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Sample records for quantitative mass spectrometry

  1. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  2. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  3. Quantitative mass spectrometry of urinary biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of treatment of renal diseases is limited because the lack of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic markers. Despite the more than a decade of intensive investigation of urinary biomarkers, no new clinical biomarkers were approved. This is in part because the early expectations toward proteomics in biomarkers discovery were significantly higher than the capability of technology at the time. However, during the last decade, proteomic technology has made dramatic progress in both the hardware and software methods. In this review we are discussing modern quantitative methods of mass-spectrometry and providing several examples of their applications for discovery and validation of renal disease biomarkers. We are optimistic about future prospects for the development of novel of specific clinical urinary biomarkers. PMID:25984422

  4. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Heinrich; Hunsucker, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the essential characteristics of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), especially as they relate to its applications in quantitative analysis. Approaches to quantification by MALDI-TOF MS are presented and published applications are critically reviewed. PMID:19106161

  5. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  6. Quantitative matrix assisted plasma desorption mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Schmidt, Lothar; Köhl, Peter; Fritsch, Hans-Walter

    1993-07-01

    The development of optimized sample preparation methods accompanied the history of successful applications of 252Cf-PDMS. Studying the pharmacokinetics of the antineoplastic agent etoposide serum samples from cancer patients were labelled with the homologeous compounds teniposide as internal standard for the quantitative PDMS analysis. Sample purification by chloroform extraction and by thin layer chromatography turned out to be insufficient to guarantee a satisfying final PDMS result. Embedding the purified sample into a matrix of suitable substances on the target reduced the negative influence of impurities, raised the signal-to-noise ratio of molecular ions and improved the reproducibility of calibration. This preparation method was again successfully employed for the quantitative analysis of the cytostatic drug doxorubicin. The application of a different matrix optimized for the preparation of this anthracycline and its homologeous compound daunorubicin, improved the sensitivity, linearity and detection limit.

  7. Mass Spectrometry-Based Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the differential protein expression in complex biological samples, strategies for rapid, highly reproducible and accurate quantification are necessary. Isotope labeling and fluorescent labeling techniques have been widely used in quantitative proteomics research. However, researchers are increasingly turning to label-free shotgun proteomics techniques for faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics falls into two general categories. In the first are the measurements of changes in chromatographic ion intensity such as peptide peak areas or peak heights. The second is based on the spectral counting of identified proteins. In this paper, we will discuss the technologies of these label-free quantitative methods, statistics, available computational software, and their applications in complex proteomics studies. PMID:19911078

  8. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-03-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  9. Attomole quantitation of protein separations with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Grant, P G; Buccholz, B A; Dingley, K; Turteltaub, K W

    2000-12-15

    Quantification of specific proteins depends on separation by chromatography or electrophoresis followed by chemical detection schemes such as staining and fluorophore adhesion. Chemical exchange of short-lived isotopes, particularly sulfur, is also prevalent despite the inconveniences of counting radioactivity. Physical methods based on isotopic and elemental analyses offer highly sensitive protein quantitation that has linear response over wide dynamic ranges and is independent of protein conformation. Accelerator mass spectrometry quantifies long-lived isotopes such as 14C to sub-attomole sensitivity. We quantified protein interactions with small molecules such as toxins, vitamins, and natural biochemicals at precisions of 1-5% . Micro-proton-induced-xray-emission quantifies elemental abundances in separated metalloprotein samples to nanogram amounts and is capable of quantifying phosphorylated loci in gels. Accelerator-based quantitation is a possible tool for quantifying the genome translation into proteome.

  10. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  11. Quantitation of DNA adducts by stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Natalia; Goggin, Melissa; Janis, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to endogenous and exogenous chemicals can lead to the formation of structurally modified DNA bases (DNA adducts). If not repaired, these nucleobase lesions can cause polymerase errors during DNA replication, leading to heritable mutations potentially contributing to the development of cancer. Due to their critical role in cancer initiation, DNA adducts represent mechanism-based biomarkers of carcinogen exposure, and their quantitation is particularly useful for cancer risk assessment. DNA adducts are also valuable in mechanistic studies linking tumorigenic effects of environmental and industrial carcinogens to specific electrophilic species generated from their metabolism. While multiple experimental methodologies have been developed for DNA adduct analysis in biological samples – including immunoassay, HPLC, and 32P-postlabeling – isotope dilution high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) generally has superior selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. As typical DNA adducts concentrations in biological samples are between 0.01 – 10 adducts per 108 normal nucleotides, ultrasensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies are required for their analysis. Recent developments in analytical separations and biological mass spectrometry – especially nanoflow HPLC, nanospray ionization MS, chip-MS, and high resolution MS – have pushed the limits of analytical HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies for DNA adducts, allowing researchers to accurately measure their concentrations in biological samples from patients treated with DNA alkylating drugs and in populations exposed to carcinogens from urban air, drinking water, cooked food, alcohol, and cigarette smoke. PMID:22827593

  12. Quantitative Proteomics Using Ultralow Flow Capillary Electrophoresis–Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the incorporation of an ultralow flow interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation as an alternate workflow for quantitative proteomics. Proteins, extracted from a SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) labeled and an unlabeled yeast strain were mixed and digested enzymatically in solution. The resulting peptides were fractionated using RP-HPLC and analyzed by CE–MS yielding a total of 28 538 quantified peptides that correspond to 3 272 quantified proteins. CE–MS analysis was performed using a neutral capillary coating, providing the highest separation efficiency at ultralow flow conditions (<10 nL/min). Moreover, we were able to demonstrate that CE–MS is a powerful method for the identification of low-abundance modified peptides within the same sample. Without any further enrichment strategies, we succeeded in quantifying 1 371 phosphopeptides present in the CE–MS data set and found 49 phosphopeptides to be differentially regulated in the two yeast strains. Including acetylation, phosphorylation, deamidation, and oxidized forms, a total of 8 106 modified peptides could be identified in addition to 33 854 unique peptide sequences found. The work presented here shows the first quantitative proteomics approach that combines SILAC labeling with CE–MS analysis. PMID:25839223

  13. Investigating quantitation of phosphorylation using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Laurie; Engel-Hall, Aaron; Drew, Kevin; Steinhardt, George; Helseth, Donald L.; Jabon, David; McMurry, Timothy; Angulo, David S.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in methods and instrumentation for analysis of phosphopeptides using mass spectrometry, it is still difficult to quantify the extent of phosphorylation of a substrate due to physiochemical differences between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated peptides. Here we report experiments to investigate those differences using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for a set of synthetic peptides by creating calibration curves of known input ratios of peptides/phosphopeptides and analyzing their resulting signal intensity ratios. These calibration curves reveal subtleties in sequence-dependent differences for relative desorption/ionization efficiencies that cannot be seen from single-point calibrations. We found that the behaviors were reproducible with a variability of 5–10% for observed phosphopeptide signal. Although these data allow us to begin addressing the issues related to modeling these properties and predicting relative signal strengths for other peptide sequences, it is clear this behavior is highly complex and needs to be further explored. PMID:18064576

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry for quantitative in vivo tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S

    2005-04-19

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) counts individual rare, usually radio-, isotopes such as radiocarbon at high efficiency and specificity in milligram-sized samples. AMS traces very low chemical doses ({micro}g) and radiative doses (100 Bq) of isotope labeled compounds in animal models and directly in humans for pharmaceutical, nutritional, or toxicological research. Absorption, metabolism, distribution, binding, and elimination are all quantifiable with high precision after appropriate sample definition.

  15. Quantitative analysis of terbutaline by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leferink, J G; Baillie, T A; Lindberg, C

    1984-01-01

    Over the past 6 years, several gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for terbutaline have been developed, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. They all involve monitoring of an ion selected from the mass spectrum of a suitable terbutaline derivative. This technique, often referred to as mass fragmentography or selected ion monitoring, reduces the interference from other drugs and endogenous compounds. Different ionization techniques have been employed to obtain high sensitivity, viz. electron impact and chemical ionization. Typically, the methods can be used to measure terbutaline concentrations down to 0.1-0.3 ng/mL in plasma or serum. Isolation of terbutaline from biological materials is complicated by the low partition of the drug from water to organic solvents. Extraction with a large volume of ethyl acetate, ion pair extraction, or isolation on a cation exchange column have been used. These methods are time consuming, and attempts have therefore been made to modify them. Rapid extraction can be achieved on a disposable reversed-phase octadecylsilyl column with unimpaired sensitivity and selectivity. Preliminary results indicate that negative ion chemical ionization of a fluorine-containing derivative can further increase the sensitivity of the terbutaline assays. PMID:6586484

  16. Sample preparation for quantitation of tritium by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Dingley, Karen H; Roberts, Mark L; Velsko, Carol A; Love, Adam H

    2002-12-15

    The capability to prepare samples accurately and reproducibly for analysis of tritium (3H) content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) greatly facilitates isotopic tracer studies in which attomole levels of 3H can be measured in milligram-sized samples. A method has been developed to convert the hydrogen of organic samples to a solid, titanium hydride, which can be analyzed by AMS. Using a two-step process, the sample is first oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. In the second step, the water is transferred within a heated manifold into a quartz tube, reduced to hydrogen gas using zinc, and reacted with titanium powder. The 3H/1H ratio of the titanium hydride is measured by AMS and normalized to standards whose ratios were determined by decay counting to calculate the amount of 3H in the original sample. Water, organic compounds, and biological samples with 3H activities measured by liquid scintillation counting were utilized to develop and validate the method. The 3H/1H ratios were quantified in samples that spanned 5 orders of magnitude, from 10(-10) to 10(-15), with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10(-15), which is equivalent to 0.02 dpm tritium/mg of material. Samples smaller than 2 mg were analyzed following addition of 2 mg of a tritium-free-hydrogen carrier. Preparation of organic standards containing both 14C and 3H in 2-mg organic samples demonstrated that this sample preparation methodology can also be applied to quantify both of these isotopes from a single sample. PMID:12510750

  17. Quantitative liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry warfarin assay for in vitro cytochrome P450 studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y; King, B M; Wong, Y N

    2001-11-01

    A sensitive assay using high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been established for the quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 form-specific activities using warfarin as a probe substrate. Four metabolites, 6-, 7-, 8-, and 10-hydroxywarfarin, were chromatographically resolved within 10 min using gradient mobile phases. The mass spectrometry was operated under negative ionization mode. The MS/MS product ion spectra of warfarin and the metabolites were generated using collision-activated dissociation and interpreted. The abundant product ions of the metabolites were selected for quantification applying multiple reaction monitoring. Quantification was based on a quadratic or power curve of the peak area ratio of the metabolite over the internal standard against the respective concentration of the metabolite. This assay has been validated from 2 to 1000 nM for 10-hydroxywarfarin and from 2 to 5000 nM for 6-, 7-, and 8-hydroxywarfarin and successfully applied to evaluate cytochrome P450-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro using human hepatocytes and liver microsomal preparations. PMID:11673893

  18. Development of rapid methodologies for the isolation and quantitation of drug metabolites by differential mobility spectrometrymass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Stephen L.; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Vouros, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories are inundated with thousands of samples requiring lengthy chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometry. Here, we employ differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) interfaced to nano-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to provide a rapid ion filtration technique for the separation of ions in gas phase media prior to mass spectral analysis on a DMS-integrated AB SCIEX API 3000 triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. DMS is efficient at the rapid separation of ions under ambient conditions and provides many advantages when used as an ion filtration technique in tandem with mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS. Our studies evaluated DMS-MS/MS as a rapid, quantitative platform for the analysis of drug metabolites isolated from urine samples. In targeted applications, five metabolites of common drugs of abuse were effectively and rapidly separated using isopropanol and ethyl acetate as transport gas modifiers, eliminating the gas chromatography or liquid chromatography-based separations commonly employed in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories. Calibration curves were prepared for the selected drug metabolites utilizing deuterated internal standards for quantitative purposes. The feasibility of separating and quantitating drug metabolites in a rapid fashion was evaluated by compensation voltage stepping followed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection. Rapid profiling of clinical and forensic toxicology samples could help to address an urgent need within the scientific community by developing high-throughput analytical methodologies, which could reduce significant case backlogs present within these laboratories. PMID:24311968

  19. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  20. Identification and Quantitative Measurements of Chemical Species by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zondlo, Mark A.; Bomse, David S.

    2005-01-01

    The development of a miniature gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system for the measurement of chemical species of interest to combustion is described. The completed system is a fully-contained, automated instrument consisting of a sampling inlet, a small-scale gas chromatograph, a miniature, quadrupole mass spectrometer, vacuum pumps, and software. A pair of computer-driven valves controls the gas sampling and introduction to the chromatographic column. The column has a stainless steel exterior and a silica interior, and contains an adsorbent of that is used to separate organic species. The detection system is based on a quadrupole mass spectrometer consisting of a micropole array, electrometer, and a computer interface. The vacuum system has two miniature pumps to maintain the low pressure needed for the mass spectrometer. A laptop computer uses custom software to control the entire system and collect the data. In a laboratory demonstration, the system separated calibration mixtures containing 1000 ppm of alkanes and alkenes.

  1. Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burlingame, A.L.; Baillie, T.A.; Derrick, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It is the intention of the review to bring together in one source the direction of major developments in mass spectrometry and to illustrate these by citing key contributions from both fundamental and applied research. The Review is intended to provide the reader with a sense of the main currents, their breadth and depth, and probable future directions. It is also intended to provide the reader with a glimpse of the diverse discoveries and results that underpin the eventual development of new methods and instruments - the keys to obtaining new insights in all the physical, chemical, and biological sciences which depend on mass spectrometry at various levels of sophistication. Focal points for future interdisciplinary synergism might be selective quantitative derivatization of large peptides, which would convey properties that direct fragmentation providing specific sequence information, or optimization of LCMS for biooligomer sequencing and mixture analysis, or the perfect way to control or enhance the internal energy of ions of any size, or many others. 1669 references.

  2. Identification of dengue RNA binding proteins using RNA chromatography and quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex M; Gunaratne, J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in dengue virus (DENV) research has been to understand the interaction of the viral RNA with host cell proteins during infection. Until recently, there were no comprehensive studies identifying host RNA binding proteins that interact with DENV RNA (Ward et al. RNA Biol 8 (6):1173-1186, 2011). Here, we describe a method for identifying proteins that associate with DENV RNA using RNA chromatography and quantitative mass spectrometry. The method utilizes a tobramycin RNA aptamer incorporated into an RNA containing the dengue 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) in order to reversibly bind RNA to a tobramycin matrix. The RNA-tobramycin matrix is incubated with SILAC-labeled cell lysates, and bound proteins are eluted using an excess of tobramycin. The eluate is analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, which allows direct and quantitative comparison of proteins bound to DENV UTRs and a control RNA-tobramycin matrix. This technique has the advantage of allowing one to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding proteins based on the ratio of protein preferentially bound to the DENV UTRs versus the control RNA. This methodology can also be used for validation of quantitative mass spectrometry results using conventional Western blotting for specific proteins. Furthermore, though it was specifically developed to identify DENV RNA binding proteins, the RNA chromatography method described here can be applied to a broad range of viral and cellular RNAs for identification of interacting proteins. PMID:24696342

  3. Building the connectivity map of epigenetics: Chromatin profiling by quantitative targeted mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Creech, Amanda L.; Taylor, Jordan E.; Maier, Verena K.; Wu, Xiaoyun; Feeney, Caitlin M.; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Peach, Sally E.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Lee, Jeannie T.; Carr, Steven A.; Jaffe, Jacob D.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic control of genome function is an important regulatory mechanism in diverse processes such as lineage commitment and environmental sensing, and in disease etiologies ranging from neuropsychiatric disorders to cancer. Here we report a robust, high-throughput targeted, quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) method to rapidly profile modifications of the core histones of chromatin that compose the epigenetic landscape, enabling comparisons among cells with differing genetic backgrounds, genomic perturbations, and drug treatments. PMID:25448295

  4. Quantitative characterization of solid state phases by secondary neutral mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oechsner, H.; Getto, R.; Kopnarski, M.

    2009-03-01

    The quantitative determination of chemical solid phases by secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) based on the quantitative character of this technique is described and demonstrated for several thin film structures. The intermetallic phases in a Ni-Zn coating on Fe are shown to be achieved directly from the concentration ratios determined by SNMS. When correlating the local elemental concentration tupels with the corresponding phase fractions by a matrix equation, the determination of chemical solid phase depth profiles becomes possible. This is exemplified by the detection of temperature induced chemical phases in Ni and Ti/Si films on SiC substrates.

  5. Quantitation of acrylamide in foods by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide detection still represents one of the hottest topics in food chemistry. Solid phase cleanup coupled to liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry detection along with GC-MS detection are nowadays the gold standard procedure for acrylamide quantitation thanks to high reproducibility, good recovery, and low relative standard deviation. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is particularly suitable for the detection of low molecular weight amides, and it can provide some analytical advantages over other MS techniques. In this paper a liquid chromatography (LC) method for acrylamide determination using HRMS detection was developed and compared to LC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The procedure applied a simplified extraction, no cleanup steps, and a 4 min chromatography. It proved to be solid and robust with an acrylamide mass accuracy of 0.7 ppm, a limit of detection of 2.65 ppb, and a limit of quantitation of 5 ppb. The method was tested on four acrylamide-containing foods: cookies, French fries, ground coffee, and brewed coffee. Results were perfectly in line with those obtained by LC-MS/MS. PMID:24369782

  6. Mass Spectrometry Provides Accurate and Sensitive Quantitation of A2E

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Blakeley, Lorie; Goletz, Patrice W.; Schey, Kevin L.; Hanneken, Anne; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Summary Orange autofluorescence from lipofuscin in the lysosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a hallmark of aging in the eye. One of the major components of lipofuscin is A2E, the levels of which increase with age and in pathologic conditions, such as Stargardt disease or age-related macular degeneration. In vitro studies have suggested that A2E is highly phototoxic and, more specifically, that A2E and its oxidized derivatives contribute to RPE damage and subsequent photoreceptor cell death. To date, absorption spectroscopy has been the primary method to identify and quantitate A2E. Here, a new mass spectrometric method was developed for the specific detection of low levels of A2E and compared to a traditional method of analysis. The new mass spectrometry method allows the detection and quantitation of approximately 10,000-fold less A2E than absorption spectroscopy and the detection and quantitation of low levels of oxidized A2E, with localization of the oxidation sites. This study suggests that identification and quantitation of A2E from tissue extracts by chromatographic absorption spectroscopyoverestimates the amount of A2E. This mass spectrometry approach makes it possible to detect low levels of A2E and its oxidized metabolites with greater accuracy than traditional methods, thereby facilitating a more exact analysis of bis-retinoids in animal models of inherited retinal degeneration as well as in normal and diseased human eyes. PMID:20931136

  7. Investigation of Elemental Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacology for Peptide Quantitation at Femtomolar Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cordeau, Emmanuelle; Arnaudguilhem, Carine; Bouyssiere, Brice; Hagège, Agnès; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Cantel, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    In the search of new robust and environmental-friendly analytical methods able to answer quantitative issues in pharmacology, we explore liquid chromatography (LC) associated with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to monitor peptides in such complex biological matrices. The novelty is to use mass spectrometry to replace radiolabelling and radioactivity measurements, which represent up-to now the gold standard to measure organic compound concentrations in life science. As a proof of concept, we choose the vasopressin (AVP)/V1A receptor system for model pharmacological assays. The capacity of ICP-MS to provide highly sensitive quantitation of metallic and hetero elements, whatever the sample medium, prompted us to investigate this technique in combination with appropriate labelling of the peptide of interest. Selenium, that is scarcely present in biological media, was selected as a good compromise between ICP-MS response, covalent tagging ability using conventional sulfur chemistry and peptide detection specificity. Applying selenium monitoring by elemental mass spectrometry in pharmacology is challenging due to the very high salt content and organic material complexity of the samples that produces polyatomic aggregates and thus potentially mass interferences with selenium detection. Hyphenation with a chromatographic separation was found compulsory. Noteworthy, we aimed to develop a straightforward quantitative protocol that can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a standard macrobore LC-ICP-MS system, in order to avoid time-consuming sample treatment or special implementation of instrumental set-up, while allowing efficient suppression of all mass interferences to reach the targeted sensitivity. Significantly, a quantification limit of 57 ng Se L-1 (72 femtomoles of injected Se) was achieved, the samples issued from the pharmacological assays being directly introduced into the LC-ICP-MS system. The established method was successfully validated and

  8. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  9. Quantitative analysis of intact apolipoproteins in human HDL by top-down differential mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Matthew T.; Cardasis, Helene L.; Spellman, Daniel S.; Liaw, Andy; Yates, Nathan A.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Top-down mass spectrometry holds tremendous potential for the characterization and quantification of intact proteins, including individual protein isoforms and specific posttranslationally modified forms. This technique does not require antibody reagents and thus offers a rapid path for assay development with increased specificity based on the amino acid sequence. Top-down MS is efficient whereby intact protein mass measurement, purification by mass separation, dissociation, and measurement of product ions with ppm mass accuracy occurs on the seconds to minutes time scale. Moreover, as the analysis is based on the accurate measurement of an intact protein, top-down mass spectrometry opens a research paradigm to perform quantitative analysis of “unknown” proteins that differ in accurate mass. As a proof of concept, we have applied differential mass spectrometry (dMS) to the top-down analysis of apolipoproteins isolated from human HDL3. The protein species at 9415.45 Da demonstrates an average fold change of 4.7 (p-value 0.017) and was identified as an O-glycosylated form of apolipoprotein C-III [NANA-(2 → 3)-Gal-β(1 → 3)-GalNAc, +656.2037 Da], a protein associated with coronary artery disease. This work demonstrates the utility of top-down dMS for quantitative analysis of intact protein mixtures and holds potential for facilitating a better understanding of HDL biology and complex biological systems at the protein level. PMID:20388904

  10. Rapid quantitation of monoclonal antibody N-glyco-occupancy and afucosylation using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suli; Zang, Li

    2016-09-15

    N-glyco-occupancy and afucoslyation level are two important quality attributes associated with N-glycosylation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We report here a fast mass spectrometry-based workflow for quantification of N-glycan site-occupancy and afucoslyation level of mAbs with improved throughput, precision, sensitivity and robustness. This method uses the deglycosylation after the first GlcNAc and inter-chain reduction of the mAbs, followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The entire process can be completed within one hour, which provides a rapid quantitation of N-glyco-occupancy and afucosylation to support high-throughput cell line selection and process development for mAb biopharmaceuticals. PMID:27377969

  11. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  12. PyQuant: A Versatile Framework for Analysis of Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Kim, Min-Sik; Na, Chan Hyun; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry data necessitates an analytical pipeline that captures the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the experiments. Currently, data analysis is often coupled to specific software packages, which restricts the analysis to a given workflow and precludes a more thorough characterization of the data by other complementary tools. To address this, we have developed PyQuant, a cross-platform mass spectrometry data quantification application that is compatible with existing frameworks and can be used as a stand-alone quantification tool. PyQuant supports most types of quantitative mass spectrometry data including SILAC, NeuCode, (15)N, (13)C, or (18)O and chemical methods such as iTRAQ or TMT and provides the option of adding custom labeling strategies. In addition, PyQuant can perform specialized analyses such as quantifying isotopically labeled samples where the label has been metabolized into other amino acids and targeted quantification of selected ions independent of spectral assignment. PyQuant is capable of quantifying search results from popular proteomic frameworks such as MaxQuant, Proteome Discoverer, and the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline in addition to several standalone search engines. We have found that PyQuant routinely quantifies a greater proportion of spectral assignments, with increases ranging from 25-45% in this study. Finally, PyQuant is capable of complementing spectral assignments between replicates to quantify ions missed because of lack of MS/MS fragmentation or that were omitted because of issues such as spectra quality or false discovery rates. This results in an increase of biologically useful data available for interpretation. In summary, PyQuant is a flexible mass spectrometry data quantification platform that is capable of interfacing with a variety of existing formats and is highly customizable, which permits easy configuration for custom analysis. PMID:27231314

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Isotope Distributions In Proteomic Mass Spectrometry Using Least-Squares Fourier Transform Convolution

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Edit; Bunner, Anne E.; Sykes, Michael T.; Williamson, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry involves comparison of the amplitudes of peaks resulting from different isotope labeling patterns, including fractional atomic labeling and fractional residue labeling. We have developed a general and flexible analytical treatment of the complex isotope distributions that arise in these experiments, using Fourier transform convolution to calculate labeled isotope distributions and least-squares for quantitative comparison with experimental peaks. The degree of fractional atomic and fractional residue labeling can be determined from experimental peaks at the same time as the integrated intensity of all of the isotopomers in the isotope distribution. The approach is illustrated using data with fractional 15N-labeling and fractional 13C-isoleucine labeling. The least-squares Fourier transform convolution approach can be applied to many types of quantitive proteomic data, including data from stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and pulse labeling experiments. PMID:18522437

  14. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  15. Absolute Quantitation of Intact Recombinant Antibody Product Variants Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Frank D; Yang, Feng; Li, Charlene; Wang, Chenchen; Dang, Anh Nguyen; Marhoul, Joseph C; Zhang, Hui-min; Tully, Timothy; Liu, Hongbin; Yu, X Christopher; Michels, David A

    2015-10-20

    Accurate and precise quantitative measurement of product-related variants of a therapeutic antibody is essential for product development and testing. Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are Abs composed of two different half antibody arms, each of which recognizes a distinct target, and recently they have attracted substantial therapeutic interest. Because of the increased complexity of its structure and its production process, as compared to a conventional monoclonal antibody, additional product-related variants, including covalent and noncovalent homodimers of half antibodies (hAbs), may be present in the bsAb product. Sufficient separation and reliable quantitation of these bsAb homodimers using liquid chromatography (LC) or capillary electrophoresis-based methods is challenging because these homodimer species and the bsAb often have similar physicochemical properties. Formation of noncovalent homodimers and heterodimers can also occur. In addition, since homodimers share common sequences with their corresponding halves and bsAb, it is not suitable to use peptides as surrogates for their quantitation. To tackle these analytical challenges, we developed a mass spectrometry-based quantitation method. Chip-based nanoflow LC-time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a standard addition approach provided unbiased absolute quantitation of these drug-product-related variants. Two methods for the addition of known levels of standard (multi- or single-addition) were evaluated. Both methods demonstrated accurate and reproducible quantitation of homodimers at the 0.2% (w/w) level, with the single-addition method having the promise of higher analytical throughput. PMID:26376221

  16. Absolute Quantitative MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry: A Case of Rifampicin in Liver Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chumbley, Chad W; Reyzer, Michelle L; Allen, Jamie L; Marriner, Gwendolyn A; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-02-16

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) elucidates molecular distributions in thin tissue sections. Absolute pixel-to-pixel quantitation has remained a challenge, primarily lacking validation of the appropriate analytical methods. In the present work, isotopically labeled internal standards are applied to tissue sections to maximize quantitative reproducibility and yield accurate quantitative results. We have developed a tissue model for rifampicin (RIF), an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis, and have tested different methods of applying an isotopically labeled internal standard for MALDI IMS analysis. The application of the standard and subsequently the matrix onto tissue sections resulted in quantitation that was not statistically significantly different from results obtained using HPLC-MS/MS of tissue extracts. Quantitative IMS experiments were performed on liver tissue from an animal dosed in vivo. Each microspot in the quantitative images measures the local concentration of RIF in the thin tissue section. Lower concentrations were detected from the blood vessels and around the portal tracts. The quantitative values obtained from these measurements were comparable (>90% similarity) to HPLC-MS/MS results obtained from extracts of the same tissue. PMID:26814665

  17. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. PMID:26302362

  18. Identification and Quantitation of Biomarkers for Radiation-Induced Injury via Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jace W.; Scott, Alison J.; Tudor, Gregory; Xu, Pu-Ting; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Booth, Catherine; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Ernst, Robert K.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2013-01-01

    Biomarker identification and validation for radiation exposure is a rapidly expanding field encompassing the need for well-defined animal models and advanced analytical techniques. The resources within the consortium, Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Threats (MCART), provide a unique opportunity for accessing well-defined animal models that simulate the key sequelae of the acute radiation syndrome and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposure. Likewise, the use of mass spectrometry-based analytical techniques for biomarker discovery and validation enables a robust analytical platform that is amenable to a variety of sample matrices and considered the benchmark for bio-molecular identification and quantitation. Herein, we demonstrate the use of two targeted mass spectrometry approaches to link established MCART animal models to identified metabolite biomarkers. Circulating citrulline concentration was correlated to gross histological gastrointestinal tissue damage and retinoic acid production in lung tissue was established to be reduced at early and late time points post high dose irradiation. Going forward, the use of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics coupled to well-defined animal models provides the unique opportunity for comprehensive biomarker discovery. PMID:24276554

  19. Detecting outlier peptides in quantitative high-throughput mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Florian; Zimmer, Ralf

    2012-06-18

    Quantitative high-throughput mass spectrometry has become an established tool to measure relative gene expression proteome-wide. The output of such an experiment usually consists of a list of expression ratios (fold changes) for several thousand proteins between two conditions. However, we observed that individual peptide fold changes may show a significantly different behavior than other peptides from the same protein and that these differences cannot be explained by imprecise measurements. Such outlier peptides can be the consequence of several technical (misidentifications, misquantifications) or biological (post-translational modifications, differential regulation of isoforms) reasons. We developed a method to detect outlier peptides in mass spectrometry data which is able to delineate imprecise measurements from real outlier peptides with high accuracy when the true difference is as small as 1.4 fold. We applied our method to experimental data and investigated the different technical and biological effects that result in outlier peptides. Our method will assist future research to reduce technical bias and can help to identify genes with differentially regulated protein isoforms in high throughput mass spectrometry data. PMID:22483996

  20. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, André C; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[(18)O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  1. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  2. Comparison of STIM and particle backscattering spectrometry mass determination for quantitative microanalysis of cultured cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, G.; Ortega, R.

    2001-07-01

    In biological sample microanalysis, a mass-normalisation method is commonly used as a quantitative index of elemental concentrations determined by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The organic mass can either be determined using particle backscattering spectrometry (BS) or scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). However, the accuracy of quantitative microanalysis in samples such as cultured cells is affected by beam-induced loss of organic mass during analysis. The aim of this paper is to compare mass measurements determined by particle BS or by STIM. In order to calibrate STIM and BS analyses, we measured by both techniques the thickness of standard foils of polycarbonate (3 and 6 μm) , Mylar ®(4 μm) , Kapton ®(7.5 μm) and Nylon ®(15 μm) , as well as biological samples of mono-layered cultured cells. Non-damaging STIM analysis of samples before PIXE irradiation is certainly one of the most accurate ways to determine the sample mass, however, this requires strong experimental handling. On the other hand, BS performed simultaneously to PIXE is the simplest method to determine the local mass in polymer foils, but appears less accurate in the case of cultured cells.

  3. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for quantitative gene expression analysis of acid responses in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rode, Tone Mari; Berget, Ingunn; Langsrud, Solveig; Møretrø, Trond; Holck, Askild

    2009-07-01

    Microorganisms are constantly exposed to new and altered growth conditions, and respond by changing gene expression patterns. Several methods for studying gene expression exist. During the last decade, the analysis of microarrays has been one of the most common approaches applied for large scale gene expression studies. A relatively new method for gene expression analysis is MassARRAY, which combines real competitive-PCR and MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry. In contrast to microarray methods, MassARRAY technology is suitable for analysing a larger number of samples, though for a smaller set of genes. In this study we compare the results from MassARRAY with microarrays on gene expression responses of Staphylococcus aureus exposed to acid stress at pH 4.5. RNA isolated from the same stress experiments was analysed using both the MassARRAY and the microarray methods. The MassARRAY and microarray methods showed good correlation. Both MassARRAY and microarray estimated somewhat lower fold changes compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The results confirmed the up-regulation of the urease genes in acidic environments, and also indicated the importance of metal ion regulation. This study shows that the MassARRAY technology is suitable for gene expression analysis in prokaryotes, and has advantages when a set of genes is being analysed for an organism exposed to many different environmental conditions. PMID:19445975

  4. Visualizing spatial distribution of alectinib in murine brain using quantitative mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Ryu, Shoraku; Yamashita, Makiko; Ohtsuka, Naoto; Nishidate, Masanobu; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hamada, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    In the development of anticancer drugs, drug concentration measurements in the target tissue have been thought to be crucial for predicting drug efficacy and safety. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is commonly used for determination of average drug concentrations; however, complete loss of spatial information in the target tissue occurs. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been recently applied as an innovative tool for detection of molecular distribution of pharmacological agents in heterogeneous targets. This study examined the intra-brain transitivity of alectinib, a novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MSI and LC-MS/MS techniques. We first analyzed the pharmacokinetic profiles in FVB mice and then examined the effect of the multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR1) using Mdr1a/b knockout mice including quantitative distribution of alectinib in the brain. While no differences were observed between the mice for the plasma alectinib concentrations, diffuse alectinib distributions were found in the brain of the Mdr1a/b knockout versus FVB mice. These results indicate the potential for using quantitative MSI for clarifying drug distribution in the brain on a microscopic level, in addition to suggesting a possible use in designing studies for anticancer drug development and translational research. PMID:27026287

  5. Identification of hypoxia-regulated proteins using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging combined with quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas; Schmich, Fabian; Sinclair, John; Mršnik, Martina; Schoof, Erwin M; Barker, Holly E; Linding, Rune; Jørgensen, Claus; Erler, Janine T

    2014-05-01

    Hypoxia is present in most solid tumors and is clinically correlated with increased metastasis and poor patient survival. While studies have demonstrated the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in cancer progression, no attempts have been made to identify hypoxia-regulated proteins using quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer cells using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). MS analyses were performed on laser-capture microdissected samples isolated from normoxic and hypoxic regions from tumors derived from the same cells used in vitro. MALDI-MSI was used in combination to investigate hypoxia-regulated protein localization within tumor sections. Here we identified more than 100 proteins, both novel and previously reported, that were associated with hypoxia. Several proteins were localized in hypoxic regions, as identified by MALDI-MSI. Visualization and data extrapolation methods for the in vitro SILAC data were also developed, and computational mapping of MALDI-MSI data to IHC results was applied for data validation. The results and limitations of the methodologies described are discussed. PMID:24702160

  6. Visualizing spatial distribution of alectinib in murine brain using quantitative mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Ryu, Shoraku; Yamashita, Makiko; Ohtsuka, Naoto; Nishidate, Masanobu; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hamada, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    In the development of anticancer drugs, drug concentration measurements in the target tissue have been thought to be crucial for predicting drug efficacy and safety. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is commonly used for determination of average drug concentrations; however, complete loss of spatial information in the target tissue occurs. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been recently applied as an innovative tool for detection of molecular distribution of pharmacological agents in heterogeneous targets. This study examined the intra-brain transitivity of alectinib, a novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–MSI and LC-MS/MS techniques. We first analyzed the pharmacokinetic profiles in FVB mice and then examined the effect of the multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR1) using Mdr1a/b knockout mice including quantitative distribution of alectinib in the brain. While no differences were observed between the mice for the plasma alectinib concentrations, diffuse alectinib distributions were found in the brain of the Mdr1a/b knockout versus FVB mice. These results indicate the potential for using quantitative MSI for clarifying drug distribution in the brain on a microscopic level, in addition to suggesting a possible use in designing studies for anticancer drug development and translational research. PMID:27026287

  7. Quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate in plasma by liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Kim, D H

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in human plasma. Plasma samples (1.0 mL) were simply extracted with pentane and the extracts were analyzed by HPLC with the detection of the analyte in the selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The determination of MPA was accurate and reproducible, with a limit of quantitation of 0.05 ng/mL in plasma. The standard calibration curve for MPA was linear (r = 0.998) over the concentration range 0.05-6.0 ng/mL in human plasma. Analysis precision over the concentration range of MPA was lower than 18.8% (relative standard deviation, RSD) and accuracy was between 96.2 and 108.7%. PMID:11675672

  8. Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants and high-performance mass spectrometry for quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Mills, Davinia J S; Cramer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants (HILEP) combines hydroponic plant cultivation and metabolic labeling with stable isotopes using (15)N-containing inorganic salts to label whole and mature plants. Employing (15)N salts as the sole nitrogen source for HILEP leads to the production of healthy-looking plants which contain (15)N proteins labeled to nearly 100%. Therefore, HILEP is suitable for quantitative plant proteomic analysis, where plants are grown in either (14)N- or (15)N-hydroponic media and pooled when the biological samples are collected for relative proteome quantitation. The pooled (14)N-/(15)N-protein extracts can be fractionated in any suitable way and digested with a protease for shotgun proteomics, using typically reverse phase liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-nESI-MS/MS). Best results were obtained with a hybrid ion trap/FT-MS mass spectrometer, combining high mass accuracy and sensitivity for the MS data acquisition with speed and high-throughput MS/MS data acquisition, increasing the number of proteins identified and quantified and improving protein quantitation. Peak processing and picking from raw MS data files, protein identification, and quantitation were performed in a highly automated way using integrated MS data analysis software with minimum manual intervention, thus easing the analytical workflow. In this methodology paper, we describe how to grow Arabidopsis plants hydroponically for isotope labeling using (15)N salts and how to quantitate the resulting proteomes using a convenient workflow that does not require extensive bioinformatics skills. PMID:22665301

  9. Comparison of two methods for obtaining quantitative mass concentrations from aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xueying; Bhave, Prakash V; Prather, Kimberly A

    2006-09-01

    Aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) measurements provide continuous information on the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual particles. In this work, we compare two approaches for converting unscaled ATOFMS measurements into quantitative particle mass concentrations using (1) reference mass concentrations from a co-located micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) with an accurate estimate of instrument busy time and (2) reference number concentrations from a co-located aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Aerodynamic-diameter-dependent scaling factors are used for both methods to account for particle transmission efficiencies through the ATOFMS inlet. Scaling with APS data retains the high-resolution characteristics of the ambient aerosol because the scaling functions are specific for each hourly time period and account for a maximum in the ATOFMS transmission efficiency curve for larger-sized particles. Scaled mass concentrations obtained from both methods are compared with co-located PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation purposes. When compared against mass concentrations from a beta attenuation monitor (BAM), the MOUDI-scaled ATOFMS mass concentrations show correlations of 0.79 at Fresno, and the APS-scaled results show correlations of 0.91 at Angiola. Applying composition-dependent density corrections leads to a slope of nearly 1 with 0 intercept between the APS-scaled absolute mass concentration values and BAM mass measurements. This paper provides details on the methodologies used to convert ATOFMS data into continuous, quantitative, and size-resolved mass concentrations that will ultimately be used to provide a quantitative estimate of the number and mass concentrations of particles from different sources. PMID:16944899

  10. Multiplicative effects model with internal standard in mobile phase for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Chen, Yao; Jin, Jing-Wen

    2014-07-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays suffer from signal instability caused by the gradual fouling of the ion source, vacuum instability, aging of the ion multiplier, etc. To address this issue, in this contribution, an internal standard was added into the mobile phase. The internal standard was therefore ionized and detected together with the analytes of interest by the mass spectrometer to ensure that variations in measurement conditions and/or instrument have similar effects on the signal contributions of both the analytes of interest and the internal standard. Subsequently, based on the unique strategy of adding internal standard in mobile phase, a multiplicative effects model was developed for quantitative LC-MS assays and tested on a proof of concept model system: the determination of amino acids in water by LC-MS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method could efficiently mitigate the detrimental effects of continuous signal variation, and achieved quantitative results with average relative predictive error values in the range of 8.0-15.0%, which were much more accurate than the corresponding results of conventional internal standard method based on the peak height ratio and partial least squares method (their average relative predictive error values were as high as 66.3% and 64.8%, respectively). Therefore, it is expected that the proposed method can be developed and extended in quantitative LC-MS analysis of more complex systems. PMID:24840455

  11. Advances in liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative and qualitative environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Aceña, Jaume; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià

    2015-08-01

    This review summarizes the advances in environmental analysis by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) during the last decade and discusses different aspects of their application. LC-HRMS has become a powerful tool for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic pollutants, enabling their quantitation and the search for metabolites and transformation products or the detection of unknown compounds. LC-HRMS provides more information than low-resolution (LR) MS for each sample because it can accurately determine the mass of the molecular ion and its fragment ions if it can be used for MS-MS. Another advantage is that the data can be processed using either target analysis, suspect screening, retrospective analysis, or non-target screening. With the growing popularity and acceptance of HRMS analysis, current guidelines for compound confirmation need to be revised for quantitative and qualitative purposes. Furthermore, new commercial software and user-built libraries are required to mine data in an efficient and comprehensive way. The scope of this critical review is not to provide a comprehensive overview of the many studies performed with LC-HRMS in the field of environmental analysis, but to reveal its advantages and limitations using different workflows. PMID:26138893

  12. Annotator: Post-processing Software for generating function-based signatures from quantitative mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Juliesta E.; Bray, Tyler S.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used to investigate global changes in protein abundance in cell lysates. Increasingly powerful methods of data collection have emerged over the past decade, but this has left researchers with the task of sifting through mountains of data for biologically significant results. Often, the end result is a list of proteins with no obvious quantitative relationships to define the larger context of changes in cell behavior. Researchers are often forced to perform a manual analysis from this list or to fall back on a range of disparate tools, which can hinder the communication of results and their reproducibility. To address these methodological problems we developed Annotator, an application that filters validated mass spectrometry data and applies a battery of standardized heuristic and statistical tests to determine significance. To address systems-level interpretations we incorporated UniProt and Gene Ontology keywords as statistical units of analysis, yielding quantitative information about changes in abundance for an entire functional category. This provides a consistent and quantitative method for formulating conclusions about cellular behavior, independent of network models or standard enrichment analyses. Annotator allows for “bottom-up” annotations that are based on experimental data and not inferred by comparison to external or hypothetical models. Annotator was developed as an independent post-processing platform that runs on all common operating systems, thereby providing a useful tool for establishing the inherently dynamic nature of functional annotations, which depend on results from on-going proteomic experiments. Annotator is available for download at http://people.cs.uchicago.edu/~tyler/annotator/annotator_desktop_0.1.tar.gz. PMID:22224429

  13. Quantitation of acrylamide in food products by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, B Loye; Ewald, Deborah K; Sanders, Robert A; Tallmadge, Daniel H; Zyzak, David V; Strothers, Melissa A

    2005-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method was developed for the quantitation of acrylamide in various food products. The method involved spiking the isotope-substituted internal standard (1-C13 acrylamide) onto 6.00 g of the food product, adding 40 mL distilled/deionized water, and heating at 65 degrees C for 30 min. Afterwards, 10 mL ethylene dichloride was added and the mixture was homogenized for 30 s and centrifuged at 2700 x g for 30 min, and then 8 g supernatant was extracted with 10, 5, and 5 mL portions of ethyl acetate. The extracts were combined, dried with sodium sulfate, and concentrated to 100-200 microL. Acrylamide was determined by analysis of the final extract on a single quadrupole, bench-top mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization, using a 2 mm id C18 column and monitoring m/z = 72 (acrylamide) and m/z = 73 (internal standard). For difficult food matrixes, such as coffee and cocoa, a solid-phase extraction cleanup step was incorporated to improve both chromatography and column lifetime. The method had a limit of quantitation of 10 ppb, and coefficients of determination (r2) for calibration curves were typically better than 0.998. Acceptable spike recovery results were achieved in 11 different food matrixes. Precision in potato chip analyses was 5-8% (relative standard deviation). This method provides an LC/MS alternative to the current LC/MS/MS methods and derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods, and is applicable to difficult food products such as coffee, cocoa, and high-salt foods. PMID:16152941

  14. Improving quantitative precision and throughput by reducing calibrator use in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rule, Geoffrey S; Rockwood, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    To improve efficiency in our mass spectrometry laboratories we have made efforts to reduce the number of calibration standards utilized for quantitation over time. We often analyze three or more batches of 96 samples per day, on a single instrument, for a number of assays. With a conventional calibration scheme at six concentration levels this amounts to more than 5000 calibration points per year. Modern LC-tandem mass spectrometric instrumentation is extremely rugged however, and isotopically labelled internal standards are widely available. This made us consider whether alternative calibration strategies could be utilized to reduce the number of calibration standards analyzed while still retaining high precision and accurate quantitation. Here we demonstrate how, by utilizing a single calibration point in each sample batch, and using the resulting response factor (RF) to update an existing, historical response factor (HRF), we are able to obtain improved precision over a conventional multipoint calibration approach, as judged by quality control samples. The laboratory component of this study was conducted with an existing LC tandem mass spectrometric method for three androgen analytes in our production laboratory. Using examples from both simulated and laboratory data we illustrate several aspects of our single point alternative calibration strategy and compare it with a conventional, multipoint calibration approach. We conclude that both the cost and burden of preparing multiple calibration standards with every batch of samples can be reduced while at the same time maintaining, or even improving, analytical quality. PMID:27086099

  15. Quantitative analysis of antibiotics in aquifer sediments by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lei; Liu, Hui; Xie, Cong; Li, Minjing

    2016-06-24

    A highly effective analytical method for multi-residue determination of antibiotics in aquifer sediments was first established in this study. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and solid-phase extraction were used for sample pre-concentration and purification, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) was applied for detection. For high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), the target compounds were tentatively identified by retention time and accurate mass which was measured with precursor ions in Target-SIM scan, and then confirmed by the monitoring of daughter ion fragments which were generated in dd-MS(2) scan. The results provided good mass accuracy with mass deviations below 2ppm (except norfloxacin with -2.3ppm) for quantitative analysis of the compounds by HRMS. Reasonable recoveries of all analytes were obtained more than 60% (except doxytetracycline) in fortification samples at concentrations higher than 10μgkg(-1). Relative standard deviations of repeatability and inter-day precision were below 21% and 11%. Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.1 to 3.8μgkg(-1), whereas limits of quantification (LOQ) were established between 0.3-9.0μgkg(-1). The method was applied to analyze real aquifer sediment samples in different aquifer depth of 4.0, 7.5, 13.0 and 18.0m. Chlorotetracycline and ofloxacin were observed at relative high concentrations of 53 and 19μgkg(-1) respectively in 18.0m deepness. The exposure to low doses of these compounds in subsurface environment increases concerns on long-term ecological security of underground system. PMID:27215464

  16. Validation of the Mass-Extraction-Window for Quantitative Methods Using Liquid Chromatography High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Gaétan; Grund, Baptiste; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Menin, Laure; Henry, Hugues; Bromirski, Maciej; Schütz, Frédéric; McMullen, Justin; Rochat, Bertrand

    2016-03-15

    A paradigm shift is underway in the field of quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis thanks to the arrival of recent high-resolution mass spectrometers (HRMS). The capability of HRMS to perform sensitive and reliable quantifications of a large variety of analytes in HR-full scan mode is showing that it is now realistic to perform quantitative and qualitative analysis with the same instrument. Moreover, HR-full scan acquisition offers a global view of sample extracts and allows retrospective investigations as virtually all ionized compounds are detected with a high sensitivity. In time, the versatility of HRMS together with the increasing need for relative quantification of hundreds of endogenous metabolites should promote a shift from triple-quadrupole MS to HRMS. However, a current "pitfall" in quantitative LC-HRMS analysis is the lack of HRMS-specific guidance for validated quantitative analyses. Indeed, false positive and false negative HRMS detections are rare, albeit possible, if inadequate parameters are used. Here, we investigated two key parameters for the validation of LC-HRMS quantitative analyses: the mass accuracy (MA) and the mass-extraction-window (MEW) that is used to construct the extracted-ion-chromatograms. We propose MA-parameters, graphs, and equations to calculate rational MEW width for the validation of quantitative LC-HRMS methods. MA measurements were performed on four different LC-HRMS platforms. Experimentally determined MEW values ranged between 5.6 and 16.5 ppm and depended on the HRMS platform, its working environment, the calibration procedure, and the analyte considered. The proposed procedure provides a fit-for-purpose MEW determination and prevents false detections. PMID:26836506

  17. ULSI technology and materials: Quantitative answers by combined mass spectrometry surface techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, M.; Fedrizzi, M.; Sbetti, M.; Anderle, M.

    1998-11-01

    The progressive microelectronics ULSI device shrinking towards improving the performances has driven the development of new materials and process technologies. A good example is given by oxynitride, an innovative material which is thought for the next generation of 0.25 μm MOS circuits. Oxynitrides have replaced thermal silicon oxides as gate insulator due to the properties of good masking against impurity diffusion, together with the excellent dielectric strength and the better resistance to dielectric breakdown. The strong request from microelectronics industries for a complete and accurate characterization of this new material and the technological processes concerned, has considerably stimulated the research, particularly in the field of analytical methodology. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, linked since the beginning with microelectronics development, shows again to be the most reliable and suitable microanalytical technique to give answers to this topics. In this work we present some examples of methodologies applied to an accurate quantitative characterization of this new material, together with its impact on the production processes. We show how the complementary employing of several mass spectrometry techniques, such as magnetic sector SIMS, SNMS and ToF-SIMS, can give a more complete overview both to process issues and to methodological developements of the techniques themselves.

  18. ULSI technology and materials: Quantitative answers by combined mass spectrometry surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bersani, M.; Fedrizzi, M.; Anderle, M.; Sbetti, M.

    1998-11-24

    The progressive microelectronics ULSI device shrinking towards improving the performances has driven the development of new materials and process technologies. A good example is given by oxynitride, an innovative material which is thought for the next generation of 0.25 {mu}m MOS circuits. Oxynitrides have replaced thermal silicon oxides as gate insulator due to the properties of good masking against impurity diffusion, together with the excellent dielectric strength and the better resistance to dielectric breakdown. The strong request from microelectronics industries for a complete and accurate characterization of this new material and the technological processes concerned, has considerably stimulated the research, particularly in the field of analytical methodology. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, linked since the beginning with microelectronics development, shows again to be the most reliable and suitable microanalytical technique to give answers to this topics. In this work we present some examples of methodologies applied to an accurate quantitative characterization of this new material, together with its impact on the production processes. We show how the complementary employing of several mass spectrometry techniques, such as magnetic sector SIMS, SNMS and ToF-SIMS, can give a more complete overview both to process issues and to methodological developements of the techniques themselves.

  19. Dual enzyme activities assay by quantitative electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tingting; Zhang, Li; Wang, Haoyang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yurong; Guo, Yinlong

    2012-01-01

    A practical and rapid method based on electrospray ionization quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-ToF MS) was developed for detecting activities of both acetylcholinesterase IAChEI and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The simultaneous study of these two enzyme activities is significant for studying human bio-functions, especially for those who take in toxic compounds and have a risk of disease. Here, the enzyme activities were represented by the conversion of enzymatic substrates and determined by quantitatively analyzing enzymatic substrates. Different internal standards were used to quantify each enzymatic substrate and the good linearity of calibration curves demonstrated the feasibility of the internal standards. The Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) of both GST and AChE were measured by this method and were consistent with values previously reported. Furthermore, we applied this approach to detect GST and AChE activities of whole bloods from four deceased and healthy people. The variation in enzyme activity was in accord with information from gas chromatography mass spectrometry [GC/MS). The screening of AChE and GST provided reliable results and strong forensic evidence. This method offers an alternative choice for detecting enzyme activities and is anticipated to have wide applications in pharmaceutical research and prevention in toxic compounds. PMID:23654197

  20. Quantitative analysis of tivantinib in rat plasma using ultra performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan-Li; Yuan, Hong-Chang; Zhang, Dong-Tao; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yin

    2016-07-15

    In this work, a simple, sensitive and fast ultra performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of tivantinib in rat plasma. Plasma samples were processed with a protein precipitation. The separation was achieved by an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (2.1mm×50mm, 1.7μm) column with a gradient mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Detection was carried out using positive-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The validated method had an excellent linearity in the range of 1.0-100ng/mL (r(2)>0.9967) with a lower limit of quantification (1.0ng/mL). The extraction recovery was in the range of 79.4-84.2% for tivantinib and 80.3% for carbamazepine (internal standard, IS). The intra- and inter-day precision was below 8.9% and accuracy was from -7.2% to 9.5%. No notable matrix effect and astaticism was observed for tivantinib. The method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of tivantinib in rats for the first time, which provides the basis for the further development and application of tivantinib. PMID:27179187

  1. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of clobenzorex.

    PubMed

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    1999-01-01

    Drugs metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine are potentially significant concerns in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive urine drug-testing results. One of these compounds, clobenzorex, is an anorectic drug that is available in many countries. Clobenzorex (2-chlorobenzylamphetamine) is metabolized to amphetamine by the body and excreted in the urine. Following administration, the parent compound was detectable for a shorter time than the metabolite amphetamine, which could be detected for days. Because of the potential complication posed to the interpretation of amphetamin-positive drug tests following administration of this drug, the viability of a current amphetamine procedure using liquid-liquid extraction and conversion to the heptafluorobutyryl derivative followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was evaluated for identification and quantitation of clobenzorex. Qualitative identification of the drug was relatively straightforward. Quantitative analysis proved to be a far more challenging process. Several compounds were evaluated for use as the internal standard in this method, including methamphetamine-d11, fenfluramine, benzphetamine, and diphenylamine. Results using these compounds proved to be less than satisfactory because of poor reproducibility of the quantitative values. Because of its similar chromatographic properties to the parent drug, the compound 3-chlorobenzylamphetamine (3-Cl-clobenzorex) was evaluated in this study as the internal standard for the quantitation of clobenzorex. Precision studies showed 3-Cl-clobenzorex to produce accurate and reliable quantitative results (within-run relative standard deviations [RSDs] < 6.1%, between-run RSDs < 6.0%). The limits of detection and quantitation for this assay were determined to be 1 ng/mL for clobenzorex. PMID:10595847

  2. Quantitative Thin-Layer Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Caffeine Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  3. xTract: software for characterizing conformational changes of protein complexes by quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walzthoeni, Thomas; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Rosenberger, George; Röst, Hannes L; Malmström, Lars; Leitner, Alexander; Frydman, Judith; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-12-01

    Chemical cross-linking in combination with mass spectrometry generates distance restraints of amino acid pairs in close proximity on the surface of native proteins and protein complexes. In this study we used quantitative mass spectrometry and chemical cross-linking to quantify differences in cross-linked peptides obtained from complexes in spatially discrete states. We describe a generic computational pipeline for quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry consisting of modules for quantitative data extraction and statistical assessment of the obtained results. We used the method to detect conformational changes in two model systems: firefly luciferase and the bovine TRiC complex. Our method discovers and explains the structural heterogeneity of protein complexes using only sparse structural information. PMID:26501516

  4. xTract: software for characterizing conformational changes of protein complexes by quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Walzthoeni, Thomas; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Rosenberger, George; Röst, Hannes L; Malmström, Lars; Leitner, Alexander; Frydman, Judith; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking in combination with mass spectrometry generates distance restraints of amino acid pairs in close proximity on the surface of native proteins and protein complexes. In this study we used quantitative mass spectrometry and chemical cross-linking to quantify differences in cross-linked peptides obtained from complexes in spatially discrete states. We describe a generic computational pipeline for quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry consisting of modules for quantitative data extraction and statistical assessment of the obtained results. We used the method to detect conformational changes in two model systems: firefly luciferase and the bovine TRiC complex. Our method discovers and explains the structural heterogeneity of protein complexes using only sparse structural information. PMID:26501516

  5. Quantitative Composition Analysis of Lipid Membranes by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, M L; Weber, P K; Lin, W C; Blanchette, C D; Longo, M L; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2005-04-29

    The lateral organization and interactions of lipid and protein components within biological membranes are essential for their functions. Investigations of the lateral organization within membranes hinge upon the ability to differentiate one component of interest from another. Typically, fluorophores are conjugated to specific components, and the organization is probed with fluorescence microscopy. However, bulky fluorophores may change the physical properties of the components they label, only the labeled components can be visualized, and the diffraction limit of light restricts the lateral resolution. Here we present a method to image microdomains within supported lipid membranes using isotopic labels and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) performed with the NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca). Lateral resolution of 100 nm is achieved with high sensitivity. Quantitative information on the lipid composition within each domain was determined using calibration curves constructed from homogeneous lipid bilayer samples that systematically varied in the isotopically labeled lipid content.

  6. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  7. Facilitated Diffusion of Acetonitrile Revealed by Quantitative Breath Analysis Using Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Ding, Jianhua; Gu, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Susu; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen; Li, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    By using silver cations (Ag+) as the ionic reagent in reactive extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), the concentrations of acetonitrile in exhaled breath samples from the volunteers including active smokers, passive smokers, and non-smokers were quantitatively measured in vivo, without any sample pretreatment. A limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.16 ng/L and 3.5% (n = 8), respectively, for the acetonitrile signals in MS/MS experiments. Interestingly, the concentrations of acetonitrile in human breath continuously increased for 1–4 hours after the smoker finished smoking and then slowly decreased to the background level in 7 days. The experimental data of a large number of (> 165) samples indicated that the inhaled acetonitrile is excreted most likely by facilitated diffusion, instead of simple diffusion reported previously for other volatile compounds. PMID:23386969

  8. Quantitative determination of capsaicinoids by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert Q; Phinney, Karen W; Welch, Michael J; White, Edward

    2005-04-01

    Eight naturally occurring capsaicinoids have been determined in Capsicum by use of high-purity standards, with norcapsaicin as an internal standard. The solid standards were rigorously checked for purity. The sensitivity of electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and coordination ion-spray (CIS; with silver) toward the capsaicinoids were measured and compared. The highest sensitivity was found for positive-ion ESI. Method validation of the liquid chromatography-ESI-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) determination is reported, including tests for repeatability (4%), detection limit (5 pg injected), linear range (20-6 ng injected), quantitation (excellent linearity; < 2% relative standard deviation), and recovery (99-103%). The major and minor capsaicinoids in a commercial plant extract and in chili pepper fruits were quantified. PMID:15803309

  9. A rapid quantitative method of carisoprodol and meprobamate by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Essler, Shannon; Bruns, Kerry; Frontz, Michael; McCutcheon, J Rod

    2012-11-01

    The identification and quantitation of carisoprodol (Soma) and its chief metabolite meprobamate, which is also a clinically prescribed drug, remains a challenge for forensic toxicology laboratories. Carisoprodol and meprobamate are notable for their widespread use as muscle relaxants and their frequent identification in the blood of impaired drivers. Routine screening is possible in both an acidic/neutral pH screen and a traditional basic screen. An improvement in directed testing quantitations was desirable over the current options of an underivatized acidic/neutral extraction or a basic screen, neither of which used ideal internal standards. A new method was developed that utilized a simple protein precipitation, deuterated internal standards and a short 2-min isocratic liquid chromatography separation, followed by multiple reaction monitoring with tandem mass spectrometry. The linear quantitative range for carisoprodol was determined to be 1-35mg/L and for meprobamate was 0.5-50mg/L. The method was validated for specificity and selectivity, matrix effects, and accuracy and precision. PMID:23040985

  10. Quantitative measurement of immunoglobulins and free light chains using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    VanDuijn, Martijn M; Jacobs, Joannes F M; Wevers, Ron A; Engelke, Udo F; Joosten, Irma; Luider, Theo M

    2015-08-18

    Serum free light chain (sFLC) assays are well established in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell disorders. However, current FLC immunoassays are subject to several analytical issues, which results in a lack of harmonized results. To facilitate sFLC standardization, we investigated the strengths and limitations of mass spectrometry as a novel technological platform for sFLC quantification. Stable isotope labeled reference peptides are added to serum samples for quantitation by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The use of redundant peptide sets allows for quality control measures during data analysis. Measurements on serum provide information on intact immunoglobulins, but depletion of these intact molecules from the sera during sample processing permits the quantitation of sFLC. sFLC concentrations measured with SRM were comparable to those obtained by nephelometry and showed excellent linearity (r(2) > 0.99). In samples with high levels of sFLC, SRM data was more consistent with serum protein electrophoresis than nephelometric data and SRM is unaffected by antigen excess. The lower limits of quantitation were 3.8 and 2.7 mg/L for κ and λ sFLC. Errors due to polymorphic sequences were prevented by comparison of redundant peptide pairs. The application of stable isotope labeling combined with SRM can overcome many of the current potential analytical issues of sFLC analysis. We describe which hurdles still need to be taken to make SRM a robust and more accurate method for sFLC measurements. PMID:26168337

  11. Quantitative detection of nitric oxide in exhaled human breath by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Susu; Tian, Yong; Li, Ming; Zhao, Jiuyan; Zhu, Lanlan; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Haiwei; Wang, Haidong; Shi, Jianbo; Fang, Xiang; Li, Penghui; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-03-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is a useful biomarker of various physiological conditions, including asthma and other pulmonary diseases. Herein a fast and sensitive analytical method has been developed for the quantitative detection of eNO based on extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS). Exhaled NO molecules selectively reacted with 2-phenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) reagent, and eNO concentration was derived based on the EESI-MS response of 1-oxyl-2-phenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline (PTI) product. The method allowed quantification of eNO below ppb level (~0.02 ppbv) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 11.6%. In addition, eNO levels of 20 volunteers were monitored by EESI-MS over the time period of 10 hrs. Long-term eNO response to smoking a cigarette was recorded, and the observed time-dependent profile was discussed. This work extends the application of EESI-MS to small molecules (<30 Da) with low proton affinity and collision-induced dissociation efficiency, which are usually poorly visible by conventional ion trap mass spectrometers. Long-term quantitative profiling of eNO by EESI-MS opens new possibilities for the research of human metabolism and clinical diagnosis.

  12. Quantitative Metabolome Analysis Based on Chromatographic Peak Reconstruction in Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Li, Liang

    2015-07-21

    Generating precise and accurate quantitative information on metabolomic changes in comparative samples is important for metabolomics research where technical variations in the metabolomic data should be minimized in order to reveal biological changes. We report a method and software program, IsoMS-Quant, for extracting quantitative information from a metabolomic data set generated by chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Unlike previous work of relying on mass spectral peak ratio of the highest intensity peak pair to measure relative quantity difference of a differentially labeled metabolite, this new program reconstructs the chromatographic peaks of the light- and heavy-labeled metabolite pair and then calculates the ratio of their peak areas to represent the relative concentration difference in two comparative samples. Using chromatographic peaks to perform relative quantification is shown to be more precise and accurate. IsoMS-Quant is integrated with IsoMS for picking peak pairs and Zero-fill for retrieving missing peak pairs in the initial peak pairs table generated by IsoMS to form a complete tool for processing CIL LC-MS data. This program can be freely downloaded from the www.MyCompoundID.org web site for noncommercial use. PMID:26086729

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A; Koester, C

    2008-11-13

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limit of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.

  14. Quantitative determination of DNA adducts using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siethoff, C; Feldmann, I; Jakubowski, N; Linscheid, M

    1999-04-01

    The quantitative determination of nucleotides from DNA modified by styrene oxide is described using a combination of inductively coupled plasma high-resolution mass spectrometry (ICP-HRMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), both interfaced to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). LC/ICP-MS (resolution > 1500 to discriminate against 15N16O+ and 14N16OH+) was employed to determine quantitatively the content of modified nucleotides in standard solutions based on the signal of phosphorus; phosphoric acid served as an internal standard. By means of the standard addition technique the sensitivity of the LC/ESI-MS approach was subsequently determined. Since a comparison of UV, ICP and ESI-MS data suggested that in ESI-MS the ionization efficiency of the adducts is identical within the error limits, quantitative determination of all adducts is possible. For LC/ESI-MS with single ion monitoring, the detection limit for styrene oxide adducts of nucleotides was determined to be 20 pg absolute or 14 modified in 10(8) unmodified nucleotides in a 5 micrograms DNA sample, which comes close to the best methods available for the detection of chemical modifications in DNA. PMID:10226366

  15. Quantitation of ethyl glucuronide in serum & urine by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyamvada; Bharat, Venkatesh; Murthy, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Alcohol misuse has now become a serious public health problem and early intervention is important in minimizing the harm. Biochemical markers of recent and high levels of alcohol consumption can play an important role in providing feedback regarding the health consequences of alcohol misuse. Existing markers are not sensitive to recent consumption and in detecting early relapse. Ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a phase-II metabolite of ethanol is a promising marker of recent alcohol use and can be detected in body fluids. In this study an analytical technique for quantitation of EtG in body fluids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric detection (MS) was developed and validated. Methods: De-proteinization of serum and urine samples was done with perchloric acid and hydrochloric acid, respectively. Serum samples were passed through phospholipids removal cartridges for further clean up. EtG was isolated using amino propyl solid phase extraction columns. Chromatographic separation was achieved by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Results: Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 50 and 150 ng/ml for urine and 80 and 210 ng/ml for serum, respectively. Signal to noise ratio was 3:1, mean absolute recovery was 80-85 per cent. Significant correlation was obtained between breath alcohol and serum EtG levels (r=0.853) and urine EtG and time since last abuse (r = -0.903) in clinical samples. Interpretation & conclusions: In the absence of other standardized techniques to quantitate EtG in biological samples, this GC-MS method was found to have high throughput and was sensitive and specific. PMID:25857498

  16. Quantitative, Multidrug Pain Medication Testing by Liquid Chromatography: Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Bodor, Geza S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is often treated with narcotic analgesics. The most commonly used narcotic analgesics are the opiates (natural or modified compounds of the poppy plant) or opioids (synthetic chemicals that act on opiate receptors). While opiates and opioids are excellent analgesics, they can also have significant side effects that include respiratory depression, coma, or death. Tolerance, physical dependence, and addiction (psychological dependence) are other severe side effects of opioid use. Patients who develop dependence or addiction often times abuse other, non-opioid narcotics and may trade their prescription medication for illegal street drugs (called "diversion"). In order to minimize side effects, detect possible multidrug abuse and prove diversion, simultaneous monitoring of numerous prescription and illicit drugs is required. The method described in this chapter is for the quantitative measurement of 43 different drugs in urine. The panel includes narcotic pain medications, benzodiazepines, NIDA drugs, and other, commonly abused medications. The analytes of interests are injected in the presence of deuterated internal standards to correct for possible extraction inefficiencies, ion suppression, or other interferences. The sample is prepared by adding dilution buffer with the deuterated internal standards to the sample, followed by reversed-phase, gradient HPLC separation on a Phenyl-Hexyl column using water and methanol as mobile phases. Detection of the analytes of interest is done by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer following electrospray ionization in the positive mode. Mass spectrometric (MS) data are collected in the scheduled MRM (sMRM) mode. Two MRM transitions are monitored for each analyte and one MRM transition is monitored for each IS. Quantitation of the unknown analytes is achieved by comparing the peak area ratios of the analytes to that of the internal standards and reading the unknown

  17. Profiling of Protein Interaction Networks of Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for nearly all biological processes, and it is known that aberrant protein-protein interactions can lead to human disease and cancer. Recent evidence has suggested that protein interaction interfaces describe a new class of attractive targets for drug development. Full characterization of protein interaction networks of protein complexes and their dynamics in response to various cellular cues will provide essential information for us to understand how protein complexes work together in cells to maintain cell viability and normal homeostasis. Affinity purification coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry has become the primary method for studying in vivo protein interactions of protein complexes and whole organism proteomes. Recent developments in sample preparation and affinity purification strategies allow the capture, identification, and quantification of protein interactions of protein complexes that are stable, dynamic, transient, and/or weak. Current efforts have mainly focused on generating reliable, reproducible, and high confidence protein interaction data sets for functional characterization. The availability of increasing amounts of information on protein interactions in eukaryotic systems and new bioinformatics tools allow functional analysis of quantitative protein interaction data to unravel the biological significance of the identified protein interactions. Existing studies in this area have laid a solid foundation toward generating a complete map of in vivo protein interaction networks of protein complexes in cells or tissues. PMID:20445003

  18. Quantitative images of metals in plant tissues measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. S.; Dietrich, R. C.; Matusch, A.; Pozebon, D.; Dressler, V. L.

    2008-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of toxic and essential elements in thin sections (thickness of 30 or 40 μm) of tobacco plant tissues. Two-dimensional images of Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Rh, Pt and Pb in leaves, shoots and roots of tobacco were produced. Sections of the plant tissues (fixed onto glass slides) were scanned by a focused beam of a Nd:YAG laser in a laser ablation chamber. The ablated material was transported with argon as carrier gas to the ICP ion source at a quadrupole ICP-MS instrument. Ion intensities of the investigated elements were measured together with 13C +, 33S + and 34S + within the entire plant tissue section. Matrix matching standards (prepared using powder of dried tobacco leaves) were used to constitute calibration curves, whereas the regression coefficient of the attained calibration curves was typically 0.99. The variability of LA-ICP-MS process, sample heterogeneity and water content in the sample were corrected by using 13C + as internal standard. Quantitative imaging of the selected elements revealed their inhomogeneous distribution in leaves, shoots and roots.

  19. High-resolution quantitative imaging of mammalian and bacterial cells using stable isotope mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lechene, Claude; Hillion, Francois; McMahon, Greg; Benson, Douglas; Kleinfeld, Alan M; Kampf, J Patrick; Distel, Daniel; Luyten, Yvette; Bonventre, Joseph; Hentschel, Dirk; Park, Kwon Moo; Ito, Susumu; Schwartz, Martin; Benichou, Gilles; Slodzian, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Background Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an important tool for investigating isotopic composition in the chemical and materials sciences, but its use in biology has been limited by technical considerations. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS), which combines a new generation of SIMS instrument with sophisticated ion optics, labeling with stable isotopes, and quantitative image-analysis software, was developed to study biological materials. Results The new instrument allows the production of mass images of high lateral resolution (down to 33 nm), as well as the counting or imaging of several isotopes simultaneously. As MIMS can distinguish between ions of very similar mass, such as 12C15N- and 13C14N-, it enables the precise and reproducible measurement of isotope ratios, and thus of the levels of enrichment in specific isotopic labels, within volumes of less than a cubic micrometer. The sensitivity of MIMS is at least 1,000 times that of 14C autoradiography. The depth resolution can be smaller than 1 nm because only a few atomic layers are needed to create an atomic mass image. We illustrate the use of MIMS to image unlabeled mammalian cultured cells and tissue sections; to analyze fatty-acid transport in adipocyte lipid droplets using 13C-oleic acid; to examine nitrogen fixation in bacteria using 15N gaseous nitrogen; to measure levels of protein renewal in the cochlea and in post-ischemic kidney cells using 15N-leucine; to study DNA and RNA co-distribution and uridine incorporation in the nucleolus using 15N-uridine and 81Br of bromodeoxyuridine or 14C-thymidine; to reveal domains in cultured endothelial cells using the native isotopes 12C, 16O, 14N and 31P; and to track a few 15N-labeled donor spleen cells in the lymph nodes of the host mouse. Conclusion MIMS makes it possible for the first time to both image and quantify molecules labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes within subcellular compartments. PMID:17010211

  20. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  1. Multiplexed Quantitation of Endogenous Proteins in Dried Blood Spots by Multiple Reaction Monitoring - Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Yang, Juncong; Camenzind, Alexander G.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, coupled with multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS), is a well-established approach for quantifying a wide range of small molecule biomarkers and drugs. This sampling procedure is simpler and less-invasive than those required for traditional plasma or serum samples enabling collection by minimally trained personnel. Many analytes are stable in the DBS format without refrigeration, which reduces the cost and logistical challenges of sample collection in remote locations. These advantages make DBS sample collection desirable for advancing personalized medicine through population-wide biomarker screening. Here we expand this technology by demonstrating the first multiplexed method for the quantitation of endogenous proteins in DBS samples. A panel of 60 abundant proteins in human blood was targeted by monitoring proteotypic tryptic peptides and their stable isotope-labeled analogs by MRM. Linear calibration curves were obtained for 40 of the 65 peptide targets demonstrating multiple proteins can be quantitatively extracted from DBS collection cards. The method was also highly reproducible with a coefficient of variation of <15% for all 40 peptides. Overall, this assay quantified 37 proteins spanning a range of more than four orders of magnitude in concentration within a single 25 min LC/MRM-MS analysis. The protein abundances of the 33 proteins quantified in matching DBS and whole blood samples showed an excellent correlation, with a slope of 0.96 and an R2 value of 0.97. Furthermore, the measured concentrations for 80% of the proteins were stable for at least 10 days when stored at −20 °C, 4 °C and 37 °C. This work represents an important first step in evaluating the integration of DBS sampling with highly-multiplexed MRM for quantitation of endogenous proteins. PMID:23221968

  2. The role of quantitative mass spectrometry in the discovery of pancreatic cancer biomarkers for translational science

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, it has become evident that genetic changes alone are not sufficient to understand most disease processes including pancreatic cancer. Genome sequencing has revealed a complex set of genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer such as point mutations, chromosomal losses, gene amplifications and telomere shortening that drive cancerous growth through specific signaling pathways. Proteome-based approaches are important complements to genomic data and provide crucial information of the target driver molecules and their post-translational modifications. By applying quantitative mass spectrometry, this is an alternative way to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis and personalized medicine. We review the current quantitative mass spectrometric technologies and analyses that have been developed and applied in the last decade in the context of pancreatic cancer. Examples of candidate biomarkers that have been identified from these pancreas studies include among others, asporin, CD9, CXC chemokine ligand 7, fibronectin 1, galectin-1, gelsolin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2, metalloproteinase inhibitor 1, stromal cell derived factor 4, and transforming growth factor beta-induced protein. Many of these proteins are involved in various steps in pancreatic tumor progression including cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, metastasis, immune response and angiogenesis. These new protein candidates may provide essential information for the development of protein diagnostics and targeted therapies. We further argue that new strategies must be advanced and established for the integration of proteomic, transcriptomic and genomic data, in order to enhance biomarker translation. Large scale studies with meta data processing will pave the way for novel and unexpected correlations within pancreatic cancer, that will benefit the patient, with targeted treatment. PMID:24708694

  3. Comparison of Different Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry Modes for Small Molecule Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chindarkar, Nandkishor S; Park, Hyung-Doo; Stone, Judith A; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) in quantitative analysis of small molecules is rare. Recently, the quantitative performance of TOF mass analyzers has improved due to the advancements in TOF technology. We evaluated a Q-TOF-MS in different modes, i.e., Q-TOF-full scan (Q-TOF-FS), Q-TOF-enhanced-full scan (Q-TOF-En-FS), MS(E), Q-TOF-targeted (Q-TOF-TGT), Q-TOF-enhanced-targeted (Q-TOF-En-TGT), and compared their quantitative performance against a unit resolution LC-MS-MS (tandem quadrupole) platform. The five modes were investigated for sensitivity, linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, recovery and precision using 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) as a model compound in electrospray ionization (ESI) with negative polarity. Preliminary studies indicated that Q-TOF-FS mode was the least linear and precise; hence, it was eliminated from further investigation. Total imprecision in remaining four modes was <10%. The Q-TOF-En-FS and Q-TOF-En-TGT showed better signal intensity than their respective modes without enhancement. Overall, peak signal intensity was the highest in MS(E) mode, whereas the signal-to-noise ratio was the best in the Q-TOF-En-TGT mode. Relatively, MS(E) and Q-TOF-En-TGT modes were the best overall performers compared with the other modes. Both MS(E) and Q-TOF-En-TGT modes showed excellent precision (coefficient of variation <6%), patient correlation (r > 0.99) and linearity (range, 5-455 ng/mL) for THC-COOH analysis when compared with LC-MS-MS. We also investigated the performance of the same four modes using methamphetamine in positive ESI. Quantitative data obtained by Q-TOF-En-TGT and MS(E), using both positive and negative ESI, suggest that these modes performed better than the other modes. While unit resolution LC-MS-MS remains the optimal technique for quantification, our data showed that Q-TOF-MS can also be used to quantify small molecules in complex biological specimens. PMID:26239972

  4. Development of quantitative laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS). Final report, 1 Aug 87-1 Jan 90

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, R.W.

    1991-06-04

    The objective of the research was to develop quantitative microanalysis methods for dielectric thin films using the laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS) technique. The research involved preparation of thin (5,000 A) films of SiO2, Al2O3, MgF2, TiO2, Cr2O3, Ta2O5, Si3N4, and ZrO2, and doping these films with ion implant impurities of 11B, 40Ca, 56Fe, 68Zn, 81Br, and 121Sb. Laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were performed on these films. The research demonstrated quantitative LIMS analysis down to detection levels of 10-100 ppm, and led to the development of (1) a compound thin film standards product line for the performing organization, (2) routine LIMS analytical methods, and (3) the manufacture of high speed preamplifiers for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) techniques.

  5. A mass spectrometry-based assay for improved quantitative measurements of efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Todd, Daniel; Cole, Patrick S; Egan, Joseph M; Foil, Daniel H; Graf, Tyler N; Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cech, Nadja B

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps are active transport proteins responsible for resistance to selected biocides and antibiotics. It has been shown that production of efflux pumps is up-regulated in a number of highly pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, the identification of new bacterial efflux pump inhibitors is a topic of great interest. Existing assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity rely on fluorescence by an efflux pump substrate. When employing these assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of plant extracts and some purified compounds, we observed severe optical interference that gave rise to false negative results. To circumvent this problem, a new mass spectrometry-based method was developed for the quantitative measurement of bacterial efflux pump inhibition. The assay was employed to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of a crude extract of the botanical Hydrastis Canadensis, and to compare the efflux pump inhibitory activity of several pure flavonoids. The flavonoid quercetin, which appeared to be completely inactive with a fluorescence-based method, showed an IC50 value of 75 μg/mL with the new method. The other flavonoids evaluated (apigenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, luteolin, myricetin), were also active, with IC50 values ranging from 19 μg/mL to 75 μg/mL. The assay described herein could be useful in future screening efforts to identify efflux pump inhibitors, particularly in situations where optical interference precludes the application of methods that rely on fluorescence. PMID:25961825

  6. A Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for Improved Quantitative Measurements of Efflux Pump Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Ettefagh, Keivan A.; Todd, Daniel; Cole, Patrick S.; Egan, Joseph M.; Foil, Daniel H.; Graf, Tyler N.; Schindler, Bryan D.; Kaatz, Glenn W.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps are active transport proteins responsible for resistance to selected biocides and antibiotics. It has been shown that production of efflux pumps is up-regulated in a number of highly pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, the identification of new bacterial efflux pump inhibitors is a topic of great interest. Existing assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity rely on fluorescence by an efflux pump substrate. When employing these assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of plant extracts and some purified compounds, we observed severe optical interference that gave rise to false negative results. To circumvent this problem, a new mass spectrometry-based method was developed for the quantitative measurement of bacterial efflux pump inhibition. The assay was employed to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of a crude extract of the botanical Hydrastis Canadensis, and to compare the efflux pump inhibitory activity of several pure flavonoids. The flavonoid quercetin, which appeared to be completely inactive with a fluorescence-based method, showed an IC50 value of 75 μg/mL with the new method. The other flavonoids evaluated (apigenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, luteolin, myricetin), were also active, with IC50 values ranging from 19 μg/mL to 75 μg/mL. The assay described herein could be useful in future screening efforts to identify efflux pump inhibitors, particularly in situations where optical interference precludes the application of methods that rely on fluorescence. PMID:25961825

  7. Identification of CRM1-dependent Nuclear Export Cargos Using Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Ketan; Karaca, Samir; Port, Sarah A.; Urlaub, Henning; Kehlenbach, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome region maintenance 1/exportin1/Exp1/Xpo1 (CRM1) is the major transport receptor for the export of proteins from the nucleus. It binds to nuclear export signals (NESs) that are rich in leucines and other hydrophobic amino acids. The prediction of NESs is difficult because of the extreme recognition flexibility of CRM1. Furthermore, proteins can be exported upon binding to an NES-containing adaptor protein. Here we present an approach for identifying targets of the CRM1-export pathway via quantitative mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. With this approach, we identified >100 proteins from HeLa cells that were depleted from cytosolic fractions and/or enriched in nuclear fractions in the presence of the selective CRM1-inhibitor leptomycin B. Novel and validated substrates are the polyubiquitin-binding protein sequestosome 1, the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), the guanine nucleotide-binding protein-like 3-like protein, the programmed cell death protein 2-like protein, and the cytosolic carboxypeptidase 1 (CCP1). We identified a functional NES in CCP1 that mediates direct binding to the export receptor CRM1. The method will be applicable to other nucleocytoplasmic transport pathways, as well as to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins under different growth conditions. PMID:23242554

  8. Quantitative mass spectrometry of diabetic kidney tubules identifies GRAP as a novel regulator of TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Timothy D.; Barati, Michelle T.; Coventry, Susan C.; Salyer, Sarah A.; Klein, Jon B.; Powell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define novel mediators of tubule injury in diabetic kidney disease. For this, we used state-of-the-art proteomic methods combined with a label-free quantitative strategy to define protein expression differences in kidney tubules from transgenic OVE26 type 1 diabetic and control mice. The analysis was performed with diabetic samples that displayed a pro-fibrotic phenotype. We have identified 476 differentially expressed proteins. Bioinformatic analysis indicated several clusters of regulated proteins in relevant functional groups such as TGF-β signaling, tight junction maintenance, oxidative stress, and glucose metabolism. Mass spectrometry detected expression changes of four physiologically relevant proteins were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Of these, the Grb2-related adaptor protein (GRAP) was up-regulated in kidney tubules from diabetic mice and fibrotic kidneys from diabetic patients, and subsequently confirmed as a novel component of TGF-β signaling in cultured human renal tubule cells. Thus, indicating a potential novel role for GRAP in TGF-β-induced tubule injury in diabetic kidney disease. Although we targeted a specific disease, this approach offers a robust, high-sensitivity methodology that can be applied to the discovery of novel mediators for any experimental or disease condition. PMID:19836472

  9. Identification of Cell Cycle Dependent Interaction Partners of the Septins by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renz, Christian; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Grinhagens, Sören; Warscheid, Bettina; Johnsson, Nils; Gronemeyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that, in the baker's yeast, assemble into a highly ordered array of filaments at the mother bud neck. These filaments undergo significant structural rearrangements during the cell cycle. We aimed at identifying key components that are involved in or regulate the transitions of the septins. By combining cell synchronization and quantitative affinity-purification mass-spectrometry, we performed a screen for specific interaction partners of the septins at three distinct stages of the cell cycle. A total of 83 interaction partners of the septins were assigned. Surprisingly, we detected DNA-interacting/nuclear proteins and proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis predominantly present in alpha-factor arrested that do not display an assembled septin structure. Furthermore, two distinct sets of regulatory proteins that are specific for cells at S-phase with a stable septin collar or at mitosis with split septin rings were identified. Complementary methods like SPLIFF and immunoprecipitation allowed us to more exactly define the spatial and temporal characteristics of selected hits of the AP-MS screen. PMID:26871441

  10. Quantitative lipidomic analysis of plasma and plasma lipoproteins using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serna, Jorge; García-Seisdedos, David; Alcázar, Alberto; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Pastor, Óscar

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the plasma lipid composition is essential to clarify the specific roles of different lipid species in various pathophysiological processes. In this study, we developed an analytical strategy combining high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) and off-line coupling with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to determine the composition of plasma and major lipoproteins at two levels, lipid classes and lipid species. We confirmed the suitability of MALDI-TOF/MS as a quantitative measurement tool studying the linearity and repeatability for triglycerides (TG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC). Moreover, data obtained with this method were correlated with other lipid classes and species measurements using currently available technologies. To establish the potential utility of our approach, human plasma very low density- (VLDL), low density- (LDL) and high density- (HDL) lipoproteins from 10 healthy donors were separated using ultracentrifugation, and compositions of nine lipid classes, cholesteryl esters (CE), TG, free cholesterol (FC), PE, phosphatidylinositol (PI), sulfatides (S), PC, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and sphingomyelin (SM), analyzed. In total, 157 lipid species in plasma, 182 in LDL, 171 in HDL, and 148 in VLDL were quantified. The lipidomic profile was consistent with known differences in lipid classes, but also revealed unexpected differences in lipid species distribution of lipoproteins, particularly for LPC and SM. In summary, the methodology developed in this study constitutes a valid approach to determine the lipidomic composition of plasma and lipoproteins. PMID:26004846

  11. Quantitative mass spectrometry measurements reveal stoichiometry of principal postsynaptic density proteins.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Markey, Sanford P; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative studies are presented of postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from rat cerebral cortex with the ultimate goal of defining the average copy numbers of proteins in the PSD complex. Highly specific and selective isotope dilution mass spectrometry assays were developed using isotopically labeled polypeptide concatemer internal standards. Interpretation of PSD protein stoichiometry was achieved as a molar ratio with respect to PSD-95 (SAP-90, DLG4), and subsequently, copy numbers were estimated using a consensus literature value for PSD-95. Average copy numbers for several proteins at the PSD were estimated for the first time, including those for AIDA-1, BRAGs, and densin. Major findings include evidence for the high copy number of AIDA-1 in the PSD (144 ± 30)-equivalent to that of the total GKAP family of proteins (150 ± 27)-suggesting that AIDA-1 is an element of the PSD scaffold. The average copy numbers for NMDA receptor sub-units were estimated to be 66 ± 18, 27 ± 9, and 45 ± 15, respectively, for GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B, yielding a total of 34 ± 10 NMDA channels. Estimated average copy numbers for AMPA channels and their auxiliary sub-units TARPs were 68 ± 36 and 144 ± 38, respectively, with a stoichiometry of ∼1:2, supporting the assertion that most AMPA receptors anchor to the PSD via TARP sub-units. This robust, quantitative analysis of PSD proteins improves upon and extends the list of major PSD components with assigned average copy numbers in the ongoing effort to unravel the complex molecular architecture of the PSD. PMID:25874902

  12. Stable isotope labeling - Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of androgenic and progestagenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Liu, Ping; Ding, Jun; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-28

    Steroid hormones play important roles in mammal at very low concentrations and are associated with numerous endocrinology and oncology diseases. Therefore, quantitative analysis of steroid hormones can provide crucial information for uncovering underlying mechanisms of steroid hormones related diseases. In the current study, we developed a sensitive method for the detection of steroid hormones (progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, pregnenolone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone) in body fluids by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. In this respect, a pair of isotopes labeling reagents, Girard reagent P (GP) and d5-Girard reagent P (d5-GP), were synthesized and utilized to label steroid hormones in follicular fluid samples and steroid hormone standards, respectively. The heavy labeled standards were used as internal standards for quantification to minimize quantitation deviation in MS analysis due to the matrix and ion suppression effects. The ionization efficiencies of steroid hormones were greatly improved by 4-504 folds through the introduction of a permanent charged moiety of quaternary ammonium from GP. Using the developed method, we successfully quantified steroid hormones in human follicular fluid. We found that the contents of testosterone and androstenedione exhibited significant increase while the content of pregnenolone had significant decrease in follicular fluid of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) patients compared with healthy controls, indicating that these steroid hormones with significant change may contribute to the pathogenesis of PCOS. Taken together, the developed stable isotope labeling coupled LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis demonstrated to be a promising method for the sensitive and accurate determination of steroid hormones, which may facilitate the in-depth investigation of steroid hormones related

  13. A Novel Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Platform for Determining Protein O-GlcNAcylation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoshi; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Fan, Jing; Karch, Kelly R; Ball, Lauren E; Denu, John M; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decades, protein O-GlcNAcylation has been found to play a fundamental role in cell cycle control, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and cellular signaling. Nevertheless, quantitative approaches to determine in vivo GlcNAc dynamics at a large-scale are still not readily available. Here, we have developed an approach to isotopically label O-GlcNAc modifications on proteins by producing (13)C-labeled UDP-GlcNAc from (13)C6-glucose via the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. This metabolic labeling was combined with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine protein O-GlcNAcylation turnover rates. First, an efficient enrichment method for O-GlcNAc peptides was developed with the use of phenylboronic acid solid-phase extraction and anhydrous DMSO. The near stoichiometry reaction between the diol of GlcNAc and boronic acid dramatically improved the enrichment efficiency. Additionally, our kinetic model for turnover rates integrates both metabolomic and proteomic data, which increase the accuracy of the turnover rate estimation. Other advantages of this metabolic labeling method include in vivo application, direct labeling of the O-GlcNAc sites and higher confidence for site identification. Concentrating only on nuclear localized GlcNAc modified proteins, we are able to identify 105 O-GlcNAc peptides on 42 proteins and determine turnover rates of 20 O-GlcNAc peptides from 14 proteins extracted from HeLa nuclei. In general, we found O-GlcNAcylation turnover rates are slower than those published for phosphorylation or acetylation. Nevertheless, the rates widely varied depending on both the protein and the residue modified. We believe this methodology can be broadly applied to reveal turnovers/dynamics of protein O-GlcNAcylation from different biological states and will provide more information on the significance of O-GlcNAcylation, enabling us to study the temporal dynamics of this critical modification for the first time. PMID:27114449

  14. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L−1 (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L−1 in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10–1000 μg·L−1. Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L−1 gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples. PMID:27529262

  15. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples. PMID:27529262

  16. Quantitative analysis of glycerol levels in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Ma, Yanhua; Yan, Kuan; Shen, Li; Wang, Xiaobing; Xu, Youxuan; He, Genye; Wu, Yun; Lu, Jianghai; Yang, Zhiyong; Feng, Feifei

    2014-04-15

    Glycerol has the latent capacity to act as a plasma volume expander and disguise blood doping practices. Therefore, it has been prohibited in sports as a masking agent by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) since January 2010 and a urinary threshold (1mg/mL) was recommended recently [1]. The purpose of this study was to establish and validate a novel quantitative method for the determination of urinary glycerol concentrations using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. This simple yet highly specific method made use of the derivatization of glycerol by benzoyl chloride in aqueous solution at 40°C followed by analysis via LC-ESI-MS/MS without sample pre-concentration or cleanup. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 1.0-1000μg/mL for glycerol in human urine. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) and lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) were 0.3μg/mL and 1.0μg/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision of the method at three concentration levels (3, 500 and 900μg/mL) was less than 12.2%. The method also afforded satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, derivatization yield, extraction recovery, matrix effect and specificity. The method has been successfully applied to the detection of glycerol in "Quality Assurance Program" samples provided by the World Association of Anti-Doping Scientists (WAADS) and routine doping-control samples in our laboratory. PMID:24657408

  17. Quantitative depth profiling by laser-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    Depth profiling by laser-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) is reviewed. The matrix effects, including surface and interface effects, in laser-ionization SNMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are compared with each other and discussed. Laser-ionization SNMS can provide depth profiles with much smaller matrix effects than conventional SIMS. Depth resolution can effectively be improved by using grazing incidence for the primary ion beam with little interfacial effect. The quantification method in laser-ionization SNMS is also mentioned.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N.; Tolic, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-05-31

    There are several notable challenges inherent to fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, post-translational modifications, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of post-translational modifications. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M). In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein (PIP) and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein (aPRP). These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid (PS) and submandibular/sublingual gland (SMSL) secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FTICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different protein and PTM patterns were resolved with high reproducibility between PS and SMSL glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  19. Quantitative analysis of urinary glycerol levels for doping control purposes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Guddat, Sven; Flenker, Ulrich; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    The administration of glycerol to endurance athletes results in an increased fluid retention and improved performance, particularly under hot and humid conditions. Consequently, glycerol is considered relevant for sports drug testing and methods for its detection in urine specimens are required. A major issue in this regard is the natural occurrence of trace amounts of glycerol in human urine, which necessitates a quantitative analysis and the determination of normal urinary glycerol levels under various sporting conditions. A quantitative method was established using a gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based approach that was validated with regard to lower limit of detection (0.3 microg mL(-1)), lower limit of quantification (0.9 microg mL(-1)), specificity, linearity (1.0-98.0 microg mL(-1)), intraday and interday precision (<20% at 2.4, 24.1 and 48.2 microg mL(-1)) as well as accuracy (92-110%). Sample aliquots of 20 microL were enriched with five-fold deuterated glycerol, dried and derivatised using N-methyl-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) before analysis. The established method was applied to a total of 1039 doping control samples covering various sport disciplines (349 endurance samples, 286 strength sport samples, 325 game sport samples and 79 other samples) in- and out-of-competition, which provided quantitative information about the glycerol content commonly observed in elite athletes' urine samples. About 85% of all specimens yielded glycerol concentrations < 20.0 microg mL(-1) and few reached values up to 132.6 microg mL(-1). One further sample, however, was found to contain 2690 microg mL(-1), which might indicate the misuse of glycerol, but no threshold for urinary glycerol concentrations has been established yet due to the lack of substantial data. Based on the results obtained from the studied reference population, a threshold for glycerol levels in urine set at 200 microg mL(-1) is suggested, which provides a tool to

  20. Direct quantitative determination of cyanamide by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Kamo, Tsunashi; Nakajima, Eri; Kato, Kenji; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2005-12-01

    Cyanamide is a multifunctional agrochemical used, for example, as a pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer. Recent research has revealed that cyanamide is a natural product biosynthesized in a leguminous plant, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa). In the present study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with a capillary column for amines was used for direct quantitative determination of cyanamide. Quantitative signals for ((14)N(2))cyanamide, ((15)N(2))cyanamide (internal standard for stable isotope dilution method), and m-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (internal standard for correcting errors in GC-MS analysis) were recorded as peak areas on mass chromatograms at m/z 42 (A(42)), 44 (A(44)), and 171 (A(IS)), respectively. Total cyanamide content, ((14)N(2))cyanamide plus ((15)N(2))cyanamide, was determined as a function of (A(42)+A(44))/A(IS). Contents of ((14)N(2))cyanamide and ((15)N(2))cyanamide were then calculated by multiplying the total cyanamide content by A(42)/(A(42)+A(44)) and A(44)/(A(42)+A(44)), respectively. The limit of detection for the total cyanamide content by the GC-MS analysis was around 1ng. The molar ratio of ((14)N(2))cyanamide to ((15)N(2))cyanamide in the injected sample was equal to the observed A(42)/A(44) value in the range from 0.1 to 5. It was, therefore, possible to use the stable isotope dilution method to quantify the natural cyanamide content in samples; i.e., the natural cyanamide content was derived by subtracting the A(42)/A(44) ratio of the internal standard from the A(42)/A(44) ratio of sample spiked with internal standard, and then multiplying the resulting difference by the amount of added ((15)N(2))cyanamide (SID-GC-MS method). This method successfully gave a reasonable value for the natural cyanamide content in hairy vetch, concurring with the value obtained by a conventional method in which cyanamide was derivatized to a photometrically active compound 4-cyanimido-1,2-naphthoquinone and analyzed with reversed

  1. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Dick Jr, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90–110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques. PMID:25997113

  2. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques. PMID:25997113

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Strategies for Assessing the Biological Consequences and Repair of DNA Adducts.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-02-16

    The genetic integrity of living organisms is constantly threatened by environmental and endogenous sources of DNA damaging agents that can induce a plethora of chemically modified DNA lesions. Unrepaired DNA lesions may elicit cytotoxic and mutagenic effects and contribute to the development of human diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. Understanding the deleterious outcomes of DNA damage necessitates the investigation about the effects of DNA adducts on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA replication and transcription. Conventional methods for measuring lesion-induced replicative or transcriptional alterations often require time-consuming colony screening and DNA sequencing procedures. Recently, a series of mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have been developed in our laboratory as an efficient platform for qualitative and quantitative analyses of the changes in genetic information induced by DNA adducts during DNA replication and transcription. During the past few years, we have successfully used these MS-based methods for assessing the replicative or transcriptional blocking and miscoding properties of more than 30 distinct DNA adducts. When combined with genetic manipulation, these methods have also been successfully employed for revealing the roles of various DNA repair proteins or translesion synthesis DNA polymerases (Pols) in modulating the adverse effects of DNA lesions on transcription or replication in mammalian and bacterial cells. For instance, we found that Escherichia coli Pol IV and its mammalian ortholog (i.e., Pol κ) are required for error-free bypass of N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-CEdG) in cells. We also found that the N(2)-CEdG lesions strongly inhibit DNA transcription and they are repaired by transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells. In this Account, we focus on the development of MS-based approaches for determining the effects of DNA adducts on DNA replication and transcription

  4. Quantitation of Insulin Analogues in Serum Using Immunoaffinity Extraction, Liquid Chromatography, and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gugten, J Grace; Wong, Sophia; Holmes, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    Insulin analysis is used in combination with glucose, C-peptide, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and proinsulin determination for the investigation of adult hypoglycemia. The most common cause is the administration of too much insulin or insulin secretagogue to a diabetic patient or inadequate caloric intake after administration of either. Occasionally there is a question as to whether hypoglycemia has been caused by an exogenous insulin-whether by accident, intent, or even malicious intent. While traditionally this was confirmed by a low or undetectable C-peptide in a hypoglycemic specimen, this finding is not entirely specific and would also be expected in the context of impaired counter-regulatory response, fatty acid oxidation defects, and liver failure-though beta-hydroxybutyrate levels can lend diagnostic clarity. For this reason, insulin is often requested. However, popular automated chemiluminescent immunoassays for insulin have distinctly heterogeneous performance in detecting analogue synthetic insulins with cross-reactivities ranging from near 0 % to greater than 100 %. The ability to detect synthetic insulins is vendor-specific and varies between insulin products. Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers a means to circumvent these analytical issues and both quantify synthetic insulins and identify the specific type. We present an immunoaffinity extraction and LC-MS/MS method capable of independent identification and quantitation of native sequence insulins (endogenous, Insulin Regular, Insulin NPH), and analogues Glargine, Lispro, Detemir, and Aspart with an analytical sensitivity for endogenous insulin of between 1 and 2 μU/mL in patient serum samples. PMID:26602124

  5. Quantitative determination of perfluorooctanoic acid in serum and plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, John M; Connolly, Paul D; Decker, Emily R; Kennedy, S Mark; Ellefson, Mark E; Reagen, William K; Szostek, Bogdan

    2005-05-25

    A selective and sensitive method for analysis of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in human serum and plasma, utilizing liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), has been developed and thoroughly validated to satisfy strict FDA guidelines for bioanalytical methods. A simple, automated sample preparation procedure, involving extraction of the target analyte with acetonitrile on protein precipitation media in a 96-well plate format was developed, allowing efficient handling of large numbers of samples. The proposed method uses the calibration standards prepared in a surrogate matrix (rabbit serum or plasma) and (13)C-labeled PFOA as the internal standard to account for matrix effects, instrument drift, and extraction efficiency. Human serum and plasma could not be used for matrix matching of calibration standards as endogenous levels of PFOA observed in the control human serum and plasma significantly exceeded the targeted lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of the method. Precision and accuracy of the method were demonstrated by analysis of rabbit serum and plasma control samples fortified at 0.5, 5, and 40 ng/mL PFOA and human serum and plasma fortified at 1.0, 5.0, 40 ng/mL PFOA. The LLOQ of 0.5 ng/mL PFOA was experimentally demonstrated for rabbit and human serum and plasma. Within-day precision and accuracy, short-term stability, freeze-thaw stability, equivalence of response between PFOA and APFO (the ammonium salt of PFOA), and dilution of concentrated samples were also investigated. The results of the validation experiments comply with the precision and accuracy limits defined by the FDA guidance document: "Guidance for Industry, Bioanalytical Method Validation", May 2001. PMID:15833298

  6. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Plasticity of Metabolic Networks in Mycobacterium smegmatis *

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Tarun; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Chiappe, Diego; Moniatte, Marc; McKinney, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a remarkable ability to persist within the human host as a clinically inapparent or chronically active infection. Fatty acids are thought to be an important carbon source used by the bacteria during long term infection. Catabolism of fatty acids requires reprogramming of metabolic networks, and enzymes central to this reprogramming have been targeted for drug discovery. Mycobacterium smegmatis, a nonpathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis, is often used as a model system because of the similarity of basic cellular processes in these two species. Here, we take a quantitative proteomics-based approach to achieve a global view of how the M. smegmatis metabolic network adjusts to utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled proteins identified a total of 3,067 proteins with high confidence. This number corresponds to 44% of the predicted M. smegmatis proteome and includes most of the predicted metabolic enzymes. Compared with glucose-grown cells, 162 proteins showed differential abundance in acetate- or propionate-grown cells. Among these, acetate-grown cells showed a higher abundance of proteins that could constitute a functional glycerate pathway. Gene inactivation experiments confirmed that both the glyoxylate shunt and the glycerate pathway are operational in M. smegmatis. In addition to proteins with annotated functions, we demonstrate carbon source-dependent differential abundance of proteins that have not been functionally characterized. These proteins might play as-yet-unidentified roles in mycobacterial carbon metabolism. This study reveals several novel features of carbon assimilation in M. smegmatis, which suggests significant functional plasticity of metabolic networks in this organism. PMID:24997995

  7. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative measurements of lead in bone

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lead accumulates in bone over many years or decades. Accordingly, the study of lead in bone is important in determining the fate of ingested lead, the potential for remobilization, and for the application of bone lead measurements as a biomarker of lead exposure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure the spatial distribution of lead in bone on the micrometer scale. In general, LA-ICP-MS studies are somewhat limited by the lack of matrix-matched standards and/or reference materials for calibration and validation purposes. Here we describe the application of pressed pellets prepared from New York State Department of Health candidate Reference Materials for Lead in Bone (levels 1 through 4), to provide a linear calibration for 208Pb/43Ca in the concentration range <1 to 30 μg g−1. The limit of detection was estimated as 0.2 μg g−1. The measured lead values for pelletized NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal and SRM 1400 Bone Ash were in good agreement with certified reference values. Using this approach, we quantitatively measured the spatial distribution of lead in a cross-section of goat metacarpal from a lead-dosed animal. The lead content was spatially variable in the range of 2 to 30 μg g−1 with a complex distribution. In some sections, lead appeared to be enriched in the center of the bone relative to peripheral areas, indicating preferential accumulation in trabecular (spongy) rather than cortical bone. In addition, there were discrete areas of lead enrichment, or hot spots, of 100 to 200 μm in width. PMID:22833692

  8. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative measurements of lead in bone.

    PubMed

    Bellis, David J; Hetter, Katherine M; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula; Parsons, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Lead accumulates in bone over many years or decades. Accordingly, the study of lead in bone is important in determining the fate of ingested lead, the potential for remobilization, and for the application of bone lead measurements as a biomarker of lead exposure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure the spatial distribution of lead in bone on the micrometer scale. In general, LA-ICP-MS studies are somewhat limited by the lack of matrix-matched standards and/or reference materials for calibration and validation purposes. Here we describe the application of pressed pellets prepared from New York State Department of Health candidate Reference Materials for Lead in Bone (levels 1 through 4), to provide a linear calibration for (208)Pb/(43)Ca in the concentration range <1 to 30 μg g(-1). The limit of detection was estimated as 0.2 μg g(-1). The measured lead values for pelletized NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal and SRM 1400 Bone Ash were in good agreement with certified reference values. Using this approach, we quantitatively measured the spatial distribution of lead in a cross-section of goat metacarpal from a lead-dosed animal. The lead content was spatially variable in the range of 2 to 30 μg g(-1) with a complex distribution. In some sections, lead appeared to be enriched in the center of the bone relative to peripheral areas, indicating preferential accumulation in trabecular (spongy) rather than cortical bone. In addition, there were discrete areas of lead enrichment, or hot spots, of 100 to 200 μm in width. PMID:22833692

  9. Quantitation of Cotinine in Nonsmoker Saliva Using Chip Based Nanoelectrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J; Jenkins, Roger A; Counts, Richard Wayne

    2006-01-01

    A new analytical procedure was developed for the quantitation of nonsmoker salivary cotinine. Small volumes of saliva were diluted with water, fortified with cotinine-d{sub 3} (internal standard), then passed through small extraction columns. The analyte and internal standard were eluted with 0.1% (v/v) acetic acid/acetonitrile. Aliquots of each extract were analyzed directly, without chromatographic separation, using chip-based (NanoMate{sup TM}) nanospray tandem mass spectrometry. The calculated detection limit was 0.49 ng cotinine/mL saliva. This method was used to quantify salivary cotinine collected from nonsmoking human subjects living in one of three environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure categories or 'cells': 1. smoking home/smoking workplace; 2. smoking home/nonsmoking workplace; and 3. nonsmoking home/smoking workplace. Samples were collected during five sequential days, including Saturday, as part of a larger study to evaluate potential variability in exposure to ETS. Salivary cotinine measurements were made for the purpose of excluding misclassified smokers and for comparison with known levels of exposure to airborne nicotine in each exposure category. The concentrations observed were consistent with those reported from other large studies reported elsewhere. A non-parametric statistical test was applied to the data within each cell. No statistically significant differences were found between the mean cotinine concentrations collected on a weekday as compared to those collected on a weekend day. When the non-parametric test was applied to the three cells, a statistically significant difference was observed between cell 1 compared to cells 2 and 3. The salivary cotinine concentrations were thus statistically invariant over a five-day exposure period, and they were greatest under the conditions of smoking home and smoking workplace.

  10. Quantitative determination of terbutaline and orciprenaline in human plasma by gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionization/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leis, H J; Gleispach, H; Nitsche, V; Malle, E

    1990-06-01

    A method for the determination of unconjugated terbutaline and orciprenaline in human plasma is described. The assay is based on stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionization/mass spectrometry. An inexpensive and rapid method for preparation of stable isotope labelled analogues as well as their use in quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is shown. A highly efficient sample work-up procedure with product recoveries of more than 95% is presented. The method developed permits quantitative measurement of terbutaline and orciprenaline in human plasma down to 100 pg ml-1, using 1 ml of sample. Plasma levels of terbutaline after oral administration of 5 mg of terbutaline sulphate were estimated. PMID:2357489

  11. Potential of monitoring isotopologues by quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry for metabolomic assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Hu, Haiyan; Su, Yue; Zhang, Fang; Guo, Yinlong

    2016-03-01

    Because of the extreme complexity of metabolomic samples, the effectiveness of quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry depends substantially on the expansion of the linear dynamic range. Facing the existence of numerous saturated detector signals, a data processing method based on monitoring isotopologues has been developed. The monoisotopic ion kept the high mass spectrometry sensitivity, and the less abundant isotopologue ions extended the linear dynamic range. This alternative method was proved to extend the linear dynamic range to five orders of magnitude successfully and overcome the quantitative problems induced by the ion detector saturation. Finally, to validate the applicability, the method was applied to a metabolomic assay of Alzheimer's disease. Comparing with the traditional monoisotopic method, the use of monitoring isotopologues helped us to discover an additional eight metabolites with significant difference and to conduct a more reliable principal component analysis as well. The results demonstrated that monitoring isotopologues in quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry could improve the authenticity of metabolomic analysis. PMID:26763370

  12. Quantitation of aflatoxins from corn and other food related materials by direct analysis in real time - mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ambient ionization coupled to mass spectrometry continues to be applied to new analytical problems, facilitating the rapid and convenient analysis of a variety of analytes. Recently, demonstrations of ambient ionization mass spectrometry applied to quantitative analysis of mycotoxins have been shown...

  13. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Nier, A.O.C.

    1959-08-25

    A voltage switching apparatus is described for use with a mass spectrometer in the concentratron analysis of several components of a gas mixture. The system automatically varies the voltage on the accelerating electrode of the mass spectrometer through a program of voltages which corresponds to the particular gas components under analysis. Automatic operation may be discontinued at any time to permit the operator to manually select any desired predetermined accelerating voltage. Further, the system may be manually adjusted to vary the accelerating voltage over a wide range.

  14. Development of Mass Spectrometry Selected Reaction Monitoring Method for Quantitation and Pharmacokinetic Study of Stepharine in Rabbit Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Arthur T.; Kuznetsova, Ksenia G.; Mikhailova, Olga M.; Moshkin, Andrey G.; Turkin, Vladimir V.; Alimov, Andrei A.

    2014-01-01

    Highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method on triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometer was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic study of stepharine in rabbit plasma. Specific ion transitions of stepharine protonated precursor ion were selected and recorded in the certain retention time employing dynamic selected reaction monitoring mode. The developed method facilitated quantitative measurements of stepharine in plasma samples in linear range of five orders of magnitude with high accuracy and low standard deviation coefficient and pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated. The apparent volume of stepharine distribution (estimated as ratio of clearance to elimination rate constant, data not shown) allows us to assume that stepharine was extensively distributed throughout the body. PMID:24696679

  15. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.

    1962-01-01

    method is described for operating a mass spectrometer to improve its resolution qualities and to extend its period of use substantially between cleanings. In this method, a small amount of a beta emitting gas such as hydrogen titride or carbon-14 methane is added to the sample being supplied to the spectrometer for investigation. The additive establishes leakage paths on the surface of the non-conducting film accumulating within the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer, thereby reducing the effect of an accumulated static charge on the electrostatic and magnetic fields established within the instrument. (AEC)

  16. Quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay development and validation: from small molecules to proteins.

    PubMed

    Božović, Andrea; Kulasingam, Vathany

    2013-04-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool for the identification, characterization and quantification of various biomolecules (small molecules, drug metabolites and proteins) in biological specimens. The use of mass spectrometers in the clinical diagnostic laboratories have gained popularity due to its ease of development of new assays, ability to measure multiple analytes in a single analytical run, low volume requirements and low reagent costs. Novel technological advancements in ionization sources, instrumentation and software have increased the popularity of these platforms. Consequently, a number of home-brew assays, utilizing the power of MS, are being developed and validated for clinical diagnostic use. In this review, we will discuss the two phases that precede method implementation: method development and validation for both small molecule analysis and protein quantification using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Some of the challenges facing protein quantification will be highlighted and an outlook for the future of laboratory medicine and MS will be provided. PMID:23041077

  17. Peak intensity prediction in MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: A machine learning study to support quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Wiebke; Scherbart, Alexandra; Böcker, Sebastian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2008-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry is a key technique in proteomics and can be used to analyze complex samples quickly. One key problem with the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins, however, is the fact that absolute quantification is severely hampered by the unclear relationship between the observed peak intensity and the peptide concentration in the sample. While there are numerous approaches to circumvent this problem experimentally (e.g. labeling techniques), reliable prediction of the peak intensities from peptide sequences could provide a peptide-specific correction factor. Thus, it would be a valuable tool towards label-free absolute quantification. Results In this work we present machine learning techniques for peak intensity prediction for MALDI mass spectra. Features encoding the peptides' physico-chemical properties as well as string-based features were extracted. A feature subset was obtained from multiple forward feature selections on the extracted features. Based on these features, two advanced machine learning methods (support vector regression and local linear maps) are shown to yield good results for this problem (Pearson correlation of 0.68 in a ten-fold cross validation). Conclusion The techniques presented here are a useful first step going beyond the binary prediction of proteotypic peptides towards a more quantitative prediction of peak intensities. These predictions in turn will turn out to be beneficial for mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics. PMID:18937839

  18. Chemical modification of deoxyribonucleic acids: Quantitation of 3-methylthymidine and O4-methylthymidine by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Joe M.; Hoke, Steven H., II; Graham Cooks, R.; Chae, Whi-Gun; Chang, Ching-Jer

    1991-12-01

    Quantitation of 3-methylthymidine and O4-methylthymidine generated in the reaction of calf thymus DNA with methyl methanesulfonate (MeMS) and 1-methyl-1nitrosourea (MeNU) by mass spectrometry is reported. Quantitative precision of 7% or better is achieved on samples of 10-12 -10-13 mole in the HPLC and a final stage of separation before quantification by tandem mass spectrometry using desorption chemical ionization. Synthetic CD3-labeled nucleosides were used as internal standards for mass spectral quantification. A unique mass spectrometric scanning procedure, which allowed simultaneous MS--MS product ion analysis of both the analyte and the internal standard, was utilized to enchance precision and accuracy in these low level determinations. MeNU (a potent carcinogen) resulted in 18&%; 3-methylation and 0.17% O4-methylation of deoxythymidine whereas MeMS (a weak carcinogen) produced only 6.8% 3-methylation and 0.005% of deoxythymidine. These results demonstrate that the sensitivity and accuracy of this method should be adequate for the detection and quantification of methyl-nucleosides at the sub-picomole level at which mutation is induced in cell cultures.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative metabolomic investigation of single neurons by capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Peter; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Aerts, Jordan T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) empowers metabolomic investigations by decreasing analytical dimensions to the size of individual cells and subcellular structures. We describe a protocol for investigating and quantifying metabolites in individual isolated neurons using single-cell capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS. The protocol requires ~2 h for sample preparation, neuron isolation, and metabolite extraction, and 1 h for metabolic measurement. The approach was used to detect more than 300 distinct compounds in the mass range of typical metabolites in various individual neurons (25–500-µm in diameter) isolated from the sea slug (Aplysia californica) central and rat (Rattus norvegicus) peripheral nervous systems. A subset of identified compounds was sufficient to reveal metabolic differences among freshly isolated neurons of different types and changes in the metabolite profiles of cultured neurons. The protocol can be applied to the characterization of the metabolome in a variety of smaller cells and/or subcellular domains. PMID:23538882

  20. Biological Matrix Effects in Quantitative Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Analytical Methods: Advancing Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E.; D’Souza, Priya E.; Chen, Xianyu; Radford, Samantha A.; Cohen, Jordan R.; Marder, M. Elizabeth; Kartavenka, Kostya; Ryan, P. Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    The ability to quantify levels of target analytes in biological samples accurately and precisely, in biomonitoring, involves the use of highly sensitive and selective instrumentation such as tandem mass spectrometers and a thorough understanding of highly variable matrix effects. Typically, matrix effects are caused by co-eluting matrix components that alter the ionization of target analytes as well as the chromatographic response of target analytes, leading to reduced or increased sensitivity of the analysis. Thus, before the desired accuracy and precision standards of laboratory data are achieved, these effects must be characterized and controlled. Here we present our review and observations of matrix effects encountered during the validation and implementation of tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods. We also provide systematic, comprehensive laboratory strategies needed to control challenges posed by matrix effects in order to ensure delivery of the most accurate data for biomonitoring studies assessing exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:25562585

  1. Quantitative analysis of biomolecules by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry: Fundamental considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Muddiman, D.C.; Nicola, A.J.; Proctor, A.

    1995-12-31

    Static Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has been applied to investigate an extensive assortment of analytical systems; from semiconductors to DNA sequencing. Recently, the TOF-SIMS method has been successfully applied to real biological systems. This report focuses on some important aspects that must be taken into consideration when conducting measurements on biomaterials in order to observe the potential the TOF-SIMS method affords. The current data are presented using Cyclosporin A (CsA, 1202 Da) and cocaine (303 Da) as model compounds. CsA is observed in the TOF-SIMS mass spectrum predominately as a Ag-cationized species and cocaine as a protonated species; thus, they are complementary probe molecules.

  2. Quantitative analysis of phenibut in rat brain tissue extracts by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grinberga, Solveiga; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Dambrova, Maija; Pugovics, Osvalds

    2008-12-01

    Phenibut (3-phenyl-4-aminobutyric acid) is a gamma-aminobutyric acid mimetic drug, which is used clinically as a mood elevator and tranquilizer. In the present work, a rapid, selective and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantification of phenibut in biological matrices has been developed. The method is based on protein precipitation with acidic acetonitrile followed by isocratic chromatographic separation using acetonitrile-formic acid (0.1% in water; 8:92, v/v) mobile phase on a reversed-phase column. Detection of the analyte was performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode with the precursor-to-product ion transition m/z 180.3 --> m/z 117.2. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 50-2000 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification for phenibut in rat brain extracts was 50 ng/mL. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained over the whole concentration range. The validated method was successfully applied in a pharmacological study to analyze phenibut concentration in rat brain tissue extract samples. PMID:19034959

  3. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. METHODS The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. RESULTS An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm2 additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3–14%. CONCLUSIONS The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24097398

  4. Quantitative confirmation of dimetridazole and ipronidazole in swine feed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with multiple ion detection.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J; Nandrea, G J; Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W; Skinner, H R

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from 4 types of swine feed containing 0.11 ppm each of dimetridazole (DMZ) and ipronidazole (IPR) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using multiple ion detection (MID) techniques. We demonstrate in this paper that the quantitative results obtained by capillary GC/MS with MID are comparable for both compounds to results obtained by liquid chromatography and have a lower coefficient of variation for DMZ. Moreover, consistency in the ion ratios (5 ions in DMZ and 6 ions in IPR) permits identification of these compounds by electron ionization MS. PMID:3624166

  5. Rapid whole protein quantitation of staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Isabel; Soler, Carla; Mañes, Jordi; Soriano, José Miguel

    2012-05-18

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen and has been indicated as the fifth causative agent of food-borne human illness throughout the world. Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are toxic compounds excreted mainly by strains of S. aureus. Among these toxins, enterotoxins A (SEA) and B (SEB) are both of the most prevalent compounds in staphylococcal food poisoning. In this work, reverse phase liquid chromatography coupled to ESI mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS) has been applied for its rapid identification and quantification. Limit of detection (LOD) values were 0.5 and 0.2 ng for SEA and SEB, respectively and limit of quantification (LOQ) value was 1 ng for both enterotoxins. SEA and SEB have been analyzed as intact proteins in milk and fruit juices. Analytical methods are essential for routine monitoring purposes and safeguard public health and the proposed technique can detect and quantify successfully SEA and SEB in food samples. PMID:22498351

  6. Neuroprotective potential of Linezolid: a quantitative and distribution study via mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baijnath, Sooraj; Shobo, Adeola; Bester, Linda A; Singh, Sanil D; Kruger, Gert; Arvidsson, Per I; Naicker, Tricia; Govender, Thavendran

    2016-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the neuroprotective potential of Linezolid (LIN) in an animal model. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were either given a single (100 mg/kg) dose or treated daily for 4 weeks. A validated LC-MS/MS method was used to measure LIN levels in plasma and brain, this was paired with mass spectrometry imaging to determine the tissue spatial distribution of the drug. The results showed that after a single dose there was poor penetration of the drug into the brain. With multiple doses there were high tissue levels, with the drug reaching steady state in subsequent weeks. LIN displayed a promising distribution pattern with localisation in the brainstem. Systemic circulation is fed into the brain by the carotid and vertebral arteries which enter through the brain stem, therefore high drug concentrations is this area may protect against infectious agents entering via this route. PMID:27324049

  7. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages. PMID:19939702

  8. Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for quantitative measurement of quorum sensing inhibition.

    PubMed

    Todd, Daniel A; Zich, David B; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-08-01

    Drug resistant bacterial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and new strategies are needed for the treatment of these infections. The anti-virulence approach, which targets non-essential virulence factors in bacteria, has been proposed as one way to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. Virulence in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and many other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is controlled by the quorum sensing system. Thus, there is excellent therapeutic potential for compounds that target this system. With this project, we have developed and validated a novel approach for measuring quorum sensing inhibition in vitro. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was employed to directly measure one of the important outputs of the quorum sensing system in MRSA, auto-inducing peptide I (AIP I) in bacterial cultures. The method for AIP detection was validated and demonstrated limits of detection and quantification of range of 0.0035μM and 0.10μM, respectively. It was shown that the known quorum sensing inhibitor ambuic acid inhibited AIP I production by a clinically relevant strain of MRSA, with an IC50 value of 2.6±0.2μM. The new method performed similarly to previously published methods using GFP reporter assays, but has the advantage of being applicable without the need for engineering of a reporter strain. Additionally, the mass spectrometry-based method could be applicable in situations where interference by the inhibitor prevents the application of fluorescence-based methods. PMID:27237773

  9. A quantitative assay for reductive metabolism of a pesticide in fish using electrochemistry coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Li, Ke; Li, Weiming

    2015-04-01

    This is the first study to use electrochemistry to generate a nitro reduction metabolite as a standard for a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative assay. This approach is further used to quantify 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) reductive metabolism. TFM is a widely used pesticide for the population control of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an invasive species of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Three animal models, sea lamprey, lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were selected to evaluate TFM reductive metabolism because they have been known to show differential susceptibilities to TFM toxicity. Amino-TFM (aTFM; 3-trifluoromethyl-4-aminophenol) was the only reductive metabolite identified through liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry screening of liver extracts incubated with TFM and was targeted for electrochemical synthesis. After synthesis and purification, aTFM was used to develop a quantitative assay of the reductive metabolism of TFM through liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of aTFM were measured from TFM-treated cellular fractions, including cytosolic, nuclear, membrane, and mitochondrial protein extracts. Sea lamprey extracts produced the highest concentrations (500 ng/mL) of aTFM. In addition, sea lamprey and sturgeon cytosolic extracts showed concentrations of aTFM substantially higher than those of rainbow trout. However, other fractions of lake sturgeon extracts tend to show aTFM concentrations similar to those of rainbow trout but not with sea lamprey. These data suggest that the level of reductive metabolism of TFM may be associated with the sensitivities of the animals to this particular pesticide. PMID:25730707

  10. Liquid chromatography quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry for quantitative steroid hormone analysis in plasma, urine, saliva and hair.

    PubMed

    Gaudl, Alexander; Kratzsch, Juergen; Bae, Yoon Ju; Kiess, Wieland; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta

    2016-09-16

    Steroid analysis is being conquered by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) benefiting from higher standardization, selectivity and diversity. Regarding high throughput in routine diagnostics rapid chromatography is mandatory. Introducing MS(3) (MS/MS/MS), specificity of mass spectrometric detection can be enhanced without sacrificing analysis time. 100mL of human plasma/serum, saliva, urine and 10-20mg of hair are used for the simultaneous quantification of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, aldosterone, androstenedione, cortisol, cortisone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone using online solid phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS or LC-MS(3). Steroids can be analyzed in 4min after a single manual dilution and protein precipitation step. In complex sample matrices like hair MS(3) detection was found to be appropriate for quantitation. Lower limits of quantitation ranged from 37pmol/L (estradiol) up to 3.1nmol/L (DHEAS). General accuracy was 89-107% with between-run imprecision ≤10%. Comparison to immunoassays revealed significant differences in quantitation for urinary cortisol (-71% mean), aldosterone (-40% mean) and plasma aldosterone (-45% mean). The comparison of MS(2) and MS(3) quantitation of hair cortisol also revealed significant differences. In general, quantitation via MS(3) was not applicable for a long time. But with the current generation of mass spectrometers quantitation via MS(3) can be superior to MS(2) regarding specificity and accuracy when dealing with matrix issues. However, drawbacks regarding flexibility and precision have to be taken into account. Concludingly, simple protein precipitation combined with rapid online SPE LC-MS/MS/MS allows us to quantify over broad, essential concentration ranges in human serum, saliva, urine and hair. PMID:27554022

  11. Quantitative determination of nitrendipine in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xul, Feng-Guo; Zhang, Zun-Jian; Song, Rui; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Yun

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive and highly selective liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) method was developed to determine nitrendipine (4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3, 5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid ethyl methyl ester, CAS 39562-70-4) in human plasma. The analyte and the internal standard nimodipine (CAS 66085-59-4) were extracted from plasma samples by n-hexane-isopropanol (95:5, v/v), and analyzed on a commercially available column Interfaced with a mass spectrometer. Positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was empolyed as the ionization source. The samples were detected by the use of selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The mobile phase consisted of methanol-water (75:25, v/v). The method has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 ng/ml. The linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentra tions range of 0.3-40 ng/ml (r2 > or = .99). The intra- and inter-day batch precisions were lower than 10% in terms of relative standard deviation (R. S. D.), and the accuracy ranged from 85 to 110% in terms of percent accuracy. The overall extraction recoveries were determined to be about 75% on average. This validated method was successfully applied to the evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profiles of nitrendipine tablets administered to 8 Chinese healthy volunteers. PMID:18488806

  12. Quantitative determination of ondansetron in human plasma by enantioselective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Dai, Xiaojian; Zhong, Dafang; Chen, Xiaoyan

    2008-03-15

    A sensitive and enantioselective method was developed and validated for the determination of ondansetron enantiomers in human plasma using enantioselective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The enantiomers of ondansetron were extracted from plasma using ethyl acetate under alkaline conditions. HPLC separation was performed on an ovomucoid column using an isocratic mobile phase of methanol-5 mM ammonium acetate-acetic acid (20:80:0.02, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 0.40 mL/min. Acquisition of mass spectrometric data was performed in multiple reaction monitoring mode, using the transitions of m/z 294-->170 for ondansetron enantiomers, and m/z 285-->124 for tropisetron (internal standard). The method was linear in the concentration range of 0.10-40 ng/mL for each enantiomer using 200 microL of plasma. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) for each enantiomer was 0.10 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay precision was 3.7-11.6% and 5.6-12.3% for R-(-)-ondansetron and S-(+)-ondansetron, respectively. The accuracy was 100.4-107.1% for R-(-)-ondansetron and 103.3-104.9% for S-(+)-ondansetron. No chiral inversion was observed during the plasma storage, preparation and analysis. The method was successfully applied to characterize the pharmacokinetic profiles of ondansetron enantiomers in healthy volunteers after an intravenous infusion of 8 mg racemic ondansetron. PMID:18299256

  13. Quantitative analysis of mitragynine in human urine by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shijun; Tran, Buu N; Nelsen, Jamie L; Aldous, Kenneth M

    2009-08-15

    Mitragynine is the primary active alkaloid extracted from the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth, a plant that originates in South-East Asia and is commonly known as kratom in Thailand. Kratom has been used for many centuries for their medicinal and psychoactive qualities, which are comparable to that of opiate-based drugs. Kratom abuse can lead to a detectable content of mitragynine residue in urine. Ultra trace amount of mitragynine in human urine was determined by a high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS/MS). Mitragynine was extracted by methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) and separated on a HILIC column. The ESI/MS/MS was accomplished using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in positive ion detection and multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode. Ajmalicine, a mitragynine's structure analog was selected as internal standard (IS) for method development. Quality control (QC) performed at three levels 0.1, 1 and 5 ng/ml of mitragynine in urine gave mean recoveries of 90, 109, and 98% with average relative standard deviation of 22, 12 and 16%, respectively. The regression linearity of mitragynine calibration ranged from 0.01 to 5.0 ng/ml was achieved with correlation coefficient greater than 0.995. A detection limit of 0.02 ng/ml and high precision data within-day and between days analysis were obtained. PMID:19577523

  14. Quantitative Cross-linking/Mass Spectrometry Using Isotope-labeled Cross-linkers and MaxQuant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo A; Fischer, Lutz; Cox, Jürgen; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-08-01

    The conceptually simple step from cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CLMS) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS) is compounded by technical challenges. Currently, quantitative proteomics software is tightly integrated with the protein identification workflow. This prevents automatically quantifying other m/z features in a targeted manner including those associated with cross-linked peptides. Here we present a new release of MaxQuant that permits starting the quantification process from an m/z feature list. Comparing the automated quantification to a carefully manually curated test set of cross-linked peptides obtained by cross-linking C3 and C3b with BS(3) and isotope-labeled BS(3)-d4 revealed a number of observations: (1) Fully automated process using MaxQuant can quantify cross-links in our reference data set with 68% recall rate and 88% accuracy. (2) Hidden quantification errors can be converted into exposed failures by label-swap replica, which makes label-swap replica an essential part of QCLMS. (3) Cross-links that failed during automated quantification can be recovered by semi-automated re-quantification. The integrated workflow of MaxQuant and semi-automated assessment provides the maximum of quantified cross-links. In contrast, work on larger data sets or by less experienced users will benefit from full automation in MaxQuant. PMID:27302889

  15. Direct and rapid quantitation of ephedrines in human urine by paper spray ionization/high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Ki Hun; Cha, Eunju; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Cha, Sangwon; Lee, Jaeick

    2016-08-15

    A rapid and direct paper spray ionization/mass spectrometry (PSI/MS) method was developed for quantitative analysis of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, norpseudoephedrine, and methylephedrine in human urine. This method involves the use of a triangular filter paper and high-resolution mass spectrometry, where the molecular ions of ephedrines were generated by applying high voltage after loading the spray solvent to the paper which urine sample was pre-loaded. Small amounts (2μL) of urine spiked with an internal standard were directly analyzed for ephedrines. The PSI/MS method was validated for linearity, within- and between-run precision, accuracy, and limit of detection. The results showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.9928) and acceptable precision and accuracy. Furthermore, the accuracy of the method was assessed by analyzing a blind urine sample from World Anti-Doping Agency and comparing the measured concentrations with the nominal concentrations. This test resulted in accuracies ranging from 96.4 to 106.1%, indicating that the PSI/MS method has the potential to be an alternative technique for the fast quantitation of ephedrines in doping control analysis. PMID:27393909

  16. Quantitative Cross-linking/Mass Spectrometry Using Isotope-labeled Cross-linkers and MaxQuant*

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The conceptually simple step from cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CLMS) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS) is compounded by technical challenges. Currently, quantitative proteomics software is tightly integrated with the protein identification workflow. This prevents automatically quantifying other m/z features in a targeted manner including those associated with cross-linked peptides. Here we present a new release of MaxQuant that permits starting the quantification process from an m/z feature list. Comparing the automated quantification to a carefully manually curated test set of cross-linked peptides obtained by cross-linking C3 and C3b with BS3 and isotope-labeled BS3-d4 revealed a number of observations: (1) Fully automated process using MaxQuant can quantify cross-links in our reference data set with 68% recall rate and 88% accuracy. (2) Hidden quantification errors can be converted into exposed failures by label-swap replica, which makes label-swap replica an essential part of QCLMS. (3) Cross-links that failed during automated quantification can be recovered by semi-automated re-quantification. The integrated workflow of MaxQuant and semi-automated assessment provides the maximum of quantified cross-links. In contrast, work on larger data sets or by less experienced users will benefit from full automation in MaxQuant. PMID:27302889

  17. High-resolution mass spectrometry for integrated qualitative and quantitative analysis of pharmaceuticals in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Tonoli, David; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative and qualitative high-resolution (HR) dependent and independent acquisition schemes on a QqTOF MS (with resolving power 20,000-40,000) were investigated for the analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in biological fluids. High-resolution selected reaction monitoring (HR-SRM) was found to be linear over three orders of magnitude for quantitative analysis of paracetamol in human plasma, offering a real alternative to triple quadrupole LC-SRM/MS. Metabolic stability of talinolol in microsomes was characterized by use of three different acquisition schemes: (i) information-dependent acquisition (IDA) with a TOF MS experiment as survey scan and product-ion scan as dependent scan; (ii) MS(ALL) by collecting TOF mass spectra with and without fragmentation by alternating the collision energy of the collision cell between a low (i.e., 10 eV) and high setting (i.e., 40 eV); and (iii) a novel independent acquisition mode referred to as "sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra" (SWATH) or "global precursor ions scan mode" (GPS) in which sequential precursor ions windows (typically 20 u) are used to collect the same spectrum precursor and fragment ions using a collision energy range. SWATH or GPS was found to be superior to IDA or MS(ALL) in combination with UHPLC for qualitative analysis but requires a rapidly acquiring mass spectrometer. Finally, the GPS concept was used for QUAL/QUAN analysis (i.e. integration of qualitative and quantitative analysis) of bosentan and its metabolites in urine over a concentration range from 5 to 2,500 ng mL(-1). PMID:22203371

  18. Quantitative analysis of positional isomers of triacylglycerols via electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of sodiated adducts.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Potvin, Michael A; Melanson, Jeremy E

    2010-09-01

    Herein we report a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC/MS/MS) method for the analysis of positional isomers of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in vegetable oils. The fragmentation behavior of [M + X](+) ions (X = NH(4), Li, Na or Ag) was studied on a quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. Mass spectra that were dependent on the X(+) ion and the nature and position of the acyl substituents were observed for four pairs of 'AAB/ABA'-type TAGs, namely PPO/POP, OOP/OPO, LLO/LOL and OOL/OLO (where P is 16:0, palmitic acid; O is 18:1, oleic acid; and L is 18:2, linoleic acid). For the majority of [M + X](+) adducts, the loss of the fatty acid in the outer positions (sn-1 or sn-3) was favored over the loss in the central position (sn-2), which enabled the determination of the fractional abundance of the isomers. Ratios of the intensity of fragment ions at various AAB/ABA compositions produced linear calibration curves with positive slopes, comparable to those obtained traditionally by ESI-MS/MS of [M + NH(4)](+) adducts. The only exceptions were the [M + Ag](+) adducts of the PPO/POP system, which produced calibration curves with negative slopes. Sodium adducts provided the most consistent level of isomeric discrimination for the TAGs studied and also offered the most convenience in that they required no additive to the mobile phase. Therefore, calibration curve data derived from [M + Na](+) adducts were applied to the quantification of TAG regioisomers in sunflower and olive oils. The regiospecific analysis showed that palmitic acid was typically located at positions sn-1 or sn-3, whereas unsaturated fatty acids, oleic and linoleic acids were mostly found at the sn-2 position. PMID:20814981

  19. Multiplexed Isobaric Tagging Protocols for Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Approaches to Auditory Research.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Douglas E; Basappa, Johnvesly

    2016-01-01

    Modern biologists have at their disposal a large array of techniques used to assess the existence and relative or absolute quantity of any molecule of interest in a sample. However, implementing most of these procedures can be a daunting task for the first time, even in a lab with experienced researchers. Just choosing a protocol to follow can take weeks while all of the nuances are examined and it is determined whether a protocol will (a) give the desired results, (b) result in interpretable and unbiased data, and (c) be amenable to the sample of interest. We detail here a robust procedure for labeling proteins in a complex lysate for the ultimate differential quantification of protein abundance following experimental manipulations. Following a successful outcome of the labeling procedure, the sample is submitted for mass spectrometric analysis, resulting in peptide quantification and protein identification. While we will concentrate on cells in culture, we will point out procedures that can be used for labeling lysates generated from tissues, along with any minor modifications required for such samples. We will also outline, but not fully document, other strategies used in our lab to label proteins prior to mass spectrometric analysis, and describe under which conditions each procedure may be desirable. What is not covered in this chapter is anything but the most brief introduction to mass spectrometry (instrumentation, theory, etc.), nor do we attempt to cover much in the way of software used for post hoc analysis. These two topics are dependent upon one's resources, and where applicable, one's collaborators. We strongly encourage the reader to seek out expert advice on topics not covered here. PMID:27259924

  20. Fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry method for quantitative chemical residue screening in food.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Stry, James J; Pentz, Anne M; McClory, Joseph P; May, John H

    2011-07-27

    A prototype multiresidue method based on fast extraction and dilution of samples followed by flow injection mass spectrometric analysis is proposed here for high-throughput chemical screening in complex matrices. The method was tested for sulfonylurea herbicides (triflusulfuron methyl, azimsulfuron, chlorimuron ethyl, sulfometuron methyl, chlorsulfuron, and flupyrsulfuron methyl), carbamate insecticides (oxamyl and methomyl), pyrimidine carboxylic acid herbicides (aminocyclopyrachlor and aminocyclopyrachlor methyl), and anthranilic diamide insecticides (chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole). Lemon and pecan were used as representative high-water and low-water content matrices, respectively, and a sample extraction procedure was designed for each commodity type. Matrix-matched external standards were used for calibration, yielding linear responses with correlation coefficients (r) consistently >0.99. The limits of detection (LOD) were estimated to be between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg for all analytes, allowing execution of recovery tests with samples fortified at ≥0.05 mg/kg. Average analyte recoveries obtained during method validation for lemon and pecan ranged from 75 to 118% with standard deviations between 3 and 21%. Representative food processed fractions were also tested, that is, soybean oil and corn meal, yielding individual analyte average recoveries ranging from 62 to 114% with standard deviations between 4 and 18%. An intralaboratory blind test was also performed; the method excelled with 0 false positives and 0 false negatives in 240 residue measurements (20 samples × 12 analytes). The daily throughput of the fast extraction and dilution (FED) procedure is estimated at 72 samples/chemist, whereas the flow injection mass spectrometry (FI-MS) throughput could be as high as 4.3 sample injections/min, making very efficient use of mass spectrometers with negligible instrumental analysis time compared to the sample homogenization, preparation, and data

  1. High resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis and untargeted screening of algal toxins in mussels and passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Zendong, Zita; McCarron, Pearse; Herrenknecht, Christine; Sibat, Manoella; Amzil, Zouher; Cole, Richard B; Hess, Philipp

    2015-10-16

    Measurement of marine algal toxins has traditionally focussed on shellfish monitoring while, over the last decade, passive sampling has been introduced as a complementary tool for exploratory studies. Since 2011, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been adopted as the EU reference method (No. 15/2011) for detection and quantitation of lipophilic toxins. Traditional LC-MS approaches have been based on low-resolution mass spectrometry (LRMS), however, advances in instrument platforms have led to a heightened interest in the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) for toxin detection. This work describes the use of HRMS in combination with passive sampling as a progressive approach to marine algal toxin surveys. Experiments focused on comparison of LRMS and HRMS for determination of a broad range of toxins in shellfish and passive samplers. Matrix effects are an important issue to address in LC-MS; therefore, this phenomenon was evaluated for mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and passive samplers using LRMS (triple quadrupole) and HRMS (quadrupole time-of-flight and Orbitrap) instruments. Matrix-matched calibration solutions containing okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins, pectenotoxin, azaspiracids, yessotoxins, domoic acid, pinnatoxins, gymnodimine A and 13-desmethyl spirolide C were prepared. Similar matrix effects were observed on all instruments types. Most notably, there was ion enhancement for pectenotoxins, okadaic acid/dinophysistoxins on one hand, and ion suppression for yessotoxins on the other. Interestingly, the ion selected for quantitation of PTX2 also influenced the magnitude of matrix effects, with the sodium adduct typically exhibiting less susceptibility to matrix effects than the ammonium adduct. As expected, mussel as a biological matrix, quantitatively produced significantly more matrix effects than passive sampler extracts, irrespective of toxin. Sample dilution was demonstrated as an effective measure to reduce

  2. An automated gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry instrument for the quantitative analysis of halocarbons in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obersteiner, F.; Bönisch, H.; Engel, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the characterization and application of a new gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry instrument (GC-TOFMS) for the quantitative analysis of halocarbons in air samples. The setup comprises three fundamental enhancements compared to our earlier work (Hoker et al., 2015): (1) full automation, (2) a mass resolving power R = m/Δm of the TOFMS (Tofwerk AG, Switzerland) increased up to 4000 and (3) a fully accessible data format of the mass spectrometric data. Automation in combination with the accessible data allowed an in-depth characterization of the instrument. Mass accuracy was found to be approximately 5 ppm in mean after automatic recalibration of the mass axis in each measurement. A TOFMS configuration giving R = 3500 was chosen to provide an R-to-sensitivity ratio suitable for our purpose. Calculated detection limits are as low as a few femtograms by means of the accurate mass information. The precision for substance quantification was 0.15 % at the best for an individual measurement and in general mainly determined by the signal-to-noise ratio of the chromatographic peak. Detector non-linearity was found to be insignificant up to a mixing ratio of roughly 150 ppt at 0.5 L sampled volume. At higher concentrations, non-linearities of a few percent were observed (precision level: 0.2 %) but could be attributed to a potential source within the detection system. A straightforward correction for those non-linearities was applied in data processing, again by exploiting the accurate mass information. Based on the overall characterization results, the GC-TOFMS instrument was found to be very well suited for the task of quantitative halocarbon trace gas observation and a big step forward compared to scanning, quadrupole MS with low mass resolving power and a TOFMS technique reported to be non-linear and restricted by a small dynamical range.

  3. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features.

    PubMed

    Kaddi, Chanchala D; Bennett, Rachel V; Paine, Martin R L; Banks, Mitchel D; Weber, Arthur L; Fernández, Facundo M; Wang, May D

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26508443

  4. Quantitative determination of methylnaltrexone in human serum using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Stefan; Schumacher, Gitta; Siegmund, Werner

    2011-12-15

    Methylnaltrexone (MNTX) is a novel peripherally acting μ-opioid antagonist that prevents peripheral side effects of opioid drugs such as constipation without affecting the analgesia. We developed a selective and sensitive assay to measure MTNX concentrations in human serum. The drug was measured after protein precipitation with perchloric acid using naltrexone as internal standard and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for detection. The chromatography was performed isocratically on a RP18 column using 25 mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 4)/acetonitrile (90%/10%; flow rate 200 μl/min) as mobile phase. The MS/MS analysis was performed in positive ionization mode monitoring the m/z transitions 356.4/284.2 for MNTX and 342.4/324.2 for naltrexone. The method was validated according to selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effects and stability. The validation range for MNTX in serum was 0.5-250 ng/ml. The developed LC-MS/MS was shown to be valid and successfully applied to measure serum-concentration-time curves of MNTX in a pilot study in healthy volunteers. PMID:21880450

  5. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Feature

    PubMed Central

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis. PMID:26508443

  6. Label-Free Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals a Panel of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Nai-Jun; Gao, Jiang-Ling; Liu, Yan; Song, Wei; Zhang, Zhan-Yang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To identify potential biomarkers involved in CRC, a shotgun proteomic method was applied to identify soluble proteins in three CRCs and matched normal mucosal tissues using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Label-free protein profiling of three CRCs and matched normal mucosal tissues were then conducted to quantify and compare proteins. Results showed that 67 of the 784 identified proteins were linked to CRC (28 upregulated and 39 downregulated). Gene Ontology and DAVID databases were searched to identify the location and function of differential proteins that were related to the biological processes of binding, cell structure, signal transduction, cell adhesion, and so on. Among the differentially expressed proteins, tropomyosin-3 (TPM3), endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 29 (ERp29), 18 kDa cationic antimicrobial protein (CAMP), and heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (HSPA8) were verified to be upregulated in CRC tissue and seven cell lines through western blot analysis. Furthermore, the upregulation of TPM3, ERp29, CAMP, and HSPA8 was validated in 69 CRCs byimmunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Combination of TPM3, ERp29, CAMP, and HSPA8 can identify CRC from matched normal mucosal achieving an accuracy of 73.2% using IHC score. These results suggest that TPM3, ERp29, CAMP, and HSPA8 are great potential IHC diagnostic biomarkers for CRC. PMID:25699276

  7. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis.

  8. Commercially available antibodies can be applied in quantitative multiplexed peptide immunoaffinity enrichment targeted mass spectrometry assays

    PubMed Central

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Kennedy, Jacob; Yan, Ping; Lin, Chenwei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides coupled to multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (immuno-MRM) enables highly specific, sensitive, and precise quantification of peptides and post-translational modifications. Major obstacles to developing a large number of immuno-MRM assays are the poor availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) validated for immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides and the cost and lead time of developing the antibodies de novo. Although many thousands of mAbs are commercially offered, few have been tested for application to immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides. In this study we tested the success rate of using commercially available mAbs for peptide immuno-MRM assays. We selected 105 commercial mAbs (76 targeting non-modified “pan” epitopes, 29 targeting phosphorylation) to proteins associated with the DNA damage response network. We found that 8 of the 76 pan (11%) and 5 of the 29 phospho-specific mAbs (17%) captured tryptic peptides (detected by LC-MS/MS) of their protein targets from human cell lysates. Seven of these mAbs were successfully used to configure and analytically characterize immuno-MRM assays. By applying selection criteria upfront, the results indicate that a screening success rate of up to 24% is possible, establishing the feasibility of screening a large number of catalog antibodies to provide readily-available assay reagents. PMID:27094115

  9. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed. PMID:27131112

  10. Quantitative high-throughput analysis of drugs in biological matrices by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bourgogne, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    To support pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism studies, LC-MS/MS plays more and more an essential role for the quantitation of drugs and their metabolites in biological matrices. With the new challenges encountered in drug discovery and drug development, new strategies are put in place to achieve high-throughput analysis, using serial and parallel approaches. To speed-up method development and validation, generic approaches with the direct injection of biological fluids is highly desirable. Column-switching, using various packing materials for the extraction columns, is widely applied. Improvement of mass spectrometers performance, and in particular triple quadrupoles, also strongly influences sample preparation strategies, which remain a key element in the bioanalytical process. PMID:12838545

  11. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  12. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-01

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins. PMID:24027776

  13. Rapid and High-Throughput Detection and Quantitation of Radiation Biomarkers in Human and Nonhuman Primates by Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L.; Pannkuk, Evan L.; Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Hall, Adam B.; Fornace, Albert J.; Vouros, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Radiation exposure is an important public health issue due to a range of accidental and intentional threats. Prompt and effective large-scale screening and appropriate use of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate radiation injury requires rapid methods for determining the radiation dose. In a number of studies, metabolomics has identified small-molecule biomarkers responding to the radiation dose. Differential mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) has been used for similar compounds for high-throughput small-molecule detection and quantitation. In this study, we show that DMS-MS can detect and quantify two radiation biomarkers, trimethyl-L-lysine (TML) and hypoxanthine. Hypoxanthine is a human and nonhuman primate (NHP) radiation biomarker and metabolic intermediate, whereas TML is a radiation biomarker in humans but not in NHP, which is involved in carnitine synthesis. They have been analyzed by DMS-MS from urine samples after a simple strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE). The dramatic suppression of background and chemical noise provided by DMS-MS results in an approximately 10-fold reduction in time, including sample pretreatment time, compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). DMS-MS quantitation accuracy has been verified by validation testing for each biomarker. Human samples are not yet available, but for hypoxanthine, selected NHP urine samples (pre- and 7-d-post 10 Gy exposure) were analyzed, resulting in a mean change in concentration essentially identical to that obtained by LC-MS (fold-change 2.76 versus 2.59). These results confirm the potential of DMS-MS for field or clinical first-level rapid screening for radiation exposure.

  14. Quantitative determination of sarsasapogenin in rat plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Zhirui; Hu, Jing; Lai, Xiaodan; Xia, Peiyuan

    2016-06-01

    Sarsasapogenin, a natural compound from Chinese medical herb Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bge., has recently received a great deal of attention due to its various bioactivities. In this study, an easy and applicable liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantification of sarsasapogenin in rat plasma was developed. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple one-step protein precipitation procedure with methanol. Negative electrospray ionization was performed using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode with transitions of m/z 417.4/273.2 for sarsasapogenin, and 415.2/271.4 for diosgenin (internal standard). The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.5-500ng/mL (r=0.9994), with a lower limit of quantification at 0.5ng/mL. The RSD of intra- and inter-day precision was below 6.41%, and accuracy ranged from 87.60% to 99.20%. The RSD of matrix effect and recovery yield was within ±15% of nominal concentrations and sarsasapogenin was stable during stability tests. This validated method had been successfully applied to the preclinical pharmacokinetic studies of sarsasapogenin in rats. The half-life (t1/2) was (15.1±2.3), (16.1±3.0) and (15.4±3.9) h after single intragastric administration of 25, 50 and 100mg/kg sarsasapogenin, respectively. And it was found that, the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC0-72h) and the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) were linearly related to dose. PMID:27107248

  15. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Dynamics of Factor-inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor-catalyzed Hydroxylation*

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Rachelle S.; Trudgian, David C.; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Cockman, Matthew E.

    2011-01-01

    The asparaginyl hydroxylase, factor-inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), is central to the oxygen-sensing pathway that controls the activity of HIF. Factor-inhibiting HIF (FIH) also catalyzes the hydroxylation of a large set of proteins that share a structural motif termed the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD). In vitro studies have defined kinetic properties of FIH with respect to different substrates and have suggested FIH binds more tightly to certain ARD proteins than HIF and that ARD hydroxylation may have a lower Km value for oxygen than HIF hydroxylation. However, regulation of asparaginyl hydroxylation on ARD substrates has not been systematically studied in cells. To address these questions, we employed isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to monitor the accrual, inhibition, and decay of hydroxylation under defined conditions. Under the conditions examined, hydroxylation was not reversed but increased as the protein aged. The extent of hydroxylation on ARD proteins was increased by addition of ascorbate, whereas iron and 2-oxoglutarate supplementation had no significant effect. Despite preferential binding of FIH to ARD substrates in vitro, when expressed as fusion proteins in cells, hydroxylation was found to be more complete on HIF polypeptides compared with sites within the ARD. Furthermore, comparative studies of hydroxylation in graded hypoxia revealed ARD hydroxylation was suppressed in a site-specific manner and was as sensitive as HIF to hypoxic inhibition. These findings suggest that asparaginyl hydroxylation of HIF-1 and ARD proteins is regulated by oxygen over a similar range, potentially tuning the HIF transcriptional response through competition between the two types of substrate. PMID:21808058

  16. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Partial Translational Regulation for Dosage Compensation in Chicken.

    PubMed

    Uebbing, Severin; Konzer, Anne; Xu, Luohao; Backström, Niclas; Brunström, Björn; Bergquist, Jonas; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that dosage compensation is not a ubiquitous feature following sex chromosome evolution, especially not in organisms where females are the heterogametic sex, like in birds. Even when it occurs, compensation can be incomplete and limited to dosage-sensitive genes. However, previous work has mainly studied transcriptional regulation of sex-linked genes, which may not reflect expression at the protein level. Here, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to detect and quantify expressed levels of more than 2,400 proteins in ten different tissues of male and female chicken embryos. For comparison, transcriptome sequencing was performed in the same individuals, five of each sex. The proteomic analysis revealed that dosage compensation was incomplete, with a mean male-to-female (M:F) expression ratio of Z-linked genes of 1.32 across tissues, similar to that at the RNA level (1.29). The mean Z chromosome-to-autosome expression ratio was close to 1 in males and lower than 1 in females, consistent with partly reduced Z chromosome expression in females. Although our results exclude a general mechanism for chromosome-wide dosage compensation at translation, 30% of all proteins encoded from Z-linked genes showed a significant change in the M:F ratio compared with the corresponding ratio at the RNA level. This resulted in a pattern where some genes showed balanced expression between sexes and some close to 2-fold higher expression in males. This suggests that proteomic analyses will be necessary to reveal a more complete picture of gene regulation and sex chromosome evolution. PMID:26108680

  17. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for the quantitative analysis of solid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, J.

    1999-02-12

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become the method of choice for elemental and isotopic analysis. Several factors contribute to its success. Modern instruments are capable of routine analysis at part per trillion levels with relative detection limits in part per quadrillion levels. Sensitivities in these instruments can be as high as 200 million counts per second per part per million with linear dynamic ranges up to eight orders of magnitude. With standards for only a few elements, rapid semiquantitative analysis of over 70 elements in an individual sample can be performed. Less than 20 years after its inception ICP-MS has shown to be applicable to several areas of science. These include geochemistry, the nuclear industry, environmental chemistry, clinical chemistry, the semiconductor industry, and forensic chemistry. In this introduction, the general attributes of ICP-MS will be discussed in terms of instrumentation and sample introduction. The advantages and disadvantages of current systems are presented. A detailed description of one method of sample introduction, laser ablation, is given. The paper also gives conclusions and suggestions for future work. Chapter 2, Quantitative analysis of solids by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for calibration, has been removed for separate processing.

  18. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  19. Quantitative mass spectrometry reveals a role for the GTPase Rho1p in actin organization on the peroxisome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Marcello; Smith, Jennifer J.; Jung, Sunhee; Yi, Eugene; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Christmas, Rowan H.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Tam, Yuen Yi C.; Fagarasanu, Andrei; Goodlett, David R.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rachubinski, Richard A.; Aitchison, John D.

    2004-01-01

    We have combined classical subcellular fractionation with large-scale quantitative mass spectrometry to identify proteins that enrich specifically with peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In two complementary experiments, isotope-coded affinity tags and tandem mass spectrometry were used to quantify the relative enrichment of proteins during the purification of peroxisomes. Mathematical modeling of the data from 306 quantified proteins led to a prioritized list of 70 candidates whose enrichment scores indicated a high likelihood of them being peroxisomal. Among these proteins, eight novel peroxisome-associated proteins were identified. The top novel peroxisomal candidate was the small GTPase Rho1p. Although Rho1p has been shown to be tethered to membranes of the secretory pathway, we show that it is specifically recruited to peroxisomes upon their induction in a process dependent on its interaction with the peroxisome membrane protein Pex25p. Rho1p regulates the assembly state of actin on the peroxisome membrane, thereby controlling peroxisome membrane dynamics and biogenesis. PMID:15596542

  20. Development and evaluation of a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for rapid, accurate quantitation of malondialdehyde in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, Constance A; Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Swardfager, Walter; Levitt, Anthony; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    Malondialdhyde (MDA) is a commonly used marker of lipid peroxidation in oxidative stress. To provide a sensitive analytical method that is compatible with high throughput, we developed a multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) approach using 3-nitrophenylhydrazine chemical derivatization, isotope-labeling, and liquid chromatography (LC) with electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry assay to accurately quantify MDA in human plasma. A stable isotope-labeled internal standard was used to compensate for ESI matrix effects. The assay is linear (R(2)=0.9999) over a 20,000-fold concentration range with a lower limit of quantitation of 30fmol (on-column). Intra- and inter-run coefficients of variation (CVs) were <2% and ∼10% respectively. The derivative was stable for >36h at 5°C. Standards spiked into plasma had recoveries of 92-98%. When compared to a common LC-UV method, the LC-MS method found near-identical MDA concentrations. A pilot project to quantify MDA in patient plasma samples (n=26) in a study of major depressive disorder with winter-type seasonal pattern (MDD-s) confirmed known associations between MDA concentrations and obesity (p<0.02). The LC-MS method provides high sensitivity and high reproducibility for quantifying MDA in human plasma. The simple sample preparation and rapid analysis time (5x faster than LC-UV) offers high throughput for large-scale clinical applications. PMID:27437618

  1. A new approach for the comparative analysis of multiprotein complexes based on 15N metabolic labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trompelt, Kerstin; Steinbeck, Janina; Terashima, Mia; Hippler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The introduced protocol provides a tool for the analysis of multiprotein complexes in the thylakoid membrane, by revealing insights into complex composition under different conditions. In this protocol the approach is demonstrated by comparing the composition of the protein complex responsible for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, isolated from genetically different strains. The procedure comprises the isolation of thylakoid membranes, followed by their separation into multiprotein complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, SDS-PAGE, immunodetection and comparative, quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) based on differential metabolic labeling ((14)N/(15)N) of the analyzed strains. Detergent solubilized thylakoid membranes are loaded on sucrose density gradients at equal chlorophyll concentration. After ultracentrifugation, the gradients are separated into fractions, which are analyzed by mass-spectrometry based on equal volume. This approach allows the investigation of the composition within the gradient fractions and moreover to analyze the migration behavior of different proteins, especially focusing on ANR1, CAS, and PGRL1. Furthermore, this method is demonstrated by confirming the results with immunoblotting and additionally by supporting the findings from previous studies (the identification and PSI-dependent migration of proteins that were previously described to be part of the CEF-supercomplex such as PGRL1, FNR, and cyt f). Notably, this approach is applicable to address a broad range of questions for which this protocol can be adopted and e.g. used for comparative analyses of multiprotein complex composition isolated from distinct environmental conditions. PMID:24686495

  2. Impacts of CD44 knockdown in cancer cells on tumor and host metabolic systems revealed by quantitative imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Mitsuyo; Hishiki, Takako; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Tamada, Mayumi; Toue, Sakino; Kabe, Yasuaki; Saya, Hideyuki; Suematsu, Makoto

    2015-04-30

    CD44 expressed in cancer cells was shown to stabilize cystine transporter (xCT) that uptakes cystine and excretes glutamate to supply cysteine as a substrate for reduced glutathione (GSH) for survival. While targeting CD44 serves as a potentially therapeutic stratagem to attack cancer growth and chemoresistance, the impact of CD44 targeting in cancer cells on metabolic systems of tumors and host tissues in vivo remains to be fully determined. This study aimed to reveal effects of CD44 silencing on alterations in energy metabolism and sulfur-containing metabolites in vitro and in vivo using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and quantitative imaging mass spectrometry (Q-IMS), respectively. In an experimental model of xenograft transplantation of human colon cancer HCT116 cells in superimmunodeficient NOG mice, snap-frozen liver tissues containing metastatic tumors were examined by Q-IMS. As reported previously, short hairpin CD44 RNA interference (shCD44) in cancer cells caused significant regression of tumor growth in the host liver. Under these circumstances, the CD44 knockdown suppressed polyamines, GSH and energy charges not only in metastatic tumors but also in the host liver. In culture, HCT116 cells treated with shCD44 decreased total amounts of methionine-pool metabolites including spermidine and spermine, and reactive cysteine persulfides, suggesting roles of these metabolites for cancer growth. Collectively, these results suggest that CD44 expressed in cancer accounts for a key regulator of metabolic interplay between tumor and the host tissue. PMID:25461272

  3. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  4. Simultaneous quantitation of six major quassinoids in Tongkat Ali dietary supplements by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Min; Jang, Moonhee; Kim, In Sook; Kim, Seung Hyun; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia) is one of the most popular traditional herbs in Southeast Asia and generally consumed as forms of dietary supplements, tea, or drink additives for coffee or energy beverages. In this study, the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of six major quassinoids of Tongkat Ali (eurycomanone, 13,21-dihydroeurycomanone, 13α(21)-epoxyeurycomanone, 14,15β-dihydroxyklaineanone, eurycomalactone, and longilactone) was developed and validated. Using the developed method, the content of the six quassinoids was measured in Tongkat Ali containing dietary supplement tablets or capsules, and the resulting data were used to confirm the presence of Tongkat Ali in those products. Among the six quassinoids, eurycomanone was the most abundant quassinoid in all samples tested. The developed method would be useful for the quality assessment of Tongkat Ali containing dietary supplements. PMID:25914245

  5. Analysis and Quantitation of Glycated Hemoglobin by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattan, Stephen J.; Parker, Kenneth C.; Vestal, Marvin L.; Yang, Jane Y.; Herold, David A.; Duncan, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of glycated hemoglobin is widely used for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of patient samples is used to demonstrate a method for quantitation of total glycation on the β-subunit of hemoglobin. The approach is accurate and calibrated with commercially available reference materials. Measurements were linear (R2 > 0.99) across the clinically relevant range of 4% to 20% glycation with coefficients of variation of ≤ 2.5%. Additional and independent measurements of glycation of the α-subunit of hemoglobin are used to validate β-subunit glycation measurements and distinguish hemoglobin variants. Results obtained by MALDI-TOF MS were compared with those obtained in a clinical laboratory using validated HPLC methodology. MALDI-TOF MS sample preparation was minimal and analysis times were rapid making the method an attractive alternative to methodologies currently in practice.

  6. New HDAC6-mediated deacetylation sites of tubulin in the mouse brain identified by quantitative mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Xiong, Yun; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; He, Qianqian; Gao, Siqi; Zhou, Jun; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring on microtubules have been implicated in the regulation of microtubule properties and functions. Acetylated K40 of α-tubulin, a hallmark of long-lived stable microtubules, is known to be negatively controlled by histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). However, the vital roles of HDAC6 in microtubule-related processes such as cell motility and cell division cannot be fully explained by the only known target site on tubulin. Here, we attempt to comprehensively map lysine acetylation sites on tubulin purified from mouse brain tissues. Furthermore, mass spectrometry-based quantitative comparison of acetylated peptides from wild-type vs HDAC6 knockout mice allowed us to identify six new deacetylation sites possibly mediated by HDAC6. Thus, adding new sites to the repertoire of HDAC6-mediated tubulin deacetylation events would further our understanding of the multi-faceted roles of HDAC6 in regulating microtubule stability and cellular functions. PMID:26581825

  7. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered samples by radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Toral, Aitor; Fernandez, Beatriz; Malherbe, Julien; Claverie, Fanny; Molloy, John L; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    In recent years particular effort is being devoted to the development of pulsed glow discharges (PGDs) for mass spectrometry because this powering operation mode could offer important ionization analytical advantages. However, the capabilities of radiofrequency (RF) PGD coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) for accurate isotope ratio measurements have not been demonstrated yet. This work is focused on investigating different time positions along the pulse profile for the accurate measurement of isotope ratios. As a result, a method has been developed for the direct and simultaneous multielement determination of trace elements in powdered geological samples by RF-PGD-ToFMS in combination with isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) as an absolute measurement method directly traceable to the International System of Units. Optimized operating conditions were 70 W of applied radiofrequency power, 250 Pa of pressure, 2 ms of pulse width and 4 ms of pulse period, being argon the plasma gas used. To homogeneously distribute the added isotopically-enriched standards, lithium borate fusion of powdered solid samples was used as sample preparation approach. In this way, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb were successfully determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) in two NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRM 2586 and SRM 2780) representing two different matrices of geological interest (soil and rock samples). Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb concentrations determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) were well in agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence interval and precisions below 12% relative standard deviation were observed for three independent analyses. Elemental concentrations investigated were in the range of 81-5770 mg/kg, demonstrating the potential of RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) for a sensitive, accurate and robust analysis of powdered samples. PMID:24054645

  8. Self-aliquoting microarray plates for accurate quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Martin; Fagerer, Stephan R; Köhling, Rudolf; Küster, Simon K; Steinhoff, Robert; Badertscher, Martin; Wahl, Fabian; Dittrich, Petra S; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-10-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a fast analysis tool employed for the detection of a broad range of analytes. However, MALDI-MS has a reputation of not being suitable for quantitative analysis. Inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization, spot-to-spot inhomogeneity, as well as a typically low number of replicates are the main contributing factors. Here, we present a novel MALDI sample target for quantitative MALDI-MS applications, which addresses the limitations mentioned above. The platform is based on the recently developed microarray for mass spectrometry (MAMS) technology and contains parallel lanes of hydrophilic reservoirs. Samples are not pipetted manually but deposited by dragging one or several sample droplets with a metal sliding device along these lanes. Sample is rapidly and automatically aliquoted into the sample spots due to the interplay of hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. With a few microliters of sample, it is possible to aliquot up to 40 replicates within seconds, each aliquot containing just 10 nL. The analyte droplet dries immediately and homogeneously, and consumption of the whole spot during MALDI-MS analysis is typically accomplished within few seconds. We evaluated these sample targets with respect to their suitability for use with different samples and matrices. Furthermore, we tested their application for generating calibration curves of standard peptides with α-cyano-4-hdydroxycinnamic acid as a matrix. For angiotensin II and [Glu(1)]-fibrinopeptide B we achieved coefficients of determination (r(2)) greater than 0.99 without the use of internal standards. PMID:24003910

  9. Selective quantitation of the neurotoxin BMAA by use of hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-DMS-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Kerrin, Elliott S; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been reported in cyanobacteria and shellfish, raising concerns about widespread human exposure. However, inconsistent results for BMAA analysis have led to controversy. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is the most appropriate method for analysis of BMAA, but the risk of interference from isomers, other sample components, and the electrospray background is still present. We have investigated differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as an ion filter to improve selectivity in the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC)-MS/MS determination of BMAA. We obtained standards for two BMAA isomers not previously analyzed by HILIC-MS, β-amino-N-methylalanine and 3,4-diaminobutanoic acid, and the typically used 2,4-diaminobutanoic acid and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine. DMS separation of BMAA from these isomers was achieved and optimized conditions were used to develop a sensitive and highly selective multidimensional HILIC-DMS-MS/MS method. This work revealed current technical limitations of DMS for trace quantitation, and practical solutions were implemented. Accurate control of low levels of DMS carrier gas modifier was essential, but required external metering. The linearity of our optimized method was excellent from 0.01 to 6 μmol L(-1). The instrumental LOD was 0.4 pg BMAA injected on-column and the estimated method LOD was 20 ng g(-1) dry weight for BMAA in sample matrix. The method was used to analyze cycad plant tissue, a cyanobacterial reference material, and mussel tissues, by use of isotope-dilution quantitation with deuterated BMAA. This confirmed the presence of BMAA and several of its isomers in cycad and mussel tissues, including commercially available mussel tissue reference materials certified for other biotoxins. Graphical Abstract Differential Mobility Spectrometry is used to increases the selectivity of BMAA analysis by HILIC-MS/MS. PMID:26396078

  10. Quantitative determination of ginsenoside Rh2 in rat biosamples by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Wang, Guang-Ji; Sun, Jian-Guo; Jia, Yuan-Wei; Xie, Hai-Tang; Wang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    Ginsenoside Rh2 is a "hot" natural compound with great potential as a new anti-cancer drug based on abundant pharmacological experiments. However, no systemic pharmacokinetic study of Rh2 was reported because current analysis methods could not fully meet the requirements. Thus, we developed a simple LC/MS method with highly improved sensitivities for the determination of Rh2 in rat plasma, bile, urine, feces and most tissues. The tissues and feces were firstly homogenized mechanically using buffer and methanol as the media, respectively. Plasma, bile, urine and tissue homogenates were extracted with diethyl ether for sample preparation. Feces homogenates were directly deproteinized with acetonitrile. The subsequent analysis procedures were performed on a Shimadzu LCMS2010A system (electrospray ionization single quadrupole mass analyzer), with an ODS column (150 mm x 2.0-mm i.d., 5 microm) plus a C18 guard column for separation and ammonium chloride (500 micromol) as mobile phase additive. The proportions of mobile phase were changed timely according to gradient programs. Chlorinated adducts of molecular ions [M + Cl]- of Rh2 at m/z 657.35 and internal standard digitoxin at m/z 799.55 were monitored in selective ion monitoring mode of negative ions. The method was validated to be accurate, precise and rugged with good linearity in all matrices, according to the FDA guidelines. The lower limits of quantitation in rat plasma, urine and feces were 0.2, 0.2 and 20 ng/mL respectively. Stability studies were also performed, indicating that there were no stability-related problems in the analytical procedure of Rh2. The proposed method was successfully applied to the preclinical pharmacokinetic research of Rh2 in rats, including plasma kinetics, tissue distribution and excretion studies. PMID:17082877

  11. Development of an isoform-specific tandem mass spectrometry assay for absolute quantitation of maize lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Severin E; McClain, Scott; Thelen, Jay J

    2015-01-28

    Precise and accurate quantitation of maize grain allergens is important for seed and food industries. The major allergen in maize grain is Zea m 14, a lipid transfer protein (LTP). The B73 maize genome encodes for at least six LTPs sharing 15%-87% sequence identity to Zea m 14. Phylogenetic analysis of the maize LTP family revealed one gene that corresponds to Zea m 14 (denoted as LTPa) and two other genes sharing 43% (LTPc) and 74% (LTPb) identity with Zea m 14 that are putative homologues. Using stable isotope peptide mimics as internal standards for LTPs, we present a multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry approach for multiplexed, absolute quantitation of all three LTP proteins and alternative transcript models therein. To validate quantitative accuracy, a redundant peptide, simultaneously representing the two most abundant LTPs, was included. Analysis of 21 maize varieties revealed LTPa was most prominently expressed in maize grain, ranging from 9 to 32 μg LTP/mg protein. Proteins belonging to the LTPb and LTPc gene models were also expressed but at approximately 10- and 100-fold lower levels than LTPa, respectively. The quantitative results provided by the redundant peptide show around 95% agreement with the sum of the two unique peptides, thus providing support for the LTP gene models and validating the accuracy of this method. Though not all Zea m 14-related LTPs are abundant in grain, their high sequence homology and detectable expression in maize grain signify that LTPb and LTPc are putative allergens and should be accounted for in any quantitation strategy for maize LTP allergens. PMID:25540820

  12. The life sciences mass spectrometry research unit.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry (LSMS) research unit focuses on the development of novel analytical workflows based on innovative mass spectrometric and software tools for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, peptides and proteins in complex biological matrices. The present article summarizes some of the recent work of the unit: i) the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of drug of abuse in hair, ii) the use of high resolution mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative/quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and metabolomics, and iii) the absolute quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry using the selected reaction monitoring mode. PMID:22867547

  13. Identification and quantitation of N-(carboxymethyl)valine adduct in hemoglobin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, J; Hurst, H E

    1999-05-01

    A sensitive, specific and reproducible method was developed for the quantitation of the hemoglobin (Hb) adduct N-(carboxymethyl)valine (CMV). This adduct is one of various products from the Maillard reaction, involving reducing sugars and amino acids, proteins or other molecules with a free amino group. Such adducts, including N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), are called advanced glycation end products (AGE) and have been correlated with aging and severity of diabetes in human tissues. This method was developed to examine the CMV-Hb adduct as a possible AGE formed by reaction of Hb with glucose or other oxidation products. CMV was cleaved selectively from isolated globin using pentafluorophenyl isothiocyanate (PFPITC) in a modified Edman degradation at pH 9.5. The carboxyl group of the adduct was derivatized to its methyl ester with diazomethane. The resulting derivative, 5-isopropyl-1-(methyl acetate)-3-pentafluorophenyl-2-thiohydantoin, was detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC/SIM/MS). Quantitation was based on the response factor of the derivative molecular ion (m/z 396) from synthesized CMV and N-(2-carboxyethyl)valine (molecular ion m/z 410) as internal standard. This method exhibits reproducibility and linearity in the range 0.2-100 ng CMV. The limit of quantitation (0.2 ng CMV) gave a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5:1 using a 1:30 sample aliquot. The GC/SIM/MS method can detect CMV adduct in 5 mg globin samples with relative standard deviations less than 5%. This approach avoids tedious acid hydrolysis and interference from other amino acids. The molecular ion and other CMV derivative ion assignments from samples were confirmed by accurate mass determinations using GC/high resolution SIM/MS. Measurements from random mouse, rat and human globin samples gave mean CMV levels of about 6, 5 and 14 nmol g-1 Hb in these species, respectively. PMID:10390858

  14. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Proteomics for Dissecting Multiplexed Redox Cysteine Modifications in Nitric Oxide-Protected Cardiomyocyte Under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Yi-Yun; Pu, Tsung-Hsien; Chao, Yu-Shu; Yang, Chun-Yi; Bomgarden, Ryan D.; Rogers, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Distinctive states of redox-dependent cysteine (Cys) modifications are known to regulate signaling homeostasis under various pathophysiological conditions, including myocardial injury or protection in response to ischemic stress. Recent evidence further implicates a dynamic interplay among these modified forms following changes in cellular redox environment. However, a precise delineation of multiplexed Cys modifications in a cellular context remains technically challenging. To this end, we have now developed a mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative approach using a set of novel iodoacetyl-based Cys-reactive isobaric tags (irreversible isobaric iodoacetyl Cys-reactive tandem mass tag [iodoTMT]) endowed with unique irreversible Cys-reactivities. Results: We have established a sequential iodoTMT-switch procedure coupled with efficient immunoenrichment and advanced shotgun liquid chromatography-MS/MS analysis. This workflow allows us to differentially quantify the multiple redox-modified forms of a Cys site in the original cellular context. In one single analysis, we have identified over 260 Cys sites showing quantitative differences in multiplexed redox modifications from the total lysates of H9c2 cardiomyocytes experiencing hypoxia in the absence and presence of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), indicative of a distinct pattern of individual susceptibility to S-nitrosylation or S-glutathionylation. Among those most significantly affected are proteins functionally implicated in hypoxic damage from which we showed that GSNO would protect. Innovation: We demonstrate for the first time how quantitative analysis of various Cys-redox modifications occurring in biological samples can be performed precisely and simultaneously at proteomic levels. Conclusion: We have not only developed a new approach to map global Cys-redoxomic regulation in vivo, but also provided new evidences implicating Cys-redox modifications of key molecules in NO-mediated ischemic

  15. Confirmatory and quantitative analysis using experimental design for the extraction and liquid chromatography-UV, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry determination of quinolones in turkey muscle.

    PubMed

    Clemente, M; Hermo, M P; Barrón, D; Barbosa, J

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this work is to established methods for determination of quinolones (ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, difloxacin and flumequine), regulated by European Union, and sarafloxacin in turkey muscle. An experimental design has been applied for the optimization of the factors that influence the extraction of quinolones from turkey muscle in order to determine the experimental conditions for their extraction with high recoveries. Liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (LC-UV), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have been used for the simultaneous quantification of quinolones antibiotics in turkey muscle. The proposed methods have been validated according to the Food Drugs Administration guideline and presents the limit of quantification below the maximum residue limits established by the European Union for quinolones in turkey muscle. The methods developed have been applied to quantification of enrofloxacin and its main metabolite ciprofloxacin in samples of turkey muscle obtained from animals treated with enrofloxacin. PMID:17027811

  16. STRUCTURAL DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL PHOSPHOLIPIDS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a comprehensive spectral analysis of common bacterial phospholipids using electrospray/mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) under both negative and positive ionization conditions. Phospholipids under positive ionization yield sodium-adduct molecular ions which are mos...

  17. Quantitative Profiling of Major Neutral Lipid Classes in Human Meibum by Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Green, Kari B.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to better understand lipid composition in human meibum. Methods. Intact lipids in meibum samples were detected by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in positive detection mode using sodium iodide (NaI) as an additive. The peak intensities of all major types of lipid species, that is, wax esters (WEs), cholesteryl esters (CEs), and diesters (DEs) were corrected for peak overlapping and isotopic distribution; an additional ionization efficiency correction was performed for WEs and CEs, which was simplified by the observation that the corresponding ionization efficiency was primarily dependent on the specific lipid class and saturation degree of the lipids while independent of the carbon chain length. A set of WE and CE standards was spiked in meibum samples for ionization efficiency determination and absolute quantitation. Results. The absolute amount (μmol/mg) for each of 51 WEs and 31 CEs in meibum samples was determined. The summed masses for 51 WEs and 31 CEs accounted for 48 ± 4% and 40 ± 2%, respectively, of the total meibum lipids. The mass percentages of saturated and unsaturated species were determined to be 75 ± 2% and 25 ± 1% for CEs and 14 ± 1% and 86 ± 1% for WEs. The profiles for two types of DEs were also obtained, which include 42 α,ω Type II DEs, and 21 ω Type I-St DEs. Conclusions. Major neutral lipid classes in meibum samples were quantitatively profiled by ESI-MS analysis with NaI additive. PMID:23847307

  18. High-throughput quantitative analysis of domoic acid directly from mussel tissue using Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization - tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Walsh, Callee M; McCarron, Pearse

    2014-12-15

    Eliminating sample extraction or liquid chromatography steps from methods for analysis of the neurotoxin Domoic Acid (DA) in shellfish could greatly increase throughput in food safety testing laboratories worldwide. To this end, we have investigated the use of Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (LAESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection for DA analysis directly from mussel tissue homogenates without sample extraction, cleanup or separation. DA could be selectively detected directly from mussel tissue homogenates using MS/MS in selected reaction monitoring scan mode. The quantitative capabilities of LAESI-MS/MS for DA analysis from mussel tissue were evaluated by analysis of four mussel tissue reference materials using matrix-matched calibration. Linear response was observed from 1 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg and the method limit of detection was 1 mg/kg. Results for DA analysis in tissue within the linear range were in good agreement with two established methods, LC-UV and LC-MS/MS (recoveries from 103 to 125%). Beyond the linear range, extraction and clean-up were required to achieve good quantitation. Most notable is the extremely rapid analysis time of about 10 s per sample by LAESI-MS/MS, which corresponds to a significant increase in sample throughput compared with existing methodology for routine DA analysis. PMID:25449096

  19. LaCyTools: A Targeted Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Data Processing Package for Relative Quantitation of Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Bas C; Falck, David; de Haan, Noortje; Hipgrave Ederveen, Agnes L; Razdorov, Genadij; Lauc, Gordan; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    Bottom-up glycoproteomics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is an established approach for assessing glycosylation in a protein- and site-specific manner. Consequently, tools are needed to automatically align, calibrate, and integrate LC-MS glycoproteomics data. We developed a modular software package designed to tackle the individual aspects of an LC-MS experiment, called LaCyTools. Targeted alignment is performed using user defined m/z and retention time (tr) combinations. Subsequently, sum spectra are created for each user defined analyte group. Quantitation is performed on the sum spectra, where each user defined analyte can have its own tr, minimum, and maximum charge states. Consequently, LaCyTools deals with multiple charge states, which gives an output per charge state if desired, and offers various analyte and spectra quality criteria. We compared throughput and performance of LaCyTools to combinations of available tools that deal with individual processing steps. LaCyTools yielded relative quantitation of equal precision (relative standard deviation <0.5%) and higher trueness due to the use of MS peak area instead of MS peak intensity. In conclusion, LaCyTools is an accurate automated data processing tool for high-throughput analysis of LC-MS glycoproteomics data. Released under the Apache 2.0 license, it is freely available on GitHub ( https://github.com/Tarskin/LaCyTools ). PMID:27267458

  20. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications. PMID:24261083

  1. Coumarin and furanocoumarin quantitation in citrus peel via ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS).

    PubMed

    Dugrand, Audray; Olry, Alexandre; Duval, Thibault; Hehn, Alain; Froelicher, Yann; Bourgaud, Frédéric

    2013-11-13

    Coumarins and furanocoumarins are secondary metabolites commonly found in citrus plants. These molecules are allelochemical compounds in plants that have controversial effects on humans, such as phototoxicity and the commonly described interactions with drugs, referred to as the "grapefruit juice effect". Thus, it is important to develop a reliable method to identify and quantitate the coumarins and furanocoumarins in citrus extracts. For this purpose, we herein describe an ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS)-based method. We first developed a rapid UPLC method (20 min) to separate the isomers of each furanocoumarin. A subsequent single ion monitoring MS detection method was performed to distinguish between the molecules, which were possibly coeluting but had different molecular weights. The method was successfully used to separate and quantitate 6 coumarins and 21 furanocoumarins in variable amounts within peel extracts (flavedo and albedo) of 6 varieties of Citrus (sweet orange, lemon, grapefruit, bergamot, pummelo, and clementine). This method combines high selectivity and sensitivity in a rapid analysis and is useful for fingerprinting Citrus species via their coumarin and furanocoumarin contents. PMID:24117278

  2. Simultaneous quantitative determination of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in human plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bernhard M; Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Wintersteiger, Reinhold; Windischhofer, Werner; Leis, Hans J

    2010-04-01

    Alpha-ketoglutaric acid (alpha-KG) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are currently under investigation as promising cancer cell damaging agents. A method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of alpha-KG and 5-HMF in human plasma was established for screening these compounds in human plasma. Plasma samples were directly treated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride to form the corresponding oximes, thus facilitating subsequent liquid-liquid extraction. After formation of the trimethylsilyl ethers, samples were analyzed by gas chromatography with electron ionization mass spectrometry. Stable isotope labeled standards were used, the preparation of (13)C(6)-5-HMF is described. Limits of quantitation were set to 0.938 microg/mL for alpha-KG and 0.156 microg/mL for 5-HMF. Inter-day accuracy was < or = 93.7% (alpha-KG) and < or = 92.8% (5-HMF). Inter-day precision was < or = 6.0% (alpha-KG) and < or = 4.6% (5-HMF). The method has been successfully applied to pharmacokinetic profiling of the compounds after intravenous application. PMID:20155414

  3. Metabolomics relative quantitation with mass spectrometry using chemical derivatization and isotope labeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    O'Maille, Grace; Go, Eden P.; Hoang, Linh; Want, Elizabeth J.; Smith, Colin; O'Maille, Paul; NordstrÖm, Anders; Morita, Hirotoshi; Qin, Chuan; Uritboonthai, Wilasinee; et al

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive detection and quantitation of metabolites from a biological source constitute the major challenges of current metabolomics research. Two chemical derivatization methodologies, butylation and amination, were applied to human serum for ionization enhancement of a broad spectrum of metabolite classes, including steroids and amino acids. LC-ESI-MS analysis of the derivatized serum samples provided a significant signal elevation across the total ion chromatogram to over a 100-fold increase in ionization efficiency. It was also demonstrated that derivatization combined with isotopically labeled reagents facilitated the relative quantitation of derivatized metabolites from individual as well as pooled samples.

  4. Rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of proanthocyanidin oligomers and polymers by ultra-performance liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a rapid method with ultra-performance liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of plant proanthocyanidins (PAs) directly from crude plant extracts. The method utilizes a range of cone voltages to achieve the depolymeriza...

  5. Factors That Contribute to Assay Variation in Quantitative Analysis of Sex Steroid Hormones Using Liquid and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The list of physiological events in which sex steroids play a role continues to increase. To decipher the roles that sex steroids play in any condition requires high quality cohorts of samples and assays that provide highly accurate quantitative measures. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS and GC-MS) have…

  6. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  7. Quantitative determination of coenyzme Q10 by liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Strazisar, Monika; Fir, Maja; Golc-Wondra, Alenka; Milivojevic, Luka; Prosek, Mirko; Abram, Veronika

    2005-01-01

    The dietary sources of CoQ10 and the evaluation of CoQ10 in dairy products were characterized. For quantitation of CoQ10 in food samples, 2 liquid chromatography (LC) methods with UV and mass spectrometry (MS) detections were developed. LC with UV detection was performed at 25 degrees C on a Hyperclone ODS 5 microm 150 x 4.6 mm column with mobile phase consisting of methanol-ethanol-2-propanol (70 + 15 + 15, v/v/v). Flow rate was 1.0 mL/min. Retention time of CoQ10 was 10.9 +/- 0.1 min. The method was sensitive [limit of detection (LOD) = 0.2 mg/kg], reproducible [relative standard deviation (RSD) = 3:0%), and linear up to 25 mg/kg (R > 0.999). LC/MS analysis was performed on a LUNA C18 3 microm, 150 x 4.6 mm column, using mobile phase consisting of ethanol-dioxane-acetic acid (9 + 1 + 0.01, v/v/v), flow rate was 0.6 mL/min, and the retention time of CoQ10 was 4.1 +/- 0.1 min. Identification and quantitation were performed with a Finnigan-LCQ mass detector in positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode. Mass spectra were obtained in selected-ion monitoring mode; molecular mass (M+H)+ m/z 863.4 +/- 1 was used for quantitative determination. MS detection is more sensitive than UV detection (LOD = 0.1 mg/kg), less reproducible (RSD = 4.0%), and linear in selected range. Analytical recoveries are 75-90% and depend on the ratio between the amount of fat in the matrix and the concentration of CoQ10 in the sample. Some soybean milk products were analyzed together with different cow, goat, and sheep milk products. Concentrations obtained with LC and LC/MS were compared with a few accessible results available from the literature. Concentrations varied from 0 ppm in soybean milk to nearly 2 ppm in fresh milk from local farms. PMID:16152917

  8. Quantitative Proteomics using Nano-LC with High Accuracy Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-29

    Despite significant advances in LC-MS based technologies, challenges remain in implementing a proteomics platform for routine clinical applications. These include the needed robustness as well as the sensitivity and dynamic range of detection to both effectively address extremely small tissue samples, for example microdissected or biopsy tissues, or high dynamic range samples, such as blood plasma. Other key components include providing the needed throughput to enable statistically meaningful number of analyses for clinical setting within a robust platform that utilizes effective quantitative approaches for high accuracy and reproducibility. This chapter describes the key components of a nanoLC- MS based technological approach that is designed to target these challenges by virtue of enhancing sensitivity, dynamic range coverage, and throughput, for the generation of robust quantitative measurements in support of clinical studies.

  9. High-throughput pesticide residue quantitative analysis achieved by tandem mass spectrometry with automated flow injection.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Pentz, Anne M; Bramble, Frederick Q

    2009-04-15

    The use of automated flow injection with MS/MS detection for fast quantitation of agrochemicals in food and water samples was demonstrated in this study. Active ingredients from the sulfonylurea herbicide and carbamate insecticide classes were selected as model systems. Samples were prepared using typical procedures from residue methods, placed in an autosampler, and injected directly into a triple quadrupole instrument without chromatographic separation. The technique allows data acquisition in 15 s per injection, with samples being injected every 65 s, representing a significant improvement from the 15-30 min needed in typical HPLC/MS/MS methods. The availability of HPLC systems is an advantage since they can be used in flow-injection mode (bypassing the column compartment). Adequate accuracy, linearity, and precision (R(2) > 0.99 and RSD < 20%) were obtained using external standards prepared in each control matrix. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) achieved for all analytes was 0.01 mg/kg in food samples and 0.1 ng/mL in water; while limits of detection (LOD) were estimated to be about 0.003 mg/kg and 0.03 ng/mL in food and water, respectively. The advantages and limitations of flow injection MS/MS for ultratrace-level quantitative analysis in complex matrixes are discussed. PMID:19296591

  10. Characterization and quantitative analysis of surfactants in textile wastewater by liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González, Susana; Petrović, Mira; Radetic, Maja; Jovancic, Petar; Ilic, Vesna; Barceló, Damià

    2008-05-01

    A method based on the application of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QqTOF-MS) with an electrospray (ESI) interface has been developed for the screening and confirmation of several anionic and non-ionic surfactants: linear alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS), alkylsulfate (AS), alkylethersulfate (AES), dihexyl sulfosuccinate (DHSS), alcohol ethoxylates (AEOs), coconut diethanolamide (CDEA), nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), and their degradation products (nonylphenol carboxylate (NPEC), octylphenol carboxylate (OPEC), 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-octylphenol (OP) and NPEO sulfate (NPEO-SO4). The developed methodology permits reliable quantification combined with a high accuracy confirmation based on the accurate mass of the (de)protonated molecules in the TOFMS mode. For further confirmation of the identity of the detected compounds the QqTOF mode was used. Accurate masses of product ions obtained by performing collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the (de)protonated molecules of parent compounds were matched with the ions obtained for a standard solution. The method was applied for the quantitative analysis and high accuracy confirmation of surfactants in complex mixtures in effluents from the textile industry. Positive identification of the target compounds was based on accurate mass measurement of the base peak, at least one product ion and the LC retention time of the analyte compared with that of a standard. The most frequently surfactants found in these textile effluents were NPEO and NPEO-SO4 in concentrations ranging from 0.93 to 5.68 mg/L for NPEO and 0.06 to 4.30 mg/L for NPEO-SO4. AEOs were also identified. PMID:18398847

  11. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  12. Generalized multiple internal standard method for quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Chen, Yao; Shi, Cai-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution, a multiplicative effects model for generalized multiple-internal-standard method (MEMGMIS) was proposed to solve the signal instability problem of LC-MS over time. MEMGMIS model seamlessly integrates the multiple-internal-standard strategy with multivariate calibration method, and takes full use of all the information carried by multiple internal standards during the quantification of target analytes. Unlike the existing methods based on multiple internal standards, MEMGMIS does not require selecting an optimal internal standard for the quantification of a specific analyte from multiple internal standards used. MEMGMIS was applied to a proof-of-concept model system: the simultaneous quantitative analysis of five edible artificial colorants in two kinds of cocktail drinks. Experimental results demonstrated that MEMGMIS models established on LC-MS data of calibration samples prepared with ultrapure water could provide quite satisfactory concentration predictions for colorants in cocktail samples from their LC-MS data measured 10days after the LC-MS analysis of the calibration samples. The average relative prediction errors of MEMGMIS models did not exceed 6.0%, considerably better than the corresponding values of commonly used univariate calibration models combined with multiple internal standards. The advantages of good performance and simple implementation render MEMGMIS model a promising alternative tool in quantitative LC-MS assays. PMID:27072522

  13. Quantitative metabolomic profiling using dansylation isotope labeling and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruokun; Li, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Differential chemical isotopic labeling (CIL) LC-MS has been used for quantifying a targeted metabolite in biological samples with high precision and accuracy. Herein we describe a high-performance CIL LC-MS method for generating quantitative and comprehensive profiles of the metabolome for metabolomics applications. After mixing two comparative samples separately labeled by light or heavy isotopic tags through chemical reactions, the peak intensity ratio of the labeled analyte pair can provide relative or absolute quantitative information on the metabolites. We describe the use of (12)C2- and (13)C2-dansyl chloride (DnsCl) as the isotope reagents to profile the metabolites containing amine and phenolic hydroxyl functional groups by LC-MS. This method can be used to compare the relative concentration changes of hundreds or thousands of amine- and phenol-containing metabolites among many comparative samples and generate absolute concentration information on metabolites for which the standards are available. Combined with statistical analysis and metabolite identification tools, this method can be used to identify key metabolites involved in differentiating comparative samples such as disease cases vs. healthy controls. PMID:25270927

  14. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  15. Streaming visualisation of quantitative mass spectrometry data based on a novel raw signal decomposition method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Bhamber, Ranjeet; Riba-Garcia, Isabel; Liao, Hanqing; Unwin, Richard D; Dowsey, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    As data rates rise, there is a danger that informatics for high-throughput LC-MS becomes more opaque and inaccessible to practitioners. It is therefore critical that efficient visualisation tools are available to facilitate quality control, verification, validation, interpretation, and sharing of raw MS data and the results of MS analyses. Currently, MS data is stored as contiguous spectra. Recall of individual spectra is quick but panoramas, zooming and panning across whole datasets necessitates processing/memory overheads impractical for interactive use. Moreover, visualisation is challenging if significant quantification data is missing due to data-dependent acquisition of MS/MS spectra. In order to tackle these issues, we leverage our seaMass technique for novel signal decomposition. LC-MS data is modelled as a 2D surface through selection of a sparse set of weighted B-spline basis functions from an over-complete dictionary. By ordering and spatially partitioning the weights with an R-tree data model, efficient streaming visualisations are achieved. In this paper, we describe the core MS1 visualisation engine and overlay of MS/MS annotations. This enables the mass spectrometrist to quickly inspect whole runs for ionisation/chromatographic issues, MS/MS precursors for coverage problems, or putative biomarkers for interferences, for example. The open-source software is available from http://seamass.net/viz/. PMID:25663356

  16. Streaming visualisation of quantitative mass spectrometry data based on a novel raw signal decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Bhamber, Ranjeet; Riba-Garcia, Isabel; Liao, Hanqing; Unwin, Richard D; Dowsey, Andrew W

    2015-04-01

    As data rates rise, there is a danger that informatics for high-throughput LC-MS becomes more opaque and inaccessible to practitioners. It is therefore critical that efficient visualisation tools are available to facilitate quality control, verification, validation, interpretation, and sharing of raw MS data and the results of MS analyses. Currently, MS data is stored as contiguous spectra. Recall of individual spectra is quick but panoramas, zooming and panning across whole datasets necessitates processing/memory overheads impractical for interactive use. Moreover, visualisation is challenging if significant quantification data is missing due to data-dependent acquisition of MS/MS spectra. In order to tackle these issues, we leverage our seaMass technique for novel signal decomposition. LC-MS data is modelled as a 2D surface through selection of a sparse set of weighted B-spline basis functions from an over-complete dictionary. By ordering and spatially partitioning the weights with an R-tree data model, efficient streaming visualisations are achieved. In this paper, we describe the core MS1 visualisation engine and overlay of MS/MS annotations. This enables the mass spectrometrist to quickly inspect whole runs for ionisation/chromatographic issues, MS/MS precursors for coverage problems, or putative biomarkers for interferences, for example. The open-source software is available from http://seamass.net/viz/. PMID:25663356

  17. Quantitative assessment of chemical artefacts produced by propionylation of histones prior to mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Soldi, Monica; Cuomo, Alessandro; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-07-01

    Histone PTMs play a crucial role in regulating chromatin structure and function, with impact on gene expression. MS is nowadays widely applied to study histone PTMs systematically. Because histones are rich in arginine and lysine, classical shot-gun approaches based on trypsin digestion are typically not employed for histone modifications mapping. Instead, different protocols of chemical derivatization of lysines in combination with trypsin have been implemented to obtain "Arg-C like" digestion products that are more suitable for LC-MS/MS analysis. Although widespread, these strategies have been recently described to cause various side reactions that result in chemical modifications prone to be misinterpreted as native histone marks. These artefacts can also interfere with the quantification process, causing errors in histone PTMs profiling. The work of Paternoster V. et al. is a quantitative assessment of methyl-esterification and other side reactions occurring on histones after chemical derivatization of lysines with propionic anhydride [Proteomics 2016, 16, 2059-2063]. The authors estimate the effect of different solvents, incubation times, and pH on the extent of these side reactions. The results collected indicate that the replacement of methanol with isopropanol or ACN not only blocks methyl-esterification, but also significantly reduces other undesired unspecific reactions. Carefully titrating the pH after propionic anhydride addition is another way to keep methyl-esterification under control. Overall, the authors describe a set of experimental conditions that allow reducing the generation of various artefacts during histone propionylation. PMID:27373704

  18. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Identifies Novel Host Binding Partners for Pathogenic Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Effectors.

    PubMed

    Law, Robyn J; Law, Hong T; Scurll, Joshua M; Scholz, Roland; Santos, Andrew S; Shames, Stephanie R; Deng, Wanyin; Croxen, Matthew A; Li, Yuling; de Hoog, Carmen L; van der Heijden, Joris; Foster, Leonard J; Guttman, Julian A; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli cause enteric diseases resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These pathogens remain extracellular and translocate a set of type III secreted effector proteins into host cells to promote bacterial virulence. Effectors manipulate host cell pathways to facilitate infection by interacting with a variety of host targets, yet the binding partners and mechanism of action of many effectors remain elusive. We performed a mass spectrometry screen to identify host targets for a library of effectors. We found five known effector targets and discovered four novel interactions. Interestingly, we identified multiple effectors that interacted with the microtubule associated protein, ensconsin. Using co-immunoprecipitations, we confirmed that NleB1 and EspL interacted with ensconsin in a region that corresponded to its microtubule binding domain. Ensconsin is an essential cofactor of kinesin-1 that is required for intracellular trafficking, and we demonstrated that intracellular trafficking was severely disrupted during wild type EPEC infections but not during infections with ΔnleB1 or ΔespL mutants. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of quantitative proteomics for identifying effector-host protein interactions and suggest that vesicular trafficking is a crucial cellular process that may be targeted by NleB1 and EspL through their interaction with ensconsin. PMID:27018634

  19. Observations on the quantitation of the phosphate content of peptides by fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Poulter, L; Ang, S G; Williams, D H; Cohen, P

    1987-07-29

    Equimolar mixtures of the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of several peptides have been subjected to fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS), to investigate whether the stoichiometry of phosphorylation can be determined from the relative molecular-ion abundances of the phospho and dephospho derivatives. It is concluded that quantitation can be achieved for peptides with large positive or negative hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity indices (delta F values) where addition of a phosphate group does not alter the distribution of the peptide within the matrix significantly. For peptides with small positive or negative delta F values, phosphopeptides tend to be partially suppressed by their dephosphorylated counterparts. Suppression can be partially or totally overcome by conversion of the peptide to a hydrophobic derivative, and by the selection of an appropriate matrix. Alternatively, addition of a very strong acid, perchloric acid, can even reverse the original suppression effect. This last effect is believed to be due to the increased ionic strength in the matrix, which forces a relatively hydrophilic analyte to the matrix surface; and the ability of such a phosphorylated analyte to form a more stable gas-phase cation. PMID:3038197

  20. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3′ domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3′-domain is unanchored and the 5′-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04491.001 PMID:25313868

  1. Capillary zone electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for analyzing qualitative and quantitative variations in therapeutic albumin.

    PubMed

    Marie, Anne-Lise; Przybylski, Cédric; Gonnet, Florence; Daniel, Régis; Urbain, Rémi; Chevreux, Guillaume; Jorieux, Sylvie; Taverna, Myriam

    2013-10-24

    The present study describes a reproducible and quantitative capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method, which leads to the separation of nine forms (native, oxidized and glycated) of human serum albumin (HSA). In an attempt to identify the different species separated by this CZE method, the capillary electrophoresis was coupled to mass spectrometry using a sheath liquid interface, an optimized capillary coating and a suitable CE running buffer. CE-MS analyses confirmed the heterogeneity of albumin preparation and revealed new truncated and modified forms such as Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs). Assignment of the CZE peaks was carried out using specific antibodies, carboxypeptidase A or sample reduction before or during the CE separation. Thus, five HSA forms were unambiguously identified. Using this CZE method several albumin batches produced by slightly different fractionation ways could be discriminated. Furthermore, analyses of HSA preparations marketed by five pharmaceutical industries revealed that two therapeutic albumins, including that marketed by LFB, contained the highest proportion of native form and lower levels of oxidized forms. PMID:24120174

  2. Improved Sensitivity for the Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Active Ricin by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxia; Baudys, Jakub; Barr, John R; Kalb, Suzanne R

    2016-07-01

    Ricin is a highly toxic protein which causes cell death by blocking protein synthesis and is considered a potential bioterrorism agent. Rapid and sensitive detection of ricin toxin in various types of sample matrices is needed as an emergency requirement for public health and antibioterrorism response. An in vitro MALDI TOF MS-based activity assay that detects ricin mediated depurination of synthetic substrates was improved through optimization of the substrate, reaction conditions, and sample preparation. In this method, the ricin is captured by a specific polycolonal antibody followed by hydrolysis reaction. The ricin activity is determined by detecting the unique cleavage product of synthetic oligomer substrates. The detection of a depurinated substrate was enhanced by using a more efficient RNA substrate and optimizing buffer components, pH, and reaction temperature. In addition, the factors involved in mass spectrometry analysis, such as MALDI matrix, plate, and sample preparation, were also investigated to improve the ionization of the depurinated product and assay reproducibility. With optimized parameters, the limit of detection of 0.2 ng/mL of ricin spiked in buffer and milk was accomplished, representing more than 2 orders of magnitude enhancement in assay sensitivity. Improving assay's ruggeddness or reproducibility also made it possible to quantitatively detect active ricin with 3 orders of magnitude dynamic range. PMID:27264550

  3. Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Quantitation of Seventeen Sedative Hypnotics in Six Common Toxicological Matrices.

    PubMed

    Mata, Dani C; Davis, John F; Figueroa, Ariana K; Stanford, Mary June

    2016-01-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the quantification of 14 benzodiazepines and three sedative hypnotics is presented. The fast and inexpensive assay was developed for California's Orange County Crime Lab for use in antemortem (AM) and postmortem casework. The drugs were rapidly cleaned up from AM blood, postmortem blood, urine, liver, brain and stomach contents using DPX(®) Weak Anion Exchange (DPX WAX) tips fitted on a pneumatic extractor, which can process up to 48 samples at one time. Assay performance was determined for validation based on recommendations by the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology for linearity, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, bias, precision (within run and between run), dilution integrity, carry-over, selectivity, recovery, ion suppression and extracted sample stability. Linearity was verified using the therapeutic and toxic ranges of all 17 analytes. Final verification of the method was confirmed by four analysts using 20 blind matrix matched samples. All results were within 20% of each other and the expected value. PMID:26374882

  4. Quantitative analysis of surfactant deposits on human skin by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Massey, Karen A; Snelling, Anna M; Nicolaou, Anna

    2010-05-15

    Surfactants are commonly used as cleansing agents and yet there are concerns that they may also have a role in skin irritation. The lack of suitable methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of surfactant deposition on skin has hindered the in-depth investigation of such effects. Here, we report the application of reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) assays for two surfactants commonly used in consumer products, namely sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) and laurylamidopropyl betaine (LAPB), to a baseline study aiming to assess deposition levels on human skin. The linearity of the assays was established at 3-20 ng, with coefficient of variation below 5%. The detection limits were 100 pg for LAPB and 1 ng for SLES; quantitation limits were 500 pg for LAPB and 2.5 ng for SLES. The baseline study was conducted using a panel of 40 healthy volunteers. Skin extract samples were taken in triplicate from forearms, using ethanol. SLES was detected on most volunteers, with 75% of them having SLES deposits in the range of 100-600 ng/cm(2). LAPB was detected on the skin of all volunteers with 85% of them having deposit levels within the concentration range of 1-100 ng/cm(2). These results demonstrate the extent to which commonly used surfactants remain on the skin during the day. The analytical methods reported here can be applied to the investigation of surfactants in relation to general skin condition and to the development and optimisation of new consumer wash products. PMID:20391611

  5. Quantitative determination of the anticancer agent tubeimoside I in rat plasma by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Jin; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Chuan; Liu, Run-Hui; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Hui-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Xiang-Wei; Zhu, Jian-Bao; Chen, Chun-Lin

    2007-01-01

    Tubeimoside I is an important component isolated from Bolbostemma paniculatum. Tubeimoside I has been demonstrated to possess many pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antitumor-promoting effects. The purpose of the present study was to examine in vivo pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of tubeimoside I in rats by using a liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry quantitative detection method (LC/MS). The plasma samples were deproteinated, evaporated and reconstituted in 100 microl methanol prior to analysis. The separation was performed by Waters Symmetry C18 reversed-phase column (3.5 microm, 150 mm x 2.1mm, Waters Inc., USA) and a SB-C18 guard column (5 microm, 20 mm x 4.0mm). The mobile phase was a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 5 microM NaAc (60:40, v/v). The method was validated within the concentration range 20-5000 ng/ml, and the calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficients >0.999. The lowest limit of quantitation (LLOQ) for tubeimoside I was 20 ng/ml in 0.1 ml rat plasma. The intra-assay accuracy and precision ranged from 92.4 to 104.9% and from 5.8 to 10.5%, respectively, while inter-assay accuracy and precision ranged from 94.2 to 95.0% and from 5.1 to 8.8%, respectively. The method was further applied to assess pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of tubeimoside I after intravenous and oral administration to rats. The oral bioavailability of tubeimoside I is only 0.23%, which indicates that tubeimoside I has poor absorption or undergoes acid-induced degradation. Practical utility of this new LC/MS method was confirmed in pilot pharmacokinetic studies in rats following both intravenous and oral administration. PMID:16931181

  6. Discovery of Mouse Spleen Signaling Responses to Anthrax using Label-Free Quantitative Phosphoproteomics via Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Dong, Li; Zhou, Weidong; Du, Xiuxia; Reghu, Nikitha; Kool, Arjan C.; Choi, Dahan; Bailey, Charles L.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2011-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), and is an extremely dangerous disease that can kill unvaccinated victims within 2 weeks. Modern antibiotic-based therapy can increase the survival rate to ∼50%, but only if administered presymptomatically (within 24–48 h of exposure). To discover host signaling responses to presymptomatic anthrax, label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to compare spleens from uninfected and spore-challenged mice over a 72 h time-course. Spleen proteins were denatured using urea, reduced using dithiothreitol, alkylated using iodoacetamide, and digested into peptides using trypsin, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide solid-phase extraction and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography-Linear Trap Quadrupole-Orbitrap-MS(/MS). The fragment ion spectra were processed using DeconMSn and searched using both Mascot and SEQUEST resulting in 252,626 confident identifications of 6248 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 5782 phosphorylation sites). The precursor ion spectra were deisotoped using Decon2LS and aligned using MultiAlign resulting in the confident quantitation of 3265 of the identified phosphopeptides. ANOVAs were used to produce a q-value ranked list of host signaling responses. Late-stage (48–72 h postchallenge) Sterne strain (lethal) infections resulted in global alterations to the spleen phosphoproteome. In contrast, ΔSterne strain (asymptomatic; missing the anthrax toxin) infections resulted in 188 (5.8%) significantly altered (q<0.05) phosphopeptides. Twenty-six highly tentative phosphorylation responses to early-stage (24 h postchallenge) anthrax were discovered (q<0.5), and ten of these originated from eight proteins that have known roles in the host immune response. These tentative early-anthrax host response signaling events within mouse spleens may translate into presymptomatic

  7. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques. PMID:26070716

  8. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  9. Application of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in quantitative bioanalyses of organic molecules in aquatic environment and organisms.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Li, Ke; Li, Weiming

    2016-05-01

    Analytical methods using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of metabolites or contaminants (or both) in various tissues of aquatic organisms and in the aquatic environment have received increasing attention in the last few years. This review discusses the findings relevant to such procedures published between 2005 and 2015. The aim is to evaluate the advantages, restrictions, and performances of the procedures from sample preparation to mass spectrometry measurement. To support these discussions, a general knowledge on LC-MS/MS is also provided. PMID:26996906

  10. Simultaneous quantitation of amphetamines and opiates in human hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Ray H; Lin, Dong-Liang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an incubation, solid-phase extraction (SPE) and LC-MS-MS procedure was developed, validated and used for simultaneous analysis of amphetamine (AP), methamphetamine (MA), morphine (MOR), codeine (COD), 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) and 6-acetylcodeine (6-AC) in hair. Hair samples were initially cut into sections, washed with dichloromethane, then sonicated in a methanol-trifluoroacetic acid mixture. The resulting solutions were processed with a SPE procedure before undergoing LC-MS-MS analysis. Mass spectrometric analysis was performed in positive-ion, multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode, using appropriate collision energy for each selected precursor ion. The overall protocol, when applied to the analysis of hair (50 mg) samples fortified with 100-10,000 pg/mg of the analytes, was found to achieve 55.5-74.6% recovery of the six analytes with the following analytical parameters: (i) intra- and interday precision/accuracy data for the six analytes in the 1.6-7.6%/-6.0-12.8% and 1.3-6.6%/-6.9-9.3% ranges, respectively; (ii) r(2) > 0.998 for all six analytes and (iii) LOD 2 pg/mg for AP and MA, and 8 pg/mg for MOR, COD, 6-AM and 6-AC; LOQ 10 pg/mg for all six analytes. This method was then utilized to (i) analyze hair samples collected from 86 self-reported drug users and (ii) evaluate the deposition pattern of drugs in head hairs from four female MA and heroin users in a rehabilitation facility. This relatively simple protocol was found superior over the GC-MS methods we have previously developed and utilized in our laboratory for the analysis of these six analytes. PMID:25564575

  11. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Changes in Histone H2B Variants as Cells Undergo Inorganic Arsenic-Mediated Cellular Transformation.

    PubMed

    Rea, Matthew; Jiang, Tingting; Eleazer, Rebekah; Eckstein, Meredith; Marshall, Alan G; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a ubiquitous environmental toxic metalloid, leads to carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism is unknown. Several studies have shown that inorganic arsenic exposure alters specific gene expression patterns, possibly through alterations in chromatin structure. While most studies on understanding the mechanism of chromatin-mediated gene regulation have focused on histone post-translational modifications, the role of histone variants remains largely unknown. Incorporation of histone variants alters the functional properties of chromatin. To understand the global dynamics of chromatin structure and function in arsenic-mediated carcinogenesis, analysis of the histone variants incorporated into the nucleosome and their covalent modifications is required. Here we report the first global mass spectrometric analysis of histone H2B variants as cells undergo arsenic-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition. We used electron capture dissociation-based top-down tandem mass spectrometry analysis validated with quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction to identify changes in the expression levels of H2B variants in inorganic arsenic-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We identified changes in the expression levels of specific histone H2B variants in two cell types, which are dependent on dose and length of exposure of inorganic arsenic. In particular, we found increases in H2B variants H2B1H/1K/1C/1J/1O and H2B2E/2F, and significant decreases in H2B1N/1D/1B as cells undergo inorganic arsenic-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The analysis of these histone variants provides a first step toward an understanding of the functional significance of the diversity of histone structures, especially in inorganic arsenic-mediated gene expression and carcinogenesis. PMID:27169413

  12. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  13. Determination of loperamide in mdr1a/1b knock-out mouse brain tissue using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and comparison with quantitative electrospray-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young G; Dong, Teresa; Chou, Bilin; Menghrajani, Kapil

    2011-11-01

    Recently matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) imaging has been used to analyze small molecule pharmaceutical compounds directly on tissue sections to determine spatial distribution within target tissue and organs. The data presented to date usually indicate relative amounts of drug within the tissue. The determination of absolute amounts is still done using tissue homogenization followed by traditional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, the quantitative determination of loperamide, an antidiarrheal agent and a P-glycoprotein substrate, in mdr1a/1b (-/-) mouse brain tissue sections using MALDI MS on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. 5 mg/mL α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid in 50% acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid and 0.5 μM reserpine was used as the MALDI matrix. The calibration curve constructed by the peak intensities of standard samples from MALDI MS was linear from 0.025 to 0.5 μM with r² = 0.9989. The accuracy of calibration curve standards was 78.3-105.9% and the percent deviation was less than 25%. Comparison between direct MALDI tissue analysis and conventional tissue analysis using homogenization followed by electrospray LC-MS/MS was also explored. PMID:22139698

  14. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  15. Development of a High-Sensitivity Quantitation Method for Arginine Vasopressin by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry, and Comparison with Quantitative Values by Radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Tsukazaki, Yasuko; Senda, Naoto; Kubo, Kinya; Yamada, Shigeru; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels serve as a clinically relevant marker of diabetes and related syndromes. We developed a highly sensitive method for measuring human plasma AVP using high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. AVP was extracted from human plasma using a weak-cation solid-phase extraction plate, and separated on a wide-bore octadecyl reverse-phase column. AVP was quantified in ion-transition experiments utilizing a product ion (m/z 328.3) derived from its parent ion (m/z 542.8). The sensitivity was enhanced using 0.02% dichloromethane as a mobile-phase additive. The lower limit of quantitation was 0.200 pmol/L. The extraction recovery ranged from 70.2 ± 7.2 to 73.3 ± 6.2% (mean ± SD), and the matrix effect ranged from 1.1 - 1.9%. Quality-testing samples revealed interday/intraday accuracy and precision ranging over 0.9 - 3% and -0.3 - 2%, respectively, which included the endogenous baseline. Our results correlated well with radioimmunoassay results using 22 human volunteer plasma samples. PMID:26860558

  16. Spin trapping combined with quantitative mass spectrometry defines free radical redistribution within the oxidized hemoglobin:haptoglobin complex.

    PubMed

    Vallelian, Florence; Garcia-Rubio, Ines; Puglia, Michele; Kahraman, Abdullah; Deuel, Jeremy W; Engelsberger, Wolfgang R; Mason, Ronald P; Buehler, Paul W; Schaer, Dominik J

    2015-08-01

    Extracellular or free hemoglobin (Hb) accumulates during hemolysis, tissue damage, and inflammation. Heme-triggered oxidative reactions can lead to diverse structural modifications of lipids and proteins, which contribute to the propagation of tissue damage. One important target of Hb׳s peroxidase reactivity is its own globin structure. Amino acid oxidation and crosslinking events destabilize the protein and ultimately cause accumulation of proinflammatory and cytotoxic Hb degradation products. The Hb scavenger haptoglobin (Hp) attenuates oxidation-induced Hb degradation. In this study we show that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Hb and the Hb:Hp complex share comparable peroxidative reactivity and free radical generation. While oxidation of both free Hb and Hb:Hp complex generates a common tyrosine-based free radical, the spin-trapping reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) yields dissimilar paramagnetic products in Hb and Hb:Hp, suggesting that radicals are differently redistributed within the complex before reacting with the spin trap. With LC-MS(2) mass spectrometry we assigned multiple known and novel DMPO adduct sites. Quantification of these adducts suggested that the Hb:Hp complex formation causes extensive delocalization of accessible free radicals with drastic reduction of the major tryptophan and cysteine modifications in the β-globin chain of the Hb:Hp complex, including decreased βCys93 DMPO adduction. In contrast, the quantitative changes in DMPO adduct formation on Hb:Hp complex formation were less pronounced in the Hb α-globin chain. In contrast to earlier speculations, we found no evidence that free Hb radicals are delocalized to the Hp chain of the complex. The observation that Hb:Hp complex formation alters free radical distribution in Hb may help to better understand the structural basis for Hp as an antioxidant protein. PMID:25933590

  17. Structure of Complement C3(H2O) Revealed By Quantitative Cross-Linking/Mass Spectrometry And Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Barlow, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    The slow but spontaneous and ubiquitous formation of C3(H2O), the hydrolytic and conformationally rearranged product of C3, initiates antibody-independent activation of the complement system that is a key first line of antimicrobial defense. The structure of C3(H2O) has not been determined. Here we subjected C3(H2O) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS). This revealed details of the structural differences and similarities between C3(H2O) and C3, as well as between C3(H2O) and its pivotal proteolytic cleavage product, C3b, which shares functionally similarity with C3(H2O). Considered in combination with the crystal structures of C3 and C3b, the QCMLS data suggest that C3(H2O) generation is accompanied by the migration of the thioester-containing domain of C3 from one end of the molecule to the other. This creates a stable C3b-like platform able to bind the zymogen, factor B, or the regulator, factor H. Integration of available crystallographic and QCLMS data allowed the determination of a 3D model of the C3(H2O) domain architecture. The unique arrangement of domains thus observed in C3(H2O), which retains the anaphylatoxin domain (that is excised when C3 is enzymatically activated to C3b), can be used to rationalize observed differences between C3(H2O) and C3b in terms of complement activation and regulation. PMID:27250206

  18. Simultaneous quantitative analysis of eight vitamin D analogues in milk using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fabio P; Shaw, P Nicholas; Whitfield, Karen; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2015-09-01

    Milk is an important source of nutrients for various risk populations, including infants. The accurate measurement of vitamin D in milk is necessary to provide adequate supplementation advice for risk groups and to monitor regulatory compliance. Currently used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods are capable of measuring only four analogues of vitamin D in unfortified milk. We report here an accurate quantitative analytical method for eight analogues of vitamin D: Vitamin D2 and D3 (D2 and D3), 25-hydroxy D2 and D3, 24,25-dihydroxy D2 and D3, and 1,25-dihydroxyD2 and D3. In this study, we compared saponification and protein precipitation for the extraction of vitamin D from milk and found the latter to be more effective. We also optimised the pre-column derivatisation using 4-phenyl-l,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD), to achieve the highest sensitivity and accuracy for all major vitamin D forms in milk. Chromatography was optimised to reduce matrix effects such as ion-suppression, and the matrix effects were eliminated using co-eluting stable isotope labelled internal standards for the calibration of each analogue. The analogues, 25-hydroxyD3 (25(OH)D3) and its epimer (3-epi-25(OH)D3) were chromatographically resolved, to prevent over-estimation of 25(OH)D3. The method was validated and subsequently applied for the measurement of total vitamin D levels in human, cow, mare, goat and sheep milk samples. The detection limits, repeatability standard deviations, and recovery ranges were from 0.2 to 0.4 femtomols, 6.30-13.5%, and 88.2-105%, respectively. PMID:26388380

  19. Structure of Complement C3(H2O) Revealed By Quantitative Cross-Linking/Mass Spectrometry And Modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo A; Pellarin, Riccardo; Fischer, Lutz; Sali, Andrej; Nilges, Michael; Barlow, Paul N; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-08-01

    The slow but spontaneous and ubiquitous formation of C3(H2O), the hydrolytic and conformationally rearranged product of C3, initiates antibody-independent activation of the complement system that is a key first line of antimicrobial defense. The structure of C3(H2O) has not been determined. Here we subjected C3(H2O) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS). This revealed details of the structural differences and similarities between C3(H2O) and C3, as well as between C3(H2O) and its pivotal proteolytic cleavage product, C3b, which shares functionally similarity with C3(H2O). Considered in combination with the crystal structures of C3 and C3b, the QCMLS data suggest that C3(H2O) generation is accompanied by the migration of the thioester-containing domain of C3 from one end of the molecule to the other. This creates a stable C3b-like platform able to bind the zymogen, factor B, or the regulator, factor H. Integration of available crystallographic and QCLMS data allowed the determination of a 3D model of the C3(H2O) domain architecture. The unique arrangement of domains thus observed in C3(H2O), which retains the anaphylatoxin domain (that is excised when C3 is enzymatically activated to C3b), can be used to rationalize observed differences between C3(H2O) and C3b in terms of complement activation and regulation. PMID:27250206

  20. Quantitative Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles by Coupling Thin Layer Chromatography with Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Neng; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Guo, Wei; Gan, Yiqun; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-06-16

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) determination has recently attracted considerable attention because of the continuing boom of nanotechnology. In this study, a novel method for separation and quantitative characterization of NPs in aqueous suspension was established by coupling thin layer chromatography (TLC) with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of various sizes were used as the model system. It was demonstrated that TLC not only allowed separation of gold nanoparticles from ionic gold species by using acetyl acetone/butyl alcohol/triethylamine (6:3:1, v/v) as the mobile phase, but it also achieved the separation of differently sized gold nanoparticles (13, 34, and 47 nm) by using phosphate buffer (0.2 M, pH = 6.8), Triton X-114 (0.4%, w/v), and EDTA (10 mM) as the mobile phase. Various experimental parameters that affecting TLC separation of AuNPs, such as the pH of the phosphate buffer, the coating of AuNPs, the concentrations of EDTA and Triton X-114, were investigated and optimized. It was found that separations of AuNPs by TLC displayed size dependent retention behavior with good reproducibility, and the retardation factors (R(f) value) increased linearly with decreasing nanoparticle size. The analytical performance of the present method was evaluated under optimized conditions. The limits of detection were in the tens of pg range, and repeatability (RSD, n = 7) was 6.3%, 5.9%, and 8.3% for 30 ng of 13 nm AuNPs, 34 nm AuNPs, and 47 nm AuNPs, respectively. The developed TLC-LA-ICP-MS method has also been applied to the analysis of spiked AuNPs in lake water, river water, and tap water samples. PMID:26005902

  1. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  2. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis protein expression upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica, a common food-borne bacterial pathogen, is believed to change its protein expression profile in the presence of different environmental stress such as that caused by the exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which can be generated by phagocytes during infection and represents an important antibacterial mechanism of host cells. Among Salmonella proteins, the effectors of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) are of particular interest since they are expressed during host infection in vivo and are important for invasion of epithelial cells and for replication in organs during systemic infection, respectively. However, the expression profiles of these proteins upon exposure to H2O2 or to host cells in vivo during the established phase of systemic infection have not been extensively studied. Results Using stable isotope labeling coupled with mass spectrometry, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and identified 76 proteins whose expression is modulated upon exposure to H2O2. SPI-1 effector SipC was expressed about 3-fold higher and SopB was expressed approximately 2-fold lower in the presence of H2O2, while no significant change in the expression of another SPI-1 protein SipA was observed. The relative abundance of SipA, SipC, and SopB was confirmed by Western analyses, validating the accuracy and reproducibility of our approach for quantitative analysis of protein expression. Furthermore, immuno-detection showed substantial expression of SipA and SipC but not SopB in the late phase of infection in macrophages and in the spleen of infected mice. Conclusions We have identified Salmonella proteins whose expression is modulated in the presence of H2O2. Our results also provide the first direct evidence that SipC is highly expressed in the spleen at late stage of salmonellosis in vivo. These results suggest a possible role of SipC and other regulated proteins in

  3. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  4. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spot Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry: An Avenue to Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manicke, Nicholas Edward; Abu-Rabie, Paul; Spooner, Neil; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-09-01

    A method is presented for the direct quantitative analysis of therapeutic drugs from dried blood spot samples by mass spectrometry. The method, paper spray mass spectrometry, generates gas phase ions directly from the blood card paper used to store dried blood samples without the need for complex sample preparation and separation; the entire time for preparation and analysis of blood samples is around 30 s. Limits of detection were investigated for a chemically diverse set of some 15 therapeutic drugs; hydrophobic and weakly basic drugs, such as sunitinib, citalopram, and verapamil, were found to be routinely detectable at approximately 1 ng/mL. Samples were prepared by addition of the drug to whole blood. Drug concentrations were measured quantitatively over several orders of magnitude, with accuracies within 10% of the expected value and relative standard deviation (RSD) of around 10% by prespotting an internal standard solution onto the paper prior to application of the blood sample. We have demonstrated that paper spray mass spectrometry can be used to quantitatively measure drug concentrations over the entire therapeutic range for a wide variety of drugs. The high quality analytical data obtained indicate that the technique may be a viable option for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  6. The coupling of supercritical fluid chromatography and field ionization time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry for rapid and quantitative analysis of petroleum middle distillates.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kuangnan; Diehl, John W; Dechert, Gary J; DiSanzo, Frank P

    2004-01-01

    We report the first coupling of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with field ionization time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (FI-ToF HRMS), in parallel with ultraviolet (UV) detection and flame ionization detection (FID), for rapid and quantitative analysis of petroleum middle distillates. SFC separates petroleum middle distillates into saturates and 1- to 3-ring aromatics. FI generates molecular ions for hydrocarbon species eluted from the SFC. The high resolution and exact mass measurements by ToF mass spectrometry provide elemental compositions of the molecules in the petroleum product. The amounts of saturates and aromatic ring types were quantified using the parallel SFC-FID assisted by SFC-UV. With a proper carbon-number calibration, the detailed composition of the petroleum middle distillate was rapidly determined. PMID:15103095

  7. Quantitative analysis of polar lipids in the nanoliter level of rat serum by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polar lipids in serum, including lysophospholipids (LPLs) and free fatty acids (FFAs), have a broad range of biological activities and require a suitable method for their quantitative analysis. Conventional methods use multistep procedures to simultaneously purify and analyze polar lipids and non-po...

  8. A temporal examination of the planktonic and biofilm proteome of whole cell Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 using quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Amber J; Murphy, Kathleen; Krieger, Jonathan R; Brewer, Dyanne; Taylor, Paul; Habash, Marc; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-04-01

    Chronic polymicrobial lung infections are the chief complication in patients with cystic fibrosis. The dominant pathogen in late-stage disease is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which forms recalcitrant, structured communities known as biofilms. Many aspects of biofilm biology are poorly understood; consequently, effective treatment of these infections is limited, and cystic fibrosis remains fatal. Here we combined in-solution protein digestion of triplicate growth-matched samples with a high-performance mass spectrometry platform to provide the most comprehensive proteomic dataset known to date for whole cell P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in biofilm cultures. Our analysis included protein-protein interaction networks and PseudoCAP functional information for unique and significantly modulated proteins at three different time points. Secondary analysis of a subgroup of proteins using extracted ion currents validated the spectral counting data of 1884 high-confidence proteins. In this paper we demonstrate a greater representation of proteins related to metabolism, DNA stability, and molecular activity in planktonically grown P. aeruginosa PAO1. In addition, several virulence-related proteins were increased during planktonic growth, including multiple proteins encoded by the pyoverdine locus, uncharacterized proteins with sequence similarity to mammalian cell entry protein, and a member of the hemagglutinin family of adhesins, HecA. Conversely, biofilm samples contained an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to an adhesion protein with self-association characteristics (AidA). Increased levels of several phenazine biosynthetic proteins, an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to a metallo-beta-lactamase, and lower levels of the drug target gyrA support the putative characteristics of in situ P. aeruginosa infections, including competitive fitness and antibiotic resistance. This quantitative whole cell approach advances the existing P. aeruginosa

  9. Quantitative determination of dexamethasone in bovine milk by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cherlet, Marc; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick

    2004-06-01

    Dexamethasone (DXM) is a synthetic glucocorticoid that is authorized for therapeutic use in veterinary medicine. The European Community (EC) fixed a maximum residue limit (MRL) at 2ng/g for liver, 0.75ng/g for muscle and kidney tissues, and 0.3ng/ml for milk, while its use as growth-promoter is completely banned. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a simple and reliable method to determine DXM residues in bovine milk. Milk proteins were removed by the addition of concentrated trichloroacetic acid and paper filtration. Solid-phase extraction clean-up on a C18 reversed phase column was performed to obtain an extract suitable for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Chromatographic separation of DXM and the internal standard desoximetasone, was achieved on a PLRP-S polymeric reversed phase column, using a mixture of 0.1% (v/v) acetic acid in water (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B) as the mobile phases. They were identified using the MS/MS detection technique, and were subsequently quantified. The method has been validated according to the requirements of the EC at 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60ng/ml (being half the MRL, the MRL and double the MRL levels fixed by the EC). Calibration graphs were prepared in the 0.15-5ng/ml range and good linearity was achieved (r>or=0.99 and goodness of fit quantitative determination of DXM residues in milk after intravenous administration of DXM to lactating cows to determine its depletion

  10. A Temporal Examination of the Planktonic and Biofilm Proteome of Whole Cell Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Using Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Amber J.; Murphy, Kathleen; Krieger, Jonathan R.; Brewer, Dyanne; Taylor, Paul; Habash, Marc; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic polymicrobial lung infections are the chief complication in patients with cystic fibrosis. The dominant pathogen in late-stage disease is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which forms recalcitrant, structured communities known as biofilms. Many aspects of biofilm biology are poorly understood; consequently, effective treatment of these infections is limited, and cystic fibrosis remains fatal. Here we combined in-solution protein digestion of triplicate growth-matched samples with a high-performance mass spectrometry platform to provide the most comprehensive proteomic dataset known to date for whole cell P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in biofilm cultures. Our analysis included protein–protein interaction networks and PseudoCAP functional information for unique and significantly modulated proteins at three different time points. Secondary analysis of a subgroup of proteins using extracted ion currents validated the spectral counting data of 1884 high-confidence proteins. In this paper we demonstrate a greater representation of proteins related to metabolism, DNA stability, and molecular activity in planktonically grown P. aeruginosa PAO1. In addition, several virulence-related proteins were increased during planktonic growth, including multiple proteins encoded by the pyoverdine locus, uncharacterized proteins with sequence similarity to mammalian cell entry protein, and a member of the hemagglutinin family of adhesins, HecA. Conversely, biofilm samples contained an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to an adhesion protein with self-association characteristics (AidA). Increased levels of several phenazine biosynthetic proteins, an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to a metallo-beta-lactamase, and lower levels of the drug target gyrA support the putative characteristics of in situ P. aeruginosa infections, including competitive fitness and antibiotic resistance. This quantitative whole cell approach advances the existing P. aeruginosa

  11. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  12. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  13. Use of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for quantitative monitoring of toxic nitramines in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthaler, A.; Zhu, L.; Stenstrøm, Y.; Nielsen, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring aliphatic amines and industrially emitted aromatic amines and alkanolamines produce toxic nitramines, (R1R2)-N-NO2, when photo-oxidized in the atmosphere in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Particular concerns arise from amine-based CO2 capture where the amine solution may get nitrated by NOx in the flue gas. An on-line analytical technique for measuring nitramines in industrial emissions and in ambient air is thus in high demand. Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a state-of-the-art technique for on-line measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. Herein, we report on the use of high mass resolution proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) for on-line analysis of nitramines. We generated a mass spectral library from a series of nitramines and investigated the analytical performance of PTR-ToF-MS in terms of sensitivity, precision, accuracy and detection limit. We will discuss limitations of the innovative technique and propose measurement strategies for future emission and ambient measurements.

  14. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context. PMID:25980644

  15. Real-Time Quantitative Analysis of H2, He, O2, and Ar by Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Harrison, W. W.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The use of a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for quantitative analysis of hydrogen and helium as well as other permanent gases is demonstrated. The customized instrument utilizes the mass selective instability mode of mass analysis as with commercial instruments; however, this instrument operates at a greater RF trapping frequency and without a buffer gas. With these differences, a useable mass range from 2 to over 50 Da is achieved, as required by NASA for monitoring the Space Shuttle during a launch countdown. The performance of the ion trap is evaluated using part-per-million concentrations of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon mixed into a nitrogen gas stream. Relative accuracy and precision when quantitating the four analytes were better than the NASA-required minimum of 10% error and 5% deviation, respectively. Limits of detection were below the NASA requirement of 25-ppm hydrogen and 100-ppm helium; those for oxygen and argon were slightly higher than the requirement. The instrument provided adequate performance at fast data recording rates, demonstrating the utility of an ion trap mass spectrometer as a real-time quantitative monitoring device for permanent gas analysis.

  16. Characterization and quantitative amino acids analysis of analgesic peptides in cinobufacini injection by size exclusion chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Si, Nan; Bo, Gao; Hu, Hao; Yang, Jian; Bian, Baolin; Zhao, Hai Yu; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Cinobufacini injection that comes from the water extract of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor skin is widely used for cancer treatment in China. Peptide is one of its major types of constituents, however the biological effects and content of this injection are little reported. In present study, the analgesic effect of peptides was determined and evaluated by in-vivo models. To characterize and quantitatively analyze these peptides, a reliable and efficient method combining size exclusion chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with amino acid analysis was developed. The peptides presented as a series of analogs with similar molecular weights mostly ranging from 2 to 8 kDa. The amino acid analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine both free and combined amino acids (FAA and CAA) in cinobufacini injection. This method achieved good linearity (R(2) , 0.9909-0.9999) and low limit of detection and quantification. FAA and CAA samples were efficiently analyzed by modified Phenomenex EZ: faast procedure. For the sample analysis, the method showed good repeatability (relative standard deviation, RSD ≤ 10%). For most FAA and CAA the mean recoveries were >80% with RSD <10%. The GC-MS based method is useful for quality assurance of both FAA and CAA in cinobufacini injection. PMID:24924921

  17. Tissue-specific metabolite profiling of Cyperus rotundus L. rhizomes and (+)-nootkatone quantitation by laser microdissection, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Guo, Ping; Ho, Hing-Man; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2014-07-23

    Cyperus rotundus L. is a plant species commonly found in both India and China. The caused destruction of this plant is of critical concern for agricultural produce. Nevertheless, it can serve as a potential source of the commercially important sesquiterpenoid (+)-nootkatone. The present work describes comparative metabolite profiling and (+)-nootkatone content determination in rhizome samples collected from these two countries. Laser dissected tissues, namely, the cortex, hypodermal fiber bundles, endodermis, amphivasal vascular bundles, and whole rhizomes were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was used for profiling of essential oil constituents and quantitation of (+)-nootkatone. The content of (+)-nootkatone was found to be higher in samples from India (30.47 μg/10 g) compared to samples from China (21.72 μg/10 g). The method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidelines (Q2 R1). The results from this study can be applied for quality control and efficient utilization of this terpenoid-rich plant for several applications in food-based industries. PMID:24938835

  18. Mass Spectrometry Applications for the Identification and Quantitation of Biomarkers Resulting from Human Exposure to Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. Richard; Capacio, Benedict R.

    In recent years, a number of analytical methods using biomedical samples such as blood and urine have been developed for the verification of exposure to chemical warfare agents. The majority of methods utilize gas or liquid chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometry. In a small number of cases of suspected human exposure to chemical warfare agents, biomedical specimens have been made available for testing. This chapter provides an overview of biomarkers that have been verified in human biomedical samples, details of the exposure incidents, the methods utilized for analysis, and the biomarker concentration levels determined in the blood and/or urine.

  19. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  20. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  1. Quantitative determination of dimethyl fumarate in silica gel by solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ultrasound-assisted extraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bocchini, Paola; Pinelli, Francesca; Pozzi, Romina; Ghetti, Federica; Galletti, Guido C

    2015-06-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a chemical compound which has been added to silica gel bags used for preserving leather products during shipment. DMF has recently been singled out due to its ability to induce a number of medical problems in people which touch products contaminated by it. Its use as a biocide has been recently made illegal in Europe. Two different extraction techniques, namely ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), both coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were applied to the quantitative determination of DMF in silica gel. Linearity of the methods, reproducibility and detection limits were determined. The two methods were applied to the quantification of DMF in thirty-four silica gel samples used as anti-mould agents in different leather products sold in Italy, and the obtained results were statistically compared. PMID:25939646

  2. Quantitative analysis of human serum corticosterone by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ghulam, A; Kouach, M; Racadot, A; Boersma, A; Vantyghem, M C; Briand, G

    1999-04-30

    An original method based upon high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for corticosterone (B) quantification in human serum. After extraction by diethyl ether using triamcinolone (T) as an internal standard, solutes are separated on a C18 microbore column (250 X 1.0 mm, I.D.), using acetonitrile-water-formic acid (40:59.9:0.1, v/v/v) as the mobile phase (flow-rate 40 microl/min). Detection is performed on an API 1 single quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with a ESI interface and operated in positive ionization mode. Corticosterone quantifications were realized by computing peak area ratios (B/T) of the serum extracts analyzed in SIM mode (m/z 347 and m/z 395 for B and T. respectively), and comparing them with the calibration curve (r=0.998). PMID:10360442

  3. Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Mi, J; Hernroth, B; Bergquist, J; Lind, S Bergström

    2016-09-01

    Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on the potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, "Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)" [1]. Blue mussels were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides and samples were collected at different time points post injection. Protein extracts were prepared from the gills, digested using trypsin and a full in-depth proteome investigation was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Protein identification and quantification was performed using the MaxQuant 1.5.1.2 software, "MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification" [2]. PMID:27358907

  4. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an organism or varying experimental conditions. Results Although the scientific questions behind these experiments are of course manifold, there are, nevertheless, two questions that commonly arise: 1) which proteins are differentially regulated regarding the selected experimental conditions, and 2) are there groups of proteins that show similar abundance ratios, indicating that they have a similar turnover? We give advice on how these two questions can be answered and comprehensively compare a variety of commonly applied computational methods and their outcomes. Conclusions This work provides guidance through the jungle of computational methods to analyze mass spectrometry-based isotope-labeled datasets and recommends an effective and easy-to-use evaluation strategy. We demonstrate our approach with three recently published datasets on Bacillus subtilis [1,2] and Corynebacterium glutamicum [3]. Special focus is placed on the application and validation of cluster analysis methods. All applied methods were implemented within the rich internet application QuPE [4]. Results can be found at http://qupe.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de. PMID:21663690

  5. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  6. Bioaffinity Mass Spectrometry Screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ben; Feng, Yun Jiang; Vu, Hoan; McCormick, Brendan; Rowley, Jessica; Pedro, Liliana; Crowther, Gregory J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Forster, Paul I; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS or ESI-FTMS) was used to screen 192 natural product extracts and a 659-member natural product-based fragment library for bindings to a potential malaria drug target, Plasmodium falciparum Rab11a (PfRab11a, PF13_0119). One natural product extract and 11 fragments showed binding activity. A new natural product, arborside E, was identified from the active extract of Psydrax montigena as a weak binder. Its binding activity and inhibitory activity against PfRab11a were confirmed by ESI-FTMS titration experiments and an orthogonal enzyme assay. PMID:26773071

  7. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  8. Quantitative determination of uridine in rabbit plasma and urine by liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonku

    2012-04-01

    Recently a pyrimidine nucleoside, uridine, has been show to have a protective effect on cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and on dry eye animal model and patients. In this study, we introduce a sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of uridine in rabbit plasma and urine. After protein precipitation with methanol including methaqualone (internal standard), the analyte was chromatographed on a reversed-phase column with a mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution and methanol (1:4, v/v). The accuracy and precision of the assay were in accordance with Food and Drug Administration regulations for the validation of bioanalytical methods. This method was used to measure the concentrations of uridine in plasma and urine after a single oral administration of 450 mg/kg uridine in rabbits. PMID:22392515

  9. Identification and quantitation of glycosidically bound aroma compounds in three tobacco types by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Xiang, Zhangmin; Pan, Wenjie; Zhao, Huina; Ren, Zhu; Lei, Bo; Geng, Zhaoliang

    2013-10-11

    Glycosidically bound aroma compounds in three different types of tobacco were investigated. After isolation of extracts obtained by Amberlite XAD-2 adsorption and ethyl acetate elution, glycosides were analyzed after enzymatic hydrolysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or directly after trifluoroacetylated (TFA) derivatization by GC-MS in electron ionization (EI) and negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode. In total 21 bound aglycones were identified by β-glucosidase hydrolysis. These aglycones mainly consisted of C13-norisoprenoids, aromatic components and sesquiterpenoids. Additionally, with the aid of enzymatic hydrolysis, 15 β-d-glucopyranosides and 1 β-d-rutinoside were tentatively identified by TFA derivatization. TFA method was validated by repeatability and successfully employed to analyze different types of tobacco. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on identified glycoside variables to visualize the difference between the tobacco types and the relationship between the glycoside variables and the tobacco types was established. PMID:24011421

  10. KiC assay: a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach for kinase client screening and activity analysis [corrected].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yadong; Thelen, Jay J

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important posttranslational modifications (PTMs) involved in the transduction of cellular signals. The number of kinases in eukaryotic genomes ranges from several hundred to over one thousand. And with rapidly evolving mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches, thousands to tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) have been reported from various eukaryotic organisms, from man to plants. In this relative context, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been identified to date. To merge the gap between these phosphosites and the cognate kinases that beget these events, comparable large-scale methodologies are required. We describe in detail a MS-based method for identifying kinase-client interactions and quantifying kinase activity. We term this novel Kinase-Client assay, the KiC assay. The KiC assay relies upon the fact that substrate specificities of many kinases are largely determined by primary amino acid sequence or phosphorylation motifs, which consist of key amino acids surrounding the phosphorylation sites. The workflow for detecting kinase-substrate interactions includes four major steps: (1) preparation of purified kinases and synthetic peptide library, (2) in vitro kinase peptide library assay, (3) liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem MS (MS/MS) analysis, and (4) data processing and interpretation. Kinase activity is quantified with the KiC assay by monitoring spectral counts of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated peptides as the readout from LC-tandem mass spectrometry. The KiC assay can be applied as a discovery assay to screen kinases against a synthetic peptide library to find kinase-client relationships or as a targeted assay to characterize kinase kinetics. PMID:22665311