBF and MFR. Robust estimation requires substantial post-smoothing of noisy data, degrading valuable functional information of physiological and pathological importance. We present a feasible and robust approach to generate parametric images at the voxel-level that substantially reduces noise without significant loss of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology, denoted physiological clustering, makes use of the functional similarity of voxels to penalize deviation of voxel kinetics from physiological partners. The results were validated using extensive simulations (with transmural and non-transmural perfusion defects) and clinical studies. Compared to post-smoothing, physiological clustering depicted enhanced quantitative noise versus bias performance as well as superior recovery of perfusion defects (as quantified by CNR) with minimal increase in bias. Overall, parametric images obtained from the proposed methodology were robust in the presence of high-noise levels as manifested in the voxel time-activity-curves.

  4. Quantitative wavelength analysis and image classification for intraoperative cancer diagnosis with hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Complete surgical removal of tumor tissue is essential for postoperative prognosis after surgery. Intraoperative tumor imaging and visualization are an important step in aiding surgeons to evaluate and resect tumor tissue in real time, thus enabling more complete resection of diseased tissue and better conservation of healthy tissue. As an emerging modality, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds great potential for comprehensive and objective intraoperative cancer assessment. In this paper, we explored the possibility of intraoperative tumor detection and visualization during surgery using HSI in the wavelength range of 450 nm - 900 nm in an animal experiment. We proposed a new algorithm for glare removal and cancer detection on surgical hyperspectral images, and detected the tumor margins in five mice with an average sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 98.3%, respectively. The hyperspectral imaging and quantification method have the potential to provide an innovative tool for image-guided surgery.

  5. Quantitative Wavelength Analysis and Image Classification for Intraoperative Cancer Diagnosis with Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Complete surgical removal of tumor tissue is essential for postoperative prognosis after surgery. Intraoperative tumor imaging and visualization are an important step in aiding surgeons to evaluate and resect tumor tissue in real time, thus enabling more complete resection of diseased tissue and better conservation of healthy tissue. As an emerging modality, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds great potential for comprehensive and objective intraoperative cancer assessment. In this paper, we explored the possibility of intraoperative tumor detection and visualization during surgery using HSI in the wavelength range of 450 nm - 900 nm in an animal experiment. We proposed a new algorithm for glare removal and cancer detection on surgical hyperspectral images, and detected the tumor margins in five mice with an average sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 98.3%, respectively. The hyperspectral imaging and quantification method have the potential to provide an innovative tool for image-guided surgery. PMID:26523083

  6. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhinav K; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2016-04-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  7. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  8. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  9. Quantitative x-ray phase imaging at the nanoscale by multilayer Laue lenses

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hanfei; Chu, Yong S.; Maser, Jörg; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Kim, Jungdae; Kang, Hyon Chol; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2013-01-01

    For scanning x-ray microscopy, many attempts have been made to image the phase contrast based on a concept of the beam being deflected by a specimen, the so-called differential phase contrast imaging (DPC). Despite the successful demonstration in a number of representative cases at moderate spatial resolutions, these methods suffer from various limitations that preclude applications of DPC for ultra-high spatial resolution imaging, where the emerging wave field from the focusing optic tends to be significantly more complicated. In this work, we propose a highly robust and generic approach based on a Fourier-shift fitting process and demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode by multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs). The high sensitivity of the phase to structural and compositional variations makes our technique extremely powerful in correlating the electrode performance with its buried nanoscale interfacial structures that may be invisible to the absorption and fluorescence contrasts. PMID:23419650

  10. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  11. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2006-10-21

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p<0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair. PMID:17019042

  12. Quantitative in vivo imaging of the lung using time-domain fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guobin; Jean-Jacques, Muriel; Melanson-Drapeau, Lysanne; Khayat, Mario

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, nebulized or intravenous cetuximab (also known as Erbitux) labeled with NIR dyes is administered in the lungs of the mouse and imaged using a time-domain fluorescence imaging system (Optix(R)). Time resolved measurements provide lifetime of the fluorescent probes. In addition, through time-of-flight information contained in the data, one can also assess probe localization and concentration distribution quantitatively. Results shown include suppression of tissue autofluorescence by lifetime gating and recovery of targeted and non-targeted distributions of cetuximab labeled with the NIR fluorophores.

  13. Quantitative modulated imaging of turbid media in the high spatial frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weihao; Cao, Zili; Zeng, Bixin; Xu, M.

    2016-03-01

    The Spatial-frequency dependence of turbid media reflectance encodes both optical properties and depth information. The high spatial frequency domain imaging (HSFDI) can, in particular, extract key characteristics of the phase function of the scattering medium which carries the ultimate structural information of the medium. We first outline the principle of HSFDI and then present here a compact optical configuration integrating the modulated illumination and imaging systems, facilitating quantitative wide-field optical properties mapping at high spatial frequencies. The performance of HSFDI is assessed on both tissue phantoms and in vivo.

  14. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  15. Impact of Model Uncertainties on Quantitative Analysis of FUV Auroral Images: Peak Production Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Richards, Phil G.

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that small uncertainties in the modeled height of peak production for FUV emissions can lead to significant uncertainties in the analysis of these sai-ne emissions. In particular, an uncertainty of only 3 km in the peak production height can lead to a 50% uncertainty in the mean auroral energy deduced from the images. This altitude uncertainty is comparable to differences in different auroral deposition models currently used for UVI analysis. Consequently, great care must be taken in quantitative photometric analysis and interpretation of FUV auroral images.

  16. High-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging with spectral domain phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangzhi; Ding, Zhihua; Shen, Yi; Chen, Zhiyan; Zhao, Chen; Ni, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy for high-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging is presented. The phase retrieval is realized in the depth domain to maintain a high sensitivity, while the phase information obtained in the spectral domain is exploited to extend the dynamic range of optical path difference. Sensitivity advantage of phase retrieved in the depth domain over that in the spectral domain is thoroughly investigated. The performance of the proposed depth domain phase based approach is illustrated by phase imaging of a resolution target and an onion skin. PMID:24216799

  17. Hyperspectral and differential CARS microscopy for quantitative chemical imaging in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy for quantitative chemical imaging of saturated and unsaturated lipids in human stem-cell derived adipocytes. We compare dual-frequency/differential CARS (D-CARS), which enables rapid imaging and simple data analysis, with broadband hyperspectral CARS microscopy analyzed using an unsupervised phase-retrieval and factorization method recently developed by us for quantitative chemical image analysis. Measurements were taken in the vibrational fingerprint region (1200-2000/cm) and in the CH stretch region (2600-3300/cm) using a home-built CARS set-up which enables hyperspectral imaging with 10/cm resolution via spectral focussing from a single broadband 5 fs Ti:Sa laser source. Through a ratiometric analysis, both D-CARS and phase-retrieved hyperspectral CARS determine the concentration of unsaturated lipids with comparable accuracy in the fingerprint region, while in the CH stretch region D-CARS provides only a qualitative contrast owing to its non-linear behavior. When analyzing hyperspectral CARS images using the blind factorization into susceptibilities and concentrations of chemical components recently demonstrated by us, we are able to determine vol:vol concentrations of different lipid components and spatially resolve inhomogeneities in lipid composition with superior accuracy compared to state-of-the art ratiometric methods. PMID:24877002

  18. Quantitative imaging of the human upper airway: instrument design and clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, M. S.; Armstrong, J. J.; Paduch, A.; Sampson, D. D.; Walsh, J. H.; Hillman, D. R.; Eastwood, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    Imaging of the human upper airway is widely used in medicine, in both clinical practice and research. Common imaging modalities include video endoscopy, X-ray CT, and MRI. However, no current modality is both quantitative and safe to use for extended periods of time. Such a capability would be particularly valuable for sleep research, which is inherently reliant on long observation sessions. We have developed an instrument capable of quantitative imaging of the human upper airway, based on endoscopic optical coherence tomography. There are no dose limits for optical techniques, and the minimally invasive imaging probe is safe for use in overnight studies. We report on the design of the instrument and its use in preliminary clinical studies, and we present results from a range of initial experiments. The experiments show that the instrument is capable of imaging during sleep, and that it can record dynamic changes in airway size and shape. This information is useful for research into sleep disorders, and potentially for clinical diagnosis and therapies.

  19. Characterization of Cerebral White Matter Properties Using Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Stains

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Samuel A.; Samsonov, Alexey A.; Adluru, Nagesh; Hosseinbor, Ameer Pasha; Mossahebi, Pouria; Tromp, Do P.M.; Zakszewski, Elizabeth; Field, Aaron S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive to several mechanisms that are modulated by the properties of the tissue environment. The degree and type of contrast weighting may be viewed as image filters that accentuate specific tissue properties. Maps of quantitative measures of these mechanisms, akin to microstructural/environmental-specific tissue stains, may be generated to characterize the MRI and physiological properties of biological tissues. In this article, three quantitative MRI (qMRI) methods for characterizing white matter (WM) microstructural properties are reviewed. All of these measures measure complementary aspects of how water interacts with the tissue environment. Diffusion MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging, characterizes the diffusion of water in the tissues and is sensitive to the microstructural density, spacing, and orientational organization of tissue membranes, including myelin. Magnetization transfer imaging characterizes the amount and degree of magnetization exchange between free water and macromolecules like proteins found in the myelin bilayers. Relaxometry measures the MRI relaxation constants T1 and T2, which in WM have a component associated with the water trapped in the myelin bilayers. The conduction of signals between distant brain regions occurs primarily through myelinated WM tracts; thus, these methods are potential indicators of pathology and structural connectivity in the brain. This article provides an overview of the qMRI stain mechanisms, acquisition and analysis strategies, and applications for these qMRI stains. PMID:22432902

  20. Using Non-Invasive Multi-Spectral Imaging to Quantitatively Assess Tissue Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A; Chernomordik, V; Riley, J; Hassan, M; Amyot, F; Dasgeb, B; Demos, S G; Pursley, R; Little, R; Yarchoan, R; Tao, Y; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2007-10-04

    This research describes a non-invasive, non-contact method used to quantitatively analyze the functional characteristics of tissue. Multi-spectral images collected at several near-infrared wavelengths are input into a mathematical optical skin model that considers the contributions from different analytes in the epidermis and dermis skin layers. Through a reconstruction algorithm, we can quantify the percent of blood in a given area of tissue and the fraction of that blood that is oxygenated. Imaging normal tissue confirms previously reported values for the percent of blood in tissue and the percent of blood that is oxygenated in tissue and surrounding vasculature, for the normal state and when ischemia is induced. This methodology has been applied to assess vascular Kaposi's sarcoma lesions and the surrounding tissue before and during experimental therapies. The multi-spectral imaging technique has been combined with laser Doppler imaging to gain additional information. Results indicate that these techniques are able to provide quantitative and functional information about tissue changes during experimental drug therapy and investigate progression of disease before changes are visibly apparent, suggesting a potential for them to be used as complementary imaging techniques to clinical assessment.

  1. Activation autoradiography: imaging and quantitative determination of endogenous and exogenous oxygen in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, K.; Iwata, R.; Kogure, K.; Ohtomo, H.; Orihara, H.; Ido, T.

    1987-06-01

    Endogenous and exogenous oxygen in the rat brain were quantitatively determined using an autoradiographic technique. The oxygen images of frozen and dried rat brain sections were obtained as /sup 18/F images by using the /sup 16/O (/sup 3/He,p)/sup 18/F reaction for endogenous /sup 16/O images and the /sup 18/O(p,n)/sup 18/F reaction for endogenous and exogenous /sup 18/O images. These autoradiograms demonstrated the different distribution of oxygen between gray and white matter. These images also allowed differentiation of the individual structures of hippocampal formation, owing to the differing water content of the various structures. Local oxygen contents were quantitatively determined from autoradiograms of brain sections and standard sections with known oxygen contents. The estimated values were 75.6 +/- 4.6 wt% in gray matter and 72.2 +/- 4.0 wt% in white matter. The systematic error in the present method was estimated to be 4.9%.

  2. Quantitative simultaneous In-111/Tc-99m planar imaging in a long-bone infection phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuping; Park, Mi-Ae; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Moore, Stephen C.

    2007-12-01

    In-111-white-blood-cell and Tc-99m-sulfur-colloid dual-radionuclide imaging are frequently utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected osteomyelitis. We have developed a quantitative planar imaging method in which Tc-99m and In-111 scans are acquired simultaneously in accurate spatial registration. Long, thin tubes containing only In-111 or Tc-99m were first imaged in a list mode within a water bath inclined with respect to the water surface; from these, 12 energy spectra corresponding to different Tc/In ratios were synthesized. Triple-energy-window (TEW) parameters for scatter and radionuclide crosstalk correction, including scatter windows and weights, were optimized using 100 noise realizations of each of the spectra (1200 total). A long-bone phantom containing a simulated infection site was then imaged in water with five In/Tc ratios; 100 noise realizations of two conjugate-view images were generated from each acquisition (500 total). Two regions of interest (ROIs) were defined, and the ratio of In/Tc count ratios in these two ROIs was evaluated with and without the TEW scatter correction and geometric mean attenuation compensation. The average bias improved from 17.2% to 5.3%, with comparable precision. TEW corrections with non-optimized but practical energy windows also improved the bias to 6.4%. Compared with subjective visual assessment, quantitation of In-111/Tc-99m ratios may improve diagnostic accuracy and could eventually permit grading of osteomyelitis.

  3. The evolution of medical imaging from qualitative to quantitative: opportunities, challenges, and approaches (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Edward F.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increasing focus on quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIBs), which are defined as "objectively measured characteristics derived from in vivo images as indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or response to a therapeutic intervention"1. To evolve qualitative imaging assessments to the use of QIBs requires the development and standardization of data acquisition, data analysis, and data display techniques, as well as appropriate reporting structures. As such, successful implementation of QIB applications relies heavily on expertise from the fields of medical physics, radiology, statistics, and informatics as well as collaboration from vendors of imaging acquisition, analysis, and reporting systems. When successfully implemented, QIBs will provide image-derived metrics with known bias and variance that can be validated with anatomically and physiologically relevant measures, including treatment response (and the heterogeneity of that response) and outcome. Such non-invasive quantitative measures can then be used effectively in clinical and translational research and will contribute significantly to the goals of precision medicine. This presentation will focus on 1) outlining the opportunities for QIB applications, with examples to demonstrate applications in both research and patient care, 2) discussing key challenges in the implementation of QIB applications, and 3) providing overviews of efforts to address such challenges from federal, scientific, and professional organizations, including, but not limited to, the RSNA, NCI, FDA, and NIST. 1Sullivan, Obuchowski, Kessler, et al. Radiology, epub August 2015.

  4. Quantitative characterization of the x-ray imaging capability of rotating modulation collimators with laser light.

    PubMed

    Gaither Iii, C C; Schmahl, E J; Crannell, C J; Dennis, B R; Lang, F L; Orwig, L E; Hartman, C N; Hurford, G J

    1996-12-01

    We developed a method for making quantitative characterizations of bi-grid rotating modulation collimators (RMC's) that are used in a Fourier transform x-ray imager. With appropriate choices of the collimator spacings, this technique can be implemented with a beam-expanded He-Ne laser to simulate the plane wave produced by a point source at infinity even though the RMC's are diffraction limited at the He-Ne wavelength of 632.8 nm. The expanded beam passes through the grid pairs at a small angle with respect to their axis of rotation, and the modulated transmission through the grids as the RMC's rotate is detected with a photomultiplier tube. In addition to providing a quantitative characterization of the RMC's, the method also produces a measured point response function and provides an end-to-end check of the imaging system. We applied our method to the RMC's on the high-energy imaging device (HEIDI) balloon payload in its preflight configuration. We computed the harmonic ratios of the modulation time profile from the laser measurements and compared them with theoretical calculations, including the diffraction effects on irregular grids. Our results indicate the 25-in. (64-cm) x-ray imaging optics on HEIDI are capable of achieving images near the theoretical limit and are not seriously compromised by imperfections in the grids. PMID:21151253

  5. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  6. Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KyeoReh; Kim, Kyoohyun; Jung, Jaehwang; Heo, JiHan; Cho, Sangyeon; Lee, Sangyun; Chang, Gyuyoung; Jo, YoungJu; Park, Hyunjoo; Park, YongKeun

    2013-01-01

    A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases. Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases. To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:23539026

  7. High throughput quantitative phenotyping of plant resistance using chlorophyll fluorescence image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to select for quantitative plant resistance to pathogens, high throughput approaches that can precisely quantify disease severity are needed. Automation and use of calibrated image analysis should provide more accurate, objective and faster analyses than visual assessments. In contrast to conventional visible imaging, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging is not sensitive to environmental light variations and provides single-channel images prone to a segmentation analysis by simple thresholding approaches. Among the various parameters used in chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry (Fv/Fm) is well adapted to phenotyping disease severity. Fv/Fm is an indicator of plant stress that displays a robust contrast between infected and healthy tissues. In the present paper, we aimed at the segmentation of Fv/Fm images to quantify disease severity. Results Based on the Fv/Fm values of each pixel of the image, a thresholding approach was developed to delimit diseased areas. A first step consisted in setting up thresholds to reproduce visual observations by trained raters of symptoms caused by Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans (Xff) CFBP4834-R on Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Flavert. In order to develop a thresholding approach valuable on any cultivars or species, a second step was based on modeling pixel-wise Fv/Fm-distributions as mixtures of Gaussian distributions. Such a modeling may discriminate various stages of the symptom development but over-weights artifacts that can occur on mock-inoculated samples. Therefore, we developed a thresholding approach based on the probability of misclassification of a healthy pixel. Then, a clustering step is performed on the diseased areas to discriminate between various stages of alteration of plant tissues. Notably, the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging could detect pre-symptomatic area. The interest of this image analysis procedure for assessing the levels of

  8. Simulation of 3D MRI brain images for quantitative evaluation of image segmentation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Obladen, Thorsten; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-06-01

    To model the true shape of MRI brain images, automatically classified T1-weighted 3D MRI images (gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, scalp/bone and background) are utilized for simulation of grayscale data and imaging artifacts. For each class, Gaussian distribution of grayscale values is assumed, and mean and variance are computed from grayscale images. A random generator fills up the class images with Gauss-distributed grayscale values. Since grayscale values of neighboring voxels are not correlated, a Gaussian low-pass filtering is done, preserving class region borders. To simulate anatomical variability, a Gaussian distribution in space with user-defined mean and variance can be added at any user-defined position. Several imaging artifacts can be added: (1) to simulate partial volume effects, every voxel is averaged with neighboring voxels if they have a different class label; (2) a linear or quadratic bias field can be added with user-defined strength and orientation; (3) additional background noise can be added; and (4) artifacts left over after spoiling can be simulated by adding a band with increasing/decreasing grayscale values. With this method, realistic-looking simulated MRI images can be produced to test classification and segmentation algorithms regarding accuracy and robustness even in the presence of artifacts.

  9. Dynamic phase differences based on quantitative phase imaging for the objective evaluation of cell behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizova, Aneta; Collakova, Jana; Dostal, Zbynek; Kvasnica, Lukas; Uhlirova, Hana; Zikmund, Tomas; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) brought innovation to noninvasive observation of live cell dynamics seen as cell behavior. Unlike the Zernike phase contrast or differential interference contrast, QPI provides quantitative information about cell dry mass distribution. We used such data for objective evaluation of live cell behavioral dynamics by the advanced method of dynamic phase differences (DPDs). The DPDs method is considered a rational instrument offered by QPI. By subtracting the antecedent from the subsequent image in a time-lapse series, only the changes in mass distribution in the cell are detected. The result is either visualized as a two-dimensional color-coded projection of these two states of the cell or as a time dependence of changes quantified in picograms. Then in a series of time-lapse recordings, the chain of cell mass distribution changes that would otherwise escape attention is revealed. Consequently, new salient features of live cell behavior should emerge. Construction of the DPDs method and results exhibiting the approach are presented. Advantage of the DPDs application is demonstrated on cells exposed to an osmotic challenge. For time-lapse acquisition of quantitative phase images, the recently developed coherence-controlled holographic microscope was employed.

  10. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  11. Intracellular subsurface imaging using a hybrid shear-force feedback/scanning quantitative phase microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) allows for the imaging of translucent or transparent biological specimens without the need for exogenous contrast agents. This technique is usually applied towards the investigation of simple cells such as red blood cells which are typically enucleated and can be considered to be homogenous. However, most biological cells are nucleated and contain other interesting intracellular organelles. It has been established that the physical characteristics of certain subsurface structures such as the shape and roughness of the nucleus is well correlated with onset and progress of pathological conditions such as cancer. Although the acquired quantitative phase information of biological cells contains surface information as well as coupled subsurface information, the latter has been ignored up until now. A novel scanning quantitative phase imaging system unencumbered by 2pi ambiguities is hereby presented. This system is incorporated into a shear-force feedback scheme which allows for simultaneous phase and topography determination. It will be shown how subsequent image processing of these two data sets allows for the extraction of the subsurface component in the phase data and in vivo cell refractometry studies. Both fabricated samples and biological cells ranging from rat fibroblast cells to malaria infected human erythrocytes were investigated as part of this research. The results correlate quite well with that obtained via other microscopy techniques.

  12. Quantitative CT Imaging of Ventral Hernias: Preliminary Validation of an Anatomical Labeling Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We described and validated a quantitative anatomical labeling protocol for extracting clinically relevant quantitative parameters for ventral hernias (VH) from routine computed tomography (CT) scans. This information was then used to predict the need for mesh bridge closure during ventral hernia repair (VHR). Methods A detailed anatomical labeling protocol was proposed to enable quantitative description of VH including shape, location, and surrounding environment (61 scans). Intra- and inter-rater reproducibilities were calculated for labeling on 18 and 10 clinically acquired CT scans, respectively. Preliminary clinical validation was performed by correlating 20 quantitative parameters derived from anatomical labeling with the requirement for mesh bridge closure at surgery (26 scans). Prediction of this clinical endpoint was compared with similar models fit on metrics from the semi-quantitative European Hernia Society Classification for Ventral Hernia (EHSCVH). Results High labeling reproducibilities were achieved for abdominal walls (±2 mm in mean surface distance), key anatomical landmarks (±5 mm in point distance), and hernia volumes (0.8 in Cohen’s kappa). 9 out of 20 individual quantitative parameters of hernia properties were significantly different between patients who required mesh bridge closure versus those in whom fascial closure was achieved at the time of VHR (p<0.05). Regression models constructed by two to five metrics presented a prediction with 84.6% accuracy for bridge requirement with cross-validation; similar models constructed by EHSCVH variables yielded 76.9% accuracy. Significance Reproducibility was acceptable for this first formal presentation of a quantitative image labeling protocol for VH on abdominal CT. Labeling-derived metrics presented better prediction of the need for mesh bridge closure than the EHSCVH metrics. This effort is intended as the foundation for future outcomes studies attempting to optimize choice of

  13. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doot, Robert K; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E; Allberg, Keith C; Linden, Hannah M; Mankoff, David A; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging are a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing the feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed, and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  14. MRI technique for the snapshot imaging of quantitative velocity maps using RARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiko, G.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.

    2012-03-01

    A quantitative PGSE-RARE pulse sequence was developed and successfully applied to the in situ dissolution of two pharmaceutical formulations dissolving over a range of timescales. The new technique was chosen over other existing fast velocity imaging techniques because it is T2 weighted, not T2∗ weighted, and is, therefore, robust for imaging time-varying interfaces and flow in magnetically heterogeneous systems. The complex signal was preserved intact by separating odd and even echoes to obtain two phase maps which are then averaged in post-processing. Initially, the validity of the technique was shown when imaging laminar flow in a pipe. Subsequently, the dissolution of two drugs was followed in situ, where the technique enables the imaging and quantification of changes in the form of the tablet and the flow field surrounding it at high spatial and temporal resolution. First, the complete 3D velocity field around an eroding salicylic acid tablet was acquired at a resolution of 98 × 49 μm2, within 20 min, and monitored over ˜13 h. The tablet was observed to experience a heterogeneous flow field and, hence a heterogeneous shear field, which resulted in the non-symmetric erosion of the tablet. Second, the dissolution of a fast dissolving immediate release tablet was followed using one-shot 2D velocity images acquired every 5.2 s at a resolution of 390 × 390 μm2. The quantitative nature of the technique and fast acquisition times provided invaluable information on the dissolution behaviour of this tablet, which had not been attainable previously with conventional quantitative MRI techniques.

  15. Quantitative diagnosis of connective tissue disease-associated interstitial pneumonia using thoracic computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Ozuno, Nobuko Tosaka; Akamatsu, Hokuto; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoko; Yoshida, Shunji

    2015-12-01

    Patients with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) frequently show interstitial pneumonia (IP), which is sometimes rapidly progressive or resistant to treatment, thereby significantly affecting the prognosis. The diagnosis and response evaluation of IP are commonly performed qualitatively based on imaging findings, which may cause disagreement among rheumatologists in the evaluation of early lesions and atypical interstitial changes. To determine whether IP could be diagnosed in a quantitative manner during the early stage of PM/DM using a workstation that allows quantitative image processing. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) images of 20 PM/DM patients were reconstructed into a three-dimensional (3D) image using an image processing workstation. The CT values of the constituent voxels were arranged in a histogram of -1000 to +1000 Hounsfield units (HU). The most frequent lung field density was -900 to -801 HU, and relative size was as follows: IP (+) group 0.45 and IP (-) group 0.53. Between -1000 and -701 HU, relative size was not significantly different between the IP (+) group and IP (-) group. Between -700 and -1 HU, the relative size of the lung field was significantly larger in the IP (+) than in the IP (-) group, demonstrating its IP-diagnosing ability. Particularly, within the range from -700 to -301 HU, the macroscopically-assessed ground glass opacity was consistent with the CT value, which, in turn, was closely correlated with KL-6, the pre-existing marker for IP diagnosis. The results of this study may lead to the establishment of quantitative methods of evaluating IP and possible elucidation of the pathogenesis of IP. PMID:26519047

  16. Quantitative Magnetic Particle Imaging Monitors the Transplantation, Biodistribution, and Clearance of Stem Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bo; von See, Marc P.; Yu, Elaine; Gunel, Beliz; Lu, Kuan; Vazin, Tandis; Schaffer, David V.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapies have enormous potential for treating many debilitating diseases, including heart failure, stroke and traumatic brain injury. For maximal efficacy, these therapies require targeted cell delivery to specific tissues followed by successful cell engraftment. However, targeted delivery remains an open challenge. As one example, it is common for intravenous deliveries of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to become entrapped in lung microvasculature instead of the target tissue. Hence, a robust, quantitative imaging method would be essential for developing efficacious cell therapies. Here we show that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), a novel technique that directly images iron-oxide nanoparticle-tagged cells, can longitudinally monitor and quantify MSC administration in vivo. MPI offers near-ideal image contrast, depth penetration, and robustness; these properties make MPI both ultra-sensitive and linearly quantitative. Here, we imaged, for the first time, the dynamic trafficking of intravenous MSC administrations using MPI. Our results indicate that labeled MSC injections are immediately entrapped in lung tissue and then clear to the liver within one day, whereas standard iron oxide particle (Resovist) injections are immediately taken up by liver and spleen. Longitudinal MPI-CT imaging also indicated a clearance half-life of MSC iron oxide labels in the liver at 4.6 days. Finally, our ex vivo MPI biodistribution measurements of iron in liver, spleen, heart, and lungs after injection showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.943) with measurements from induction coupled plasma spectrometry. These results demonstrate that MPI offers strong utility for noninvasively imaging and quantifying the systemic distribution of cell therapies and other therapeutic agents. PMID:26909106

  17. Enhancing contrast and quantitation by spatial frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessica; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging with fluorescent contrast agents is highly sensitive for molecular imaging but is limited in depth to a few centimeters below the skin. Planar fluorescence imaging with full-field, uniform illumination and scientific camera image capture provides a portable and robust configuration for real-time, sensitive fluorescence detection with scalable resolution, but is inherently surface weighted and therefore limited in depth to a few millimeters. At the NIR region (700-1000 nm), tissue absorption and autofluorescence are relatively reduced, increasing depth penetration and reducing background signal, respectively. Optical imaging resolution scales with depth, limiting microscopic resolution with multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography to < 3 mm depth. Unfortunately, patient skin and peri-tumoral tissues are not uniform, varying in thickness and color, complicating subsurface fluorescence measurements. Diffuse optical imaging methods have been developed that better quantify optical signals relative to faster full-field planar reflectance imaging, but require long scan times, complex instrumentation, and reconstruction algorithms. Here we report a novel strategy for rapid measurement of subsurface fluorescence using structured light illumination to improve quantitation of deep-seated fluorescence molecular probe accumulation. This technique, in combination with highly specific, tumor-avid fluorescent molecular probes, will easily integrate noninvasive diagnostics for superficial cancers and fluorescence guided surgery.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of automatic methods for lesions detection in breast ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcomini, Karem D.; Schiabel, Homero; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish benign from malignant breast masses, providing more detailed evaluation in dense breasts. Due to the subjectivity in the images interpretation, computer-aid diagnosis (CAD) schemes have been developed, increasing the mammography analysis process to include ultrasound images as complementary exams. As one of most important task in the evaluation of this kind of images is the mass detection and its contours interpretation, automated segmentation techniques have been investigated in order to determine a quite suitable procedure to perform such an analysis. Thus, the main goal in this work is investigating the effect of some processing techniques used to provide information on the determination of suspicious breast lesions as well as their accurate boundaries in ultrasound images. In tests, 80 phantom and 50 clinical ultrasound images were preprocessed, and 5 segmentation techniques were tested. By using quantitative evaluation metrics the results were compared to a reference image delineated by an experienced radiologist. A self-organizing map artificial neural network has provided the most relevant results, demonstrating high accuracy and low error rate in the lesions representation, corresponding hence to the segmentation process for US images in our CAD scheme under tests.

  19. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  20. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Live Avian Embryonic Morphogenesis Via Micro-computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Alyssa L.; Jiang, Michael X.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Many clinically relevant congenital malformations arise during mid to late embryonic stages. This period is challenging to image quantitatively in live embryos, necessitating the use of multiple specimens with increased experimental variability. Here we establish X-ray and blood-pool computed tomography (CT) contrast agent toxicity and teratogenesis thresholds for 3D Micro-CT imaging of live avian embryos. Day 4 chick embryos micro-injected with Visipaque™ (VP) developed for an additional 6 days without defect. X-ray radiation up to 798 mGy was nontoxic. Peak average contrast of 1,060 HU occurred within 1 hr of imaging at 50 μm resolution. VP-enhanced contrast persisted past 24 hr with delayed accumulation in the allantois. Regional volumes of VP-injected embryos were statistically identical to those of fixed embryos perfused with osmium tetroxide. We further quantified longitudinal volumetric morphogenesis of the allantois over 30 hr. These results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of contrast enhanced quantitative micro-CT imaging for live embryos. PMID:21761480

  1. Effects of finite spatial resolution on quantitative CBF images from dynamic PET

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Mahoney, D.K.

    1985-05-01

    The finite spatial resolution of PET causes the time-activity responses on pixels around the boundaries between gray and white matter regions to contain kinetic components from tissues of different CBF's. CBF values estimated from kinetics of such mixtures are underestimated because of the nonlinear relationship between the time-activity response and the estimated CBF. Computer simulation is used to investigate these effects on phantoms of circular structures and realistic brain slice in terms of object size and quantitative CBF values. The CBF image calculated is compared to the case of having resolution loss alone. Results show that the size of a high flow region in the CBF image is decreased while that of a low flow region is increased. For brain phantoms, the qualitative appearance of CBF images is not seriously affected, but the estimated CBF's are underestimated by 11 to 16 percent in local gray matter regions (of size 1 cm/sup 2/) with about 14 percent reduction in global CBF over the whole slice. It is concluded that the combined effect of finite spatial resolution and the nonlinearity in estimating CBF from dynamic PET is quite significant and must be considered in processing and interpreting quantitative CBF images.

  2. Quantitative Lifetime Unmixing of Multiexponentially Decaying Fluorophores Using Single-Frequency Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; van Munster, Erik B.; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative microscopy technique for imaging nanosecond decay times of fluorophores. In the case of frequency-domain FLIM, several methods have been described to resolve the relative abundance of two fluorescent species with different fluorescence decay times. Thus far, single-frequency FLIM methods generally have been limited to quantifying two species with monoexponential decay. However, multiexponential decays are the norm rather than the exception, especially for fluorescent proteins and biological samples. Here, we describe a novel method for determining the fractional contribution in each pixel of an image of a sample containing two (multiexponentially) decaying species using single-frequency FLIM. We demonstrate that this technique allows the unmixing of binary mixtures of two spectrally identical cyan or green fluorescent proteins, each with multiexponential decay. Furthermore, because of their spectral identity, quantitative images of the relative molecular abundance of these fluorescent proteins can be generated that are independent of the microscope light path. The method is rigorously tested using samples of known composition and applied to live cell microscopy using cells expressing multiple (multiexponentially decaying) fluorescent proteins. PMID:18359789

  3. 3D quantitative imaging of the microvasculature with the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Botvinick, Elliott L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Gough, David A.

    2001-11-01

    There is a growing need for developing 3D quantitative imaging tools that can operate at high speed enabling real-time visualization for the field of biology, material science, and the semiconductor industry. We will present our 3D quantitative imaging system based on a confocal microscope built with a Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). By using the DMD as a spatial light modulator, confocal transverse surface (x, y) scanning can be performed in parallel at speeds faster than video rate without physical movement of the sample. The DMD allows us to programmably configure the source and the detection pinhole array in the lateral direction to achieve the best signal and to reduce the crosstalk noise. Investigations of the microcirculation were performed on 40 g to 45 g golden Syrian hamsters fit with dorsal skin fold window chambers. FITC-Dextran or Red blood cells from donor hamsters, stained with Celltracker CM-DiI, were injected into the circulation and imaged with the confocal microscope. We will present the measured results for the axial resolution, in vivo, as well as experimental results from imaging the window chamber.

  4. Rapid quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion: spectral analysis of myocardial contrast echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Bae, Richard Y; Belohlavek, Marek; Greenleaf, James F; Seward, James B

    2002-01-01

    We described a novel rapid spectral analysis technique performed on raw digital in-phase quadrature (IQ) data that quantitatively differentiated perfused from nonperfused myocardium based on the simultaneous comparison of local fundamental and harmonic frequency band intensity levels. In open-chest pigs after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and continuous venous contrast infusion, the fundamental-to-harmonic intensity ratio (FHIR) for samples placed within the left ventricular (LV) cavity (10.8 +/- 1.7 dB) and perfused myocardium (13.7 +/- 1.6 dB) were significantly (P <.001) lower than for nonperfused myocardium (27.1 +/- 2.9 dB). In attenuated images, the FHIR for the LV cavity and perfused myocardium were also significantly (P <.05) lower than for the nonperfused myocardium (21.4 +/- 3.0 dB, 34.4 +/- 3.2 dB, and 40.2 +/- 4.4 dB, respectively). Spectral properties of contrast microbubbles, as characterized by the FHIR, allow for rapid quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion from data contained in a single-image frame, without requiring background image subtraction and image averaging. PMID:11781556

  5. Quantitative magnetic imaging at the nanometer scale by ballistic electron magnetic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Herve, M.; Tricot, S.; Guezo, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lepine, B.; Schieffer, P.; Turban, P.

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrate quantitative ballistic electron magnetic microscopy (BEMM) imaging of simple model Fe(001) nanostructures. We use in situ nanostencil shadow mask resistless patterning combined with molecular beam epitaxy deposition to prepare under ultra-high vacuum conditions nanostructured epitaxial Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) spin-valves. In this epitaxial system, the magnetization of the bottom Fe/GaAs(001) electrode is parallel to the [110] direction, defining accurately the analysis direction for the BEMM experiments. The large hot-electron magnetoresistance of the Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) epitaxial spin-valve allows us to image various stable magnetic configurations on the as-grown Fe(001) microstructures with a high sensitivity, even for small misalignments of both magnetic electrodes. The angular dependence of the hot-electron magnetocurrent is used to convert magnetization maps calculated by micromagnetic simulations into simulated BEMM images. The calculated BEMM images and magnetization rotation profiles show quantitative agreement with experiments and allow us to investigate the magnetic phase diagram of these model Fe(001) microstructures. Finally, magnetic domain reversals are observed under high current density pulses. This opens the way for further BEMM investigations of current-induced magnetization dynamics.

  6. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, P. L.; Pizarro, J.; Guerrero, E.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; Scavello, G.; Yáñez, A.; Núñez-Moraleda, B. M.; Maestre, J. M.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples.

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in intact plants--quantitative observation of flow in plant vessels.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbrod, E; Kahler, E; Thürmer, F; Deichmann, R; Zimmermann, U; Haase, A

    1998-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) images of flow velocities in intact corn plants were acquired using magnetization-prepared MR microscopy. A phase contrast flow imaging technique was used to quantitate water flow velocities and total volume flow rates in small xylem vessels. The simultaneous measurement of the transpiration of the whole plant was achieved by using a closed climate chamber within the MR magnet. The total volume flow rate and the transpiration values were in close correlation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in intact plants was performed by light stimulation of the transpiration inside of the magnet. The change in the flow velocities in the xylem vessels of single vascular bundles was in correlation with the changes in the transpiration. Significant differences were observed between the xylem vessels in different vascular bundles. Furthermore, flow velocity measurements were performed on excised plant stems and visualized by the uptake of the MR contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). A comparison between the phase contrast flow imaging and the contrast media uptake showed to be in good agreement with each other. PMID:9621974

  8. Accounting for systematic errors in bioluminescence imaging to improve quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Shelley L.; Perry, Tracey A.; Styles, Iain B.; Cobbold, Mark; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a widely used pre-clinical imaging technique, but there are a number of limitations to its quantitative accuracy. This work uses an animal model to demonstrate some significant limitations of BLI and presents processing methods and algorithms which overcome these limitations, increasing the quantitative accuracy of the technique. The position of the imaging subject and source depth are both shown to affect the measured luminescence intensity. Free Space Modelling is used to eliminate the systematic error due to the camera/subject geometry, removing the dependence of luminescence intensity on animal position. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is then used to provide additional information about the depth and intensity of the source. A substantial limitation in the number of sources identified using BLI is also presented. It is shown that when a given source is at a significant depth, it can appear as multiple sources when imaged using BLI, while the use of BLT recovers the true number of sources present.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaque phantom by near-infrared multispectral imaging with three wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Ryo; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a primary cause of critical ischemic disease. The risk of critical event is involved the content of lipid in unstable plaque. Near-infrared (NIR) range is effective for diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaque because of the absorption peaks of lipid. NIR multispectral imaging (NIR-MSI) is suitable for the evaluation of plaque because it can provide spectroscopic information and spatial image quickly with a simple measurement system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the lipid concentrations in plaque phantoms quantitatively with a NIR-MSI system. A NIR-MSI system was constructed with a supercontinuum light, a grating spectrometer and a MCT camera. Plaque phantoms with different concentrations of lipid were prepared by mixing bovine fat and a biological soft tissue model to mimic the different stages of unstable plaque. We evaluated the phantoms by the NIR-MSI system with three wavelengths in the band at 1200 nm. Multispectral images were processed by spectral angle mapper method. As a result, the lipid areas of phantoms were effectively highlighted by using three wavelengths. In addition, the concentrations of lipid areas were classified according to the similarity between measured spectra and a reference spectrum. These results suggested the possibility of image enhancement and quantitative evaluation of lipid in unstable plaque with a NIR-MSI.

  10. Quantitative “Hot Spot” Imaging of Transplanted Stem Cells using Superparamagnetic Tracers and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, J.W.M.; Walczak, P.; Janowski, M.; Krishnan, K.M.; Arami, H.; Halkola, A.; Gleich, B.; Rahmer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic labeling of stem cells enables their non-invasive detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Practically, most MRI studies have been limited to visualization of local engraftment as other sources of endogenous hypointense contrast complicate the interpretation of systemic (whole body) cell distribution. In addition, MRI cell tracking is inherently non-quantitative in nature. We report here on the potential of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) as a novel tomographic technique for non-invasive hot spot imaging and quantification of stem cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) tracers. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells, representing small and larger cell bodies, were labeled with three different SPIO tracer formulations, including two preparations that have previously been used in clinical MRI cell tracking studies (Feridex® and Resovist®). Magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) measurements demonstrated a linear correlation between MPI signal and iron content, for both homogeneous solutions of free particles in solution and for internalized and aggregated particles in labeled cells over a wide range of concentrations. The overall MP signal ranged from 1×10-3 - 3×10-4 Am2/g Fe, which was equivalent to 2×10-14 – 1×10-15 Am2 per cell, indicating that cell numbers can be quantified with MPI analogous to the use of radiotracers in nuclear medicine or fluorine tracers in 19F MRI. When SPIO-labeled cells were transplanted in mouse brain, they could be readily detected by MPI at a detection threshold of about 5×104 cells, with MPI/MRI overlays showing an excellent agreement between the hypointense MRI areas and MPI hot spots. The calculated tissue MPI signal ratio for 100,000 vs. 50,000 implanted cells was 2.08. Hence, MPI has potential to be further developed for quantitative and easy-to-interpret, tracer-based non-invasive imaging of cells, preferably with MRI as an adjunct anatomical imaging modality. PMID:26740972

  11. General solution for quantitative dark-field contrast imaging with grating interferometers

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, M.

    2014-01-01

    Grating interferometer based imaging with X-rays and neutrons has proven to hold huge potential for applications in key research fields conveying biology and medicine as well as engineering and magnetism, respectively. The thereby amenable dark-field imaging modality implied the promise to access structural information beyond reach of direct spatial resolution. However, only here a yet missing approach is reported that finally allows exploiting this outstanding potential for non-destructive materials characterizations. It enables to obtain quantitative structural small angle scattering information combined with up to 3-dimensional spatial image resolution even at lab based x-ray or at neutron sources. The implied two orders of magnitude efficiency gain as compared to currently available techniques in this regime paves the way for unprecedented structural investigations of complex sample systems of interest for material science in a vast range of fields. PMID:25430623

  12. Single-Shot Smartphone-Based Quantitative Phase Imaging Using a Distorted Grating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-01-01

    Blood testing has been used as an essential tool to diagnose diseases for decades. Recently, there has been a rapid developing trend in using Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) methods for blood cell screening. Compared to traditional blood testing techniques, QPI has the advantage of avoiding dyeing or staining the specimen, which may cause damage to the cells. However, most existing systems are bulky and costly, requiring experienced personnel to operate. This work demonstrates the integration of one QPI method onto a smartphone platform and the application of imaging red blood cells. The adopted QPI method is based on solving the Intensity Transport Equation (ITE) from two de-focused pupil images taken in one shot by the smartphone camera. The device demonstrates a system resolution of about 1 μm, and is ready to be used for 3D morphological study of red blood cells. PMID:27441837

  13. Active illumination using a digital micromirror device for quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-11-15

    We present a powerful and cost-effective method for active illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for quantitative phase-imaging techniques. Displaying binary illumination patterns on a DMD with appropriate spatial filtering, plane waves with various illumination angles are generated and impinged onto a sample. Complex optical fields of the sample obtained with various incident angles are then measured via Mach-Zehnder interferometry, from which a high-resolution 2D synthetic aperture phase image and a 3D refractive index tomogram of the sample are reconstructed. We demonstrate the fast and stable illumination-control capability of the proposed method by imaging colloidal spheres and biological cells. The capability of high-speed optical diffraction tomography is also demonstrated by measuring 3D Brownian motion of colloidal particles with the tomogram acquisition rate of 100 Hz. PMID:26565886

  14. Automatic quantitative evaluation of autoradiographic band films by computerized image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Masseroli, M.; Messori, A.; Bendotti, C.; Ponti, M.; Forloni, G. )

    1993-01-01

    The present paper describes a new image processing method for automatic quantitative analysis of autoradiographic band films. It was developed in a specific image analysis environment (IBAS 2.0) but the algorithms and methods can be utilized elsewhere. The program is easy to use and presents some particularly useful features for evaluation of autoradiographic band films, such as the choice of whole film or single lane background determination; the possibility of evaluating bands with film scratch artifacts and the quantification in absolute terms or relative to reference values. The method was tested by comparison with laser-scanner densitometric quantifications of the same autoradiograms. The results show the full compatibility of the two methods and demonstrate the reliability and sensitivity of image analysis. The method can be used not only to evaluate autoradiographic band films, but to analyze any type of signal bands on other materials (e.g electrophoresis gel, chromatographic paper, etc.).

  15. Iron in Multiple Sclerosis and Its Noninvasive Imaging with Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Stüber, Carsten; Pitt, David; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is considered to play a key role in the development and progression of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In particular, iron that accumulates in myeloid cells after the blood-brain barrier (BBB) seals may contribute to chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and eventually neurodegeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established tool for the non-invasive study of MS. In recent years, an advanced MRI method, quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), has made it possible to study brain iron through in vivo imaging. Moreover, immunohistochemical investigations have helped defining the lesional and cellular distribution of iron in MS brain tissue. Imaging studies in MS patients and of brain tissue combined with histological studies have provided important insights into the role of iron in inflammation and neurodegeneration in MS. PMID:26784172

  16. Quantitative medical imaging: Initial studies of noncontact ultrasound applied to cortical bone phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halcrow, Peter William

    The purpose of this study was to take the initial steps towards applying Noncontact Ultrasound (NCU) to the in vivo monitoring of osteoporosis and to skeletal quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) using cortical bone phantoms. This project sought additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing third-degree burns. With this noncontact ultrasound imaging system, noncontact transducers and cortical bone phantoms with known bone mineral density (BMD) were used to determine speed of sound (SOS), integrated acoustical response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were used to collect data. Significant correlations between BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained. These NCU results were shown to be in agreement with results from contact ultrasound within 1-2%, which suggests that NCU might find additional applications in a clinical setting in the future in medical imaging.

  17. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rafay; Oborski, Matthew J; Hwang, Misun; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies, and importantly, for facilitating patient management, sparing patients from weeks or months of toxicity and ineffective treatment. This review will present an overview of epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis and current advances in diagnoses, and management of malignant gliomas. PMID:24711712

  18. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo.

  19. Quantitative Assessment of Murine Articular Cartilage and Bone Using X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Huihui; Wu, Mingshu; Dong, Linan; Zhang, Lu; Shi, Hongli; Luo, Shuqian

    2014-01-01

    Murine models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research can provide important insights for understanding RA pathogenesis and evaluating the efficacy of novel treatments. However, simultaneously imaging both murine articular cartilage and subchondral bone using conventional techniques is challenging because of low spatial resolution and poor soft tissue contrast. X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) is a new technique that offers high spatial resolution for the visualisation of cartilage and skeletal tissues. The purpose of this study was to utilise XPCI to observe articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) murine model and quantitatively assess changes in the joint microstructure. XPCI was performed on the two treatment groups (the control group and CIA group, n = 9 per group) to monitor the progression of damage to the femur from the knee joint in a longitudinal study (at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after primary injection). For quantitative assessment, morphologic parameters were measured in three-dimensional (3D) images using appropriate image analysis software. Our results showed that the average femoral cartilage volume, surface area and thickness were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the CIA group compared to the control group. Meanwhile, these decreases were accompanied by obvious destruction of the surface of subchondral bone and a loss of trabecular bone in the CIA group. This study confirms that XPCI technology has the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate microstructural changes in mouse joints. This technique has the potential to become a routine analysis method for accurately monitoring joint damage and comprehensively assessing treatment efficacy. PMID:25369528

  20. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo. PMID:25027002

  1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and computer imaging: quantitation of human milk casein.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, M

    1999-01-01

    Because human casein does not precipitate from milk at its isoelectric point as does bovine casein, there is no easy method of quantitation. Casein represents only approximately 30% of the protein fraction in human milk, and the complex methods necessary for isolation cannot be used easily with small samples in a survey of a large number of mothers. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with computer imaging has the potential to compare and quantitate proteins expeditiously using a small sample size. IsoDalt, a denaturing methodology, separates the casein micelle into its component parts, beta-casein, kappa-casein, parakappa-casein and casomorphins. Identification of these spots was made by immunoassay of a Western blot with monoclonal anti-human casein. Two spots at 24 kDa and 26 kDa, thought to be phosphorylated isomers of beta casein, were selected for quantitation. Milk samples from 20 mothers, 8 weeks post partum, were run on two-dimensional (2-D) gels; a slide was taken of each silverstained gel with a Kodak control strip; the slide was scanned into powerMac Photoshop 3 with a Polaroid-Sprintscan; spots were isolated using "threshold", "mask" with IPTK (Imaging Processing Tool Kit, Reindeer Games) a Photoshop plug-in, and transferred to the NIH-Image program. Using an NIH-Image gel macro (Thomas Seebacher), the area and integrated density of the spots were measured. The Kodak control scale provided calibration and conversion to OD units. Visual scanning of the gels and computer units indicated a wide range of concentrations. To understand the range in units of weight, a standard was generated using bovine alpha casein (Sigma). Measurements will be used in a statistical program, Statview (Abacus), in an attempt to correlate information from a questionaire with casein concentration. PMID:10344261

  2. Quantitative 4D Transcatheter Intraarterial Perfusion MR Imaging as a Method to Standardize Angiographic Chemoembolization Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Brian; Wang, Dingxin; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T.; Larson, Andrew C.; Salem, Riad; Omary, Reed A.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to test the hypothesis that subjective angiographic endpoints during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exhibit consistency and correlate with objective intraprocedural reductions in tumor perfusion as determined by quantitative four dimensional (4D) transcatheter intraarterial perfusion (TRIP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Eighteen consecutive patients underwent TACE in a combined MR/interventional radiology (MR-IR) suite. Three board-certified interventional radiologists independently graded the angiographic endpoint of each procedure based on a previously described subjective angiographic chemoembolization endpoint (SACE) scale. A consensus SACE rating was established for each patient. Patients underwent quantitative 4D TRIP-MR imaging immediately before and after TACE, from which mean whole tumor perfusion (Fρ) was calculated. Consistency of SACE ratings between observers was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The relationship between SACE ratings and intraprocedural TRIP-MR imaging perfusion changes was evaluated using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. RESULTS The SACE rating scale demonstrated very good consistency among all observers (ICC = 0.80). The consensus SACE rating was significantly correlated with both absolute (r = 0.54, P = 0.022) and percent (r = 0.85, P < 0.001) intraprocedural perfusion reduction. CONCLUSION The SACE rating scale demonstrates very good consistency between raters, and significantly correlates with objectively measured intraprocedural perfusion reductions during TACE. These results support the use of the SACE scale as a standardized alternative method to quantitative 4D TRIP-MR imaging to classify patients based on embolic endpoints of TACE. PMID:22021520

  3. Bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM) for accurate phase imaging using conventional microscopy hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Micah; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    2015-03-01

    Most quantitative phase microscopy methods require the use of custom-built or modified microscopic configurations which are not typically available to most bio/pathologists. There are, however, phase retrieval algorithms which utilize defocused bright-field images as input data and are therefore implementable in existing laboratory environments. Among these, deterministic methods such as those based on inverting the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) or a phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) are particularly attractive due to their compatibility with Köhler illuminated systems and numerical simplicity. Recently, a new method has been proposed, called multi-filter phase imaging with partially coherent light (MFPI-PC), which alleviates the inherent noise/resolution trade-off in solving the TIE by utilizing a large number of defocused bright-field images spaced equally about the focal plane. Despite greatly improving the state-ofthe- art, the method has many shortcomings including the impracticality of high-speed acquisition, inefficient sampling, and attenuated response at high frequencies due to aperture effects. In this report, we present a new method, called bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM), which efficiently utilizes a small number of defocused bright-field images and recovers frequencies out to the partially coherent diffraction limit. The method is based on a noiseminimized inversion of a PCTF derived for each finite defocus distance. We present simulation results which indicate nanoscale optical path length sensitivity and improved performance over MFPI-PC. We also provide experimental results imaging live bovine mesenchymal stem cells at sub-second temporal resolution. In all, BFQPM enables fast and accurate phase imaging with unprecedented spatial resolution using widely available bright-field microscopy hardware.

  4. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kolasinski, James; Chance, Steven A.; DeLuca, Gabriele C.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Chang, Eun-Hyuk; Palace, Jacqueline A.; McNab, Jennifer A.; Jenkinson, Mark; Miller, Karla L.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional

  5. Quantitative diagnosis of bladder cancer by morphometric analysis of HE images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Nebylitsa, Samantha V.; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Jain, Manu

    2015-02-01

    In clinical practice, histopathological analysis of biopsied tissue is the main method for bladder cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The diagnosis is performed by a pathologist based on the morphological features in the image of a hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained tissue sample. This manuscript proposes algorithms to perform morphometric analysis on the HE images, quantify the features in the images, and discriminate bladder cancers with different grades, i.e. high grade and low grade. The nuclei are separated from the background and other types of cells such as red blood cells (RBCs) and immune cells using manual outlining, color deconvolution and image segmentation. A mask of nuclei is generated for each image for quantitative morphometric analysis. The features of the nuclei in the mask image including size, shape, orientation, and their spatial distributions are measured. To quantify local clustering and alignment of nuclei, we propose a 1-nearest-neighbor (1-NN) algorithm which measures nearest neighbor distance and nearest neighbor parallelism. The global distributions of the features are measured using statistics of the proposed parameters. A linear support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is used to classify the high grade and low grade bladder cancers. The results show using a particular group of nuclei such as large ones, and combining multiple parameters can achieve better discrimination. This study shows the proposed approach can potentially help expedite pathological diagnosis by triaging potentially suspicious biopsies.

  6. Image Registration for Quantitative Parametric Response Mapping of Cancer Treatment Response1

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Jennifer L; Hoff, Benjamin A; Hylton, Nola; Pickles, Martin D; Turnbull, Lindsay W; Schott, Anne F; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Chamberlain, Ryan; Lemasson, Benjamin; Chenevert, Thomas L; Galbán, Craig J; Meyer, Charles R; Ross, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers capable of early quantification of tumor response to therapy would provide an opportunity to individualize patient care. Image registration of longitudinal scans provides a method of detecting treatment associated changes within heterogeneous tumors by monitoring alterations in the quantitative value of individual voxels over time, which is unattainable by traditional volumetric-based histogram methods. The concepts involved in the use of image registration for tracking and quantifying breast cancer treatment response using parametric response mapping (PRM), a voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) scans, are presented. Application of PRM to breast tumor response detection is described, wherein robust registration solutions for tracking small changes in water diffusivity in breast tumors during therapy are required. Methodologies that employ simulations are presented for measuring expected statistical accuracy of PRM for response assessment. Test-retest clinical scans are used to yield estimates of system noise to indicate significant changes in voxel-based changes in water diffusivity. Overall, registration-based PRM image analysis provides significant opportunities for voxel-based image analysis to provide the required accuracy for early assessment of response to treatment in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24772213

  7. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity. PMID:26080302

  8. Key Parameters Affecting Quantitative Analysis of STEM-EDS Spectrum Images

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Luke; Parish, Chad M

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we use simulated and experimental data to explore how three operator-controllable parameters - (1) signal level, (2) detector resolution, and (3) number of factors chosen for analysis - affect quantitative analyses of scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy spectrum images processed by principal component analysis (PCA). We find that improvements in both signal level and detector resolution improve the precision of quantitative analyses, but that signal level is the most important. We also find that if the rank of the PCA solution is not chosen properly, it may be possible to improperly fit the underlying data and degrade the accuracy of results. Additionally, precision is degraded in the case when too many factors are included in the model.

  9. Quantitative CT for volumetric analysis of medical images: initial results for liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnaz, Alexander S.; Snider, James; Chibuzor, Eneh; Esposito, Giuseppe; Wilson, Emmanuel; Yaniv, Ziv; Cohen, Emil; Cleary, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative CT for volumetric analysis of medical images is increasingly being proposed for monitoring patient response during chemotherapy trials. An integrated MATLAB GUI has been developed for an oncology trial at Georgetown University Hospital. This GUI allows for the calculation and visualization of the volume of a lesion. The GUI provides an estimate of the volume of the tumor using a semi-automatic segmentation technique. This software package features a fixed parameter adaptive filter from the ITK toolkit and a tumor segmentation algorithm to reduce inter-user variability and to facilitate rapid volume measurements. The system also displays a 3D rendering of the segmented tumor, allowing the end user to have not only a quantitative measure of the tumor volume, but a qualitative view as well. As an initial validation test, several clinical cases were hand-segmented, and then compared against the results from the tool, showing good agreement.

  10. Measuring the Nonuniform Evaporation Dynamics of Sprayed Sessile Microdroplets with Quantitative Phase Imaging.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Chris; Arbabi, Amir; Bhaduri, Basanta; Wang, Xiaozhen; Ganti, Raman; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L

    2015-10-13

    We demonstrate real-time quantitative phase imaging as a new optical approach for measuring the evaporation dynamics of sessile microdroplets. Quantitative phase images of various droplets were captured during evaporation. The images enabled us to generate time-resolved three-dimensional topographic profiles of droplet shape with nanometer accuracy and, without any assumptions about droplet geometry, to directly measure important physical parameters that characterize surface wetting processes. Specifically, the time-dependent variation of the droplet height, volume, contact radius, contact angle distribution along the droplet's perimeter, and mass flux density for two different surface preparations are reported. The studies clearly demonstrate three phases of evaporation reported previously: pinned, depinned, and drying modes; the studies also reveal instances of partial pinning. Finally, the apparatus is employed to investigate the cooperative evaporation of the sprayed droplets. We observe and explain the neighbor-induced reduction in evaporation rate, that is, as compared to predictions for isolated droplets. In the future, the new experimental methods should stimulate the exploration of colloidal particle dynamics on the gas-liquid-solid interface. PMID:26389788

  11. Fast wide-field photothermal and quantitative phase cell imaging with optical lock-in detection

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Will J.; Meiri, Amihai; Sheinfeld, Adi; Rinehart, Matthew T.; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast, wide-field holography system for detecting photothermally excited gold nanospheres with combined quantitative phase imaging. An interferometric photothermal optical lock-in approach (POLI) is shown to improve SNR for detecting nanoparticles (NPs) on multiple substrates, including a monolayer of NPs on a silanized coverslip, and NPs bound to live cells. Furthermore, the set up allowed for co-registered quantitative phase imaging (QPI) to be acquired in an off-axis holographic set-up. An SNR of 103 was obtained for NP-tagging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in live cells with a 3 second acquisition, while an SNR of 47 was seen for 20 ms acquisition. An analysis of improvements in SNR due to averaging multiple frames is presented, which suggest that residual photothermal signal can be a limiting factor. The combination of techniques allows for high resolution imaging of cell structure via QPI with the ability to identify receptor expression via POLI. PMID:25136482

  12. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  13. Quantitative images of metals in plant tissues measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. S.; Dietrich, R. C.; Matusch, A.; Pozebon, D.; Dressler, V. L.

    2008-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of toxic and essential elements in thin sections (thickness of 30 or 40 μm) of tobacco plant tissues. Two-dimensional images of Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Rh, Pt and Pb in leaves, shoots and roots of tobacco were produced. Sections of the plant tissues (fixed onto glass slides) were scanned by a focused beam of a Nd:YAG laser in a laser ablation chamber. The ablated material was transported with argon as carrier gas to the ICP ion source at a quadrupole ICP-MS instrument. Ion intensities of the investigated elements were measured together with 13C +, 33S + and 34S + within the entire plant tissue section. Matrix matching standards (prepared using powder of dried tobacco leaves) were used to constitute calibration curves, whereas the regression coefficient of the attained calibration curves was typically 0.99. The variability of LA-ICP-MS process, sample heterogeneity and water content in the sample were corrected by using 13C + as internal standard. Quantitative imaging of the selected elements revealed their inhomogeneous distribution in leaves, shoots and roots.

  14. Hyperspectral quantitative imaging of gas sources in the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Conejo, M A; Meléndez, Juan

    2015-01-10

    An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the medium infrared (1800-5000  cm(-1)) has been used to image two gas sources: a controlled CO2 leak at room temperature and the exhaust of a combustion engine. Spectra have been acquired at a resolution of 0.5  cm(-1) using an extended blackbody as the background. By fitting them with theoretical spectra generated with parameters from the High-Resolution Transmission Molecular Absorption database, quantitative maps of temperature and gas column density (concentration·path product) for the gas plumes have been obtained. Spectra are related to gas plume parameters by means of a radiometric model that takes into account not only gas absorption, but also its emission and the atmospheric absorption, as well as the instrument lineshape function. Measurements for the gas leak show very good agreement between retrieved and nominal values of temperature and CO2 column density. This result has direct application to obtain quantitative imaging of exhaust emissions from automobiles and other mobile sources, as shown here with measurements of exhaust gases in a diesel engine. PMID:25967610

  15. Electrical impedance tomography-based sensing skin for quantitative imaging of damage in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaji, Milad; Seppänen, Aku; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    This paper outlines the development of a large-area sensing skin for damage detection in concrete structures. The developed sensing skin consists of a thin layer of electrically conductive copper paint that is applied to the surface of the concrete. Cracking of the concrete substrate results in the rupture of the sensing skin, decreasing its electrical conductivity locally. The decrease in conductivity is detected with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) imaging. In previous works, electrically based sensing skins have provided only qualitative information on the damage on the substrate surface. In this paper, we study whether quantitative imaging of the damage is possible. We utilize application-specific models and computational methods in the image reconstruction, including a total variation (TV) prior model for the damage and an approximate correction of the modeling errors caused by the inhomogeneity of the painted sensing skin. The developed damage detection method is tested experimentally by applying the sensing skin to polymeric substrates and a reinforced concrete beam under four-point bending. In all test cases, the EIT-based sensing skin provides quantitative information on cracks and/or other damages on the substrate surface: featuring a very low conductivity in the damage locations, and a reliable indication of the lengths and shapes of the cracks. The results strongly support the applicability of the painted EIT-based sensing skin for damage detection in reinforced concrete elements and other substrates.

  16. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers: A Review of Statistical Methods for Computer Algorithm Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative biomarkers from medical images are becoming important tools for clinical diagnosis, staging, monitoring, treatment planning, and development of new therapies. While there is a rich history of the development of quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) techniques, little attention has been paid to the validation and comparison of the computer algorithms that implement the QIB measurements. In this paper we provide a framework for QIB algorithm comparisons. We first review and compare various study designs, including designs with the true value (e.g. phantoms, digital reference images, and zero-change studies), designs with a reference standard (e.g. studies testing equivalence with a reference standard), and designs without a reference standard (e.g. agreement studies and studies of algorithm precision). The statistical methods for comparing QIB algorithms are then presented for various study types using both aggregate and disaggregate approaches. We propose a series of steps for establishing the performance of a QIB algorithm, identify limitations in the current statistical literature, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:24919829

  17. Combined quantitative ultrasonic and time-resolved interaction force AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Z.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-01-15

    The authors describe a method where quantitative ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) is achieved during time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) imaging in intermittent contact mode. The method uses a calibration procedure for quantitative UAFM. It improves elasticity measurements of stiff regions of surfaces while retaining the capabilities of the TRIF mode for topography, adhesion, dissipation, and elasticity measurements on soft regions of sample surfaces. This combination is especially advantageous when measuring and imaging samples with broad stiffness range in a nondestructive manner. The experiments utilize an active AFM probe with high bandwidth and the UAFM calibration is performed by measuring the magnitude of the time-resolved UAFM signal at a judiciously chosen frequency for different contact stiffness values during individual taps. Improved sensitivity to stiff surface elasticity is demonstrated on a special sample. The results show that combining UAFM with TRIF provides 2.5 GPa (5%) standard deviation on the silicon surface reduced Young's modulus, representing 5x improvement over using only TRIF mode imaging.

  18. Noninvasive Quantitative Imaging of Collagen Microstructure in Three-Dimensional Hydrogels Using High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Karla P.; Helguera, María; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen I is widely used as a natural component of biomaterials for both tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The physical and biological properties of fibrillar collagens are strongly tied to variations in collagen fiber microstructure. The goal of this study was to develop the use of high-frequency quantitative ultrasound to assess collagen microstructure within three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels noninvasively and nondestructively. The integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC) was employed as a quantitative ultrasound parameter to detect, image, and quantify spatial variations in collagen fiber density and diameter. Collagen fiber microstructure was varied by fabricating hydrogels with different collagen concentrations or polymerization temperatures. IBC values were computed from measurements of the backscattered radio-frequency ultrasound signals collected using a single-element transducer (38-MHz center frequency, 13–47 MHz bandwidth). The IBC increased linearly with increasing collagen concentration and decreasing polymerization temperature. Parametric 3D images of the IBC were generated to visualize and quantify regional variations in collagen microstructure throughout the volume of hydrogels fabricated in standard tissue culture plates. IBC parametric images of corresponding cell-embedded collagen gels showed cell accumulation within regions having elevated collagen IBC values. The capability of this ultrasound technique to noninvasively detect and quantify spatial differences in collagen microstructure offers a valuable tool to monitor the structural properties of collagen scaffolds during fabrication, to detect functional differences in collagen microstructure, and to guide fundamental research on the interactions of cells and collagen matrices. PMID:25517512

  19. A novel image-based quantitative method for the characterization of NETosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenpu; Fogg, Darin K.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2015-01-01

    NETosis is a newly recognized mechanism of programmed neutrophil death. It is characterized by a stepwise progression of chromatin decondensation, membrane rupture, and release of bactericidal DNA-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Conventional ‘suicidal’ NETosis has been described in pathogenic models of systemic autoimmune disorders. Recent in vivo studies suggest that a process of ‘vital’ NETosis also exists, in which chromatin is condensed and membrane integrity is preserved. Techniques to assess ‘suicidal’ or ‘vital’ NET formation in a specific, quantitative, rapid and semiautomated way have been lacking, hindering the characterization of this process. Here we have developed a new method to simultaneously assess both ‘suicidal’ and ‘vital’ NETosis, using high-speed multi-spectral imaging coupled to morphometric image analysis, to quantify spontaneous NET formation observed ex-vivo or stimulus-induced NET formation triggered in vitro. Use of imaging flow cytometry allows automated, quantitative and rapid analysis of subcellular morphology and texture, and introduces the potential for further investigation using NETosis as a biomarker in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26003624

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Subcellular Distribution of the SUMO Conjugation System by Confocal Microscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mas, Abraham; Amenós, Montse; Lois, L Maria

    2016-01-01

    Different studies point to an enrichment in SUMO conjugation in the cell nucleus, although non-nuclear SUMO targets also exist. In general, the study of subcellular localization of proteins is essential for understanding their function within a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for studying subcellular protein partitioning in living cells, since fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to determine their localization. Subcellular distribution of proteins can be influenced by binding to other biomolecules and by posttranslational modifications. Sometimes these changes affect only a portion of the protein pool or have a partial effect, and a quantitative evaluation of fluorescence images is required to identify protein redistribution among subcellular compartments. In order to obtain accurate data about the relative subcellular distribution of SUMO conjugation machinery members, and to identify the molecular determinants involved in their localization, we have applied quantitative confocal microscopy imaging. In this chapter, we will describe the fluorescent protein fusions used in these experiments, and how to measure, evaluate, and compare average fluorescence intensities in cellular compartments by image-based analysis. We show the distribution of some components of the Arabidopsis SUMOylation machinery in epidermal onion cells and how they change their distribution in the presence of interacting partners or even when its activity is affected. PMID:27424751

  1. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Willner, M; Herzen, J; Grandl, S; Auweter, S; Mayr, D; Hipp, A; Chabior, M; Sarapata, A; Achterhold, K; Zanette, I; Weitkamp, T; Sztrókay, A; Hellerhoff, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method's prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography. PMID:24614413

  2. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  3. Quantitative Image Analysis of Ni-P Coatings Deposited on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozera, R.; Bucki, J. J.; Sałacińska, A.; Bieliński, J.; Boczkowska, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers coated with different thicknesses of Ni-P coatings were studied. The coatings were deposited by electroless metallization lasting from 3 to 22 min and consisted of approximately 3 wt.% phosphorous. Computer quantitative image analysis was used to characterize the surface features and thickness of the coatings as a function of the time of metallization. The results showed that quantitative image analysis is a useful technique for the measurement of the coating thickness and can be used as a tool for obtaining an innovative description of the Ni-P coating morphology. The morphology of the coatings and their thicknesses were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The image analyses were performed using the proprietary software Micrometer, developed at the Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. The observations revealed that a specific feature of the coating topography is the hemispherical bulge of a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm. The thickness of the coatings increases linearly with the metallization time. The obtained results indicated that the methodology proposed in the present work can be successfully applied and possesses several advantages over the traditionally used weight measurements technique.

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  5. A Practical Approach to Quantitative Processing and Analysis of Small Biological Structures by Fluorescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Noller, Crystal M; Boulina, Maria; McNamara, George; Szeto, Angela; McCabe, Philip M; Mendez, Armando J

    2016-09-01

    Standards in quantitative fluorescent imaging are vaguely recognized and receive insufficient discussion. A common best practice is to acquire images at Nyquist rate, where highest signal frequency is assumed to be the highest obtainable resolution of the imaging system. However, this particular standard is set to insure that all obtainable information is being collected. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate that for quantification purposes, these correctly set acquisition rates can be redundant; instead, linear size of the objects of interest can be used to calculate sufficient information density in the image. We describe optimized image acquisition parameters and unbiased methods for processing and quantification of medium-size cellular structures. Sections of rabbit aortas were immunohistochemically stained to identify and quantify sympathetic varicosities, >2 μm in diameter. Images were processed to reduce background noise and segment objects using free, open-access software. Calculations of the optimal sampling rate for the experiment were based on the size of the objects of interest. The effect of differing sampling rates and processing techniques on object quantification was demonstrated. Oversampling led to a substantial increase in file size, whereas undersampling hindered reliable quantification. Quantification of raw and incorrectly processed images generated false structures, misrepresenting the underlying data. The current study emphasizes the importance of defining image-acquisition parameters based on the structure(s) of interest. The proposed postacquisition processing steps effectively removed background and noise, allowed for reliable quantification, and eliminated user bias. This customizable, reliable method for background subtraction and structure quantification provides a reproducible tool for researchers across biologic disciplines. PMID:27182204

  6. A Practical Approach to Quantitative Processing and Analysis of Small Biological Structures by Fluorescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Noller, Crystal M.; Boulina, Maria; McNamara, George; Szeto, Angela; McCabe, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Standards in quantitative fluorescent imaging are vaguely recognized and receive insufficient discussion. A common best practice is to acquire images at Nyquist rate, where highest signal frequency is assumed to be the highest obtainable resolution of the imaging system. However, this particular standard is set to insure that all obtainable information is being collected. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate that for quantification purposes, these correctly set acquisition rates can be redundant; instead, linear size of the objects of interest can be used to calculate sufficient information density in the image. We describe optimized image acquisition parameters and unbiased methods for processing and quantification of medium-size cellular structures. Sections of rabbit aortas were immunohistochemically stained to identify and quantify sympathetic varicosities, >2 μm in diameter. Images were processed to reduce background noise and segment objects using free, open-access software. Calculations of the optimal sampling rate for the experiment were based on the size of the objects of interest. The effect of differing sampling rates and processing techniques on object quantification was demonstrated. Oversampling led to a substantial increase in file size, whereas undersampling hindered reliable quantification. Quantification of raw and incorrectly processed images generated false structures, misrepresenting the underlying data. The current study emphasizes the importance of defining image-acquisition parameters based on the structure(s) of interest. The proposed postacquisition processing steps effectively removed background and noise, allowed for reliable quantification, and eliminated user bias. This customizable, reliable method for background subtraction and structure quantification provides a reproducible tool for researchers across biologic disciplines. PMID:27182204

  7. Evaluation of three MRI-based anatomical priors for quantitative PET brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Vunckx, Kathleen; Atre, Ameya; Baete, Kristof; Reilhac, Anthonin; Deroose, Christophe M; Van Laere, Koen; Nuyts, Johan

    2012-03-01

    In emission tomography, image reconstruction and therefore also tracer development and diagnosis may benefit from the use of anatomical side information obtained with other imaging modalities in the same subject, as it helps to correct for the partial volume effect. One way to implement this, is to use the anatomical image for defining the a priori distribution in a maximum-a-posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm. In this contribution, we use the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulator to evaluate the quantitative accuracy reached by three different anatomical priors when reconstructing positron emission tomography (PET) brain images, using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide the anatomical information. The priors are: 1) a prior especially developed for FDG PET brain imaging, which relies on a segmentation of the MR-image (Baete , 2004); 2) the joint entropy-prior (Nuyts, 2007); 3) a prior that encourages smoothness within a position dependent neighborhood, computed from the MR-image. The latter prior was recently proposed by our group in (Vunckx and Nuyts, 2010), and was based on the prior presented by Bowsher (2004). The two latter priors do not rely on an explicit segmentation, which makes them more generally applicable than a segmentation-based prior. All three priors produced a compromise between noise and bias that was clearly better than that obtained with postsmoothed maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) or MAP with a relative difference prior. The performance of the joint entropy prior was slightly worse than that of the other two priors. The performance of the segmentation-based prior is quite sensitive to the accuracy of the segmentation. In contrast to the joint entropy-prior, the Bowsher-prior is easily tuned and does not suffer from convergence problems. PMID:22049363

  8. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  9. Quantitative accuracy of MAP reconstruction for dynamic PET imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ju-Chieh (Kevin); Shoghi, Kooresh; Laforest, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction algorithms are becoming more commonly employed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images still requires validation for various levels of contrast and counting statistics. Methods: The authors present an evaluation of the quantitative accuracy of the 3D maximum a posteriori (3D-MAP) image reconstruction algorithm for dynamic PET imaging with comparisons to two of the most widely used reconstruction algorithms: the 2D filtered-backprojection (2D-FBP) and 2D-ordered subsets expectation maximization (2D-OSEM) on the Siemens microPET scanners. The study was performed for various levels of count density encountered in typical dynamic scanning as well as the imaging of cardiac activity concentration in small animal studies on the Focus 120. Specially designed phantoms were used for evaluation of the spatial resolution, image quality, and quantitative accuracy. A normal mouse was employed to evaluate the accuracy of the blood time activity concentration extracted from left ventricle regions of interest (ROIs) within the images as compared to the actual blood activity concentration measured from arterial blood sampling. Results: For MAP reconstructions, the spatial resolution and contrast have been found to reach a stable value after 20 iterations independent of the β values (i.e., hyper parameter which controls the weight of the penalty term) and count density within the frame. The spatial resolution obtained with 3D-MAP reaches values of ∼1.0 mm with a β of 0.01 while the 2D-FBP has value of 1.8 mm and 2D-OSEM has a value of 1.6 mm. It has been observed that the lower the hyper parameter β used in MAP, more iterations are needed to reach the stable noise level (i.e., image roughness). The spatial resolution is improved by using a lower β value at the expense of higher image noise. However, with similar noise level the spatial resolution achieved by 3D-MAP was

  10. Gamma camera calibration and validation for quantitative SPECT imaging with (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, M; Cazzato, M; Cozzella, M L; Cox, M; D'Andrea, M; Fazio, A; Fenwick, A; Iaccarino, G; Johansson, L; Strigari, L; Ungania, S; De Felice, P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years (177)Lu has received considerable attention from the clinical nuclear medicine community thanks to its wide range of applications in molecular radiotherapy, especially in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In addition to short-range beta particles, (177)Lu emits low energy gamma radiation of 113keV and 208keV that allows gamma camera quantitative imaging. Despite quantitative cancer imaging in molecular radiotherapy having been proven to be a key instrument for the assessment of therapeutic response, at present no general clinically accepted quantitative imaging protocol exists and absolute quantification studies are usually based on individual initiatives. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an approach to gamma camera calibration for absolute quantification in tomographic imaging with (177)Lu. We assessed the gamma camera calibration factors for a Philips IRIX and Philips AXIS gamma camera system using various reference geometries, both in air and in water. Images were corrected for the major effects that contribute to image degradation, i.e. attenuation, scatter and dead- time. We validated our method in non-reference geometry using an anthropomorphic torso phantom provided with the liver cavity uniformly filled with (177)LuCl3. Our results showed that calibration factors depend on the particular reference condition. In general, acquisitions performed with the IRIX gamma camera provided good results at 208keV, with agreement within 5% for all geometries. The use of a Jaszczak 16mL hollow sphere in water provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in anthropomorphic geometry within 1% for the 208keV peak, for both gamma cameras. The point source provided the poorest results, most likely because scatter and attenuation correction are not incorporated in the calibration factor. However, for both gamma cameras all geometries provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in

  11. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Paciscopi, Marco; Soda, Paolo; Biamonte, Filippo; Iannello, Giulio; Frasconi, Paolo; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells (PCs) across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all PCs are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent PCs. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of PCs, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of PCs with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments. PMID:26074783

  12. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Paciscopi, Marco; Soda, Paolo; Biamonte, Filippo; Iannello, Giulio; Frasconi, Paolo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells (PCs) across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all PCs are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent PCs. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of PCs, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of PCs with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments. PMID:26074783

  13. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-01

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images. Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable. The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  14. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-01

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images.Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable.The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  15. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Metzner, Ralf; Kochs, Johannes; Postma, Johannes A; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Bühler, Jonas; Schurr, Ulrich; Jahnke, Siegfried

    2016-03-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. PMID:26729797

  16. Quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes using satellite image data at different scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    When aerial and satellite photographs and images are used in the quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes, either through direct observation of active processes or by analysis of landforms resulting from inferred active or dormant processes, a number of limitations in the use of such data must be considered. Active geomorphic processes work at different scales and rates. Therefore, the capability of imaging an active or dormant process depends primarily on the scale of the process and the spatial-resolution characteristic of the imaging system. Scale is an important factor in recording continuous and discontinuous active geomorphic processes, because what is not recorded will not be considered or even suspected in the analysis of orbital images. If the geomorphic process of landform change caused by the process is less than 200 m in x to y dimension, then it will not be recorded. Although the scale factor is critical, in the recording of discontinuous active geomorphic processes, the repeat interval of orbital-image acquisition of a planetary surface also is a consideration in order to capture a recurring short-lived geomorphic process or to record changes caused by either a continuous or a discontinuous geomorphic process.

  17. Improved Dynamic Analysis method for quantitative PIXE and SXRF element imaging of complex materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, C. G.; Laird, J. S.; Fisher, L. A.; Kirkham, R.; Moorhead, G. F.

    2015-11-01

    The Dynamic Analysis (DA) method in the GeoPIXE software provides a rapid tool to project quantitative element images from PIXE and SXRF imaging event data both for off-line analysis and in real-time embedded in a data acquisition system. Initially, it assumes uniform sample composition, background shape and constant model X-ray relative intensities. A number of image correction methods can be applied in GeoPIXE to correct images to account for chemical concentration gradients, differential absorption effects, and to correct images for pileup effects. A new method, applied in a second pass, uses an end-member phase decomposition obtained from the first pass, and DA matrices determined for each end-member, to re-process the event data with each pixel treated as an admixture of end-member terms. This paper describes the new method and demonstrates through examples and Monte-Carlo simulations how it better tracks spatially complex composition and background shape while still benefitting from the speed of DA.

  18. Holographic quantitative imaging of sample hidden by turbid medium or occluding objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, V.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Memmolo, P.; Gennari, O.; Paturzo, Melania; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Digital Holography (DH) numerical procedures have been developed to allow imaging through turbid media. A fluid is considered turbid when dispersed particles provoke strong light scattering, thus destroying the image formation by any standard optical system. Here we show that sharp amplitude imaging and phase-contrast mapping of object hidden behind turbid medium and/or occluding objects are possible in harsh noise conditions and with a large field-of view by Multi-Look DH microscopy. In particular, it will be shown that both amplitude imaging and phase-contrast mapping of cells hidden behind a flow of Red Blood Cells can be obtained. This allows, in a noninvasive way, the quantitative evaluation of living processes in Lab on Chip platforms where conventional microscopy techniques fail. The combination of this technique with endoscopic imaging can pave the way for the holographic blood vessel inspection, e.g. to look for settled cholesterol plaques as well as blood clots for a rapid diagnostics of blood diseases.

  19. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  20. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kochs, Johannes; Pflugfelder, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. PMID:26729797

  1. Quantitative Determination of Lateral Mode Dispersion in Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators through Laser Acoustic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; John D. Larson III

    2006-10-01

    Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators are useful for many signal processing applications. Detailed knowledge of their operation properties are needed to optimize their design for specific applications. The finite size of these resonators precludes their use in single acoustic modes; rather, multiple wave modes, such as, lateral wave modes are always excited concurrently. In order to determine the contributions of these modes, we have been using a newly developed full-field laser acoustic imaging approach to directly measure their amplitude and phase throughout the resonator. This paper describes new results comparing modeling of both elastic and piezoelectric effects in the active material with imaging measurement of all excited modes. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a quantitative determination of excited mode amplitude and wavenumber at any frequency. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode excitation and dispersion for the device under test allowing mode identification and comparison with predicted operational properties. Discussion and analysis are presented for modes near the first longitudinal thickness resonance (~900 MHz) in an AlN thin film resonator. Plate wave modeling, taking account of material crystalline orientation, elastic and piezoelectric properties and overlayer metallic films, will be discussed in relation to direct image measurements.

  2. Quantitative analysis of coronary dynamics by time-dependent ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marraccini, Paolo; Salvetti, Ovidio; Braccini, Giovanni; Bragagni, Paolo; Levorato, Dianora; L'Abbate, Antonio; Marzilli, Mario

    1995-04-01

    Intravascular ultrasound imaging is a new technique that displays information on lumen and arterial walls, and is capable of providing real-time monitoring of cross-sectional high- resolution images. This technique has potential application for studying the dynamics of the arterial wall with respect to the presence or absence of pathology and the vascular response to physiological or pharmacological stimuli. Although the extraction of information related to coronary dynamics and wall pathologies is possible by manual procedures it is very time consuming and influenced by intra- and interobserver errors. We developed an evaluation system for analyzing 3D spaces defined by digitized cross-sectional ultrasound images of coronaries quantifying the vasomotion in relation to the morphology of the arterial wall. Sequences of echographic images were obtained and recorded as ordered stacks of 2D frames on a VHS videotape. For each image, an automatic lumen edge segmentation was performed, then 3D reconstruction was obtained to evaluate time-dependent lumen and vessel wall changes. These 3D representations serve to demonstrate dynamic phenomena and to perform quantitative analyses (e.g., area/hemidiameter variations, projections, sections, 'carving,' etc.).

  3. Immunocytochemical study of the ontogeny of Peyer's patches in the Brazilian marsupial Didelphis albiventris.

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, H B; Nogueira, J C; King, G; Coutinho, V B; Robalinho, T I; Amorim, A M; Cavalcanti, V M; Robins, R A; Sewell, H F

    1994-01-01

    A detailed ontogenetic immunocytochemical study is reported on gut-associated lymphoid development in the Brazilian marsupial Didelphis albiventris. This employed antibody probes raised to evolutionarily conserved peptides which have been shown to detect HLA-DR-like (class II MHC) antigens and T and B cell markers in a wide range of animal species. Cells with macrophage and dendritic morphology expressing class II MHC and a few cells expressing the T cell marker CD3 were found in the lamina propria of duodenal villi in early (approximately 24 mm crown-rump length) latent opossum. Cells with B cell markers were not detected until lactent animals reached > 60 mm. Development of Peyer's patches (PP) was seen first in the duodenum in 45-60 mm lactent animals, progressing to well developed PP in the duodenum and ileum in lactent animals > 80 mm. These PP, like those in weanling and juvenile animals, consisted of follicles with a network of class II MHC positive dendritic cells and round cells lacking T and B markers, but lacking well defined mantle zones. B cells were present mainly in the lymphatic sinuses, with CD3 T cells present between follicles in the PP and intraepithelially in the villi. The study reveals the sequential development of class II MHC positive dendritic cells, T cells and B cells in the intestinal ontogeny of the opossum PP. These features occurred initially exclusively in the duodenum and subsequently in the ileum, paralleling the physiological maturation of the gut in eutheria. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Figs. 5-7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:7961141

  4. Immunocytochemical Localization of Mandelonitrile Lyase in Mature Black Cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua-Cheng; Poulton, Jonathan E.

    1991-01-01

    Mandelonitrile lyase (MDL, EC 4.1.2.10), which catalyzes the reversible dissociation of (R)-(+)-mandelonitrile to benzaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, was purified to apparent homogeneity from mature black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) seeds by conventional protein purification techniques. This flavoprotein is monomeric with a subunit molecular mass of 57 kilodaltons. Glycoprotein character was shown by its binding to the affinity matrix concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B with subsequent elution by α-methyl-d-glucoside. Upon chemical deglycosylation by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, the molecular mass was reduced to 50.9 kilodaltons. Two-dimensional gel analysis of deglycosylated MDL revealed the presence of several subunit isoforms of similar molecular mass but differing slightly in isoelectric point. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in New Zealand white rabbits against deglycosylated and untreated MDL. Antibody titers were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent and dot immunobinding assays, while their specificities were assessed by Western immunoblot analysis. Antibodies raised against untreated lyase recognized several proteins in addition to MDL. In contrast, antisera raised against deglycosylated MDL were monospecific and were utilized for developmental and immunocytochemical localization studies. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis of seed proteins during fruit maturation showed that MDL first appeared in seeds shortly after cotyledons began development. In cotyledon cells of mature seeds, MDL was localized primarily in the cell wall with lesser amounts in the protein bodies, whereas in endosperm cells, this labeling pattern was reversed. N-terminal sequence data was gathered for future molecular approaches to the question of MDL microheterogeneity. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668338

  5. Nanoscale topography and spatial light modulator characterization using wide-field quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Bhaduri, Basanta; Edwards, Chris; Zhou, Renjie; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-02-10

    We demonstrate an optical technique for large field of view quantitative phase imaging of reflective samples. It relies on a common-path interferometric design, which ensures high stability without the need for active stabilization. The technique provides single-shot, full-field and robust measurement of nanoscale topography of large samples. Further, the inherent stability allows reliable measurement of the temporally varying phase retardation of the liquid crystal cells, and thus enables real-time characterization of spatial light modulators. The technique's application potential is validated through experimental results. PMID:24663633

  6. Vision ray calibration for the quantitative geometric description of general imaging and projection optics in metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Bothe, Thorsten; Li Wansong; Schulte, Michael; von Kopylow, Christoph; Bergmann, Ralf B.; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2010-10-20

    Exact geometric calibration of optical devices like projectors or cameras is the basis for utilizing them in quantitative metrological applications. The common state-of-the-art photogrammetric pinhole-imaging-based models with supplemental polynomial corrections fail in the presence of nonsymmetric or high-spatial-frequency distortions and in describing caustics efficiently. These problems are solved by our vision ray calibration (VRC), which is proposed in this paper. The VRC takes an optical mapping system modeled as a black box and directly delivers corresponding vision rays for each mapped pixel. The underlying model, the calibration process, and examples are visualized and reviewed, demonstrating the potential of the VRC.

  7. Time-resolved imaging refractometry of microbicidal films using quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; Drake, Tyler K.; Robles, Francisco E.; Rohan, Lisa C.; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy is applied to image temporal changes in the refractive index (RI) distributions of solutions created by microbicidal films undergoing hydration. We present a novel method of using an engineered polydimethylsiloxane structure as a static phase reference to facilitate calibration of the absolute RI across the entire field. We present a study of dynamic structural changes in microbicidal films during hydration and subsequent dissolution. With assumptions about the smoothness of the phase changes induced by these films, we calculate absolute changes in the percentage of film in regions across the field of view.

  8. An imaging system for quantitive surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for obtaining detailed quantitative temperature distributions on test models in hypersonic wind tunnels is presented. This technique is based on the ratio of blue to green (450, 520 nm) emission from an UV (365 nm) excited phosphor coating. Separately filtered images are recorded from a three-tube color camera, utilizing off-the-shelf front-end video optics to discriminate wavelengths. Two demonstration studies in a 31-inch Mach 10 tunnel are discussed. One study presents the windward surface temperature-time history for a transatmospheric vehicle, and the other illustrates nosetip heating on a spherically blunted slender cone.

  9. Determination of bending-induced strain in optical fibers by use of quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A; Thorn, K; Michna, M L; Dragomir, N; Farrell, P; Baxter, G

    2002-01-15

    Quantitative phase microscopy with polarized light has been used to determine the change in refractive index introduced into an optical fiber when the fiber is bent through a constant radius of curvature. By obtaining phase images for two orthogonal directions of the polarization of the incident light, one can infer the induced axial strain profile within the fiber. Radii of curvature from 1 to 8 cm were considered, and in each case excellent agreement, within lambda/100, was obtained between experimental results and theory. PMID:18007720

  10. Determination of bending-induced strain in optical fibers by use of quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Thorn, K.; Michna, M. L.; Dragomir, N.; Farrell, P.; Baxter, G.

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy with polarized light has been used to determine the change in refractive index introduced into an optical fiber when the fiber is bent through a constant radius of curvature. By obtaining phase images for two orthogonal directions of the polarization of the incident light, one can infer the induced axial strain profile within the fiber. Radii of curvature from 1 to 8 cm were considered, and in each case excellent agreement, within λ/100, was obtained between experimental results and theory.

  11. Quantitative phase imaging of biological cells using spatially low and temporally high coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Azeem; Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Singh, Veena; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of biological samples, such as human red blood cells (RBCs) and onion cells using narrow temporal frequency and wide angular frequency spectrum light source. This type of light source was synthesized by the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity of speckle reduction technique. The importance of using low spatial and high temporal coherence light source over the broad band and narrow band light source is that it does not require any dispersion compensation mechanism for biological samples. Further, it avoids the formation of speckle or spurious fringes which arises while using narrow band light source. PMID:27192285

  12. Bone marrow glucose metabolic response to GMCSF by quantitative FDG PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W.J.; Hoh, C.K.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate noninvasively the recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) effects on bone marrow glucose metabolism, we studied 18 patients with metastatic melanoma with quantitative FDG PET imaging. All patients received 14 days of therapy in 3 groups; group 1: 4 patients treated with GMCSF (5 ug/kg/d SQ), group 2: 8 patients treated with GMCSF (5 ug/kg/d SQ) and monoclonal antibody MAbR24, and group 3: 6 patients treated with MCSF (80 ug/kg/d IVCI) and MAbR24.

  13. Roles of biologic breast tissue composition and quantitative image analysis of mammographic images in breast tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Christopher I.; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Shepherd, John

    2014-03-01

    Purpose. Investigate whether knowledge of the biologic image composition of mammographic lesions provides imagebased biomarkers above and beyond those obtainable from quantitative image analysis (QIA) of X-ray mammography. Methods. The dataset consisted of 45 in vivo breast lesions imaged with the novel 3-component breast (3CB) imaging technique based on dual-energy mammography (15 malignant, 30 benign diagnoses). The 3CB composition measures of water, lipid, and protein thicknesses were assessed and mathematical descriptors, `3CB features', were obtained for the lesions and their periphery. The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method obtaining `QIA features' describing morphology and texture. We investigated the correlation within the `3CB features', within the `QIA features', and between the two. In addition, the merit of individual features in the distinction between malignant and benign lesions was assessed. Results. Whereas many descriptors within the `3CB features' and `QIA features' were, often by design, highly correlated, correlation between descriptors of the two feature groups was much weaker (maximum absolute correlation coefficient 0.58, p<0.001) indicating that 3CB and QIA-based biomarkers provided potentially complementary information. Single descriptors from 3CB and QIA appeared equally well-suited for the distinction between malignant and benign lesions, with maximum area under the ROC curve 0.71 for a protein feature (3CB) and 0.71 for a texture feature (QIA). Conclusions. In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of breast tissue composition appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between benign and malignant lesions.

  14. MR brain image analysis in dementia: From quantitative imaging biomarkers to ageing brain models and imaging genetics.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Wiro J

    2016-10-01

    MR brain image analysis has constantly been a hot topic research area in medical image analysis over the past two decades. In this article, it is discussed how the field developed from the construction of tools for automatic quantification of brain morphology, function, connectivity and pathology, to creating models of the ageing brain in normal ageing and disease, and tools for integrated analysis of imaging and genetic data. The current and future role of the field in improved understanding of the development of neurodegenerative disease is discussed, and its potential for aiding in early and differential diagnosis and prognosis of different types of dementia. For the latter, the use of reference imaging data and reference models derived from large clinical and population imaging studies, and the application of machine learning techniques on these reference data, are expected to play a key role. PMID:27344937

  15. Data sets for the qualification of volumetric CT as a quantitative imaging biomarker in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Buckler, A J; Schwartz, L H; Petrick, N; McNitt-Gray, M; Zhao, B; Fenimore, C; Reeves, A P; Mozley, P D; Avila, R S

    2010-07-01

    The drug development industry is faced with increasing costs and decreasing success rates. New ways to understand biology as well as the increasing interest in personalized treatments for smaller patient segments requires new capabilities for the rapid assessment of treatment responses. Deployment of qualified imaging biomarkers lags apparent technology capabilities. The lack of consensus methods and qualification evidence needed for large-scale multi-center trials, as well as the standardization that allows them, are widely acknowledged to be the limiting factors. The current fragmentation in imaging vendor offerings, coupled with the independent activities of individual biopharmaceutical companies and their contract research organizations (CROs), may stand in the way of the greater opportunity were these efforts to be drawn together. A preliminary report, "Volumetric CT: a potential biomarker of response," of the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) activity was presented at the Medical Imaging Continuum: Path Forward for Advancing the Uses of Medical Imaging in the Development of New Biopharmaceutical Products meeting of the Extended Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Imaging Group sponsored by the Drug Information Agency (DIA) in October 2008. The clinical context in Lung Cancer and a methodology for approaching the qualification of volumetric CT as a biomarker has since been reported [Acad. Radiol. 17, 100-106, 107-115 (2010)]. This report reviews the effort to collect and utilize publicly available data sets to provide a transparent environment in which to pursue the qualification activities in such a way as to allow independent peer review and verification of results. This article focuses specifically on our role as stewards of image sets for developing new tools. PMID:20640013

  16. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging as a Biomarker for Effects of Systemic Inflammation on the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Cooper, Ella; Dowell, Nicholas G.; Keramida, Georgia; Voon, Valerie; Critchley, Hugo D.; Cercignani, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation impairs brain function and is increasingly implicated in the etiology of common mental illnesses, particularly depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Immunotherapies selectively targeting proinflammatory cytokines demonstrate efficacy in a subset of patients with depression. However, efforts to identify patients most vulnerable to the central effects of inflammation are hindered by insensitivity of conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging. Methods We used quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging, a magnetic resonance imaging technique that enables quantification of changes in brain macromolecular density, together with experimentally induced inflammation to investigate effects of systemic inflammatory challenge on human brain microstructure. Imaging with qMT was performed in 20 healthy participants after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. An additional 20 participants underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography following the same inflammatory challenge. Results The qMT data demonstrated that inflammation induced a rapid change in brain microstructure, reflected in increased magnetization exchange from free (water) to macromolecular-bound protons, within a discrete region of insular cortex implicated in representing internal physiologic states including inflammation. The functional significance of this change in insular microstructure was demonstrated by correlation with inflammation-induced fatigue and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging, which revealed increased resting glucose metabolism within this region following the same inflammatory challenge. Conclusions Together these observations highlight a novel structural biomarker of the central physiologic and behavioral effects of mild systemic inflammation. The widespread clinical availability of magnetic resonance imaging supports the viability of qMT imaging as a clinical biomarker in trials of immunotherapeutics

  17. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging study for quantitative evaluation of a small field of view (SFOV) gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqahtani, M. S.; Lees, J. E.; Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Perkins, A. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Hybrid Compact Gamma Camera (HCGC) is a portable optical-gamma hybrid imager designed for intraoperative medical imaging, particularly for sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures. To investigate the capability of the HCGC in lymphatic system imaging, two lymphoscintigraphic phantoms have been designed and constructed. These phantoms allowed quantitative assessment and evaluation of the HCGC for lymphatic vessel (LV) and sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection. Fused optical and gamma images showed good alignment of the two modalities allowing localisation of activity within the LV and the SLN. At an imaging distance of 10 cm, the spatial resolution of the HCGC during the detection process of the simulated LV was not degraded at a separation of more than 1.5 cm (variation <5%) from the injection site (IS). Even in the presence of the IS the targeted LV was detectable with an acquisition time of less than 2 minutes. The HCGC could detect SLNs containing different radioactivity concentrations (ranging between 1:20 to 1:100 SLN to IS activity ratios) and under various scattering thicknesses (ranging between 5 mm to 30 mm) with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values (ranging between 11.6 and 110.8). The HCGC can detect the simulated SLNs at various IS to SLN distances, different IS to SLN activity ratios and through varied scattering medium thicknesses. The HCGC provided an accurate physical localisation of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the simulated SLN. These characteristics of the HCGC reflect its suitability for utilisation in lymphatic vessel drainage imaging and SLN imaging in patients in different critical clinical situations such as interventional and surgical procedures.

  18. Errors in quantitative T1rho imaging and the correction methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weitian

    2015-08-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1rho) is useful for assessment of the properties of macromolecular environment inside tissue. Quantification of T1rho is found promising in various clinical applications. However, T1rho imaging is prone to image artifacts and quantification errors, which remains one of the greatest challenges to adopt this technique in routine clinical practice. The conventional continuous wave spin-lock is susceptible to B1 radiofrequency (RF) and B0 field inhomogeneity, which appears as banding artifacts in acquired images. A number of methods have been reported to modify T1rho prep RF pulse cluster to mitigate this effect. Adiabatic RF pulse can also be used for spin-lock with insensitivity to both B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Another source of quantification error in T1rho imaging is signal evolution during imaging data acquisition. Care is needed to affirm such error does not take place when specific pulse sequence is used for imaging data acquisition. Another source of T1rho quantification error is insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is common among various quantitative imaging approaches. Measurement of T1rho within an ROI can mitigate this issue, but at the cost of reduced resolution. Noise-corrected methods are reported to address this issue in pixel-wise quantification. For certain tissue type, T1rho quantification can be confounded by magic angle effect and the presence of multiple tissue components. Review of these confounding factors from inherent tissue properties is not included in this article. PMID:26435922

  19. Errors in quantitative T1rho imaging and the correction methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1rho) is useful for assessment of the properties of macromolecular environment inside tissue. Quantification of T1rho is found promising in various clinical applications. However, T1rho imaging is prone to image artifacts and quantification errors, which remains one of the greatest challenges to adopt this technique in routine clinical practice. The conventional continuous wave spin-lock is susceptible to B1 radiofrequency (RF) and B0 field inhomogeneity, which appears as banding artifacts in acquired images. A number of methods have been reported to modify T1rho prep RF pulse cluster to mitigate this effect. Adiabatic RF pulse can also be used for spin-lock with insensitivity to both B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Another source of quantification error in T1rho imaging is signal evolution during imaging data acquisition. Care is needed to affirm such error does not take place when specific pulse sequence is used for imaging data acquisition. Another source of T1rho quantification error is insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is common among various quantitative imaging approaches. Measurement of T1rho within an ROI can mitigate this issue, but at the cost of reduced resolution. Noise-corrected methods are reported to address this issue in pixel-wise quantification. For certain tissue type, T1rho quantification can be confounded by magic angle effect and the presence of multiple tissue components. Review of these confounding factors from inherent tissue properties is not included in this article. PMID:26435922

  20. Quantitative nanoscopy: Tackling sampling limitations in (S)TEM imaging of polymers and composites.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Snel, Roderick; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Sampling limitations in electron microscopy questions whether the analysis of a bulk material is representative, especially while analyzing hierarchical morphologies that extend over multiple length scales. We tackled this problem by automatically acquiring a large series of partially overlapping (S)TEM images with sufficient resolution, subsequently stitched together to generate a large-area map using an in-house developed acquisition toolbox (TU/e Acquisition ToolBox) and stitching module (TU/e Stitcher). In addition, we show that quantitative image analysis of the large scale maps provides representative information that can be related to the synthesis and process conditions of hierarchical materials, which moves electron microscopy analysis towards becoming a bulk characterization tool. We demonstrate the power of such an analysis by examining two different multi-phase materials that are structured over multiple length scales. PMID:26492325

  1. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2016-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement. PMID:26754332

  2. Oxygen octahedra picker: A software tool to extract quantitative information from STEM images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Salzberger, Ute; Sigle, Wilfried; Eren Suyolcu, Y; van Aken, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    In perovskite oxide based materials and hetero-structures there are often strong correlations between oxygen octahedral distortions and functionality. Thus, atomistic understanding of the octahedral distortion, which requires accurate measurements of atomic column positions, will greatly help to engineer their properties. Here, we report the development of a software tool to extract quantitative information of the lattice and of BO6 octahedral distortions from STEM images. Center-of-mass and 2D Gaussian fitting methods are implemented to locate positions of individual atom columns. The precision of atomic column distance measurements is evaluated on both simulated and experimental images. The application of the software tool is demonstrated using practical examples. PMID:27344044

  3. Quantitative electron phase imaging with high sensitivity and an unlimited field of view

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, A. M.; Sarahan, M. C.; Stagg, M. D.; Schramm, S. M.; Humphry, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    As it passes through a sample, an electron beam scatters, producing an exit wavefront rich in information. A range of material properties, from electric and magnetic field strengths to specimen thickness, strain maps and mean inner potentials, can be extrapolated from its phase and mapped at the nanoscale. Unfortunately, the phase signal is not straightforward to obtain. It is most commonly measured using off-axis electron holography, but this is experimentally challenging, places constraints on the sample and has a limited field of view. Here we report an alternative method that avoids these limitations and is easily implemented on an unmodified transmission electron microscope (TEM) operating in the familiar selected area diffraction mode. We use ptychography, an imaging technique popular amongst the X-ray microscopy community; recent advances in reconstruction algorithms now reveal its potential as a tool for highly sensitive, quantitative electron phase imaging. PMID:26423558

  4. Long-term quantitative phase-contrast imaging of living cells by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Pan, F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Rong, L.; Shang, P.; Xiao, W.

    2011-04-01

    The dynamic analysis of biological living samples is one of the particular interests in life sciences. An improved digital holographic microscope for long-term quantitative phase-contrast imaging of living cells is presented in this paper. The optical configuration is optimized in the form of a free-space-fiber hybrid system which promotes the flexibility of imaging in complex or semi-enclosed experimental environment. Aberrations compensation is implemented taking into account the additional phase aberration induced by liquid culture medium in long-term observation. The proposed approach is applied to investigate living samples of MC3T3-E1 and MLO-Y4 cells. The experimental results demonstrate its availability in the analysis of cellular changes.

  5. Quantitative determination of total pigments in red meats using hyperspectral imaging and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhenjie; Sun, Da-Wen; Xie, Anguo; Pu, Hongbin; Han, Zhong; Luo, Man

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the potential of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for quantitative determination of total pigments in red meats, including beef, goose, and duck. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to correlate the spectral data with the reference values of total pigments measured by a traditional method. In order to simplify the PLSR model based on the full spectra, eleven optimal wavelengths were selected using successive projections algorithm (SPA). The new SPA-PLSR model yielded good results with the coefficient of determination (R(2)p) of 0.953, root mean square error (RMSEP) of 9.896, and ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD) of 4.628. Finally, distribution maps of total pigments in red meats were developed using an image processing algorithm. The overall results from this study indicated HSI had the capability for predicting total pigments in red meats. PMID:25704721

  6. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  7. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  8. Tracer kinetic model for quantitative imaging of thymidine ultilization using [C-11] thymidine and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mankoff, D.A.; Shields, A.F.; Lee, T.T.

    1994-05-01

    2-[C-11]thymidine, a marker of thymidine incorporation into DNA, is a PET tracer for assessing tumor proliferation. Quantitation of thymidine images is complicated by the presence of C-11 labeled metabolites, which include thymidine degradation products such as thymine, as well as labeled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). We have therefore formulated and analyzed a compartmental model of tracer and metabolite distribution for the estimation of the thymidine incorporation rate (TIR), which is closely tied to the DNA synthetic rate. During [C-11]thymidine studies, the activities of intact thymidine (Tdr), labeled CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}), and labeled non-carbon dioxide metabolites (Met) are measured from blood samples. The model uses these blood time-activity curves as the inputs to three separate sets of compartments representing tissue Tdr, Met, and CO{sub 2}. There are 9 parameters to be estimated by optimization of the model, given the three input functions and a tissue time-activity curve obtained from PET images taken over the 60 minutes following injection. The TIR is estimated from the rate constants for transfer between the plasma and the Tdr tissue compartments. To simplify parameter estimation, we have determined through sensitivity analysis and simulations that 4 of the parameters can be fixed to physiological reasonable values without overly biasing the estimate of the TIR. The remaining 5 parameters, including those necessary to estimate the TIR, can be floated in the optimization and reliably determined. Simulations show that errors in the assumed values for the fixed parameters lead to worst-case errors in the TIR estimate on the order of 25-30%. We therefore conclude that quantitative imaging of tumor proliferation with [C-11]thymidine is feasible and may be advantageous in tumor imaging, particularly following the response of tumors to therapy.

  9. Imaging and quantitation of a tissue-selective lanthanide chelate using an endoscopic fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlne, Michael P.; Hubbard, Darren S.; Kiefer, Garry; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    1998-04-01

    Tissue spectroscopy and endoscopy are combined with a tissue site-selective fluorescent probes molecule to demonstrate in vitro, spatial, remote, quantitative imaging of the rat small intestine. The probe molecule employed, Tb-3,6,9- tris(methylene phosphonic acid n-butyl ester)-3,6,9,15- tetraaza-bicyclco(9.3.1)pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene(Tb- PTCMB), is shown to bind with the small intestine and provide improved image contrast. High sensitivity is possible due to the absorption-emission Stoke's shift exhibited by the Tb-PTCMB complex. Excitation is centered near 270 nm and multifeatured emission is observed at 490, 550, 590, and 625 nm. Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with the Tb-PTCMB complex, which shows biodistribution, leading to preferential binding to the inner surface of the small intestine. It is shown that the fluorescent image, taken at 550 nm, can be used to quantify the amount of Tb-PCTMB present in an excised tissue sample. The 3(sigma) detection limits are found to be in the femtomole range. An optical mass balance for Tb-PCTMB-dosed small intestine is performed and along with radiotracer biodistribution, demonstrates that approximately 40 percent of the marker probe resides in the endothelial tissue of the small intestine inner lumen. This result is of particular interest since most adult colon cancers develop in this region. These result demonstrate the ability to perform spatial, quantitative, in vitro, endoscopic imaging of a complex biological sample using a probe marker.

  10. Characterisation of a PVCP-based tissue-mimicking phantom for quantitative photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Martina; Zeqiri, Bajram; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can provide high resolution images of tissue structure, pathology and function. As these images can be obtained at multiple wavelengths, quantitatively accurate, spatially resolved, estimates for chromophore concentration, for example, may be obtainable. Such a capability would find a wide range of clinical and pre-clinical applications. However, despite a growing body of theoretical papers on how this might be achieved, there is a noticeable lack of studies providing validated evidence that it can be achieved experimentally, either in vitro or in vivo. Well-defined, versatile and stable phantom materials are essential to assess the accuracy, robustness and applicability of multispectral Quantitative Photoacoustic Imaging (qPAI) algorithms in experimental scenarios. This study assesses the potential of polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) as a phantom material for qPAI, building on previous work that focused on using PVCP for quality control. Parameters that might be controlled or tuned to assess the performance of qPAI algorithms were studied: broadband acoustic properties, multiwavelength optical properties with added absorbers and scatterers, and photoacoustic efficiency. The optical and acoustic properties of PVCP can be tuned to be broadly representative of soft tissue. The Grüneisen parameter is larger than expected in tissue, which is an advantage as it increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the photoacoustic measurements. Interestingly, when the absorption was altered by adding absorbers, the absorption spectra measured using high peak power nanosecond-pulsed sources (typical in photoacoustics) were repeatably different from the ones measured using the low power source in the spectrophotometer, indicative of photochemical reactions taking place.

  11. Making digital phantoms with spectral and spatial light modulators for quantitative applications of hyperspectral optical medical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-03-01

    We present a procedure to generate digital phantoms with a hyperspectral image projector (HIP) consisting of two liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulators (SLMs). The digital phantoms are 3D image data cubes of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxy-hemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standards to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and inter-laboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  12. Structural and Immunocytochemical Characterization of the Adhesive Tendril of Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tendrils of Virginia creeper do not coil around their supports. Rather, they adhere to supporting objects by flattening against the support surface and secreting an adhesive compound which firmly glues the tendril to the support. In this study, microscopic and immunocytochemical techniques wer...

  13. Persistent Angiogenesis in the Autism Brain: An Immunocytochemical Study of Postmortem Cortex, Brainstem and Cerebellum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmitia, E. C.; Saccomano, Z. T.; Alzoobaee, M. F.; Boldrini, M.; Whitaker-Azmitia, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    In the current work, we conducted an immunocytochemical search for markers of ongoing neurogenesis (e.g. nestin) in auditory cortex from postmortem sections of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched control donors. We found nestin labeling in cells of the vascular system, indicating blood vessels plasticity. Evidence of angiogenesis was…

  14. Quantitation and immunocytochemical localization of ubiquitin conjugates within rat red and white skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Haas, Arthur L.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    Solid-phase immunochemical methods were employed to probe the dynamics of ubiquitin pools within selected rat skeletal muscles. The total ubiquitin content of red muscles was greater than that of white muscles, even though the fractional conjugation was similar for both types of muscles. The specificity for conjugated ubiquitin in solid-phase applications, previously demonstrated for an affinity-purified antibody against SDS-denatured ubiquitin, was retained when used as a probe for ubiquitin-protein adducts in tissue sections. Immunohistochemical localization revealed that differences in ubiquitin pools derived from the relative content of red (oxidative) vs white (glycolytic) fibers, with the former exhibiting a higher content of ubiquitin conjugates. Subsequent immunogold labeling demonstrated statistically significant enhanced localization of ubiquitin conjugates to the Z-lines in both red and white muscle fiber types.

  15. In vivo quantitative ultrasound image analysis of femoral subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Koski, Juhani M; Pulkkinen, Pasi; Saarakkala, Simo

    2013-01-01

    A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US) for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of -1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes' grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r = 0.600, P < 0.001; r = 0.486, P = 0.006, resp.) or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r = 0.332, P = 0.039; r = 0.335, P = 0.037, resp.). This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA. PMID:23781150

  16. Imaging Beads-Retained Prey Assay for Rapid and Quantitative Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Conventional Western blot based pull-down methods involve lengthy and laborious work and the results are generally not quantitative. Here, we report the imaging beads-retained prey (IBRP) assay that is rapid and quantitative in studying protein-protein interactions. In this assay, the bait is immobilized onto beads and the prey is fused with a fluorescence protein. The assay takes advantage of the fluorescence of prey and directly quantifies the amount of prey binding to the immobilized bait under a microscope. We validated the assay using previously well studied interactions and found that the amount of prey retained on beads could have a relative linear relationship to both the inputs of bait and prey. IBRP assay provides a universal, fast, quantitative and economical method to study protein interactions and it could be developed to a medium- or high-throughput compatible method. With the availability of fluorescence tagged whole genome ORFs in several organisms, we predict IBRP assay should have wide applications. PMID:23555762

  17. Alzheimer disease: Quantitative analysis of I-123-iodoamphetamine SPECT brain imaging